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Sample records for 1h chemical shifts

  1. 4D prediction of protein (1)H chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Lehtivarjo, Juuso; Hassinen, Tommi; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Peräkylä, Mikael; Laatikainen, Reino

    2009-12-01

    A 4D approach for protein (1)H chemical shift prediction was explored. The 4th dimension is the molecular flexibility, mapped using molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical shifts were predicted with a principal component model based on atom coordinates from a database of 40 protein structures. When compared to the corresponding non-dynamic (3D) model, the 4th dimension improved prediction by 6-7%. The prediction method achieved RMS errors of 0.29 and 0.50 ppm for Halpha and HN shifts, respectively. However, for individual proteins the RMS errors were 0.17-0.34 and 0.34-0.65 ppm for the Halpha and HN shifts, respectively. X-ray structures gave better predictions than the corresponding NMR structures, indicating that chemical shifts contain invaluable information about local structures. The (1)H chemical shift prediction tool 4DSPOT is available from http://www.uku.fi/kemia/4dspot . PMID:19876601

  2. 1H NMR spectra part 31: 1H chemical shifts of amides in DMSO solvent.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The (1)H chemical shifts of 48 amides in DMSO solvent are assigned and presented. The solvent shifts Δδ (DMSO-CDCl3 ) are large (1-2 ppm) for the NH protons but smaller and negative (-0.1 to -0.2 ppm) for close range protons. A selection of the observed solvent shifts is compared with calculated shifts from the present model and from GIAO calculations. Those for the NH protons agree with both calculations, but other solvent shifts such as Δδ(CHO) are not well reproduced by the GIAO calculations. The (1)H chemical shifts of the amides in DMSO were analysed using a functional approach for near ( ≤ 3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy and steric effect of the amide group for more distant protons. The chemical shifts of the NH protons of acetanilide and benzamide vary linearly with the π density on the αN and βC atoms, respectively. The C=O anisotropy and steric effect are in general little changed from the values in CDCl3. The effects of substituents F, Cl, Me on the NH proton shifts are reproduced. The electric field coefficient for the protons in DMSO is 90% of that in CDCl3. There is no steric effect of the C=O oxygen on the NH proton in an NH…O=C hydrogen bond. The observed deshielding is due to the electric field effect. The calculated chemical shifts agree well with the observed shifts (RMS error of 0.106 ppm for the data set of 257 entries). PMID:24824670

  3. Generation of heteronuclear 13C 1H chemical-shift correlations using soft pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doddrell, David M.; Brooks, William; Field, James; Lynden-Bell, R. M.

    Two multipulse sequences are analyzed which can be used to generate heteronuclear 13C, 1H chemical-shift correlations without 2D NMR techniques. Both sequences utilize polarization-transfer techniques and generate the required chemical-shift correlation using a single soft proton pulse. The most useful technique is an extension of the DEPT method of polarization transfer since not only are the chemical-shift correlations generated in an easy to interpret form, but depending on the specific form of the pulse train used, the method can be employed to obtain information on the CH n group multiplicity. The methods are illustrated by applying them to generate 13C, 1H chemical-shift correlation spectra for menthol and cholesterol.

  4. Dynamics-based selective 2D (1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-05-28

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of (1)H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of (1)H/(1)H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials. PMID:26026440

  5. Rapid and accurate calculation of protein 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Neal, Stephen; Nip, Alex M; Zhang, Haiyan; Wishart, David S

    2003-07-01

    A computer program (SHIFTX) is described which rapidly and accurately calculates the diamagnetic 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts of both backbone and sidechain atoms in proteins. The program uses a hybrid predictive approach that employs pre-calculated, empirically derived chemical shift hypersurfaces in combination with classical or semi-classical equations (for ring current, electric field, hydrogen bond and solvent effects) to calculate 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts from atomic coordinates. The chemical shift hypersurfaces capture dihedral angle, sidechain orientation, secondary structure and nearest neighbor effects that cannot easily be translated to analytical formulae or predicted via classical means. The chemical shift hypersurfaces were generated using a database of IUPAC-referenced protein chemical shifts--RefDB (Zhang et al., 2003), and a corresponding set of high resolution (<2.1 A) X-ray structures. Data mining techniques were used to extract the largest pairwise contributors (from a list of approximately 20 derived geometric, sequential and structural parameters) to generate the necessary hypersurfaces. SHIFTX is rapid (<1 CPU second for a complete shift calculation of 100 residues) and accurate. Overall, the program was able to attain a correlation coefficient (r) between observed and calculated shifts of 0.911 (1Halpha), 0.980 (13Calpha), 0.996 (13Cbeta), 0.863 (13CO), 0.909 (15N), 0.741 (1HN), and 0.907 (sidechain 1H) with RMS errors of 0.23, 0.98, 1.10, 1.16, 2.43, 0.49, and 0.30 ppm, respectively on test data sets. We further show that the agreement between observed and SHIFTX calculated chemical shifts can be an extremely sensitive measure of the quality of protein structures. Our results suggest that if NMR-derived structures could be refined using heteronuclear chemical shifts calculated by SHIFTX, their precision could approach that of the highest resolution X-ray structures. SHIFTX is freely available as a web server at http

  6. Sequential acquisition of multi-dimensional heteronuclear chemical shift correlation spectra with 1H detection

    PubMed Central

    Bellstedt, Peter; Ihle, Yvonne; Wiedemann, Christoph; Kirschstein, Anika; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2014-01-01

    RF pulse schemes for the simultaneous acquisition of heteronuclear multi-dimensional chemical shift correlation spectra, such as {HA(CA)NH & HA(CACO)NH}, {HA(CA)NH & H(N)CAHA} and {H(N)CAHA & H(CC)NH}, that are commonly employed in the study of moderately-sized protein molecules, have been implemented using dual sequential 1H acquisitions in the direct dimension. Such an approach is not only beneficial in terms of the reduction of experimental time as compared to data collection via two separate experiments but also facilitates the unambiguous sequential linking of the backbone amino acid residues. The potential of sequential 1H data acquisition procedure in the study of RNA is also demonstrated here. PMID:24671105

  7. Stereospecificity of (1) H, (13) C and (15) N shielding constants in the isomers of methylglyoxal bisdimethylhydrazone: problem with configurational assignment based on (1) H chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Ushakov, Igor A; Keiko, Natalia A

    2012-07-01

    In the (13) C NMR spectra of methylglyoxal bisdimethylhydrazone, the (13) C-5 signal is shifted to higher frequencies, while the (13) C-6 signal is shifted to lower frequencies on going from the EE to ZE isomer following the trend found previously. Surprisingly, the (1) H-6 chemical shift and (1) J(C-6,H-6) coupling constant are noticeably larger in the ZE isomer than in the EE isomer, although the configuration around the -CH═N- bond does not change. This paradox can be rationalized by the C-H⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond in the ZE isomer, which is found from the quantum-chemical calculations including Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis. This hydrogen bond results in the increase of δ((1) H-6) and (1) J(C-6,H-6) parameters. The effect of the C-H⋯N hydrogen bond on the (1) H shielding and one-bond (13) C-(1) H coupling complicates the configurational assignment of the considered compound because of these spectral parameters. The (1) H, (13) C and (15) N chemical shifts of the 2- and 8-(CH(3) )(2) N groups attached to the -C(CH(3) )═N- and -CH═N- moieties, respectively, reveal pronounced difference. The ab initio calculations show that the 8-(CH(3) )(2) N group conjugate effectively with the π-framework, and the 2-(CH(3) )(2) N group twisted out from the plane of the backbone and loses conjugation. As a result, the degree of charge transfer from the N-2- and N-8- nitrogen lone pairs to the π-framework varies, which affects the (1) H, (13) C and (15) N shieldings. PMID:22615146

  8. Are nucleus-independent (NICS) and 1H NMR chemical shifts good indicators of aromaticity in π-stacked polyfluorenes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuna, Sílvia; Poater, Jordi; Bofill, Josep M.; Alemany, Pere; Solà, Miquel

    2006-09-01

    We have analyzed the change of local aromaticity in a series of polyfluorene compounds with the increase of the number of π-stacked layers. The local aromaticity of the aromatic and non-aromatic rings of polyfluorenes remains unchanged when going from one to four layers of π-stacked rings according to HOMA, PDI, and FLU aromaticity descriptors. On the contrary, experimental 1H NMR chemical shifts indicate a reduction of the aromaticity of π-stacked rings with the increase of the number of layers. Calculated NICS also show a change of aromaticity, but opposite to the tendency given by the 1H NMR chemical shifts. We show that this increase (decrease) of local aromaticity in superimposed aromatic rings indicated by NICS ( 1H NMR) is not real but the result of the coupling between the magnetic fields generated by the π-stacked rings.

  9. Benchmark fragment-based (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua D; Kudla, Ryan A; Day, Graeme M; Mueller, Leonard J; Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-08-21

    The performance of fragment-based ab initio(1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions is assessed against experimental NMR chemical shift data in four benchmark sets of molecular crystals. Employing a variety of commonly used density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP, TPSSh, OPBE, PBE, TPSS), we explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, and combined cluster/fragment models. The hybrid density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP and TPSSh) generally out-perform their generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based counterparts. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O isotropic chemical shifts can be predicted with root-mean-square errors of 0.3, 1.5, 4.2, and 9.8 ppm, respectively, using a computationally inexpensive electrostatically embedded two-body PBE0 fragment model. Oxygen chemical shieldings prove particularly sensitive to local many-body effects, and using a combined cluster/fragment model instead of the simple two-body fragment model decreases the root-mean-square errors to 7.6 ppm. These fragment-based model errors compare favorably with GIPAW PBE ones of 0.4, 2.2, 5.4, and 7.2 ppm for the same (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O test sets. Using these benchmark calculations, a set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided and their robustness assessed using statistical cross-validation. We demonstrate the utility of these approaches and the reported scaling parameters on applications to 9-tert-butyl anthracene, several histidine co-crystals, benzoic acid and the C-nitrosoarene SnCl2(CH3)2(NODMA)2. PMID:27431490

  10. Dynamics-based selective 2D {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-05-28

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of {sup 1}H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials.

  11. Determination of nuclear distances and chemical-shift anisotropy from 1H MAS NMR sideband patterns of surface OH groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenzke, Dieter; Hunger, Michael; Pfeifer, Harry

    A procedure is described which allows a separate determination of the proton-aluminum distance and of the chemical-shift anisotropy for the bridging OH groups of crystalline molecular sieves from their 'H MAS NMR sideband patterns. For the bridging OH groups which point into the 6-rings of the framework (line "c"), the 1H- 27Al distance could be determined to be 0.237 ± 0.004 and 0.234 ± 0.004 nm for molecular sieves of type H-Y and SAPO-5, respectively. In contrast, for the bridging OH groups of the 12-rings (line "b"), the corresponding distances are equal and distinctly larger, 0.248 ± 0.004 nm. Within the limits of error, the values of the chemical-shift anisotropy are equal (about 19 ± 2 ppm) except for line b of SAPO-5, which exhibits a much smaller value of 14.5 ± 2 ppm.

  12. Predicting paramagnetic 1H NMR chemical shifts and state-energy separations in spin-crossover host-guest systems.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Zarra, Salvatore; Carlson, Rebecca K; Bilbeisi, Rana A; Ronson, Tanya K; Nitschke, Jonathan R; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J

    2014-06-14

    The behaviour of metal-organic cages upon guest encapsulation can be difficult to elucidate in solution. Paramagnetic metal centres introduce additional dispersion of signals that is useful for characterisation of host-guest complexes in solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, paramagnetic centres also complicate spectral assignment due to line broadening, signal integration error, and large changes in chemical shifts, which can be difficult to assign even for known compounds. Quantum chemical predictions can provide information that greatly facilitates the assignment of NMR signals and identification of species present. Here we explore how the prediction of paramagnetic NMR spectra may be used to gain insight into the spin crossover (SCO) properties of iron(II)-based metal organic coordination cages, specifically examining how the structure of the local metal coordination environment affects SCO. To represent the tetrahedral metal-organic cage, a model system is generated by considering an isolated metal-ion vertex: fac-ML3(2+) (M = Fe(II), Co(II); L = N-phenyl-2-pyridinaldimine). The sensitivity of the (1)H paramagnetic chemical shifts to local coordination environments is assessed and utilised to shed light on spin crossover behaviour in iron complexes. Our data indicate that expansion of the metal coordination sphere must precede any thermal SCO. An attempt to correlate experimental enthalpies of SCO with static properties of bound guests shows that no simple relationship exists, and that effects are likely due to nuanced dynamic response to encapsulation. PMID:24752730

  13. 13C and 1H chemical shift assignments and conformation confirmation of trimedlure-Y via 2-D NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warthen, J. D.; Waters, R. M.; McGovern, T. P.

    The conformation of 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- cis-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-Y) was confirmed as 1,2,5 equatorial, axial, equatorial via 13C, 1H, APT, CSCM and COSY NMR analyses. The carbon and proton nuclei in trimedlure-Y and the previously unassigned eight cyclohexyl protons (1.50-2.60 ppm) in 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- trans-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-B 1; 1,2,5 equatorial, equatorial, equatorial) were also characterized by these methods. The effects of the 2-CH 3 in the axial or equatorial conformation upon the chemical shifts of the other nuclei in the molecule are discussed.

  14. A Simple and Fast Approach for Predicting 1H and 13C Chemical Shifts: Toward Chemical Shift-Guided Simulations of RNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a simple and fast approach for predicting RNA chemical shifts from interatomic distances that performs with an accuracy similar to existing predictors and enables the first chemical shift-restrained simulations of RNA to be carried out. Our analysis demonstrates that the applied restraints can effectively guide conformational sampling toward regions of space that are more consistent with chemical shifts than the initial coordinates used for the simulations. As such, our approach should be widely applicable in mapping the conformational landscape of RNAs via chemical shift-guided molecular dynamics simulations. The simplicity and demonstrated sensitivity to three-dimensional structure should also allow our method to be used in chemical shift-based RNA structure prediction, validation, and refinement. PMID:25255209

  15. Chemical Constituents of Lecythispisonis (Lecythidaceae)--A New Saponin and Complete 1H and 13C Chemical Shift Assignments.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rennê C; Matos, Carlos R R; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Mathias, Leda

    2015-06-01

    A novel triterpenoid saponin 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1' --> 3)-2α,19α-dihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid [3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1' --> 3)-arjunic acid, 1], ten known compounds [six triterpenoids: α-amyrin (2), β-amyrin (3), germanicol (4), lupeol (5), friedelin (6), friedelanol (7); four steroids--campesterol (8), stigmasterol (9), sitosterol (10), cholesterol (11)], and a long chain alcohol n-eicosan-1-ol (12) were identified in the bark of Lecythis pisonis. The structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy (1H and 13C-NMR, DEPTQ, 1H-1H-COSY, NOESY, HSQC and HMBC), low (CG-MS) and high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS), and infrared (IR) spectral data involving comparison with the literature. PMID:26197504

  16. 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shift Assignments and Conformational Analysis for the Two Diastereomers of the Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Inhibitor Brodifacoum

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Cho, Herman M.

    2009-10-01

    Proton and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments and 1H-1H scalar couplings for the two diastereomers of the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) inhibitor brodifacoum have been determined from acetone solutions containing both diastereomers. Data were obtained from homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra acquired at 1H frequencies of 750 and 900 MHz over a 268-303 K temperature range. Conformations inferred from scalar coupling and 1-D NOE measurements exhibit large differences between the diastereomers. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  17. The Effect of Molecular Conformation on the Accuracy of Theoretical (1)H and (13)C Chemical Shifts Calculated by Ab Initio Methods for Metabolic Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Shimbo, Yudai; Komatsu, Keiko; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-14

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analyzing metabolic mixtures. The information obtained from an NMR spectrum is in the form of physical parameters, such as chemical shifts, and construction of databases for many metabolites will be useful for data interpretation. To increase the accuracy of theoretical chemical shifts for development of a database for a variety of metabolites, the effects of sets of conformations (structural ensembles) and the levels of theory on computations of theoretical chemical shifts were systematically investigated for a set of 29 small molecules in the present study. For each of the 29 compounds, 101 structures were generated by classical molecular dynamics at 298.15 K, and then theoretical chemical shifts for 164 (1)H and 123 (13)C atoms were calculated by ab initio quantum chemical methods. Six levels of theory were used by pairing Hartree-Fock, B3LYP (density functional theory), or second order Møller-Plesset perturbation with 6-31G or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The six average fluctuations in the (1)H chemical shift were ±0.63, ± 0.59, ± 0.70, ± 0.62, ± 0.75, and ±0.66 ppm for the structural ensembles, and the six average errors were ±0.34, ± 0.27, ± 0.32, ± 0.25, ± 0.32, and ±0.25 ppm. The results showed that chemical shift fluctuations with changes in the conformation because of molecular motion were larger than the differences between computed and experimental chemical shifts for all six levels of theory. In conclusion, selection of an appropriate structural ensemble should be performed before theoretical chemical shift calculations for development of an accurate database for a variety of metabolites. PMID:26963288

  18. DFT-GIAO 1H and 13C NMR prediction of chemical shifts for the configurational assignment of 6beta-hydroxyhyoscyamine diastereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Marcelo A; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2009-07-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift calculations using the density functional theory-gauge including/invariant atomic orbitals (DFT-GIAO) approximation at the B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) level of theory have been used to assign both natural diastereoisomers of 6beta-hydroxyhyoscyamine. The theoretical chemical shifts of the (1)H and (13)C atoms in both isomers were calculated using a previously determined conformational distribution, and the theoretical and experimental values were cross-compared. For protons, the obtained average absolute differences and root mean square (rms) errors for each comparison showed that the experimental chemical shifts of dextrorotatory and levorotatory 6beta-hydroxyhyoscyamines correlated well with the theoretical values calculated for the (3R,6R,2'S) and (3S,6S,2'S) configurations, respectively, whereas for (13)C atoms the calculations were unable to differentiate between isomers. The nature of the relatively large chemical shift differences observed in nuclei that share similar chemical environments between isomers was asserted from the same calculations. It is shown that the anisotropic effect of the phenyl group in the tropic ester moiety, positioned under the tropane ring, has a larger shielding effect over one ring side than over the other one. PMID:19373852

  19. Correlation between 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydroxyl protons in n-hexanol/cyclohexane and molecular association properties investigated using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Mario E.; Shibue, Toshimichi; Sugimura, Natsuhiko; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Moreno-Villoslada, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Association of n-hexanol molecules in cyclohexane forming clusters is studied by DFT and 1H NMR. Geometry optimization, corrected binding energies, charge distributions, charge transfer energies, and 1H NMR chemical shifts have been obtained. The calculated chemical shifts of hydroxyl protons have been correlated to experimental data obtained in the range of n-hexanol molar fraction between 0.002 and 0.2, showing that n-hexanol molecules at a molar fraction around 0.1, where well-structured hydrogen bond networks are observed, tend to form linear pentamers and hexamers. The experimental data are consistent with the continuous linear association thermodynamic model, showing a dimensionless association constant of 284.

  20. 1H NMR spectra of alcohols and diols in chloroform: DFT/GIAO calculation of chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Lomas, John S

    2014-12-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts of aliphatic alcohols in chloroform have been computed on the basis of density functional theory, the solvent being included by the integral-equation-formalism polarisable continuum model of Gaussian 09. Relative energies of all conformers are calculated at the Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE)0/6-311+G(d,p) level, and NMR shifts by the gauge-including atomic orbital method with the PBE0/6-311+G(d,p) geometry and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The 208 computed CH proton NMR shifts for 34 alcohols correlate very well with the experimental values, with a gradient of 1.00 ± 0.01 and intercept close to zero; the overall root mean square difference (RMSD) is 0.08 ppm. Shifts for CH protons of diols in chloroform are well correlated with the theoretical values for (isotropic) benzene, with similar gradient and intercept (1.02 ± 0.01, -0.13 ppm), but the overall RMSD is slightly higher, 0.12 ppm. This approach generally gives slightly better results than the CHARGE model of Abraham et al. The shifts of unsaturated alcohols in benzene have been re-examined with Gaussian 09, but the overall fit for CH protons is not improved, and OH proton shifts are worse. Shifts of vinyl protons in alkenols are systematically overestimated, and the correlation of computed shifts against the experimental data for unsaturated alcohols follows a quadratic equation. Splitting the 20 compounds studied into two sets, and applying empirical scaling based on the quadratic for the first set to the second set, gives an RMSD of 0.10 ppm. A multi-standard approach gives a similar result. PMID:25199903

  1. Determination of NH proton chemical shift anisotropy with 14N-1H heteronuclear decoupling using ultrafast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    The extraction of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors of protons either directly bonded to 14N nuclei (I = 1) or lying in their vicinity using rotor-synchronous recoupling pulse sequence is always fraught with difficulty due to simultaneous recoupling of 14N-1H heteronuclear dipolar couplings and the lack of methods to efficiently decouple these interactions. This difficulty mainly arises from the presence of large 14N quadrupolar interactions in comparison to the rf field that can practically be achieved. In the present work it is demonstrated that the application of on-resonance 14N-1H decoupling with rf field strength ∼30 times weaker than the 14N quadrupolar coupling during 1H CSA recoupling under ultrafast MAS (90 kHz) results in CSA lineshapes that are free from any distortions from recoupled 14N-1H interactions. With the use of extensive numerical simulations we have shown the applicability of our proposed method on a naturally abundant L-Histidine HCl·H2O sample.

  2. Comparative molecular field analysis and comparative molecular similarity index analysis studies on 1H NMR chemical shift of NH group of diaryl triazene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rofouie, M K; Salahinejad, M; Ghasemi, J B; Aghaei, A

    2013-05-01

    Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular field analysis region focusing (CoMFA-RF) for optimizing the region for the final partial least square analysis, and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methods were employed to develop three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models of (1)H NMR chemical shift of NH proton of diaryl triazene derivatives. The best orientation was searched by all-orientation search (AOS) strategy to minimize the effect of the initial orientation of the structures. The predictive abilities of CoMFA-RF and CoMSIA models were determined using a test set of ten compounds affording predictive correlation coefficients of 0.721 and 0.754, respectively, indicating good predictive power. For further model validation, cross validation (leave one out), progressive scrambling, and bootstrapping were also applied. The accuracy and speed of obtained 3D-QSAR models for the prediction of (1)H NMR chemical shifts of NH group of diaryl triazene derivatives were greater compared to some computational well-known procedures. PMID:23456682

  3. Characterizing the Microstructure of Heparin and Heparan Sulfate using N-sulfoglucosamine 1H and 15N NMR Chemical Shift Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beecher, Consuelo N.; Naggi, Annamaria; Guerrini, Marco; Torri, Giangiacomo; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2014-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) are members of a biologically important group of highly anionic linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Because of their structural complexity, the molecular-level characterization of heparin and HS continues to be a challenge. The work presented herein describes an emerging approach for the analysis of unfractionated and low molecular weight heparins as well as porcine and human-derived HS. This approach utilizes the untapped potential of 15N NMR to characterize these preparations through detection of the NH resonances of N-sulfo-glucosamine residues. The sulfamate group 1H and 15N chemical shifts of six GAG microenvironments were assigned based on the critical comparison of selectively modified heparin derivatives, NMR measurements for a library of heparin-derived oligosaccharide standards, and an in-depth NMR analysis of the low molecular weight heparin enoxaparin through systematic investigation of the chemical exchange properties of NH resonances and residue-specific assignments using the [1H, 15N] HSQC-TOCSY experiment. The sulfamate microenvironments characterized in this study include GlcNS(6S)-UA(2S), ΔUA(2S)-GlcNS(6S), GlcNS(3S)(6S)-UA(2S), GlcNS-UA, GlcNS(6S)-redα, and 1,6-anhydro GlcNS demonstrate the utility of [1H, 15N] HSQC NMR spectra to provide a spectroscopic fingerprint reflecting the composition of intact GAGs and low molecular weight heparin preparations. PMID:23240897

  4. Probing structural patterns of ion association and solvation in mixtures of imidazolium ionic liquids with acetonitrile by means of relative (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Marekha, Bogdan A; Kalugin, Oleg N; Bria, Marc; Idrissi, Abdenacer

    2015-09-21

    Mixtures of ionic liquids (ILs) with polar aprotic solvents in different combinations and under different conditions (concentration, temperature etc.) are used widely in electrochemistry. However, little is known about the key intermolecular interactions in such mixtures depending on the nature of the constituents and mixture composition. In order to systematically address the intermolecular interactions, the chemical shift variation of (1)H and (13)C nuclei has been followed in mixtures of imidazolium ILs 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BmimBF4), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmimPF6), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BmimTfO) and 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BmimTFSI) with molecular solvent acetonitrile (AN) over the entire composition range at 300 K. The concept of relative chemical shift variation is proposed to assess the observed effects on a unified and unbiased scale. We have found that hydrogen bonds between the imidazolium ring hydrogen atoms and electronegative atoms of anions are stronger in BmimBF4 and BmimTfO ILs than those in BmimTFSI and BmimPF6. Hydrogen atom at position 2 of the imidazolium ring is substantially more sensitive to interionic hydrogen bonding than those at positions 4-5 in the case of BmimTfO and BmimTFSI ILs. These hydrogen bonds are disrupted upon dilution in AN due to ion dissociation which is more pronounced at high dilutions. Specific solvation interactions between AN molecules and IL cations are poorly manifested. PMID:26278514

  5. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments of cyanobacteriochrome NpR6012g4 in the green-absorbing photoproduct state.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sunghyuk; Yu, Qinhong; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Lagarias, J Clark; Ames, James B

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial photosensory proteins with a tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore that belong to the phytochrome superfamily. Like phytochromes, CBCRs photoconvert between two photostates with distinct spectral properties. NpR6012g4 from Nostoc punctiforme is a model system for widespread CBCRs with conserved red/green photocycles. Atomic-level structural information for the photoproduct state in this subfamily is not known. Here, we report NMR backbone chemical shift assignments of the light-activated state of NpR6012g4 (BMRB no. 26577) as a first step toward determining its atomic resolution structure. PMID:26537963

  6. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 1H, 13C and 15N NMR coordination shifts in Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with quinoline, isoquinoline, and 2,2'-biquinoline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2007-12-01

    1H, 13C, and 15N NMR studies of platinide(II) (M=Pd, Pt) chloride complexes with quinolines (L=quinoline-quin, or isoquinoline-isoquin; LL=2,2'-biquinoline-bquin), having the general formulae trans-/cis-[ML2Cl2] and [M(LL)Cl2], were performed and the respective chemical shifts (delta1H, delta13C, delta15N) reported. 1H coordination shifts of various signs and magnitudes (Delta1Hcoord=delta1Hcomplex-delta1Hligand) are discussed in relation to the changes of diamagnetic contribution to the relevant 1H shielding constants. The comparison to the literature data for similar complexes containing auxiliary ligands other than chlorides exhibited a large dependence of delta1H parameters on electron density variations and ring-current effects (inductive and anisotropic phenomena). The influence of deviations from planarity, concerning either MN2Cl2 chromophores or azine ring systems, revealed by the known X-ray structures of [Pd(bquin)Cl2] and [Pt(bquin)Cl2], is discussed in respect to 1H NMR spectra. 15N coordination shifts (Delta15Ncoord=delta15Ncomplex-delta15Nligand) of ca. 78-100 ppm (to lower frequency) are attributed mainly to the decrease of the absolute value of paramagnetic contribution in the relevant 15N shielding constants, this phenomenon being noticeably dependent on the type of a platinide metal and coordination sphere geometry. The absolute magnitude of Delta15Ncoord parameter increased by ca 15 ppm upon Pd(II)-->Pt(II) replacement but decreased by ca. 15 ppm following trans-->cis transition. Experimental 1H, 13C, 15N NMR chemical shifts are compared to those quantum-chemically calculated by B3LYP/LanL2DZ+6-31G**//B3LYP/LanL2DZ+6-31G*, both in vacuo and in CHCl3 or DMF solution. PMID:18044805

  7. Determination of the tautomeric equilibria of pyridoyl benzoyl β-diketones in the liquid and solid state through the use of deuterium isotope effects on (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V; Lindon, John C

    2015-02-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition, in the solution state the 2-bond and 3-bond J((1)H-(13)C) coupling constants have been used to confirm the equilibrium positions. The isotope effects due to deuteriation at the OH position are shown to be superior to chemical shift in determination of equilibrium positions of these almost symmetrical -pyridoyl-benzoyl methanes. The assignments of the NMR spectra are supported by calculations of the chemical shifts at the DFT level. The equilibrium positions are shown to be different in the liquid and the solid state. In the liquid state the 4-pyridoyl derivative is at the B-form (C-1 is OH), whereas the 2-and 3-pyridoyl derivatives are in the A-form. In the solid state all three compounds are on the B-form. The 4-pyridoyl derivative shows unusual deuterium isotope effects in the solid, which are ascribed to a change of the crystal structure of the deuteriated compound. PMID:24070650

  8. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 1H, 13C and 15N NMR coordination shifts in Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with picolines.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Malináková, Katerina; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2009-03-01

    (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of gold(III), palladium(II) and platinum(II) chloride complexes with picolines, [Au(PIC)Cl(3)], trans-[Pd(PIC)(2)Cl(2)], trans/cis-[Pt(PIC)(2)Cl(2)] and [Pt(PIC)(4)]Cl(2), were performed. After complexation, the (1)H and (13)C signals were shifted to higher frequency, whereas the (15)N ones to lower (by ca 80-110 ppm), with respect to the free ligands. The (15)N shielding phenomenon was enhanced in the series [Au(PIC)Cl(3)] < trans-[Pd(PIC)(2)Cl(2)] < cis-[Pt(PIC)(2)Cl(2)] < trans-[Pt(PIC)(2)Cl(2)]; it increased following the Pd(II) --> Pt(II) replacement, but decreased upon the trans --> cis-transition. Experimental (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts were compared to those quantum-chemically calculated by B3LYP/LanL2DZ + 6-31G**//B3LYP/LanL2DZ + 6-31G*. PMID:19097135

  9. Molecular structure and vibrational and chemical shift assignments of 3-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)-4-phenyl-1 H-1,2,4-triazole-5-(4 H)-thione by DFT and ab initio HF calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf; Şekerci, Mehmet; Dinçer, Muharrem

    2009-07-01

    The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) 1H and 13C chemical shift values and several thermodynamic parameters of 3-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)-4-phenyl-1 H-1,2,4-triazole-5-(4 H)-thione in the ground state have been calculated by using the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional methods (BLYP and B3LYP) with 6-31G(d) basis set. The results of the optimized molecular structure are presented and compared with the experimental X-ray diffraction. The molecule contains one O-H···N and one C-H···π (phenyl) intramolecular interactions. The computed vibrational frequencies are used to determine the types of molecular motions associated with each of the experimental bands observed. Data of the title compound display significant structure-correlation and provide the basis for future design of efficient materials having the derivatives of 1,2,4-triazole. Also, calculated 1H chemical shift values compared with the experimental ones.

  10. (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignment of the Gram-positive conjugative transfer protein TraHpIP501.

    PubMed

    Fercher, Christian; Keller, Walter; Zangger, Klaus; Helge Meyer, N

    2016-04-01

    Conjugative transfer of DNA represents the most important transmission pathway in terms of antibiotic resistance and virulence gene dissemination among bacteria. TraH is a putative transfer protein of the type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded by the Gram-positive (G+) conjugative plasmid pIP501. This molecular machine involves a multi-protein core complex spanning the bacterial envelope thereby serving as a macromolecular secretion channel. Here, we report the near complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment of a soluble TraH variant comprising the C-terminal domain. PMID:26559076

  11. (1)H NMR-based metabolite profiling workflow to reduce inter-sample chemical shift variations in urine samples for improved biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ryan B; Lehmann, Rainer; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Heinzmann, Silke S

    2016-07-01

    peaks with standard phosphate buffering and with in silico alignment. C citrate peak with additional potassium fluoride and standard phosphate buffering without in silico alignment. D citrate peaks with additional potassium fluoride and standard phosphate buffering with in silico alignment. Below the respective spectrum are displayed the percent relative standard deviation (RSD) of the respective citrate peaks. This is a measure of the positional noise of peaks within a (1)H NMR analysis. It can be seen that D performs the best in reducing positional noise of citrate peaks. E-H STOCSY analysis of correlating spectral features with the driver peak at 2.675 ppm (see red arrow) to identify structural correlations. As a, b, c, and d are known to be structurally correlated, STOCSY analysis should reveal r (2) = 1 if data is perfectly aligned and can therefore be used as a measure of peak alignment. E Strong positional noise does not allow identifying the c and d peaks of the AB system to be correlated. F, G Neither in silico alignment or KF addition alone can completely improve the alignment and therefore increase the correlations. H Highly improved alignment by combining both KF addition and in silico alignment reduces positional noise and elucidates all four citrate peaks to be strongly correlated. PMID:27178551

  12. Unusual 1H NMR chemical shifts support (His) C(epsilon) 1...O==C H-bond: proposal for reaction-driven ring flip mechanism in serine protease catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ash, E L; Sudmeier, J L; Day, R M; Vincent, M; Torchilin, E V; Haddad, K C; Bradshaw, E M; Sanford, D G; Bachovchin, W W

    2000-09-12

    13C-selective NMR, combined with inhibitor perturbation experiments, shows that the C(epsilon)(1)H proton of the catalytic histidine in resting alpha-lytic protease and subtilisin BPN' resonates, when protonated, at 9.22 ppm and 9.18 ppm, respectively, which is outside the normal range for such protons and approximately 0.6 to 0.8 ppm further downfield than previously reported. They also show that the previous alpha-lytic protease assignments [Markley, J. L., Neves, D. E., Westler, W. M., Ibanez, I. B., Porubcan, M. A. & Baillargeon, M. W. (1980) Front. Protein Chem. 10, 31-61] were to signals from inactive or denatured protein. Simulations of linewidth vs. pH demonstrate that the true signal is more difficult to detect than corresponding signals from inactive derivatives, owing to higher imidazole pK(a) values and larger chemical shift differences between protonated and neutral forms. A compilation and analysis of available NMR data indicates that the true C(epsilon)(1)H signals from other serine proteases are similarly displaced downfield, with past assignments to more upfield signals probably in error. The downfield displacement of these proton resonances is shown to be consistent with an H-bond involving the histidine C(epsilon)(1)H as donor, confirming the original hypothesis of Derewenda et al. [Derewenda, Z. S., Derewenda, U. & Kobos, P. M. (1994) J. Mol. Biol. 241, 83-93], which was based on an analysis of literature x-ray crystal structures of serine hydrolases. The invariability of this H-bond among enzymes containing Asp-His-Ser triads indicates functional importance. Here, we propose that it enables a reaction-driven imidazole ring flip mechanism, overcoming a major dilemma inherent in all previous mechanisms, namely how these enzymes catalyze both the formation and productive breakdown of tetrahedral intermediates. PMID:10984533

  13. On the choice of optimal methodology for calculation of (13)C and (1)H NMR isotropic chemical shifts in cagelike systems. Case studies of adamantane, 2-adamantanone, and 2,4-methano-2,4-dehydroadamantane.

    PubMed

    Vikić-Topić, D; Pejov, L

    2001-01-01

    The (13)C and (1)H isotropic chemical shift values computed at HF, BLYP, B3LYP, and MPW1PW91/6-311+G(2d,p) levels of theory, for the BLYP and B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) optimized geometries of adamantane, 2-adamantanone, and 2,4-methano-2,4-dehydroadamantane ([3.1.1] propellane) are reported and compared with the experimental data. Except for the "inverted" carbon atoms and some of their nearest neighbors, the HF values are superior over the DFT ones, when the isotropic shifts with respect to TMS are in question. However, in case of the relative shifts computed with respect to the most deshielded center within the molecule, the DFT methods yield significantly better agreement with the experimental data than the HF method, the hybrid DFT methods being superior over "pure" DFT ones. The most probable reason for these findings may be the cancellation of errors arising from the inappropriate description of the paramagnetic contributions to the overall shielding tensor within the Kohn-Sham approach when an internal standard (within a molecule) is chosen, instead of an external one. Almost excellent linear correlation was found between the calculated and experimental relative shift values, which is significantly superior at DFT levels than at HF level, further proving the more systematical nature of errors in predicting the second-order magnetic response properties at DFT levels of theory. Among all DFT methods employed, the MPW1PW91 showed the best performance, in line with the significantly improved long-range behavior of this functional, as compared to the B3LYP one. PMID:11749572

  14. Synthesis and x-ray structural characterization of binuclear iridium(I) and rhodium(I) hydroxypyridinate complexes. 1. Complete assignment of the /sup 1/H NMR spectra by two-dimensional and NOE techniques. The nature of inside and outside /sup 1/H chemical shift differences

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, G.S.; Mann, K.R.

    1988-09-21

    Six new d/sup 8/-d/sup 8/ complexes, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-chp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-2hq))/sub 2/, (Rh(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/, and (Rh(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/ (hp = 2-hydroxyphridinate, mhp = 6-methyl-2-hydroxypyridinate, chp = 6-chloro-2-hydroxypyridinate, 2hq = 2-hydroxyquinolate, COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene), were synthesized and characterized by /sup 1/H NMR, /sup 13/C NMR, and IR spectroscopy and FAB mass spectrometry. X-ray crystallographic analyses of the isostructural (M(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/ (M = Ir and Rh) complexes confirmed the binuclear nature of the complexes. The complete assignment of the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of (Ir(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/ (and by analogy, the spectra of the other five complexes) was carried out with selective decoupling, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE), and two-dimensional NMR techniques. The NOE observed between hp proton H5 and COD proton H15 allowed the precise assignment of all 12 COD resonances. Olefinic proton H12 (trans to N and outside) resonates downfield of olefinic proton H11 (trans to N and inside). Olefininc proton H15 (trans to O and outside) resonates upfield of olefinic proton H16 (trans to O and inside). The endo methylene protons resonate upfield of the exo methylene protons. The inside/outside chemical shift differences observed for these compounds are ascribed to steric and magnetic anisotropy effects. The crystallographic data are presented. The molecular structure of the complexes is discussed in detail. 39 references, 5 figures, 9 tables.

  15. Hydrogen concentration dependence of 1H Knight shift in NbH x studied by 1H MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Hayamizu, Kikuko

    1993-08-01

    Hydrogen concentration dependence of the Knight shift of protons in NbH x(0.05≤×≤1.05) has been studied by means of 1H MAS (magic angle sample spinning) NMR. In the mixed-phase samples of the α and β phases (0.05<×≤0.7), it is found that the 1H Knight shift of β-NbH x depends on the phase fraction. The shift variation in the β phase can be correlated with the unit cell volume, being explained by the variation of the density of electronic states at the Fermi level N(0) due to the compression of the crystal lattice. On the other hand, in the single β-phase samples (0.7<×≤1.05), the 1H Knight shift becomes smaller as the hydrogen concentration increases. This variation can be explained by increase in the number of electrons in the unit cell with the hydrogen concentration, resulting in the N(0) increase.

  16. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 1H, 13C and 15N NMR coordination shifts in Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with methyl and phenyl derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2007-12-01

    1H, 13C and 15N NMR studies of platinide(II) (M=Pd, Pt) chloride complexes with methyl and phenyl derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline [LL=4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (dmbpy); 4,4'-diphenyl-2,2'-bipyridine (dpbpy); 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmphen); 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dpphen)] having a general [M(LL)Cl2] formula were performed and the respective chemical shifts (delta1H, delta13C, delta15N) reported. 1H high-frequency coordination shifts (Delta1Hcoord=delta1Hcomplex-delta1Hligand) were discussed in relation to the changes of diamagnetic contribution in the relevant 1H shielding constants. The comparison to literature data for similar [M(LL)(XX)], [M(LL)X2] and [M(LL)XY] coordination or organometallic compounds containing various auxiliary ligands revealed a large dependence of delta1H parameters on inductive and anisotropic effects. 15N low-frequency coordination shifts (Delta15Ncoord=delta 15Ncomplex-delta15Nligand) of ca 88-96 ppm for M=Pd and ca 103-111 ppm for M=Pt were attributed to both the decrease of the absolute value of paramagnetic contribution and the increase of the diamagnetic term in the expression for 15N shielding constants. The absolute magnitude of Delta15Ncoord parameter increased by ca 15 ppm upon Pd(II)-->Pt(II) transition and by ca 6-7 ppm following dmbpy-->dmphen or dpbpy-->dpphen ligand replacement; variations between analogous complexes containing methyl and phenyl ligands (dmbpy vs dpbpy; dmphen vs dpphen) did not exceed+/-1.5 ppm. Experimental 1H, 13C, 15N NMR chemical shifts were compared to those quantum-chemically calculated by B3LYP/LanL2DZ+6-31G**//B3LYP/LanL2DZ+6-31G*, both in vacuo and in DMSO or DMF solution. PMID:18044804

  17. Unusual 1H NMR chemical shifts support (His) Cɛ1—H⋅⋅⋅O⩵C H-bond: Proposal for reaction-driven ring flip mechanism in serine protease catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Elissa L.; Sudmeier, James L.; Day, Regina M.; Vincent, Matthew; Torchilin, Ekaterina V.; Haddad, Kristin Coffman; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Sanford, David G.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2000-01-01

    13C-selective NMR, combined with inhibitor perturbation experiments, shows that the Cɛ1—H proton of the catalytic histidine in resting α-lytic protease and subtilisin BPN′ resonates, when protonated, at 9.22 ppm and 9.18 ppm, respectively, which is outside the normal range for such protons and ≈0.6 to 0.8 ppm further downfield than previously reported. They also show that the previous α-lytic protease assignments [Markley, J. L., Neves, D. E., Westler, W. M., Ibanez, I. B., Porubcan, M. A. & Baillargeon, M. W. (1980) Front. Protein Chem. 10, 31–61] were to signals from inactive or denatured protein. Simulations of linewidth vs. pH demonstrate that the true signal is more difficult to detect than corresponding signals from inactive derivatives, owing to higher imidazole pKa values and larger chemical shift differences between protonated and neutral forms. A compilation and analysis of available NMR data indicates that the true Cɛ1—H signals from other serine proteases are similarly displaced downfield, with past assignments to more upfield signals probably in error. The downfield displacement of these proton resonances is shown to be consistent with an H-bond involving the histidine Cɛ1—H as donor, confirming the original hypothesis of Derewenda et al. [Derewenda, Z. S., Derewenda, U. & Kobos, P. M. (1994) J. Mol. Biol. 241, 83–93], which was based on an analysis of literature x-ray crystal structures of serine hydrolases. The invariability of this H-bond among enzymes containing Asp-His-Ser triads indicates functional importance. Here, we propose that it enables a reaction-driven imidazole ring flip mechanism, overcoming a major dilemma inherent in all previous mechanisms, namely how these enzymes catalyze both the formation and productive breakdown of tetrahedral intermediates. PMID:10984533

  18. Chemical shift driven geometry optimization.

    PubMed

    Witter, Raiker; Priess, Wolfram; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2002-01-30

    A new method for refinement of 3D molecular structures by geometry optimization is presented. Prerequisites are a force field and a very fast procedure for the calculation of chemical shifts in every step of optimization. To the energy, provided by the force field (COSMOS force field), a pseudoenergy, depending on the difference between experimental and calculated chemical shifts, is added. In addition to the energy gradients, pseudoforces are computed. This requires the derivatives of the chemical shifts with respect to the coordinates. The pseudoforces are analytically derived from the integral expressions of the bond polarization theory. Single chemical shift values attributed to corresponding atoms are considered for structural correction. As a first example, this method is applied for proton position refinement of the D-mannitol X-ray structure. A crystal structure refinement with 13C chemical shift pseudoforces is carried out. PMID:11924742

  19. Relative Configuration of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By comparing calculated with experimental NMR chemical shifts, we were able to determine the relative configurations of three monoterpene diastereomers produced by the walkingstick Anisomorpha buprestoides. The combined RMSDs of both 1H and 13C quantum chemically calculated shifts were able to predi...

  20. Proton-detected 3D 14N/14N/1H isotropic shift correlation experiment mediated through 1H-1H RFDR mixing on a natural abundant sample under ultrafast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    In this contribution, we have demonstrated a proton detection-based approach on a natural abundant powdered L-Histidine HCl-H2O sample at ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) to accomplish 14N/14N correlation from a 3D 14N/14N/1H isotropic shift correlation experiment mediated through 1H finite-pulse radio frequency-driven recoupling (fp-RFDR). Herein the heteronuclear magnetization transfer between 14N and 1H has been achieved by HMQC experiment, whereas 14N/14N correlation is attained through enhanced 1H-1H spin diffusion process due to 1H-1H dipolar recoupling during the RFDR mixing. While the use of ultrafast MAS (90 kHz) provides sensitivity enhancement through increased 1H transverse relaxation time (T2), the use of micro-coil probe which can withstand strong 14N radio frequency (RF) fields further improves the sensitivity per unit sample volume.

  1. No first night shift effect observed following a nocturnal main sleep and a prophylactic 1-h afternoon nap.

    PubMed

    Kosmadopoulos, Anastasi; Zhou, Xuan; Roach, Gregory D; Darwent, David; Sargent, Charli

    2016-01-01

    Neurobehavioural impairment on the first night shift is often greater than on subsequent night shifts due to extended wakefulness. The aim of the study was to determine whether a 1-h afternoon nap prior to the first night shift is sufficient to produce neurobehavioural performance at levels comparable to the second night shift. Twelve male volunteers (mean age 22.9 years) participated in a laboratory protocol that simulated two 12-h night shifts. A nap preceded the first shift and a 7-h daytime sleep was scheduled between shifts. Neurobehavioural performance and subjective sleepiness measured across each night did not significantly differ between first and second shifts. PMID:27077691

  2. Assignment of 1H and 13C hyperfine-shifted resonances for tuna ferricytochrome c.

    PubMed Central

    Sukits, S F; Satterlee, J D

    1996-01-01

    Tuna ferricytochrome c has been used to demonstrate the potential for completely assigning 1H and 13C strongly hyperfine-shifted resonances in metalloprotein paramagnetic centers. This was done by implementation of standard two-dimensional NMR experiments adapted to take advantage of the enhanced relaxation rates of strongly hyperfine-shifted nuclei. The results show that complete proton assignments of the heme and axial ligands can be achieved, and that assignments of several strongly shifted protons from amino acids located close to the heme can also be made. Virtually all proton-bearing heme 13C resonances have been located, and additional 13C resonances from heme vicinity amino acids are also identified. These results represent an improvement over previous proton resonance assignment efforts that were predicated on the knowledge of specific assignments in the diamagnetic protein and relied on magnetization transfer experiments in heterogeneous solutions composed of mixtures of diamagnetic ferrocytochrome c and paramagnetic ferricytochrome c. Even with that more complicated procedure, complete heme proton assignments for ferricytochrome c have never been demonstrated by a single laboratory. The results presented here were achieved using a more generally applicable strategy with a solution of the uniformly oxidized protein, thereby eliminating the requirement of fast electron self-exchange, which is a condition that is frequently not met. PMID:8913622

  3. 1H, 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance coordination shifts in Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with phenylpyridines.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2009-08-01

    1H, 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies of gold(III), palladium(II) and platinum(II) chloride complexes with phenylpyridines (PPY: 4-phenylpyridine, 4ppy; 3-phenylpyridine, 3ppy; and 2-phenylpyridine, 2ppy) having the general formulae [Au(PPY)Cl3], trans-/cis-[Pd(PPY)2Cl2] and trans-/cis-[Pt(PPY)2Cl2] were performed and the respective chemical shifts (delta1H, delta13C and delta15N) reported. 1H, 13C and 15N coordination shifts (i.e. differences between chemical shifts of the same atom in the complex and ligand molecules: Delta(coord)(1H) = delta(complex)(1H)-delta(ligand)(1H), Delta(coord)(13C) = delta(complex)(13C)-delta(ligand)(13C), Delta(coord)(15N) = delta(complex)(15N)-delta(ligand)(15N)) were discussed in relation to the type of the central atom (Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(II)), geometry (trans-/cis-) and the position of a phenyl group in the pyridine ring system. PMID:19472306

  4. Theoretical and experimental NMR chemical shifts of norsanguinarine and norchelerythrine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toušek, Jaromír.; Dostál, Jiří; Marek, Radek

    2004-02-01

    Norchelerythrine and norsanguinarine, tertiary benzo[ c]phenanthridine alkaloids, were examined by gradient-selected 2D NMR spectroscopy and the later also by extensive theoretical calculations. 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts assignments of the title isoquinoline alkaloids based on NOE and multiple-bond chemical-shift correlation experiments (GSQMBC) are reported. Various methods were used for the NMR chemical shifts calculations. Molecular mechanics (MM3 forcefield), AM1 method and Ab initio methods were used for optimizing the geometry. Chemical shielding constants were computed by density functional theory, GIAO and IGLO approaches were used. Chemical shifts calculated by all methods display good qualitative agreement with experimentally determined values. The best overall agreement was achieved when geometry was optimized by RHF/6-31G** method and chemical shielding constants were calculated by B3LYP/6-311G** method, GIAO approach.

  5. GlyNest and CASPER: two independent approaches to estimate 1H and 13C NMR shifts of glycans available through a common web-interface.

    PubMed

    Loss, Alexander; Stenutz, Roland; Schwarzer, Eberhard; von der Lieth, Claus-W

    2006-07-01

    GlyNest and CASPER (www.casper.organ.su.se/casper/) are two independent services aiming to predict (1)H- and (13)C-NMR chemical shifts of glycans. GlyNest estimates chemical shifts of glycans based on a spherical environment encoding scheme for each atom. CASPER is an increment rule-based approach which uses chemical shifts of the free reducing monosaccharides which are altered according to attached residues of an oligo- or polysaccharide sequence. Both services, which are located on separate, distributed, servers are now available through a common interface of the GLYCOSCIENCES.de portal (www.glycosciences.de). The predictive ability of both techniques was evaluated for a test set of 155 (13)C and 181 (1)H spectra of assigned glycan structures. The standard deviations between experimental and estimated shifts ((1)H; 0.081/0.102; (13)C 0.763/0.794; GlyNest/CASPER) are comparable for both methods and significantly better than procedures where stereochemistry is not encoded. The predictive ability of both approaches is in most cases sufficiently precise to be used for an automatic assignment of NMR-spectra. Since both procedures work efficiently and require computation times in the millisecond range on standard computers, they are well suited for the assignment of NMR spectra in high-throughput glycomics projects. The service is available at www.glycosciences.de/sweetdb/start.php?action=form_shift_estimation. PMID:16845109

  6. Calculation of Chemical Shift Anisotropy in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sishi; Case, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Individual peptide groups in proteins must exhibit some variation in the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of their constituent atoms, but not much is known about the extent or origins of this dispersion. Direct spectroscopic measurement of CSA remains technically challenging, and theoretical methods can help to overcome these limitations by estimating shielding tensors for arbitrary structures. Here we use an automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (AF-QM/MM) approach to compute 15N, 13C′ and 1H chemical shift tensors for human ubiquitin and the GB1 and GB3 fragments of staphylococcal protein G. The average and range of variation of the anisotropies is in good agreement with experimental estimates from solid-state NMR, and the variation among residues is somewhat smaller than that estimated from solution-state measurements. Hydrogen-bond effects account for much of the variation, both between helix and sheet regions, and within elements of secondary structure, but other effects (including variations in torsion angles) may play a role as well. PMID:21866436

  7. A Short History of Three Chemical Shifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A short history of chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, which are useful for chemical studies, is described. The term chemical shift is shown to have originated in the mistaken assumption that nuclei of a given element would all undergo resonance at the…

  8. Solvent and metal dependent (1)H NMR hyperfine shifts in paramagnetic pentaamminemetal cyanide-bridged mixed-valence complexes.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, William Michael; Thompson, Amber L; Denning, Robert Gordon

    2013-04-01

    (1)H NMR resonances, in several aprotic solvents, are reported for axial and equatorial ammonias coordinated to a single spin paramagnetic centre in the Robin-Day Class II cyanide-bridged mixed-valence cations [(OC)(5)Cr(μ-CN)M(NH(3))(5)](2+) (M = Ru, Os) as well as in the complex [(OC)(5)Re(μ-CN)Ru(NH(3))(5)](3+), whose synthesis and properties are reported herein. Using the appropriate isotropic hexaammine complex as a reference, the chemical shift difference between the ammonia protons, δ(ax) - δ(eq), is found to be very sensitive to the paramagnetic metal (M), the remote diamagnetic metal (Cr or Re) and also to the donor properties of the solvent (as well as the counter-ion) as a result of hydrogen bonding interactions. The difference varies linearly with the MMCT energy, and in [(OC)(5)Re(μ-CN)Ru(NH(3))(5)](3+) can be tuned from positive (δ(ax) > δ(eq)) to negative (δ(ax) < δ(eq)) through zero (δ(ax) = δ(eq)) by the choice of solvent. This reflects the sign and magnitude of the axial ligand field parameter which is in turn a result of changes in the π-donor-acceptor interactions between the donor-cyanide bridging group and the pentaammine metal unit. PMID:23361503

  9. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts

    SciTech Connect

    Metaxas, Athena E.; Cort, John R.

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on 1H and 13C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD) and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents, but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. The observed effects are much greater in organic solvents than in water. Slight concentration-dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared to the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts.

  10. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Athena E; Cort, John R

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here, we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD), and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. Slight concentration dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared with the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts. PMID:23495106

  11. Chemical shift referencing in MAS solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcombe, Corey R.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2003-06-01

    Solid state 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra are typically referenced externally using a probe which does not incorporate a field frequency lock. Solution NMR shifts on the other hand are more often determined with respect to an internal reference and using a deuterium based field frequency lock. Further differences arise in solution NMR of proteins and nucleic acids where both 13C and 1H shifts are referenced by recording the frequency of the 1H resonance of DSS (sodium salt of 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulphonic acid) instead of TMS (tetramethylsilane). In this note we investigate the difficulties in relating shifts measured relative to TMS and DSS by these various approaches in solution and solids NMR, and calibrate adamantane as an external 13C standard for solids NMR. We find that external chemical shift referencing of magic angle spinning spectra is typically quite reproducible and accurate, with better than ±0.03 ppm accuracy being straight forward to achieve. Solid state and liquid phase NMR shifts obtained by magic angle spinning with external referencing agree with those measured using typical solution NMR hardware with the sample tube aligned with the applied field as long as magnetic susceptibility corrections and solvent shifts are taken into account. The DSS and TMS reference scales for 13C and 1H are related accurately using MAS NMR. Large solvent shifts for the 13C resonance in TMS in either deuterochloroform or methanol are observed, being +0.71 ppm and -0.74 ppm from external TMS, respectively. The ratio of the 13C resonance frequencies for the two carbons in solid adamantane to the 1H resonance of TMS is reported.

  12. Chemical shift referencing in MAS solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Morcombe, Corey R; Zilm, Kurt W

    2003-06-01

    Solid state 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra are typically referenced externally using a probe which does not incorporate a field frequency lock. Solution NMR shifts on the other hand are more often determined with respect to an internal reference and using a deuterium based field frequency lock. Further differences arise in solution NMR of proteins and nucleic acids where both 13C and 1H shifts are referenced by recording the frequency of the 1H resonance of DSS (sodium salt of 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulphonic acid) instead of TMS (tetramethylsilane). In this note we investigate the difficulties in relating shifts measured relative to TMS and DSS by these various approaches in solution and solids NMR, and calibrate adamantane as an external 13C standard for solids NMR. We find that external chemical shift referencing of magic angle spinning spectra is typically quite reproducible and accurate, with better than +/-0.03 ppm accuracy being straight forward to achieve. Solid state and liquid phase NMR shifts obtained by magic angle spinning with external referencing agree with those measured using typical solution NMR hardware with the sample tube aligned with the applied field as long as magnetic susceptibility corrections and solvent shifts are taken into account. The DSS and TMS reference scales for 13C and 1H are related accurately using MAS NMR. Large solvent shifts for the 13C resonance in TMS in either deuterochloroform or methanol are observed, being +0.71 ppm and -0.74 ppm from external TMS, respectively. The ratio of the 13C resonance frequencies for the two carbons in solid adamantane to the 1H resonance of TMS is reported. PMID:12810033

  13. Solution structure of Ln(III) complexes with macrocyclic ligands through theoretical evaluation of 1H NMR contact shifts.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Aurora; Esteban-Gómez, David; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa; Botta, Mauro; Tripier, Raphaël; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2012-12-17

    Herein, we present a new approach that combines DFT calculations and the analysis of Tb(III)-induced (1)H NMR shifts to quantitatively and accurately account for the contact contribution to the paramagnetic shift in Ln(III) complexes. Geometry optimizations of different Gd(III) complexes with macrocyclic ligands were carried out using the hybrid meta-GGA TPSSh functional and a 46 + 4f(7) effective core potential (ECP) for Gd. The complexes investigated include [Ln(Me-DODPA)](+) (H(2)Me-DODPA = 6,6'-((4,10-dimethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diyl)bis(methylene))dipicolinic acid, [Ln(DOTA)(H(2)O)](-) (H(4)DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate), [Ln(DOTAM)(H(2)O)](3+) (DOTAM = 1,4,7,10- tetrakis[(carbamoyl)methyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane), and related systems containing pyridyl units (Ln = Gd, Tb). Subsequent all-electron relativistic calculations based on the DKH2 approximation, or small-core ECP calculations, were used to compute the (1)H hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) at the ligand nuclei (A(iso) values). The calculated A(iso) values provided direct access to contact contributions to the (1)H NMR shifts of the corresponding Tb(III) complexes under the assumption that Gd and Tb complexes with a given ligand present similar HFCCs. These contact shifts were used to obtain the pseudocontact shifts, which encode structural information as they depend on the position of the nucleus with respect to the lanthanide ion. An excellent agreement was observed between the experimental and calculated pseudocontact shifts using the DFT-optimized geometries as structural models of the complexes in solution, which demonstrates that the computational approach used provides (i) good structural models for the complexes, (ii) accurate HFCCs at the ligand nuclei. The methodology presented in this work can be classified in the context of model-dependent methods, as it relies on the use of a specific molecular structure obtained from DFT

  14. SHIFTX2: significantly improved protein chemical shift prediction.

    PubMed

    Han, Beomsoo; Liu, Yifeng; Ginzinger, Simon W; Wishart, David S

    2011-05-01

    A new computer program, called SHIFTX2, is described which is capable of rapidly and accurately calculating diamagnetic (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts from protein coordinate data. Compared to its predecessor (SHIFTX) and to other existing protein chemical shift prediction programs, SHIFTX2 is substantially more accurate (up to 26% better by correlation coefficient with an RMS error that is up to 3.3× smaller) than the next best performing program. It also provides significantly more coverage (up to 10% more), is significantly faster (up to 8.5×) and capable of calculating a wider variety of backbone and side chain chemical shifts (up to 6×) than many other shift predictors. In particular, SHIFTX2 is able to attain correlation coefficients between experimentally observed and predicted backbone chemical shifts of 0.9800 ((15)N), 0.9959 ((13)Cα), 0.9992 ((13)Cβ), 0.9676 ((13)C'), 0.9714 ((1)HN), 0.9744 ((1)Hα) and RMS errors of 1.1169, 0.4412, 0.5163, 0.5330, 0.1711, and 0.1231 ppm, respectively. The correlation between SHIFTX2's predicted and observed side chain chemical shifts is 0.9787 ((13)C) and 0.9482 ((1)H) with RMS errors of 0.9754 and 0.1723 ppm, respectively. SHIFTX2 is able to achieve such a high level of accuracy by using a large, high quality database of training proteins (>190), by utilizing advanced machine learning techniques, by incorporating many more features (χ(2) and χ(3) angles, solvent accessibility, H-bond geometry, pH, temperature), and by combining sequence-based with structure-based chemical shift prediction techniques. With this substantial improvement in accuracy we believe that SHIFTX2 will open the door to many long-anticipated applications of chemical shift prediction to protein structure determination, refinement and validation. SHIFTX2 is available both as a standalone program and as a web server ( http://www.shiftx2.ca ). PMID:21448735

  15. NMR crystallography: the use of chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robin K.

    2004-10-01

    Measurements of chemical shifts obtained from magic-angle spinning NMR spectra (together with quantum mechanical computations of shielding) can provide valuable information on crystallography. Examples are given of the determination of crystallographic asymmetric units, of molecular symmetry in the solid-state environment, and of crystallographic space group assignment. Measurements of full tensor components for 199Hg have given additional coordination information. The nature of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in cortisone acetate polymorphs and solvates is obtained from chemical shift information, also involving measurement of the full tensor parameters. The resulting data have been used as restraints, built into the computation algorithm, in the analysis of powder diffraction patterns to give full crystal structures. A combination of quantum mechanical computation of shielding and measurement of proton chemical shifts (obtained by high-speed MAS) leads to the determination of the position of a proton in an intermolecular hydrogen bond. A recently-developed computer program specifically based on crystallographic repetition has been shown to give acceptable results. Moreover, NMR chemical shifts can distinguish between static and dynamic disorder in crystalline materials and can be used to determine modes and rates of molecular exchange motion.

  16. Accessible surface area from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    Accessible surface area (ASA) is the surface area of an atom, amino acid or biomolecule that is exposed to solvent. The calculation of a molecule's ASA requires three-dimensional coordinate data and the use of a "rolling ball" algorithm to both define and calculate the ASA. For polymers such as proteins, the ASA for individual amino acids is closely related to the hydrophobicity of the amino acid as well as its local secondary and tertiary structure. For proteins, ASA is a structural descriptor that can often be as informative as secondary structure. Consequently there has been considerable effort over the past two decades to try to predict ASA from protein sequence data and to use ASA information (derived from chemical modification studies) as a structure constraint. Recently it has become evident that protein chemical shifts are also sensitive to ASA. Given the potential utility of ASA estimates as structural constraints for NMR we decided to explore this relationship further. Using machine learning techniques (specifically a boosted tree regression model) we developed an algorithm called "ShiftASA" that combines chemical-shift and sequence derived features to accurately estimate per-residue fractional ASA values of water-soluble proteins. This method showed a correlation coefficient between predicted and experimental values of 0.79 when evaluated on a set of 65 independent test proteins, which was an 8.2 % improvement over the next best performing (sequence-only) method. On a separate test set of 92 proteins, ShiftASA reported a mean correlation coefficient of 0.82, which was 12.3 % better than the next best performing method. ShiftASA is available as a web server ( http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com ) for submitting input queries for fractional ASA calculation. PMID:26078090

  17. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua D; Summers, Michael F; Johnson, Bruce A

    2015-09-01

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the (1)H NMR and (13)C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides. PMID:26141454

  18. The nature and origin of chemical shift for intracellular water nuclei in artemia cysts.

    PubMed

    Kasturi, S R; Hazlewood, C F; Yamanashi, W S; Dennis, L W

    1987-08-01

    We investigated the possible existence of chemical shift of water nuclei in Artemia cysts using high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The results conducted at 60, 200, and 500 MHz revealed an unusually large chemical shift for intracellular water protons. After correcting for bulk susceptibility effects, a residual downfield chemical shift of 0.11 ppm was observed in fully hydrated cysts. Similar results have been observed for the deuterium and (17)O nuclei.We have ruled out unusual intracellular pH, diamagnetic susceptibility of intracellular water, or interaction of water molecules with lipids, glycerol, and/or trehalose as possible origins of the residual chemical shift. We conclude that the residual chemical shift observed for water nuclei ((1)H, (2)H, and (17)O) is due to significant water-macromolecular interactions. PMID:19431702

  19. Trace level detection of compounds related to the chemical weapons convention by 1H-detected 13C NMR spectroscopy executed with a sensitivity-enhanced, cryogenic probehead.

    PubMed

    Cullinan, David B; Hondrogiannis, George; Henderson, Terry J

    2008-04-15

    Two-dimensional 1H-13C HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum correlation) and fast-HMQC (heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation) pulse sequences were implemented using a sensitivity-enhanced, cryogenic probehead for detecting compounds relevant to the Chemical Weapons Convention present in complex mixtures. The resulting methods demonstrated exceptional sensitivity for detecting the analytes at trace level concentrations. 1H-13C correlations of target analytes at < or = 25 microg/mL were easily detected in a sample where the 1H solvent signal was approximately 58,000-fold more intense than the analyte 1H signals. The problem of overlapping signals typically observed in conventional 1H spectroscopy was essentially eliminated, while 1H and 13C chemical shift information could be derived quickly and simultaneously from the resulting spectra. The fast-HMQC pulse sequences generated magnitude mode spectra suitable for detailed analysis in approximately 4.5 h and can be used in experiments to efficiently screen a large number of samples. The HSQC pulse sequences, on the other hand, required roughly twice the data acquisition time to produce suitable spectra. These spectra, however, were phase-sensitive, contained considerably more resolution in both dimensions, and proved to be superior for detecting analyte 1H-13C correlations. Furthermore, a HSQC spectrum collected with a multiplicity-edited pulse sequence provided additional structural information valuable for identifying target analytes. The HSQC pulse sequences are ideal for collecting high-quality data sets with overnight acquisitions and logically follow the use of fast-HMQC pulse sequences to rapidly screen samples for potential target analytes. Use of the pulse sequences considerably improves the performance of NMR spectroscopy as a complimentary technique for the screening, identification, and validation of chemical warfare agents and other small-molecule analytes present in complex mixtures and environmental

  20. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  1. Computation of Chemical Shifts for Paramagnetic Molecules: A Laboratory Experiment for the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Benjamin P.; Simpson, Scott; Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    A computational experiment investigating the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of molecules with unpaired electrons has been developed and implemented. This experiment is appropriate for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory course in computational, physical, or inorganic chemistry. The…

  2. Protein conformation and proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Pardi, A; Wagner, G; Wüthrich, K

    1983-12-15

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the polypeptide backbone protons in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor from bovine organs and the inhibitors E and K from the venom of Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis have been analyzed. Using the corresponding shifts in model peptides, the chemical shifts observed in the proteins were decomposed into random-coil shifts and conformation-dependent shifts. Correlations between contributions to the latter term and the polypeptide conformation were investigated by using the crystal structure of the bovine inhibitor. In addition to the well-known ring-current effects, a correlation was found between chemical shifts of amide and C alpha protons and the length of the hydrogen bonds formed by these protons with nearby oxygen atoms as acceptor groups. There remain sizeable and as yet unexplained residual conformation shifts. Overall, the present treatment provides a satisfactory qualitative explanation for the outstandingly large shifts of backbone hydrogen atoms in these diamagnetic proteins. PMID:6198174

  3. Structural correlations for (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR coordination shifts in Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with lutidines and collidine.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Pawlak, Tomasz; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2010-06-01

    (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of gold(III), palladium(II) and platinum(II) chloride complexes with dimethylpyridines (lutidines: 2,3-lutidine, 2,3lut; 2,4-lutidine, 2,4lut; 3,5-lutidine, 3,5lut; 2,6-lutidine, 2,6lut) and 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine (2,4,6-collidine, 2,4,6col) having general formulae [AuLCl(3)], trans-[PdL(2)Cl(2)] and trans-/cis-[PtL(2)Cl(2)] were performed and the respective chemical shifts (delta(1H), delta(13C), delta(15N)) reported. The deshielding of protons and carbons, as well as the shielding of nitrogens was observed. The (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR coordination shifts (Delta(1H) (coord), Delta(13C) (coord), Delta(15N) (coord); Delta(coord) = delta(complex) - delta(ligand)) were discussed in relation to some structural features of the title complexes, such as the type of the central atom [Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(II)], geometry (trans- or cis-), metal-nitrogen bond lengths and the position of both methyl groups in the pyridine ring system. PMID:20474019

  4. Comment on the reference compound for chemical shift and Knight shift determination of (209)Bi nuclei.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Several groups exploring the (209)Bi NMR in solids, including usual insulators, metallic and magnetic materials and recently diamagnetic topological materials, use different standards (usually old and invalid) for chemical shift (Knight shift) determination, ignoring IUPAC recommendations. As a consequence the published shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 17,500 ppm). PMID:25534279

  5. The use of IRMS, (1)H NMR and chemical analysis to characterise Italian and imported Tunisian olive oils.

    PubMed

    Camin, Federica; Pavone, Anita; Bontempo, Luana; Wehrens, Ron; Paolini, Mauro; Faberi, Angelo; Marianella, Rosa Maria; Capitani, Donatella; Vista, Silvia; Mannina, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS), (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR), conventional chemical analysis and chemometric elaboration were used to assess quality and to define and confirm the geographical origin of 177 Italian PDO (Protected Denomination of Origin) olive oils and 86 samples imported from Tunisia. Italian olive oils were richer in squalene and unsaturated fatty acids, whereas Tunisian olive oils showed higher δ(18)O, δ(2)H, linoleic acid, saturated fatty acids β-sitosterol, sn-1 and 3 diglyceride values. Furthermore, all the Tunisian samples imported were of poor quality, with a K232 and/or acidity values above the limits established for extra virgin olive oils. By combining isotopic composition with (1)H NMR data using a multivariate statistical approach, a statistical model able to discriminate olive oil from Italy and those imported from Tunisia was obtained, with an optimal differentiation ability arriving at around 98%. PMID:26593470

  6. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR coordination shifts in gold(III), cobalt(III), rhodium(III) chloride complexes with pyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Marek, Radek; Szłyk, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Au(III), Co(III) and Rh(III) chloride complexes with pyridine (py), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) of the general formulae [M1LCl3], trans-[M2L4Cl2]+, mer-[M2L3Cl3], [M1(LL)Cl2]+, cis-[M2(LL)2Cl2]+, where M1=Au; M2=Co, Rh; L=py; LL=bpy, phen, were studied by 1H--13C HMBC and 1H--15N HMQC/HSQC. The 1H, 13C and 15N coordination shifts (the latter from ca-78 to ca-107 ppm) are discussed in relation to the type of metal, electron configuration, coordination sphere geometry and the type of ligand. The 13C and 15N chemical shifts were also calculated by quantum-chemical NMR methods, which reproduced well the experimental tendencies concerning the coordination sphere geometry and the ligand type. PMID:17048265

  7. An isotropic chemical shift-chemical shift anisotropic correlation experiment using discrete magic angle turning.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jesse A; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hoyt, David W; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H F

    2009-05-01

    An isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectroscopy is introduced that combines the advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) technologies. In this new approach, denoted DMAT for "discrete magic angle turning", the sample rotates clockwise followed by an anticlockwise rotation of exactly the same amount with each rotation less or equal than 360 degrees but greater than 240 degrees , with the rotation speed being constant only for times related to the evolution dimension. This back and forth rotation is repeated and synchronized with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. For any spin-interaction of rank-2 such as chemical shift anisotropy, isotropic magnetic susceptibility interaction, and residual homo-nuclear dipolar interaction in biological fluid samples, the projection along the isotropic dimension is a high resolution spectrum. Since a less than 360 degrees sample rotation is involved, the design potentially allows for in situ control over physical parameters such as pressure, flow conditions, feed compositions, and temperature so that true in situ NMR investigations can be carried out. PMID:19246221

  8. Probabilistic validation of protein NMR chemical shift assignments.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Hesam; Tonelli, Marco; Lee, Woonghee; Westler, William M; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Ulrich, Eldon L; Markley, John L

    2016-01-01

    Data validation plays an important role in ensuring the reliability and reproducibility of studies. NMR investigations of the functional properties, dynamics, chemical kinetics, and structures of proteins depend critically on the correctness of chemical shift assignments. We present a novel probabilistic method named ARECA for validating chemical shift assignments that relies on the nuclear Overhauser effect data . ARECA has been evaluated through its application to 26 case studies and has been shown to be complementary to, and usually more reliable than, approaches based on chemical shift databases. ARECA is available online at http://areca.nmrfam.wisc.edu/. PMID:26724815

  9. Applications of Chemical Shift Imaging to Marine Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haakil; Tikunov, Andrey; Stoskopf, Michael K.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    The successful applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in medicine are mostly due to the non-invasive and non-destructive nature of MRI techniques. Longitudinal studies of humans and animals are easily accomplished, taking advantage of the fact that MRI does not use harmful radiation that would be needed for plain film radiographic, computerized tomography (CT) or positron emission (PET) scans. Routine anatomic and functional studies using the strong signal from the most abundant magnetic nucleus, the proton, can also provide metabolic information when combined with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). MRS can be performed using either protons or hetero-nuclei (meaning any magnetic nuclei other than protons or 1H) including carbon (13C) or phosphorus (31P). In vivo MR spectra can be obtained from single region of interest (ROI or voxel) or multiple ROIs simultaneously using the technique typically called chemical shift imaging (CSI). Here we report applications of CSI to marine samples and describe a technique to study in vivo glycine metabolism in oysters using 13C MRS 12 h after immersion in a sea water chamber dosed with [2-13C]-glycine. This is the first report of 13C CSI in a marine organism. PMID:20948912

  10. NMR Hyperfine Shifts in Blue Copper Proteins: A Quantum Chemical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Oldfield, Eric

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of the first quantum chemical investigations of 1H NMR hyperfine shifts in the blue copper proteins (BCPs): amicyanin, azurin, pseudoazurin, plastocyanin, stellacyanin, and rusticyanin. We find that very large structural models that incorporate extensive hydrogen bond networks, as well as geometry optimization, are required to reproduce the experimental NMR hyperfine shift results, the best theory vs experiment predictions having R2 = 0.94, a slope = 1.01, and a SD = 40.5 ppm (or ~4.7% of the overall ~860 ppm shift range). We also find interesting correlations between the hyperfine shifts and the bond and ring critical point properties computed using atoms-in-molecules theory, in addition to finding that hyperfine shifts can be well-predicted by using an empirical model, based on the geometry-optimized structures, which in the future should be of use in structure refinement. PMID:18314973

  11. Automated assignment of NMR chemical shifts based on a known structure and 4D spectra.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Matthias; Fredriksson, Kai; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Apart from their central role during 3D structure determination of proteins the backbone chemical shift assignment is the basis for a number of applications, like chemical shift perturbation mapping and studies on the dynamics of proteins. This assignment is not a trivial task even if a 3D protein structure is known and needs almost as much effort as the assignment for structure prediction if performed manually. We present here a new algorithm based solely on 4D [(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC-NOESY-[(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC spectra which is able to assign a large percentage of chemical shifts (73-82 %) unambiguously, demonstrated with proteins up to a size of 250 residues. For the remaining residues, a small number of possible assignments is filtered out. This is done by comparing distances in the 3D structure to restraints obtained from the peak volumes in the 4D spectrum. Using dead-end elimination, assignments are removed in which at least one of the restraints is violated. Including additional information from chemical shift predictions, a complete unambiguous assignment was obtained for Ubiquitin and 95 % of the residues were correctly assigned in the 251 residue-long N-terminal domain of enzyme I. The program including source code is available at https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign . PMID:27484442

  12. Influence of inner-sphere processes on the paramagnetic shifts in the {sup 1}H NMR spectra of some mixed-ligand complexes of rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, A.S.; Vashchuk, A.V.; Panyushkin, V.T.

    1995-12-20

    Concentration dependences of the observed chemical shifts in the NMR spectra of 1:1:1 and 1:2:1 mixed-ligand complexes of rare-earth elements with acetylacetone and acrylic, methacrylic, maleic, and fumaric acids were analyzed. The complexes undergo inner-sphere structural transformations involving different modes of coordination of the unsaturated acid, which is capable of coordination to the central ion through both the carboxylic group and {pi} electrons of the double bond. The possibility of determining equilibrium constants and limiting chemical shifts of the isomeric forms of the complexes was demonstrated. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Prediction of Bioactive Compounds Using Computed NMR Chemical Shifts.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Rajamohanan, Pattuparambil Ramanpillai; Vyas, Renu

    2015-01-01

    NMR based chemical shifts are an important diagnostic parameter for structure elucidation as they capture rich information related to conformational, electronic and stereochemical arrangement of functional groups in a molecule which is responsible for its activity towards any biological target. The present work discusses the importance of computing NMR chemical shifts from molecular structures. The NMR chemical shift data (experimental or computed) was used to generate fingerprints in binary formats for mapping molecular fragments (as descriptors) and correlating with the bioactivity classes. For this study, chemical shift data derived binary fingerprints were computed for 149 classes and 4800 bioactive molecules. The sensitivity and selectivity of fingerprints in discriminating molecules belonging to different therapeutic categories was assessed using a LibSVM based classifier. An accuracy of 82% for proton and 94% for carbon NMR fingerprints were obtained for anti-psoriatic and anti-psychotic molecules demonstrating the effectiveness of this approach for virtual screening. PMID:26138568

  14. Measurement of proton chemical shifts in invisible states of slowly exchanging protein systems by chemical exchange saturation transfer.

    PubMed

    Bouvignies, Guillaume; Kay, Lewis E

    2012-12-13

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful technique for studies of transiently formed, sparsely populated (excited) conformational states of protein molecules in slow exchange with a dominant structure. The most popular form of the experiment, and the version originally developed, uses a weak (1)H radio frequency field to perturb longitudinal magnetization of one state with the effect transferred to magnetization in the second conformation via chemical exchange. A significant limitation of the method for protein applications emerges from (1)H magnetization transfer via dipolar relaxation (NOE effect) that can severely complicate analysis of the resulting CEST profile. This is particularly an issue since the (1)H chemical shifts of the excited state, critical for structural studies of these elusive conformers, become difficult to extract. Here we present a method for measurement of these shifts via CEST experiments in which the NOE effect is not an issue. The methodology is illustrated through applications to a pair of exchanging systems where the results are cross-validated. PMID:23194058

  15. 93Nb NMR chemical shift scale for niobia systems.

    PubMed

    Lapina, Olga B; Khabibulin, Dzhalil F; Romanenko, Konstantin V; Gan, Zhehong; Zuev, Mikhail G; Krasil'nikov, Vladimir N; Fedorov, Vladimir E

    2005-09-01

    93Nb solid-state NMR spectra of a series of inorganic niobates with Nb in different oxygen coordination environments were measured. For all studied compounds the chemical shielding and quadrupole tensor parameters were determined using conventional and ultrahigh field NMR facilities, ultrahigh speed MAS, DQ STMAS, solid-echo and computer modeling. It has been demonstrated that the 93Nb isotropic chemical shift is sensitive to the coordination number of Nb sites. For the first time the 93Nb NMR chemical shift scale for NbOx polyhedra in solid materials has been proposed: for four-coordinated Nb sites, the isotropic shifts occur from -650 to -950 ppm; five-coordinated Nb sites have the isotropic shifts in the range of -900 to -980 ppm; for six-coordinated Nb sites the isotropic shifts vary from -900 to -1360 ppm; the shifts from -1200 to -1600 ppm are typical for seven-coordinated Nb sites; for eight-coordinated Nb sites the shifts are higher than -1400 ppm. The possible correlation between the value of the isotropic chemical shift and the ionic character of the NbOx-MOy polyhedra association has been suggested. The magnitude of the 93Nb quadrupole coupling constant depends on the local symmetry of Nb sites and may vary from hundreds of kHz to hundreds of MHz. PMID:16216475

  16. Chemical shift guided homology modeling of larger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    We describe an alternate approach to protein structure determination that relies on experimental NMR chemical shifts, plus sparse NOEs if available. The newly introduced alignment method, POMONA, directly exploits the powerful bioinformatics algorithms previously developed for sequence-based homology modeling, but does not require significant sequence similarity. Protein templates, generated by POMONA, are subsequently used as input for chemical shift based Rosetta comparative modeling (CS-RosettaCM) to generate reliable full atom models. PMID:26053889

  17. Primidone - An antiepileptic drug - characterisation by quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR and UV-Visible) investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Subramanian, S.; Mohan, S.

    2013-05-01

    The solid phase FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of primidone were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The vibrational spectra were analysed and the observed fundamentals were assigned and analysed. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the theoretical scaled vibrational wavenumbers determined by DFT methods. The Raman intensities were also determined with B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surface of the molecule were constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of primidone has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded and the chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated.

  18. Chemical shift of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2002-01-01

    We report NMR measurements of hyperpolarized xenon dissolved in liquid nitrogen. The dependence of the 129Xe frequency shift on liquid nitrogen temperature was measured along the nitrogen saturated vapor curve from 77 to 93 K. Plotted as a function of the liquid nitrogen density, the chemical shift of xenon is very well described by a simple proportionality relation, with a slope of 0.2135(15) ppm/amagat. The relationship between the chemical shift and the longitudinal spin relaxation is considered in terms of the spin-rotation interaction, and estimates of Xe relaxation time in liquid nitrogen are discussed.

  19. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    PubMed Central

    Bratholm, Lars A.; Christensen, Anders S.; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term, the simulations suggests that sampling both the structure and the uncertainties in chemical shift prediction leads more accurate structures compared to conventional methods using empirical determined weights. The Cauchy distribution, using either sampled uncertainties or predetermined weights, did, however, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction. PMID:25825683

  20. The 4He1H ratios in the chemical compositions of solar flare particles and the primordial solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical abundances of solar flare particles are similar to those of galactic cosmic rays at their sources. In order to infer the 4He/1H ratio in the solar atmosphere, this ratio as observed in the interstellar gases was considered in addition to those which were contained of galactic cosmic rays and the stars classified as the early types. Since it is clear that the most of these ratios ever deduced for both of the Sun and solar flare particles are lower than those for the interstellar gases, this ratio suggests that hydrogens are relatively overabundant in the chemical abundances of the Sun and the primordial solar nebula as compared to those of the interstellar gases currently observed.

  1. Interpretation of chemical shifts and coupling constants in macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Case, D A

    2000-04-01

    Recent developments in NMR spectroscopy, along with advances in computational techniques, have produced new approaches to the interpretation of chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants in biomolecules. Quantum chemical studies of useful accuracy are now becoming more routine and are increasingly being used in conjunction with experimental studies to map out expected structural patterns for peptides and oligonucleotides. Topics of recent special interest include spin couplings across hydrogen bonds and patterns of chemical shift anisotropies, in both diamagnetic and paramagnetic proteins. PMID:10753812

  2. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported. PMID:24746715

  3. Determination of Relative Configuration from Residual Chemical Shift Anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nilamoni; Schmidt, Manuel; Gil, Roberto R; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Griesinger, Christian; Liu, Yizhou

    2016-08-01

    Determination of relative configuration is frequently a rate-limiting step in the characterization of small organic molecules. Solution NMR-based nuclear Overhauser effect and scalar J-coupling constants can provide useful spatial information but often fail when stereocenters are separated by more than 4-5 Å. Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) can provide a means of assigning relative configuration without limits of distance between stereocenters. However, sensitivity limits their application. Chemical shift is the most readily measured NMR parameter, and partial molecular alignment can reveal the anisotropic component of the chemical shift tensor, manifested as residual chemical shift anisotropy (RCSA). Hence, (13)C RCSAs provide information on the relative orientations of specific structural moieties including nonprotonated carbons and can be used for stereochemical assignment. Herein, we present two robust and sensitive methods to accurately measure and apply (13)C RCSAs for stereochemical assignment. The complementary techniques are demonstrated with five molecules representing differing structural classes. PMID:27294984

  4. Protein Structure Refinement Using 13Cα Chemical Shift Tensors

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Oldfield, Eric; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained the 13Cα chemical shift tensors for each amino acid in the protein GB1. We then developed a CST force field and incorporated this into the Xplor-NIH structure determination program. GB1 structures obtained by using CST restraints had improved precision over those obtained in the absence of CST restraints, and were also more accurate. When combined with isotropic chemical shifts, distance and vector angle restraints, the root-mean squared error with respect to existing x-ray structures was better than ~1.0 Å. These results are of broad general interest since they show that chemical shift tensors can be used in protein structure refinement, improving both structural accuracy and precision, opening up the way to accurate de novo structure determination. PMID:19123862

  5. Molecular dynamics averaging of Xe chemical shifts in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Sears, Devin N.; Murad, Sohail

    2004-11-01

    The Xe nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift differences that afford the discrimination between various biological environments are of current interest for biosensor applications and medical diagnostic purposes. In many such environments the Xe signal appears close to that in water. We calculate average Xe chemical shifts (relative to the free Xe atom) in solution in eleven liquids: water, isobutane, perfluoro-isobutane, n-butane, n-pentane, neopentane, perfluoroneopentane, n-hexane, n-octane, n-perfluorooctane, and perfluorooctyl bromide. The latter is a liquid used for intravenous Xe delivery. We calculate quantum mechanically the Xe shielding response in Xe-molecule van der Waals complexes, from which calculations we develop Xe (atomic site) interpolating functions that reproduce the ab initio Xe shielding response in the complex. By assuming additivity, these Xe-site shielding functions can be used to calculate the shielding for any configuration of such molecules around Xe. The averaging over configurations is done via molecular dynamics (MD). The simulations were carried out using a MD technique that one of us had developed previously for the simulation of Henry's constants of gases dissolved in liquids. It is based on separating a gaseous compartment in the MD system from the solvent using a semipermeable membrane that is permeable only to the gas molecules. We reproduce the experimental trends in the Xe chemical shifts in n-alkanes with increasing number of carbons and the large chemical shift difference between Xe in water and in perfluorooctyl bromide. We also reproduce the trend for a given solvent of decreasing Xe chemical shift with increasing temperature. We predict chemical shift differences between Xe in alkanes vs their perfluoro counterparts.

  6. NMR chemical shifts in periodic systems from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, Daniel; Goward, Gillian; Schnell, Ingo; Parrinello, Michele

    2002-08-01

    A recently developed ab-initio method for the calculation of NMR chemical shifts and magnetic susceptibilities in systems under periodic boundary conditions is presented and applied to a hydrogen-bonded molecular crystal. The calculations can unambiguously assign the chemical shifts to individual atoms in experimental spectra, and can further serve for the validation of simulated atomic trajectories and geometries. Apart from the example presented, the method can be applied to crystalline and amorphous insulators, as well as to isolated molecules using a supercell technique. The results are in good agreement with experiment.

  7. NMR characterization of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose 2: Chemical shift assignment and conformation analysis of substituent groups.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroyuki; Oshima, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Hisaho; Shimizu, Yuuichi; Tajima, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    The chemical shifts of the substituent groups of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were assigned by examining a series of CMC samples with different degrees of substitution. Comparative analysis of the (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) spectra allowed the complete assignment of the substituent groups at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions of the seven substituted monomers comprising the CMC chains, namely, 2-mono-, 3-mono-, 6-mono-, 2,3-di-, 2,6-di-, 3,6-di-, and 2,3,6-tri-substituted anhydroglucose units (AGUs). In addition, the mole fractions of the monomers were determined by lineshape analysis of the carbonyl carbon resonances. The comparison between the chemical shifts of the substituents revealed strong interactions between 2- and 3-substituents in the same AGU, and showed that the steric hindrance by a substituent at the 2- or 3-position suppresses subsequent substitution at the adjacent position. PMID:27312635

  8. 1H nuclear-magnetic-resonance investigation of oxidized Fe4S4 ferredoxin from Thermotoga maritima. Hyperfine-shifted resonances, sequence-specific assignments and secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Wildegger, G; Bentrop, D; Ejchart, A; Alber, M; Hage, A; Sterner, R; Rösch, P

    1995-05-01

    The oxidized Fe4S4 ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima has been investigated by one- and two-dimensional NMR in order to characterize its hyperfine-shifted resonances originating from the cysteinyl cluster ligands and to assign its resonances in the diamagnetic shift range. The chemical shift and relaxation time pattern of the hyperfine-shifted signals is very similar to other oxidized Fe4S4 ferredoxins. A tentative sequence-specific assignment of these resonances according to a general pattern of chemical shift of cysteine protons versus sequence position of cluster ligand is presented. Furthermore, sequence-specific assignments for 85% of the amino acid residues that were obtained without any guidance by known X-ray structures of ferredoxins are given. They reveal the formation of at least two elements of secondary structure by the polypeptide chain of T. maritima ferredoxin: an alpha-helix comprising residues C43-D49 and a double-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet consisting of the N- and C-terminal parts of the protein. This folding pattern is very similar to that of the crystallographically characterized ferredoxin from the mesophile Desulfovibrio gigas [Kissinger, C.R., Sieker, L.C., Adman E.T. & Jensen, L.H. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 219, 693-715] and therefore suggesting different mechanisms of stabilization for T. maritima ferredoxin and the ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus that was recently investigated by NMR [Teng, Q., Zhou, Z.H., Smith, E.T., Busse, S. C., Howard, J.B., Adams M.W.W. & La Mar, G.N. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 6316-6326]. PMID:7758460

  9. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts. 7. Gauge-invariant INDO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, H.; Miura, K.; Hirai, A.

    A gauge-invariant INDO method based on the coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory is presented and applied to the calculation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of hydrocarbons including ring compounds. Invariance of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic shieldings with respect to displacement of the coordinate origin is discussed. Comparison between calculated and experimental results exhibits fairly good agreement, provided that the INDO parameters of Ellis et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.94, 4069 (1972)) are used with the inclusion of all multicenter one-electron integrals.

  10. Protein structural information derived from NMR chemical shift with the neural network program TALOS-N.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    Chemical shifts are obtained at the first stage of any protein structural study by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts are known to be impacted by a wide range of structural factors, and the artificial neural network based TALOS-N program has been trained to extract backbone and side-chain torsion angles from (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C shifts. The program is quite robust and typically yields backbone torsion angles for more than 90 % of the residues and side-chain χ 1 rotamer information for about half of these, in addition to reliably predicting secondary structure. The use of TALOS-N is illustrated for the protein DinI, and torsion angles obtained by TALOS-N analysis from the measured chemical shifts of its backbone and (13)C(β) nuclei are compared to those seen in a prior, experimentally determined structure. The program is also particularly useful for generating torsion angle restraints, which then can be used during standard NMR protein structure calculations. PMID:25502373

  11. (1)H NMR assignment corrections and (1)H, (13)C, (15)N NMR coordination shifts structural correlations in Fe(II), Ru(II) and Os(II) cationic complexes with 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Pawlak, Tomasz; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2010-06-01

    (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of iron(II), ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) tris-chelated cationic complexes with 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline of the general formula [M(LL)(3)](2+) (M = Fe, Ru, Os; LL = bpy, phen) were performed. Inconsistent literature (1)H signal assignments were corrected. Significant shielding of nitrogen-adjacent protons [H(6) in bpy, H(2) in phen] and metal-bonded nitrogens was observed, being enhanced in the series Ru(II) --> Os(II) --> Fe(II) for (1)H, Fe(II) --> Ru(II) --> Os(II) for (15)N and bpy --> phen for both nuclei. The carbons are deshielded, the effect increasing in the order Ru(II) --> Os(II) --> Fe(II). PMID:20474023

  12. Proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-01

    A proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of 13C-1H connectivities, and proximities of 13C-1H and 1H-1H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including 1H-1H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) 1H/1H and 2D 13C/1H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of 1H-1H proximity and 13C-1H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) 1H/13C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of 1H-1H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between 13C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of 1H-1H-13C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ṡ H2O ṡ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  13. Insights into the chemical characterization and sources of PM(2.5) in Beijing at a 1-h time resolution.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Peng, Xing; Chen, Gang; Xu, Jiao; Shi, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Yue-Chong; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2016-01-15

    As the widespread application of online instruments penetrates the environmental fields, it is interesting to investigate the sources of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) based on the data monitored by online instruments. In this study, online analyzers with 1-h time resolution were employed to observe PM2.5 composition data, including carbon components, inorganic ions, heavy metals and gas pollutants, during a summer in Beijing. Chemical characteristics, temporal patterns and sources of PM2.5 are discussed. On the basis of hourly data, the mean concentration value of PM2.5 was 62.16±39.37 μg m(-3) (ranging from 6.69 to 183.67 μg m(-3)). The average concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), NH4(+), OC and EC, the major chemical species, were 15.18±13.12, 14.80±14.53, 8.90±9.51, 9.32±4.16 and 3.08±1.43 μg m(-3), respectively. The concentration of PM2.5 varied during the online-sampling period, initially increasing and then subsequently decreasing. Three factor analysis models, including principal component analysis (PCA), positive matrix factorization (PMF) and Multilinear Engine 2 (ME2), were applied to apportion the PM2.5 sources. Source apportionment results obtained by the three different models were in agreement. Four sources were identified in Beijing during the sampling campaign, including secondary sources (38-39%), crustal dust (17-22%), vehicle exhaust (25-28%) and coal combustion (15-16%). Similar source profiles and contributions of PM2.5 were derived from ME2 and PMF, indicating the results of the two models are reasonable. The finding provides information that could be exploited for regular air control strategies. PMID:26519577

  14. Calculations of NMR chemical shifts with APW-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskowski, Robert; Blaha, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present a full potential, all electron augmented plane wave (APW) implementation of first-principles calculations of NMR chemical shifts. In order to obtain the induced current we follow a perturbation approach [Pickard and Mauri, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.63.245101 63, 245101 (2001)] and extended the common APW + local orbital (LO) basis by several LOs at higher energies. The calculated all-electron current is represented in traditional APW manner as Fourier series in the interstitial region and with a spherical harmonics representation inside the nonoverlapping atomic spheres. The current is integrated using a “pseudocharge” technique. The implementation is validated by comparison of the computed chemical shifts with some “exact” results for spherical atoms and for a set of solids and molecules with available published data.

  15. Ab initio theory of NMR chemical shifts in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, S.G. |

    1997-12-31

    A new formalism for ab initio calculation of the orbital magnetic susceptibility and the NMR chemical shifts in solids and liquids is presented. The approach can be applied to periodic systems such as crystals, surfaces or polymers, and with a supercell technique, to nonperiodic systems such as amorphous materials, liquids, or solids with defects. The formalism is based on the density functional theory in the local density approximation and makes use of a generalized f-sum rule to eliminate the divergent terms that plagued previous theories. Calculations have been successfully carried out for the diamagnetic susceptibility of a number of insulators and for the NMR chemical shifts of a variety of systems including free molecules, ionic crystals, hydrogen-bonded materials and amorphous carbon.

  16. Chemical Shift Induced Phase Errors in Phase Contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Middione, Matthew J.; Ennis, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is subject to numerous sources of error, which decrease clinical confidence in the reported measures. This work outlines how stationary perivascular fat can impart a significant chemical shift induced PC-MRI measurement error using computational simulations, in vitro, and in vivo experiments. This chemical shift error does not subtract in phase difference processing, but can be minimized with proper parameter selection. The chemical shift induced phase errors largely depend on both the receiver bandwidth (BW) and the TE. Both theory and an in vivo comparison of the maximum difference in net forward flow between vessels with and without perivascular fat indicated that the effects of chemically shifted perivascular fat are minimized by the use of high BW (814 Hz/px) and an in-phase TE (HBW-TEIN). In healthy volunteers (N=10) HBW-TEIN significantly improves intrapatient net forward flow agreement compared to low BW (401 Hz/px) and a mid-phase TE as indicated by significantly decreased measurement biases and limits of agreement for the ascending aorta (1.8±0.5 mL vs. 6.4±2.8 mL, P=0.01), main pulmonary artery (2.0±0.9 mL vs. 11.9±5.8 mL, P=0.04), the left pulmonary artery (1.3±0.9 mL vs. 5.4±2.5 mL, P=0.003), and all vessels (1.7±0.8 mL vs. 7.2±4.4 mL, P=0.001). PMID:22488490

  17. Chemical-shift MRI of exogenous lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.E.; Choplin, R.H.; Chiles, C.

    1996-05-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia results from the aspiration or inhalation of fatty substances, such as mineral oil found in laxatives or nasal medications containing liquid paraffin. We present standard and lipid-sensitive (chemical-shift) MR findings in a patient with histologically confirmed lipoid pneumonia. The loss of signal intensity in an area of airspace disease on opposed-phase imaging was considered specific for the presence of lipid. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Composite-180° pulse-based symmetry sequences to recouple proton chemical shift anisotropy tensors under ultrafast MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malon, Michal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the measurement of proton ((1)H) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors to obtain deeper insights into H-bonding interactions which find numerous applications in chemical and biological systems. However, the presence of strong (1)H/(1)H dipolar interaction makes it difficult to determine small size (1)H CSAs from the homogeneously broadened NMR spectra. Previously reported pulse sequences for (1)H CSA recoupling are prone to the effects of radio frequency field (B1) inhomogeneity. In the present work we have carried out a systematic study using both numerical and experimental approaches to evaluate γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequences based on R-symmetries that recouple (1)H CSA in the indirect dimension of a 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. The spectral resolution and sensitivity can be significantly improved in both frequency dimensions of the 2D (1)H/(1)H correlation spectrum without decoupling (1)H/(1)H dipolar couplings but by using ultrafast MAS rates up to 70 kHz. We successfully demonstrate that with a reasonable RF field requirement (<200 kHz) a set of symmetry-based recoupling sequences, with a series of phase-alternating 270°0-90°180 composite-180° pulses, are more robust in combating B1 inhomogeneity effects. In addition, our results show that the new pulse sequences render remarkable (1)H CSA recoupling efficiency and undistorted CSA lineshapes. Experimental results on citric acid and malonic acid comparing the efficiencies of these newly developed pulse sequences with that of previously reported CSA recoupling pulse sequences are also reported under ultrafast MAS conditions. PMID:25497846

  19. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride an active metabolite in tramadol - An analgesic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2014-03-01

    O-desmethyltramadol is one of the main metabolites of tramadol widely used clinically and has analgesic activity. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of O-desmethyl tramadol hydrochloride are recorded in the solid phase in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. Theoretical studies have been performed as its hydrochloride salt. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-31G** and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The optimised bond length and bond angles are correlated with the X-ray data. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT methods. The IR and Raman intensities are determined with B3LYP method using cc-pVDZ and 6-31G(d,p) basic sets. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule have been anlysed.

  20. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping of DNA binding by a zinc-finger domain from the yeast transcription factor ADR1.

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedeskamp, M.; Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    Mutagenesis studies have revealed that the minimal DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor ADR1 consists of two Cys2-His2 zinc fingers plus an additional 20 residues proximal and N-terminal to the fingers. We have assigned NMR 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts for the entire minimal DNA-binding domain of ADR1 both free and bound to specific DNA. 1H chemical shift values suggest little structural difference between the zinc fingers in this construct and in single-finger constructs, and 13C alpha chemical shift index analysis indicates little change in finger structure upon DNA binding. 1H chemical shift perturbations upon DNA binding are observed, however, and these are mapped to define the protein-DNA interface. The two zinc fingers appear to bind DNA with different orientations, as the entire helix of finger 1 is perturbed, while only the extreme N-terminus of the finger 2 helix is affected. Furthermore, residues N-terminal to the first finger undergo large chemical shift changes upon DNA binding suggesting a role at the protein-DNA interface. A striking correspondence is observed between the protein-DNA interface mapped by chemical shift changes and that previously mapped by mutagenesis. PMID:9300483

  1. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments. PMID:26556218

  2. Relativistic DFT Calculation of (119)Sn Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants in Tin Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bagno, Alessandro; Casella, Girolamo; Saielli, Giacomo

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear shielding and spin-spin coupling constants of (119)Sn in stannane, tetramethylstannane, methyltin halides Me4-nSnXn (X = Cl, Br, I; n = 1-3), tin halides, and some stannyl cations have been investigated computationally by DFT methods and Slater all-electron basis sets, including relativistic effects by means of the zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA) method up to spin-orbit coupling. Calculated (119)Sn chemical shifts generally correlate well with experimental values, except when several heavy halogen atoms, especially iodine, are bound to tin. In such cases, calculated chemical shifts are almost constant at the scalar (spin-free) ZORA level; only at the spin-orbit level is a good correlation, which holds for all compounds examined, attained. A remarkable "heavy-atom effect", analogous to that observed for analogous alkyl halides, is evident. The chemical shift of the putative stannyl cation (SnH3(+)) has also been examined, and it is concluded that the spectrum of the species obtained in superacids is inconsistent with a simple SnH3(+) structure; strong coordination to even weak nucleophiles such as FSO3H leads to a very satisfactory agreement. On the contrary, the calculated (119)Sn chemical shift of the trimesitylstannyl cation is in very good agreement with the experimental value. Coupling constants between (119)Sn and halogen nuclei are also well-modeled in general (taking into account the large uncertainties in the experimental values); relativistic spin-orbit effects are again quite evident. Couplings to (13)C and (1)H also fall, on the average, on the same correlation line, but individual values show a significant deviation from the expected unit slope. PMID:26626377

  3. Chemical shifts of small heterogeneous Ar/Xe clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblad, A.; Rander, T.; Bradeanu, I.; Oehrwall, G.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Mucke, M.; Ulrich, V.; Lischke, T.; Hergenhahn, U.

    2011-03-15

    Heterogeneous rare-gas clusters produced by a coexpansion of an argon/xenon mixture have been studied using synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy. Both valence and Xe 4d{sub 5/2} core-level photoelectron spectra were recorded for three different concentrations of the primary argon/xenon mixture and, for those mixtures, spectra were recorded at several different stagnation conditions. The studied size regime of the mixed clusters ranges from large, similar to those studied in an earlier paper [Phys. Rev. A 69, 031210(R) (2004)], to very small--as reflected in the cluster line shapes and chemical shifts. The chemical shifts obtained from a curve fitting procedure similar to that used in our earlier paper are discussed in terms of the mixed cluster structure which can be expected from equilibrium considerations and the Lennard-Jones parameters of the constituent atoms. Molecular dynamics simulations of the vertical polarization shifts allow more specific assignments of ''on-top'' sites and interfacial sites.

  4. Subtle Chemical Shifts Explain the NMR Fingerprints of Oligomeric Proanthocyanidins with High Dentin Biomodification Potency.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo-Won; Phansalkar, Rasika S; Lankin, David C; Bisson, Jonathan; McAlpine, James B; Leme, Ariene A; Vidal, Cristina M P; Ramirez, Benjamin; Niemitz, Matthias; Bedran-Russo, Ana; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-08-01

    The ability of certain oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPACs) to enhance the biomechanical properties of dentin involves collagen cross-linking of the 1.3-4.5 nm wide space via protein-polyphenol interactions. A systematic interdisciplinary search for the bioactive principles of pine bark has yielded the trimeric PAC, ent-epicatechin-(4β→8)-epicatechin-(2β→O→7,4β→8)-catechin (3), representing the hitherto most potent single chemical entity capable of enhancing dentin stiffness. Building the case from two congeneric PAC dimers, a detailed structural analysis decoded the stereochemistry, spatial arrangement, and chemical properties of three dentin biomodifiers. Quantum-mechanics-driven (1)H iterative full spin analysis (QM-HiFSA) of NMR spectra distinguished previously unrecognized details such as higher order J coupling and provided valuable information about 3D structure. Detection and quantification of H/D-exchange effects by QM-HiFSA identified C-8 and C-6 as (re)active sites, explain preferences in biosynthetic linkage, and suggest their involvement in dentin cross-linking activity. Mapping of these molecular properties underscored the significance of high δ precision in both (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Occurring at low- to subppb levels, these newly characterized chemical shift differences in ppb are small but diagnostic measures of dynamic processes inherent to the OPAC pharmacophores and can help augment our understanding of nanometer-scale intermolecular interactions in biomodified dentin macromolecules. PMID:26214362

  5. Observation of 1H-13C and 1H-1H proximities in a paramagnetic solid by NMR at high magnetic field under ultra-fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenhui; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Zhou, Lei; Shen, Ming; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The assignment of NMR signals in paramagnetic solids is often challenging since: (i) the large paramagnetic shifts often mask the diamagnetic shifts specific to the local chemical environment, and (ii) the hyperfine interactions with unpaired electrons broaden the NMR spectra and decrease the coherence lifetime, thus reducing the efficiency of usual homo- and hetero-nuclear NMR correlation experiments. Here we show that the assignment of (1)H and (13)C signals in isotopically unmodified paramagnetic compounds with moderate hyperfine interactions can be facilitated by the use of two two-dimensional (2D) experiments: (i) (1)H-(13)C correlations with (1)H detection and (ii) (1)H-(1)H double-quantum↔single-quantum correlations. These methods are experimentally demonstrated on isotopically unmodified copper (II) complex of l-alanine at high magnetic field (18.8 T) and ultra-fast Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) frequency of 62.5 kHz. Compared to (13)C detection, we show that (1)H detection leads to a 3-fold enhancement in sensitivity for (1)H-(13)C 2D correlation experiments. By combining (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(1)H 2D correlation experiments with the analysis of (13)C longitudinal relaxation times, we have been able to assign the (1)H and (13)C signals of each l-alanine ligand. PMID:25557861

  6. /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR coordination-induced shifts in a series of tris(/alpha/-diimine)ruthenium(II) complexes containing pyridine, pyrazine, and thiazole moieties

    SciTech Connect

    Orellana, G.; Ibarra, C.A.; Santoro, J.

    1988-03-23

    /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts of a series of ruthenium(II) tris chelates containing the heterocyclic ligands 2,2/prime/-bipyridine, 2-(2-pyridyl)thiazole, 2-(2-pyrazyl)thiazole, and 2,2/prime/-bithiazole are reported and compared to those of the corresponding free ligands. Calculated coordination-induced shifts (CIS, /delta//sub complexed/ - /delta//sub free/) range from +0.41 to /minus/1.00 ppM for /sup 1/H and from +5.8 to /minus/3.7 ppM for /sup 13/C nuclei. These values are discussed on the basis of the various effects (charge perturbation and field interactions) that arise upon chelation: electronic /sigma/-donation to the metallic center via the nitrogen lone pair, d-/pi/* back-donation to the ligand, van der Waals interactions, and magnetic anisotropy of the spectator ligands. Semiquantitative values of each effect at the different positions have been proposed, taking theoretical calculations of steric and anisotropic contributions as the starting point. Shielding van der Waals interaction between proximate atoms influences only the H(3/prime/) CIS of six-membered moieties, but to a very low extent (<0.15 ppM). Magnetic anisotropy of proximate ring currents practically determines the CIS of the /alpha/ positions for all the complexed ligands examined (upfield shifts from /minus/0.8 to /minus/1.0 ppm), has a lower influence on external /beta/ positions (< 0.2 ppM), and is negligible for /gamma/-protons. /sigma/-donation deshields all the positions, its contribution increasing as protons separate from the coordinated nitrogen atom (up to 0.4 ppM). /Pi/-back-bonding is a weaker effect (< 0.2 ppM upfield contribution) that operates mainly on the /gamma/ position of the pyridine and /alpha/ and /beta/ positions of the pyrazine rings. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Errors of fourier chemical-shift imaging and their corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyue; Bolinger, Lizann; Subramanian, V. Harihara; Leigh, John S.

    From a finite and discrete Fourier transform point of view, we discuss the sources of localization errors in Fourier chemical-shift imaging, and demonstrate them explicitly by computer simulations for simple cases. Errors arise from intravoxel dephasing and the intravoxel asymmetry. The spectral leakage due to intravoxel dephasing is roughly 6-8% from one voxel to one of its nearest neighbors. Neighbors further away are influenced less significantly. The loss of localization due to intravoxel asymmetry effect is also severe. Fortunately, these errors can be corrected under certain conditions. The method for correcting the errors by postprocessing the data is described.

  8. A simple graphical approach to predict local residue conformation using NMR chemical shifts and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Hoora; Ebrahimi, Hossein Pasha; Fathi, Fariba; Bahrami Panah, Niloufar; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Tafazzoli, Mohsen

    2016-05-30

    The dependency of amino acid chemical shifts on φ and ψ torsion angle is, independently, studied using a five-residue fragment of ubiquitin and ONIOM(DFT:HF) approach. The variation of absolute deviation of (13) C(α) chemical shifts relative to φ dihedral angle is specifically dependent on secondary structure of protein not on amino acid type and fragment sequence. This dependency is observed neither on any of (13) C(β) , and (1) H(α) chemical shifts nor on the variation of absolute deviation of (13) C(α) chemical shifts relative to ψ dihedral angle. The (13) C(α) absolute deviation chemical shifts (ADCC) plots are found as a suitable and simple tool to predict secondary structure of protein with no requirement of highly accurate calculations, priori knowledge of protein structure and structural refinement. Comparison of Full-DFT and ONIOM(DFT:HF) approaches illustrates that the trend of (13) C(α) ADCC plots are independent of computational method but not of basis set valence shell type. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26940760

  9. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  10. Z and E rotamers of N-formyl-1-bromo-4-hydroxy-3-methoxymorphinan-6-one and their interconversion as studied by 1H/13C NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    PubMed Central

    Sulima, Agnieszka; Cheng, Kejun; Jacobson, Arthur E.; Rice, Kenner C.; Gawrisch, Klaus; Lee, Yong-Sok

    2012-01-01

    N-Formyl-1-bromo-4-hydroxy-3-methoxymorphinan-6-one (2), an important intermediate in the NIH Opiate Total Synthesis, presumably exists as a mixture of two rotamers (Z and E) in both CHCl3 and DMSO at room temperature due to the hindered rotation of its N-C18 bond in the amide moiety. By comparing the experimental 1H and 13C chemical shifts of a single rotamer and the mixture of 2 in CDCl3 with the calculated chemical shifts of the geometry optimized Z and E rotamers utilizing density functional theory, the crystalline rotamer of 2 was characterized as having the E configuration. The energy barrier between the two rotamers was also determined with the temperature dependence of 1H and 13C NMR coalescence experiments, and then compared with that from the reaction path for the interconversion of the two rotamers calculated at the level of B3LYP/6-31G*. Detailed geometry of the ground state and the transition states of both rotamers are given and discussed. PMID:23233124

  11. Accurate calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts in polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Borràs, Magda; López, Xavier; Poblet, Josep M

    2015-04-14

    We search for the best density functional theory strategy for the determination of (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts, δ((31)P), in polyoxometalates. Among the variables governing the quality of the quantum modelling, we tackle herein the influence of the functional and the basis set. The spin-orbit and solvent effects were routinely included. To do so we analysed the family of structures α-[P2W18-xMxO62](n-) with M = Mo(VI), V(V) or Nb(V); [P2W17O62(M'R)](n-) with M' = Sn(IV), Ge(IV) and Ru(II) and [PW12-xMxO40](n-) with M = Pd(IV), Nb(V) and Ti(IV). The main results suggest that, to date, the best procedure for the accurate calculation of δ((31)P) in polyoxometalates is the combination of TZP/PBE//TZ2P/OPBE (for NMR//optimization step). The hybrid functionals (PBE0, B3LYP) tested herein were applied to the NMR step, besides being more CPU-consuming, do not outperform pure GGA functionals. Although previous studies on (183)W NMR suggested that the use of very large basis sets like QZ4P were needed for geometry optimization, the present results indicate that TZ2P suffices if the functional is optimal. Moreover, scaling corrections were applied to the results providing low mean absolute errors below 1 ppm for δ((31)P), which is a step forward in order to confirm or predict chemical shifts in polyoxometalates. Finally, via a simplified molecular model, we establish how the small variations in δ((31)P) arise from energy changes in the occupied and virtual orbitals of the PO4 group. PMID:25738630

  12. Protein Dielectric Constants Determined from NMR Chemical Shift Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Kukic, Predrag; Farrell, Damien; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; E., Bertrand García-Moreno; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Toleikis, Zigmantas; Teilum, Kaare; Nielsen, Jens Erik

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the connection between protein structure and function requires a quantitative understanding of electrostatic effects. Structure-based electrostatics calculations are essential for this purpose, but their use have been limited by a long-standing discussion on which value to use for the dielectric constants (εeff and εp) required in Coulombic models and Poisson-Boltzmann models. The currently used values for εeff and εp are essentially empirical parameters calibrated against thermodynamic properties that are indirect measurements of protein electric fields. We determine optimal values for εeff and εp by measuring protein electric fields in solution using direct detection of NMR chemical shift perturbations (CSPs). We measured CSPs in fourteen proteins to get a broad and general characterization of electric fields. Coulomb's law reproduces the measured CSPs optimally with a protein dielectric constant (εeff) from 3 to 13, with an optimal value across all proteins of 6.5. However, when the water-protein interface is treated with finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann calculations, the optimal protein dielectric constant (εp) rangedsfrom 2-5 with an optimum of 3. It is striking how similar this value is to the dielectric constant of 2-4 measured for protein powders, and how different it is from the εp of 6-20 used in models based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation when calculating thermodynamic parameters. Because the value of εp = 3 is obtained by analysis of NMR chemical shift perturbations instead of thermodynamic parameters such as pKa values, it is likely to describe only the electric field and thus represent a more general, intrinsic, and transferable εp common to most folded proteins. PMID:24124752

  13. Structural characterization of chemical warfare agent degradation products in decontamination solutions with proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Harri; Hakala, Ullastiina; Vanninen, Paula

    2010-06-15

    Decontamination solutions, which are usually composed of strong alkaline chemicals, are used for efficient detoxification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The analysis of CWA degradation products directly in decontamination solutions is challenging due to the nature of the matrix. Furthermore, occasionally an unforeseen degradation pathway can result in degradation products which could be eluded to in standard analyses. Here, we present the results of the application of proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy, i.e., band-selective 1D (1)H-(31)P heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) and band-selective 2D (1)H-(31)P HSQC-total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), for ester side chain characterization of organophosphorus nerve agent degradation products in decontamination solutions. The viability of the approach is demonstrated with a test mixture of typical degradation products of nerve agents sarin, soman, and VX. The proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy is also applied in characterization of unusual degradation products of VX in GDS 2000 solution. PMID:20507069

  14. Automated evaluation of chemical shift perturbation spectra: New approaches to quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand interaction NMR spectra

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chen; Unger, Stephen W.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Sattler, Michael; Szalma, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents new methods designed for quantitative analysis of chemical shift perturbation NMR spectra. The methods automatically trace the displacements of cross peaks between a perturbed test spectrum and the reference spectrum (or among a series of titration spectra), and measure the changes of chemical shifts, heights, and widths of the altered peaks. The methods are primary aimed at the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of relatively small proteins (<15 kDa) assuming fast exchange between free and ligand-bound states on the chemical shift time scale, or for comparing spectra of free and fully bound states in the slow exchange situation. Using the 1H-15N HSQC spectra from a titration experiment of the 74-residue Pex13p SH3 domain with a Pex14p peptide ligand (14 residues, Kd = ~ 40µM), we demonstrate the scope and limits of our automatic peak tracing (APET) algorithm for efficient scoring of high-throughput SAR by NMR type HSQC spectra, and progressive peak tracing (PROPET) algorithm for detailed analysis of ligand titration spectra. Simulated spectra with low signal-to-noise ratios (S/N ranged from 20 to 1) were used to demonstrate the reliability and reproducibility of the results when dealing with poor quality spectra. These algorithms have been implemented in a new software module, FELIX-Autoscreen, for streamlined processing, analysis and visualization of SAR by NMR and other high-throughput receptor/ligand interaction experiments. PMID:15243180

  15. Quantum chemical 13Cα chemical shift calculations for protein NMR structure determination, refinement, and validation

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Aramini, James M.; Rossi, Paolo; Kuzin, Alexandre; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    A recently determined set of 20 NMR-derived conformations of a 48-residue all-α-helical protein, (PDB ID code 2JVD), is validated here by comparing the observed 13Cα chemical shifts with those computed at the density functional level of theory. In addition, a recently introduced physics-based method, aimed at determining protein structures by using NOE-derived distance constraints together with observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts, was applied to determine a new set of 10 conformations, (Set-bt), as a blind test for the same protein. A cross-validation of these two sets of conformations in terms of the agreement between computed and observed 13Cα chemical shifts, several stereochemical quality factors, and some NMR quality assessment scores reveals the good quality of both sets of structures. We also carried out an analysis of the agreement between the observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts for a slightly longer construct of the protein solved by x-ray crystallography at 2.0-Å resolution (PDB ID code 3BHP) with an identical amino acid residue sequence to the 2JVD structure for the first 46 residues. Our results reveal that both of the NMR-derived sets, namely 2JVD and Set-bt, are somewhat better representations of the observed 13Cα chemical shifts in solution than the 3BHP crystal structure. In addition, the 13Cα-based validation analysis appears to be more sensitive to subtle structural differences across the three sets of structures than any other NMR quality-assessment scores used here, and, although it is computationally intensive, this analysis has potential value as a standard procedure to determine, refine, and validate protein structures. PMID:18787110

  16. Automated determination of chemical functionalisation addition routes based on magnetic susceptibility and nucleus independent chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lier, G.; Ewels, C. P.; Geerlings, P.

    2008-07-01

    We present a modified version of our previously reported meta-code SACHA, for systematic analysis of chemical addition. The code automates the generation of structures, running of quantum chemical codes, and selection of preferential isomers based on chosen selection rules. While the selection rules for the previous version were based on the total system energy, predicting purely thermodynamic addition patterns, we examine here the possibility of using other system parameters, notably magnetic susceptibility as a descriptor of global aromaticity, and nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) as local aromaticity descriptor.

  17. Discovery of antitubercular 2,4-diphenyl-1H-imidazoles from chemical library repositioning and rational design.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Marco; Wan, Baojie; Zuliani, Valentina; Franzblau, Scott G; Costantino, Gabriele; Rivara, Mirko

    2015-07-15

    TB, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the deadliest infections worldwide. The co-infection with HIV and the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains have further increased the burden for this disease. In the attempt to respond to the constant need of novel therapeutic options, we herein report the discovery of 2,4-diphenyl-1H-imidazoles as effective antitubercular agents, with MIC in the low micromolar range against actively replicating and persistent M. tuberculosis strains. The good activity, along with the lack of toxicity and the feasible synthesis, underscore their value as novel scaffolds for the development of new anti-TB drugs. PMID:26071857

  18. Proton-detected 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-10-28

    A proton-detected 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H connectivities, and proximities of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H and 2D {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H proximity and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between {sup 13}C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ⋅ H{sub 2}O ⋅ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  19. Pitfalls of adrenal imaging with chemical shift MRI.

    PubMed

    Schieda, N; Al Dandan, O; Kielar, A Z; Flood, T A; McInnes, M D F; Siegelman, E S

    2014-11-01

    Chemical shift (CS) MRI of the adrenal glands exploits the different precessional frequencies of fat and water protons to differentiate the intracytoplasmic lipid-containing adrenal adenoma from other adrenal lesions. The purpose of this review is to illustrate both technical and interpretive pitfalls of adrenal imaging with CS MRI and emphasize the importance of adherence to strict technical specifications and errors that may occur when other imaging features and clinical factors are not incorporated into the diagnosis. When performed properly, the specificity of CS MRI for the diagnosis of adrenal adenoma is over 90%. Sampling the in-phase and opposed-phase echoes in the correct order and during the same breath-hold are essential requirements, and using the first echo pair is preferred, if possible. CS MRI characterizes more adrenal adenomas then unenhanced CT but may be non-diagnostic in a proportion of lipid-poor adenomas; CT washout studies may be able to diagnose these lipid-poor adenomas. Other primary and secondary adrenal tumours and supra-renal disease entities may contain lipid or gross fat and mimic adenoma or myelolipoma. Heterogeneity within an adrenal lesion that contains intracytoplasmic lipid could be due to myelolipoma, lipomatous metaplasia of adenoma, or collision tumour. Correlation with previous imaging, other imaging features, clinical history, and laboratory investigations can minimize interpretive errors. PMID:25062926

  20. Molecular orbital studies (hardness, chemical potential and electrophilicity), vibrational investigation and theoretical NBO analysis of 4-4'-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl methylene) dibenzonitrile based on abinitio and DFT methods.

    PubMed

    Sheela, N R; Muthu, S; Sampathkrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and FT Raman (FTR) of 4-4'-(1H-1, 2, 4-triazol-1-yl methylene) dibenzonitrile (4-HTMDBN) have been recorded and analyzed. The equilibrium geometry harmonic vibrational frequencies have been investigated with the help of standard HF and DFT methods with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of normal co-ordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology (SQMFF). Theoretical simulations of the FTIR and FTR spectra of the title compound have been calculated. The (1)H and (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The stability of the molecule has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule have been computed using HF/DFT/6-31G(d,p) methods on the finite field approach. UV-Vis spectrum of the compound is recorded and the electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies, are performed. The directly calculated ionization potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), electronegativity (χ), electrophilicity index (ω), hardness (η) and chemical potential (ρ) are all correlated with the HOMO and LUMO energies with their molecular properties. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges, molecular electrostatic potential maps (MEP) and thermodynamical properties of title compound at different temperature have been calculated. PMID:24184626

  1. Thermodynamic and activation parameters for dissociation of [CpCr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and [Cp*Cr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} into paramagnetic monomers from {sup 1}H NMR shift and line width measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Woska, D.C.; Ni, Y.; Wayland, B.B.

    1999-09-06

    Substitution of pentamethyl cyclopentadienide (Cp*) for cyclopentadienide (Cp) is commonly used as an approach for increasing ligand steric requirements that can enhance dissociation of M-M bonded complexes. {sup 1}H NMR spectra for solutions prepared by dissolution of [CpCr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and [Cp*Cr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} in toluene in the temperature range 190--390 K are interpreted in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for dissociation of the diamagnetic dimers into the paramagnetic monomers CpCr(CO){sub 3} and Cp*Cr(CO){sub 3}. There is no evidence in this temperature range for thermally populated excited states or non-Curie magnetic behavior of the monomers making a significant contribution to the NMR. An expression for the temperature dependence of the NMR chemical shift at limiting fast interchange of monomer and dimer in terms of the {Delta}H{degree} and {Delta}S{degree} for dimer dissociation is applied in determining the thermodynamic parameters for Cr-Cr bond homolysis of [CpCr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} ({Delta}H{sub 1}{degree} = 15.3 {+-} 0.6 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}S{sub 1}{degree} = 39 {+-} 2 cal K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1}) and [Cp*Cr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} ({Delta}H{sub 2}{degree} = 14.2 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}S{sub 2}{degree} = 47 {+-} 2 cal K{sup {minus}1}mol{sup {minus}1}). Rate constants and activation parameters have been evaluated from {sup 1}H NMR line broadening in the region of slow dimer-monomer interchange for dissociation of [CpCr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} ({kappa}{sub 1} (240 K) {approx} 59 s{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}H{sub 1}{double{underscore}dagger} = 17 {+-} 2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}S{sub 1}{double{underscore}dagger} = 21 {+-} 6 cal K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1}) and [Cp*Cr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} ({kappa}{sub 2} (240 K) {approx} 1.4 x 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}H{sub 2}{double{underscore}dagger} = 16 {+-} 1 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}S{sub 2}{double{underscore}dagger} = 30 {+-} 6 cal K

  2. Chemical mapping of anxiety in the brain of healthy humans: an in vivo 1H-MRS study on the effects of sex, age, and brain region.

    PubMed

    Grachev, I D; Apkarian, A V

    2000-12-01

    We recently presented results in an in vivo study of human brain chemistry in 'physiologic' anxiety, i.e., the anxiety of normal everyday life. Normal subjects with high anxiety demonstrated increased concentration of chemicals in orbital frontal cortex (OFC) as compared to lower anxiety. In a separate study of aging we demonstrated a decrease of total chemical concentration in OFC of middle-aged subjects, as compared with younger age. This brain region also showed gender dependence; men demonstrating decreased chemical concentration compared to women. We hypothesized that these sex- and age-dependent differences in OFC chemistry changes are a result of anxiety effects on this brain region. In the present study we examined these sex- and age-differential regional brain chemistry changes (as identified by localized in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy [1H-MRS]) in relation to the state-trait-anxiety (as measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) in 35 healthy subjects. The concentrations for all nine chemicals of 1H-MRS spectra were measured relative to creatine across multiple brain regions, including OFC in the left hemisphere. Analysis of variance showed anxiety-specific effects on chemical concentration changes in OFC, which were different for both sexes and age groups. Male subjects showed larger effect of anxiety on OFC chemistry as compared to females when the same sex high-anxiety subjects were compared to lower anxiety. Similarly, middle-aged subjects showed larger effect of anxiety on OFC chemistry as compared to younger age when the same age subjects with high anxiety were compared to lower anxiety. Largest effect of anxiety on OFC chemistry was due to changes of N-Acetyl aspartate. The results indicate that the state-trait anxiety has sex- and age-differential patterns on OFC chemistry in healthy humans, providing new information about the neurobiological roots of anxiety. PMID:11144755

  3. A procedure to validate and correct the 13C chemical shift calibration of RNA datasets.

    PubMed

    Aeschbacher, Thomas; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-02-01

    Chemical shifts reflect the structural environment of a certain nucleus and can be used to extract structural and dynamic information. Proper calibration is indispensable to extract such information from chemical shifts. Whereas a variety of procedures exist to verify the chemical shift calibration for proteins, no such procedure is available for RNAs to date. We present here a procedure to analyze and correct the calibration of (13)C NMR data of RNAs. Our procedure uses five (13)C chemical shifts as a reference, each of them found in a narrow shift range in most datasets deposited in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank. In 49 datasets we could evaluate the (13)C calibration and detect errors or inconsistencies in RNA (13)C chemical shifts based on these chemical shift reference values. More than half of the datasets (27 out of those 49) were found to be improperly referenced or contained inconsistencies. This large inconsistency rate possibly explains that no clear structure-(13)C chemical shift relationship has emerged for RNA so far. We were able to recalibrate or correct 17 datasets resulting in 39 usable (13)C datasets. 6 new datasets from our lab were used to verify our method increasing the database to 45 usable datasets. We can now search for structure-chemical shift relationships with this improved list of (13)C chemical shift data. This is demonstrated by a clear relationship between ribose (13)C shifts and the sugar pucker, which can be used to predict a C2'- or C3'-endo conformation of the ribose with high accuracy. The improved quality of the chemical shift data allows statistical analysis with the potential to facilitate assignment procedures, and the extraction of restraints for structure calculations of RNA. PMID:22252483

  4. Binding of Sulfonamide Antibiotics to CTABr Micelles Characterized Using (1)H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Ashish K; Cashin, Patrick J; Balakrishnan, Vimal K; Exall, Kirsten; Buncel, Erwin; Brown, R Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Interactions of nine sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfadoxine, sulfathiazole, sulfamethoxazole, sulfamerazine, sulfadiazine, sulfamethazine, sulfacetamide, sulfaguanidine, and sulfanilamide) with cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTABr) micelles were examined using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Seven of the nine provided a significant change in the (1)H NMR chemical shift such that the magnitude and direction (upfield vs downfield) of the chemical shift could be used to propose a locus and orientation of the sulfonamide within the micelle structure. The magnitude of the chemical shift was used to estimate the binding constant for seven sulfonamides with CTABr micelles, providing values and an overall pattern consistent with previous studies of these sulfonamides. PMID:27391918

  5. Predicting (17)O NMR chemical shifts of polyoxometalates using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rupali; Zhang, Jie; Ohlin, C André

    2016-03-21

    We have investigated the computation of (17)O NMR chemical shifts of a wide range of polyoxometalates using density functional theory. The effects of basis sets and exchange-correlation functionals are explored, and whereas pure DFT functionals generally predict the chemical shifts of terminal oxygen sites quite well, hybrid functionals are required for the prediction of accurate chemical shifts in conjunction with linear regression. By using PBE0/def2-tzvp//PBE0/cc-pvtz(H-Ar), lanl2dz(K-) we have computed the chemical shifts of 37 polyoxometalates, corresponding to 209 (17)O NMR signals. We also show that at this level of theory the protonation-induced pH dependence of the chemical shift of the triprotic hexaniobate Lindqvist anion, [HxNb6O19]((8-x)), can be reproduced, which suggests that hypotheses regarding loci of protonation can be confidently tested. PMID:26925832

  6. Backbone chemical shift assignments for the sensor domain of the Burkholderia pseudomallei histidine kinase RisS: "missing" resonances at the dimer interface.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Edwards, Thomas E; Hewitt, Stephen N; Phan, Isabelle Q H; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Miller, Samuel I; Myler, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Using a deuterated sample, all the observable backbone (1)H(N), (15)N, (13)C(a), and (13)C' chemical shifts for the dimeric, periplasmic sensor domain of the Burkholderia pseudomallei histidine kinase RisS were assigned. Approximately one-fifth of the amide resonances are "missing" in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum and map primarily onto α-helices at the dimer interface observed in a crystal structure suggesting this region either undergoes intermediate timescale motion (μs-ms) and/or is heterogeneous. PMID:25957069

  7. Parallel-plate RF resonator imaging of chemical shift resolved capillary flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Balcom, Bruce J

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has been introduced to study flow in microchannels using pure phase spatial encoding with a microfabricated parallel-plate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe. The NMR probe and pure phase spatial encoding enhance the sensitivity and resolution of the measurement. In this paper, (1)H NMR spectra and images were acquired at 100 MHz. The B(1) magnetic field is homogeneous and the signal-to-noise ratio of 30 microl doped water for a single scan is 8x10(4). The high sensitivity of the probe enables velocity mapping of the fluids in the micro-channel with a spatial resolution of 13x13 microm. The parallel-plate probe with pure phase encoding permits the acquisition of NMR spectra; therefore, chemical shift resolved velocity mapping was also undertaken. Results are presented which show separate velocity maps for water and methanol flowing through a straight circular micro-channel. Finally, future performance of these techniques for the study of microfluidics is extrapolated and discussed. PMID:20444567

  8. Backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments of apolipophorin III from Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Crowhurst, Karin A; Horn, James V C; Weers, Paul M M

    2016-04-01

    Apolipophorin III, a 163 residue monomeric protein from the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella (abbreviated as apoLp-IIIGM), has roles in upregulating expression of antimicrobial proteins as well as binding and deforming bacterial membranes. Due to its similarity to vertebrate apolipoproteins there is interest in performing atomic resolution analysis of apoLp-IIIGM as part of an effort to better understand its mechanism of action in innate immunity. In the first step towards structural characterization of apoLp-IIIGM, 99 % of backbone and 88 % of side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts were assigned. TALOS+ analysis of the backbone resonances has predicted that the protein is composed of five long helices, which is consistent with the reported structures of apolipophorins from other insect species. The next stage in the characterization of apoLp-III from G. mellonella will be to utilize these resonance assignments in solving the solution structure of this protein. PMID:26493308

  9. Ab Initio Calculation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors 1. Influence of Basis Set on the Calculation of 31P Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.

    1998-09-01

    The influence of changes in the contracted Gaussian basis set used for ab initio calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phosphorous chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors was investigated. The isotropic chemical shitl and chemical shift anisotropy were found to converge with increasing complexity of the basis set at the Hartree-Fock @IF) level. The addition of d polarization function on the phosphorous nucIei was found to have a major impact of the calculated chemical shi~ but diminished with increasing number of polarization fimctions. At least 2 d polarization fimctions are required for accurate calculations of the isotropic phosphorous chemical shift. The introduction of density fictional theory (DFT) techniques through tie use of hybrid B3LYP methods for the calculation of the phosphorous chemical shift tensor resulted in a poorer estimation of the NMR values, even though DFT techniques result in improved energy and force constant calculations. The convergence of the W parametem with increasing basis set complexity was also observed for the DFT calculations, but produced results with consistent large deviations from experiment. The use of a HF 6-31 l++G(242p) basis set represents a good compromise between accuracy of the simulation and the complexity of the calculation for future ab initio calculations of 31P NMR parameters in larger complexes.

  10. Relativistically corrected nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts calculated with the normalized elimination of the small component using an effective potential-NMR chemical shifts of molybdenum and tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2003-07-01

    A new method for relativistically corrected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts is developed by combining the individual gauge for the localized orbital approach for density functional theory with the normalized elimination of a small component using an effective potential. The new method is used for the calculation of the NMR chemical shifts of 95Mo and 183W in various molybdenum and tungsten compounds. It is shown that quasirelativistic corrections lead to an average improvement of calculated NMR chemical shift values by 300 and 120 ppm in the case of 95Mo and 183W, respectively, which is mainly due to improvements in the paramagnetic contributions. The relationship between electronic structure of a molecule and the relativistic paramagnetic corrections is discussed. Relativistic effects for the diamagnetic part of the magnetic shielding caused by a relativistic contraction of the s,p orbitals in the core region concern only the shielding values, however, have little consequence for the shift values because of the large independence from electronic structure and a cancellation of these effects in the shift values. It is shown that the relativistic corrections can be improved by level shift operators and a B3LYP hybrid functional, for which Hartree-Fock exchange is reduced to 15%.

  11. Quantum-chemical analyses of aromaticity, UV spectra, and NMR chemical shifts in plumbacyclopentadienylidenes stabilized by Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Toshiaki; Abe, Minori; Saito, Masaichi; Hada, Masahiko

    2014-04-30

    We carried out a series of zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA)-density functional theory (DFT) and ZORA-time-dependent (TD)-DFT calculations for molecular geometries, NMR chemical shifts, nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS), and electronic transition energies of plumbacyclopentadienylidenes stabilized by several Lewis bases, (Ph)2 ((t) BuMe2 Si)2 C4 PbL1 L2 (L1, L2 = tetrahydrofuran, Pyridine, N-heterocyclic carbene), and their model molecules. We mainly discussed the Lewis-base effect on the aromaticity of these complexes. The NICS was used to examine the aromaticity. The NICS values showed that the aromaticity of these complexes increases when the donation from the Lewis bases to Pb becomes large. This trend seems to be reasonable when the 4n-Huckel rule is applied to the fractional π-electron number. The calculated (13)C- and (207)Pb-NMR chemical shifts and the calculated UV transition energies reasonably reproduced the experimental trends. We found a specific relationship between the (13)C-NMR chemical shifts and the transition energies. As we expected, the relativistic effect was essential to reproduce a trend not only in the (207)Pb-NMR chemical shifts and J[Pb-C] but also in the (13)C-NMR chemical shifts of carbons adjacent to the lead atom. PMID:24643814

  12. Investigation of DOTA-Metal Chelation Effects on the Chemical Shift of (129) Xe.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Keunhong; Slack, Clancy C; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Dao, Phuong; Gomes, Muller D; Kennedy, Daniel J; Truxal, Ashley E; Sperling, Lindsay J; Francis, Matthew B; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has shown that xenon chemical shifts in cryptophane-cage sensors are affected when tethered chelators bind to metals. Here, we explore the xenon shifts in response to a wide range of metal ions binding to diastereomeric forms of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) linked to cryptophane-A. The shifts induced by the binding of Ca(2+) , Cu(2+) , Ce(3+) , Zn(2+) , Cd(2+) , Ni(2+) , Co(2+) , Cr(2+) , Fe(3+) , and Hg(2+) are distinct. In addition, the different responses of the diastereomers for the same metal ion indicate that shifts are affected by partial folding with a correlation between the expected coordination number of the metal in the DOTA complex and the chemical shift of (129) Xe. These sensors may be used to detect and quantify many important metal ions, and a better understanding of the basis for the induced shifts could enhance future designs. PMID:26376768

  13. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    PubMed

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated. PMID:27335085

  14. An Improved Experiment to Illustrate the Effect of Electronegativity on Chemical Shift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boggess, Robert K.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a method for using nuclear magnetic resonance to observe the effect of electronegativity on the chemical shift of protons in similar compounds. Suggests the use of 1,3-dihalopropanes as samples. Includes sample questions. (MVL)

  15. Chemical shifts and coupling constants of C8H10N4O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, M.

    This document is part of Subvolume D3 `Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13: Heterocycles' of Volume 35 `Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Data' of Landolt-Börnstein Group III `Condensed Matter'

  16. Determination of relative orientation between (1)H CSA tensors from a 3D solid-state NMR experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H RFDR mixing under ultrafast MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    To obtain piercing insights into inter and intramolecular H-bonding, and π-electron interactions measurement of (1)H chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors is gradually becoming an obvious choice. While the magnitude of CSA tensors provides unique information about the local electronic environment surrounding the nucleus, the relative orientation between these tensors can offer further insights into the spatial arrangement of interacting nuclei in their respective three-dimensional (3D) space. In this regard, we present a 3D anisotropic/anisotropic/isotropic proton chemical shift (CSA/CSA/CS) correlation experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) which enhances spin diffusion through recoupled (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequency (70kHz). Relative orientation between two interacting 1H CSA tensors is obtained by fitting two-interacting (1)H CSA tensors by fitting two-dimensional (2D) (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA spectral slices through extensive numerical simulations. To recouple (1)H CSAs in the indirect frequency dimensions of a 3D experiment we have employed γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence based on R-symmetry (R188(7)) with a series of phase-alternated 2700(°)-90180(°) composite-180° pulses on citric acid sample. Due to robustness of applied (1)H CSA recoupling sequence towards the presence of RF field inhomogeneity, we have successfully achieved an excellent (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA cross-correlation efficiency between H-bonded sites of citric acid. PMID:26065628

  17. An efficient amplification pulse sequence for measuring chemical shift anisotropy under fast magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong

    2011-12-01

    A two-dimensional experiment for measuring chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) under fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) is presented. The chemical shift anisotropy evolution is amplified by a sequence of π-pulses that repetitively interrupt MAS averaging. The amplification generates spinning sideband manifolds in the indirect dimension separated by the isotropic shift along the direct dimension. The basic unit of the pulse sequence is designed based on the magic-angle turning experiment and can be concatenated for larger amplification factors. PMID:21962909

  18. Magnetic couplings in the chemical shift of paramagnetic NMR.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha; Rouf, Syed Awais; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-10-13

    We apply the Kurland-McGarvey (J. Magn. Reson. 1970, 2, 286) theory for the NMR shielding of paramagnetic molecules, particularly its special case limited to the ground-state multiplet characterized by zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction of the form S·D·S. The correct formulation for this problem was recently presented by Soncini and Van den Heuvel (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 054113). With the effective electron spin quantum number S, the theory involves 2S+1 states, of which all but one are low-lying excited states, between which magnetic couplings take place by Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. We investigate these couplings as a function of temperature, focusing on both the high- and low-temperature behaviors. As has been seen in work by others, the full treatment of magnetic couplings is crucial for a realistic description of the temperature behavior of NMR shielding up to normal measurement temperatures. At high temperatures, depending on the magnitude of ZFS, the effect of magnetic couplings diminishes, and the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions become effectively averaged in the thermally occupied states of the multiplet. At still higher temperatures, the ZFS may be omitted altogether, and the shielding properties may be evaluated using a doublet-like formula, with all the 2S+1 states becoming effectively degenerate at the limit of vanishing magnetic field. We demonstrate these features using first-principles calculations of Ni(II), Co(II), Cr(II), and Cr(III) complexes, which have ZFS of different sizes and signs. A non-monotonic inverse temperature dependence of the hyperfine shift is predicted for axially symmetric integer-spin systems with a positive D parameter of ZFS. This is due to the magnetic coupling terms that are proportional to kT at low temperatures, canceling the Curie-type 1/kT prefactor of the hyperfine shielding in this case. PMID:26574272

  19. Chemical shift prediction for protein structure calculation and quality assessment using an optimally parameterized force field

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jakob T.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2011-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity of chemical shifts as reporters of structural information, and the ability to measure them routinely and accurately, gives great import to formulations that elucidate the structure-chemical-shift relationship. Here we present a new and highly accurate, precise, and robust formulation for the prediction of NMR chemical shifts from protein structures. Our approach, shAIC (shift prediction guided by Akaikes Information Criterion), capitalizes on mathematical ideas and an information-theoretic principle, to represent the functional form of the relationship between structure and chemical shift as a parsimonious sum of smooth analytical potentials which optimally takes into account short-, medium-, and long-range parameters in a nuclei-specific manner to capture potential chemical shift perturbations caused by distant nuclei. shAIC outperforms the state-of-the-art methods that use analytical formulations. Moreover, for structures derived by NMR or structures with novel folds, shAIC delivers better overall results; even when it is compared to sophisticated machine learning approaches. shAIC provides for a computationally lightweight implementation that is unimpeded by molecular size, making it an ideal for use as a force field. PMID:22293396

  20. Solvation chemical shifts of perylenic antenna molecules from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Nergiz; Mareš, Jiří; Sundholm, Dage; Vaara, Juha

    2014-10-28

    Solvation-induced shifts in molecular properties can be realistically simulated by employing a dynamic model with explicit solvent molecules. In this work, (13)C NMR chemical shifts of various candidate antenna molecules for dye-sensitised solar cells have been studied by using density-functional theory calculations both in vacuo and by employing a dynamic solvation model. The solvent effects were investigated using instantaneous molecular dynamics snapshots containing the antenna molecule and surrounding acetonitrile solvent molecules. Such calculations take into account the main mechanisms of solvation-induced chemical shifts. We have analysed the contributions to the solvent shift due to the solvent susceptibility anisotropy, changes in the density of the virtual orbital space and the accessibility of the excited states to the pronouncedly local magnetic hyperfine operator. We present Lorentzian-broadened chemical shift stick spectra in which a comparison of the in vacuo and dynamic-solvation model results is graphically illustrated. The results show that the solvent-accessible atoms at the perimeter of the solute are influenced by the virtual states of the solvent molecules, which are visible to the hyperfine operators of the perimeter nuclei. This enables efficient coupling of the ground state of the solute to the magnetically allowed excited states, resulting in a positive chemical shift contribution of the perimeter nuclei. As a result of solvation, the chemical shift signals of perimeter nuclei are found to be displaced towards larger chemical shift values, whereas the nuclei of the inner region of the solute molecules show the opposite trend. The solvent susceptibility anisotropy is found to cause a small and practically constant contribution. PMID:25222796

  1. Method for evaluating chemical shifts of x-ray emission lines in molecules and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomachuk, Yuriy V.; Titov, Anatoly V.

    2013-12-01

    A method of evaluating chemical shifts of x-ray emission lines for period four and heavier elements is developed. This method is based on the relativistic pseudopotential model and one-center restoration approach [Int. J. Quantum Chem.IJQCB20020-760810.1002/qua.20418 104, 223 (2005)] to recover a proper electronic structure in heavy-atom cores after the pseudopotential simulation of chemical compounds. The approximations of instantaneous transition and frozen core are presently applied to derive an expression for chemical shift as a difference between mean values of certain effective operator. The method allows one to avoid evaluation of small quantities (chemical shifts ˜0.01-1 eV) as differences of very large values (transition energies ˜1-100 keV in various compounds). The results of our calculations of chemical shifts for the Kα1, Kα2, and L transitions of group-14 metal cations with respect to neutral atoms are presented. Calculations of Kα1-line chemical shifts for the Pb core transitions in PbO and PbF2 with respect to those in the Pb atom are also performed and discussed. The accuracy of approximations used is estimated and the quality of the calculations is analyzed.

  2. Monomeric and dimeric structures analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid with experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Kose, Etem; Atac, Ahmet; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Kurt, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid (3,5-DFPBA, C6H3F2B(OH)2) were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase and 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO solution were recorded. The UV spectra that dissolved in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule have been obtained for possible three conformers from DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of title molecule, optimized by counterpoise correction, was also studied B3LYP at the 6-311++G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have been discussed. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. The effects due to the substitutions of boric acid group and halogen were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), nonlinear optical properties (NLO) and thermodynamic features were performed.

  3. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Anitha, R.; Devi, L.; Mohan, S.; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic epoxides are causative factors for mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of polycyclic arenes. The 1,2- or 2,3-epoxy compounds are widely used to a considerable extent in the textile, plastics, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, detergent and photochemical industries. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane are recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The IR and Raman intensities are determined. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of the compounds has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecules have been analysed.

  4. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride an active metabolite in tramadol--an analgesic drug.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, V; Santhanam, R; Marchewka, M K; Mohan, S

    2014-03-25

    O-desmethyltramadol is one of the main metabolites of tramadol widely used clinically and has analgesic activity. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of O-desmethyl tramadol hydrochloride are recorded in the solid phase in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. Theoretical studies have been performed as its hydrochloride salt. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-31G(**) and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The optimised bond length and bond angles are correlated with the X-ray data. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT methods. The IR and Raman intensities are determined with B3LYP method using cc-pVDZ and 6-31G(d,p) basic sets. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule have been anlysed. PMID:24316546

  5. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, (1)H, (13)C NMR) investigations of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, V; Anitha, R; Devi, L; Mohan, S; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-01-25

    Aromatic epoxides are causative factors for mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of polycyclic arenes. The 1,2- or 2,3-epoxy compounds are widely used to a considerable extent in the textile, plastics, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, detergent and photochemical industries. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane are recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The IR and Raman intensities are determined. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of the compounds has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecules have been analysed. PMID:25062058

  6. NMRDSP: an accurate prediction of protein shape strings from NMR chemical shifts and sequence data.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wusong; Cong, Peisheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Lu, Longjian; Zhu, Zhongliang; Li, Tonghua

    2013-01-01

    Shape string is structural sequence and is an extremely important structure representation of protein backbone conformations. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts give a strong correlation with the local protein structure, and are exploited to predict protein structures in conjunction with computational approaches. Here we demonstrate a novel approach, NMRDSP, which can accurately predict the protein shape string based on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts and structural profiles obtained from sequence data. The NMRDSP uses six chemical shifts (HA, H, N, CA, CB and C) and eight elements of structure profiles as features, a non-redundant set (1,003 entries) as the training set, and a conditional random field as a classification algorithm. For an independent testing set (203 entries), we achieved an accuracy of 75.8% for S8 (the eight states accuracy) and 87.8% for S3 (the three states accuracy). This is higher than only using chemical shifts or sequence data, and confirms that the chemical shift and the structure profile are significant features for shape string prediction and their combination prominently improves the accuracy of the predictor. We have constructed the NMRDSP web server and believe it could be employed to provide a solid platform to predict other protein structures and functions. The NMRDSP web server is freely available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/NMRDSP/index.jsp. PMID:24376713

  7. MP2 calculation of (77) Se NMR chemical shifts taking into account relativistic corrections.

    PubMed

    Rusakov, Yury Yu; Rusakova, Irina L; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-07-01

    The main factors affecting the accuracy and computational cost of the Second-order Möller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculation of (77) Se NMR chemical shifts (methods and basis sets, relativistic corrections, and solvent effects) are addressed with a special emphasis on relativistic effects. For the latter, paramagnetic contribution (390-466 ppm) dominates over diamagnetic term (192-198 ppm) resulting in a total shielding relativistic correction of about 230-260 ppm (some 15% of the total values of selenium absolute shielding constants). Diamagnetic term is practically constant, while paramagnetic contribution spans over 70-80 ppm. In the (77) Se NMR chemical shifts scale, relativistic corrections are about 20-30 ppm (some 5% of the total values of selenium chemical shifts). Solvent effects evaluated within the polarizable continuum solvation model are of the same order of magnitude as relativistic corrections (about 5%). For the practical calculations of (77) Se NMR chemical shifts of the medium-sized organoselenium compounds, the most efficient computational protocols employing relativistic Dyall's basis sets and taking into account relativistic and solvent corrections are suggested. The best result is characterized by a mean absolute error of 17 ppm for the span of (77) Se NMR chemical shifts reaching 2500 ppm resulting in a mean absolute percentage error of 0.7%. PMID:25998325

  8. NMRDSP: An Accurate Prediction of Protein Shape Strings from NMR Chemical Shifts and Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wusong; Cong, Peisheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Lu, Longjian; Zhu, Zhongliang; Li, Tonghua

    2013-01-01

    Shape string is structural sequence and is an extremely important structure representation of protein backbone conformations. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts give a strong correlation with the local protein structure, and are exploited to predict protein structures in conjunction with computational approaches. Here we demonstrate a novel approach, NMRDSP, which can accurately predict the protein shape string based on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts and structural profiles obtained from sequence data. The NMRDSP uses six chemical shifts (HA, H, N, CA, CB and C) and eight elements of structure profiles as features, a non-redundant set (1,003 entries) as the training set, and a conditional random field as a classification algorithm. For an independent testing set (203 entries), we achieved an accuracy of 75.8% for S8 (the eight states accuracy) and 87.8% for S3 (the three states accuracy). This is higher than only using chemical shifts or sequence data, and confirms that the chemical shift and the structure profile are significant features for shape string prediction and their combination prominently improves the accuracy of the predictor. We have constructed the NMRDSP web server and believe it could be employed to provide a solid platform to predict other protein structures and functions. The NMRDSP web server is freely available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/NMRDSP/index.jsp. PMID:24376713

  9. Benchmarking quantum mechanical calculations with experimental NMR chemical shifts of 2-HADNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuemin; Junk, Thomas; Liu, Yucheng; Tzeng, Nianfeng; Perkins, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In this study, both GIAO-DFT and GIAO-MP2 calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were benchmarked with experimental chemical shifts. The experimental chemical shifts were determined experimentally for carbon-13 (C-13) of seven carbon atoms for the TNT degradation product 2-hydroxylamino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-HADNT). Quantum mechanics GIAO calculations were implemented using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) and other six hybrid DFT methods (Becke-1-Lee-Yang-Parr (B1LYP), Becke-half-and-half-Lee-Yang-Parr (BH and HLYP), Cohen-Handy-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (O3LYP), Coulomb-attenuating-B3LYP (CAM-B3LYP), modified-Perdew-Wang-91-Lee-Yang-Parr (mPW1LYP), and Xu-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (X3LYP)) which use the same correlation functional LYP. Calculation results showed that the GIAO-MP2 method gives the most accurate chemical shift values, and O3LYP method provides the best prediction of chemical shifts among the B3LYP and other five DFT methods. Three types of atomic partial charges, Mulliken (MK), electrostatic potential (ESP), and natural bond orbital (NBO), were also calculated using MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ method. A reasonable correlation was discovered between NBO partial charges and experimental chemical shifts of carbon-13 (C-13).

  10. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence. PMID:27586953

  11. Raman and infrared spectra of barium and strontium halide monohydrates, MX2 · 1H2O (M = Ba, Sr; X = Cl, Br, I). A new interpretation of the frequency shiftings of OH stretching modes in solid hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, H. D.; Christian, H.

    The infrared and Raman spectra of the isotypic alkaline earth halide monohydrates, MX2 · 1H2O, with M = Sr, Ba and X = Cl, Br, I, and of deuterated and isotopically dilute samples have been recorded in the H2O stretching and bending mode region. From the temperature dependence of the stretching modes it is shown that bifurcated hydrogen bridges are present in these hydrates. The water molecules are symmetrically bonded in the case of the iodides, possibly caused by dipole-like interactions with adjacent iodide ions, and assymmetrically bonded in the case of the chlorides and bromides due to normal hydrogen bonds, as shown from the absence or presence of splitting of the stretching modes in isotopically dilute samples. The relative Raman intensities of the two H2O stretching modes, {Ivsym}/{Ivasym}, which reveal the amount of intramolecular coupling of the stretching vibrations, give an additional view of the bond structure of the water molecules. The frequency shiftings of the stretching modes of water molecules in solid hydrates are discussed in terms of hydrogen bonds, metal-oxygen interaction and the repulsion potential of the lattice, as shown, for example, by the correlation with the unit cell volumes.

  12. Studies on molecular weaker interactions, spectroscopic analysis and chemical reactivity of synthesized ethyl 3,5-dimethyl-4-[3-(2-nitro-phenyl)-acryloyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate through experimental and quantum chemical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. N.; Baboo, Vikas; Rawat, Poonam; Gupta, V. P.

    2013-04-01

    Ethyl 3,5-dimethyl-4-[3-(2-nitro-phenyl)-acryloyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EDNPAPC) has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, UV-Vis, FT-IR and Mass spectroscopy. Geometrical, spectral, thermodynamic properties have been calculated and evaluated using DFT level of theory, B3LYP functional and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The observed absorption peaks at 364, 308 and 256 nm are corresponds to the calculated electronic transitions at 352, 286 nm and 252 nm respectively. The experimental data shows red shift in comparison to the calculated. The detailed vibrational analysis has been carried out with the aid of potential energy distribution (PED) and the experimental FTIR peaks confirm red shifts in Nsbnd H and Cdbnd O stretching bond as result of dimer formation. The multiple interactions present in the molecule have been evaluated with the help of QTAIM theory. The ellipticity values confirm the presence of resonance assisted hydrogen bonding in dimer formation. The binding energy of dimer formation through DFT and AIM calculations has been found to be 13.94 and 15.22 kcal/mol respectively. The binding energy of dimer after basis set superposition error (BSSE) found to be as 10.54 kcal/mol. Theoretical result from reactivity descriptors show that C6, C13 and C15 are more reactive sites for nucleophilic attack within molecule favoring the formation of heterocyclic compounds such as pyrazoline and oxazoline. The calculated β0 values for monomer and dimer are found to be as 1.8 × 10-30, 7.8 × 10-30 esu, respectively, indicating that this pyrrole chalcone is an attractive material for nonlinear optical (NLO) applications.

  13. (77)Se chemical shift tensor of L-selenocystine: experimental NMR measurements and quantum chemical investigations of structural effects.

    PubMed

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-03-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine's specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their (77)Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state (77)Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information on selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on (77)Se L-selenocystine's chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10-20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of -180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. -90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from -120° to -60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. (77)Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272 ± 30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3-9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results suggest

  14. 77Se Chemical Shift Tensor of L-selenocystine: Experimental NMR Measurements and Quantum Chemical Investigations of Structural Effects

    PubMed Central

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine’s specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their 77Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state 77Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information of selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on 77Se L-selenocystine’s chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10–20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of −180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. −90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from −120° to −60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. 77Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272±30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3–9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results

  15. Synthesis, spectral analysis (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-visible) and quantum chemical studies on molecular geometry, NBO, NLO, chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties of novel 2-amino-4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-5-oxo-6-phenyl-5,6-dihydro-4H-pyrano[3,2-c]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatma, Shaheen; Bishnoi, Abha; Verma, Anil Kumar

    2015-09-01

    In the present study novel 2-amino-4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-5-oxo-6-phenyl-5,6-dihydro-4H-pyrano[3,2-c]quinoline-3-carbonitrile was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-visible spectroscopy and mass spectral analysis. The chemical calculations were done by DFT level of theory using Becke3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) and Coulomb Attenuating Method (CAM-B3LYP)/6-31G(d,p) basis set. 1H, 13C chemical shifts and vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and good correlation with the experimental data has been accomplished. UV-Visible spectrum of the molecule was recorded in the region 200-500 nm and the electronic properties and composition were obtained using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) method. Hyperconjugative interactions were studied with the help of natural bond orbital analysis. Electric dipole moment, polarizability and first static hyperpolarizability values have been calculated. The results show that the title compound possesses nonlinear optical behavior with non-zero values. The thermodynamic properties of the compound were calculated at different temperatures. The local reactivity descriptors show that C(7) is most reactive site for nucleophilic attack.

  16. Sequential nearest-neighbor effects on computed 13Cα chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate sequential nearest-neighbor effects on quantum-chemical calculations of 13Cα chemical shifts, we selected the structure of the nucleic acid binding (NAB) protein from the SARS coronavirus determined by NMR in solution (PDB id 2K87). NAB is a 116-residue α/β protein, which contains 9 prolines and has 50% of its residues located in loops and turns. Overall, the results presented here show that sizeable nearest-neighbor effects are seen only for residues preceding proline, where Pro introduces an overestimation, on average, of 1.73 ppm in the computed 13Cα chemical shifts. A new ensemble of 20 conformers representing the NMR structure of the NAB, which was calculated with an input containing backbone torsion angle constraints derived from the theoretical 13Cα chemical shifts as supplementary data to the NOE distance constraints, exhibits very similar topology and comparable agreement with the NOE constraints as the published NMR structure. However, the two structures differ in the patterns of differences between observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts, Δca,i, for the individual residues along the sequence. This indicates that the Δca,i -values for the NAB protein are primarily a consequence of the limited sampling by the bundles of 20 conformers used, as in common practice, to represent the two NMR structures, rather than of local flaws in the structures. PMID:20644980

  17. Proton Magnetic Resonance and Human Thyroid Neoplasia III. Ex VivoChemical-Shift Microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, Allison; Künnecke, Basil; Dowd, Susan; Russell, Peter; Delbridge, Leigh; Mountford, Carolyn E.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetic-resonance chemical-shift microimaging, with a spatial resolution of 40 × 40 μm, is a modality which can detect alterations to cellular chemistry and hence markers of pathological processes in human tissueex vivo.This technique was used as a chemical microscope to assess follicular thyroid neoplasms, lesions which are unsatisfactorily investigated using standard histopathological techiques or water-based magnetic-resonance imaging. The chemical-shift images at the methyl frequency (0.9 ppm) identify chemical heterogeneity in follicular tumors which are histologically homogeneous. The observed changes to cellular chemistry, detectable in foci of approximately 100 cells or less, support the existence of a preinvasive state hitherto unidentified by current pathological techniques.

  18. Hydrogen bonding between acetate-based ionic liquids and water: Three types of IR absorption peaks and NMR chemical shifts change upon dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Cao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yuwei; Mu, Tiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen-bonding interaction between acetate-based ionic liquids (AcIL) and water was investigated by attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) and 1H NMR. Interestingly, the relative change of chemical shift δ of 1H NMR upon dilution could be divided into three regions. All the H show an upfield shift in Regions 1 and 2 while a different tendency in Region 3 (upfield, no, and downfield shift classified as Types 1, 2, 3, respectively). For ATR-IR, the red, no, or blue shift of νOD (IR absorption peak of OD in D2O) and ν± (IR absorption peak of AcILs) also have three types, respectively. Two-Times Explosion Mechanism (TTEM) was proposed to interpret the dynamic processes of AcILs upon dilution macroscopically, meanwhile an Inferior Spring Model (ISM) was proposed to help to understand the TTEM microscopically, All those indicate that AcILs present the state of network, sub-network, cluster, sub-cluster, ion pairs and sub-ion pairs in sequence upon dilution by water and the elongation of hydrogen bonding between AcILs-water, between cation-anion of AcILs is plastic deformation rather than elastic deformation.

  19. The Chemical Shift Baseline for High-Pressure NMR Spectra of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Frach, Roland; Kibies, Patrick; Böttcher, Saraphina; Pongratz, Tim; Strohfeldt, Steven; Kurrmann, Simon; Koehler, Joerg; Hofmann, Martin; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Reiser, Oliver; Horinek, Dominik; Kast, Stefan M

    2016-07-18

    High-pressure (HP) NMR spectroscopy is an important method for detecting rare functional states of proteins by analyzing the pressure response of chemical shifts. However, for the analysis of the shifts it is mandatory to understand the origin of the observed pressure dependence. Here we present experimental HP NMR data on the (15) N-enriched peptide bond model, N-methylacetamide (NMA), in water, combined with quantum-chemical computations of the magnetic parameters using a pressure-sensitive solvation model. Theoretical analysis of NMA and the experimentally used internal reference standard 4,4-dimethyl-4-silapentane-1-sulfonic (DSS) reveal that a substantial part of observed shifts can be attributed to purely solvent-induced electronic polarization of the backbone. DSS is only marginally responsive to pressure changes and is therefore a reliable sensor for variations in the local magnetic field caused by pressure-induced changes of the magnetic susceptibility of the solvent. PMID:27282319

  20. Use of 13Cα Chemical-Shifts in Protein Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Ripoll, Daniel R.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    A physics-based method, aimed at determining protein structures by using NOE-derived distances together with observed and computed 13C chemical shifts, is proposed. The approach makes use of 13Cα chemical shifts, computed at the density functional level of theory, to obtain torsional constraints for all backbone and side-chain torsional angles without making a priori use of the occupancy of any region of the Ramachandran map by the amino acid residues. The torsional constraints are not fixed but are changed dynamically in each step of the procedure, following an iterative self-consistent approach intended to identify a set of conformations for which the computed 13Cα chemical shifts match the experimental ones. A test is carried out on a 76-amino acid all-α-helical protein, namely the B. Subtilis acyl carrier protein. It is shown that, starting from randomly generated conformations, the final protein models are more accurate than an existing NMR-derived structure model of this protein, in terms of both the agreement between predicted and observed 13Cα chemical shifts and some stereochemical quality indicators, and of similar accuracy as one of the protein models solved at a high level of resolution. The results provide evidence that this methodology can be used not only for structure determination but also for additional protein structure refinement of NMR-derived models deposited in the Protein Data Bank. PMID:17516673

  1. Chemical shifts in transition metal dithiocarbamates from infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, R.; Magee, R. J.; Liesegang, J.

    1982-11-01

    Measurements of the IR stretching frequencies of the NC and MS bonds in transition-metal (M) dithiocarbamates show significant correlation with measurement of core level XPS chemical shifts. This is believed to be the first demonstration of such a correlation for a series of solid-phase compounds.

  2. Compressed sensing for chemical shift-based water-fat separation.

    PubMed

    Doneva, Mariya; Börnert, Peter; Eggers, Holger; Mertins, Alfred; Pauly, John; Lustig, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Multi echo chemical shift-based water-fat separation methods allow for uniform fat suppression in the presence of main field inhomogeneities. However, these methods require additional scan time for chemical shift encoding. This work presents a method for water-fat separation from undersampled data (CS-WF), which combines compressed sensing and chemical shift-based water-fat separation. Undersampling was applied in the k-space and in the chemical shift encoding dimension to reduce the total scanning time. The method can reconstruct high quality water and fat images in 2D and 3D applications from undersampled data. As an extension, multipeak fat spectral models were incorporated into the CS-WF reconstruction to improve the water-fat separation quality. In 3D MRI, reduction factors of above three can be achieved, thus fully compensating the additional time needed in three-echo water-fat imaging. The method is demonstrated on knee and abdominal in vivo data. PMID:20859998

  3. Identify Beta-Hairpin Motifs with Quadratic Discriminant Algorithm Based on the Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    YongE, Feng; GaoShan, Kou

    2015-01-01

    Successful prediction of the beta-hairpin motif will be helpful for understanding the of the fold recognition. Some algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of beta-hairpin motifs. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on the amino acid sequences. Here, we proposed a novel model for predicting beta-hairpin structure based on the chemical shift. Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in not beta-hairpin and beta-hairpin motifs. Secondly, we used these chemical shifts as features combined with three algorithms to predict beta-hairpin structure. Finally, we achieved the best prediction, namely sensitivity of 92%, the specificity of 94% with 0.85 of Mathew’s correlation coefficient using quadratic discriminant analysis algorithm, which is clearly superior to the same method for the prediction of beta-hairpin structure from 20 amino acid compositions in the three-fold cross-validation. Our finding showed that the chemical shift is an effective parameter for beta-hairpin prediction, suggesting the quadratic discriminant analysis is a powerful algorithm for the prediction of beta-hairpin. PMID:26422468

  4. Spectral analysis, structural elucidation, and evaluation of both nonlinear optical properties and chemical reactivity of a newly synthesized ethyl-3,5-dimethyl-4-[(toluenesulfonyl)-hydrazonomethyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate through experimental studies and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. N.; Rawat, Poonam

    2013-12-01

    As part of study of hydrazide-hydrazones, we have synthesized ethyl-3,5-dimethyl-4-[(toluenesulfonyl)-hydrazonomethyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EDTHMPC) and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H, 13C NMR and Mass spectroscopy. The structure, spectral and thermodynamic parameters of EDTHMPC were quantum chemically calculated performing density functional level theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional and 6-31G (d,p) basis set. Electrophilic charge transfer (ECT) values of interacting molecules indicate that charge flows from p-toluene sulphonyl-hydrazide to ethyl-3,5-dimethyl-4-formyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate confirming the formation of product by nucleophilic attack. The calculated and experimental wavenumbers analysis confirms the formation of dimer. The calculated changes in thermodynamic quantities during dimer formation in gaseous phase have the negative values for ΔH, ΔG (kcal/mol) and ΔS (cal/mol-K) indicating that the dimer formation is exothermic and will proceed only at low temperature. The strength and nature of hydrogen bonding and weak interactions in dimer have been analyzed by 'Quantum theory of atoms in molecules' (QTAIM) and found to be five types of interactions in which three types are (C⋯N, CH⋯O and CH⋯HC) intramolecular and two types are (CO⋯HN and CH⋯OC) intermolecular. The calculated binding energy of dimer using DFT and QTAIM theory are 14.32 and 15.41 kcal/mol, respectively. The β0 value for monomer is calculated as 11.54 x 10-30 esu indicating microscopic nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non-zero values.

  5. A geometrical parametrization of C1'-C5' RNA ribose chemical shifts calculated by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suardíaz, Reynier; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-07-01

    It has been recently shown that NMR chemical shifts can be used to determine the structures of proteins. In order to begin to extend this type of approach to nucleic acids, we present an equation that relates the structural parameters and the 13C chemical shifts of the ribose group. The parameters in the equation were determined by maximizing the agreement between the DFT-derived chemical shifts and those predicted through the equation for a database of ribose structures. Our results indicate that this type of approach represents a promising way of establishing quantitative and computationally efficient analytical relationships between chemical shifts and structural parameters in nucleic acids.

  6. Combining NMR ensembles and molecular dynamics simulations provides more realistic models of protein structures in solution and leads to better chemical shift prediction.

    PubMed

    Lehtivarjo, Juuso; Tuppurainen, Kari; Hassinen, Tommi; Laatikainen, Reino; Peräkylä, Mikael

    2012-03-01

    While chemical shifts are invaluable for obtaining structural information from proteins, they also offer one of the rare ways to obtain information about protein dynamics. A necessary tool in transforming chemical shifts into structural and dynamic information is chemical shift prediction. In our previous work we developed a method for 4D prediction of protein (1)H chemical shifts in which molecular motions, the 4th dimension, were modeled using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although the approach clearly improved the prediction, the X-ray structures and single NMR conformers used in the model cannot be considered fully realistic models of protein in solution. In this work, NMR ensembles (NMRE) were used to expand the conformational space of proteins (e.g. side chains, flexible loops, termini), followed by MD simulations for each conformer to map the local fluctuations. Compared with the non-dynamic model, the NMRE+MD model gave 6-17% lower root-mean-square (RMS) errors for different backbone nuclei. The improved prediction indicates that NMR ensembles with MD simulations can be used to obtain a more realistic picture of protein structures in solutions and moreover underlines the importance of short and long time-scale dynamics for the prediction. The RMS errors of the NMRE+MD model were 0.24, 0.43, 0.98, 1.03, 1.16 and 2.39 ppm for (1)Hα, (1)HN, (13)Cα, (13)Cβ, (13)CO and backbone (15)N chemical shifts, respectively. The model is implemented in the prediction program 4DSPOT, available at http://www.uef.fi/4dspot. PMID:22314705

  7. Experimental link between the /sup 13/C NMR chemical shift of carbonyl carbons and the energy shifts observed in the n. -->. 3s optical transition of cyclic ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, T.J.; Baer, T.

    1988-09-14

    The n ..-->.. 3s transition energies of cold methylcyclopentanones and -cyclohexanones, as well as those of some branched-chain and bicyclic ketones, have been measured with 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The energy shifts of the n ..-->.. 3s transition origins are found to correlate in a linear fashion with reported /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts of the carbonyl carbon atoms. Several possible explanations for the experimental connection to NMR are discussed including consideration of both the paramagnetic and diamagnetic shielding contributions to the total chemical shift. 31 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  8. Scalar Relativistic Computations and Localized Orbital Analyses of Nuclear Hyperfine Coupling and Paramagnetic NMR Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, Fredy W.; Pritchard, Ben; Autschbach, Jochen

    2012-02-14

    A method is reported by which calculated hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) and paramagnetic NMR (pNMR) chemical shifts can be analyzed in a chemically intuitive way by decomposition into contributions from localized molecular orbitals (LMOs). A new module for density functional calculations with nonhybrid functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids, utilizing the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA), has been implemented in the parallel open-source NWChem quantum chemistry package. Benchmark results are reported for a test set of few-atom molecules with light and heavy elements. Finite nucleus effects on ¹⁹⁹Hg HFCCs are shown to be on the order of -11 to -15%. A proof of concept for the LMO analysis is provided for the metal and fluorine HFCCs of TiF₃ and NpF₆. Calculated pNMR chemical shifts are reported for the 2-methylphenyl-t-butylnitroxide radical and for five cyclopentadienyl (Cp) sandwich complexes with 3d metals. Nickelocene and vanadocene carbon pNMR shifts are analyzed in detail, demonstrating that the large carbon pNMR shifts calculated as +1540 for Ni (exptl.: +1514) and -443 for V (exptl.: -510) are caused by different spin-polarization mechanisms. For Ni, Cp to Ni π back-donation dominates the result, whereas for vanadocene, V to Cp σ donation with relaxation of the carbon 1s shells can be identified as the dominant mechanism.

  9. DFT study of zigzag (n, 0) single-walled carbon nanotubes: (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Stachów, Michal; Stobiński, Leszek; Kaminský, Jakub

    2016-06-01

    (13)C NMR chemical shifts of selected finite-size models of pristine zigzag single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a diameter of ∼0.4-0.8nm and length up to 2.2nm were studied theoretically. Results for finite SWCNTs models containing 1, 4 and 10 adjacent bamboo-type units were compared with data obtained for infinite tubes in order to estimate the reliability of small finite models in predicting magnetic properties of real-size nanotubes and to assess their tube-length dependence. SWCNTs were fully optimized using unrestricted density functional theory (DFT-UB3LYP/6-31G*). Cyclacenes, as the shortest models of open-ended zigzag SWCNTs, with systematically varying diameter were calculated as well. GIAO NMR calculations on the SWCNT and cyclacene models were performed using the BHandH density functional combined with relatively small STO-3Gmag basis set, developed by Leszczyński and coworkers for accurate description of magnetic properties. Regular changes of carbon (13)C chemical shifts along the tube axis of real size (6, 0) and (9, 0) zigzag carbon nanotubes were shown. The (13)C NMR shifts according to increasing diameter calculated for zigzag (n, 0, n=5-10) cyclacenes followed the trends observed for zigzag (n, 0) SWCNTs. The results for 4-units long SWCNTs match reasonably well with the data obtained for infinite zigzag (n, 0) SWCNTs, especially to those with bigger diameter (n=8-15). The presence of rim hydrogens obviously affects theoretical (13)C chemical shieldings and shifts in cyclacenes and thus cyclacenes can provide only approximate estimation of (13)C NMR parameters of real-size SWCNTs. The NMR properties predicted for the longest 10-units long models of SWCNTs reliably correspond to results obtained for infinite nanotubes. They were thus able to accurately predict also recently reported experimental chemical shift of chiral (6, 5) SWCNT. PMID:27155813

  10. A sensitive, high resolution magic angle turning experiment for measuring chemical shift tensor principal values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, high-resolution 'FIREMAT' two-dimensional (2D) magic-angle-turning experiment is described that measures chemical shift tensor principal values in powdered solids. The spectra display spinning-sideband patterns separated by their isotropic shifts. The new method's sensitivity and high resolution in the isotropic-shift dimension result from combining the 5pi magic-angle-turning pulse sequence, an extension of the pseudo-2D sideband-suppression data rearrangement, and the TIGER protocol for processing 2D data. TPPM decoupling is used to enhance resolution. The method requires precise synchronization of the pulses and sampling to the rotor position. It is shown that the technique obtains 35 natural-abundance 13C tensors from erythromycin in 19 hours, and high quality naturalabundance 15N tensors from eight sites in potassium penicillin V in three days on a 400MHz spectrometer.

  11. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Tamim A; Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J; James, Michael

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual (1)H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D2O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary (13)C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing (13)C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve (13)C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ((1)H, (2)H) resolves closely separated quaternary (13)C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up. PMID:27237841

  12. Assignment of protein backbone resonances using connectivity, torsion angles and 13Calpha chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Morris, Laura C; Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H

    2004-05-01

    A program is presented which will return the most probable sequence location for a short connected set of residues in a protein given just (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts (delta((13)C(alpha))) and data restricting the phi and psi backbone angles. Data taken from both the BioMagResBank and the Protein Data Bank were used to create a probability density function (PDF) using a multivariate normal distribution in delta((13)C(alpha)), phi, and psi space for each amino acid residue. Extracting and combining probabilities for particular amino acid residues in a short proposed sequence yields a score indicative of the correctness of the proposed assignment. The program is illustrated using several proteins for which structure and (13)C(alpha) chemical shift data are available. PMID:15017135

  13. Four-Component Relativistic DFT Calculations of (13)C Chemical Shifts of Halogenated Natural Substances.

    PubMed

    Casella, Girolamo; Bagno, Alessandro; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Saielli, Giacomo

    2015-12-14

    We have calculated the (13)C NMR chemical shifts of a large ensemble of halogenated organic molecules (81 molecules for a total of 250 experimental (13)C NMR data at four different levels of theory), ranging from small rigid organic compounds, used to benchmark the performance of various levels of theory, to natural substances of marine origin with conformational degrees of freedom. Carbon atoms bonded to heavy halogen atoms, particularly bromine and iodine, are known to be rather challenging when it comes to the prediction of their chemical shifts by quantum methods, due to relativistic effects. In this paper, we have applied the state-of-the-art four-component relativistic density functional theory for the prediction of such NMR properties and compared the performance with two-component and nonrelativistic methods. Our results highlight the necessity to include relativistic corrections within a four-component description for the most accurate prediction of the NMR properties of halogenated organic substances. PMID:26541625

  14. Characterization of Tricoordinate Boron Chemical Shift Tensors: Definitive High-Field

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, David L.; Wasylishen, Roderick E.; Gee, Myrlene

    2001-01-01

    Despite the large known chemical shift (CS) range for boron and the large number of 11B NMR studies of glasses, no boron CS tensors have been characterized to date. We report the application of solid-state NMR techniques at moderate (9.4 T) and high (17.63 T) applied magnetic field strengths to the characterization of the boron CS tensors in trimesitylborane (BMes3) and triphenyl borate (B(OPh)3). The boron CS tensor of the former compound exhibits a remarkably large span,? 121 1 ppm, which encompasses the known range of isotropic chemical shifts for tricoordinate boron compounds. Conversely, the effect of the boron CS tensor on the 11B NMR spectra of B(OPh)3 is difficult to observe and quantify even at field strengths as high

  15. Using Neural Networks for 13C NMR Chemical Shift Prediction-Comparison with Traditional Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiler, Jens; Maier, Walter; Will, Martin; Meusinger, Reinhard

    2002-08-01

    Interpretation of 13C chemical shifts is essential for structure elucidation of organic molecules by NMR. In this article, we present an improved neural network approach and compare its performance to that of commonly used approaches. Specifically, our recently proposed neural network ( J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 2000, 40, 1169-1176) is improved by introducing an extended hybrid numerical description of the carbon atom environment, resulting in a standard deviation (std. dev.) of 2.4 ppm for an independent test data set of ˜42,500 carbons. Thus, this neural network allows fast and accurate 13C NMR chemical shift prediction without the necessity of access to molecule or fragment databases. For an unbiased test dataset containing 100 organic structures the accuracy of the improved neural network was compared to that of a prediction method based on the HOSE code ( hierarchically ordered spherical description of environment) using S PECI NFO. The results show the neural network predictions to be of quality (std. dev.=2.7 ppm) comparable to that of the HOSE code prediction (std. dev.=2.6 ppm). Further we compare the neural network predictions to those of a wide variety of other 13C chemical shift prediction tools including incremental methods (C HEMD RAW, S PECT OOL), quantum chemical calculation (G AUSSIAN, C OSMOS), and HOSE code fragment-based prediction (S PECI NFO, ACD/CNMR, P REDICTI T NMR) for the 47 13C-NMR shifts of Taxol, a natural product including many structural features of organic substances. The smallest standard deviations were achieved here with the neural network (1.3 ppm) and S PECI NFO (1.0 ppm).

  16. Prediction of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts for phosphines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Jianbo; Liu, Shuling; Zhang, Shengwan; Li, Shengshi Z.

    2007-07-01

    Quantitative relationships of the 31P NMR chemical shifts of the phosphorus atoms in 291 phosphines with the atomic ionicity index (INI) and stereoscopic effect parameters ( ɛα, ɛβ, ɛγ) were primarily investigated in this paper for modeling some fundamental quantitative structure-spectroscopy relationships (QSSR). The results indicated that the 31P NMR chemical shifts of phosphines can be described as the quantitative equation by multiple linear regression (MLR): δp (ppm) = -174.0197 - 2.6724 INI + 40.4755 ɛα + 15.1141 ɛβ - 3.1858 ɛγ, correlation coefficient R = 0.9479, root mean square error (rms) = 13.9, and cross-validated predictive correlation coefficient was found by using the leave-one-out procedure to be Q2 = 0.8919. Furthermore, through way of random sampling, the estimative stability and the predictive power of the proposed MLR model were examined by constructing data set randomly into both the internal training set and external test set of 261 and 30 compounds, respectively, and then the chemical shifts were estimated and predicted with the training correlation coefficient R = 0.9467 and rms = 13.4 and the external predicting correlation coefficient Qext = 0.9598 and rms = 10.8. A partial least square model was developed that produced R = 0.9466, Q = 0.9407 and Qext = 0.9599, respectively. Those good results provided a new, simple, accurate and efficient methodology for calculating 31P NMR chemical shifts of phosphines.

  17. 14N Chemical Shifts and Quadrupole Coupling Constants of Inorganic Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marburger, Simon P.; Fung, B. M.; Khitrin, A. K.

    2002-02-01

    The isotropic chemical shift and the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant for 14N were obtained for 14 inorganic nitrates by solid-state MAS NMR measurements at two different field strengths, 9.4 and 11.7 T. The compounds studied were polycrystalline powders of AgNO3, Al(NO3)3, Ba(NO3)2, Ca(NO3)2, CsNO3, KNO3, LiNO3, Mg(NO3)2, NaNO3, Pb(NO3)2, RbNO3, Sr(NO3)2, Th(NO3)4·4H2O, and UO2(NO3)2·3H2O. Even though the spectra show broadening due to 14N quadrupole interactions, linewidths of a few hundred hertz and a good signal-to-noise ratio were achieved. From the position of the central peaks at the two fields, the chemical shifts and the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants were calculated. The chemical shifts for all compounds studied range from 282 to 342 ppm with respect to NH4Cl. The nuclear quadrupole coupling constants range from 429 kHz for AgNO3 to 993 kHz for LiNO3. These data are compared with those available in the literature.

  18. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda; Dybas, Joseph M.; Fiser, Andras

    2013-01-01

    Summary A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences that do not share recognizable sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. This challenge can be addressed by hybrid algorithms that utilize easily obtainable experimental data and carry a limited amount of indirect structural information. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein super-secondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago, and new folds discovered since then are novel combinations of existing Smotifs. This observation suggests that it should be possible to build any structure, of either a known or yet to be discovered fold, from a combination of existing Smotifs derived from already known structures. In the absence of any sequence similarity signal, limited experimental data can be used to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known experimental structures. Here we present a modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on NMR chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins with unique folds, the algorithm delivered 90 homology model quality models, among them 24 high quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. Detailed analysis of the method’s performance suggests that further improvement can be achieved by improving sampling algorithms and developing more precise tools that predict dihedral angle preferences from chemical shift assignments. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available. PMID:23685209

  19. 1-Vinyl-5-amino-1 H-tetrazole: X-ray molecular and crystal structures and quantum-chemical DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhov, Alexander S.; Matulis, Vadim E.; Gaponik, Pavel N.; Voitekhovich, Sergei V.; Ivashkevich, Oleg A.

    2008-03-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of 1-vinyl-5-amino-1 H-tetrazole (VAT) were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The amino group lies in the plane of the tetrazole ring and valence angles around the N atom are close to 120°, the exocyclic C sbnd N amino bond being substantially shorter in comparison with "normal" C sbnd N bond. Natural bond orbital analysis was performed, using density functional theory B3LYP method, to explain the structural peculiarities of crystalline VAT. By using MO calculations, relative stability of all possible tautomeric forms of protonated VAT molecule was investigated.

  20. Molecular structure and vibrational and chemical shift assignments of 3'-chloro-4-dimethylamino azobenzene by DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Toy, Mehmet; Tanak, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, a combined experimental and theoretical study on ground state molecular structure, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of azo compound 3'-chloro-4-dimethlamino azobenzene are reported. The molecular geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and the first order hyperpolarizability of the title compound were calculated with the help of density functional theory computations. The optimized geometric parameters obtained by using DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)) show good agreement with the experimental data. The vibrational transitions were identified based on the recorded FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-400cm(-1) for solid state. The (1)H isotropic chemical shifts with respect to TMS were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental data. Using the TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the title compound have been predicted, and good agreement is determined with the experimental ones. To investigate the NLO properties of the title compound, the polarizability and the first hyperpolarizability were calculated using the density functional B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. According to results, the title compound exhibits non-zero first hyperpolarizability value revealing second order NLO behavior. In addition, DFT calculations of the title compound, molecular electrostatic potential and frontier molecular orbitals were also performed at 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. PMID:25468435

  1. Molecular structure and vibrational and chemical shift assignments of 3‧-chloro-4-dimethylamino azobenzene by DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, Mehmet; Tanak, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, a combined experimental and theoretical study on ground state molecular structure, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of azo compound 3‧-chloro-4-dimethlamino azobenzene are reported. The molecular geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and the first order hyperpolarizability of the title compound were calculated with the help of density functional theory computations. The optimized geometric parameters obtained by using DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)) show good agreement with the experimental data. The vibrational transitions were identified based on the recorded FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-400 cm-1 for solid state. The 1H isotropic chemical shifts with respect to TMS were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental data. Using the TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the title compound have been predicted, and good agreement is determined with the experimental ones. To investigate the NLO properties of the title compound, the polarizability and the first hyperpolarizability were calculated using the density functional B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. According to results, the title compound exhibits non-zero first hyperpolarizability value revealing second order NLO behavior. In addition, DFT calculations of the title compound, molecular electrostatic potential and frontier molecular orbitals were also performed at 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory.

  2. 1H and 13C resonance designation of antimycin A1 by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.; Adams, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Complete 1H and 13C resonance assignments of antimycin A1 were accomplished by two-dimensional NMR techniques, viz. 1H homonuclear COSY correlation, heteronuclear 13C-1H chemical shift correlation and long-range heteronuclear 13C-1H COLOC correlation. Antimycin A1 was found to consist of two isomeric components in a 2:1 ratio based on NMR spectroscopic evidence. The structure of the major component was newly assigned as the 8-isopentanoic acid ester. The spectra of the minor component were consistent with the known structure of antimycin A1.

  3. Temperature dependence of contact and dipolar NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bob; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-02-07

    Using a recently proposed equation for NMR nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules with unpaired electrons [A. Soncini and W. Van den Heuvel, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 021103 (2013)], equations for the temperature (T) dependent isotropic shielding for multiplets with an effective spin S equal to 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, and 5/2 in terms of electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters are derived and then expanded in powers of 1/T. One simplifying assumption used is that a matrix derived from the zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor and the Zeeman coupling matrix (g-tensor) share the same principal axis system. The influence of the rhombic ZFS parameter E is only investigated for S = 1. Expressions for paramagnetic contact shielding (from the isotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) and pseudo-contact or dipolar shielding (from the anisotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) are considered separately. The leading order is always 1/T. A temperature dependence of the contact shielding as 1/T and of the dipolar shielding as 1/T{sup 2}, which is sometimes assumed in the assignment of paramagnetic chemical shifts, is shown to arise only if S ≥ 1 and zero-field splitting is appreciable, and only if the Zeeman coupling matrix is nearly isotropic (Δg = 0). In such situations, an assignment of contact versus dipolar shifts may be possible based only on linear and quadratic fits of measured variable-temperature chemical shifts versus 1/T. Numerical data are provided for nickelocene (S = 1). Even under the assumption of Δg = 0, a different leading order of contact and dipolar shifts in powers of 1/T is not obtained for S = 3/2. When Δg is not very small, dipolar and contact shifts both depend in leading order in 1/T in all cases, with sizable contributions in order 1/T{sup n} with n = 2 and higher.

  4. Study of chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 ions in [N(CH3)4]2ZnBr4 near the phase transition temperature using 1H MAS NMR, 13C CP/MAS NMR, and 14N NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-02-01

    The temperature dependences of the chemical shifts and intensities of 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in tetramethylammonium tetrabromozincate, [N(CH3)4]2ZnBr4, were investigated using single-crystal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the structural geometry near the phase transition temperature. Based on the analysis of the 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR and 14N NMR spectra, the two chemically inequivalent N(1) (CH3)4 and N(2) (CH3)4 ions were distinguished. Furthermore, the 14N NMR spectrum at the phase transition temperature indicated the existence of the ferroelastic characteristics of the N(CH3)4 ions.

  5. Backbone and Ile-δ1, Leu, Val Methyl 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments for human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Cuifeng; Aramini, James M.; Ma, LiChung; Cort, John R.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Krug, R. M.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2011-10-01

    Human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein (ISG15), also called ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP), is the first identified ubiquitin-like protein containing two ubiquitin-like domains fused in tandem. The active form of ISG15 is conjugated to target proteins via the C-terminal glycine residue through an isopeptide bond in a manner similar to ubiquitin. The biological role of ISG15 is strongly associated with the modulation of cell immune function, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that many viral pathogens evade the host innate immune response by interfering with ISG15 conjugation to both host and viral proteins in a variety of ways. Here we report nearly complete backbone 1HN, 15N, 13CO, and 13Ca, as well as side chain 13Cb, methyl (Ile-d1, Leu, Val), amide (Asn, Gln), and indole NH (Trp) NMR resonance assignments for the 157-residue human ISG15 protein. These resonance assignments provide the basis for future structural and functional solution NMR studies of the biologically important human ISG15 protein.

  6. 3D ¹⁵N/¹⁵N/¹H chemical shift correlation experiment utilizing an RFDR-based ¹H/¹H mixing period at 100 kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yusuke; Malon, Michal; Ishii, Yuji; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Homonuclear correlation NMR experiments are commonly used in the high-resolution structural studies of proteins. While (13)C/(13)C chemical shift correlation experiments utilizing dipolar recoupling techniques are fully utilized under MAS, correlation of the chemical shifts of (15)N nuclei in proteins has been a challenge. Previous studies have shown that the negligible (15)N-(15)N dipolar coupling in peptides or proteins necessitates the use of a very long mixing time (typically several seconds) for effective spin diffusion to occur and considerably slows down a (15)N/(15)N correlation experiment. In this study, we show that the use of mixing proton magnetization, instead of (15)N, via the recoupled (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings enable faster (15)N/(15)N correlation. In addition, the use of proton-detection under ultrafast MAS overcomes the sensitivity loss due to multiple magnetization transfer (between (1)H and (15)N nuclei) steps. In fact, less than 300 nL (∼1.1 micromole quantity) sample is sufficient to acquire the 3D spectrum within 5 h. Our results also demonstrate that a 3D (15)N/(15)N/(1)H experiment can render higher resolution spectra that will be useful in the structural studies of proteins at ultrafast MAS frequencies. 3D (15)N/(15)N/(1)H and 2D radio frequency-driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR)-based (1)H/(1)H experimental results obtained from a powder sample of N-acetyla-L-(15)N-valyl-L-(15)N-leucine at 70 and 100kHz MAS frequencies are presented. PMID:24801998

  7. Blue-shifted and picosecond amplified UV emission from aqueous chemical grown ZnO microrods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Empizo, Melvin John F.; Yamanoi, Kohei; Santos-Putungan, Alexandra B.; Arita, Ren; Minami, Yuki; Luong, Mui Viet; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Estacio, Elmer S.; Somintac, Armando S.; Salvador, Arnel A.; Sarmago, Roland V.; Sarukura, Nobuhiko

    2015-10-01

    Room-temperature amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) has been observed from aqueous chemical grown zinc oxide (ZnO) microrods. The well-faceted microrods have only a single narrow ultraviolet (UV) emission at 390 nm (3.2 eV) with average lifetimes as fast as 85-100 ps. The characteristic ASE also exhibits blue-shifted peaks and shortened lifetimes. At present, the peak shifting and the lifetime shortening are attributed to the band filling and photo-induced screening effects and to the nonradiative relaxation process, respectively. Results indicate that the ZnO microrods have good structural and optical quality which leads to their suitable use for optoelectronic applications.

  8. On the bathochromic shift of the absorption by astaxanthin in crustacyanin: a quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbeej, Bo; Eriksson, Leif A.

    2003-06-01

    The structural origin of the bathochromic shift assumed by the electronic absorption spectrum of protein-bound astaxanthin, the carotenoid that upon binding to crustacyanin is responsible for the blue colouration of lobster shell, is investigated by means of quantum chemical methods. The calculations suggest that the bathochromic shift is largely due to one of the astaxanthin C4 keto groups being hydrogen-bonded to a histidine residue of the surrounding protein, and that the effect of this histidine is directly dependent on its protonation state. Out of the different methodologies (CIS, TD-DFT, and ZINDO/S) employed to calculate wavelengths of maximum absorption, the best agreement with experimental data is obtained using the semiempirical ZINDO/S method.

  9. Direct detection of spin chemical potential shift through spin filtering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Guoxing; Moodera, Jagadeesh

    2010-03-01

    Spin filtering (SF) effect is a unique way to generate highly spin-polarized tunnel currents from nonmagnetic electrodes. Magnetic tunnel junctions based on pure SF effect have been realized recently [1] as a clear demonstration of principle for the spin manipulation through SF effect. The next challenge is the readout of spin information. In this work, we present the direct detection of the spin chemical potential shift in an Al nano cluster sandwiched between two SF EuS tunnel barriers. The spin channels are split by depositing Al directly onto EuS, and the indirect exchange interaction between the Al conduction electrons and the localized Eu 4f electrons gives rise to an effective Zeeman splitting with the strength of a few mV. EuS on the readout side is isolated from the Al clusters with a natural Al2O3 barrier. In a vertical measurement geometry with no transport current, we directly detected the spin dependent voltage levels by aligning the detection SF barrier parallel or antiparallel to the first SF barrier, corresponding to the equilibrium up- and down-spin chemical potentials. A simple analysis treating the barriers as a set of resistors revealed that the observed voltage difference is the actual chemical potential shift modulated by the SF efficiency.[4pt] [1] G.X. Miao, M. Muller, J.S. Moodera,PRL102,076601(2009)

  10. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  11. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations (13C–13C, 15N–13C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 13C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited “hand-picked” data sets, we show that ~94 % of the 13C NMR data and almost all 15N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6 % of the 13C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. −2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided command

  12. Performance of Density Functional Models to Reproduce Observed 13Cα Chemical Shifts of Proteins in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Baldoni, Héctor A.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to test several density functional models (namely, OPBE, O3LYP, OPW91, BPW91, OB98, BPBE, B971, OLYP, PBE1PBE, and B3LYP) to determine their accuracy and speed for computing 13Cα chemical shifts in proteins. The test is applied to 10 NMR-derived conformations of the 76-residue α/β protein ubiquitin (protein data bank id 1D3Z). With each functional, the 13Cα shielding was computed for 760 amino acid residues by using a combination of approaches that includes, but is not limited to, treating each amino acid X in the sequence as a terminally blocked tripeptide with the sequence Ac-GXG-NMe in the conformation of the regularized experimental protein structure. As computation of the 13Cα chemical shifts, not their shielding, is the main goal of this work, a computation of the 13Cα shielding of the reference, namely, tetramethylsilane, is investigated here and an effective and a computed tetramethylsilane shielding value for each of the functionals is provided. Despite observed small differences among all functionals tested, the results indicate that four of them, namely, OPBE, OPW91, OB98, and OLYP, provide the most accurate functionals with which to reproduce observed 13Cα chemical shifts of proteins in solution, and are among the faster ones. This study also provides evidence for the applicability of these functionals to proteins of any size or class, and for the validation of our previous results and conclusions, obtained from calculations with the slower B3LYP functional. PMID:18780343

  13. Study the chemical composition and biological outcomes resulting from the interaction of the hormone adrenaline with heavy elements: Infrared, Raman, electronic, 1H NMR, XRD and SEM studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Omar B.; Mohamed, Mahmoud A.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal adrenaline complexes formed from the reaction of adrenaline with Al3+, Zn2+, Sn2+, Sb3+, Pb2+and Bi3+ ions in methanolic solvent at 60 °C. The final reaction products have been isolated and characterization using elemental analyses (% of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen), conductivity measurements, mid infrared, Raman laser, UV-Vis, 1H NMR spectra, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Upon the spectroscopic, conductivity and elemental analyses, the stoichiometric reactions indicated that the data obtained refer to 1:2 (M:L) for Zn2+, Sn2+, Pb2+and Bi3+ complexes [Zn(Adr)2(Cl)2], [Sn(Adr)2]Cl2, [Pb(Adr)2](NO3)2 and [Bi(Adr)2(Cl)2]Cl, while the molar ratio 1:3 (M:L) for Al3+ and Sb3+ with formulas [Al(Adr)3](NO3)3 and [Sb(Adr)3]Cl3. The infrared and Raman laser spectra interpreted the mode of interactions which associated through the two phenolic groups of catechol moiety. The adrenaline chelates have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacteria, Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two strains of fungus (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The metal chelates were shown to possess more antibacterial and antifungal activities than the free adrenaline chelate.

  14. FT-IR, Laser-Raman spectra and quantum chemical calculations of methyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate-A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, Yusuf; Sreenivasa, S.; Doğan, H.; Manojkumar, K. E.; Suchetan, P. A.; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-06-01

    In this study the experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory agent namely, methyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate have been investigated. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and Laser-Raman spectra (4000-100 cm-1) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths, bond angles and torsion angles) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr and DFT/M06-2X: highly parameterized, empirical exchange correlation function) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 03 software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been done by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and results in the literature. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy and the other related molecular energy values of the compound have been investigated using the same theoretical calculations.

  15. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian A; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz-McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (< or equal 16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > or =5 for echo train lengths (ETLs) > or =4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and/or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with > or =4 echoes and for T2*(<1.0%) with > or =7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire < or =16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo

  16. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brian A.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D.; Stafford, R. Jason

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz–McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (≤16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer–Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)≥5 for echo train lengths (ETLs)≥4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and∕or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with ≥4 echoes and for T2* (<1.0%) with ≥7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire ≤16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo and in vivo

  17. Can the current density map topology be extracted from the nucleus independent chemical shifts?

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Sofie; Acke, Guillaume; Havenith, Remco W A; Bultinck, Patrick

    2016-04-28

    Aromatic compounds are characterised by the presence of a ring current when in a magnetic field. As a consequence, current density maps are used to assess (the degree of) aromaticity of a compound. However, often a more discrete set of so-called Nucleus Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) values is used that is derived from the current density. It is shown here that there is no simple one-to-one relationship that allows reconstructing current density maps from only NICS-values. NICS values should therefore not be used as aromaticity indices without analysis of the ab initio computed current density map. PMID:26762574

  18. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  19. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored. PMID:27598217

  20. Synthesis, structural, and spectroscopic (FT-IR, NMR, and UV) Characterization of 1-(Cyclohexylmethyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole by experimental techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Namık; Dayan, Osman; Demirmen, Selin

    2016-05-01

    The title compound ( II), 1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole (C19H21N3), was synthesized via N-alkylation of 2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole ( I). Both compounds I and II were characterized by IR, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy. Solid-state structure of compound II was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Furthermore, quantum chemical calculations employing density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-311++ G( d, p) basis set were performed for the theoretical characterization of the molecular and spectroscopic features of the compounds. Using the TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the compounds have been predicted at same level. When the obtained results were compared with the experimental findings, it is seen that theoretical results support the experimental data and a good agreement exists between them.

  1. Calcium-43 chemical shift and electric field gradient tensor interplay: a sensitive probe of structure, polymorphism, and hydration.

    PubMed

    Widdifield, Cory M; Moudrakovski, Igor; Bryce, David L

    2014-07-14

    Calcium is the 5th most abundant element on earth, and is found in numerous biological tissues, proteins, materials, and increasingly in catalysts. However, due to a number of unfavourable nuclear properties, such as a low magnetogyric ratio, very low natural abundance, and its nuclear electric quadrupole moment, development of solid-state (43)Ca NMR has been constrained relative to similar nuclides. In this study, 12 commonly-available calcium compounds are analyzed via(43)Ca solid-state NMR and the information which may be obtained by the measurement of both the (43)Ca electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift tensors (the latter of which are extremely rare with only a handful of literature examples) is discussed. Combined with density functional theory (DFT) computations, this 'tensor interplay' is, for the first time for (43)Ca, illustrated to be diagnostic in distinguishing polymorphs (e.g., calcium formate), and the degree of hydration (e.g., CaCl2·2H2O and calcium tartrate tetrahydrate). For Ca(OH)2, we outline the first example of (1)H to (43)Ca cross-polarization on a sample at natural abundance in (43)Ca. Using prior knowledge of the relationship between the isotropic calcium chemical shift and the calcium quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) with coordination number, we postulate the coordination number in a sample of calcium levulinate dihydrate, which does not have a known crystal structure. Natural samples of CaCO3 (aragonite polymorph) are used to show that the synthetic structure is present in nature. Gauge-including projector augmented-wave (GIPAW) DFT computations using accepted crystal structures for many of these systems generally result in calculated NMR tensor parameters which are in very good agreement with the experimental observations. This combination of (43)Ca NMR measurements with GIPAW DFT ultimately allows us to establish clear correlations between various solid-state (43)Ca NMR observables and selected structural parameters

  2. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  3. Resolution enhancement in spectra of natural products dissolved in weakly orienting media with the help of 1H homonuclear dipolar decoupling during acquisition: Application to 1H- 13C dipolar couplings measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farjon, Jonathan; Bermel, Wolfgang; Griesinger, Christian

    2006-05-01

    In weakly orienting media such as poly-γ-benzyl- L-glutamate (PBLG) a polymer that forms a chiral liquid crystal in organic solvents, the spectral resolution for embedded molecules is usually poor because of numerous 1H, 1H dipolar couplings that generally broaden proton spectra. Therefore 1H, 13C dipolar couplings are difficult or impossible to measure. Here, we incorporate Flip-Flop decoupling during detection into an HSQC experiment. Flip-Flop removes the 1H, 1H dipolar couplings and scales the chemical shifts of the protons as well as the 1H, 13C dipolar couplings during detection. A resolution gain by a factor 1.5-4.2 and improved signal intensity by an average factor of 1.6-1.7 have been obtained. This technique is demonstrated on (+)-menthol dissolved in a PBLG/CDCl 3 phase.

  4. Correlation between 19F environment and isotropic chemical shift in barium and calcium fluoroaluminates.

    PubMed

    Body, M; Silly, G; Legein, C; Buzaré, J-Y

    2004-04-19

    High-speed MAS (19)F NMR spectra are recorded and reconstructed for 10 compounds from BaF(2)-AlF(3) and CaF(2)-AlF(3) binary systems which leads to the determination of 77 isotropic (19)F chemical shifts in various environments. A first attribution of NMR lines is performed for 8 compounds using a superposition model as initially proposed by B. Bureau et al. The phenomenological parameters of this model are then refined to improve the NMR line assignment. A satisfactory reliability is reached with a root-mean-square (RMS) deviation between calculated and measured values equal to 6 ppm. The refined parameters are then successfully tested on alpha-BaCaAlF(7) whose structure was recently determined. Finally, the isotropic chemical shift ranges are defined for shared, unshared, and "free" fluorine atoms encountered in the investigated binary systems. So, the fluorine surroundings can be deduced from the NMR line positions in compounds whose structure is unknown. Such an approach can also be applied to fluoride glasses. PMID:15074964

  5. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine.

  6. Density-functional computation of ⁹³Nb NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Wrackmeyer, Bernd

    2010-12-01

    93Nb chemical shifts of [NbX6](-) (X = Cl, F, CO), [NbXCl4](-) (X = O, S), Nb2(OMe)10, Cp*2Nb(κ2-BH4), (Cp*Nb)2(µ-B2H6)2, CpNb(CO)4, and Cp2NbH3 are computed at the GIAO (gauge-including atomic orbitals)-, BPW91- and B3LYP-, and CSGT (continuous set of gauge transformations)-CAM-B3LYP, -ωB97, and -ωB97X levels, using BP86-optimized or experimental (X-ray) geometries. Experimental chemical shifts are best reproduced at the GIAO-BPW91 level when δ(93Nb) values of inorganic complexes are referenced directly relative to [NbCl6](-) and those of organometallic species are first calculated relative to [Nb(CO)6](-). An inadvertent error in the reported δ(93Nb) values of cyclopentadiene borane complexes (H. Brunner et al., J. Organomet. Chem.1992, 436, 313) is corrected. Trends in the observed 93Nb NMR linewidths for anionic niobates [Nb(CO)5](3-), [Nb(CO)5H](2-), and [Nb(CO)5(NH3)](-) are rationalized in terms of computed electric field gradients at the metal. PMID:20552575

  7. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine. PMID:26350355

  8. Solvation effects on chemical shifts by embedded cluster integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M

    2014-12-11

    The accurate computational prediction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters like chemical shifts represents a challenge if the species studied is immersed in strongly polarizing environments such as water. Common approaches to treating a solvent in the form of, e.g., the polarizable continuum model (PCM) ignore strong directional interactions such as H-bonds to the solvent which can have substantial impact on magnetic shieldings. We here present a computational methodology that accounts for atomic-level solvent effects on NMR parameters by extending the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) integral equation theory to the prediction of chemical shifts of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in aqueous solution. We examine the influence of various so-called closure approximations of the underlying three-dimensional RISM theory as well as the impact of basis set size and different treatment of electrostatic solute-solvent interactions. We find considerable and systematic improvement over reference PCM and gas phase calculations. A smaller basis set in combination with a simple point charge model already yields good performance which can be further improved by employing exact electrostatic quantum-mechanical solute-solvent interaction energies. A larger basis set benefits more significantly from exact over point charge electrostatics, which can be related to differences of the solvent's charge distribution. PMID:25377116

  9. A general chemical shift decomposition method for hyperpolarized (13) C metabolite magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Xiong; Merritt, Matthew E; Sherry, Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized carbon-13 allows sequential steps of metabolism to be detected in vivo. Potential applications in cancer, brain, muscular, myocardial, and hepatic metabolism suggest that clinical applications could be readily developed. A primary concern in imaging hyperpolarized nuclei is the irreversible decay of the enhanced magnetization back to thermal equilibrium. Multiple methods for rapid imaging of hyperpolarized substrates and their products have been proposed with a multi-point Dixon method distinguishing itself as a robust protocol for imaging [1-(13) C]pyruvate. We describe here a generalized chemical shift decomposition method that incorporates a single-shot spiral imaging sequence plus a spectroscopic sequence to retain as much spin polarization as possible while allowing detection of metabolites that have a wide range of chemical shift values. The new method is demonstrated for hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate, [1-(13) C]acetoacetate, and [2-(13) C]dihydroxyacetone. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27060361

  10. Relativistic environmental effects in (29)Si NMR chemical shifts of halosilanes: light nucleus, heavy environment.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Sergey V; Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    Relativistic calculations of (29)Si NMR shielding constants (chemical shifts) in the series of halosilanes SiX(n)H(4-n) (X = F, Cl, Br and I) are performed within a full four-component relativistic Dirac's scheme using relativistic Dyall's basis sets. Three different theoretical levels are tested in the computation of (29)Si NMR chemical shifts in comparison with experiment: namely, four-component relativistic GIAO-DFT, four-component relativistic GIAO-RPA, and a hybrid scheme of a nonrelativistic GIAO-MP2 with taking into account relativistic corrections using the four-component relativistic GIAO-RPA. The DFT results give larger relativistic effects as compared to the RPA data which might be rationalized in terms of the manifestation of correlation effects taken into account at the DFT level and not accounted for at the uncorrelated RPA level. Taking into account solvent effects slightly improves agreement with experiment, however, being not a matter of principle. Generally, relativistic pure nonempirical wave function methods perform much better as compared to relativistic DFT methods when benchmarked to experiment. PMID:25946056

  11. Predicting Pt-195 NMR chemical shift using new relativistic all-electron basis set.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, D; Guerra, C Fonseca; de Oliveira, M A L; Ramalho, T C; Dos Santos, H F

    2016-10-01

    Predicting NMR properties is a valuable tool to assist the experimentalists in the characterization of molecular structure. For heavy metals, such as Pt-195, only a few computational protocols are available. In the present contribution, all-electron Gaussian basis sets, suitable to calculate the Pt-195 NMR chemical shift, are presented for Pt and all elements commonly found as Pt-ligands. The new basis sets identified as NMR-DKH were partially contracted as a triple-zeta doubly polarized scheme with all coefficients obtained from a Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) second-order scalar relativistic calculation. The Pt-195 chemical shift was predicted through empirical models fitted to reproduce experimental data for a set of 183 Pt(II) complexes which NMR sign ranges from -1000 to -6000 ppm. Furthermore, the models were validated using a new set of 75 Pt(II) complexes, not included in the descriptive set. The models were constructed using non-relativistic Hamiltonian at density functional theory (DFT-PBEPBE) level with NMR-DKH basis set for all atoms. For the best model, the mean absolute deviation (MAD) and the mean relative deviation (MRD) were 150 ppm and 6%, respectively, for the validation set (75 Pt-complexes) and 168 ppm (MAD) and 5% (MRD) for all 258 Pt(II) complexes. These results were comparable with relativistic DFT calculation, 200 ppm (MAD) and 6% (MRD). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27510431

  12. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds. PMID:19685922

  13. Qualitative Study of Substituent Effects on NMR 15N and 17O Chemical Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Rubén H.; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Bustamante, Manuel G.; Pasqualini, Enrique E.; Melo, Juan I.; Tormena, Cláudio F.

    2009-08-01

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-β substituent effects on both 15N and 17O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and σ-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  14. Quantum-chemical insight into structure-reactivity relationship in 4,5,6,7-tetrahalogeno-1H-benzimidazoles: a combined X-ray, DSC, DFT/QTAIM, Hirshfeld surface-based, and molecular docking approach.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Maurin, Jan Krzysztof; Orzeszko, Andrzej; Kazimierczuk, Zygmunt

    2014-03-20

    The weak interaction patterns in 4,5,6,7-tetrahalogeno-1H-benzimidazoles, protein kinase CK2 inhibitors, in solid state are studied by the X-ray method and quantum chemistry calculations. The crystal structures of 4,5,6,7-tetrachloro- and 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole are determined by X-ray diffraction and refined to a final R-factor of 3.07 and 3.03%, respectively, at room temperature. The compound 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole, which crystallizes in the I41/a space group, is found to be isostructural with previously studied 4,5,6,7-tetraiodo-1H-benzimidazole in contrast to 4,5,6,7-tetrachloro-1H-benzimidazole, which crystallizes as triclinic P1̅ with 4 molecules in elementary unit. For 4,5,6,7-tetrachloro-1H-benzimidazole, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed a second order glassy phase transition at Tg = 95°/106° (heating/cooling), an indication of frozen disorder. The lack of 3D isostructurality found in all 4,5,6,7-tetrahalogeno-1H-benzimidazoles is elucidated on the basis of the intra- and intermolecular interactions (hydrogen bonding, van der Waals contacts, and C-H···π interactions). The topological Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and Spackman's Hirshfeld surface-based approaches reveal equilibration of electrostatic matching and dispersion van der Waals interactions between molecules consistent with the crystal site-symmetry. The weakening of van der Waals forces accompanied by increasing strength of the hydrogen bond (N-H···N) result in a decrease in the crystal site-symmetry and a change in molecular packing in the crystalline state. Crystal packing motifs were investigated with the aid of Hirshfeld surface fingerprint plots. The ordering 4,5,6,7-tetraiodo > 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo > 4,5,6,7-tetrachloro > 4,5,6,7-tetrafluoro reflects not only a decrease in crystal symmetry but also increase in chemical reactivity (electronic activation), which could explain some changes in biological activity of

  15. Cuticular hydrocarbon divergence in the jewel wasp Nasonia: Evolutionary shifts in chemical communication channels?

    PubMed Central

    Buellesbach, Jan; Gadau, Jürgen; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Echinger, Felix; Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Werren, John H.; Schmitt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The evolution and maintenance of intraspecific communication channels constitutes a key feature of chemical signaling and sexual communication. However, how divergent chemical communication channels evolve while maintaining their integrity for both sender and receiver is poorly understood. In the present study, we compare male and female cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles in the jewel wasp genus Nasonia, analyze their chemical divergence, and investigate their role as species-specific sexual signaling cues. Males and females of all four Nasonia species showed unique, non-overlapping CHC profiles unambiguously separating them. Surprisingly, male and female phylogenies based on the chemical distances between their CHC profiles differed dramatically, where only male CHC divergence parallels the molecular phylogeny of Nasonia. In particular, N. giraulti female CHC profiles were the most divergent from all other species and very different from its most closely related sibling species N. oneida. Furthermore, although our behavioural assays indicate that female CHC can generally be perceived as sexual cues attracting males in Nasonia, this function has apparently been lost in the highly divergent female N. giraulti CHC profiles. Curiously, N. giraulti males are still attracted to heterospecific, but not to conspecific female CHC profiles. We suggest that this striking discrepancy has been caused by an extensive evolutionary shift in female N. giraulti CHC profiles, which are no longer used as conspecific recognition cues. Our study constitutes the first report of an apparent abandonment of a sexual recognition cue that the receiver did not adapt to. PMID:24118588

  16. Molecular structure, spectral investigation (1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Visible, FT-IR, FT-Raman), NBO, intramolecular hydrogen bonding, chemical reactivity and first hyperpolarizability analysis of formononetin [7-hydroxy-3(4-methoxyphenyl)chromone]: A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Mishra, Rashmi; Kumar, Sudhir; Dev, Kapil; Tandon, Poonam; Maurya, Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Formononetin [7-hydroxy-3(4-methoxyphenyl)chromone or 4‧-methoxy daidzein] is a soy isoflavonoid that is found abundantly in traditional Chinese medicine Astragalus mongholicus (Bunge) and Trifolium pretense L. (red clover), and in an Indian medicinal plant, Butea (B.) monosperma. Crude extract of B.monosperma is used for rapid healing of fracture in Indian traditional medicine. In this study, a combined theoretical and experimental approach is used to study the properties of formononetin. The optimized geometry was calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p) as a large basis set. The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were recorded in the solid phase, and interpreted in terms of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis. Density functional theory (DFT) is applied to explore the nonlinear optical properties of the molecule. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and observed data for the electronic absorption, IR and Raman spectra. The solvent effects have been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory in combination with the integral equation formalism polarized continuum model, and the results are in good agreement with observed measurements. The double well potential energy curve of the molecule about the respective bonds, have been plotted, as obtained from DFT/6-31G basis set. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of formononetin. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap of possible conformers has been calculated for comparing their chemical activity. Chemical reactivity has been measured by reactivity descriptors and molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEP). The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Furthermore, the role of CHsbnd O intramolecular hydrogen bond in the stability of molecule is investigated on the basis of the results of topological properties of AIM theory and NBO analysis. The calculated first hyperpolarizability shows

  17. U1h Superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Glen Sykes

    2000-11-01

    The U1H Shaft Project is a design build subcontract to supply the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) a 1,045 ft. deep, 20 ft. diameter, concrete lined shaft for unspecified purposes. The subcontract awarded to Atkinson Construction by Bechtel Nevada to design and construct the shaft for the DOE has been split into phases with portions of the work being released as dictated by available funding. The first portion released included the design for the shaft, permanent hoist, headframe, and collar arrangement. The second release consisted of constructing the shaft collar to a depth of 110 ft., the service entry, utility trenches, and installation of the temporary sinking plant. The temporary sinking plant included the installation of the sinking headframe, the sinking hoist, two deck winches, the shaft form, the sinking work deck, and temporary utilities required to sink the shaft. Both the design and collar construction were completed on schedule. The third release consisted of excavating and lining the shaft to the station depth of approximately 950 feet. Work is currently proceeding on this production sinking phase. At a depth of approximately 600 feet, Atkinson has surpassed production expectation and is more than 3 months ahead of schedule. Atkinson has employed the use of a Bobcat 331 excavator as the primary means of excavation. the shaft is being excavated entirely in an alluvial deposit with varying degrees of calcium carbonate cementation. Several more work packages are expected to be released in the near future. The remaining work packages include, construction of the shaft station a depth of 975 ft. and construction of the shaft sump to a depth of 1,045 ft., installation of the loading pocket and station steel and equipment, installation of the shaft steel and guides, installation of the shaft utilities, and installation of the permanent headframe, hoist, collar utilities, and facilities.

  18. Organometallic derivatives of furan. LII. Synthesis of carbofunctional furylsilanes and their /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 29/Si NMR spectroscopic and quantum-chemical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Lukevits, E.; Erchak, N.P.; Castro, I.; Popelis, Yu.Yu.; Kozyrev, A.K.; Anoshkin, V.I.; Kovalev, I.F.

    1986-03-10

    Under the standard conditions for the synthesis of furan compounds it is possible to obtain the carbofunctional derivatives of silylated furfural with retention of the trimethylsilyl group in the ring. By NMR and CNDO/2 LCAO MO methods and also as a result of the investigation of the chemical characteristics of silylated furfural and its carbofunctional derivatives it was established that the introduction of a trimethylsilyl group at position 5 of the furan ring does not change the reactivity of the carbofunctional substituents at position 2. The electronic effects of the substituents are hardly transmitted through the furan ring at all. The effect of substituents in the carbofunctional furylsilanes on the electronic structure of the ring is additive.

  19. 1H NMR investigation of self-association of vanillin in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Mircea; Floare, Calin G.; Pîrnau, Adrian

    2009-08-01

    A self-association of vanillin have been studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy using the analysis of proton chemical shifts changes in aqueous solution as a function of concentration. The experimental results have been analysed using indefinite non-cooperative and cooperative models of molecular self-association, enabling the determination of equilibrium constants, parameters of cooperativity and the limiting values of vanillin proton chemical shifts in the complex. It was found that the dimer formation creates energetically favourable conditions for subsequent molecular association.

  20. Stereochemistry of Complex Marine Natural Products by Quantum Mechanical Calculations of NMR Chemical Shifts: Solvent and Conformational Effects on Okadaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Humberto J.; Crespín, Guillermo D.; Santiago-Benítez, Adrián J.; Gavín, José A.; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J.; Hernández Daranas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Marine organisms are an increasingly important source of novel metabolites, some of which have already inspired or become new drugs. In addition, many of these molecules show a high degree of novelty from a structural and/or pharmacological point of view. Structure determination is generally achieved by the use of a variety of spectroscopic methods, among which NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) plays a major role and determination of the stereochemical relationships within every new molecule is generally the most challenging part in structural determination. In this communication, we have chosen okadaic acid as a model compound to perform a computational chemistry study to predict 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts. The effect of two different solvents and conformation on the ability of DFT (density functional theory) calculations to predict the correct stereoisomer has been studied. PMID:24402177

  1. Water-fat imaging and general chemical shift imaging with spectrum modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Li

    Water-fat chemical shift imaging (CSI) has been an active research area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the early 1980's. There are two main reasons for water- fat imaging. First, water-fat imaging can serve as a fat- suppression method. Removing the usually bright fatty signals not only extends the useful dynamic range of an image, but also allows better visualization of lesions or injected contrast, and removes chemical shift artifacts, which may contribute to improved diagnosis. Second, quantification of water and fat provides useful chemical information for characterizing tissues such as bone marrow, liver, and adrenal masses. A milestone in water- fat imaging is the Dixon method that can produce separate water and fat images with only two data acquisitions. In practice, however, the Dixon method is not always successful due to field inhomogeneity problems. In recent years, many variations of the Dixon method have been proposed to overcome the field inhomogeneity problem. In general, these methods can at best separate water and fat without identifying the two because the water and fat magnetization vectors are sampled symmetrically, only parallel and anti-parallel. Furthermore, these methods usually depend on two-dimensional phase unwrapping which itself is sensitive to noise and artifacts, and becomes unreliable when the images have disconnected tissues in the field-of-view (FOV). We will first introduce the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chapter 1, and briefly review the existing water-fat imaging techniques in chapter 2. In chapter 3, we will introduce a new method for water-fat imaging. With three image acquisitions, a general direct phase encoding (DPE) of the chemical shift information is achieved, which allows an unambiguous determination of water and fat on a pixel by pixel basis. Details of specific implementations and noise performance will be discussed. Representative results

  2. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamura, Naoka Kitada, Yuta; Honma, Itaru; Tsurumi, Junto; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun; Horiba, Koji; Oshima, Masaharu

    2015-06-22

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO{sub 2} (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying −30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping.

  3. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamura, Naoka; Kitada, Yuta; Tsurumi, Junto; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Horiba, Koji; Honma, Itaru; Takeya, Jun; Oshima, Masaharu

    2015-06-01

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO2 (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying -30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping.

  4. 125Te NMR chemical-shift trends in PbTe–GeTe and PbTe–SnTe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Njegic, Bosiljka; Levin, Evgenii M.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-10-08

    Complex tellurides, such as doped PbTe, GeTe, and their alloys, are among the best thermoelectric materials. Knowledge of the change in 125Te NMR chemical shift due to bonding to dopant or “solute” atoms is useful for determination of phase composition, peak assignment, and analysis of local bonding. We have measured the 125Te NMR chemical shifts in PbTe-based alloys, Pb1-xGexTe and Pb1-xSnxTe, which have a rocksalt-like structure, and analyzed their trends. For low x, several peaks are resolved in the 22-kHz MAS 125Te NMR spectra. A simple linear trend in chemical shifts with the number of Pb neighbors is observed. No evidence of a proposed ferroelectric displacement of Ge atoms in a cubic PbTe matrix is detected at low Ge concentrations. The observed chemical shift trends are compared with the results of DFT calculations, which confirm the linear dependence on the composition of the first-neighbor shell. The data enable determination of the composition of various phases in multiphase telluride materials. They also provide estimates of the 125Te chemical shifts of GeTe and SnTe (+970 and +400±150 ppm, respectively, from PbTe), which are otherwise difficult to access due to Knight shifts of many hundreds of ppm in neat GeTe and SnTe.

  5. Characterisation of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of methylcitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Hanna; Martyniuk, Tomasz

    2007-06-01

    Methylcitric acid (MCA) was synthesised in Reformatsky reaction (2 RS, 3 RS stereoisomers) and in the nucleophilic addition (2 RS, 3 SR stereoisomers). The stereoselectivity of these reactions was analysed. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of diastereoisomers of methylcitric acid were recorded and interpreted. The values of 1H chemical shifts and 1H- 1H coupling constants were analysed. Proton-decoupled high-resolution 13C NMR spectra of MCA diastereoisomers were measured in a series of dilute water solutions of various acidities. These data may provide a basis for unequivocal determination of the presence of MCA in the urine samples of patients' suffering from propionic acidemia, methylmalonic aciduria, or holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. NMR spectroscopy enables determination of MCA diastereoisomers in body fluids and can be a complementary and useful diagnostic tool.

  6. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  7. Quantum Chemical Calculations of Amide-15N Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors for a Membrane-Bound Cytochrome b5

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining amide-15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors from biomolecules and understanding their variation for structural and dynamics studies using solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy and also by quantum chemical calculations. Due to the difficulties associated with the measurement of CSA tensors from membrane proteins, NMR-based structural studies heavily relied on the CSA tensors determined from model systems, typically single crystals of model peptides. In the present study, the principal components of backbone amide-15N CSA tensor have been determined using density functional theory for a 16.7-kDa membrane-bound paramagnetic heme containing protein, cytochrome b5 (cytb5). All the calculations were performed by taking residues within 5Å distance from the backbone amide-15N nucleus of interest. The calculated amide-15N CSA spans agree less well with our solution NMR data determined for an effective internuclear distance rN-H = 1.023 Å and a constant angle β = 18° that the least shielded component (δ11) makes with the N-H bond. The variation of amide-15N CSA span obtained using quantum chemical calculations is found to be smaller than that obtained from solution NMR measurements, whereas the trends of the variations are found to be in close agreement. We believe that the results reported in this study will be useful in studying the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and heme-containing proteins, and also membrane-bound protein-protein complexes such as cytochromes-b5-P450. PMID:23268659

  8. XPS Chemical Shifts for CO Adsorbed on Ni(100):. a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedocchi, L.; Rovida, G.; Russo, N.

    Starting from the observed chemical shift of C-1s and O-1s ionization potentials (IP), reported in the literature for the adsorption of CO on Ni(100), and correlated to the different CO adsorption sites at different coverages, we have carried out a theoretical investigation, using a first-principle density-functional method, to calculate ionization energies for adsorbed CO in the atop and bridge sites. In our approach, the Ni(100) surface was simulated with clusters of up to nine metal atoms of different geometry, in order to test the two adsorption sites. For each cluster, the CO adsorption geometry was optimized and the O-1s and C-1s ionizations were calculated. The main result was that the (O-1s-C-1s) difference was very well reproduced even with clusters of modest size, thus confirming the possibility to use this value as a structure-sensitive parameter.

  9. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, S M

    2011-09-21

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 {+-} 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 {+-} 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 {+-} 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  10. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  11. Subchondral bone and cartilage thickness from MRI: effects of chemical-shift artifact.

    PubMed

    McGibbon, Chris A; Bencardino, Jenny; Palmer, William E

    2003-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for visualizing and quantifying articular cartilage thickness. However, difficulties persist in MRI of subchondral bone using spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) and other gradient-echo sequences, primarily due to the effects of chemical-shift artifact. Fat suppression techniques are often used to reduce these artifacts, but they prevent measurement of bone thickness. In this report, we assess the magnitude of chemical-shift effects (phase-cancellation and misregistration artifacts) on subchondral bone and cartilage thickness measurements in human femoral heads using a variety of pulse sequence parameters. Phase-cancellation effects were quantified by comparing measurements from in-phase images (TE=13.5 ms) to out-of-phase images (TE=15.8 ms). We also tested the assumption of the optimal in-phase TE by comparing thickness measures at small variations on TE (13.0, 13.5 and 14.0 ms). Misregistration effects were quantified by comparing measurements from water+fat images (water-only+fat-only images) to the measurements from in-phase (TE=13.5) images. A correction algorithm was developed and applied to the in-phase measurements and then compared to measurements from water+fat images. We also compared thickness measurements at different image resolutions. Results showed that both phase-cancellation artifact and misregistration artifact were significant for bone thickness measurement, but not for cartilage thickness measurement. Using an in-phase TE and correction algorithm for misregistration artifact, the errors in bone thickness relative to water+fat images were non-significant. This information may be useful for developing pulse sequences for optimal imaging of both cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:12695880

  12. Network of long-range concerted chemical shift displacements upon ligand binding to human angiogenin

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Donald; Narayanan, Chitra; Doucet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Molecular recognition models of both induced fit and conformational selection rely on coupled networks of flexible residues and/or structural rearrangements to promote protein function. While the atomic details of these motional events still remain elusive, members of the pancreatic ribonuclease superfamily were previously shown to depend on subtle conformational heterogeneity for optimal catalytic function. Human angiogenin, a structural homologue of bovine pancreatic RNase A, induces blood vessel formation and relies on a weak yet functionally mandatory ribonucleolytic activity to promote neovascularization. Here, we use the NMR chemical shift projection analysis (CHESPA) to clarify the mechanism of ligand binding in human angiogenin, further providing information on long-range intramolecular residue networks potentially involved in the function of this enzyme. We identify two main clusters of residue networks displaying correlated linear chemical shift trajectories upon binding of substrate fragments to the purine- and pyrimidine-specific subsites of the catalytic cleft. A large correlated residue network clusters in the region corresponding to the V1 domain, a site generally associated with the angiogenic response and structural stability of the enzyme. Another correlated network (residues 40–42) negatively affects the catalytic activity but also increases the angiogenic activity. 15N-CPMG relaxation dispersion experiments could not reveal the existence of millisecond timescale conformational exchange in this enzyme, a lack of flexibility supported by the very low-binding affinities and catalytic activity of angiogenin. Altogether, the current report potentially highlights the existence of long-range dynamic reorganization of the structure upon distinct subsite binding events in human angiogenin. PMID:25450558

  13. 1H, 13C, 15N NMR coordination shifts in Fe(II), Ru(II) and Os(II) cationic complexes with 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Pawlak, Tomasz; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szlyk, Edward

    2011-05-01

    (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of iron(II), ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) bis-chelated cationic complexes with 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine ([M(terpy)(2) ](2+) ; M = Fe, Ru, Os) were performed. Significant shielding of nitrogen-adjacent H(6) and deshielding of H(3'), H(4') protons were observed, both effects being mostly expressed for Fe(II) compounds. The metal-bonded nitrogens were shielded, this effect being much larger for the outer N(1), N(1″) than the inner N(1') atoms, and enhanced in the Fe(II) → Ru(II) → Os(II) series. PMID:21491480

  14. Automated structure verification based on a combination of 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H - (13)C HSQC spectra.

    PubMed

    Golotvin, Sergey S; Vodopianov, Eugene; Pol, Rostislav; Lefebvre, Brent A; Williams, Antony J; Rutkowske, Randy D; Spitzer, Timothy D

    2007-10-01

    A method for structure validation based on the simultaneous analysis of a 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H - (13)C single-bond correlation spectrum such as HSQC or HMQC is presented here. When compared with the validation of a structure by a 1D (1)H NMR spectrum alone, the advantage of including a 2D HSQC spectrum in structure validation is that it adds not only the information of (13)C shifts, but also which proton shifts they are directly coupled to, and an indication of which methylene protons are diastereotopic. The lack of corresponding peaks in the 2D spectrum that appear in the 1D (1)H spectrum, also gives a clear picture of which protons are attached to heteroatoms. For all these benefits, combined NMR verification was expected and found by all metrics to be superior to validation by 1D (1)H NMR alone. Using multiple real-life data sets of chemical structures and the corresponding 1D and 2D data, it was possible to unambiguously identify at least 90% of the correct structures. As part of this test, challenging incorrect structures, mostly regioisomers, were also matched with each spectrum set. For these incorrect structures, the false positive rate was observed as low as 6%. PMID:17694570

  15. A strong 13C chemical shift signature provides the coordination mode of histidines in zinc-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-06-01

    Zinc is the second most abundant metal ion incorporated in proteins, and is in many cases a crucial component of protein three-dimensional structures. Zinc ions are frequently coordinated by cysteine and histidine residues. Whereas cysteines bind to zinc via their unique S(γ) atom, histidines can coordinate zinc with two different coordination modes, either N(δ1) or N(ε2) is coordinating the zinc ion. The determination of this coordination mode is crucial for the accurate structure determination of a histidine-containing zinc-binding site by NMR. NMR chemical shifts contain a vast amount of information on local electronic and structural environments and surprisingly their utilization for the determination of the coordination mode of zinc-ligated histidines has been limited so far to (15)N nuclei. In the present report, we observed that the (13)C chemical shifts of aromatic carbons in zinc-ligated histidines represent a reliable signature of their coordination mode. Using a statistical analysis of (13)C chemical shifts, we show that (13)C(δ2) chemical shift is sensitive to the histidine coordination mode and that the chemical shift difference δ{(13)C(ε1)} - δ{(13)C(δ2)} provides a reference-independent marker of this coordination mode. The present approach allows the direct determination of the coordination mode of zinc-ligated histidines even with non-isotopically enriched protein samples and without any prior structural information. PMID:22528293

  16. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Nielsen, Anders B

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization ((RESPIRATION)CP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the (RESPIRATION)CP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous (15)N → (13)CO and (15)N → (13)Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability. PMID:27608995

  17. DFT calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants, chemical shifts and complexation shifts in complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with some nitrogenous organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-03-01

    Benchmark calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants for a set of model complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with nine organic ligands using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods have been carried out. The calculations were performed by means of several methods: the non-relativistic, relativistic scalar ZORA, and spin-orbit ZORA approaches at the CGA-PBE/QZ4P theory level, and the GIAO NMR method using the B3PW91 functional with the 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and the Stuttgart basis set for the Rh atom. The geometry of compounds was optimised either by the same basis set as for the NMR calculations or applying the B3LYP functional with the 6-31G(2d) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and LANL2DZ for the Rh atom. Computed 15N NMR shielding constants σ were compatible with experimental 15N chemical shifts δ of complexes exhibiting similar structure and fulfil the linear equation δ = aσ + b. The a and b parameters for all data sets have been estimated by means of linear regression analysis. In contrast to the correlation method giving "scaled" chemical shifts, the conversion of shielding constants to chemical shifts with respect to the reference shielding of CH3NO2 provided very inaccurate "raw" δ values. The application of the former to the calculation of complexation shifts Δδ (Δδ = δcompl - δlig) reproduced experimental values qualitatively or semi-quantitatively. The non-relativistic B3PW91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] theory level reproduced the NMR parameters as good as the more expensive relativistic CGA-PBE//QZ4P ZORA approaches.

  18. Fragment-based {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Monaco, Stephen; Schatschneider, Bohdan

    2015-09-14

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits.

  19. Carbon-13 chemical-shift tensors in indigo: A two-dimensional NMR-ROCSA and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Sean T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2015-11-01

    The principal components of the (13)C NMR chemical-shift tensors for the eight unique carbon sites of crystalline indigo have been measured using the ROCSA pulse sequence. The chemical shifts have been assigned unambiguously to their respective nuclear sites through comparison of the experimental data to the results of density-functional calculations employing a refined X-ray diffraction structure. These measurements expand the database of measured aromatic (13)C chemical-shift tensors to the indole ring. Magnetic shielding calculations for hypoxanthine and adenosine are also reported. Comparisons of calculations that include the effect of the crystalline lattice with calculations that model indigo as an isolated molecule give an estimate of the intermolecular contribution to the magnetic shielding. PMID:26344134

  20. Carbon-13 chemical-shift tensors in indigo: A two-dimensional NMR-ROCSA and DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Sean T.; Dybowski, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    The principal components of the 13C NMR chemical-shift tensors for the eight unique carbon sites of crystalline indigo have been measured using the ROCSA pulse sequence. The chemical shifts have been assigned unambiguously to their respective nuclear sites through comparison of the experimental data to the results of density-functional calculations employing a refined X-ray diffraction structure. These measurements expand the database of measured aromatic 13C chemical-shift tensors to the indole ring. Magnetic shielding calculations for hypoxanthine and adenosine are also reported. Comparisons of calculations that include the effect of the crystalline lattice with calculations that model indigo as an isolated molecule give an estimate of the intermolecular contribution to the magnetic shielding. PMID:26344134

  1. [Evaluation of the Effect of Adiabatic Pulse and B1 Shim to the Radio Frequency Homogeneity in Chemical Shift Imaging].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Chie; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Okawa, Kohei; Taguchi, Jyunichi; Hirota, Yoshifumi; Yanagiya, Yohei

    2016-04-01

    It is considered that the enhancement of chemical shift and the elevation of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) induced by high magnetic fields are useful for the evaluation of metabolism using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). However, the reduction of the localization in MRS seems to be caused by the decreased homogeneity of radio frequency (RF) pulses, especially in chemical shift imaging (CSI). To search the influence of B1 shim mode and the significance of adiabatic pulses, we have examined the changes of RF homogeneity using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the water phantom and the metabolites phantom (containing acetate and lactate) in CSI. The RF homogeneity and chemical shift artifact were obviously improved using the adiabatic pulses. Improvement of the homogeneity of RF pulses was observed when B1 shim was used. These results suggest the usefulness of CSI using adiabatic pulses and B1 shim when small amount of metabolites of target is measured in MRS. PMID:27097994

  2. CAESURA: Measurement of slow molecular dynamics by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift anisotropy modulation amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Limin; Titman, Jeremy J.

    2006-08-01

    An alternative magic angle spinning (MAS) exchange NMR experiment based on chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) amplification is described. The CSA amplification experiment correlates a standard MAS spectrum in the ω2 dimension with a sideband pattern in ω1 in which the intensities are identical to those expected for a sample spinning at some fraction 1/N of the actual rate ωr. In common with 2D-PASS, the isotropic shift appears only in the ω2 dimension, and long acquisition times can be avoided without loss of resolution of different chemical sites. The new CSA amplification exchange experiment provides information about the time scale and geometry of molecular motions via their effect on the sideband intensities in a one-dimensional pattern. The one-dimensional patterns from different chemical sites are separated across two frequency dimensions according to the isotropic shifts.

  3. Shifts in microbial and chemical patterns within the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba during a disease outbreak.

    PubMed

    Webster, Nicole S; Xavier, Joana R; Freckelton, Marnie; Motti, Cherie A; Cobb, Rose

    2008-12-01

    The microbial community composition in affected and unaffected portions of diseased sponges and healthy control sponges of Aplysina aerophoba was assessed to ascertain the role of microbes in the disease process. Sponge secondary metabolites were also examined to assess chemical shifts in response to infection. The microbial profile and aplysinimine levels in unaffected tissue near the lesions closely reflected those of healthy sponge tissue, indicating a highly localized disease process. DGGE detected multiple sequences that were exclusively present in diseased sponges. Most notably, a Deltaproteobacteria sequence with high homology to a coral black band disease strain was detected in all sponge lesions and was absent from all healthy and unaffected regions of diseased sponges. Other potential pathogens identified by DGGE include an environmental Cytophaga strain and a novel Epsilonproteobacteria strain with no known close relatives. The disease process also caused a major shift in prokaryote community structure at a very high taxonomic level. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, only the diseased sponges were found to contain sequences belonging to the Epsilonproteobacteria and Firmicutes, and there was a much greater number of Bacteroidetes sequences within the diseased sponges. In contrast, only the healthy sponges contained sequences corresponding to the cyanobacteria and 'OP1' candidate division, and the healthy sponges were dominated by Chloroflexi and Gammaproteobacteria sequences. Overall bacterial diversity was found to be considerably higher in diseased sponges than in healthy sponges. These results provide a platform for future cultivation-based experiments to isolate the putative pathogens from A. aerophoba and perform re-infection trials to define the disease aetiology. PMID:18783385

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants and chemical shifts in linear 199Hg compounds: A comparison of three relativistic computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Melo, Juan I.; Hemmingsen, Lars; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the importance of relativistic effects on NMR shielding constants and chemical shifts of linear HgL2 (L = Cl, Br, I, CH3) compounds using three different relativistic methods: the fully relativistic four-component approach and the two-component approximations, linear response elimination of small component (LR-ESC) and zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA). LR-ESC reproduces successfully the four-component results for the C shielding constant in Hg(CH3)2 within 6 ppm, but fails to reproduce the Hg shielding constants and chemical shifts. The latter is mainly due to an underestimation of the change in spin-orbit contribution. Even though ZORA underestimates the absolute Hg NMR shielding constants by ˜2100 ppm, the differences between Hg chemical shift values obtained using ZORA and the four-component approach without spin-density contribution to the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel are less than 60 ppm for all compounds using three different functionals, BP86, B3LYP, and PBE0. However, larger deviations (up to 366 ppm) occur for Hg chemical shifts in HgBr2 and HgI2 when ZORA results are compared with four-component calculations with non-collinear spin-density contribution to the XC kernel. For the ZORA calculations it is necessary to use large basis sets (QZ4P) and the TZ2P basis set may give errors of ˜500 ppm for the Hg chemical shifts, despite deceivingly good agreement with experimental data. A Gaussian nucleus model for the Coulomb potential reduces the Hg shielding constants by ˜100-500 ppm and the Hg chemical shifts by 1-143 ppm compared to the point nucleus model depending on the atomic number Z of the coordinating atom and the level of theory. The effect on the shielding constants of the lighter nuclei (C, Cl, Br, I) is, however, negligible.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants and chemical shifts in linear 199Hg compounds: a comparison of three relativistic computational methods.

    PubMed

    Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Melo, Juan I; Hemmingsen, Lars; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2011-07-28

    We investigate the importance of relativistic effects on NMR shielding constants and chemical shifts of linear HgL(2) (L = Cl, Br, I, CH(3)) compounds using three different relativistic methods: the fully relativistic four-component approach and the two-component approximations, linear response elimination of small component (LR-ESC) and zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA). LR-ESC reproduces successfully the four-component results for the C shielding constant in Hg(CH(3))(2) within 6 ppm, but fails to reproduce the Hg shielding constants and chemical shifts. The latter is mainly due to an underestimation of the change in spin-orbit contribution. Even though ZORA underestimates the absolute Hg NMR shielding constants by ∼2100 ppm, the differences between Hg chemical shift values obtained using ZORA and the four-component approach without spin-density contribution to the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel are less than 60 ppm for all compounds using three different functionals, BP86, B3LYP, and PBE0. However, larger deviations (up to 366 ppm) occur for Hg chemical shifts in HgBr(2) and HgI(2) when ZORA results are compared with four-component calculations with non-collinear spin-density contribution to the XC kernel. For the ZORA calculations it is necessary to use large basis sets (QZ4P) and the TZ2P basis set may give errors of ∼500 ppm for the Hg chemical shifts, despite deceivingly good agreement with experimental data. A Gaussian nucleus model for the Coulomb potential reduces the Hg shielding constants by ∼100-500 ppm and the Hg chemical shifts by 1-143 ppm compared to the point nucleus model depending on the atomic number Z of the coordinating atom and the level of theory. The effect on the shielding constants of the lighter nuclei (C, Cl, Br, I) is, however, negligible. PMID:21806118

  6. Multiparametric fat–water separation method for fast chemical-shift imaging guidance of thermal therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jonathan S.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Jackson, Edward F.; Hazle, John D.; Jason Stafford, R.; Taylor, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A k-means-based classification algorithm is investigated to assess suitability for rapidly separating and classifying fat/water spectral peaks from a fast chemical shift imaging technique for magnetic resonance temperature imaging. Algorithm testing is performed in simulated mathematical phantoms and agar gel phantoms containing mixed fat/water regions. Methods: Proton resonance frequencies (PRFs), apparent spin-spin relaxation (T2*) times, and T1-weighted (T1-W) amplitude values were calculated for each voxel using a single-peak autoregressive moving average (ARMA) signal model. These parameters were then used as criteria for k-means sorting, with the results used to determine PRF ranges of each chemical species cluster for further classification. To detect the presence of secondary chemical species, spectral parameters were recalculated when needed using a two-peak ARMA signal model during the subsequent classification steps. Mathematical phantom simulations involved the modulation of signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), maximum PRF shift (MPS) values, analysis window sizes, and frequency expansion factor sizes in order to characterize the algorithm performance across a variety of conditions. In agar, images were collected on a 1.5T clinical MR scanner using acquisition parameters close to simulation, and algorithm performance was assessed by comparing classification results to manually segmented maps of the fat/water regions. Results: Performance was characterized quantitatively using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), sensitivity, and specificity. The simulated mathematical phantom experiments demonstrated good fat/water separation depending on conditions, specifically high SNR, moderate MPS value, small analysis window size, and low but nonzero frequency expansion factor size. Physical phantom results demonstrated good identification for both water (0.997 ± 0.001, 0.999 ± 0.001, and 0.986 ± 0.001 for DSC, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively

  7. A 1H/19F minicoil NMR probe for solid-state NMR: application to 5-fluoroindoles.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; DeVries, Jeffrey S; McDonald, Robert; Rakovszky, Melissa L; Sykes, Brian D

    2006-01-01

    We show that it is feasible to use a minicoil for solid-state 19F 1H NMR experiments that has short pulse widths, good RF homogeneity, and excellent signal-to-noise for small samples while using low power amplifiers typical to liquid-state NMR. The closely spaced resonant frequencies of 1H and 19F and the ubiquitous use of fluorine in modern plastics and electronic components present two major challenges in the design of a high-sensitivity, high-field 1H/19F probe. Through the selection of specific components, circuit design, and pulse sequence, we were able to build a probe that has low 19F background and excellent separation of 1H and 19F signals. We determine the principle components of the chemical shift anisotropy tensor of 5-fluoroindole-3-acetic acid (5FIAA) and 5-fluorotryptophan. We also solve the crystal structure of 5FIAA, determine the orientation dependence of the chemical shift of a single crystal of 5FIAA, and predict the 19F chemical shift based on the orientation of the fluorine in the crystal. The results show that this 1H/19F probe is suitable for solid-state NMR experiments with low amounts of biological molecules that have been labeled with 19F. PMID:16198131

  8. One-dimensional phosphorus-31 chemical shift imaging of human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rutter, A.; Hugenholtz, H.; Saunders, J.K.

    1995-06-01

    Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used noninvasively to determine characteristic spectral parameters for untreated human brain tumors as a prelude to its use in clinical diagnosis. The spectra, which reflect the relative amounts of phosphorus-containing compounds, and the pH within and surrounding the tumors, were obtained in vivo using the the localization technique of one-dimensional chemical shift imaging applied with a surface coil. Phosphorus-31 chemical shift imaging was performed successfully in vivo on 9 volunteers and 27 patients with untreated brain tumors, including 7 with astrocytoma, 4 with glioblastoma, 3 with meningioma, and 11 with metastases. This study provides spectra from within and surrounding the brain tumors, and allows accountability for the heterogeneity of brain tumors by the selection of the maximum data point for each parameter. The ratios of resonance areas, phosphodiesters over nucleoside triphosphate (NTP), and phosphomonoesters over NTP, were found to be higher in glioblastomas (2.55 {plus_minus} 0.22, 1.06 {plus_minus} 0.09) and astorcytomas (3.04 {plus_minus} 0.36, 1.28 {plus_minus} 0.36) than in normal brain (2.00 {plus_minus} 0.32, 0.79 {plus_minus}0.22). The ratios of areas due to inorganic phosphate and NTP, and phosphocreatine and NTP, also were higher in astrocytomas (1.16 {plus_minus} 0.40, 1.17 {plus_minus} 0.41) compared with glioblastomas (0.68 {plus_minus} 0.01, 0.88 {plus_minus} 0.19) and normal brain (0.61 {plus_minus}0.03, 0.77 {plus_minus} 0.03). The pH of brain tumors ranged from alkaline to neutral, with meningiomas consistently having alkaline pH. These data show that there are statistically significant differences in the magnetic resonance parameters of the affected brain hemispheres of patients with astrocytomas, glioblastomas, meningiomas, and normal brain tissue, and underline the need for a multisite clinical trial to establish clinical criteria for diagnosis. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropy by R-symmetry sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-10-01

    13C and 15N chemical shift (CS) interaction is a sensitive probe of structure and dynamics in a wide variety of biological and inorganic systems, and in the recent years several magic angle spinning NMR approaches have emerged for residue-specific measurements of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors in uniformly and sparsely enriched proteins. All of the currently existing methods are applicable to slow and moderate magic angle spinning (MAS) regime, i.e., MAS frequencies below 20 kHz. With the advent of fast and ultrafast MAS probes capable of spinning frequencies of 40-100 kHz, and with the superior resolution and sensitivity attained at such high frequencies, development of CSA recoupling techniques working under such conditions is necessary. In this work, we present a family of R-symmetry based pulse sequences for recoupling of 13C/15N CSA interactions that work well in both natural abundance and isotopically enriched systems. We demonstrate that efficient recoupling of either first-rank (σ1) or second-rank (σ2) spatial components of CSA interaction is attained with appropriately chosen γ-encoded RNnv symmetry sequences. The advantage of these γ-encoded RNnv-symmetry based CSA (RNCSA) recoupling schemes is that they are suitable for CSA recoupling under a wide range of MAS frequencies, including fast MAS regime. Comprehensive analysis of the recoupling properties of these RNnv symmetry sequences reveals that the σ1-CSA recoupling symmetry sequences exhibit large scaling factors; however, the partial homonuclear dipolar Hamiltonian components are symmetry allowed, which makes this family of sequences suitable for CSA measurements in systems with weak homonuclear dipolar interactions. On the other hand, the γ-encoded symmetry sequences for σ2-CSA recoupling have smaller scaling factors but they efficiently suppress the homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Therefore, the latter family of sequences is applicable for measurements of CSA parameters in

  10. A study of the molecular conformations and the vibrational, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the anticancer drug tamoxifen and triphenylethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Khan, Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    The structural stability and the vibrational spectra of the anticancer drug tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were investigated by the DFT B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) calculations. Tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were predicted to exist predominantly as non-planar structures. The vibrational frequencies and the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the low energy structures of tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were computed at the DFT B3LYP level of theory. Complete vibrational assignments were provided by combined theoretical and experimental data of tamoxifen and triphenylethylene. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of both molecules were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the two molecules. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for tamoxifen is 0.29 and 4.72 ppm, whereas for triphenylethylene, it is 0.16 and 2.70 ppm, respectively.

  11. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M.; Exner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3–0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r2) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  12. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2014-12-16

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3-0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r(2)) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  13. (39)K NMR of solid potassium salts at 21 T: effect of quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors.

    PubMed

    Moudrakovski, Igor L; Ripmeester, John A

    2007-01-25

    39K Solid State NMR spectra (static and magic angle spinning (MAS)) on a set of potassium salts measured at 21.14 T show that the chemical shift range for K(+) ions in diamagnetic salts is well in excess of 100 ppm contrary to previous assumptions that it was quite small. Inequivalent potassium sites in crystals can be resolved through differences in chemical shifts, with chemically similar sites showing differences of over 10 ppm. The quadrupolar coupling constants obtained from MAS and solid echo experiments on powders cover the range from zero for potassium in cubic environments in halides to over 3 MHz for the highly asymmetric sites in K2CO3. Although the quadrupolar effects generally dominate the 39K spectra, in several instances, we have observed subtle but significant contributions of chemical shift anisotropy with values up to 45 ppm, a first such observation. Careful analysis of static and MAS spectra allows the observation of the various chemical shift and quadrupole coupling tensor components as well as their relative orientations, thereby demonstrating that high-field 39K NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has a substantial sensitivity to the local environment with parameters that will be of considerable value in materials characterization and electronic structure studies. PMID:17228903

  14. Cytochrome-P450-Cytochrome-b5 Interaction in a Membrane Environment Changes 15N Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Ahuja, Shivani; Huang, Rui; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    It has been well realized that the dependence of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors on the amino acid sequence, secondary structure, dynamics and electrostatic interactions can be utilized in the structural and dynamic studies of proteins by NMR spectroscopy. In addition, CSA tensors could also be utilized to measure the structural interactions between proteins in a protein-protein complex. To this end, here we report the experimentally measured backbone amide-15N CSA tensors for a membrane-bound 16.7-kDa full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5), in complexation with a 55.8-kDa microsomal rabbit cytochrome P450 2B4 (cytP4502B4). The 15N-CSAs, determined using the 15N CSA/15N-1H dipolar coupling transverse cross-correlated rates, for free cytb5 are compared with that for the cytb5 bound to cytP4502B4. An overall increase in backbone amide-15N transverse cross-correlated rates for the cytb5 residues in the cytb5-cytP450 complex was observed as compared to the free cytb5 residues. Due to fast spin-spin relaxation (T2) and subsequent broadening of the signals in the complex, we were able to measure amide-15N CSAs only for 48 residues of cytb5 as compared to 84 residues of free cytb5. We observed a change in 15N CSA for most residues of cytb5 in the complex, when compared to free cytb5, suggesting a dynamic interaction between the oppositely charged surfaces of anionic cytb5 and cationic cytP450. The mean values of 15N CSA determined for residues in helical, sheet and turn regions of cytb5 in the complex are −184.5, −146.8, and −146.2 ppm, respectively, with an overall average value of −165.5 ppm (excluding the values from residues in more flexible termini). The measured CSA value for residues in helical conformation is slightly larger as compared to previously reported values. This may be attributed to the paramagnetic effect from Fe(III) of the heme in cytb5, which is similar to our previously reported values for the free cytb5. PMID:24107224

  15. Chemical shift changes and line narrowing in 13C NMR spectra of hydrocarbon clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Kida, Masato; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro

    2013-05-23

    The solid-state (13)C NMR spectra of various guest hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, propane, adamantane) in clathrate hydrates were measured to elucidate the local structural environments around hydrocarbon molecules isolated in guest-host frameworks of clathrate hydrates. The results show that, depending on the cage environment, the trends in the (13)C chemical shift and line width change as a function of temperature. Shielding around the carbons of the guest normal alkanes in looser cage environments tends to decrease with increasing temperature, whereas shielding in tighter cage environments tends to increase continuously with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the (13)C NMR line widths suggest, because of the reorientation of the guest alkanes, that the local structures in structure II are more averaged than those in structure I. The differences between structures I and II tend to be very large in the lower temperature range examined in this study. The (13)C NMR spectra of adamantane guest molecules in structure H hydrate show that the local structures around adamantane guests trapped in structure H hydrate cages are averaged at the same level as in the α phase of solid adamantane. PMID:23607335

  16. Heterogeneous living donor hepatic fat distribution on MRI chemical shift imaging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, YoungRok; Lee, Jeong Min; Yi, Nam-Joon; Kim, Hyeyoung; Park, Min-Su; Hong, Geun; Yoo, Tae; Suh, Suk-Won; Lee, Hae Won; Lee, Kwang-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the heterogeneity of steatosis in living donor livers to determine its regional differences. Methods Between June 2011 and February 2012, 81 liver donors were selected. Fat fraction was estimated using magnetic resonance triple-echo chemical shifting gradient imaging in 13 different regions: segment 1 (S1), S2, S3, and each peripheral and deep region of S4, S5, S6, S7, and S8. Results There were differences (range, 3.2%-5.3%) in fat fractions between each peripheral and deep region of S4, S6, S7, and S8 (P < 0.001, P = 0.004, P < 0.001, and P = 0.006). Fat deposit amount in S1, S2, S3 and deep regions of S4-S8 were significantly different from one another (F [4.003, 58.032] = 8.684, P < 0.001), while there were no differences among the peripheral regions of S4-S8 (F [2.9, 5.3] = 1.3, P = 0.272) by repeated measure analysis of variance method. And regional differences of the amount of fat deposit in the whole liver increased as a peripheral fat fraction of S5 increased (R2 = 0.428, P < 0.001). Conclusion Multifocal fat measurements for the whole liver are needed because a small regional evaluation might not represent the remaining liver completely, especially in patients with severe hepatic steatosis. PMID:26131443

  17. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  18. Analysis of the contributions of ring current and electric field effects to the chemical shifts of RNA bases.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-02-21

    Ring current and electric field effects can considerably influence NMR chemical shifts in biomolecules. Understanding such effects is particularly important for the development of accurate mappings between chemical shifts and the structures of nucleic acids. In this work, we first analyzed the Pople and the Haigh-Mallion models in terms of their ability to describe nitrogen base conjugated ring effects. We then created a database (DiBaseRNA) of three-dimensional arrangements of RNA base pairs from X-ray structures, calculated the corresponding chemical shifts via a hybrid density functional theory approach and used the results to parametrize the ring current and electric field effects in RNA bases. Next, we studied the coupling of the electric field and ring current effects for different inter-ring arrangements found in RNA bases using linear model fitting, with joint electric field and ring current, as well as only electric field and only ring current approximations. Taken together, our results provide a characterization of the interdependence of ring current and electric field geometric factors, which is shown to be especially important for the chemical shifts of non-hydrogen atoms in RNA bases. PMID:23398371

  19. 13C and 31P chemical shielding tensors of a single crystal of dipotassium α- D-glucose-1-phosphate dihydrate. An application of a 13C-{ 1H, 31P} triple-resonance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, C. A.; Naito, A.; Sastry, D. L.; Takegoshi, K.

    The 13C NMR spectra of a single crystal of dipotassium α- D-glucose-l-phosphate dehydrate for different orientations in the external magnetic field, were recorded by using 1H and 31P double nuclear decoupling. To overcome difficulties encountered because of the high 13C RF power required to achieve the Hartmann-Hahn condition, a new cross-polarization method (K. Takegoshi and C. A. McDowell, J. Magn. Reson.67, 356 (1986)) was used. The directions of the most shielded principal value of the 13C chemical shielding tensors for the C2-C6 carbon nuclei in the glucose group were along the CO bond, and that for the CI carbon nucleus made an angle of 42† with the C1-O5 bond direction in the O1-C1-O5 plane. The 31P chemical shielding tensors are axially symmetric and the direction of the least shielded principal value is almost parallel to the P-O1(R) bond, which is the longest among the four PO bonds in the phosphate moiety.

  20. Detection of methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring 13C chemical-shift changes: A quantum-chemical study

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Pablo G.; Martin, Osvaldo A.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins expand the diversity of the proteome by several orders of magnitude and have a profound effect on several biological processes. Their detection by experimental methods is not free of limitations such as the amount of sample needed or the use of destructive procedures to obtain the sample. Certainly, new approaches are needed and, therefore, we explore here the feasibility of using 13C chemical shifts of different nuclei to detect methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring the deviation of the 13C chemical shifts from the expected (mean) experimental value of the non-modified residue. As a proof-of-concept, we used 13C chemical shifts, computed at the DFT-level of theory, to test this hypothesis. Moreover, as a validation test of this approach, we compare our theoretical computations of the 13Cε chemical-shift values against existing experimental data, obtained from NMR spectroscopy, for methylated and acetylated lysine residues with good agreement within ∼1 ppm. Then, further use of this approach to select the most suitable 13C-nucleus, with which to determine other modifications commonly seen, such as methylation of arginine and glycosylation of serine, asparagine and threonine, shows encouraging results. PMID:27547559

  1. Detection of methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring (13)C chemical-shift changes: A quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Garay, Pablo G; Martin, Osvaldo A; Scheraga, Harold A; Vila, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins expand the diversity of the proteome by several orders of magnitude and have a profound effect on several biological processes. Their detection by experimental methods is not free of limitations such as the amount of sample needed or the use of destructive procedures to obtain the sample. Certainly, new approaches are needed and, therefore, we explore here the feasibility of using (13)C chemical shifts of different nuclei to detect methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring the deviation of the (13)C chemical shifts from the expected (mean) experimental value of the non-modified residue. As a proof-of-concept, we used (13)C chemical shifts, computed at the DFT-level of theory, to test this hypothesis. Moreover, as a validation test of this approach, we compare our theoretical computations of the (13)Cε chemical-shift values against existing experimental data, obtained from NMR spectroscopy, for methylated and acetylated lysine residues with good agreement within ∼1 ppm. Then, further use of this approach to select the most suitable (13)C-nucleus, with which to determine other modifications commonly seen, such as methylation of arginine and glycosylation of serine, asparagine and threonine, shows encouraging results. PMID:27547559

  2. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State 17O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-containing Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A.; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules and experimental solid-state 17O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state 17O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases and in particular each of the prior computational work is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing systems. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method and basis sets for metal and non-metal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups, X= H, C, N, P, and metal. The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported 17O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors towards relatively general and accurate predictions of 17O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied various kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient R2 of 0.9880 and mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and R2 of 0.9926 for all shift tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of 17O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate bound proteins. PMID:26274812

  3. Female sea lamprey shift orientation toward a conspecific chemical cue to escape a sensory trap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brant, Cory O.; Johnson, Nicholas; Li, Ke; Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    The sensory trap model of signal evolution hypothesizes that signalers adapt to exploit a cue used by the receiver in another context. Although exploitation of receiver biases can result in conflict between the sexes, deceptive signaling systems that are mutually beneficial drive the evolution of stable communication systems. However, female responses in the nonsexual and sexual contexts may become uncoupled if costs are associated with exhibiting a similar response to a trait in both contexts. Male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) signal with a mating pheromone, 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS), which may be a match to a juvenile cue used by females during migration. Upstream movement of migratory lampreys is partially guided by 3kPZS, but females only move toward 3kPZS with proximal accuracy during spawning. Here, we use in-stream behavioral assays paired with gonad histology to document the transition of female preference for juvenile- and male-released 3kPZS that coincides with the functional shift of 3kPZS as a migratory cue to a mating pheromone. Females became increasingly biased toward the source of synthesized 3kPZS as their maturation progressed into the reproductive phase, at which point, a preference for juvenile odor (also containing 3kPZS naturally) ceased to exist. Uncoupling of female responses during migration and spawning makes the 3kPZS communication system a reliable means of synchronizing mate search. The present study offers a rare example of a transition in female responses to a chemical cue between nonsexual and sexual contexts, provides insights into the origins of stable communication signaling systems.

  4. An automated system designed for large scale NMR data deposition and annotation: application to over 600 assigned chemical shift data entries to the BioMagResBank from the Riken Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative internal database.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naohiro; Harano, Yoko; Tochio, Naoya; Nakatani, Eiichi; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Mading, Steve; Ulrich, Eldon L; Markley, John L; Akutsu, Hideo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2012-08-01

    Biomolecular NMR chemical shift data are key information for the functional analysis of biomolecules and the development of new techniques for NMR studies utilizing chemical shift statistical information. Structural genomics projects are major contributors to the accumulation of protein chemical shift information. The management of the large quantities of NMR data generated by each project in a local database and the transfer of the data to the public databases are still formidable tasks because of the complicated nature of NMR data. Here we report an automated and efficient system developed for the deposition and annotation of a large number of data sets including (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments used for the structure determination of proteins. We have demonstrated the feasibility of our system by applying it to over 600 entries from the internal database generated by the RIKEN Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative (RSGI) to the public database, BioMagResBank (BMRB). We have assessed the quality of the deposited chemical shifts by comparing them with those predicted from the PDB coordinate entry for the corresponding protein. The same comparison for other matched BMRB/PDB entries deposited from 2001-2011 has been carried out and the results suggest that the RSGI entries greatly improved the quality of the BMRB database. Since the entries include chemical shifts acquired under strikingly similar experimental conditions, these NMR data can be expected to be a promising resource to improve current technologies as well as to develop new NMR methods for protein studies. PMID:22689068

  5. X-Ray Photoelectron and Anger Electron Spectroscopic Studies of Chemical Shifts in Amorphous Ge-Se System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Tokihiro

    1983-09-01

    The chemical shifts of the Ge 3d, 3p3/2,1/2 and Se 3d, 3p3/2,1/2 photoelectron lines were measured for the amorphous Ge-Se system and those of the Ge photoelectron lines are corrected for Auger parameter shifts. According to the valence shell potential model, the ratio of the chemical shift in the amorphous Ge-Se system to that in stoichiometric GeSe2 can be approximated by the ratio of the Ge-Se bond number in the Ge-Se system to that in GeSe2. The chemical shift ratios evaluated from the experimental results reveal bond structures at non-stoichiometric compositions. In the excess-Ge range, GeSe is composed of atomic clusters of three-fold co-ordinated Ge and Se atoms, and Ge2Se3 contains atomic clusters of Se3Ge-GeSe3 units. In the excess-Se range, GeSe3 includes GeSe4 tetrahedral units, and Se-Se chains and/or Se8 rings.

  6. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in

  7. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 15N NMR coordination shifts in palladium and platinum chloride complexes with pyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Szłyk, Edward; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kamieński, Bohdan; Kozerski, Lech; Tousek, Jaromír; Marek, Radek

    2006-02-01

    A series of Pd and Pt chloride complexes with pyridine (py), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), of general formulae trans-/cis-[M(py)2Cl2], [M(py)4]Cl2, trans-/cis-[M(py)2Cl4], [M(bpy)Cl2], [M(bpy)Cl4], [M(phen)Cl2], [M(phen)Cl4], where M = Pd, Pt, was studied by 1H, 195Pt, and 15N NMR. The 90-140 ppm low-frequency 15N coordination shifts are discussed in terms of such structural features of the complexes as the type of platinide metal, oxidation state, coordination sphere geometry and the type of ligand. The results of quantum-chemical NMR calculations were compared with the experimental 15N coordination shifts, well reproducing their magnitude and correlation with the molecular structure. PMID:16392105

  8. De novo structure generation using chemical shifts for proteins with high-sequence identity but different folds

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Bryan, Philip N; He, Yanan; Orban, John; Baker, David; Bax, Ad

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with high-sequence identity but very different folds present a special challenge to sequence-based protein structure prediction methods. In particular, a 56-residue three-helical bundle protein (GA95) and an α/β-fold protein (GB95), which share 95% sequence identity, were targets in the CASP-8 structure prediction contest. With only 12 out of 300 submitted server-CASP8 models for GA95 exhibiting the correct fold, this protein proved particularly challenging despite its small size. Here, we demonstrate that the information contained in NMR chemical shifts can readily be exploited by the CS-Rosetta structure prediction program and yields adequate convergence, even when input chemical shifts are limited to just amide 1HN and 15N or 1HN and 1Hα values. PMID:19998407

  9. Deuterium-induced isotope effects on the 13C chemical shifts of α-D-glucose pentaacetate.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Álvarez-Cisneros, Celina; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2013-03-01

    1,2,3,4,6-Penta-O-acetyl-α-D-glucopyranose and the corresponding [1-(2)H], [2-(2)H], [3-(2)H], [4-(2)H], [5-(2)H], and [6,6-(2)H(2)]-labeled compounds were prepared for measuring deuterium/hydrogen-induced effects on (13)C chemical shift (n)Δ (DHIECS) values. A conformational analysis of the nondeuterated compound was achieved using density functional theory (DFT) molecular models that allowed calculation of several structural properties as well as Boltzmann-averaged (13)C NMR chemical shifts by using the gauge-including atomic orbital method. It was found that the DFT-calculated C-H bond lengths correlate with (1)Δ DHIECS. PMID:23315885

  10. Computer programming for nucleic acid studies. II. Total chemical shifts calculation of all protons of double-stranded helices.

    PubMed

    Giessner-Prettre, C; Ribas Prado, F; Pullman, B; Kan, L; Kast, J R; Ts'o, P O

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program called SHIFTS is described. Through SHIFTS, one can calculate the NMR chemical shifts of the proton resonances of single and double-stranded nucleic acids of known sequences and of predetermined conformations. The program can handle RNA and DNA for an arbitrary sequence of a set of 4 out of the 6 base types A,U,G,C,I and T. Data files for the geometrical parameters are available for A-, A'-, B-, D- and S-conformations. The positions of all the atoms are calculated using a modified version of the SEQ program [1]. Then, based on this defined geometry three chemical shift effects exerted by the atoms of the neighboring nucleotides on the protons of each monomeric unit are calculated separately: the ring current shielding effect: the local atomic magnetic susceptibility effect (including both diamagnetic and paramagnetic terms); and the polarization or electric field effect. Results of the program are compared with experimental results for a gamma (ApApGpCpUpU) 2 helical duplex and with calculated results on this same helix based on model building of A'-form and B-form and on graphical procedure for evaluating the ring current effects. PMID:6274583

  11. Biochemical classification of kidney carcinoma biopsy samples using magic-angle-spinning 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moka, D; Vorreuther, R; Schicha, H; Spraul, M; Humpfer, E; Lipinski, M; Foxall, P J; Nicholson, J K; Lindon, J C

    1998-05-01

    High resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra using spinning at the magic angle (1H MAS NMR) have been obtained on intact normal and pathological kidney tissue samples from patients undergoing surgery for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The spectra were measured on ca. 80 mg samples and provided high resolution 1H NMR spectra in which effects of dipolar couplings, chemical shift anisotropy and magnetic susceptibility differences are minimised thus yielding high spectral resolution. Conventional one-dimensional and spin-echo spectra and two-dimensional J-resolved, TOCSY and 1H-13C HMQC spectra were also measured on selected samples and these allowed the assignment of resonances of endogenous substances comprising both cytosolic and membrane components. The tumour tissues were characterised principally by an increased lipid content. These are the first reported results on human tumour tissues using this technique and the approach offers potential for the rapid classification of different types of tumour tissue. PMID:9608434

  12. On reasons of 29Si NMR chemical shift/structure relations for silicon oxides, nitrides, and carbides: an individual-gauge-for-localized-orbitals study.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R; Jancke, H; Radeglia, R

    1997-12-01

    For alpha-quartz, monoclinic ZSM-5, alpha- and beta-Si3N4 and SiC-6H polytype, the silicon chemical shifts have been calculated using the IGLO (individual gauge for localized orbitals) method and models of different size in real crystal geometry. The result is a theoretical chemical shift scale, which is very similar to the corresponding experimental scale from 29Si MAS NMR experiments. It is shown that the assignment of isotropic silicon chemical shifts of crystallized solids based on theory is a method of practical applicability, also in cases where experimental methods or empirical relations fail. The two NMR spectral lines of alpha-Si3N4 are for the first time assigned to the crystallographic positions. The partition of the silicon chemical shifts into localized contributions from different parts of the model allows insight into the interactions around the resonance nucleus due to substituent and geometry variations leading to silicon chemical shifts. PMID:9477448

  13. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  14. U1h shaft project

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Briggs; R. G. Musick

    2000-06-30

    The U1h shaft project is a design/build subcontract to construct one 20 foot (ft) finished diameter shaft to a depth of 1,045 ft at the Nevada Test Site. Atkinson Construction was subcontracted by Bechtel Nevada to construct the U1h Shaft for the Department of Energy. The project consists of furnishing and installing the sinking plant, construction of the 1,045 ft of concrete lined shaft, development of a shaft station at a depth of 976 ft, and construction of a loading pocket at the station. The outfitting of the shaft and installation of a new hoist may be incorporated into the project at a later date. This paper should be of interest to those involved with the construction of relatively deep shafts and underground excavations.

  15. Cellular thermal shift and clickable chemical probe assays for the determination of drug-target engagement in live cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua; Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Hett, Erik C; Salter, Shores; Aulabaugh, Ann; Kyne, Robert E; Pierce, Betsy; Jones, Lyn H

    2016-07-14

    Proof of drug-target engagement in physiologically-relevant contexts is a key pillar of successful therapeutic target validation. We developed two orthogonal technologies, the cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) and a covalent chemical probe reporter approach (harnessing sulfonyl fluoride tyrosine labeling and subsequent click chemistry) to measure the occupancy of the mRNA-decapping scavenger enzyme DcpS by a small molecule inhibitor in live cells. Enzyme affinity determined using isothermal dose response fingerprinting (ITDRFCETSA) and the concentration required to occupy 50% of the enzyme (OC50) using the chemical probe reporter assay were very similar. In this case, the chemical probe method worked well due to the long offset kinetics of the reversible inhibitor (determined using a fluorescent dye-tagged probe). This work suggests that CETSA could become the first choice assay to determine in-cell target engagement due to its simplicity. PMID:27216142

  16. 1H, 13C, 15N and 195Pt NMR studies of Au(III) and Pt(II) chloride organometallics with 2-phenylpyridine.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Pawlak, Tomasz; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2009-11-01

    (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (195)Pt NMR studies of gold(III) and platinum(II) chloride organometallics with N(1),C(2')-chelated, deprotonated 2-phenylpyridine (2ppy*) of the formulae [Au(2ppy*)Cl(2)], trans(N,N)-[Pt(2ppy*)(2ppy)Cl] and trans(S,N)-[Pt(2ppy*)(DMSO-d(6))Cl] (formed in situ upon dissolving [Pt(2ppy*)(micro-Cl)](2) in DMSO-d(6)) were performed. All signals were unambiguously assigned by HMBC/HSQC methods and the respective (1)H, (13)C and (15)N coordination shifts (i.e. differences between chemical shifts of the same atom in the complex and ligand molecules: Delta(1H)(coord) = delta(1H)(complex) - delta(1H)(ligand), Delta(13C)(coord) = delta(13C)(complex) - delta(13C)(ligand), Delta(15N)(coord) = delta(15N)(complex) - delta(15N)(ligand)), as well as (195)Pt chemical shifts and (1)H-(195)Pt coupling constants discussed in relation to the known molecular structures. Characteristic deshielding of nitrogen-adjacent H(6) protons and metallated C(2') atoms as well as significant shielding of coordinated N(1) nitrogens is discussed in respect to a large set of literature NMR data available for related cyclometallated compounds. PMID:19691018

  17. CHHC and 1H-1H Magnetization Exchange: Analysis by Experimental Solid-State NMR and 11-Spin Density-Matrix Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Aluas, Mihaela; Tripon, Carmen; Griffin, John M.; Filip, Xenia; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Griffin, Robert G.; Brown, Steven P.; Filip, Claudiu

    2009-01-01

    A protocol is presented for correcting the effect of non-specific cross polarization in CHHC solid-state MAS NMR experiments, thus allowing the recovery of the 1H-1H magnetization exchange functions from the mixing-time dependent buildup of experimental CHHC peak intensity. The presented protocol also incorporates a scaling procedure to take into account the effect of multiplicity of a CH2 or CH3 moiety. Experimental CHHC buildup curves are presented for L-Tyrosine.HCl samples where either all or only one in ten molecules are U-13C labeled. Good agreement between experiment and 11-spin SPINEVOLUTION simulation (including only isotropic 1H chemical shifts) is demonstrated for the initial buildup (tmix < 100 μs) of CHHC peak intensity corresponding to an intramolecular close (2.5 Å) H-H proximity. Differences in the initial CHHC buildup are observed between the 1 in 10 dilute and 100 % samples for cases where there is a close intermolecular H-H proximity in addition to a close intramolecular H-H proximity. For the dilute sample, CHHC cross peak intensities tended to significantly lower values for long mixing times (500 μs) as compared to the 100 % sample. This difference is explained as being due to the dependence of the limiting total magnetization on the ratio Nobs/Ntot between the number of protons that are directly attached to a 13C nucleus and hence contribute significantly to the observed 13C CHHC NMR signal, and the total number of 1H spins into the system. 1H-1H magnetization exchange curves extracted from CHHC spectra for the 100 % L-Tyrosine.HCl sample exhibit a clear sensitivity to the root sum squared dipolar coupling, with fast build-up being observed for the shortest intramolecular distances (2.5 Å) and slower, yet observable build-up for the longer intermolecular distances (up to 5 Å). PMID:19467890

  18. Sub-electron-volt chemical shifts and strong interference effects measured in the resonance x-ray scattering spectra of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Agren, H.; Guo, J.; Skytt, P.; Wassdahl, N.; Nordgren, J.

    1995-11-01

    By exploring the monosubstituted benzene compound aniline, we demonstrate that resonance inelastic x-ray spectroscopy of chemically shifted species is {ital site} {ital selective}. Core-excited levels with distinct, super-electron-volt shifts can be resonantly excited and their x-ray emission spectra analyzed separately. Core-excited levels referring to sites with small, sub-electron-volt, chemical shifts give resonant x-ray spectra that interfere strongly. It is demonstrated that this interference, which is manifested in the one-step model, can be used to monitor chemical shifts in the sub-electron-volt energy region. We show that in the limit when these chemical shifts go to zero some salient symmetry-selective features of the benzene resonant x-ray emission spectrum are restored in the aniline spectra.

  19. Thalassiosira spp. community composition shifts in response to chemical and physical forcing in the northeast Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, P. Dreux; Whitney, LeAnn P.; Haddock, Traci L.; Menden-Deuer, Susanne; Roy, Eric G.; Wells, Mark L.; Jenkins, Bethany D.

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are genetically diverse unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes that are key primary producers in the ocean. Many of the over 100 extant diatom species in the cosmopolitan genus Thalassiosira are difficult to distinguish in mixed populations using light microscopy. Here, we examine shifts in Thalassiosira spp. composition along a coastal to open ocean transect that encountered a 3-month-old Haida eddy in the northeast Pacific Ocean. To quantify shifts in Thalassiosira species composition, we developed a targeted automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) method to identify Thalassiosira spp. in environmental samples. As many specific fragment lengths are indicative of individual Thalassiosira spp., the ARISA method is a useful screening tool to identify changes in the relative abundance and distribution of specific species. The method also enabled us to assess changes in Thalassiosira community composition in response to chemical and physical forcing. Thalassiosira spp. community composition in the core of a 3-month-old Haida eddy remained largely (>80%) similar over a 2-week period, despite moving 24 km southwestward. Shifts in Thalassiosira species correlated with changes in dissolved iron (Fe) and temperature throughout the sampling period. Simultaneously tracking community composition and relative abundance of Thalassiosira species within the physical and chemical context they occurred allowed us to identify quantitative linkages between environmental conditions and community response. PMID:24065961

  20. 1H and 13C NMR spectra, structure and physicochemical features of phenyl acridine-9-carboxylates and 10-methyl-9-(phenoxycarbonyl)acridinium trifluoromethanesulphonates--alkyl substituted in the phenyl fragment.

    PubMed

    Krzymiński, K; Malecha, P; Zadykowicz, B; Wróblewska, A; Błażejowski, J

    2011-01-01

    The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of twelve phenyl acridine-9-carboxylates--alkyl-substituted in the phenyl fragment--and their 10-methyl-9-(phenoxycarbonyl)acridinium salts dissolved in CD3CN, CD3OD, CDCl3 and DMSO-d6 were recorded in order to examine the influence of the structure of these compounds and the properties of the solvents on chemical shifts and 1H-(1)H coupling constants. Experimental data were compared with 1H and 13C chemical shifts predicted at the GIAO/DFT level of theory for DFT(B3LYP)/6-31G** optimised geometries of molecules, as well as with values of 1H chemical shifts and 1H-(1)H coupling constants, estimated using ACD/HNMR database software to ensure that the assignment was correct. To investigate the relations between chemical shifts and selected structural or physicochemical characteristics of the target compounds, the values of several of these parameters were determined at the DFT or HF levels of theory. The HOMO and LUMO energies obtained at the HF level yielded the ionisation potentials and electron affinities of molecules. The DFT method provided atomic partial charges, dipole moments, LCAO coefficients of pz LUMO of selected C atoms, and angles reflecting characteristic structural features of the compounds. It was found that the experimentally determined 1H and 13C chemical shifts of certain atoms relate to the predicted dipole moments, the angles between the acridine and phenyl moieties, and the LCAO coefficients of the pz LUMO of the C atoms believed to participate in the initial step of the oxidation of the target compounds. The spectral and physicochemical characteristics of the target compounds were investigated in the context of their chemiluminogenic ability. PMID:21134782

  1. Multi-dimensional 1H- 13C HETCOR and FSLG-HETCOR NMR study of sphingomyelin bilayers containing cholesterol in the gel and liquid crystalline states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Gregory P.; Alam, Todd M.

    2006-08-01

    13C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) and 1H MAS NMR spectra were collected on egg sphingomyelin (SM) bilayers containing cholesterol above and below the liquid crystalline phase transition temperature ( Tm). Two-dimensional (2D) dipolar heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra were obtained on SM bilayers in the liquid crystalline ( Lα) state for the first time and display improved resolution and chemical shift dispersion compared to the individual 1H and 13C spectra and significantly aid in spectral assignment. In the gel ( Lβ) state, the 1H dimension suffers from line broadening due to the 1H- 1H homonuclear dipolar coupling that is not completely averaged by the combination of lipid mobility and MAS. This line broadening is significantly suppressed by implementing frequency switched Lee-Goldburg (FSLG) homonuclear 1H decoupling during the evolution period. In the liquid crystalline ( Lα) phase, no improvement in line width is observed when FSLG is employed. All of the observed resonances are assignable to cholesterol and SM environments. This study demonstrates the ability to obtain 2D heteronuclear correlation experiments in the gel state for biomembranes, expands on previous SM assignments, and presents a comprehensive 1H/ 13C NMR assignment of SM bilayers containing cholesterol. Comparisons are made to a previous report on cholesterol chemical shifts in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers. A number of similarities and some differences are observed and discussed.

  2. Measurement of T1/T2 relaxation times in overlapped regions from homodecoupled 1H singlet signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañar, Laura; Nolis, Pau; Virgili, Albert; Parella, Teodor

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of the HOmodecoupled Band-Selective (HOBS) technique in the conventional Inversion-Recovery and CPMG-based PROJECT experiments is described. The achievement of fully homodecoupled signals allows the distinction of overlapped 1H resonances with small chemical shift differences. It is shown that the corresponding T1 and T2 relaxation times can be individually measured from the resulting singlet lines using conventional exponential curve-fitting methods.

  3. 13C and 15N—Chemical Shift Anisotropy of Ampicillin and Penicillin-V Studied by 2D-PASS and CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Lee, Young K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1998-11-01

    The principal values of the chemical shift tensors of all13C and15N sites in two antibiotics, ampicillin and penicillin-V, were determined by 2-dimensionalphaseadjustedspinningsideband (2D-PASS) and conventional CP/MAS experiments. The13C and15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA), and their confidence limits, were evaluated using a Mathematica program. The CSA values suggest a revised assignment of the 2-methyl13C sites in the case of ampicillin. We speculate on a relationship between the chemical shift principal values of many of the13C and15N sites and the β-lactam ring conformation.

  4. Characterisation of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of N-acetylaspartylglutamate and its detection in urine from patients with Canavan disease.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Hanna; Gradowska, Wanda

    2003-03-10

    1H and 13C NMR spectra of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) have been recorded and interpreted. The values of the 1H chemical shifts and 1H-(1)H coupling constants at different pH were obtained by iterative computer fitting of 1-D 1H NMR spectra. This provided information on the solution conformation of the investigated molecule. Proton-decoupled high resolution 13C NMR spectra of NAAG have been measured in a series of dilute water solution of various acidity. These data have provided a basis for unequivocal determination of the presence of NAAG in the urine sample of a patient suffering from Canavan disease. NMR spectroscopy provides a possibility of detecting NAAG in body fluids. PMID:12615232

  5. Influence of the chemical shift artifact on measurements of compact bone thickness in equine distal limb MR images.

    PubMed

    Dimock, Abigail N; Spriet, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the chemical shift artifact, resulting from misregistration or phase cancellation at the interface between compact and trabecular bone, on apparent bone thickness was quantified in six isolated equine limbs. Sagittal T1-weighted spin echo (SE) and in-phase three-dimensional spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images were acquired twice with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) unit, switching the frequency encoding direction between acquisitions. Out-of-phase SPGR images were also obtained. MR images with different frequency encoding directions were compared with each other and to radiographs made from corresponding 3-mm-bone sections. Compact bone thickness was significantly different when comparing images acquired with different frequency encoding directions for both SE and SPGR sequences. Significant differences were identified in the frequency but not the phase encoding direction when measurements of compact bone in MR images were compared with measurements obtained from thin section radiographs for the majority of surfaces studied (P < 0.05). Correction of MR measurements with the calculated chemical shift abolished these differences (P > 0.05). Measurements of compact bone from out-of-phase SPGR sequences were significantly different than from in-phase sequences (P < 0.001) with out-of-phase measurements greater than in-phase measurements by an average of 0.38mm. These results indicate that the chemical shift artifact results in errors in MR evaluation of compact bone thickness when measurements are performed in the frequency encoding direction or in out-of-phase images. For better accuracy, measurements should be performed parallel to the phase encoding direction and avoiding out-of-phase gradient echo sequences. PMID:20806873

  6. 1H NMR structure of the heme pocket of HNO-myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Sulc, Filip; Fleischer, Everly; Farmer, Patrick J; Ma, Dejian; La Mar, Gerd N

    2003-02-01

    The unique (1)H NMR signal of nitrosyl hydride at 14.8 ppm is used to obtain a solution structure of the distal pocket of Mb-HNO, a rare nitroxyl adduct with a half-life of several months at room temperature. (1)H NMR, NOESY and TOCSY data were obtained under identical experimental conditions on solutions of the diamagnetic HNO and CO complexes of equine Mb, allowing direct comparison of NMR data to a crystallographically characterized structure. Twenty NOEs between the nitrosyl hydride and protein and heme-based signals were observed. The HNO orientation obtained by modeling the experimental (1)H NMR NOESY data yielded an orientation of ca. -104 degrees referenced to the N-Fe-N vector between alpha and beta mesoprotons. An essentially identical orientation was obtained by simple energy minimization of the HNO adduct using ESFF potentials, suggesting steric control of the orientation. Differences in chemical shifts are seen for protons on residues Phe43(CD1) and Val68(E11), but both exhibit virtually identical NOESY contacts to other residues, and thus are attributed to small movements of ca. 0.1 A within the strong ring current. The most significant differences are seen in the NOESY peak intensities and chemical shifts for the ring non-labile protons of the distal His64(E7). The orientation of the His64(E7) in Mb-HNO was analyzed on the basis of the NOESY cross-peak changes and chemical shift changes, predicting a ca. 20 degrees rotation about the beta-gamma bond. The deduced HNO and His64(E7) orientations result in geometry where the His64(E7) ring can serve as the donor for a significant H-bond to the oxygen atom of the bound HNO. PMID:12589571

  7. Chemical shift and zone-folding effects on the energy gaps of GaAs-AlAs (001) superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.B. Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 ); Cohen, M.L.; Louie, S.G. )

    1991-04-15

    The chemical shift and zone-folding effects obtained from quasiparticle calculations for ultrathin GaAs-AlAs superlattices are incorporated within a Kronig-Penny model for superlattices of the arbitrary lattice period. We determine that superlattices with lattice periods in the range of 3{times}3 to 9{times}9 have an {ital X}-derived pseudodirect gap. This result explains both the results from first-principles calculations for ultrathin superlattices and those from experiments for a broader lattice period.

  8. A multiple pulse zero crossing NMR technique, and its application to F-19 chemical shift measurements in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W.-K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple multiple-pulse 'zero crossing technique' for accurately determining the first moment of a solid-state NMR spectrum is introduced. This technique was applied to obtain the F-19 chemical shift versus pressure curves up to 5 kbar for single crystals of CaF2 (0.29 + or - 0.02 ppm/kbar) and BaF2 (0.62 + or - 0.05 ppm/kbar). Results at ambient temperature and pressure are also reported for a number of other fluorine compounds. Because of its high data rate, this technique is potentially several orders of magnitude more sensitive than similar CW methods.

  9. Comparison of the computational NMR chemical shifts of choline with the experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcorn, C.; Cuperlovic-Culf, M.; Ghandi, K.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main biological markers of the presence of cancer in living patients is an over-expression of total choline (tCho), which is the sum of free choline and its derivatives. 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, or H-MRS, enables the quantification of tCho via its proton spectra, and thus has the potential to be a diagnostic tool for the presence of cancer and an accurate early indicator of the response of cancer to treatment. However, it remains difficult to quantify individual choline derivatives, since they share a large structural similarity ((CH3)3-N+-CH2-CH2-O-), of which the strongest signal detectable by MRS is that of the choline "head group": the three methyl groups bonded to the nitrogen. This work used ACENet, a high performance computing system, to attempt to model the NMR parameters of choline derivatives, with the focus of this report being free choline. Optimized structures were determined using Density Functional Theory and the B3LYP electron correlation functional. The Polarizable Continuum Model was used to evaluate solvent effects. The Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital method was found to be the superior method for calculating the NMR parameters of cholines.

  10. The Effective Synthesis of N-(Arylalkyl)-1-R-4-hydroxy-2,2-dioxo- 1H-2λ6,1-benzothiazine-3-carboxamides as Promising Analgesics of a New Chemical Class

    PubMed Central

    Ukrainets, Igor V.; Petrushova, Lidiya A.; Dzyubenko, Sergiy P.; Sim, Galina; Grinevich, Lina A.

    2015-01-01

    A new, effective preparative method has been proposed and the synthesis of a series of N-(arylalkyl)-1-R-4-hydroxy-2,2-dioxo-1H-2λ6,1-benzothiazine-3-car-boxamides has been carried out. It has been shown that amidation of alkyl 1-R-4-hydroxy-2,2-dioxo-1H-2λ6,1-benzothiazine-3-carboxylates with arylalkyl-amines in boiling xylene proceeds with good yield and purity to the corresponding N-(arylalkyl)-amides. However, the presence of water in the reaction mixture has been shown to cause the formation of specific impurities: N-(arylalkyl)-1-R-2,2-dioxo-1H-2λ6,1-benzothiazin-4-amines. According to the results of the pharmacological studies, powerful analgesics have been found among the substances synthesized. PMID:26839838

  11. Cucurbitacins from Cayaponia racemosa: isolation and total assignment of 1H and 13C NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Davina C; Assunção, João Carlos C; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Lemos, Telma L G; Monte, Francisco J Q

    2007-05-01

    Two new cucurbitane-type triterpenoids, 2beta,3beta,16alpha,20(R),25-pentahydroxy-9-methyl-19-norlanost-5-en-7,22-dione and 2beta,3beta,16alpha,20(R),25-pentahydroxy-9-methyl-19-norlanost-5-en-7,11,22-trione, were isolated from fruits of Cayaponia racemosa. The total (1)H and (13)C chemical shift assignment of these two closely related compounds is described, making use of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques. PMID:17372957

  12. Identification of Gastric Cancer Biomarkers Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gokula Krishnan; Yong, Wei Peng; Yeow, Chen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Existing gastric cancer diagnosing methods were invasive, hence, a reliable non-invasive gastric cancer diagnosing method is needed. As a starting point, we used 1H NMR for identifying gastric cancer biomarkers using a panel of gastric cancer spheroids and normal gastric spheroids. We were able to identify 8 chemical shift biomarkers for gastric cancer spheroids. Our data suggests that the cancerous and non-cancerous spheroids significantly differ in the lipid composition and energy metabolism. These results encourage the translation of these biomarkers into in-vivo gastric cancer detection methodology using MRI-MS. PMID:27611679

  13. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance study of hydrated water dynamics in perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer Nafion

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jun Hee; Lee, Kyu Won; Jeon, G. W.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Park, W. K.; Choi, E. H.

    2015-01-12

    We have studied the dynamics of hydrated water molecules in the proton exchange membrane of Nafion by means of high-resolution {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. “Bound” and “free” states of hydrated water clusters as well as the exchange protons were identified from the NMR chemical shift measurements, and their activation energies were obtained from the temperature-dependent laboratory- and rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements. Besides, a peculiar motional transition in the ultralow frequency region was observed at 373 K for the “free” hydrated water from the rotating-frame NMR spin-lattice relaxation time measurements.

  14. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance study of distinct interstitial hydrogen dynamics in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kue Park, Jun; Won Lee, Kyu; Eui Lee, Cheol

    2013-07-01

    A comprehensive 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study has been carried out for hydrogen dynamics in a sol-gel-prepared ZnO system. The temperature-dependent linewidth and chemical shift measurements sensitively reflected the proton motions and changes in the local environment. Besides, two types of interstitial proton (Hi+) motions were distinguished from the spin-spin relaxation time measurements, one of them with an activation energy of 0.16 eV and the other with that of 0.33 eV depending on the temperature ranges.

  15. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding. PMID:17054116

  16. 13C and 199Hg nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of alkenemercurinium ions: Effect of methyl substituents on 199Hg chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Garcia-Luna, Armando

    1980-01-01

    The long-lived ethylene, cyclohexene, and norbornenemercurinium ions prepared in superacidic, low-nucleophilic media have been studied by 13C and 199Hg NMR spectroscopy. The norbornenemercurinium ion shows temperature-dependent 13C and 199Hg NMR spectra, consistent with equilibration via rapid hydride and Wagner-Meerwin shifts. The 199Hg NMR shifts of a series of alkylmercury bromides were also obtained in order to elucidate the effect of methyl substituents on 199Hg NMR chemical shifts. PMID:16592870

  17. Improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme for (1)H and (13)C NMR Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kapaev, Roman R; Toukach, Philip V

    2015-07-21

    The improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme has been developed for the simulation of (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra of oligo- and polysaccharides and their derivatives, including those containing noncarbohydrate constituents found in natural glycans. Besides adding the (1)H NMR calculations, we improved the accuracy and performance of prediction and optimized the mathematical model of the precision estimation. This new approach outperformed other methods of chemical shift simulation, including database-driven, neural net-based, and purely empirical methods and quantum-mechanical calculations at high theory levels. It can process structures with rarely occurring and noncarbohydrate constituents unsupported by the other methods. The algorithm is transparent to users and allows tracking used reference NMR data to original publications. It was implemented in the Glycan-Optimized Dual Empirical Spectrum Simulation (GODESS) web service, which is freely available at the platform of the Carbohydrate Structure Database (CSDB) project ( http://csdb.glycoscience.ru). PMID:26087011

  18. Ab initio and DFT study of 31P-NMR chemical shifts of sphingomyelin and dihydrosphingomyelin lipid molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimori, K.; Kawabe, H.; Nagao, H.; Nishikawa, K.

    One of the phospholipids, sphingomyelin (SM, N-acyl-sphingosine-1-phosphorylcholine) is the most abundant component of mammalian membranes in brain, nervous tissues, and human ocular lens. It plays an important role for apoptosis, aging, and signal transduction. Recently, Yappert and coworkers have shown that human lens sphingomyelin and its hydrogenated derivative, dihydrosphingomyelin (DHSM) are interacted with Ca2+ ions to develop human cataracts. Previously, we have investigated conformational differences between an isolated SM/DHSM molecule and Ca2+-coordinated form by using density functional theory (DFT) for geometry optimization and normal mode analysis. As a result, one of stable conformers of SMs has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl group and phosphate group, whereas another conformer has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl and phosphate amide group. In this study, 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) shielding constants of the obtained conformers are investigated by using ab initio and DFT with NMR-gauge invariant atomic orbitals (NMR-GIAO) calculations. The experimental 31P-NMR chemical shifts of SMs and DHSMs have significant small value around 0.1 ppm. We consider the relative conformational changes between SMs and DHSMs affect the slight deviations of 31P-NMR chemical shifts, and discuss intramolecular hydrogen bondings and the solvent effect in relation to NMR experimental reference.

  19. Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

    2010-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

  20. Simultaneous phase unwrapping and removal of chemical shift (SPURS) using graph cuts: application in quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jianwu; Liu, Tian; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Dong; Dimov, Alexey; Raj, Ashish; Cheng, Qiang; Spincemaille, Pascal; Wang, Yi

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that reveals tissue magnetic susceptibility. It relies on having a high quality field map, typically acquired with a relatively long echo spacing and long final TE. Applications of QSM outside the brain require the removal of fat contributions to the total signal phase. However, current water/fat separation methods applied on typical data acquired for QSM suffer from three issues: inadequacy when using large echo spacing, over-smoothing of the field maps and high computational cost. In this paper, the general phase wrap and chemical shift problem is formulated using a single species fitting and is solved using graph cuts with conditional jump moves. This method is referred as simultaneous phase unwrapping and removal of chemical shift (SPURS). The result from SPURS is then used as the initial guess for a voxel-wise iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetric and least-squares estimation (IDEAL). The estimated 3-D field maps are used to compute QSM in body regions outside of the brain, such as the liver. Experimental results show substantial improvements in field map estimation, water/fat separation and reconstructed QSM compared to two existing water/fat separation methods on 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance human data with long echo spacing and rapid field map variation. PMID:25312917

  1. Measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy in [(13)C,(15)N] uniformly enriched proteins using CSA amplification.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Ge, Yuwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Mali; Li, Conggang; Gan, Zhehong

    2015-11-01

    Extended chemical shift anisotropy amplification (xCSA) is applied for measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of uniformly labeled proteins under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The amplification sequence consists of a sequence of π-pulses that repetitively interrupt MAS averaging of the CSA interaction. The timing of the pulses is designed to generate amplified spinning sideband manifolds which can be fitted to extract CSA parameters. The (13)C/(13)C homonuclear dipolar interactions are not affected by the π-pulses due to the bilinear nature of the spin operators and are averaged by MAS in the xCSA experiment. These features make the constant evolution-time experiment suitable for measuring CSA of uniformly labeled samples. The incorporation of xCSA with multi-dimensional (13)C/(15)N correlation is demonstrated with a GB1 protein sample as a model system for measuring (13)C/(15)N CSA of all backbone (15)NH, (13)CA and (13)CO sites. PMID:26404770

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure–function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure prediction can be improved by applying constraints from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to a dynamic programming algorithm. Imino proton walks from NOESY spectra reveal double-stranded regions. Chemical shifts of protons in GH1, UH3, and UH5 of GU pairs, UH3, UH5, and AH2 of AU pairs, and GH1 of GC pairs were analyzed to identify constraints for the 5′ to 3′ directionality of base pairs in helices. The 5′ to 3′ directionality constraints were incorporated into an NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure (NAPSS-CS) program. When it was tested on 18 structures, including nine pseudoknots, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were improved relative to those of three unrestrained programs. The prediction accuracy for the pseudoknots improved the most. The program also facilitates assignment of chemical shifts to individual nucleotides, a necessary step for determining three-dimensional structure. PMID:26451676

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, calculational studies and in vitro antitumoral activity of 4-(3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)propyl)-(thiophen-2-ylmethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5(4H)-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süleymanoğlu, Nevin; Ustabaş, Reşat; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Ünver, Yasemin; Turan, Mustafa; Sancak, Kemal

    2011-03-01

    4-(3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)propyl)-(thiophen-2-ylmethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5(4H)-one (IPTT), C 13H 15N 5OS, was synthesized and characterized by 13C NMR, 1H NMR, IR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure of IPTT is stabilized by three intermolecular hydrogen bonds and by intermolecular C sbnd H⋯ π interaction. The compound IPTT was modelled by using DFT method. Calculations of vibrational frequencies, gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO), 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of IPTT in the ground state, total electronic charge density map and frontier molecular orbitals were performed at B3LYP/6-31 G(d) level of theory were carried out by using DFT method with 6-31 G(d) basis set. The structural parameters obtained by geometry optimization, the theoretical vibrational frequencies and chemical shift values are in good agreement with experimental ones. FT-IR, NMR and X-ray analytical results of IPTT show that the compound exists as keto form, that was supported by DFT calculations. In addition, in vitro studies showed hopeful antitumoral activity of the title IPTT compound.

  4. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous (19)F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues.

    PubMed

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R

    2015-11-11

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of (19)F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in (19)F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F isomer results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of (19)F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra. PMID:26524669

  5. FT-IR and {sup 1}H NMR characterization of the products of an ethylene inverse diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, Alexander; Mondragon, Fanor; Molina, Alejandro; Marsh, Nathan D.; Eddings, Eric G.; Sarofim, Adel F.

    2006-07-15

    Knowledge of the chemical structure of young soot and its precursors is very useful in the understanding of the paths leading to soot particle inception. This paper presents analyses of the chemical functional groups, based on FT-IR and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy of the products obtained in an ethylene inverse diffusion flame. The trends in the data indicate that the soluble fraction of the soot becomes progressively more aromatic and less aliphatic as the height above the burner increases. Results from {sup 1}H NMR spectra of the chloroform-soluble soot samples taken at different heights above the burner corroborate the infrared results based on proton chemical shifts (Ha, H{alpha}, H{beta}, and H{gamma}). The results indicate that the aliphatic {beta} and {gamma} hydrogens suffered the most drastic reduction, while the aromatic character increased considerably with height, particularly in the first half of the flame. (author)

  6. 40 CFR 721.10373 - 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. 721... Substances § 721.10373 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1H-imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)- (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10373 - 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. 721... Substances § 721.10373 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1H-imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)- (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10373 - 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. 721... Substances § 721.10373 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1H-imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)- (PMN...

  9. Observation of Optical Chemical Shift by Precision Nuclear Spin Optical Rotation Measurements and Calculations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junhui; Ikäläinen, Suvi; Vaara, Juha; Romalis, Michael V

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear spin optical rotation (NSOR) is a recently developed technique for detection of nuclear magnetic resonance via rotation of light polarization, instead of the usual long-range magnetic fields. NSOR signals depend on hyperfine interactions with virtual optical excitations, giving new information about the nuclear chemical environment. We use a multipass optical cell to perform the first precision measurements of NSOR signals for a range of organic liquids and find clear distinction between proton signals for different compounds, in agreement with our earlier theoretical predictions. Detailed first-principles quantum mechanical NSOR calculations are found to be in agreement with the measurements. PMID:26281737

  10. Shifting chemical equilibria in flow--efficient decarbonylation driven by annular flow regimes.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Bernhard; Elsner, Petteri; Glasnov, Toma; Roberge, Dominique M; Kappe, C Oliver

    2014-10-20

    To efficiently drive chemical reactions, it is often necessary to influence an equilibrium by removing one or more components from the reaction space. Such manipulation is straightforward in open systems, for example, by distillation of a volatile product from the reaction mixture. Herein we describe a unique high-temperature/high-pressure gas/liquid continuous-flow process for the rhodium-catalyzed decarbonylation of aldehydes. The carbon monoxide released during the reaction is carried with a stream of an inert gas through the center of the tubing, whereas the liquid feed travels as an annular film along the wall of the channel. As a consequence, carbon monoxide is effectively vaporized from the liquid phase into the gas phase and stripped from the reaction mixture, thus driving the equilibrium to the product and preventing poisoning of the catalyst. This approach enables the catalytic decarbonylation of a variety of aldehydes with unprecedented efficiency with a standard coil-based flow device. PMID:25196172

  11. Complexation of oxygen ligands with dimeric rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetate in chloroform: 1H, 13C NMR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2013-03-01

    The complexation of dimeric rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetylate with 25 ligands containing oxygen atoms: alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and esters in chloroform solution have been investigated by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. Investigated ligands form 1:1 adducts in our experimental conditions, with stability constants in the order of several hundred mol-1. The exchange of ligands in solution is fast on the NMR spectroscopic timescale. The decrease of longitudinal relaxation times T1 in ligands in the presence of rhodium salt has been tested as the means of determination of the complexation site in ligands. The influence of complexation on chemical shifts in ligands was evaluated by a parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δadd - δlig). These parameters were positive (>0 ppm) and did not exceed 1 ppm for 1H NMR; and varied from ca. -5 to +15 ppm in the case of 13C NMR. The calculation by DFT methods using the B3LYP functional (structure optimization, electronic energy) and B3PW91 functional (shielding), and combinations of the (6-31G(2d), 6-311G++(2d,p), and LANL2DZ basis sets, followed by scaling procedures reproduced satisfactorily 1H and 13C chemical shifts and, with some limitations, allowed to estimate Δδ parameters.

  12. Molecular structure and vibrational bands and 13C chemical shift assignments of both enmein-type diterpenoids by DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Yi fang; Wang, Xue liang

    2014-01-01

    We report here theoretical and experimental studies on the molecular structure and vibrational and NMR spectra of both natural enmein type diterpenoids molecule (6, 7-seco-ent-kaurenes enmein type), isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica (Burm.f.) Hara var. galaucocalyx (maxin) Hara. The optimized geometry, total energy, NMR chemical shifts and vibrational wavenumbers of epinodosinol and epinodosin have been determined using B3LYP method with 6-311G (d,p) basis set. A complete vibrational assignment is provided for the observed IR spectra of studied compounds. The calculated wavenumbers and 13C c.s. are in an excellent agreement with the experimental values. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level of theory have been carried out on studied compounds to obtain a set of molecular electronic properties (MEP,HOMO, LUMO and gap energies ΔEg). Electrostatic potential surfaces have been mapped over the electron density isosurfaces to obtain information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and chemical reactivity of the molecules.

  13. Molecular structure and vibrational bands and 13C chemical shift assignments of both enmein-type diterpenoids by DFT study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Yi fang; Wang, Xue liang

    2014-01-01

    We report here theoretical and experimental studies on the molecular structure and vibrational and NMR spectra of both natural enmein type diterpenoids molecule (6, 7-seco-ent-kaurenes enmein type), isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica (Burm.f.) Hara var. galaucocalyx (maxin) Hara. The optimized geometry, total energy, NMR chemical shifts and vibrational wavenumbers of epinodosinol and epinodosin have been determined using B3LYP method with 6-311G (d,p) basis set. A complete vibrational assignment is provided for the observed IR spectra of studied compounds. The calculated wavenumbers and 13C c.s. are in an excellent agreement with the experimental values. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level of theory have been carried out on studied compounds to obtain a set of molecular electronic properties (MEP,HOMO, LUMO and gap energies ΔEg). Electrostatic potential surfaces have been mapped over the electron density isosurfaces to obtain information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and chemical reactivity of the molecules. PMID:24013676

  14. Characterization of interface abruptness and material properties in catalytically grown III-V nanowires: exploiting plasmon chemical shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizei, L. H. G.; Chiaramonte, T.; Cotta, M. A.; Ugarte, D.

    2010-07-01

    We have studied the assessment of chemical composition changes in III-V heterostructured semiconductor nanowires (NWs) with nanometric spatial resolution using transmission electron microscopy methods. These materials represent a challenge for conventional spectroscopy techniques due to their high sensitivity to electron beam irradiation. Radiation damage strongly limits the exposure time to a few (5-10) s, which reduces the sensitivity of the traditionally used x-ray spectroscopy. The rather low counting statistics results in significant errors bars for EDS chemical quantification (5-10%) and interface width determination (few nanometers). Plasmon chemical shift is ideal in this situation, as its measurement requires very short exposure times (~100 ms) and the plasmon peak energy can be measured with high precision (~20 meV in this work). This high sensitivity allows the detection of subtle changes (1-2%) in composition or even the detection of a small plasmon energy (33 ± 7) meV change along usually assumed pure and homogeneous InAs segments. We have applied this approach to measure interface widths in heterostructure InAs/InP NWs grown using metal catalysts and also to determine the timescale (~10 s) in which beam irradiation induces material damage in these wires. In particular, we have detected small As concentrations (4.4 ± 0.5)% in the final InP segment close to the Au catalyst, which leads to the conclusion that As diffuses through the metal nanoparticle during growth.

  15. Characterization of interface abruptness and material properties in catalytically grown III-V nanowires: exploiting plasmon chemical shift.

    PubMed

    Tizei, L H G; Chiaramonte, T; Cotta, M A; Ugarte, D

    2010-07-23

    We have studied the assessment of chemical composition changes in III-V heterostructured semiconductor nanowires (NWs) with nanometric spatial resolution using transmission electron microscopy methods. These materials represent a challenge for conventional spectroscopy techniques due to their high sensitivity to electron beam irradiation. Radiation damage strongly limits the exposure time to a few (5-10) s, which reduces the sensitivity of the traditionally used x-ray spectroscopy. The rather low counting statistics results in significant errors bars for EDS chemical quantification (5-10%) and interface width determination (few nanometers). Plasmon chemical shift is ideal in this situation, as its measurement requires very short exposure times (approximately 100 ms) and the plasmon peak energy can be measured with high precision (approximately 20 meV in this work). This high sensitivity allows the detection of subtle changes (1-2%) in composition or even the detection of a small plasmon energy (33 +/- 7) meV change along usually assumed pure and homogeneous InAs segments. We have applied this approach to measure interface widths in heterostructure InAs/InP NWs grown using metal catalysts and also to determine the timescale (approximately 10 s) in which beam irradiation induces material damage in these wires. In particular, we have detected small As concentrations (4.4 +/- 0.5)% in the final InP segment close to the Au catalyst, which leads to the conclusion that As diffuses through the metal nanoparticle during growth. PMID:20585172

  16. Chemical structure elucidation from ¹³C NMR chemical shifts: efficient data processing using bipartite matching and maximal clique algorithms.

    PubMed

    Koichi, Shungo; Arisaka, Masaki; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Atsushi; Iwata, Satoru; Uno, Takeaki; Satoh, Hiroko

    2014-04-28

    Computer-assisted chemical structure elucidation has been intensively studied since the first use of computers in chemistry in the 1960s. Most of the existing elucidators use a structure-spectrum database to obtain clues about the correct structure. Such a structure-spectrum database is expected to grow on a daily basis. Hence, the necessity to develop an efficient structure elucidation system that can adapt to the growth of a database has been also growing. Therefore, we have developed a new elucidator using practically efficient graph algorithms, including the convex bipartite matching, weighted bipartite matching, and Bron-Kerbosch maximal clique algorithms. The utilization of the two matching algorithms especially is a novel point of our elucidator. Because of these sophisticated algorithms, the elucidator exactly produces a correct structure if all of the fragments are included in the database. Even if not all of the fragments are in the database, the elucidator proposes relevant substructures that can help chemists to identify the actual chemical structures. The elucidator, called the CAST/CNMR Structure Elucidator, plays a complementary role to the CAST/CNMR Chemical Shift Predictor, and together these two functions can be used to analyze the structures of organic compounds. PMID:24655374

  17. NMR chemical shift analysis of the conformational transition between the monomer and tetramer of melittin in an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshinori

    2016-05-01

    It is known that melittin in an aqueous solution undergoes a conformational transition between the monomer and tetramer by variation in temperature. The transition correlates closely with isomers of the proline residue; monomeric melittin including a trans proline peptide bond (trans-monomer) is involved directly in the transition, whereas monomeric melittin having a cis proline peptide bond (cis-monomer) is virtually not. The transition has been explored by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in order to clarify the stability of the tetrameric conformation and the cooperativity of the transition. In the light of temperature dependence of chemical shifts of resonances from the isomeric monomers, we qualitatively estimate the temperature-, salt-, and concentration-dependence of the relative equilibrium populations of the trans-monomer and tetramer, and show that the tetramer has a maximum conformational stability at 30-45 °C and that the transition cooperativity is very low. PMID:26658745

  18. Non‐invasive Localization of Thymol Accumulation in Carum copticum (Apiaceae) Fruits by Chemical Shift Selective Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    GERSBACH, P. V.; REDDY, N.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to localize the site of essential oil accumulation in fruit of Carum copticum L. (Apiaceae). A chemical shift method is described that utilized the spectral properties of the aromatic monoterpene thymol, the major component of the essential oil, to image thymol selectively. The presence of essential oil secretory structures in the fruit and an essential oil containing a high proportion of thymol were confirmed with optical microscopy and gas chromatography‐mass spectrometry, respectively. Selective imaging of whole C. copticum fruits showed that thymol accumulation was localized to the secretory structures (canals) situated in the fruit wall. The technique was considered non‐invasive as the seeds used in the imaging experiments remained intact and viable. PMID:12197523

  19. Backbone and stereospecific (13)C methyl Ile (δ1), Leu and Val side-chain chemical shift assignments of Crc.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakhi; Sahu, Bhubanananda; Ray, Malay K; Deshmukh, Mandar V

    2015-04-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) allows bacteria to selectively assimilate a preferred compound among a mixture of several potential carbon sources, thus boosting growth and economizing the cost of adaptability to variable nutrients in the environment. The RNA-binding catabolite repression control (Crc) protein acts as a global post-transcriptional regulator of CCR in Pseudomonas species. Crc triggers repression by inhibiting the expression of genes involved in transport and catabolism of non-preferred substrates, thus indirectly favoring assimilation of preferred one. We report here a nearly complete backbone and stereospecific (13)C methyl side-chain chemical shift assignments of Ile (δ1), Leu and Val of Crc (~ 31 kDa) from Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W. PMID:24496608

  20. Identification of histidine tautomers in proteins by 2D 1H/13C(delta2) one-bond correlated NMR.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, James L; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Haddad, Kristin E Coffman; Day, Regina M; Thalhauser, Craig J; Bullock, Peter A; Bachovchin, William W

    2003-07-16

    If the 13Cdelta2 chemical shift of neutral ("high pH") histidine is >122 ppm, primarily Ndelta1-H tautomer (2) is indicated; if it is <122 ppm, primarily Nepsilon2-H tautomer (1) is indicated. His resonances from the catalytic triad of active serine proteases, for example, are readily distinguished from those of denatured enzyme. The 13Cdelta2 chemical shifts increased by 6.2 ppm for the catalytic histidines in both alpha-lytic protease and subtilisin BPN' in raising the pH from that of imidazolium cation to that of tautomer 2. This tautomer identification method is easy to implement, requiring only bioincorporation of [U-13C] (or the more readily available [U-13C,15N])-histidine. Standard 1H/13C correlation HMQC or HSQC NMR pulse programs then yield the 13Cdelta2 chemical shifts with the benefit of high 1H sensitivity. Because of large one-bond spin-couplings (1JCH approximately 200 Hz), the method should extend to proteins having large 1H and 13C line widths, including very high molecular weights. PMID:12848537

  1. Portable Sequentially Shifted Excitation Raman spectroscopy as an innovative tool for in situ chemical interrogation of painted surfaces.

    PubMed

    Conti, Claudia; Botteon, Alessandra; Bertasa, Moira; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Sali, Diego

    2016-08-01

    We present the first validation and application of portable Sequentially Shifted Excitation (SSE) Raman spectroscopy for the survey of painted layers in art. The method enables the acquisition of shifted Raman spectra and the recovery of the spectral data through the application of a suitable reconstruction algorithm. The technique has a great potentiality in art where commonly a strong fluorescence obscures the Raman signal of the target, especially when conventional portable Raman spectrometers are used for in situ analyses. Firstly, the analytical capability of portable SSE Raman spectroscopy is critically discussed using reference materials and laboratory specimens, comparing its results with other conventional high performance laboratory instruments (benchtop FT-Raman and dispersive Raman spectrometers with an external fiber optic probe); secondly, it is applied directly in situ to study the complex polychromy of Italian prestigious terracotta sculptures of the 16(th) century. Portable SSE Raman spectroscopy represents a new investigation modality in art, expanding the portfolio of non-invasive, chemically specific analytical tools. PMID:27273377

  2. Halogen effect on structure and 13C NMR chemical shift of 3,6-disubstituted-N-alkyl carbazoles.

    PubMed

    Radula-Janik, Klaudia; Kupka, Teobald; Ejsmont, Krzysztof; Daszkiewicz, Zdzislaw; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2013-10-01

    Structures of selected 3,6-dihalogeno-N-alkyl carbazole derivatives were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) level of theory, and their (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) isotropic shieldings were predicted using density functional theory (DFT). The model compounds contained 9H, N-methyl and N-ethyl derivatives. The relativistic effect of Br and I atoms on nuclear shieldings was modeled using the spin-orbit zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) method. Significant heavy atom shielding effects for the carbon atom directly bonded with Br and I were observed (~-10 and ~-30 ppm while the other carbon shifts were practically unaffected). The decreasing electronegativity of the halogen substituent (F, Cl, Br, and I) was reflected in both nonrelativistic and relativistic NMR results as decreased values of chemical shifts of carbon atoms attached to halogen (C3 and C6) leading to a strong sensitivity to halogen atom type at 3 and 6 positions of the carbazole ring. The predicted NMR data correctly reproduce the available experimental data for unsubstituted N-alkylcarbazoles. PMID:23922027

  3. Reliable resonance assignments of selected residues of proteins with known structure based on empirical NMR chemical shift prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da-Wei; Meng, Dan; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    A robust NMR resonance assignment method is introduced for proteins whose 3D structure has previously been determined by X-ray crystallography. The goal of the method is to obtain a subset of correct assignments from a parsimonious set of 3D NMR experiments of 15N, 13C labeled proteins. Chemical shifts of sequential residue pairs are predicted from static protein structures using PPM_One, which are then compared with the corresponding experimental shifts. Globally optimized weighted matching identifies the assignments that are robust with respect to small changes in NMR cross-peak positions. The method, termed PASSPORT, is demonstrated for 4 proteins with 100-250 amino acids using 3D NHCA and a 3D CBCA(CO)NH experiments as input producing correct assignments with high reliability for 22% of the residues. The method, which works best for Gly, Ala, Ser, and Thr residues, provides assignments that serve as anchor points for additional assignments by both manual and semi-automated methods or they can be directly used for further studies, e.g. on ligand binding, protein dynamics, or post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation.

  4. Classification of iron-sulfur cores in ferredoxins by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, K; Ozaki, Y; Kyogoku, Y; Hase, T; Matsubara, H

    1983-09-01

    A 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was carried out on various ferredoxins which possess one of three types of iron-sulfur clusters, (2Fe-2S), (3Fe-3S), or (4Fe-4S). In the isolated form, (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins from spinach (Spinacea oleracia), pokeweed (Phytolacca americana), a blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis), and a halobacterium (Halobacterium halobium) exhibited two broad resonances common in chemical shift at the region downfield of 10 ppm. In their reduced forms, seven contact-shifted resonances appeared spread over 30 ppm. Although the positions of the contact-shifted resonances in the reduced state differed among the four, a common trend in the temperature dependence of their resonance positions was recognized. Two (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins from Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus exhibited almost indistinguishable spectral patterns in both the oxidized and reduced forms. The ferricyanide-treated ferredoxins of B. stearothermophilus and B. thermoproteolyticus showed characteristic contact-shifted resonances distinct from the spectra of the original (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins. This corresponds to the recent finding of the interconversion of (4Fe-4S) and (3Fe-3S) clusters with ferricyanide in the ferredoxin. Based on our data together with reported NMR data on other ferredoxins, contact-shift resonances of three types of clusters were tabulated. The reliability of NMR classification increases when we compare the NMR spectra of a ferredoxin with the classification standards at the two redox states. Moreover, not only the absolute values of the chemical shifts of contact-shifted resonances but also their temperature dependence give distinctive information applicable to iron core identification. PMID:6417123

  5. Thickness-Dependent Binding Energy Shift in Few-Layer MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Ruei-San; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2016-08-31

    The thickness-dependent surface states of MoS2 thin films grown by the chemical vapor deposition process on the SiO2-Si substrates are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy suggest the thicknesses of MoS2 films to be ranging from 3 to 10 layers. Both the core levels and valence band edges of MoS2 shift downward ∼0.2 eV as the film thickness increases, which can be ascribed to the Fermi level variations resulting from the surface states and bulk defects. Grainy features observed from the atomic force microscopy topographies, and sulfur-vacancy-induced defect states illustrated at the valence band spectra imply the generation of surface states that causes the downward band bending at the n-type MoS2 surface. Bulk defects in thick MoS2 may also influence the Fermi level oppositely compared to the surface states. When Au contacts with our MoS2 thin films, the Fermi level downshifts and the binding energy reduces due to the hole-doping characteristics of Au and easy charge transfer from the surface defect sites of MoS2. The shift of the onset potentials in hydrogen evolution reaction and the evolution of charge-transfer resistances extracted from the impedance measurement also indicate the Fermi level varies with MoS2 film thickness. The tunable Fermi level and the high chemical stability make our MoS2 a potential catalyst. The observed thickness-dependent properties can also be applied to other transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and facilitates the development in the low-dimensional electronic devices and catalysts. PMID:27488185

  6. Fast detection of choline-containing metabolites in liver using 2D 1H- 14N three-bond correlation (HN3BC) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xi-an; Li, Ning; Mao, Jiezhen; Li, Qiurong; Xiao, Nan; Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Xu-xia; Liu, Maili

    2012-01-01

    Detection and quantification of total choline-containing metabolites (CCMs) in tissues by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has received considerable attention as a biomarker of cancer. Tissue CCMs are mainly choline (Cho), phosphocholine (PCho), and glycerophosphocholine (GPCho). Because the methyl 1H resonances of tissue CCMs exhibit small chemical shift differences and overlap significantly in 1D 1H MRS, quantification of individual components is precluded. Development of a MRS method capably of resolving individual components of tissue CCMs would be a significant advance. Herein, a modification of the 2D 1H- 14N HSQC technique is targeted on the two methylene 1H in the CH 2O group ( 3J1H14N = 2.7 Hz) and applied to ex vivo mouse and human liver samples at physiological temperature (37 °C). Specifically, the 1H- 14N HSQC technique is modified into a 2D 1H- 14N three-bond correlation (HN3BC) experiment, which selectively detects the 1H of CH 2O coupled to 14N in CCMs. Separate signals from Cho, PCho, and GPCho components are resolved with high detection sensitivity. A 2D HN3BC spectrum can be recorded from mouse liver in only 1.5 min and from human carcinoma liver tissue in less than 3 min with effective sample volume of 0.2 ml at 14.1 T.

  7. Development of multicomponent hybrid density functional theory with polarizable continuum model for the analysis of nuclear quantum effect and solvent effect on NMR chemical shift

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2014-04-28

    We have developed the multicomponent hybrid density functional theory [MC-(HF+DFT)] method with polarizable continuum model (PCM) for the analysis of molecular properties including both nuclear quantum effect and solvent effect. The chemical shifts and H/D isotope shifts of the picolinic acid N-oxide (PANO) molecule in chloroform and acetonitrile solvents are applied by B3LYP electron exchange-correlation functional for our MC-(HF+DFT) method with PCM (MC-B3LYP/PCM). Our MC-B3LYP/PCM results for PANO are in reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimental chemical shifts and isotope shifts. We further investigated the applicability of our method for acetylacetone in several solvents.

  8. Correlation between the Temperature Dependence of Intrsinsic Mr Parameters and Thermal Dose Measured by a Rapid Chemical Shift Imaging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brian A.; Elliott, Andrew M.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D.; Stafford, R. Jason

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate simultaneous MR temperature imaging and direct validation of tissue damage during thermal therapy, temperature-dependent signal changes in proton resonance frequency (PRF) shifts, R2* values, and T1-weighted amplitudes are measured from one technique in ex vivo tissue heated with a 980-nm laser at 1.5T and 3.0T. Using a multi-gradient echo acquisition and signal modeling with the Stieglitz-McBride algorithm, the temperature sensitivity coefficient (TSC) values of these parameters are measured in each tissue at high spatiotemporal resolutions (1.6×1.6×4mm3,≤5sec) at the range of 25-61 °C. Non-linear changes in MR parameters are examined and correlated with an Arrhenius rate dose model of thermal damage. Using logistic regression, the probability of changes in these parameters is calculated as a function of thermal dose to determine if changes correspond to thermal damage. Temperature calibrations demonstrate TSC values which are consistent with previous studies. Temperature sensitivity of R2* and, in some cases, T1-weighted amplitudes are statistically different before and after thermal damage occurred. Significant changes in the slopes of R2* as a function of temperature are observed. Logistic regression analysis shows that these changes could be accurately predicted using the Arrhenius rate dose model (Ω=1.01±0.03), thereby showing that the changes in R2* could be direct markers of protein denaturation. Overall, by using a chemical shift imaging technique with simultaneous temperature estimation, R2* mapping and T1-W imaging, it is shown that changes in the sensitivity of R2* and, to a lesser degree, T1-W amplitudes are measured in ex vivo tissue when thermal damage is expected to occur according to Arrhenius rate dose models. These changes could possibly be used for direct validation of thermal damage in contrast to model-based predictions. PMID:21721063

  9. High accuracy NMR chemical shift corrected for bulk magnetization as a tool for structural elucidation of dilutable microemulsions. Part 1 - Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Roy E; Darmon, Eliezer; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2016-02-01

    In microemulsions, changes in droplet size and shape and possible transformations occur under various conditions. They are difficult to characterize by most analytical tools because of their nano-sized structure and dynamic nature. Several methods are usually combined to obtain reliable information, guiding the scientist in understanding their physical behavior. We felt that there is a need for a technique that complements those in use today in order to provide more information on the microemulsion behavior, mainly as a function of dilution with water. The improvement of NMR chemical shift measurements independent of bulk magnetization effects makes it possible to study the very weak intermolecular chemical shift effects. In the present study, we used NMR high resolution magic angle spinning to measure the chemical shift very accurately, free of bulk magnetization effects. The chemical shift of microemulsion components is measured as a function of the water content in order to validate the method in an interesting and promising, U-type dilutable microemulsion, which had been previously studied by a variety of techniques. Phase transition points of the microemulsion (O/W, bicontinuous, W/O) and changes in droplet shape were successfully detected using high-accuracy chemical shift measurements. We analyzed the results and found them to be compatible with the previous studies, paving the way for high-accuracy chemical shifts to be used for the study of other microemulsion systems. We detected two transition points along the water dilution line of the concentrate (reverse micelles) corresponding to the transition from swollen W/O nano-droplets to bicontinuous to the O/W droplets along with the changes in the droplets' sizes and shapes. The method seems to be in excellent agreement with other previously studied techniques and shows the advantage of this easy and valid technique. PMID:25113928

  10. Inverted cucurbit[n]urils: density functional investigations on the electronic structure, electrostatic potential, and NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Pinjari, Rahul V; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2009-02-19

    Inverted cucurbit[n]uril (i(x)CB[n], x = 1, 2; n = 6-8), the enantiomers of cucurbit[n]uril (CB[n]) comprising one or more inverted glycouril units, show distinct selectivity in recognition toward the guest by the virtue of shape and dimensions of its cavity. The iCB[n] (x = 1 and n = 6, 7) are isolated as intermediates during the synthesis of CB[n]. In this work, density functional theory using the hybrid B3LYP functional has been employed to derive the electronic structure and the NMR chemical shifts in the i(x)CB[n] hosts. The present calculations have shown that the inversion of the glycouril unit of CB[6] and CB[7] engenders a destabilization by 4.2 and 5.7 kJ mol(-1), respectively, and, as opposed to this, the iCB[8] is favored by 18.6 kJ mol(-1) over the corresponding CB[8] host. Likewise, i2CB[7] possessing two inverted glycourils are highly destabilized over CB[7]. A large separation of the inverted glycouril units reduces the repulsion between methine protons inside the cavity, rendering the 1,4-i2CB[n] (n = 7 or 8) to be of lowest energy. Stabilization energies from the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) theory are calculated with water, ethanol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) as solvents. Unlike in gas phase and other solvents, the stabilization hierarchy iCB[6] < iCB[7] < iCB[8] has been predicted in THF. Molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) was used to gauge the cavity shape of these hosts. Consequently the iCB[6] reveals a half-sprocket-like cavity; an additional tooth for each glycouril in the succeeding iCB[n] homologue was noticed. In the case of the 1,5-i2CB[8] enantiomer, the cavity turns out to be rectangular. The deeper MESP minima near the ureido oxygens suggest strong electrostatic interactions with the guest at the iCB[6] portals. The electron-rich region within the cavity explains the large affinity of CB[n] toward the electron deficient guests. The electronic distribution and shape and size of the cavity thus derived provide insights

  11. 1H and 13C NMR spectral study of some 3,5-bis[(E)-thienylmethylene]piperidin-4-ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, K.; Pandiarajan, K.

    2011-03-01

    1H and 13C NMR spectra have been recorded for 3,5-bis[(E)-thienylmethylene]piperidin-4-one ( 1a), 3',3″-dimethyl-3,5-bis[(E)-thienylmethylene]piperidin-4-one ( 1b), 5',5″-dibromo-3,5-bis[(E)-thienylmethylene]piperidin-4-one ( 1c), their 1-methyl derivatives 2a- c and 3,5-bis[(E)-thienylmethylene]-2r,6c-diphenylpiperidin-4-one ( 3a). For selected compounds 2D spectra have been recorded. The spectral data are used to study the configuration and conformation of these molecules. The chemical shifts are discussed in light of steric, electronic and magnetic anisotropic effects. The magnetic anisotropic effects of thiophene ring and phenyl group are noteworthy. 1H- 1H COSY spectrum of 2b suggests that long-range 1H- 1H coupling, up to seven bonds, is possible in it. HMBC spectrum of 2b displays the magnetic nonequivalence of C-2 and C-6 and protons at these carbons.

  12. NMR analysis and chemical shift calculations of poly(lactic acid) dimer model compounds with different tacticities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, PLA dimer model compounds with different tacticities were synthesized and studied in detail by 1H and 13C NMR in three solvents, CDCl3/CCl4 (20/80 v/v), CDCl3 and DMSO-d6. All the peaks in the 1H and 13C NMR spectra were assigned with the help of two-dimensional NMR. Although the solve...

  13. The contribution of magnetic susceptibility effects to transmembrane chemical shift differences in the 31P NMR spectra of oxygenated erythrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kirk, K; Kuchel, P W

    1988-01-01

    Triethyl phosphate, dimethyl methylphosphonate, and the hypophosphite ion all contain the phosphoryl functional group. When added to an oxygenated erythrocyte suspension, the former compound gives rise to a single 31P NMR resonance, whereas the latter compounds give rise to separate intra- and extracellular 31P NMR resonances. On the basis of experiments with intact oxygenated cell suspensions (in which the hematocrit was varied) and with oxygenated cell lysates (in which the lysate concentration was varied), it was concluded that the chemical shifts of the intra- and extracellular populations of triethyl phosphate differ as a consequence of the diamagnetic susceptibility of intracellular oxyhemoglobin but that this difference is averaged by the rapid exchange of the compound across the cell membrane. The difference in the magnetic susceptibility of the intra- and extracellular compartments contributes to the observed separation of the intra- and extracellular resonances of dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. The magnitude of this contribution is, however, substantially less than that calculated using a simple two-compartment model and varies with the hematocrit of the suspension. Furthermore, it is insufficient to fully account for the transmembrane chemical shift differences observed for dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. An additional effect is operating to move the intracellular resonances of these compounds to a lower chemical shift. The effect is mediated by an intracellular component, and the magnitude of the resultant chemical shift variations depends upon the chemical structure of the phosphoryl compound involved. PMID:3275636

  14. Contribution of magnetic susceptibility effects to transmembrane chemical shift differences in the /sup 31/P NMR spectra of oxygenated erythrocyte suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, K.; Kuchel, P.W.

    1988-01-05

    Triethyl phosphate, dimethyl methylphosphonate, and the hypophosphite ion all contain the phosphoryl functional group. When added to an oxygenated erythrocyte suspension, the former compound gives rise to a single /sup 31/P NMR resonance, whereas the latter compounds give rise to separate intra- and extracellular /sup 31/P NMR resonances. On the basis of experiments with intact oxygenated cell suspensions (in which the hematocrit was varied) and with oxygenated cell lysates (in which the lysate concentration was varied) it was concluded that the chemical shifts of the intra- and extracellular populations of triethyl phosphate differ as a consequence of the diamagnetic susceptibility of intracellular oxyhemoglobin but that this difference is averaged by the rapid exchange of the compound across the cell membrane. The difference is the magnetic susceptibility of the intra- and extracellular compartments contributes to the observed separation of the intra- and extracellular resonances of dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. The magnitude of this contribution is, however, substantially less than that calculated using a simple two-compartment model and varies with the hematocrit of the suspension. Furthermore, it is insufficient to fully account for the transmembrane chemical shift differences observed for dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. An additional effect is operating to move the intracellular resonances of these compounds to a lower chemical shift. The effect is mediated by an intracellular component, and the magnitude of the resultant chemical shift variations depends upon the chemical structure of the phosphoryl compound involved.

  15. Shifts in controls on the temporal coherence of throughfall chemical flux in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Sarah J.; Webster, Katherine E.; Loftin, Cynthia S.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Major ion and mercury (Hg) inputs to terrestrial ecosystems include both wet and dry deposition (total deposition). Estimating total deposition to sensitive receptor sites is hampered by limited information regarding its spatial heterogeneity and seasonality. We used measurements of throughfall flux, which includes atmospheric inputs to forests and the net effects of canopy leaching or uptake, for ten major ions and Hg collected during 35 time periods in 1999–2005 at over 70 sites within Acadia National Park, Maine to (1) quantify coherence in temporal dynamics of seasonal throughfall deposition and (2) examine controls on these patterns at multiple scales. We quantified temporal coherence as the correlation between all possible site pairs for each solute on a seasonal basis. In the summer growing season and autumn, coherence among pairs of sites with similar vegetation was stronger than for site-pairs that differed in vegetation suggesting that interaction with the canopy and leaching of solutes differed in coniferous, deciduous, mixed, and shrub or open canopy sites. The spatial pattern in throughfall hydrologic inputs across Acadia National Park was more variable during the winter snow season, suggesting that snow re-distribution affects net hydrologic input, which consequently affects chemical flux. Sea-salt corrected calcium concentrations identified a shift in air mass sources from maritime in winter to the continental industrial corridor in summer. Our results suggest that the spatial pattern of throughfall hydrologic flux, dominant seasonal air mass source, and relationship with vegetation in winter differ from the spatial pattern of throughfall flux in these solutes in summer and autumn. The coherence approach applied here made clear the strong influence of spatial heterogeneity in throughfall hydrologic inputs and a maritime air mass source on winter patterns of throughfall flux. By contrast, vegetation type was the most important influence on

  16. Neonatal body composition: dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, magnetic resonance imaging, and three-dimensional chemical shift imaging versus chemical analysis in piglets.

    PubMed

    Fusch, C; Slotboom, J; Fuehrer, U; Schumacher, R; Keisker, A; Zimmermann, W; Moessinger, A; Boesch, C; Blum, J

    1999-10-01

    An animal study to evaluate dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy for measurement of neonatal body composition was performed. Twenty-three piglets with body weights ranging from 848 to 7550 g were used. After measuring total body water, animals were killed and body composition was assessed using DXA and MR (1.5 T; MR imaging, T1-weighted sagittal spin-echo sequence; MR spectroscopy, three-dimensional chemical shift imaging) as well as chemical carcass analysis (standard methods) after homogenization. Body composition by chemical analysis (percent of body weight, mean +/- SD) was as follows: body water, 75.3 +/- 3.9%; total protein, 13.9 +/- 8.8%; and total fat, 6.5 +/- 3.7%. Absolute content of fat and total ash was 7-674 and 35-237 g, respectively. Mean hydration of fat-free mass was 0.804 +/- 0.011 g/kg and decreased with increasing body weight (r2 = 0.419) independent of age. Using DXA, bone mineral content was highly correlated with calcium content (r2 = 0.992), and calcium per bone mineral content was 44.1 +/- 4.2%. DXA fat mass correlated with total fat (r2 = 0.961). Using MR, spectroscopy and chemical analysis were highly correlated with fat-to-water ratio (r2 = 0.984) and absolute fat content (r2 = 0.988). Total fat by MR imaging volumetry showed a lower correlation (r2 = 0.913) and overestimated total fat by a factor of 2.46. Conversion equations for DXA were developed (total fat = 1.31 x fat mass measured by DXA--68.8; calcium = 0.402 x bone mineral content + 1.7), which improved precision and accuracy of DXA measurements. In conclusion, both DXA and MR spectroscopy give accurate and precise estimates of neonatal body composition and may become valuable tools for the noninvasive assessment of neonatal growth and nutritional status. PMID:10509370

  17. (1)H MRS in the rat brain under pentobarbital anesthesia: accurate quantification of in vivo spectra in the presence of propylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Iltis, Isabelle; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Du, Fei; Koski, Dee M; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Ugurbil, Kâmil; Chen, Wei; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2008-03-01

    Commercial solutions for pentobarbital anesthesia typically contain water H spectra. The purpose of the present study was to measure the concentration of metabolites in the rat brain in vivo under pentobarbital anesthesia using 1H MRS. Resonances of PG, but not ethanol, were observed in the rat brain. Chemical shifts and J-coupling constants for PG were measured at 37 degrees C and pH 7.1 and used for spectral simulation. Inclusion of the simulated PG spectrum in the basis set for LCModel analysis enabled accurate fitting of in vivo spectra. This work demonstrates that concentration of brain metabolites can be reliably measured using 1H spectroscopy under pentobarbital anesthesia. The chemical shifts and J-coupling values reported here can be used to simulate the spectrum of PG at any field strength, with various pulse sequences. PMID:18224694

  18. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies establish that heparanase is a retaining glycosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jennifer C.; Laloo, Andrew Elohim; Singh, Sanjesh; Ferro, Vito

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of fondaparinux were fully assigned by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. •Hydrolysis of fondaparinux by heparanase was monitored by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. •Heparanase is established to be a retaining glycosidase. -- Abstract: Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans in basement membranes and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Heparanase is implicated in several diverse pathological processes associated with ECM degradation such as metastasis, inflammation and angiogenesis and is thus an important target for anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drug discovery. Heparanase has been classed as belonging to the clan A glycoside hydrolase family 79 based on sequence analysis, secondary structure predictions and mutagenic analysis, and thus it has been inferred that it is a retaining glycosidase. However, there has been no direct experimental evidence to support this conclusion. Herein we describe {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies of the hydrolysis of the pentasaccharide substrate fondaparinux by heparanase, and provide conclusive evidence that heparanase hydrolyses its substrate with retention of configuration and is thus established as a retaining glycosidase. Knowledge of the mechanism of hydrolysis may have implications for future design of inhibitors for this important drug target.

  19. A 1H NMR assay for measuring the photostationary States of photoswitchable ligands.

    PubMed

    Banghart, Matthew R; Trauner, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Incorporation of photoisomerizable chromophores into small molecule ligands represents a general approach for reversibly controlling protein function with light. Illumination at different wavelengths produces photostationary states (PSSs) consisting of different ratios of photoisomers. Thus optimal implementation of photoswitchable ligands requires knowledge of their wavelength sensitivity. Using an azobenzene-based ion channel blocker as an example, this protocol describes a (1)H NMR assay that can be used to precisely determine the isomeric content of photostationary states (PSSs) as a function of illumination wavelength. Samples of the photoswitchable ligand are dissolved in deuterated water and analyzed by UV/VIS spectroscopy to identify the range of illumination wavelengths that produce PSSs. The PSSs produced by these wavelengths are quantified using (1)H NMR spectroscopy under continuous irradiation through a monochromator-coupled fiber-optic cable. Because aromatic protons of azobenzene trans and cis isomers exhibit sufficiently different chemical shifts, their relative abundances at each PSS can be readily determined by peak integration. Constant illumination during spectrum acquisition is essential to accurately determine PSSs from molecules that thermally relax on the timescale of minutes or faster. This general protocol can be readily applied to any photoswitch that exhibits distinct (1)H NMR signals in each photoisomeric state. PMID:23494375

  20. Centerband-only analysis of rotor-unsynchronized spin echo for measurement of lipid (31) P chemical shift anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Murata, Michio; Matsuoka, Shigeru

    2015-07-01

    Structural diversity and molecular flexibility of phospholipids are essential for biological membranes to play key roles in numerous cellular processes. Uncovering the behavior of individual lipids in membrane dynamics is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying biological functions of cell membranes. In this paper, we introduce a simple method to investigate dynamics of lipid molecules in multi-component systems by measuring the (31) P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. For achieving both signal separation and CSA determination, we utilized a centerband-only analysis of rotor-unsynchronized spin echo (COARSE). This analysis is based on the curve fitting of periodic modulation of centerband intensity along the interpulse delay time in rotor-unsynchronized spin-echo experiments. The utility of COARSE was examined by using phospholipid vesicles, a three-component lipid raft model system, and archaeal purple membranes. We found that the apparent advantages of this method are high resolution and high sensitivity given by the moderate MAS speed and the one-dimensional acquisition with short spin-echo delays. COARSE provides an alternative method for CSA measurement that is effective in the investigation of lipid polymorphologies. PMID:26017552

  1. Shifting Phases for Patchy Particles - Effect of mutagenesis and chemical modification on the phase diagram of human gamma D crystallin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, Jennifer J.; James, Susan; McNamara, Ruth; Quinn, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    Single mutations in human gamma D crystallin (HGD), a protein found in the eye lens are associated with several childhood cataracts. Phase diagrams for several of these protein mutants have been measured and reveal that phase boundaries are shifted compared with the native protein, leading to condensation of protein in a physiologically relevant regime. Using HGD as a model protein, we have constructed phase diagrams for double mutants of the protein, incorporating two single amino acid substitutions for which phase diagrams are already known. In doing so, the characteristics of each of the single mutations are maintained but both are now present in the same protein particle. While these proteins are not of interest physiologically, this strategy allows the controlled synthesis of nano-scale patchy particles in which features associated with a known phase behavior can be included. It can also provide a strategy for the controlled crystallisation of proteins. Phase boundaries also change after the chemical modification of the protein, through the covalent attachment of fluorescent labels, for example, and this will also be discussed. The authors acknowledge Science Foundation Ireland Stokes Lectureship and Grant 11/RFP.1/PHY/3165. The authors also acknowledge the Irish Research Council and the John and Pat Hume Scholarship.

  2. Mapping phosphorylation rate of fluoro-deoxy-glucose in rat brain by 19F chemical shift imaging

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Daniel; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Cheng, David; McCarthy, Timothy; Rothman, Douglas L.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2014-01-01

    19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies of 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate (FDG-6P) can be used for directly assessing total glucose metabolism in vivo. To date, 19F MRS measurements of FDG phosphorylation in the brain have either been achieved ex vivo from extracted tissue or in vivo by unusually long acquisition times. Electrophysiological and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements indicate that FDG doses up to 500mg/kg can be tolerated with minimal side effects on cerebral physiology and evoked fMRI-BOLD responses to forepaw stimulation. In halothane-anesthetized rats, we report localized in vivo detection and separation of FDG and FDG-6P MRS signals with 19F 2D chemical shift imaging (CSI) at 11.7T. A metabolic model based on reversible transport between plasma and brain tissue, which included a non-saturable plasma to tissue component, was used to calculate spatial distribution of FDG and FDG-6P concentrations in rat brain. In addition, spatial distribution of rate constants and metabolic fluxes of FDG to FDG-6P conversion were estimated. Mapping the rate of FDG to FDG-6P conversion by 19F CSI provides an MR methodology that could impact other in vivo applications such as characterization of tumor pathophysiology. PMID:24581725

  3. Intramolecular excited proton transfer of 1-(1-phenyl-1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazol-2-yl)naphthalen-2-ol - A combined experimental and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabharathi, J.; Thanikachalam, V.; Ramanathan, P.; Arunpandiyan, A.

    2014-03-01

    Synthesis of the 1-(1-phenyl-1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazol-2-yl)naphthalen-2-ol [PPIN] is reported, spectral and fluorescent properties of the title compound are investigated. The feasibility of excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) has been argued from the changeover of relative stability of the enol and the keto forms on photoexcitation from the S0-PES to the S1-PES. Critical evaluation on the modulations of geometrical parameters other than the proton transfer reaction coordinate has also been undertaken. The intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in PPIN has been explored by calculation of the hyperconjugative charge transfer interaction from the lone electron pair of ring nitrogen atom to the σ∗ orbital of O-H bond, under the provision of Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. However, DFT calculations together with the experimental results reveal that the excited species with the intramolecular N⋯HO hydrogen bond type undergoes rapid radiationless deactivation. This leads to a conclusion that the low-intensity dual-band fluorescence of the title compound in solution originates from the traces of the conformation with the -OH bond to azomethine nitrogen atom (ESIPT).

  4. NMR shifts for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Thonhauser, Timo; Ceresoli, Davide; Marzari, Nicola N.

    2009-09-03

    We present first-principles, density-functional theory calculations of the NMR chemical shifts for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, starting with benzene and increasing sizes up to the one- and two-dimensional infinite limits of graphene ribbons and sheets. Our calculations are performed using a combination of the recently developed theory of orbital magnetization in solids, and a novel approach to NMR calculations where chemical shifts are obtained from the derivative of the orbital magnetization with respect to a microscopic, localized magnetic dipole. Using these methods we study on equal footing the 1H and 13C shifts in benzene, pyrene, coronene, in naphthalene, anthracene, naphthacene, and pentacene, and finally in graphene, graphite, and an infinite graphene ribbon. Our results show very good agreement with experiments and allow us to characterize the trends for the chemical shifts as a function of system size.

  5. 13C NMR chemical shift correlations in application of “tool of increasing electron demand” to stable long-lived carbocations: Comprehensive evaluation*

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Berrier, Arthur L.; Prakash, G. K. Surya

    1981-01-01

    The reliability of 13C NMR chemical shift correlations in the application of the “tool of increasing electron demand” to stable long-lived carbocationic systems is demonstrated by a comprehensive analysis of 22 stable aryl-substituted carbocationic systems. The observation of slopes of less than unity in such chemical shift correlations for several cationic systems has been attributed to additional charge delocalizing mechanisms present in the system (such as homoallylic, cyclopropyl, and π conjugations). The onset of nonclassical σ-delocalization in 2-aryl-2-norbornyl cations with electron withdrawing-substituents previously observed was further verified by using σC+ substituent constants. Difficulties in relating the CαNMR shifts in different carbocationic systems are also discussed. PMID:16593000

  6. Structural determination of complex natural products by quantum mechanical calculations of (13)C NMR chemical shifts: development of a parameterized protocol for terpenes.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Ribeiro, Daniel Joras; de Amorim, Mauro Barbosa

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important tools for determining the structures of organic molecules. Despite the advances made in this technique, revisions of erroneously established structures for natural products are still commonly published in the literature. In this context, the prediction of chemical shifts through ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations has become a very powerful tool for assisting with the structural determination of complex organic molecules. In this work, we present the development of a protocol for (13)C chemical shift calculations of terpenes, a class of natural products that are widely distributed among plant species and are very important due to their biological and pharmacological activities. This protocol consists of GIAO-DFT calculations of chemical shifts and the application of a parameterized scaling factor in order to ensure accurate structural determination of this class of natural products. The application of this protocol to a set of five terpenes yielded accurate calculated chemical shifts, showing that this is a very attractive tool for the calculation of complex organic structures such as terpenes. PMID:27424297

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts with the statistical average of orbital-dependent model potentials in Kohn-Sham density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poater, Jordi; van Lenthe, Erik; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, an orbital-dependent Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation potential, the so-called statistical average of (model) orbital potentials, is applied to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of a series of simple molecules containing H, C, N, O, and F. It is shown that the use of this model potential leads to isotropic chemical shifts which are substantially improved over both local and gradient-corrected functionals, especially for nitrogen and oxygen atoms. This improvement in the chemical shift calculations can be attributed to the increase in the gap between highest occupied and lowest unoccupied orbitals, thus correcting the excessively large paramagnetic contributions, which have been identified to give deficient chemical shifts with both the local-density approximation and with gradient-corrected functionals. This is in keeping with the improvement by the statitical average of orbital model potentials for response properties in general and for excitation energies in particular. The present results are comparable in accuracy to those previously reported with self-interaction corrected functionals by Patchovskii et al., but still inferior to those obtained with accurate Kohn-Sham potentials by Wilson and Tozer. However, the present approach is computationally expedient and routinely applicable to all systems, requiring virtually the same computational effort as local-density and generalized-gradient calculations.

  8. Probing the solvent shell with 195Pt chemical shifts: density functional theory molecular dynamics study of Pt(II) and Pt(IV) anionic complexes in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Truflandier, Lionel A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2010-03-17

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (aiMD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed on a set of five anionic platinum complexes in aqueous solution. (195)Pt nuclear magnetic shielding constants were computed with DFT as averages over the aiMD trajectories, using the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) in order to treat relativistic effects on the Pt shielding tensors. The chemical shifts obtained from the aiMD averages are in good agreement with experimental data. For Pt(II) and Pt(IV) halide complexes we found an intermediate solvent shell interacting with the complexes that causes pronounced solvent effects on the Pt chemical shifts. For these complexes, the magnitude of solvent effects on the Pt shielding constant can be correlated with the surface charge density. For square-planar Pt complexes the aiMD simulations also clearly demonstrate the influence of closely coordinated non-equatorial water molecules on the Pt chemical shift, relating the structure of the solution around the complex to the solvent effects on the metal NMR chemical shift. For the complex [Pt(CN)(4)](2-), the solvent effects on the Pt shielding constant are surprisingly small. PMID:20166712

  9. Multinuclear 1H, 13C and 15N NMR study of some substituted 2-amino-4-nitropyridines and their N-oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihia, K.; Kolehmainen, E.; Kauppinen, R.; Lorenc, J.; Puszko, A.

    2002-05-01

    1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments based on pulsed field gradient selected PFG 1H,X (X= 13C and 15N) HMQC and HMBC experiments are reported for three 4-nitropyridine N-oxides and four 4-nitropyridines. It was found that an ortho effect of a methyl group inhibits the deshielding effect of the 4-nitro group and that this effect and the so-called back donation is influenced by electronegativity and position of substituents in the multisubstituted pyridine N-oxides. The shielding effect of N-oxide group is most pronounced in the 15N NMR chemical shifts of the studied compounds. This effect is further modified by methylamino, methylnitramino, 5- or 3-methyl and 4-nitro groups. Among them the 4-nitro group exerts the highest influence on the shielding effect of the N-oxide functionality. Experimental 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shifts and GIAO/DFT theoretical calculations are consistent with each other and supported by the reactivity on nucleophilic substitution, the UV spectral and the dipole moment data.

  10. Study of stereospecificity of 1H, 13C, 15N and 77Se shielding constants in the configurational isomers of the selenophene-2-carbaldehyde azine by NMR spectroscopy and MP2-GIAO calculations.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Albanov, Alexander I; Levanova, Ekaterina P; Levkovskaya, Galina G

    2011-11-01

    In the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of selenophene-2-carbaldehyde azine, the (1)H-5, (13)C-3 and (13)C-5 signals of the selenophene ring are shifted to higher frequencies, whereas those of the (1)H-1, (13)C-1, (13)C-2 and (13)C-4 are shifted to lower frequencies on going from the EE to ZZ isomer or from the E moiety to the Z moiety of EZ isomer. The (15)N chemical shift is significantly larger in the EE isomer relative to the ZZ isomer and in the E moiety relative to the Z moiety of EZ isomer. A very pronounced difference (60-65 mg/g) between the (77)Se resonance positions is revealed in the studied azine isomers, the (77)Se peak being shifted to higher frequencies in the ZZ isomer and in the Z moiety of EZ isomer. The trends in the changes of the measured chemical shifts are reasonably reproduced by the GIAO calculations at the MP2 level of the (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (77)Se shielding constants in the energy-favorable conformation with the syn orientation of both selenophene rings relative to the C = N groups. The NBO analysis suggests that such an arrangement of the selenophene rings may take place because of a higher energy of some intramolecular interactions. PMID:22002712

  11. The recognition of multi-class protein folds by adding average chemical shifts of secondary structure elements

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhenxing; Hu, Xiuzhen; Jiang, Zhuo; Song, Hangyu; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of protein folds is an important step in the prediction of protein structure and function. Recently, an increasing number of researchers have sought to improve the methods for protein fold recognition. Following the construction of a dataset consisting of 27 protein fold classes by Ding and Dubchak in 2001, prediction algorithms, parameters and the construction of new datasets have improved for the prediction of protein folds. In this study, we reorganized a dataset consisting of 76-fold classes constructed by Liu et al. and used the values of the increment of diversity, average chemical shifts of secondary structure elements and secondary structure motifs as feature parameters in the recognition of multi-class protein folds. With the combined feature vector as the input parameter for the Random Forests algorithm and ensemble classification strategy, we propose a novel method to identify the 76 protein fold classes. The overall accuracy of the test dataset using an independent test was 66.69%; when the training and test sets were combined, with 5-fold cross-validation, the overall accuracy was 73.43%. This method was further used to predict the test dataset and the corresponding structural classification of the first 27-protein fold class dataset, resulting in overall accuracies of 79.66% and 93.40%, respectively. Moreover, when the training set and test sets were combined, the accuracy using 5-fold cross-validation was 81.21%. Additionally, this approach resulted in improved prediction results using the 27-protein fold class dataset constructed by Ding and Dubchak. PMID:26980999

  12. UV-vis, IR and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies and characterization of ionic-pair crystal violet-oxytetracycline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Sandra; Soto, César; Toral, M. Inés

    2010-01-01

    The present study shows the formation and characterization of the ionic-pair between the antibiotic oxytetracycline and the dye crystal violet in ammonia solution pH 9.0 ± 0.2 extracted into chloroform. The characterization was demonstrated using UV-vis spectrophotometry, 1H NMR, measurement of relaxation times T1 and IR spectroscopy, using a comparison between the signals of individual pure compounds with the signals with the mixture CV-OTC in different alkaline media. The formation of ionic-pair was also corroborated by new signals and chemical shifts. (2D) NMR spectroscopy experiments show that the interaction is electrostatic.

  13. 15N-labeled tRNA. Identification of 4-thiouridine in Escherichia coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2 by 1H-15N two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffey, R H; Davis, D R; Yamaizumi, Z; Nishimura, S; Hawkins, B L; Poulter, C D

    1986-09-15

    Uridine is uniquely conserved at position 8 in elongator tRNAs and binds to A14 to form a reversed Hoogsteen base pair which folds the dihydrouridine loop back into the core of the L-shaped molecule. On the basis of 1H NMR studies, Hurd and co-workers (Hurd, R. E., Robillard, G. T., and Reid, B. R. (1977) Biochemistry 16, 2095-2100) concluded that the interaction between positions 8 and 14 is absent in Escherichia coli tRNAs with only 3 base pairs in the dihydrouridine stem. We have taken advantage of the unique 15N chemical shift of N3 in thiouridine to identify 1H and 15N resonances for the imino units of S4U8 and s4U9 in E. coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2. Model studies with chloroform-soluble derivatives of uridine and 4-thiouridine show that the chemical shifts of the protons in the imino moieties move downfield from 7.9 to 14.4 ppm and from 9.1 to 15.7 ppm, respectively; whereas, the corresponding 15N chemical shifts move downfield from 157.5 to 162.5 ppm and from 175.5 to 180.1 ppm upon hydrogen bonding to 5'-O-acetyl-2',3'-isopropylidene adenosine. The large difference in 15N chemical shifts for U and s4U allows one to unambiguously identify s4U imino resonances by 15N NMR spectroscopy. E. coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2 were selectively enriched with 15N at N3 of all uridines and modified uridines. Two-dimensional 1H-15N chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy revealed that both tRNAs have resonances with 1H and 15N chemical shifts characteristic of s4UA pairs. The 1H shift is approximately 1 ppm upfield from the typical s4U8 resonance at 14.8 ppm, presumably as a result of local diamagnetic anisotropies. An additional s4U resonance with 1H and 15N shifts typical of interaction of a bound water or a sugar hydroxyl group with s4U9 was discovered in the spectrum of tRNATyr2. Our NMR results for tRNAs with 3-base pair dihydrouridine stems suggest that these molecules have an U8A14 tertiary interaction similar to that found in tRNAs with 4-base pair dihydrouridine

  14. Molecular structures of 2-arylaminomethyl-1H-benzimidazole: Spectral, electrochemical, DFT and biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Ghani, Nour T.; Mansour, Ahmed M.

    2012-06-01

    In the present work, structural studies on (1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)-N-(4-chloro-phenyl)-amine (L1) and (1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)-N-(4-iodo-phenyl)-amine (L2) have been done extensively by a variety of physico-chemical techniques. Optimized geometrical structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis, and Frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) were obtained by DFT/B3LYP method. TD-DFT calculations help to assign the electronic transitions. The polarizable continuum model (PCM) fails to describe the experimental chemical shift associated with the NH protons as calculated by applying Gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method, but a very good correlation between the theoretical and experimental values was achieved by taking into account the specific solute-solvent interactions. DFT calculations showed a good agreement between the theoretical and observed results. These compounds exhibited a high biological activity through the inhibition of the metabolic growth of the investigated bacteria.

  15. Accuracy of Calculated Chemical Shifts in Carbon 1s Ionization Energies from Single-Reference ab Initio Methods and Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Holme, Alf; Børve, Knut J; Sæthre, Leif J; Thomas, T Darrah

    2011-12-13

    A database of 77 adiabatic carbon 1s ionization energies has been prepared, covering linear and cyclic alkanes and alkenes, linear alkynes, and methyl- or fluoro-substituted benzenes. Individual entries are believed to carry uncertainties of less than 30 meV in ionization energies and less than 20 meV for shifts in ionization energies. The database provides an unprecedented opportunity for assessing the accuracy of theoretical schemes for computing inner-shell ionization energies and their corresponding chemical shifts. Chemical shifts in carbon 1s ionization energies have been computed for all molecules in the database using Hartree-Fock, Møller-Plesset (MP) many-body perturbation theory of order 2 and 3 as well as various approximations to full MP4, and the coupled-cluster approximation with single- and double-excitation operators (CCSD) and also including a perturbational estimate of the energy effect of triple-excitation operators (CCSD(T)). Moreover, a wide range of contemporary density functional theory (DFT) methods are also evaluated with respect to computing experimental shifts in C1s ionization energies. Whereas the top ab initio methods reproduce the observed shifts almost to within the experimental uncertainty, even the best-performing DFT approaches meet with twice the root-mean-squared error and thrice the maximum error compared to CCSD(T). However, a number of different density energy functionals still afford sufficient accuracy to become tools in the analysis of complex C1s photoelectron spectra. PMID:26598356

  16. NMR profiling of biomolecules at natural abundance using 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C multiplicity-separated (MS) HSQC spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Freedberg, Darón I.; Keire, David A.

    2015-02-01

    2D NMR 1H-X (X = 15N or 13C) HSQC spectra contain cross-peaks for all XHn moieties. Multiplicity-edited1H-13C HSQC pulse sequences generate opposite signs between peaks of CH2 and CH/CH3 at a cost of lower signal-to-noise due to the 13C T2 relaxation during an additional 1/1JCH period. Such CHn-editing experiments are useful in assignment of chemical shifts and have been successfully applied to small molecules and small proteins (e.g. ubiquitin) dissolved in deuterated solvents where, generally, peak overlap is minimal. By contrast, for larger biomolecules, peak overlap in 2D HSQC spectra is unavoidable and peaks with opposite phases cancel each other out in the edited spectra. However, there is an increasing need for using NMR to profile biomolecules at natural abundance dissolved in water (e.g., protein therapeutics) where NMR experiments beyond 2D are impractical. Therefore, the existing 2D multiplicity-edited HSQC methods must be improved to acquire data on nuclei other than 13C (i.e.15N), to resolve more peaks, to reduce T2 losses and to accommodate water suppression approaches. To meet these needs, a multiplicity-separated1H-X HSQC (MS-HSQC) experiment was developed and tested on 500 and 700 MHz NMR spectrometers equipped with room temperature probes using RNase A (14 kDa) and retroviral capsid (26 kDa) proteins dissolved in 95% H2O/5% D2O. In this pulse sequence, the 1/1JXH editing-period is incorporated into the semi-constant time (semi-CT) X resonance chemical shift evolution period, which increases sensitivity, and importantly, the sum and the difference of the interleaved 1JXH-active and the 1JXH-inactive HSQC experiments yield two separate spectra for XH2 and XH/XH3. Furthermore we demonstrate improved water suppression using triple xyz-gradients instead of the more widely used z-gradient only water-suppression approach.

  17. Selective detection and complete identification of triglycerides in cortical bone by high-resolution (1)H MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; Xu, Jiadi; Zhu, Peizhi; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-07-28

    Using (1)H-based magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we report an atomistic-level characterization of triglycerides in compact cortical bone. By suppressing contributions from immobile molecules present in bone, we show that a (1)H-based constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak (CTUC) two-dimensional COSY-type experiment that correlates the chemical shifts of protons can selectively detect a mobile triglyceride layer as the main component of small lipid droplets embedded on the surface of collagen fibrils. High sensitivity and resolution afforded by this NMR approach could be potentially utilized to investigate the origin of triglycerides and their pathological roles associated with bone fractures, diseases, and aging. PMID:27374353

  18. Multilayer MoS2 prepared by one-time and repeated chemical vapor depositions: anomalous Raman shifts and transistors with high ON/OFF ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chong-Rong; Chang, Xiang-Rui; Chang, Shu-Wei; Chang, Chung-En; Wu, Chao-Hsin; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2015-11-01

    We show that multilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown with the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) may exhibit quite distinct behaviors of Raman shifts from those of exfoliated ones. The anomalous Raman shifts depend on CVD growth modes and are attributed to the modified dielectric screening and interlayer coupling of MoS2 in various growth conditions. With repeated CVD growths, we demonstrated the precise control over the layer number of MoS2. A decently large drain current, high ON/OFF ratio of 105, and enhanced field-effect mobility can be achieved in transistors fabricated on the six-layer MoS2.

  19. Synthesis, molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition, isometric chemical shift, polarizability and hyperpolarizability analysis of 3-(4-Methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile: A combined experimental and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kurt, Mustafa; Alamry, Khalid A.

    2011-11-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel compound, 3-(4-Methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile (abbreviated as 3-(4MP)-2-(4-NP)-AN, C 16H 12N 2O 3). The spectroscopic properties of the compound were examined by FT-IR, UV-vis and NMR ( 1H and 13C) techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was observed in the region 4000-400 cm -1. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound which dissolved in chloroform was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl 3 solution. To determine lowest-energy molecular conformation of the title molecule, the selected torsion angle is varied every 10° and molecular energy profile is calculated from 0° to 360°. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first hyperpolarizability values were also computed using the same basis set. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The HOMO and LUMO analysis were used to elucidate information regarding charge transfer within the molecule. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Comparison of the calculated frequencies, NMR chemical shifts, absorption wavelengths with the experimental values revealed that DFT and TD-DFT method produce good results. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the title compound can be used as a good nonlinear optical material

  20. Synthesis, molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition, isometric chemical shift, polarizability and hyperpolarizability analysis of 3-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile: a combined experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kurt, Mustafa; Alamry, Khalid A

    2011-11-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel compound, 3-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile (abbreviated as 3-(4MP)-2-(4-NP)-AN, C(16)H(12)N(2)O(3)). The spectroscopic properties of the compound were examined by FT-IR, UV-vis and NMR ((1)H and (13)C) techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was observed in the region 4000-400 cm(-1). The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound which dissolved in chloroform was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl(3) solution. To determine lowest-energy molecular conformation of the title molecule, the selected torsion angle is varied every 10° and molecular energy profile is calculated from 0° to 360°. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first hyperpolarizability values were also computed using the same basis set. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The HOMO and LUMO analysis were used to elucidate information regarding charge transfer within the molecule. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Comparison of the calculated frequencies, NMR chemical shifts, absorption wavelengths with the experimental values revealed that DFT and TD-DFT method produce good results. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the title compound can be used as a good nonlinear

  1. 1H, 13C, 195Pt and 15N NMR structural correlations in Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with various alkyl and aryl derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Tomasz; Pazderski, Leszek; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2011-02-01

    (1)H, (13)C, (195)Pt and (15)N NMR studies of platinide(II) (M = Pd, Pt) chloride complexes with such alkyl and aryl derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline as LL = 6,6'-dimethyl-bpy, 5,5'-dimethyl-bpy, 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-bpy, 2,9-dimethyl-phen, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-phen, 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-phen, having the general [M(LL)Cl(2)] formula were performed and the respective chemical shifts (δ(1H), δ(13C), δ(195Pt), δ(15N)) reported. (1)H high-frequency coordination shifts (Δ(coord)(1H) = δ(complex)(1H)-δ(ligand)(1H)) mostly pronounced for nitrogen-adjacent protons and methyl groups in the nearest adjacency of nitrogen, as well as (15)N low-frequency coordination shifts (Δ(coord)(15H) = δ(complex)(15H)-δ(ligand)(15H)) were discussed in relation to the molecular structures. PMID:21254225

  2. A 1H-n.m.r. study of casein micelles.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, M C; Roberts, G C

    1985-01-01

    The 1H-n.m.r. spectrum of casein micelles consists of a small number of moderately sharp (linewidth approx. 60 Hz) resonances superimposed on the envelope of very broad lines expected for particles of this size. These sharp lines resemble, in chemical shift and relative intensity, the spectrum of the isolated 'macropeptide' released from the micelles by treatment with chymosin. The sharp lines in the casein micelle spectrum are further sharpened by addition of chymosin and broadened markedly by addition of ethanol. These observations are consistent with the proposal that the 'macropeptide' (the C-terminal 64 residues of K-casein) forms flexible 'hairs' on the surface of the micelles. PMID:3924034

  3. A relativistic DFT methodology for calculating the structures and NMR chemical shifts of octahedral platinum and iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Patzschke, Michael; Marek, Radek

    2013-05-28

    A methodology for optimizing the geometry and calculating the NMR shielding constants is calibrated for octahedral complexes of Pt(IV) and Ir(III) with modified nucleic acid bases. The performance of seven different functionals (BLYP, B3LYP, BHLYP, BP86, TPSS, PBE, and PBE0) in optimizing the geometry of transition-metal complexes is evaluated using supramolecular clusters derived from X-ray data. The effects of the size of the basis set (ranging from SVP to QZVPP) and the dispersion correction (D3) on the interatomic distances are analyzed. When structural deviations and computational demands are employed as criteria for evaluating the optimizations of these clusters, the PBE0/def2-TZVPP/D3 approach provides excellent results. In the next step, the PBE0/def2-TZVPP approach is used with the continuum-like screening model (COSMO) to optimize the geometry of single molecules for the subsequent calculation of the NMR shielding constants in solution. The two-component zeroth-order regular approximation (SO-ZORA) is used to calculate the NMR shielding constants (PBE0/TZP/COSMO). The amount of exact exchange in the PBE0 functional is validated for the nuclear magnetic shieldings of atoms in the vicinity of heavy transition metals. For the PBE0/TZP/COSMO setup, an exact exchange of 40% is found to accurately reproduce the experimental NMR shielding constants for both types of complexes. Finally, the effect of the amount of exact exchange on the NMR shielding calculations (which is capable of compensating for the structural deficiencies) is analyzed for various molecular geometries (SCS-MP2, BHLYP, and PBE0) and the influence of a trans-substituent on the NMR chemical shift of nitrogen is discussed. The observed dependencies for an iridium complex cannot be rationalized by visualizing the Fermi-contact (FC) induced spin density and probably originate from changes in the d-d transitions that modulate the spin-orbit (SO) part of the SO/FC term. PMID:23598437

  4. Application of cryoprobe 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for the verification of corsican honey.

    PubMed

    Donarski, James A; Jones, Stephen A; Charlton, Adrian J

    2008-07-23

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) and multivariate analysis techniques have been used to classify honey into two groups by geographical origin. Honey from Corsica (Miel de Corse) was used as an example of a protected designation of origin product. Mathematical models were constructed to determine the feasibility of distinguishing between honey from Corsica and that from other geographical locations in Europe, using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Honey from 10 different regions within five countries was analyzed. (1)H NMR spectra were used as input variables for projection to latent structures (PLS) followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and genetic programming (GP). Models were generated using three methods, PLS-LDA, two-stage GP, and a combination of PLS and GP (PLS-GP). The PLS-GP model used variables selected by PLS for subsequent GP calculations. All models were generated using Venetian blind cross-validation. Overall classification rates for the discrimination of Corsican and non-Corsican honey of 75.8, 94.5, and 96.2% were determined using PLS-LDA, two-stage GP, and PLS-GP, respectively. The variables utilized by PLS-GP were related to their (1)H NMR chemical shifts, and this led to the identification of trigonelline in honey for the first time. PMID:18564849

  5. A closer look at the nitrogen next door: 1H-15N NMR methods for glycosaminoglycan structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beni, Szabolcs; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, experimental conditions were presented for the detection of the N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) NHSO3- or sulfamate 1H and 15N NMR resonances of the pharmaceutically and biologically important glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin in aqueous solution. In the present work, we explore further the applicability of nitrogen-bound proton detection to provide structural information for GAGs. Compared to the detection of 15N chemical shifts of aminosugars through long-range couplings using the IMPACT-HNMBC pulse sequence, the more sensitive two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiments provided additional structural data. The IMPACT-HNMBC experiment remains a powerful tool as demonstrated by the spectrum measured for the unsubstituted amine of 3-O-sulfoglucosamine (GlcN(3S)), which cannot be observed with the 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiment due to the fast exchange of the amino group protons with solvent. The 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectrum reported for the mixture of model compounds GlcNS and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrate the broad utility of this approach. Measurements for the synthetic pentasaccharide drug Arixtra® (Fondaparinux sodium) in aqueous solution illustrate the power of this NMR pulse sequence for structural characterization of highly similar N-sulfoglucosamine residues in GAG-derived oligosaccharides.

  6. 1H NMR studies on the hydrogen-bonding network in mono-altro-beta-cyclodextrin and its complex with adamantane-1-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Hakkarainen, Birgit; Fujita, Kahee; Immel, Stefan; Kenne, Lennart; Sandström, Corine

    2005-06-13

    The hydrogen-bond network in mono-altro-beta-cyclodextrin and in its inclusion complex with adamantane-1-carboxylic acid were investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy using the chemical shifts, temperature coefficients and vicinal coupling constants of the exchangeable hydroxy protons. The chemical shifts of the 3-OH signals indicated that the hydrogen-bond network between the 2-OH and 3-OH groups was disturbed not only on each side of the altrose residue, but also along the whole dextrin chain. Upon addition of adamantane-1-carboxylic acid, altrose underwent a conformational change from the (1)C(4) to the (O)S(2) form, allowing a more continuous belt of hydrogen bonding, as evidenced by the downfield shift experienced by the 3-OH proton signals of the glucose residues. PMID:15885670

  7. Use of chemical shift encoded magnetic resonance imaging (CSE-MRI) for high resolution fat-suppressed imaging of the brachial and lumbosacral plexuses

    PubMed Central

    Grayev, Allison; Reeder, Scott; Hanna, Amgad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the era of increasingly complex surgical techniques for peripheral nerve repair, there is a need for high spatial resolution imaging of the neural plexuses in the body. We describe our experience with chemical shift encoded MRI and its implications for patient management. Materials and methods IDEAL water-fat separation is a chemical shift based method of homogeneously suppressing signal from fat, while maintaining adequate signal. This technique was used in clinical practice and the patient images reviewed. Results IDEAL water-fat separation was shown to improve visualization of the brachial and lumbosacral plexuses with good fat suppression and high signal to noise ratio. Conclusion IDEAL water − fat separation is an excellent technique to use in the imaging of the brachial and lumbosacral plexuses as it balances the need for homogeneous fat suppression with maintenance of excellent signal to noise ratio. PMID:27161071

  8. Deciphering Noncovalent Interactions Accompanying 7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane Encapsulation within Biphene[n]arenes: Nucleus-Independent Chemical Shifts Approach.

    PubMed

    Lande, Dipali N; Rao, Soniya S; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2016-07-18

    Binding of novel biphene[n]arene hosts to antiaromatic 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) are investigated by DFT. Biphene[4]arene favors the inclusion complex through noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, π-π stacking, C-H⋅⋅⋅π, and C-H⋅⋅⋅H-C dihydrogen bonding. Donor-acceptor complexation renders aromatic character to the guest through charge transfer. The formation of TCNQ anionic radicals through supramolecular π stacking significantly influences its chemical and photophysical behavior. Electron density reorganization consequent to encapsulation of TCNQ reflects in the shift of characteristic vibrations in the IR spectra. The accompanying aromaticities arising from the induced ring currents are analyzed by employing nucleus-independent chemical shifts based profiles. PMID:27028656

  9. 1H- and 13C-NMR investigation of redox-state-dependent and temperature-dependent conformation changes in horse cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Turner, D L; Williams, R J

    1993-02-01

    The redox-state dependent changes in chemical shift, which have been measured for almost 100 CHn groups in the 13C-NMR spectra of horse cytochrome c [Santos, H., and Turner, D. L. (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 206, 721-728], have been used to investigate the nature of the redox-related change in conformation. Apart from the haem and its axial ligands, the shifts are found to be dominated by the electron-nuclear dipolar coupling in the oxidised form, as was the case in 1H-NMR studies. These pseudocontact shifts are well described by using an empirically determined magnetic susceptibility tensor in conjunction with atomic coordinates for the horse cytochrome c. The groups which fit least well are located in the vicinity of Trp59. Comparison between 1H and 13C shifts and their temperature dependence shows that the differences from expectation based on a single structure for both oxidation states are caused largely by changes in the diamagnetic contribution to the chemical shifts. Since these are different for 1H and 13C resonances they indicate, independently from crystal structure data, some redox-related movement of the protein under the haem. The significance of these results for understanding electron transfer pathways is discussed. Finally, the temperature dependence of the pseudocontact shifts in the range 30-50 degrees C is shown to be anomalous. Approximately half of the anomalous effect may be attributed to Zeeman mixing of the electronic wavefunctions with a spin-orbit coupling constant lambda = 241 cm-1, while the other half is attributed to thermal expansion of the protein. PMID:8382154

  10. Survey and qualification of internal standards for quantification by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rundlöf, Torgny; Mathiasson, Marie; Bekiroglu, Somer; Hakkarainen, Birgit; Bowden, Tim; Arvidsson, Torbjörn

    2010-09-01

    In quantitative NMR (qNMR) selection of an appropriate internal standard proves to be crucial. In this study, 25 candidate compounds considered to be potent internal standards were investigated with respect to the ability of providing unique signal chemical shifts, purity, solubility, and ease of use. The (1)H chemical shift (delta) values, assignments, multiplicities and number of protons (for each signal), appropriateness (as to be used as internal standards) in four different deuterated solvents (D(2)O, DMSO-d(6), CD(3)OD, CDCl(3)) were studied. Taking into account the properties of these 25 internal standards, the most versatile eight compounds (2,4,6-triiodophenol, 1,3,5-trichloro-2-nitrobenzene, 3,4,5-trichloropyridine, dimethyl terephthalate, 1,4-dinitrobenzene, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, maleic acid and fumaric acid) were qualified using both differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and NMR spectroscopy employing highly pure acetanilide as the reference standard. The data from these two methods were compared as well as utilized in the quality assessment of the compounds as internal standards. Finally, the selected internal standards were tested and evaluated in a real case of quantitative NMR analysis of a paracetamol pharmaceutical product. PMID:20207092

  11. Structure, solvent, and relativistic effects on the NMR chemical shifts in square-planar transition-metal complexes: assessment of DFT approaches.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Novotný, Jan; Straka, Michal; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Marek, Radek

    2015-10-14

    The role of various factors (structure, solvent, and relativistic treatment) was evaluated for square-planar 4d and 5d transition-metal complexes. The DFT method for calculating the structures was calibrated using a cluster approach and compared to X-ray geometries, with the PBE0 functional (def2-TZVPP basis set) providing the best results, followed closely by the hybrid TPSSH and the MN12SX functionals. Calculations of the NMR chemical shifts using the two-component (2c, Zeroth-Order Regular Approximation as implemented in the ADF package) and four-component (4c, Dirac-Coulomb as implemented in the ReSpect code) relativistic approaches were performed to analyze and demonstrate the importance of solvent corrections (2c) as well as a proper treatment of relativistic effects (4c). The importance of increased exact-exchange admixture in the functional (here PBE0) for reproducing the experimental data using the current implementation of the 2c approach is partly rationalized as a compensation for the missing exchange-correlation response kernel. The kernel contribution was identified to be about 15-20% of the spin-orbit-induced NMR chemical shift, ΔδSO, which roughly corresponds to an increase in ΔδSO introduced by the artificially increased exact-exchange admixture in the functional. Finally, the role of individual effects (geometry, solvent, relativity) in the NMR chemical shift is discussed in selected complexes. Although a fully relativistic DFT approach is still awaiting the implementation of GIAOs for hybrid functionals and an implicit solvent model, it nevertheless provides reliable NMR chemical shift data at an affordable computational cost. It is expected to outperform the 2c approach, in particular for the calculation of NMR parameters in heavy-element compounds. PMID:26344822

  12. The RAMANITA method for non-destructive and in situ semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts.

    PubMed

    Smith, David C

    2005-08-01

    The "RAMANITA" method, for semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts and mathematical calculation by simultaneous equations, is published here in detail in English for the first time. It was conceived by the present writer 20 years ago for binary and ternary pyroxene and garnet systems. The mathematical description was set out in 1989, but in an abstract in an obscure French special publication. Detailed "step-by-step" calibration of two garnet ternaries, followed by their linking, in the early 1990s provided a hexary garnet database. Much later, using this garnet database, which forms part of his personal database called RAMANITA, the present writer began to develop the method by improving the terminology, automating the calculations, discussing problems and experimenting with different real chemical problems in archaeometry. Although this RAMANITA method has been very briefly mentioned in two recent books, the necessary full mathematical explanation is given only here. The method will find application in any study which requires obtaining a non-destructive semi-quantitative chemical analysis from mineral solid solutions that cannot be analysed by any destructive analytical method, in particular for archaeological, geological or extraterrestrial research projects, e.g. Recently some other workers have begun deducing chemical compositions from Raman wavenumber shifts in multivariate chemical space, but the philosophical approach is quite different. PMID:16029851

  13. Spin-orbit ZORA and four-component Dirac-Coulomb estimation of relativistic corrections to isotropic nuclear shieldings and chemical shifts of noble gas dimers.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Marzena; Kupka, Teobald; Stobiński, Leszek; Faber, Rasmus; Lacerda, Evanildo G; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2016-02-01

    Hartree-Fock and density functional theory with the hybrid B3LYP and general gradient KT2 exchange-correlation functionals were used for nonrelativistic and relativistic nuclear magnetic shielding calculations of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon dimers and free atoms. Relativistic corrections were calculated with the scalar and spin-orbit zeroth-order regular approximation Hamiltonian in combination with the large Slater-type basis set QZ4P as well as with the four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian using Dyall's acv4z basis sets. The relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shieldings and chemical shifts are combined with nonrelativistic coupled cluster singles and doubles with noniterative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] calculations using the very large polarization-consistent basis sets aug-pcSseg-4 for He, Ne and Ar, aug-pcSseg-3 for Kr, and the AQZP basis set for Xe. For the dimers also, zero-point vibrational (ZPV) corrections are obtained at the CCSD(T) level with the same basis sets were added. Best estimates of the dimer chemical shifts are generated from these nuclear magnetic shieldings and the relative importance of electron correlation, ZPV, and relativistic corrections for the shieldings and chemical shifts is analyzed. PMID:26503739

  14. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. PMID:25979265

  15. Dynamic stereochemistry of erigeroside by measurement of 1H- 1H and 13C- 1H coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafazzoli, Mohsen; Ghiasi, Mina; Moridi, Mahdi

    2008-07-01

    Erigeroside was extracted from Satureja khuzistanica Jamzad (Marzeh Khuzistani in Persian, family of lamiaceae), and 1H, 13C, 13C{ 1H}, 1H- 1H COSY, HMQC and J-HMBC were obtained to identify this compound and determine a complete set of J-coupling constants ( 1JC-H, 2JC-H, 3JC-H and 3JH-H) values within the exocyclic hydroxymethyl group (CH 2OH) and anomeric center. In parallel, density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP functional and split-valance 6-311++G** basis set has been used to optimized the structures and conformers of erigeroside. In all calculations solvent effects were considered using a polarized continuum (overlapping spheres) model (PCM). The dependencies of 1J, 2J and 3J involving 1H and 13C on the C 5'-C 6' ( ω), C 6'-O 6' ( θ) and C 1'-O 1' ( φ) torsion angles in erigeroside were computed using DFT method. Complete hyper surfaces for 1JC1',H1', 2JC5',H6'R, 2JC5',H6'S, 2JC6',H5', 3JC4',H6'R, 3JC4',H6'S and 2JH6'R-H5'S as well as 3JH5',H6'R were obtained and used to derive Karplus equations to correlate these couplings to ω, θ and φ. These calculated J-couplings are in agreement with experimental values. These results confirm the reliability of DFT calculated coupling constants in aqueous solution.

  16. Molecular structure and vibrational bands and chemical shift assignments of 4-allyl-5-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thione by DFT and ab initio HF calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakurt, Tuncay; Dinçer, Muharrem; Çetin, Ahmet; Şekerci, Memet

    2010-09-01

    The title molecule, 4-allyl-5-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thione (C 11H 11N 3OS), was synthesized and characterized by IR-NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group is P2 1/ c, a = 9.0907(5) Å, b = 9.1288(7) Å, c = 13.6222(7) Å, α = 90°, β = 98.442 (4), γ = 90° and V = 2683.7(6) Å 3, F(000) = 488, Dx = 1.386 g/cm 3. In addition to the molecular geometry from X-ray experiment, the molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) 1H and 13C chemical shift values of the title compound in the ground state have been calculated using the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional method (DFT/BLYP and DFT/B3LYP) with 6-31G(d) basis set. To determine conformational flexibility, molecular energy profile of the title compound was obtained by HF/6-31G(d) calculations with respect to selected degree of torsional freedom, which was varied from -180° to +180° in steps of 10°. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), and several thermodynamic properties were performed by the HF and DFT methods.

  17. Adsorption mechanism at the molecular level between polymers and uremic octapeptide by the 2D 1H NMR Technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohua; Li, Jihong; Wang, Wei; Yang, Mei; Zhang, Yuanwei; Sun, Pingchuan; Yuan, Zhi; He, Binglin; Yu, Yaoting

    2006-06-01

    To remove uremic octapeptide from the blood stream of uremic patients, various modified polyacylamide cross-linked absorbents were prepared. Adsorption experiments showed these absorbents have significant differences in adsorption capacity to the target peptide. In this paper, two-dimension proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D 1H NMR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the interaction mechanism between the peptide and the adsorbents. Because of the insolubility of the absorbent, some soluble linear polymers with the same functional groups as the absorbents were employed as the model adsorbents in 2D 1H NMR. The preferred binding site for the peptide and polymers was identified to be at the C-terminal carboxyl group of the octapeptide via chemical shift perturbation effects. In this study, we found that hydrogen bonding, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions all play a role in the interaction force but had different contributions. Especially, the great chemical shift changes of the aromatic amino acid residues (Trp) during the interaction between butyl-modified polyacrylamide and octapeptide suggested the hydrophobic interaction, incorporated with the electrostatic force, played an important role in the binding reaction in aqueous solutions. This information not only rationally explained the results of the adsorption experiments, but also identified the effective binding site and mechanism, and shall provide a structural basis for designing better affinity-type adsorbents for the target peptide. PMID:16768402

  18. NMRmix: A Tool for the Optimization of Compound Mixtures in 1D (1)H NMR Ligand Affinity Screens.

    PubMed

    Stark, Jaime L; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Lee, Woonghee; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR ligand affinity screening is a powerful technique that is routinely used in drug discovery or functional genomics to directly detect protein-ligand binding events. Binding events can be identified by monitoring differences in the 1D (1)H NMR spectrum of a compound with and without protein. Although a single NMR spectrum can be collected within a short period (2-10 min per sample), one-by-one screening of a protein against a library of hundreds or thousands of compounds requires a large amount of spectrometer time and a large quantity of protein. Therefore, compounds are usually evaluated in mixtures ranging in size from 3 to 20 compounds to improve the efficiency of these screens in both time and material. Ideally, the NMR signals from individual compounds in the mixture should not overlap so that spectral changes can be associated with a particular compound. We have developed a software tool, NMRmix, to assist in creating ideal mixtures from a large panel of compounds with known chemical shifts. Input to NMRmix consists of an (1)H NMR peak list for each compound, a user-defined overlap threshold, and additional user-defined parameters if default settings are not used. NMRmix utilizes a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the composition of the mixtures to minimize spectral peak overlaps so that each compound in the mixture is represented by a maximum number of nonoverlapping chemical shifts. A built-in graphical user interface simplifies data import and visual evaluation of the results. PMID:26965640

  19. NMRmix: A Tool for the Optimization of Compound Mixtures in 1D 1H NMR Ligand Affinity Screens

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR ligand affinity screening is a powerful technique that is routinely used in drug discovery or functional genomics to directly detect protein–ligand binding events. Binding events can be identified by monitoring differences in the 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a compound with and without protein. Although a single NMR spectrum can be collected within a short period (2—10 min per sample), one-by-one screening of a protein against a library of hundreds or thousands of compounds requires a large amount of spectrometer time and a large quantity of protein. Therefore, compounds are usually evaluated in mixtures ranging in size from 3 to 20 compounds to improve the efficiency of these screens in both time and material. Ideally, the NMR signals from individual compounds in the mixture should not overlap so that spectral changes can be associated with a particular compound. We have developed a software tool, NMRmix, to assist in creating ideal mixtures from a large panel of compounds with known chemical shifts. Input to NMRmix consists of an 1H NMR peak list for each compound, a user-defined overlap threshold, and additional user-defined parameters if default settings are not used. NMRmix utilizes a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the composition of the mixtures to minimize spectral peak overlaps so that each compound in the mixture is represented by a maximum number of nonoverlapping chemical shifts. A built-in graphical user interface simplifies data import and visual evaluation of the results. PMID:26965640

  20. Synthesis, molecular structure and spectral analysis of ethyl 4-formyl-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate thiosemicarbazone: A combined DFT and AIM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. N.; Kumar, Amit; Tiwari, R. K.; Rawat, Poonam; Verma, Divya; Baboo, Vikas

    2012-05-01

    A new ethyl 4-formyl-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate thiosemicarbazone (EFDMPCT) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and FT-IR, 1H NMR, UV-Visible, DART-mass spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed by DFT level of theory using B3LYP functional and 6-31G (d,p) as basis set. The calculated 1H NMR chemical shifts using gauge including atomic orbitals (GIAO) approach are in good agreement with the observed chemical shifts. The electronic transitions within molecule have been interpreted using the time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The calculated and experimental wavenumbers analyses confirm the existence of dimer. Topological parameters electron density, Laplacian of electron density, kinetic electron energy density, potential electron density and the total electron energy density at the bond critical points (BCP) analyzed using 'Atoms in Molecules' AIM theory reveals intra and inter molecular hydrogen bonding other weaker interactions in detail. The calculated intermolecular hydrogen bond energy of dimer is -12.2176 kcal/mol using AIM calculation. The results of AIM ellipticity confirm the existence of resonance assisted hydrogen bonds in dimer. The calculated thermodynamic parameters show that reaction is exothermic and non-spontaneous at room temperature. The local reactivity descriptors find the reactive sites within molecules have been calculated.

  1. Towards high resolution ^1H NMR spectra of tannin colloidal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabel, M.; Glories, Y.; Pianet, I.; Dufourc, E. J.

    1999-10-01

    The time dependent colloidal formation of tannins in hydro-alcoholic medium has been studied by 1H-NMR. Line broadening observed with time can be cancelled by making use of magic angle sample spinning (MASS) thus yielding sharp lines that allow structural studies. We used as an example catechin, a constitutive monomer of Bordeaux young red wine tannins. Chemical shift variations of polyphenol protons allow monitoring the time course of aggregation. La formation de tanins colloïdaux au cours du temps, en milieu hydroalcoolique, a été suivie par RMN-^1H. Un élargissement marqué des résonances est observé et peut être supprimé par la rotation de l'échantillon à l'angle magique ce qui ouvre tout un champ d'études structurales sur ces composés colloïdaux. L'exemple proposé est celui de la catéchine, monomère constitutif de tannins présents en grande quantité dans les vins rouges jeunes de Bordeaux. Des variations du déplacement chimique de certains protons polyphénoliques permettent de suivre l'évolution temporelle de l'agrégation.

  2. Four-dimensional 1H and 23Na imaging using continuously oscillating gradients.

    PubMed

    Star-Lack, J M; Roos, M S; Wong, S T; Schepkin, V D; Budinger, T F

    1997-02-01

    A class of fast magnetic spectroscopic imaging methods using continuously oscillating gradients for four-dimensional (three spatial and one spectral) localization is introduced. Sampling may start immediately following the application of an RF excitation pulse, thus enabling measurement of spin density, chemical shift, and relaxation rates of short-T2 species. For spatial localization, steady-state sinusoidal gradient waveforms are used to sample a ball in k space. The two types of trajectories presented include: (1) continuously oscillating gradients with continuously rotating direction used for steady-state free-precession imaging and (2) continuously oscillating gradients followed by a spoiler directed along discrete projections. Design criteria are given and spatial-spectral and spatial-temporal reconstruction methods are developed. Theoretical point-spread functions and signal-to-noise ratios are derived while considering T2*, off-resonance effects, and RF excitation options. Experimental phantom, in vivo, and in vitro 1H and 23Na images collected at 2.35 T are presented. The 1H images were acquired with isotropic spatial resolution ranging from 0.03 to 0.27 cm3 and gradient-oscillation frequencies ranging from 600 to 700 Hz, thus allowing for the separation of water and lipid signals within a voxel. The 23Na images, acquired with 500 and 800 Hz gradient waveforms and 0.70 cm3 isotropic resolution, were resolved in the time domain, yielding spatially localized FIDs. PMID:9169223

  3. High resolution 1H NMR of a lipid cubic phase using a solution NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle-Roden, E.; Hoefer, N.; Dey, K. K.; Grandinetti, P. J.; Caffrey, M.

    2007-11-01

    The cubic mesophase formed by monoacylglycerols and water is an important medium for the in meso crystallogenesis of membrane proteins. To investigate molecular level lipid and additive interactions within the cubic phase, a method was developed for improving the resolution of 1H NMR spectra when using a conventional solution state NMR probe. Using this approach we obtained well-resolved J-coupling multiplets in the one-dimensional NMR spectrum of the cubic-Ia3d phase prepared with hydrated monoolein. A high resolution t-ROESY two-dimensional 1H NMR spectrum of the cubic-Ia3d phase is also reported. Using this new methodology, we have investigated the interaction of two additive molecules, L-tryptophan and ruthenium-tris(2,2-bipyridyl) dichloride (rubipy), with the cubic mesophase. Based on the measured chemical shift differences when changing from an aqueous solution to the cubic phase, we conclude that L-tryptophan experiences specific interactions with the bilayer interface, whereas rubipy remains in the aqueous channels and does not associate with the lipid bilayer.

  4. Low Temperature 1H MAS NMR Spectroscopy Studies of Proton Motion in Zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, H.; Peng, L; Grey, C

    2009-01-01

    Low temperature {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy is used to study protonic motion in zeolite HZSM-5 in both samples that have been dried using procedures that are standard in the literature and samples that have been more carefully dehydrated. A significant enhancement of proton mobility is seen for the ''standard'' dehydrated HZSM-5 sample in comparison to that seen for the much drier sample. This is ascribed to a vehicle-hopping mechanism involving the residual water that is present in these zeolites. A gradual change of the framework structure is observed on cooling to approximately 213 K, as monitored via the change in {sup 1}H chemical shift values of the Broensted acid resonances and by X-ray diffraction. A more sudden change in structure is seen by differential scanning calorimetry and NMR at approximately 220?230 K, which is associated with changes in both the mobility and the modes of binding of the residual water to the Broensted acid sites and the zeolite framework.

  5. 1H NMR structural and thermodynamical analysis of the hetero-association of daunomycin and novatrone in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselkov, A. N.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Rozvadovskaya, A. O.; Hernandez Santiago, A.; Zubchenok, O. V.; Djimant, L. N.; Davies, D. B.

    2004-09-01

    The complexation of antitumour antibiotics novatrone (NOV) and daunomycin (DAU) in aqueous solution has been studied by one- and two-dimensional 1H-NMR spectroscopy (500 MHz) in order to elucidate the probable molecular mechanism of the action of aromatic antitumour drugs in combination chemotherapy. The equilibrium reaction constants, thermodynamical parameters (Δ H, Δ S) of hetero-association of NOV with DAU and the limiting values of proton chemical shifts of the molecules in the hetero-complexes have been determined from the experimental concentration and temperature dependences of proton chemical shifts of the aromatic molecules. The most favourable structure of the 1:1 NOV-DAU hetero-association complex has been determined using both the molecular mechanics methods (X-PLOR software) and the limiting values of proton chemical shifts of the molecules. The obtained results have shown that intermolecular complexes between NOV and DAU molecules are mainly stabilized by stacking interactions of the aromatic chromophores. It is likely that there is an additional stabilization of the NOV-DAU hetero-complexes by intermolecular hydrogen bonds. It is concluded that aromatic molecules of antibiotics may form energetically stable hetero-association complexes in aqueous solution and hence effect their medical-biological (and probably toxic) activity.

  6. Preparation of the UNDERC 200 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectral catalog, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Gaides, G.E.; Farnum, S.A.; Wolfson, A.C.; Farnum, B.W.

    1984-01-01

    High resolution 200 MHz /sup 1/H NMR is used extensively to identify the components of complex low-rank coal-derived materials. We have compiled a catalog of 302 spectra of standards: (1) and are compiling a second, similar volume of 125 additional spectra. Many of these new compounds have only recently become available from commercial suppliers, or by synthesis. Like the previous catalog, Volume II is divided into two sections: a tabular section of all the compounds with their correct names, structure, and a line list of the chemical shifts, and a section which contains the actual spectra. Each section is arranged by functional group, for example, alkanes, phenols, etc. in order of their chromatographic elution. There is also an appendix which lists the suppliers of all the compounds in the catalog. Volume II contains several features not incorporated in the original catalog. We have added an alphabetical listing of all the compounds in both NMR catalogs, as well as formula and molecular weight indices. An added feature of this volume is the expanded coverage of nitrogen-containing compounds. Though there are many /sup 1/H NMR spectral catalogs in print, there are none that contain spectra run on 200 MHz spectrometers. Many spectra that appear complex at 60 MHz become first order at 200 MHz, facilitating their interpretation. At the UNDERC the majority of our samples are extremely complex mixtures. The simplification of the spectra of the individual components is necessary to characterize these coal-derived liquids. Another advantage of /sup 1/H NMR spectra run at 200 MHz is the greater than eleven-fold increase in sensitivity over those run at 60 MHz (2). Smaller, or more dilute samples may therefore be utilized. 2 references, 1 figure.

  7. Enhanced Y1H Assays for Arabidopis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription regulation plays a key role in development and response to environment. To understand this mechanism, we need to know which transcription factor (TFs) would bind to which promoter, thus regulate their target gene expression. Yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) technique can be used to map this kind...

  8. Effects of Irritant Chemicals on Aedes aegypti Resting Behavior: Is There a Simple Shift to Untreated “Safe Sites”?

    PubMed Central

    Manda, Hortance; Arce, Luana M.; Foggie, Tarra; Shah, Pankhil; Grieco, John P.; Achee, Nicole L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have identified the behavioral responses of Aedes aegypti to irritant and repellent chemicals that can be exploited to reduce man-vector contact. Maximum efficacy of interventions based on irritant chemical actions will, however, require full knowledge of variables that influence vector resting behavior and how untreated “safe sites” contribute to overall impact. Methods Using a laboratory box assay, resting patterns of two population strains of female Ae. aegypti (THAI and PERU) were evaluated against two material types (cotton and polyester) at various dark:light surface area coverage (SAC) ratio and contrast configuration (horizontal and vertical) under chemical-free and treated conditions. Chemicals evaluated were alphacypermethrin and DDT at varying concentrations. Results Under chemical-free conditions, dark material had significantly higher resting counts compared to light material at all SAC, and significantly increased when material was in horizontal configuration. Cotton elicited stronger response than polyester. Within the treatment assays, significantly higher resting counts were observed on chemical-treated dark material compared to untreated light fabric. However, compared to matched controls, significantly less resting observations were made on chemical-treated dark material overall. Most importantly, resting observations on untreated light material (or “safe sites”) in the treatment assay did not significantly increase for many of the tests, even at 25% SAC. Knockdown rates were ≤5% for all assays. Significantly more observations of flying mosquitoes were made in test assays under chemical-treatment conditions as compared to controls. Conclusions/Significance When preferred Ae. aegypti resting sites are treated with chemicals, even at reduced treatment coverage area, mosquitoes do not simply move to safe sites (untreated areas) following contact with the treated material. Instead, they become agitated, using

  9. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  10. 40 CFR 721.4468 - 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4468 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4468 - 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4468 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4468 - 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4468 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4468 - 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4468 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4468 - 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4468 1H-Imidazole, 2-ethyl-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  15. Shift of optical absorption edge in SnO2 films with high concentrations of nitrogen grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie; Lu, Yinmei; Meyer, Bruno K.; Hofmann, Detlev M.; Eickhoff, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The optical and electrical properties of n-type SnO2 films with high concentrations of nitrogen (SnO2:N) grown by chemical vapor deposition are studied. The carrier concentration increases from 4.1 × 1018 to 3.9 × 1019 cm-3 and the absorption edge shifts from 4.26 to 4.08 eV with increasing NH3 flow rate. Typical Urbach tails were observed from the absorption spectra and the Urbach energy increases from 0.321 to 0.526 eV with increasing NH3 flow rate. An "effective" absorption edge of about 4.61 eV was obtained for all investigated samples from fitting the extrapolations of the Urbach tails. Burstein-Moss effect, electron-impurity, and electron-electron interactions are shown to play a minor role for the shift of the absorption edges in SnO2:N thin films.

  16. Quantification of ethanol methyl 1H magnetic resonance signal intensity following intravenous ethanol administration in primate brain

    PubMed Central

    Flory, Graham S.; O’Malley, Jean; Grant, Kathleen A.; Park, Byung; Kroenke, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to directly monitor brain ethanol. Previously, studies of human subjects have lead to the suggestion that the ethanol methyl 1H MRS signal intensity relates to tolerance to ethanol’s intoxicating effects. More recently, the ethanol 1H MRS signal intensity has been recognized to vary between brain gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) due to differences in T2 within these environments. The methods presented here extend ethanol MRS techniques to nonhuman primate subjects. Twelve monkeys were administered ethanol while sedated and positioned within a 3T MRI system. Chemical shift imaging (CSI) measurements were performed following intravenous infusion of 1g/kg ethanol. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were also recorded for each monkey to provide volume fractions of GM, WM, and CSF for each CSI spectrum. To estimate co-variance of ethanol MRS intensity with GM, WM, and CSF volume fractions, the relative contribution of each tissue subtype was determined following corrections for radiofrequency pulse profile non-uniformity, chemical shift artifacts, and differences between the point spread function in the CSI data and the imaging data. The ethanol MRS intensity per unit blood ethanol concentration was found to differ between GM, WM, and CSF. Individual differences in MRS intensity were larger in GM than WM. This methodology demonstrates the feasibility of ethanol MRS experiments and analysis in nonhuman primate subjects, and suggests GM may be a site of significant variation in ethanol MRS intensity between individuals. PMID:20018244

  17. Real structure of formamide entrapped by AOT nonaqueous reverse micelles: FT-IR and 1H NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Correa, N Mariano; Pires, Paulo Augusto R; Silber, Juana J; El Seoud, Omar A

    2005-11-10

    Noninvasive techniques such as FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy have been employed to investigate the solubilization of formamide, FA, and its aqueous solution, FA-water, by sodium 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate, AOT, in heptane or isooctane reverse micelles, respectively. Partially deuterated FA (FADH) was used in the FT-IR experiments and nu(OD), n(ND) were analyzed. Also, the nu(C=O) band of FA was investigated. For AOT, the changes of the SO(3)(-) group's symmetric, nu(s), and asymmetric, nu(a), bands were also studied. The results are showing that FA is interacting strongly with the Na+ counterions of the surfactant through electrostatic interactions maintaining their hydrogen bond network present in the FA bulk. Accordingly, partially deuterated FA is "frozen" inside the aggregates and it is possible to detect, by FT-IR technique, the cis and trans isomers. Curve fitting of the nu(OD) (in the FA-water mixture) band requires use of two peaks because the band is asymmetric, not because the solubilizate molecules are present in layers of different structure. The chemical shifts of the (1)H bound to N and C of FA were studied by (1)H NMR. The comparison of the chemical shift of AOT in reverse micelles with FA and the FA-water mixture in the polar core of the aggregate shows that there is a strong preferential solvation of Na+ by FA (through electrostatic interaction) and the AOT's sulfonate group by water (through hydrogen bond interaction). PMID:16853748

  18. The RAMANITA © method for non-destructive and in situ semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David C.

    2005-08-01

    The "RAMANITA ©" method, for semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts and mathematical calculation by simultaneous equations, is published here in detail in English for the first time. It was conceived by the present writer 20 years ago for binary and ternary pyroxene and garnet systems. The mathematical description was set out in 1989, but in an abstract in an obscure French special publication. Detailed "step-by-step" calibration of two garnet ternaries, followed by their linking, by M. Pinet and D.C. Smith in the early 1990s provided a hexary garnet database. Much later, using this garnet database, which forms part of his personal database called RAMANITA ©, the present writer began to develop the method by improving the terminology, automating the calculations, discussing problems and experimenting with different real chemical problems in archaeometry. Although this RAMANITA © method has been very briefly mentioned in two recent books, the necessary full mathematical explanation is given only here. The method will find application in any study which requires obtaining a non-destructive semi-quantitative chemical analysis from mineral solid solutions that cannot be analysed by any destructive analytical method, in particular for archaeological, geological or extraterrestrial research projects, e.g. from gemstones or other crystalline artworks of the cultural heritage (especially by Mobile Raman Microscopy (MRM)) in situ in museums or at archaeological sites, including under water for subaquatic archaeometry; from scientifically precious mineral microinclusions (such as garnet or pyroxene within diamond); from minerals in rocks analysed in situ on planetary bodies by a rover (especially "at distance" by telescopy). Recently some other workers have begun deducing chemical compositions from Raman wavenumber shifts in multivariate chemical space, but the philosophical approach is

  19. Effect of 1,10-phenanthroline aromaticity in carboxylic acids:1H NMR spectroscopy, GIAO calculations and thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Camila M. B.; Santos, Vanessa F. C.; Belarmino, Marcia K. D. L.; França, José A. A.; Moura, Gustavo L. C.; Lima, Nathalia B. D.

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen bonding represents a class of chemical interactions, which are directly responsible for several physical properties, such as: energetic stabilities, boiling points, vibrational modes, bond lengths, etc. In this article, we examine from the point of view of 1H NMR spectroscopy and GIAO calculations, the effects associated with the process of formation of the hydrogen bonds as they appear in the chemical shifts of the acidic hydrogens in the complexes between nitrogenated compounds, PHEN, BIPY and DIBIPY, and carboxylic acids, HOOCH, HOOCCH3 and HOOCC6H5. All computational simulations were performed using the quantum chemical methods B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and ωB97X-D/def2-TZVP. The 1H NMR spectroscopy results showed that, in both cases, the hydrogen nucleus of the OH group is the most affected in the process of hydrogen bond formation. For the complexes involving PHEN we observed that the hydrogen nucleus is more strongly shielded when compared with this signal in the corresponding complexes involving BIPY and DIBIPY.

  20. Simultaneous cross polarization to 13C and 15N with 1H detection at 60 kHz MAS solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe high resolution MAS solid-state NMR experiments that utilize 1H detection with 60 kHz magic angle spinning; simultaneous cross-polarization from 1H to 15N and 13C nuclei; bidirectional cross-polarization between 13C and 15N nuclei; detection of both amide nitrogen and aliphatic carbon 1H; and measurement of both 13C and 15N chemical shifts through multi-dimensional correlation experiments. Three-dimensional experiments correlate amide 1H and alpha 1H selectively with 13C or 15N nuclei in a polypeptide chain. Two separate three-dimensional spectra correlating 1Hα/13Cα/1HN and 1HN/15N/1Hα are recorded simultaneously in a single experiment, demonstrating that a twofold savings in experimental time is potentially achievable. Spectral editing using bidirectional coherence transfer pathways enables simultaneous magnetization transfers between 15N, 13Cα(i) and 13C‧(i-1), facilitating intra- and inter-residue correlations for sequential resonance assignment. Non-uniform sampling is integrated into the experiments, further reducing the length of experimental time.

  1. 40 CFR 721.9078 - 6-Methoxy-1H-benz[de]isoquinoline-2 [3H]-dione derivative (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 6-Methoxy-1H-benz isoquinoline-2... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9078 6-Methoxy-1H-benz isoquinoline-2 -dione... substance identified generically as 6-methoxy-1H-benz isoquinoline-2 -dione derivative (PMN P-00-1205)...

  2. Association of Quadriceps Muscle Fat With Isometric Strength Measurements in Healthy Males Using Chemical Shift Encoding-Based Water-Fat Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Inhuber, Stephanie; Dieckmeyer, Michael; Cordes, Christian; Ruschke, Stefan; Klupp, Elisabeth; Jungmann, Pia M.; Farlock, Rosanna; Eggers, Holger; Kooijman, Hendrik; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Kirschke, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance–based assessment of quadriceps muscle fat has been proposed as surrogate marker in sarcopenia, osteoarthritis, and neuromuscular disorders. We presently investigated the association of quadriceps muscle fat with isometric strength measurements in healthy males using chemical shift encoding-based water-fat magnetic resonance imaging. Intermuscular adipose tissue fraction and intramuscular proton density fat fraction correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with isometric strength (up to r = −0.83 and −0.87, respectively). Reproducibility of intermuscular adipose tissue fraction and intramuscular proton density fat fraction was 1.5% and 5.7%, respectively. PMID:26953765

  3. NMR structure note: Structure of the Membrane Protein MerF, a Bacterial Mercury Transporter, Improved by the Inclusion of Chemical Shift Anisotropy Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ye; Lu, George J.; Marassi, Francesca M.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY MerF is a mercury transport membrane protein from the bacterial mercury detoxification system. By performing a solid-state INEPT experiment and measuring chemical shift anisotropy frequencies in aligned samples, we are able to improve on the accuracy and precision of the initial structure that we presented. MerF has four N-terminal and eleven C-terminal residues that are mobile and unstructured in phospholipid bilayers. The structure presented here has average pairwise RMSDs of 1.78 Å for heavy atoms and 0.92 Å for backbone atoms. PMID:25103921

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, X-ray structure and DFT studies on 2,6-bis(1-benzyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İnkaya, Ersin; Günnaz, Salih; Özdemir, Namık; Dayan, Osman; Dinçer, Muharrem; Çetinkaya, Bekir

    2013-02-01

    The title molecule, 2,6-bis(1-benzyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)pyridine (C33H25N5), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopies, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition, the molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift values of the title compound in the ground state have been calculated using the density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, and compared with the experimental data. The complete assignments of all vibrational modes were performed by potential energy distributions using VEDA 4 program. The geometrical parameters of the optimized structure are in good agreement with the X-ray crystallographic data, and the theoretical vibrational frequencies and GIAO 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts show good agreement with experimental values. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) distribution, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) and non-linear optical properties of the title compound were investigated by theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. The linear polarizabilities and first hyper polarizabilities of the molecule indicate that the compound is a good candidate of nonlinear optical materials. The thermodynamic properties of the compound at different temperatures were calculated, revealing the correlations between standard heat capacity, standard entropy, standard enthalpy changes and temperatures.

  5. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure, vibrational and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN ∼ 0°) structures being about 2-6 kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN ∼ 180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26 ppm, respectively.

  6. A study of the experimental and theoretical infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the biochemicals valeric and valproic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2014-10-01

    The structural stability, vibrational, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of valeric and valproic acids were investigated by the B3LYP calculations with the 6-311G** basis set. Valeric acid is predicted to exist predominantly in the planar cis form (80% abundance). Valproic acid is predicted to have an equilibrium mixture of 68% gauche-1 and 32% gauche-2 structures at 298.15 K. The spectral feature of the Osbnd H stretching mode in the infrared spectra of both acids suggests the presence of strong H-bonding in the condensed phase of valeric acid and weak H-bonding in the case of valproic acid. The harmonic and anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers were computed at the B3LYP level of theory and tentative vibrational assignments were provided on the basis of combined theoretical and experimental infrared and Raman data of the molecules. Not all of the calculated anharmonic wavenumbers showed a consistent trend with the observed wavenumbers. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of both acids were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the two acids. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for valeric acid is 1.8 and 3.8 ppm, whereas for valproic acid, it is 1.4 and 4.5 ppm, respectively.

  7. Molecular structure of 2-chloromethyl-1H-benzimidazole hydrochloride: Single crystal, spectral, biological studies, and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Ghani, Nour T.; Mansour, Ahmed M.

    2012-02-01

    In the present work, structural studies on 2-chloromethyl-1H-benzimidazole hydrochloride have been performed extensively by X-ray crystallography, 1H NMR, FT-IR, UV/vis, and elemental analysis. The title compound crystallizes in a monoclinic space group P21/c with a = 7.1982 (3) Å, b = 9.4513 (5) Å, c = 14.0485 (7) Å and β = 102.440 (3)° forming an infinite chain structure parallel to " b" axis through the intermolecular hydrogen bond. Optimized geometrical structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies, natural bonding orbital (NBO) and frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) were obtained by DFT/B3LYP method combined with 6-31G(d) basis set. TD-DFT calculations help to assign the electronic transitions. The 1H NMR chemical shifts were computed at the B3LYP/6-311 + G(2d,p) level of theory in different solvents by applying GIAO method using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). The title compound was screened for its antibacterial activity referring to Tetracycline as a standard antibacterial agent.

  8. Quantitative and qualitative shifts in defensive metabolites define chemical defense investment during leaf development in Inga, a genus of tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Natasha L; Forrister, Dale L; Endara, María-José; Coley, Phyllis D; Kursar, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Selective pressures imposed by herbivores are often positively correlated with investments that plants make in defense. Research based on the framework of an evolutionary arms race has improved our understanding of why the amount and types of defenses differ between plant species. However, plant species are exposed to different selective pressures during the life of a leaf, such that expanding leaves suffer more damage from herbivores and pathogens than mature leaves. We hypothesize that this differential selective pressure may result in contrasting quantitative and qualitative defense investment in plants exposed to natural selective pressures in the field. To characterize shifts in chemical defenses, we chose six species of Inga, a speciose Neotropical tree genus. Focal species represent diverse chemical, morphological, and developmental defense traits and were collected from a single site in the Amazonian rainforest. Chemical defenses were measured gravimetrically and by characterizing the metabolome of expanding and mature leaves. Quantitative investment in phenolics plus saponins, the major classes of chemical defenses identified in Inga, was greater for expanding than mature leaves (46% and 24% of dry weight, respectively). This supports the theory that, because expanding leaves are under greater selective pressure from herbivores, they rely more upon chemical defense as an antiherbivore strategy than do mature leaves. Qualitatively, mature and expanding leaves were distinct and mature leaves contained more total and unique metabolites. Intraspecific variation was greater for mature leaves than expanding leaves, suggesting that leaf development is canalized. This study provides a snapshot of chemical defense investment in a speciose genus of tropical trees during the short, few-week period of leaf development. Exploring the metabolome through quantitative and qualitative profiling enables a more comprehensive examination of foliar chemical defense investment

  9. Interaction of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c with cytochrome c peroxidase investigated by [15N, 1H] heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Worrall, J A; Kolczak, U; Canters, G W; Ubbink, M

    2001-06-19

    The interaction of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c with its physiological redox partner cytochrome c peroxidase has been investigated using heteronuclear NMR techniques. Chemical shift perturbations for both 15N and 1H nuclei arising from the interaction of isotopically enriched 15N cytochrome c with cytochrome c peroxidase have been observed. For the diamagnetic, ferrous cytochrome c, 34 amides are affected by binding, corresponding to residues at the front face of the protein and in agreement with the interface observed in the 1:1 crystal structure of the complex. In contrast, for the paramagnetic, ferric protein, 56 amides are affected, corresponding to residues both at the front and toward the rear of the protein. In addition, the chemical shift perturbations were larger for the ferric protein. Using experimentally observed pseudocontact shifts the magnetic susceptibility tensor of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c in both the free and bound forms has been calculated with HN nuclei as inputs. In contrast to an earlier study, the results indicate that there is no change in the geometry of the magnetic axes for cytochrome c upon binding to cytochrome c peroxidase. This leads us to conclude that the additional effects observed for the ferric protein arise either from a difference in binding mode or from the more flexible overall structure causing a transmittance effect upon binding. PMID:11401551

  10. Synthesis, antimicrobial evaluation and theoretical prediction of NMR chemical shifts of thiazole and selenazole derivatives with high antifungal activity against Candida spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łączkowski, Krzysztof Z.; Motylewska, Katarzyna; Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Biernasiuk, Anna; Misiura, Konrad; Malm, Anna; Fernández, Berta

    2016-03-01

    Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activities of novel thiazoles and selenazoles is presented. Their structures were determined using NMR, FAB(+)-MS, HRMS and elemental analyses. To support the experiment, theoretical calculations of the 1H NMR shifts were carried out for representative systems within the DFT B3LYP/6-311++G** approximation which additionally confirmed the structure of investigated compounds. Among the derivatives, compounds 4b, 4h, 4j and 4l had very strong activity against reference strains of Candida albicans ATCC and Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 with MIC = 0.49-7.81 μg/ml. In the case of compounds 4b, 4c, 4h - 4j and 4l, the activity was very strong against of Candida spp. isolated from clinical materials, i.e. C. albicans, Candida krusei, Candida inconspicua, Candida famata, Candida lusitaniae, Candida sake, C. parapsilosis and Candida dubliniensis with MIC = 0.24-15.62 μg/ml. The activity of several of these was similar to the activity of commonly used antifungal agent fluconazole. Additionally, compounds 4m - 4s were found to be active against Gram-positive bacteria, both pathogenic staphylococci Staphylococcus aureus ATCC with MIC = 31.25-125 μg/ml and opportunistic bacteria, such as Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228 and Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240 with MIC = 7.81-31.25 μg/ml.

  11. 1H and 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance studies of hydrogen chemisorption on supported platinum. Application to the metal dispersion and spillover.

    PubMed

    Rouabah, D; Fraissard, J

    1994-06-01

    Chemisorption of hydrogen, electron microscopy and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have confirmed that the chemical shift of hydrogen chemisorbed on platinum is directly related to the size of the metal particles. The influence of the hydrogen adsorbate concentration and the chemisorption temperature on the chemical shift delta H and the distribution of the hydrogen chemisorbed on these particles have been determined. This study also shows how the dispersion can be deduced from the variation of delta H with the H2 concentration and clarifies the effect of temperature on the concentration of spillover H2. 129Xe NMR of adsorbed xenon used as a probe confirmed most of the previous results. PMID:7827982

  12. Final Technical Report: A Paradigm Shift in Chemical Processing: New Sustainable Chemistries for Low-VOC Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kenneth F.

    2006-07-26

    The project employed new processes to make emulsion polymers from reduced levels of petroleum-derived chemical feedstocks. Most waterborne paints contain spherical, emulsion polymer particles that serve as the film-forming binder phase. Our goal was to make emulsion polymer particles containing 30 percent feedstock that would function as effectively as commercial emulsions made from higher level feedstock. The processes developed yielded particles maintained their film formation capability and binding capacity while preserving the structural integrity of the particles after film formation. Rohm and Haas Company (ROH) and Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) worked together to employ novel polymer binders (ROH) and new, non-volatile, biomass-derived coalescing agents (ADM). The University of Minnesota Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science utilized its unique microscopy capabilities to characterize films made from the New Emulsion Polymers (NEP).

  13. Understanding Chemical versus Electrostatic Shifts in X-ray Photoelectron Spectra of Organic Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the present article is on understanding the insight that X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements can provide when studying self-assembled monolayers. Comparing density functional theory calculations to experimental data on deliberately chosen model systems, we show that both the chemical environment and electrostatic effects arising from a superposition of molecular dipoles influence the measured core-level binding energies to a significant degree. The crucial role of the often overlooked electrostatic effects in polar self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is unambiguously demonstrated by changing the dipole density through varying the SAM coverage. As a consequence of this effect, care has to be taken when extracting chemical information from the XP spectra of ordered organic adsorbate layers. Our results, furthermore, imply that XPS is a powerful tool for probing local variations in the electrostatic energy in nanoscopic systems, especially in SAMs. PMID:26937264

  14. Comparison of the solution and crystal structures of staphylococcal nuclease with /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N chemical shifts used as structural fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, H.B.R.; Sparks, S.W.; Torchia, D.A.

    1988-09-01

    The authors report high-resolution /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N NMR spectra of crystalline staphylococcal nuclease (Nase) complexed to thymidine 3',5'-diphosphate and Ca/sup 2+/. High sensitivity and resolution are obtained by applying solid-state NMR techniques-high power proton decoupling and cross-polarization magic angle sample spinning (CPMASS)-to protein samples that have been efficiently synthesized and labeled by an overproducing strain of Escherichia coli. A comparison of CPMASS and solution spectra of Nase labeled with either (methyl-/sup 13/C)methionine or (/sup 15/)valine shows that the chemical shifts in the crystalline and solution states are virtually identical. This result is strong evidence that the protein conformations in the solution and crystalline states are nearly the same. Because of the close correspondence of the crystal and solution chemical shifts, sequential assignments obtained in solution apply to the crystal spectra. It should therefore be possible to study the molecular structure and dynamics of many sequentially assigned atomic sites in Nase crystals. Similar experiments are applicable to the growing number of proteins that can be obtained from efficient expression systems.

  15. Stored waveform inverse fourier-transform (SWIFT) excitation for water-suppressed whole-body slice-selected proton chemical shift spectra at 1.5 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Annjia T.; Hunter, William W.; Schmalbrock, Petra; Marshall, Alan G.

    Proton NMR spectroscopy for the in vivo study of metabolites in a spatially resolved region with a clinical NMR imaging device must contend with the 70% hydration of normal man. Theoretical and experimental comparisons of several excitation waveforms designed to suppress the H 2O signal in proton NMR spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging have been conducted. In particular, we have compared the 1 overline33 overline1 and 1 overline1 pulse sequences with those obtained via a stored waveform inverse Fourier-transform (SWIFT) time-domain apodized waveform generated by inverse Fourier transformation of a quadratically phase-encoded excitation magnitude spectrum. Theoretical excitation profiles are compared to those measured in a slice selected with a General Electric Signa 1.5 T whole-body imaging system, and demonstrated for a phantom (toluene, dioxane, and dichloromethane). The SWIFT waveform is theoretically and experimentally superior to 1 overline1 and 1 overline33 overline1 for selective suppression of one spectral segment with simultaneous uniform excitation over the rest of the spectral frequency range. SWIFT-excited water-suppressed depth-resolved chemical shift spectra are demonstrated for human brain and human calf muscle of normal volunteers.

  16. Free variable selection QSPR study to predict 19F chemical shifts of some fluorinated organic compounds using Random Forest and RBF-PLS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2016-04-01

    In this work, two new and powerful chemometrics methods are applied for the modeling and prediction of the 19F chemical shift values of some fluorinated organic compounds. The radial basis function-partial least square (RBF-PLS) and random forest (RF) are employed to construct the models to predict the 19F chemical shifts. In this study, we didn't used from any variable selection method and RF method can be used as variable selection and modeling technique. Effects of the important parameters affecting the ability of the RF prediction power such as the number of trees (nt) and the number of randomly selected variables to split each node (m) were investigated. The root-mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for the training set and the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 44.70, 23.86, 29.77, and 23.69, respectively. Also, the correlation coefficients of the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 0.8684 and 0.9313, respectively. The results obtained reveal that the RF model can be used as a powerful chemometrics tool for the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies.

  17. Solid-state NMR chemical-shift perturbations indicate domain reorientation of the DnaG primase in the primosome of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Gardiennet, Carole; Wiegand, Thomas; Bazin, Alexandre; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Kunert, Britta; Lacabanne, Denis; Gutsche, Irina; Terradot, Laurent; Meier, Beat H; Böckmann, Anja

    2016-03-01

    We here investigate the interactions between the DnaB helicase and the C-terminal domain of the corresponding DnaG primase of Helicobacter pylori using solid-state NMR. The difficult crystallization of this 387 kDa complex, where the two proteins interact in a six to three ratio, is circumvented by simple co-sedimentation of the two proteins directly into the MAS-NMR rotor. While the amount of information that can be extracted from such a large protein is still limited, we can assign a number of amino-acid residues experiencing significant chemical-shift perturbations upon helicase-primase complex formation. The location of these residues is used as a guide to model the interaction interface between the two proteins in the complex. Chemical-shift perturbations also reveal changes at the interaction interfaces of the hexameric HpDnaB assembly on HpDnaG binding. A structural model of the complex that explains the experimental findings is obtained. PMID:26961129

  18. Nucleotide-type chemical shift assignment of the encapsulated 40 kbp dsDNA in intact bacteriophage T7 by MAS solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Gili; Goldbourt, Amir

    2014-08-01

    The icosahedral bacteriophage T7 is a 50 MDa double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) virus that infects Escherichia coli. Although there is substantial information on the physical and morphological properties of T7, structural information, based mostly on Raman spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy, is limited. Here, we apply the magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) technique to study a uniformly (13)C and (15)N labeled wild-type T7 phage. We describe the details of the large-scale preparation and purification of an isotopically enriched phage sample under fully hydrated conditions, and show a complete (13)C and a near-complete (15)N nucleotide-type specific assignment of the sugar and base moieties in the 40 kbp dsDNA of T7 using two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C and (15)N-(13)C correlation experiments. The chemical shifts are interpreted as reporters of a B-form conformation of the encapsulated dsDNA. While MAS SSNMR was found to be extremely useful in determining the structures of proteins in native-like environments, its application to nucleic acids has lagged behind, leaving a missing (13)C and (15)N chemical shift database. This work therefore expands the (13)C and (15)N database of real B-form DNA systems, and opens routes to characterize more complex nucleic acid systems by SSNMR. PMID:24875850

  19. 4D non-uniformly sampled HCBCACON and ¹J(NCα)-selective HCBCANCO experiments for the sequential assignment and chemical shift analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Nováček, Jiří; Haba, Noam Y; Chill, Jordan H; Zídek, Lukáš; Sklenář, Vladimír

    2012-06-01

    A pair of 4D NMR experiments for the backbone assignment of disordered proteins is presented. The experiments exploit (13)C direct detection and non-uniform sampling of the indirectly detected dimensions, and provide correlations of the aliphatic proton (H(α), and H(β)) and carbon (C(α), C(β)) resonance frequencies to the protein backbone. Thus, all the chemical shifts regularly used to map the transient secondary structure motifs in the intrinsically disordered proteins (H(α), C(α), C(β), C', and N) can be extracted from each spectrum. Compared to the commonly used assignment strategy based on matching the C(α) and C(β) chemical shifts, inclusion of the H(α) and H(β) provides up to three extra resonance frequencies that decrease the chance of ambiguous assignment. The experiments were successfully applied to the original assignment of a 12.8 kDa intrinsically disordered protein having a high content of proline residues (26 %) in the sequence. PMID:22580891

  20. Validation of Relativistic DFT Approaches to the Calculation of NMR Chemical Shifts in Square-Planar Pt(2+) and Au(3+) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Tomasz; Munzarová, Markéta L; Pazderski, Leszek; Marek, Radek

    2011-12-13

    Recently implemented hybrid density functional methods of calculating nuclear magnetic shielding using the two-component zeroth-order regular approximation approach (J. Phys. Chem. A2009, 113, 11495) have been employed for a series of compounds containing heavy transition-metal atoms. These include Pt(2+), Pd(2+), and Au(3+) organometallics and metal complexes with azines, some of which exhibit interesting biological and catalytic activities. In this study we investigate the effects of geometry, exchange-correlation functional, solvent, and scalar relativistic and spin-orbit corrections on the nuclear magnetic shielding-mainly for (13)C and (15)N atoms connected to a heavy-atom center. Our calculations demonstrate that the B3LYP method using effective core potentials and a cc-pwCVTZ-PP/6-31G** basis set augmented with the polarizable continuum model of the dimethylsulfoxide solvent provides geometries for the complexes in question which are compatible with the experimental NMR results in terms of both the trends and the absolute values of the (13)C shifts. The important role of the exact exchange admixture parameter for hybrid functionals based on B3LYP and PBE0 is investigated systematically for selected Pt(2+) and Au(3+) complexes. The (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts are found to be best reproduced by using a B3LYP or PBE0 approach with 30% and 40-50% exact exchange admixtures for the Pt(2+) and Au(3+) complexes, respectively. The spin-orbit contributions to the (15)N NMR chemical shifts reflect metal-ligand bonding that is much more ionic for the Au(3+) than for the Pt(2+) complex. Finally, an optimized density functional method is applied to a series of transition-metal complexes to estimate the scope and the limitations of the current approach. PMID:26598337

  1. Accurate measurement of methyl 13C chemical shifts by solid-state NMR for the determination of protein side chain conformation: the influenza a M2 transmembrane peptide as an example.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mei; Mishanina, Tatiana V; Cady, Sarah D

    2009-06-10

    The use of side chain methyl (13)C chemical shifts for the determination of the rotameric conformation of Val and Leu residues in proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is described. Examination of the solution NMR stereospecifically assigned methyl groups shows significant correlation between the difference in the two methyl carbons' chemical shifts and the side chain conformation. It is found that alpha-helical and beta-sheet backbones cause different side chain methyl chemical shift trends. In alpha-helical Leu's, a relatively large absolute methyl (13)C shift difference of 2.89 ppm is found for the most populated mt rotamer (chi(1) = -60 degrees, chi(2) = 180 degrees), while a much smaller value of 0.73 ppm is found for the next populated tp rotamer (chi(1) = 180 degrees, chi(2) = 60 degrees). For alpha-helical Val residues, the dominant t rotamer (chi(1) = 180 degrees) has more downfield Cgamma2 chemical shifts than Cgamma1 by 1.71 ppm, while the next populated m rotamer (chi(1) = -60 degrees) shows the opposite trend of more downfield Cgamma1 chemical shift by 1.23 ppm. These significantly different methyl (13)C chemical shifts exist despite the likelihood of partial rotameric averaging at ambient temperature. We show that these conformation-dependent methyl (13)C chemical shifts can be utilized for side chain structure determination once the methyl (13)C resonances are accurately measured by double-quantum (DQ) filtered 2D correlation experiments, most notably the dipolar DQ to single-quantum (SQ) correlation technique. The advantage of the DQ-SQ correlation experiment over simple 2D SQ-SQ correlation experiments is demonstrated on the transmembrane peptide of the influenza A M2 proton channel. The methyl chemical shifts led to predictions of the side chain rotameric states for several Val and Leu residues in this tetrameric helical bundle. The predicted Val rotamers were further verified by dipolar correlation experiments that directly measure the chi(1

  2. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR) profiling and theoretical calculations of (2E)-2-[3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-1-phenylpropylidene]hydrazinecarboxamide: An anticonvulsant agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haress, Nadia G.; Govindarajan, Munusamy; AL-Wabli, Reem I.; Almutairi, Maha S.; Al-Alshaikh, Monirah A.; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.; Attia, Mohamed I.

    2016-08-01

    Vibrational characteristics of the anticonvulsant agent, (2E)-2-[3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-1-phenylpropylidene]hydrazinecarboxamide ((2E)-IPHC) have been investigated. The computational data are obtained by adopting ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and DFT/B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) methods. The most stable conformer is identified by a potential energy scan. The optimized geometrical parameters indicated that the overall symmetry of the most stable conformer is CS. Atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis is contained out and the chemical bondings between the atoms are as characterized. Mulliken atomic charges and simulated thermo-molecular (heat capacity and enthalpy) characteristics of the (2E)-IPHC molecule also have been analyzed. The magnitude of the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) of oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen atoms as well as phenyl and imidazole rings in the title molecule were investigated along with their contribution to the biological activity. The energy gap between HOMO and LUMO orbitals has been found to be 5.1334 eV in the gaseous phase. Excitation energies, oscillator strength and wavelengths were computed by the time-dependent density function theory (TD-DFT) approach. Predicted wavenumbers have been assigned and they are consistent with the experimental values. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the (2E)-IPHC molecule were computed by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and were compared with the experimental results.

  3. Analysis of the explosion of gas mixtures with a shift in the chemical equilibrium of the products taken into account

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdan, S.A.

    1983-07-01

    Starting from a representation of the detonation products as a reacting medium with an equilibrium chemical composition at each point, a generalized formulation of the problem on the explosion of a reacting gas mixture in air is given. Methaneoxygen and hydrogen-oxygen systems are considered. It is seen that almost half the energy is in the chemical component of the total internal energy behind the detonation wave front. The results of computations by the mathematical model yield greater values of the excess pressures on the shock front. Experimental data and numerical solutions are compared for the dependence of the excess pressures on the shock front radius, and are found to be in good agreement for the hydrogen-oxygen system. The methane-oxygen system shows a systematic excess in the experimental data which is apparently associated with non-one-dimensional effects in formulation of the experiment. The magnitude of the efficiency of an explosion, defined as the energy transferred to the wave during maximal detonation product expansion and the total energy initially included in the mixture, is of interest. For oxygen mixtures, only a third of the total explosion energy performs work on the surrounding air.

  4. The structure of the aggregate form of bacteriochlorophyll c showing the Q y absorption above 740 nm: a 1H-NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Matsuura, Katsumi; Shimada, Keizo; Koyama, Yasushi

    1996-09-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll c (3 1S, 8-isobutyl-12-ethyl, farnesyl) was dissolved in a mixture of methylene chloride and carbon tetrachloride (1 : 3), and changes in the 1H-NMR spectrum caused by the titration of methanol were traced. On the basis of the changes in chemical shift due to the ring-current effect of the neighboring macrocycles and in peak intensity (broadening) due to their stacking, the structure of the aggregate form showing the Q y absorption band above 740 nm is proposed: the macrocycles are stacked to form a one-dimensional inclined column, the y axis of each macrocycle being parallel to the long axis of the column.

  5. Sequence-specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin.

    PubMed

    Jeeves, Mark; Fogl, Claudia; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Chidgey, Martyn; Overduin, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The plakin repeat domain is a distinctive hallmark of the plakin superfamily of proteins, which are found within all epithelial tissues. Plakin repeat domains mediate the interactions of these proteins with the cell cytoskeleton and are critical for the maintenance of tissue integrity. Despite their biological importance, no solution state resonance assignments are available for any homologue. Here we report the essentially complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone chemical shift assignments of the singular 22 kDa plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin, providing the means to investigate its interactions with ligands including intermediate filaments. PMID:26590577

  6. Chemical potential shift and gap-state formation in SrTiO{sub 3−δ} revealed by photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Prabir Kumar, Pramod; Aswin, V.; Dogra, Anjana; Joshi, Amish G.

    2014-08-07

    In this study, we report on investigations of the electronic structure of SrTiO{sub 3} annealed at temperature ranging between 550 and 840 °C in an ultrahigh vacuum. Annealing induced oxygen vacancies (O{sub vac}) impart considerable changes in the electronic structure of SrTiO{sub 3}. Using core-level photoemission spectroscopy, we have studied the chemical potential shift (Δμ) as a function of annealing temperature. The result shows that the chemical potential monotonously increases with electron doping in SrTiO{sub 3−δ}. The monotonous increase of the chemical potential rules out the existence of electronic phase separation in the sample. Using valence band photoemission, we have demonstrated the formation of a low density of states at the near Fermi level electronic spectrum of SrTiO{sub 3−δ}. The gap-states were observed by spectral weight transfer over a large energy scale of the stoichiometric band gap of SrTiO{sub 3} system leading finally to an insulator-metal transition. We have interpreted our results from the point of structural distortions induced by oxygen vacancies.

  7. HN(α/β-COCA-J) Experiment for Measurement of 1JC‧Cα Couplings from Two-Dimensional [15N, 1H] Correlation Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permi, Perttu; Sorsa, Tia; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Annila, Arto

    1999-11-01

    Anew method for measurement of one-bond 13C‧-13Cα scalar and dipolar couplings from a two-dimensional [15N, 1H] correlation spectrum is presented. The experiment is based on multiple-quantum coherence, which is created between nitrogen and carbonyl carbon for simultaneous evolution of 15N chemical shift and coupling between 13C‧ and 13Cα. Optional subspectral editing is provided by the spin-state-selective filters. The residual dipolar dipolar contribution to the 13C‧-13Cα coupling can be measured from these simplified [15N, 1H]-HSQC-like spectra. In this way, without explicit knowledge of carbon assignments, conformational changes of proteins dissolved in dilute liquid crystals can be probed conveniently, e.g., in structure activity relationship by NMR studies. The method is demonstrated with human cardiac troponin C.

  8. Examination of anticipated chemical shift and shape distortion effect on materials commonly used in prosthetic socket fabrication when measured using MRI: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Safari, Mohammad Reza; Rowe, Philip; Buis, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    The quality of lower-limb prosthetic socket fit is influenced by shape and volume consistency during the residual limb shape-capturing process (i.e., casting). Casting can be quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. However, chemical shift artifact and image distortion may influence the accuracy of MRI when common socket/casting materials are used. We used a purpose-designed rig to examine seven different materials commonly used in socket fabrication during exposure to MRI. The rig incorporated glass marker tubes filled with water doped with 1 g/L copper sulfate (CS) and 9 plastic sample vials (film containers) to hold the specific material specimens. The specimens were scanned 9 times in different configurations. The absolute mean difference of the glass marker tube length was 1.39 mm (2.98%) (minimum = 0.13 mm [0.30%], maximum = 5.47 mm [14.03%], standard deviation = 0.89 mm). The absolute shift for all materials was <1.7 mm. This was less than the measurement tolerance of +/-2.18 mm based on voxel (three-dimensional pixel) dimensions. The results show that MRI is an accurate and repeatable method for dimensional measurement when using matter containing water. Additionally, silicone and plaster of paris plus 1 g/L CS do not show a significant shape distortion nor do they interfere with the MRI image of the residual limb. PMID:23516081

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of guest species in clathrate hydrates: Line-shape anisotropies, chemical shifts, and the determination of cage occupancy ratios and hydration numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M.J.; Ratcliffe, C.I.; Ripmeester, J.A. )

    1990-01-11

    NMR spectra of the guest molecules PH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}Se, D{sub 2}Se, D{sub 2}S, CD{sub 3}F, CD{sub 3}Cl, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}D{sub 4} in their structure I clathrate hydrates have been obtained by use of {sup 2}H, {sup 19}F, {sup 31}P, and {sup 77}Se nuclei. Components due to guests in the small and large cages have been distinguished by using isotropic chemical shift and static line-shape anisotropy differences. Low-temperature magic angle spinning was used in some cases to resolve the two components. Guests in the small cages are invariably found to have a lower field isotropic shift than those in the large cage. The static line shapes are isotropic for guests in the small spherical cages, whereas in the large oblate cages they have a residual anisotropy. Relative cage occupancy ratios {theta}{sub S}/{theta}{sub L} have been obtained from the observed NMR intensities, and together with similar results from previous NMR studies, these have been used to derive hydration numbers. This represents a new and nondestructive method of determining structure I hydrate compositions.

  10. 1H NMR analysis of complexation of hydrotropic agents nicotinamide and caffeine with aromatic biologically active molecules in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantushenko, Anastasia O.; Mukhina, Yulia V.; Veselkov, Kyrill A.; Davies, David B.; Veselkov, Alexei N.

    2004-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy has been used to elucidate the molecular mechanism of solubilization action of hydrotropic agents nicotinamide (NA) and caffeine (CAF). Hetero-association of NA with riboflavine-mononucleotide (FMN) and CAF with low soluble in aqueous solution synthetic analogue of antibiotic actinomycin D, actinocyl-bis-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) amine (Actill), has been investigated by 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. Concentration and temperature dependences of proton chemical shifts have been analysed in terms of a statistical-thermodynamic model of indefinite self- and heteroassociation of aromatic molecules. The obtained results enable to conclude that NA-FMN and CAF-Actill intermolecular complexes are mainly stabilized by the stacking interactions of the aromatic chromophores. Hetero-association of the investigated molecules plays an important role in solubilization of aromatic drugs by hydrotropic agents nicotinamide and caffeine.

  11. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone assignment of the EC-1 domain of human E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Prasasty, Vivitri D; Krause, Mary E; Tambunan, Usman S F; Anbanandam, Asokan; Laurence, Jennifer S; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2015-04-01

    The Extracellular 1 (EC1) domain of E-cadherin has been shown to be important for cadherin-cadherin homophilic interactions. Cadherins are responsible for calcium-mediated cell-cell adhesion located at the adherens junction of the biological barriers (i.e., intestinal mucosa and the blood-brain barrier (BBB)). Cadherin peptides can modulate cadherin interactions to improve drug delivery through the BBB. However, the mechanism of modulating the E-cadherin interactions by cadherin peptides has not been fully elucidated. To provide a basis for subsequent examination of the structure and peptide-binding properties of the EC1 domain of human E-cadherin using solution NMR spectroscopy, the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance of the uniformly labeled-EC1 were assigned and the secondary structure was determined based on the chemical shift values. These resonance assignments are essential for assessing protein-ligand interactions and are reported here. PMID:24510398

  12. On the utility of spectroscopic imaging as a tool for generating geometrically accurate MR images and parameter maps in the presence of field inhomogeneities and chemical shift effects.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Chris J G; de Leeuw, Hendrik; van de Maat, Gerrit H; van Gorp, Jetse S; Bouwman, Job G; Seevinck, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Lack of spatial accuracy is a recognized problem in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which severely detracts from its value as a stand-alone modality for applications that put high demands on geometric fidelity, such as radiotherapy treatment planning and stereotactic neurosurgery. In this paper, we illustrate the potential and discuss the limitations of spectroscopic imaging as a tool for generating purely phase-encoded MR images and parameter maps that preserve the geometry of an object and allow localization of object features in world coordinates. Experiments were done on a clinical system with standard facilities for imaging and spectroscopy. Images were acquired with a regular spin echo sequence and a corresponding spectroscopic imaging sequence. In the latter, successive samples of the acquired echo were used for the reconstruction of a series of evenly spaced images in the time and frequency domain. Experiments were done with a spatial linearity phantom and a series of test objects representing a wide range of susceptibility- and chemical-shift-induced off-resonance conditions. In contrast to regular spin echo imaging, spectroscopic imaging was shown to be immune to off-resonance effects, such as those caused by field inhomogeneity, susceptibility, chemical shift, f(0) offset and field drift, and to yield geometrically accurate images and parameter maps that allowed object structures to be localized in world coordinates. From these illustrative examples and a discussion of the limitations of purely phase-encoded imaging techniques, it is concluded that spectroscopic imaging offers a fundamental solution to the geometric deficiencies of MRI which may evolve toward a practical solution when full advantage will be taken of current developments with regard to scan time reduction. This perspective is backed up by a demonstration of the significant scan time reduction that may be achieved by the use of compressed sensing for a simple phantom. PMID:22898694

  13. A solid-state (11)b NMR and computational study of boron electric field gradient and chemical shift tensors in boronic acids and boronic esters.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Joseph W E; Bryce, David L

    2010-04-22

    The results of a solid-state (11)B NMR study of a series of 10 boronic acids and boronic esters with aromatic substituents are reported. Boron-11 electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors obtained from analyses of spectra acquired in magnetic fields of 9.4 and 21.1 T are demonstrated to be useful for gaining insight into the molecular and electronic structure about the boron nucleus. Data collected at 21.1 T clearly show the effects of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), with tensor spans (Omega) on the order of 10-40 ppm. Signal enhancements of up to 2.95 were achieved with a DFS-modified QCPMG pulse sequence. To understand the relationship between the measured tensors and the local structure better, calculations of the (11)B EFG and magnetic shielding tensors for these compounds were conducted. The best agreement was found between experimental results and those obtained from GGA revPBE DFT calculations. A positive correlation was found between Omega and the dihedral angle (phi(CCBO)), which describes the orientation of the boronic acid/ester functional group relative to an aromatic system bound to boron. The small boron CSA is discussed in terms of paramagnetic shielding contributions as well as diamagnetic shielding contributions. Although there is a region of overlap, both Omega and the (11)B quadrupolar coupling constants tend to be larger for boronic acids than for the esters. We conclude that the span is generally the most characteristic boron NMR parameter of the molecular and electronic environment for boronic acids and esters, and show that the values result from a delicate interplay of several competing factors, including hydrogen bonding, the value of phi(CCBO), and the electron-donating or withdrawing substituents bound to the aromatic ring. PMID:20337440

  14. Transcriptional regulation of α1H T-type calcium channel under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sellak, Hassan; Zhou, Chun; Liu, Bainan; Chen, Hairu; Lincoln, Thomas M; Wu, Songwei

    2014-10-01

    The low-voltage-activated T-type Ca(2+) channels play an important role in mediating the cellular responses to altered oxygen tension. Among three T-type channel isoforms, α1G, α1H, and α1I, only α1H was found to be upregulated under hypoxia. However, mechanisms underlying such hypoxia-dependent isoform-specific gene regulation remain incompletely understood. We, therefore, studied the hypoxia-dependent transcriptional regulation of α1G and α1H gene promoters with the aim to identify the functional hypoxia-response elements (HREs). In rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after hypoxia (3% O2) exposure, we observed a prominent increase in α1H mRNA at 12 h along with a significant rise in α1H-mediated T-type current at 24 and 48 h. We then cloned two promoter fragments from the 5'-flanking regions of rat α1G and α1H gene, 2,000 and 3,076 bp, respectively, and inserted these fragments into a luciferase reporter vector. Transient transfection of PASMCs and PC12 cells with these recombinant constructs and subsequent luciferase assay revealed a significant increase in luciferase activity from the reporter containing the α1H, but not α1G, promoter fragment under hypoxia. Using serial deletion and point mutation analysis strategies, we identified a functional HRE at site -1,173cacgc-1,169 within the α1H promoter region. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay using this site as a DNA probe demonstrated an increased binding activity to nuclear protein extracts from the cells after hypoxia exposure. Taken together, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced α1H upregulation involves binding of hypoxia-inducible factor to an HRE within the α1H promoter region. PMID:25099734

  15. Transcriptional regulation of α1H T-type calcium channel under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sellak, Hassan; Zhou, Chun; Liu, Bainan; Chen, Hairu; Lincoln, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The low-voltage-activated T-type Ca2+ channels play an important role in mediating the cellular responses to altered oxygen tension. Among three T-type channel isoforms, α1G, α1H, and α1I, only α1H was found to be upregulated under hypoxia. However, mechanisms underlying such hypoxia-dependent isoform-specific gene regulation remain incompletely understood. We, therefore, studied the hypoxia-dependent transcriptional regulation of α1G and α1H gene promoters with the aim to identify the functional hypoxia-response elements (HREs). In rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after hypoxia (3% O2) exposure, we observed a prominent increase in α1H mRNA at 12 h along with a significant rise in α1H-mediated T-type current at 24 and 48 h. We then cloned two promoter fragments from the 5′-flanking regions of rat α1G and α1H gene, 2,000 and 3,076 bp, respectively, and inserted these fragments into a luciferase reporter vector. Transient transfection of PASMCs and PC12 cells with these recombinant constructs and subsequent luciferase assay revealed a significant increase in luciferase activity from the reporter containing the α1H, but not α1G, promoter fragment under hypoxia. Using serial deletion and point mutation analysis strategies, we identified a functional HRE at site −1,173cacgc−1,169 within the α1H promoter region. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay using this site as a DNA probe demonstrated an increased binding activity to nuclear protein extracts from the cells after hypoxia exposure. Taken together, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced α1H upregulation involves binding of hypoxia-inducible factor to an HRE within the α1H promoter region. PMID:25099734

  16. 1H NMR Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Alzheimer's Disease Patients: An Example of a Possible Misinterpretation Due to Non-Adjustment of pH.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Thomas; Balayssac, Stéphane; Gilard, Véronique; Martino, Robert; Vincent, Christian; Pariente, Jérémie; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Two publications from the same research group reporting on the detection of new possible biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), based on the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid samples (CSF) with 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), are at the origin of the present study. The authors observed significant differences in 1H NMR spectra of CSF from AD patients and healthy controls and, thus, proposed some NMR signals (without attribution) as possible biomarkers. However, this work was carried out in non-standardized pH conditions. Our study aims at warning about a possible misinterpretation that can arise from 1H NMR analyses of CSF samples if pH adjustment is not done before NMR analysis. Indeed, CSF pH increases rapidly after removal and is subject to changes over conservation time. We first identify the NMR signals described by the authors as biomarkers. We then focus on the chemical shift variations of their NMR signals as a function of pH in both standard solutions and CSF samples. Finally, a principal component analysis of 1H NMR data demonstrates that the same CSF samples recorded at pH 8.1 and 10.0 are statistically differentiated. PMID:24958390

  17. 1H-NMR studies on the ternary complexes of rare-earth ions with thenoyltrifluoroacetone and polyethers in dichloromethane.

    PubMed

    Gagabe, Gene Frederick; Satoh, Keiichi; Sawada, Kiyoshi

    2009-07-28

    The structures of the ternary complexes of lanthanoid and yttrium (Ln3+)-thenoyltrifluoroacetonates (tta-) with polyether (POE) in organic phase were investigated by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, where the POEs are crown ethers (18-crown-6 and benzo-18-crown-6) and monodispersed linear polyethers (DEOn: HO-(CH2CH2O-)nC12H25, where n=4, 6, 8). The changes in chemical shift of methylene protons of POE by addition of the adduct complex [Ln(tta)3(POE)] were measured at various Ln3+-to-POE concentration ratios. Chemical shift changes for each proton of POE by the formation of [Ln(tta)3(POE)] were determined. Results revealed that oxygen atoms at the hydroxyl terminal of linear POE have higher tendency to coordinate to the metal ion in [Ln(tta)3] complex. Three (for La3+) or two (for Lu3+ or Y3+) oxygen atoms of the POE coordinate to the metal ion without substitution of tta- ligands to satisfy the metal ion's coordination number of nine or eight, respectively. In the case of 18-membered crown ether complexes, La3+ is incorporated inside the cavity of the POE, displacing one of the three tta- from the inner coordination sphere while the other two remain coordinated to the metal ion. On the other hand, for the adduct of Y3+ complex with crown ether, all three tta- ligands are directly coordinating to the metal ion. PMID:19587993

  18. Theoretical 13C chemical shift, 14N, and 2H quadrupole coupling- constant studies of hydrogen bonding in L-alanylglycine dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Tafazzoli, M; Amini, S K

    2008-04-01

    (13)C chemical shieldings and (14)N and (2)H electric field gradient (EFG) tensors of L-alanylglycine (L-alagly) dipeptide were calculated at RHF/6-31 + + G** and B3LYP/6-31 + + G** levels of theory respectively. For these calculations a crystal structure of this dipeptide obtained from X-ray crystallography was used. Atomic coordinates of different clusters containing several L-alagly molecules were used as input files for calculations. These clusters consist of central and surrounding L-alagly molecules, the latter forming short, strong, hydrogen bonds with the central molecule. Since the calculations did not converge for these clusters, the surrounding L-alagly molecules were replaced by glycine molecules. In order to improve the accuracy of calculated chemical shifts and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCCs), different geometry-optimization strategies were applied for hydrogen nuclei. Agreement between calculated and experimental data confirms that our optimized coordinates for hydrogen nuclei are more accurate than those obtained by X-ray diffraction. PMID:18273875

  19. Mechanism of Spin-Orbit Effects on the Ligand NMR Chemical Shift in Transition-Metal Complexes: Linking NMR to EPR.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Straka, Michal; Munzarová, Markéta L; Marek, Radek

    2014-04-01

    Relativistic effects play an essential role in understanding the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts in heavy-atom compounds. Particularly interesting from the chemical point of view are the relativistic effects due to heavy atom (HA) on the NMR chemical shifts of the nearby light atoms (LA), referred to as the HALA effects. The effect of Spin-Orbit (SO) interaction originating from HA on the nuclear magnetic shielding at a neighboring LA, σ(SO), is explored here in detail for a series of d(6) complexes of iridium. Unlike the previous findings, the trends in σ(SO) observed in this study can be fully explained neither in terms of the s-character of the HA-LA bonding nor by trends in the energy differences between occupied and virtual molecular orbitals (MOs). Rather, the σ(SO) contribution to the total NMR shielding is found to be modulated by the d-orbital participation of the heavy atom (Ir) in the occupied and virtual spin-orbit active MOs, i.e., those which contribute significantly to the σ(SO). The correlation between the d-character of σ(SO)-active MOs and the size of the corresponding SO contribution to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant at LA is so tight that the magnitude of σ(SO) can be predicted in a given class of compounds on the basis of d-orbital character of relevant MO with relative error smaller than 15%. This correspondence is supported by an analogy between the perturbation theory expressions for the spin-orbit induced NMR σ-tensor and those for the EPR g-tensor as well as the A-tensor of the ligand. This correlation is demonstrated on a series of d(5) complexes of iridium. Thus, known qualitative relationships between electronic structure and EPR parameters can be newly applied to reproduce, predict, and understand the SO-induced contributions to NMR shielding constants of light atoms in heavy-atom compounds. PMID:26580365

  20. Shifting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, E.P.; Welch, W.R.

    1984-03-13

    An improved shifting tool connectable in a well tool string and useful to engage and position a slidable sleeve in a sliding sleeve device in a well flow conductor. The selectively profiled shifting tool keys provide better fit with and more contact area between keys and slidable sleeves. When the engaged slidable sleeve cannot be moved up and the shifting tool is not automatically disengaged, emergency disengagement means may be utilized by applying upward force to the shifting tool sufficient to shear pins and cause all keys to be cammed inwardly at both ends to completely disengage for removal of the shifting tool from the sliding sleeve device.

  1. Intrauterine fetal brain NMR spectroscopy: 1H and 31P studies in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, T.; Kwee, I.L.; Suzuki, N.; Houkin, K. )

    1989-11-01

    Fetal brain metabolism was investigated in utero noninvasively using multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats at two representative prenatal stages: early (17-18 days) and late (20-21 days) stages. Phosphorus-31 (31P) spectroscopy revealed that phosphocreatine is significantly lower in the early stage and increases to the level of early neonates by the late prenatal stage. Intracellular pH at the early stage was found to be strikingly high (7.52 +/- 0.21) and decreased to a level similar to that of neonates by the late stage (7.29 +/- 0.07). Phosphomonoester levels at both stages were similar to the values reported for early neonates. Water-suppressed proton (1H) spectroscopy demonstrated a distinctive in vivo fetal brain spectral pattern characterized by low levels of N-acetyl aspartate and high levels of taurine. High-resolution proton spectroscopy and homonuclear chemical-shift correlate spectroscopy of brain perchloric acid extracts confirmed these in vivo findings. In vitro 31P spectroscopy of acidified chloroform methanol extracts showed the characteristic membrane phospholipid profiles of fetal brain. The phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-to-phosphatidylcholine (PC) ratio (PE/PC) did not show significant changes between the two stages at 0.40 +/- 0.11, a value similar to that of early neonates.

  2. 1H Solid-State NMR Imaging by TREV-CRAMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buszko, M. L.; Maciel, G. E.

    A proton NMR imaging experiment based on line narrowing by TREV-CRAMPS with a time-dependent magnetic field gradient has been demonstrated on a solid adamantane phantom. With the magnetic field gradient applied as 16 μs pulses in the windows of the RF pulse sequence, a spatial resolution of about 100 μm is experimentally achieved (based on linewidth and gradient strength), with a digital resolution of 40 μm, qualitatively similar to what is achieved in liquid-sample NMR imaging. The technique benefits from a favorable time average of the magnetic field gradient, relatively wide windows between the magic-echo sandwiches, and the good off-resonance line-narrowing characteristics of the TREV technique. High-resolution chemical-shift information is retained and hence potentially attainable. The low MAS rate, compared to what is used in imaging experiments in which MAS is the only line-narrowing procedure used, may be of importance if one wishes to apply 1H NMR imaging to certain types of samples, e.g., biological tissue.

  3. Crystalline 1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-ylidenes

    DOEpatents

    Bertrand, Guy; Gulsado-Barrios, Gregorio; Bouffard, Jean; Donnadieu, Bruno

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides novel and stable crystalline 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes. The present invention also provides methods of making 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes. The present invention also provides methods of using 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes in catalytic reactions.

  4. Design, synthesis and 1H NMR study of C3v-symmetric anion receptors with urethane-NH as recognition group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Oh; Sahoo, Suban K.; Choi, Heung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    C3v-Symmetric anion receptors 3 and 4 with urethane groups were synthesized by using trindane triol as tripodal molecular framework. In 1H NMR titration study, the receptors showed noticeable downfield shift/disappearance of the urethane-NH peak in presence of H2PO4- and F- due to the host-guest complexation occurred through multiple hydrogen bonding and/or the deprotonation of urethane-NH groups. Other tested anions such as Cl-, Br-, HSO4-, and NO3- showed either no or negligible chemical shift of the urethane groups. The deprotonation event in 4 allowed selective detection of F- by perceptible color change from colorless to yellowish-red with the appearance of a new charge transfer absorption band at 450 nm.

  5. Hydrophobization of epoxy nanocomposite surface with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane for superhydrophobic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psarski, Maciej; Marczak, Jacek; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Sobieraj, Grzegorz B.; Gumowski, Konrad; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Weimin

    2012-10-01

    Nature inspires the design of synthetic materials with superhydrophobic properties, which can be used for applications ranging from self-cleaning surfaces to microfluidic devices. Their water repellent properties are due to hierarchical (micrometer- and nanometre-scale) surface morphological structures, either made of hydrophobic substances or hydrophobized by appropriate surface treatment. In this work, the efficiency of two surface treatment procedures, with a hydrophobic fluoropolymer, synthesized and deposited from 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane (PFOTS) is investigated. The procedures involved reactions from the gas and liquid phases of the PFOTS/hexane solutions. The hierarchical structure is created in an epoxy nanocomposite surface, by filling the resin with alumina nanoparticles and micron-sized glass beads and subsequent sandblasting with corundum microparticles. The chemical structure of the deposited fluoropolymer was examined using XPS spectroscopy. The topography of the modified surfaces was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The hydrophobic properties of the modified surfaces were investigated by water contact and sliding angles measurements. The surfaces exhibited water contact angles of above 150° for both modification procedures, however only the gas phase modification provided the non-sticking behaviour of water droplets (sliding angle of 3°). The discrepancy is attributed to extra surface roughness provided by the latter procedure.

  6. Characterization of the structure and redox behaviour of cytochrome c3 from Desulfovibrio baculatus by 1H-nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, I B; Turner, D L; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V

    1993-01-01

    Complete assignment of the aromatic and haem proton resonances in the cytochromes c3 isolated from Desulfovibrio baculatus strains (Norway 4, DSM 1741) and (DSM 1743) was achieved using one- and two-dimensional 1H n.m.r. Nuclear Overhauser enhancements observed between haem and aromatic resonances and between resonances due to different haems, together with the ring-current contributions to the chemical shifts of haem resonances, support the argument that the haem core architecture is conserved in the various cytochromes c3, and that the X-ray structure of the D. baculatus cytochrome c3 is erroneous. The relative orientation of the haems for both cytochromes was determined directly from n.m.r. data. The n.m.r. structures have a resolution of approximately 0.25 nm and are found to be in close agreement with the X-ray structure from D. vulgaris cytochrome c3. The proton assignments were used to relate the highest potential to a specific haem in the three-dimensional structure by monitoring the chemical-shift variation of several haem resonances throughout redox titrations followed by 1H n.m.r. The haem with highest redox potential is not the same as that in other cytochromes c3. PMID:8397513

  7. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8965 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  8. Concurrent Increases and Decreases in Local Stability and Conformational Heterogeneity in Cu, Zn Superoxide Dismutase Variants Revealed by Temperature-Dependence of Amide Chemical Shifts.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Colleen M; Rumfeldt, Jessica A; Broom, Helen R; Sekhar, Ashok; Kay, Lewis E; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2016-03-01

    The chemical shifts of backbone amide protons in proteins are sensitive reporters of local structural stability and conformational heterogeneity, which can be determined from their readily measured linear and nonlinear temperature-dependences, respectively. Here we report analyses of amide proton temperature-dependences for native dimeric Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (holo pWT SOD1) and structurally diverse mutant SOD1s associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Holo pWT SOD1 loses structure with temperature first at its periphery and, while having extremely high global stability, nevertheless exhibits extensive conformational heterogeneity, with ∼1 in 5 residues showing evidence for population of low energy alternative states. The holo G93A and E100G ALS mutants have moderately decreased global stability, whereas V148I is slightly stabilized. Comparison of the holo mutants as well as the marginally stable immature monomeric unmetalated and disulfide-reduced (apo(2SH)) pWT with holo pWT shows that changes in the local structural stability of individual amides vary greatly, with average changes corresponding to differences in global protein stability measured by differential scanning calorimetry. Mutants also exhibit altered conformational heterogeneity compared to pWT. Strikingly, substantial increases as well as decreases in local stability and conformational heterogeneity occur, in particular upon maturation and for G93A. Thus, the temperature-dependence of amide shifts for SOD1 variants is a rich source of information on the location and extent of perturbation of structure upon covalent changes and ligand binding. The implications for potential mechanisms of toxic misfolding of SOD1 in disease and for general aspects of protein energetics, including entropy-enthalpy compensation, are discussed. PMID:26849066

  9. Detection of hydrogen dissolved in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin; Fujiwara, Hirotada

    2012-01-01

    Rubber materials, which are used for hydrogen gas seal, can dissolve hydrogen during exposure in high-pressure hydrogen gas. Dissolved hydrogen molecules were detected by solid state 1H NMR of the unfilled vulcanized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Two signals were observed at 4.5 ppm and 4.8 ppm, which were assignable to dissolved hydrogen, in the 1H NMR spectrum of NBR after being exposed 100 MPa hydrogen gas for 24 h at room temperature. These signals were shifted from that of gaseous hydrogen molecules. Assignment of the signals was confirmed by quantitative estimation of dissolved hydrogen and peak area of the signals.

  10. Conformation analysis and molecular mobility of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene copolymer using solid-state 19F MAS and 1H --> 19F CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aimi, Keitaro; Ando, Shinji

    2004-07-01

    The changes in the conformation and molecular mobility accompanied by a phase transition in the crystalline domain were analyzed for ethylene (E) and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) copolymer, ETFE, using variable-temperature (VT) solid-state 19F magic angle spinning (MAS) and 1H --> 19F cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The shifts of the signals for fluorines in TFE units to higher frequency and the continuing decrease and increase in the T1rho(F) values suggest that conformational exchange motions exist in the crystalline domain between 42 and 145 degrees C. Quantum chemical calculations of magnetic shielding constants showed that the high-frequency shift of TFE units should be induced by trans to gauche conformational changes at the CH2-CF2 linkage in the E-TFE unit. Although the 19F signals of the crystalline domain are substantially overlapped with those of the amorphous domain at ambient probe temperature (68 degrees C), they were successfully distinguished by using the dipolar filter and spin-lock pulse sequences at 145 degrees C. The dipolar coupling constants for the crystalline domain, which can be estimated by fitting the dipolar oscillation behaviors in the 1H --> 19F CP curve, showed a significant decrease with increasing temperature from 42 to 145 degrees C. This is due to the averaging of 1H-19F dipolar interactions originating from the molecular motion in the crystalline domain. The increase in molecular mobility in the crystalline domain was clearly shown by VT T1rho(F) and 1H --> 19F CP measurements in the phase transition temperature range. PMID:15181627

  11. High resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human brain in vivo at 1.5 tesla

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Madhwesha; Stewart, Neil J.; Norquay, Graham; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Upon inhalation, xenon diffuses into the bloodstream and is transported to the brain, where it dissolves in various compartments of the brain. Although up to five chemically distinct peaks have been previously observed in 129Xe rat head spectra, to date only three peaks have been reported in the human head. This study demonstrates high resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging (CSI) of 129Xe dissolved in the human head at 1.5 Tesla. Methods A 129Xe radiofrequency coil was built in‐house and 129Xe gas was polarized using spin‐exchange optical pumping. Following the inhalation of 129Xe gas, NMR spectroscopy was performed with spectral resolution of 0.033 ppm. Two‐dimensional CSI in all three anatomical planes was performed with spectral resolution of 2.1 ppm and voxel size 20 mm × 20 mm. Results Spectra of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head showed five distinct peaks at 188 ppm, 192 ppm, 196 ppm, 200 ppm, and 217 ppm. Assignment of these peaks was consistent with earlier studies. Conclusion High resolution spectroscopy and CSI of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head has been demonstrated. For the first time, five distinct NMR peaks have been observed in 129Xe spectra from the human head in vivo. Magn Reson Med 75:2227–2234, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27080441

  12. Intramyocellular lipid dependence on skeletal muscle fiber type and orientation characterized by diffusion tensor imaging and 1H-MRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valaparla, Sunil K.; Gao, Feng; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Clarke, Geoffrey D.

    2014-03-01

    When muscle fibers are aligned with the B0 field, intramyocellular lipids (IMCL), important for providing energy during physical activity, can be resolved in proton magnetic resonance spectra (1H-MRS). Various muscles of the leg differ significantly in their proportion of fibers and angular distribution. This study determined the influence of muscle fiber type and orientation on IMCL using 1H-MRS and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Muscle fiber orientation relative to B0 was estimated by pennation angle (PA) measurements from DTI, providing orientation-specific extramyocellular lipid (EMCL) chemical shift data that were used for subject-specific IMCL quantification. Vastus lateralis (VL), tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SO) muscles of 6 healthy subjects (21-40 yrs) were studied on a Siemens 3T MRI system with a flex 4-channel coil. 1H-MRS were acquired using stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM, TR=3s, TE=270ms). DTI was performed using single shot EPI (b=600s/mm2, 30 directions, TR=4.5s, TE=82ms, and ten×5mm slices) with center slice indexed to the MRS voxel. The average PA's measured from ROI analysis of primary eigenvectors were PA=19.46+/-5.43 for unipennate VL, 15.65+/-3.73 for multipennate SO, and 7.04+/-3.34 for bipennate TA. Chemical shift (CS) was calculated using [3cos2θ-1] dependence: 0.17+/-0.02 for VL, 0.18+/-0.01 for SO and 0.19+/-0.004 ppm for TA. IMCL-CH2 concentrations from spectral analysis were 12.77+/-6.3 for VL, 3.07+/-1.63 for SO and 0.27+/-0.08 mmol/kg ww for TA. Small PA's were measured in TA and large CS with clear separation between EMCL and IMCL peaks were observed. Larger variations in PA were measured VL and SO resulting in an increased overlap of the EMCL on IMCL peaks.

  13. Redox-dependent 1H NMR spectral features and tertiary structural constraints on the C-terminal region of putidaredoxin.

    PubMed

    Pochapsky, T C; Ratnaswamy, G; Patera, A

    1994-05-31

    Putidaredoxin (Pdx) is a 106-residue Fe2S2 ferredoxin which acts as the physiological reductant and effector of cytochrome P-450cam. Pdx has two accessible oxidation states, Fe+3-Fe+3 (oxidized) and Fe+3-Fe+2 (reduced), and exhibits redox-dependent binding affinities for cytochrome P-450cam, with reduced Pdx binding over 100-fold more tightly than oxidized Pdx to the oxidized cytochrome P-450cam [Hintz, M. J., Mock, D. M., Peterson, L. L., Tuttle, K., & Peterson, J. A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 14324-14332]. The analysis of two-dimensional 1H NMR experiments has yielded sequential 1H resonance assignments for the diamagnetic regions of the reduced form of Pdx, which are compared to those of oxidized Pdx, described previously [Ye, X. M., Pochapsky, T. C., & Pochapsky, S. S. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 1961-1968]. Increased unpaired electron-spin density on the metal cluster in reduced relative to oxidized Pdx increases the number of 1H resonances which are broadened by the metal cluster, and the pattern of paramagnetic broadening provides information concerning the placement of the metal cluster within the protein. Two-dimensional exchange experiments on half-reduced samples of Pdx indicate that electron self-exchange is slow on the chemical shift time scale, with a second-order rate constant < or = 66 M-1 s-1 at 290 K. Spectral changes unrelated to increases in unpaired electron-spin density are also observed. The largest changes of this type are observed for features structurally contiguous with the C-terminal region Pro 102-Trp 106. The C-terminal residue Trp 106 has been implicated in binding to cytochrome P-450cam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8204576

  14. Comprehensive signal assignment of 13C-labeled lignocellulose using multidimensional solution NMR and 13C chemical shift comparison with solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-09-17

    A multidimensional solution NMR method has been developed using various pulse programs including HCCH-COSY and (13)C-HSQC-NOESY for the structural characterization of commercially available (13)C labeled lignocellulose from potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), chicory (Cichorium intybus), and corn (Zea mays). This new method allowed for 119 of the signals in the (13)C-HSQC spectrum of lignocelluloses to be assigned and was successfully used to characterize the structures of lignocellulose samples from three plants in terms of their xylan and xyloglucan structures, which are the major hemicelluloses in angiosperm. Furthermore, this new method provided greater insight into fine structures of lignin by providing a high resolution to the aromatic signals of the β-aryl ether and resinol moieties, as well as the diastereomeric signals of the β-aryl ether. Finally, the (13)C chemical shifts assigned in this study were compared with those from solid-state NMR and indicated the presence of heterogeneous dynamics in the polysaccharides where rigid cellulose and mobile hemicelluloses moieties existed together. PMID:24010724

  15. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropies in solid-state NMR under high-speed magic-angle spinning and in uniformly 13C-labeled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jerry C. C.; Tycko, Robert

    2003-05-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of recoupling chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) interactions in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) under high-speed magic-angle spinning (MAS) while retaining a static CSA powder pattern line shape and simultaneously attenuating homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. CSA recoupling is accomplished by a rotation-synchronized radio-frequency pulse sequence with symmetry properties that permit static CSA line shapes to be obtained. We suggest a specific recoupling sequence, which we call ROCSA, for which the scaling factors for CSA and homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions are 0.272 and approximately 0.05, respectively. This sequence is suitable for high-speed 13C MAS NMR experiments on uniformly 13C-labeled organic compounds, including biopolymers. We demonstrate the ROCSA sequence experimentally by measuring the 13C CSA patterns of the uniformly labeled, polycrystalline compounds L-alanine and N-acetyl-D,L-valine at MAS frequencies of 11 and 20 kHz. We also present experimental data for amyloid fibrils formed by a 15-residue fragment of the β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, in which four amino acid residues are uniformly labeled, demonstrating the applicability to biochemical systems of high molecular weight and significant complexity. Analysis of the CSA patterns in the amyloid fibril sample demonstrates the utility of ROCSA measurements as probes of peptide and protein conformation in noncrystalline solids.

  16. Chemical-shift X-ray standing wavefield determination of the local structure of methanethiolate phases on Ni( 1 1 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. J.; Woodruff, D. P.; Jones, R. G.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Formoso, V.

    2002-01-01

    By monitoring the X-ray absorption through the chemically-shifted components of the S 1s photoemission signal, normal-incidence X-ray standing wavefield absorption at the (1 1 1) and ( 1¯ 1 1) scatterer planes has been used to determine the local adsorption geometry of the two distinct methanethiolate (CH 3S-) species which occur on Ni(1 1 1) following exposure to methanethiol. The species which is favoured at low temperatures is found to occupy either mixed hollow or bridge sites on a non-reconstructed Ni(1 1 1) surface, whereas that seen at higher temperatures is shown to involve Ni surface layer reconstruction and the data are consistent with hollow site adsorption on a reduced density outermost Ni layer. The relative merits of alternative reconstruction models based on that which occurs due to methanethiolate adsorption on Cu(1 1 1), or the (5√3×2)rect. phase formed by atomic S on Ni(1 1 1), are discussed. Both of these models are based on local square or `pseudo-(1 0 0)' outermost Ni layers. Co-adsorbed atomic sulphur, to which the methanethiolate species decompose at higher temperatures, appears to occupy mainly fcc hollow sites at low temperatures, but is partially converted to the local geometry of the ordered reconstructed (5√3×2)rect.-S phase after higher temperature annealing.

  17. 129Xe NMR chemical shift in Xe@C60 calculated at experimental conditions: essential role of the relativity, dynamics, and explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Standara, Stanislav; Kulhánek, Petr; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2013-08-15

    The isotropic (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift (CS) in Xe@C60 dissolved in liquid benzene was calculated by piecewise approximation to faithfully simulate the experimental conditions and to evaluate the role of different physical factors influencing the (129)Xe NMR CS. The (129)Xe shielding constant was obtained by averaging the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic shieldings calculated for snapshots obtained from the molecular dynamics trajectory of the Xe@C60 system embedded in a periodic box of benzene molecules. Relativistic corrections were added at the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) level, included the solvent, and were dynamically averaged. It is demonstrated that the contribution of internal dynamics of the Xe@C60 system represents about 8% of the total nonrelativistic NMR CS, whereas the effects of dynamical solvent add another 8%. The dynamically averaged relativistic effects contribute by 9% to the total calculated (129)Xe NMR CS. The final theoretical value of 172.7 ppm corresponds well to the experimental (129)Xe CS of 179.2 ppm and lies within the estimated errors of the model. The presented computational protocol serves as a prototype for calculations of (129)Xe NMR parameters in different Xe atom guest-host systems. PMID:23703381

  18. VITAL NMR: Using Chemical Shift Derived Secondary Structure Information for a Limited Set of Amino Acids to Assess Homology Model Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, Michael C; Nesbitt, Anna E; Hallock, Michael J; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa; Tang, Ming; Harris, Jason B; Baudry, Jerome Y; Schuler, Mary A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2011-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., (13)C-(13)C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  19. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:26845204

  20. Shifting Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  1. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  2. Synthesis, crystal structures and theoretical calculations of new 1-[2-(5-chloro-2-benzoxazolinone-3-yl)acetyl]-3,5-diphenyl-4,5-dihydro-(1H)-pyrazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökşen, Umut Salgın; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Kelekçi, Nesrin Gökhan; Işık, Şamil; Ekizoğlu, Melike

    2013-05-01

    1-[2-(5-Chloro-2-benzoxazolinone-3-yl)acetyl]-3-phenyl-5-(3-methoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-(1H)-pyrazole (5a), 1-[2-(5-chloro-2-benzoxazolinone-3-yl)acetyl]-3-phenyl-5-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-(1H)-pyrazole (5b) and 1-[2-(5-chloro-2-benzoxazolinone-3-yl)acetyl]-3-(4-methylphenyl)-5-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-(1H)-pyrazole (5c) were synthesized. The crystal and molecular structures of the compounds 5a, 5b and 5c were determined by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, ESI-MS and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. DFT method with 6-31G(d,p) basis set was used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameters, vibrational frequencies and chemical shift values. The calculated vibrational frequencies and chemical shift values were compared with experimental IR and 1H NMR values. The results represented that there was a good agreement between experimental and calculated values of the compounds 5a-5c. In addition, DFT calculations of the compounds, molecular electrostatic potentials (MEPs) and frontier molecular orbitals were performed at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. Furthermore, compounds were tested against three Gram-positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 (American Type Culture Collection), methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212; two Gram negative bacteria: Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853; and three fungi: Candida albicans ATCC 90028, Candida krusei ATCC 6258 and Candida parapsilosis ATCC 90018. In general, all of the compounds were found to be slightly active against tested microorganisms.

  3. Tumbling motions of NH2(CH3)2 ions in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 studied using 1H MAS NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Choi, Jae Hun; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-12-01

    The structure and the phase transition temperatures of [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 were determined using X-ray diffraction and DSC, respectively. The temperature dependence of chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1ρ in the rotating frame were measured for the 1H and 13C nuclei in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4. From these results, it was observed that the structural change by chemical shifts does not occur with temperature. However, T1ρ for 1H and 13C in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 showed a minimum, and it is apparent that both T1ρ values are governed by the same tumbling motions. The activation energies of tumbling motions for 1H and 13C are nearly the same owing to the connection between CH3 and NH2 ions in the [NH2(CH3)2]+ group.

  4. 1H/15N HSQC NMR studies of ligand carboxylate group interactions with arginine residues in complexes of brodimoprim analogues and Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Morgan, W D; Birdsall, B; Nieto, P M; Gargaro, A R; Feeney, J

    1999-02-16

    any residue in the protein. 1H/15N HSQC spectra have been fully assigned for the complexes with the three brodimoprim analogues and chemical shift mapping used to explore interactions in the binding site. The 1H signals of the bound ligands for all three brodimoprim analogues have been assigned. Their 1H chemical shifts were found to be fairly similar in the different complexes indicating that the 2, 4-diaminopyrimidine and the benzyl ring are binding in essentially the same binding sites and with the same overall conformation in the different complexes. The rotation rate about the NepsilonCzeta bond in the brodimoprim-4,6-dicarboxylate complex with DHFR has been determined from a zz-HSQC exchange experiment, and its value is quite similar to that observed in the DHFR.methotrexate complex (24 +/- 10 s-1 at 8 degrees C and 50 +/- 10 s-1 at 15 degrees C, respectively). The 1H and 15N chemical shift differences of selected amide and guanidino NH groups, measured between the DHFR complexes, provided further evidence about the interactions involving Arg57 with the 4-carboxylate and 4,6-dicarboxylate brodimoprim analogues. PMID:10026296

  5. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  6. The use of chemical shift temperature gradients to establish the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor orientation: implication for structure determination/refinement in paramagnetic metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Xia, Z; Nguyen, B D; La Mar, G N

    2000-06-01

    The use of dipolar shifts as important constraints in refining molecular structure of paramagnetic metalloproteins by solution NMR is now well established. A crucial initial step in this procedure is the determination of the orientation. of the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility tensor in the molecular frame which is generated interactively with the structure refinement. The use of dipolar shifts as constraints demands knowledge of the diamagnetic shift. which, however, is very often not directly and easily accessible. We demonstrate that temperature gradients of dipolar shifts can serve as alternative constraints for determining the orientation of the magnetic axes, thereby eliminating the need to estimate the diamagnetic shifts. This approach is tested on low-spin, ferric sperm whale cyanometmyoglobin by determining the orientation, anisotropies and anisotropy temperature gradients by the alternate routes of using dipolar shifts and dipolar shift gradients as constraints. The alternate routes ultimately lead to very similar orientation of the magnetic axes, magnetic anisotropies and magnetic anisotropy temperature gradients which, by inference, would lead to an equally valid description of the molecular structure. It is expected that the use of the dipolar shift temperature gradients, rather than the dipolar shifts directly, as constraints will provide an accurate shortcut in a solution structure determination of a paramagnetic metalloprotein. PMID:10921780

  7. Alkaline earth chloride hydrates: chlorine quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and plane wave pseudopotential calculations.

    PubMed

    Bryce, David L; Bultz, Elijah B

    2007-01-01

    A series of alkaline earth chloride hydrates has been studied by solid-state (35/37)Cl NMR spectroscopy in order to characterize the chlorine electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors and to relate these observables to the structure around the chloride ions. Chlorine-35/37 NMR spectra of solid powdered samples of pseudopolymorphs (hydrates) of magnesium chloride (MgCl(2).6H(2)O), calcium chloride (CaCl(2).2H(2)O), strontium chloride (SrCl(2), SrCl(2).2H(2)O, and SrCl(2).6H(2)O), and barium chloride (BaCl(2).2H(2)O) have been acquired under stationary and magic-angle spinning conditions in magnetic fields of 11.75 and 21.1 T. Powder X-ray diffraction was used as an additional tool to confirm the purity and identity of the samples. Chlorine-35 quadrupolar coupling constants (C(Q)) range from essentially zero in cubic anhydrous SrCl(2) to 4.26+/-0.03 MHz in calcium chloride dihydrate. CS tensor spans, Omega, are between 40 and 72 ppm, for example, Omega= 45+/-20 ppm for SrCl(2).6H(2)O. Plane wave-pseudopotential density functional theory, as implemented in the CASTEP program, was employed to model the extended solid lattices of these materials for the calculation of their chlorine EFG and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors, and allowed for the assignment of the two-site chlorine NMR spectra of barium chloride dihydrate. This work builds upon our current understanding of the relationship between chlorine NMR interaction tensors and the local molecular and electronic structure, and highlights the particular sensitivity of quadrupolar nucleus solid-state NMR spectroscopy to the differences between various pseudopolymorphic structures in the case of strontium chloride. PMID:17385204

  8. Muscle metabolism and activation heterogeneity by combined 31P chemical shift and T2 imaging, and pulmonary O2 uptake during incremental knee-extensor exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T.; Howe, Franklyn A.; Whipp, Brian J.; Ward, Susan A.; McIntyre, Dominick J.; Ladroue, Christophe; Griffiths, John R.; Kemp, Graham J.

    2013-01-01

    The integration of skeletal muscle substrate depletion, metabolite accumulation, and fatigue during large muscle-mass exercise is not well understood. Measurement of intramuscular energy store degradation and metabolite accumulation is confounded by muscle heterogeneity. Therefore, to characterize regional metabolic distribution in the locomotor muscles, we combined 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chemical shift imaging, and T2-weighted imaging with pulmonary oxygen uptake during bilateral knee-extension exercise to intolerance. Six men completed incremental tests for the following: 1) unlocalized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and 2) spatial determination of 31P metabolism and activation. The relationship of pulmonary oxygen uptake to whole quadriceps phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]) was inversely linear, and three of four knee-extensor muscles showed activation as assessed by change in T2. The largest changes in [PCr], [inorganic phosphate] ([Pi]) and pH occurred in rectus femoris, but no voxel (72 cm3) showed complete PCr depletion at exercise cessation. The most metabolically active voxel reached 11 ± 9 mM [PCr] (resting, 29 ± 1 mM), 23 ± 11 mM [Pi] (resting, 7 ± 1 mM), and a pH of 6.64 ± 0.29 (resting, 7.08 ± 0.03). However, the distribution of 31P metabolites and pH varied widely between voxels, and the intervoxel coefficient of variation increased between rest (∼10%) and exercise intolerance (∼30–60%). Therefore, the limit of tolerance was attained with wide heterogeneity in substrate depletion and fatigue-related metabolite accumulation, with extreme metabolic perturbation isolated to only a small volume of active muscle (<5%). Regional intramuscular disturbances are thus likely an important requisite for exercise intolerance. How these signals integrate to limit muscle power production, while regional “recruitable muscle” energy stores are presumably still available, remains uncertain. PMID:23813534

  9. Study the Effects of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems With 1H and 6Li Solid-State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun; Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Z Gary; Ren, Ruiming; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2007-07-10

    To gain insight into the effects of mechanical activation (MA) on the hydrogen desorption of the lithium amide (LiNH2) and lithium hydride (LiH) mixture, LiNH2 and LiH+LiNH2 were mechanically activated by high-energy ball milling. The formed products were studied with in situ 1H and 6Li nuclear magic angle spinning (MAS) magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy from ambient temperature to 180 degrees C. Up-field chemical shift was observed in 6Li MAS NMR spectra with increased milling time, indicating that average local electronic structure around Li nuclei was modified during MA. 1H MAS NMR was used to dynamically probe ammonia release from the activated LiNH2 at temperature as low as 50 degrees C. In the case of activated LiH+LiNH2 mixtures, the 1H MAS NMR results implied that MA enhanced the dehydrogenation reaction of LiNH2+LiH=Li2NH+H2 and suppressed ammonia generation as well.

  10. Study the effects of mechanical activation on Li-N-H systems with 1H and 6Li solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Ren, Ruiming; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leon L.

    To gain insight into the effects of mechanical activation (MA) on the hydrogen desorption of the lithium amide (LiNH 2) and lithium hydride (LiH) mixture, LiNH 2 and LiH + LiNH 2 were mechanically activated by high-energy ball milling. The formed products were studied with in situ 1H and 6Li nuclear magic angle spinning (MAS) magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy from ambient temperature to 180 °C. Up-field chemical shift was observed in 6Li MAS NMR spectra with increased milling time, indicating that average local electronic structure around Li nuclei was modified during MA. 1H MAS NMR was used to dynamically probe ammonia release from the activated LiNH 2 at temperature as low as 50 °C. In the case of activated LiH + LiNH 2 mixtures, the 1H MAS NMR results implied that MA enhanced the dehydrogenation reaction of LiNH 2 + LiH = Li 2NH + H 2.

  11. Selective observation of biologically important 15N-labeled metabolites in isolated rat brain and liver by 1H-detected multiple-quantum-coherence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.; Parivar, Farhad

    Four cerebral metabolites of importance in neurotransmission, serotonin, L-tryptophan, L-glutamine, and N-acetyl- L-aspartate, and two hepatic urea-cycle intermediates, citrulline and urea, were found to be observable by 1H- 15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum-coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy in aqueous solution at physiological pH and temperature, through the protons spin-coupled to their indole, amide, or ureido nitrogen. Their 1H chemical shifts were well dispersed over a 5-10 ppm region while the 1J 15N- 1H values were 87-99 Hz. For [γ- 15N]glutamine, a 50- to 100-fold increase in sensitivity over direct 15N detection was achieved, in contrast to a 2-fold increase by the polarization-transfer method. In the isolated brain of portacaval-shunted rats, the amide protons of biologically 15N-enriched [γ- 15N]glutamine were observed in 2 min of acquisition, with suppression of proton signals from all other cerebral metabolites. In isolated liver of 15N-enriched control rats, [ 15NIurea protons were observed in 16 min. The HMQC method is likely to be effective for the in vivo study of cerebral and hepatic nitrogen metabolism.

  12. Experimental and DFT study on a newly synthesized ethyl 2-cyano-3-[5-(phenyl-hydrazonomethyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-acrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Poonam; Singh, R. N.

    2015-02-01

    A newly synthesized ethyl 2-cyano-3-[5-(phenyl-hydrazonomethyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-acrylate (ECPHPA) has been characterized by experimental measurements. The theoretically calculated results are in accordance with the experimental studies. All calculations have been performed using B3LY/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The oscillatory strength (f) and wavelength of various electronic excitations show π → π∗ nature of transitions. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis shows intramolecular conjugative/hyperconjugative interactions within the studied molecule. The result of hydrogen bonding is obvious in 1H NMR, FT-IR and NBO analyses as down field chemical shift, vibrational red shift and π1(C8sbnd N9) → σ∗(N1sbnd H24) interaction, respectively. Global electrophilicity index (ω = 4.80 eV) shows that ECPHPA is a strong electrophile and local reactivity descriptors indicate have reactive sites within molecule and undergo for the formation of various heterocyclic compounds. The first hyperpolarizability (β0) computed found to be 35.76 × 10-30 esu, evaluate the suitability of compound for non-linear optical (NLO) response.

  13. Preliminary 1H NMR study on archaeological waterlogged wood.

    PubMed

    Maccotta, Antonella; Fantazzini, Paola; Garavaglia, Carla; Donato, Ines D; Perzia, Patrizia; Brai, Maria; Morreale, Filippa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Relaxation (MRR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are powerful tools to obtain detailed information on the pore space structure that one is unlikely to obtain in other ways. These techniques are particularly suitable for Cultural Heritage materials, because they use water 1H nuclei as a probe. Interaction with water is one of the main causes of deterioration of materials. Porous structure in wood, for example, favours the penetration of water, which can carry polluting substances and promote mould growth. A particular case is waterlogged wood from underwater discoveries and moist sites; in fact, these finds are very fragile because of chemical, physical and biological decay from the long contact with the water. When wood artefacts are brought to the surface and directly dried in air, there is the collapse of the cellular structures, and wood loses its original form and dimensions and cannot be used for study and museum exhibits. In this work we have undertaken the study of some wood finds coming from Ercolano's harbour by MRR and MRI under different conditions, and we have obtained a characterization of pore space in wood and images of the spatial distribution of the confined water in the wood. PMID:16485652

  14. The Conformations and Structures of 1H-NONAFLUOROBUTANE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Bohn, Robert K.; Montgomery, John A.; , Jr.

    2012-06-01

    The all trans conformers of perfluorocarbons, unlike hydrocarbons, are helical with C-C-C-C dihedral angles about 1640. Fluorocarbons with H substitution can replace chlorofluorocarbons as propellants and compressor fluids without the disadvantage of causing ozone depletion in the upper atmosphere. 1H-perfluorobutane, CHF_2CF_2CF_2CF_3, has been studied by pulsed-jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The spectrum is very rich. Quantum chemical calculations identify five stable conformers with relative energies up to 1.1 kcal/mol. Thus far three conformers have been characterized and many lines remain unassigned. The assigned species have CCCCanti/CCCH gauche as well as the anti/anti and gauche/anti forms. Rotational constant values are 1428.9501(2) MHz, 593.323877(6) MHz, and 546.43578(6) MHz for the anti/gauche species, 1323.664(3) MHz, 617.6051(5) MHz for the ant/anti species, and 1066.9384(4) MHz, 768.4736(4) MHz, and 671.3145(4) MHz for the gauche/anti form.

  15. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  16. Vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman), electronic (UV-Vis), NMR (1H and 13C) spectra and reactivity analyses of 4,5-dimethyl-o-phenylenediamine.

    PubMed

    Atac, Ahmet; Karaca, Caglar; Gunnaz, Salih; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2014-09-15

    The structure of 4,5-dimethyl-o-phenylenediamine (C8H12N2, DMPDA) was investigated on the basis of spectroscopic data and theoretical calculations. The sterochemical structure was determined by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR spectra. An experimental study and a theoretical analysis were associated by using the B3LYP method with Gaussian09 package program. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region of 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-10 cm(-1), respectively. The vibrational spectra were calculated by DFT method and the fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED), calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method with Parallel Quantum Solutions (PQS) program. The UV absorption spectrum of the compound that dissolved in ethanol solution were recorded in the range of 190-400 nm. Total density of state (TDOS) and partial density of state (PDOS) of the DMPDA in terms of HOMOs and LUMOs were calculated and analyzed. Chemical shifts were reported in ppm relative to tetramethylsilane (TMS) for 1H and 13C NMR spectra. The compound was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also, 1H and 13C chemical shifts calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Mullikan atomic charges and other thermo-dynamical parameters were investigated with the help of B3LYP (DFT) method using 6-311++G** basis set. On the basis of the thermodynamic properties of the title compound at different temperatures have been carried out, revealing the correlations between heat capacity (C), entropy (S), enthalpy changes (H) and temperatures. The optimized bond lengths, bond angles, chemical shifts and vibrational wavenumbers showed the best agreement with the experimental results. PMID:24813280

  17. Vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman), electronic (UV-Vis), NMR (1H and 13C) spectra and reactivity analyses of 4,5-dimethyl-o-phenylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atac, Ahmet; Karaca, Caglar; Gunnaz, Salih; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2014-09-01

    The structure of 4,5-dimethyl-o-phenylenediamine (C8H12N2, DMPDA) was investigated on the basis of spectroscopic data and theoretical calculations. The sterochemical structure was determined by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR spectra. An experimental study and a theoretical analysis were associated by using the B3LYP method with Gaussian09 package program. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region of 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-10 cm-1, respectively. The vibrational spectra were calculated by DFT method and the fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED), calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method with Parallel Quantum Solutions (PQS) program. The UV absorption spectrum of the compound that dissolved in ethanol solution were recorded in the range of 190-400 nm. Total density of state (TDOS) and partial density of state (PDOS) of the DMPDA in terms of HOMOs and LUMOs were calculated and analyzed. Chemical shifts were reported in ppm relative to tetramethylsilane (TMS) for 1H and 13C NMR spectra. The compound was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also, 1H and 13C chemical shifts calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Mullikan atomic charges and other thermo-dynamical parameters were investigated with the help of B3LYP (DFT) method using 6-311++G** basis set. On the basis of the thermodynamic properties of the title compound at different temperatures have been carried out, revealing the correlations between heat capacity (C), entropy (S), enthalpy changes (H) and temperatures. The optimized bond lengths, bond angles, chemical shifts and vibrational wavenumbers showed the best agreement with the experimental results.

  18. 1H NMR studies of maltose, maltoheptaose, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins, and complexes in aqueous solutions with hydroxy protons as structural probes.

    PubMed

    Bekiroglu, Somer; Kenne, Lennart; Sandström, Corine

    2003-03-01

    The (1)H NMR chemical shifts, coupling constants, temperature coefficients, and exchange rates have been measured for the hydroxy protons of aqueous solutions of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins, maltose, and maltoheptaose. In cyclodextrins (CDs), the high chemical shift of the O(3)H signal and its small (3)J(OH,CH) value suggest that O(3)H is involved in a hydrogen bond. The small temperature coefficients and rate of exchange values of O(2)H and O(3)H confirm the involvement of O(3)H in hydrogen bonding and indicate that O(2)H is the hydrogen bond partner. In maltose, two distinct NMR signals with two different vicinal coupling constants are found for O(2')H. A cross-peak in the ROESY spectrum indicates chemical exchange between the O(2')H and O(3)H protons. The existence of two distinct NMR signals with different J values for O(2')H shows the influence of anomeric configuration on the O(2')H-O(3)H interaction. The effect of complexation with methyl benzoate, adamantane-1-carboxylic acid, adamantane-1-ol, and l- and d-tryptophane on the NMR spectra of the hydroxy protons of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins and of maltose has been investigated. No significant spectral changes were observed upon addition of methyl benzoate and adamantane-1-carboxylic acid. The addition of adamantane-1-ol resulted in an upfield shift and a strong broadening of the O(2)H signal from alpha-CD, and a small temperature coefficient was measured upon complexation. The O(2)H and O(3)H signals in beta-CD were broadened and shifted downfield upon addition of l- and d-tryptophane. PMID:12608778

  19. Cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism alters with age as studied in 196 healthy males with the help of 31-phosphorus 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging.

    PubMed

    Esterhammer, Regina; Klug, Gert; Wolf, Christian; Mayr, Agnes; Reinstadler, Sebastian; Feistritzer, Hans-Josef; Metzler, Bernhard; Schocke, Michael F H

    2014-01-01

    Recently published studies have elucidated alterations of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism during ageing. The intention of the present study was to evaluate the impact of ageing on cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism and cardiac function in healthy humans. 31-phosphorus 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (31P 2D CSI) and echocardiography were performed in 196 healthy male volunteers divided into groups of 20 to 40 years (I, n = 43), 40 to 60 years (II, n = 123) and >60 years (III, n = 27) of age. Left ventricular PCr/β-ATP ratio, myocardial mass (MM), ejection fraction and E/A ratio were assessed. Mean PCr/β-ATP ratios were significantly different among the three groups of volunteers (I, 2.10 ± 0.37; II, 1.77 ± 0.37; III, 1.45 ± 0.28; all p<0.001). PCr/β-ATP ratios were inversely related to age (r(2)  =  -0.25; p<0.001) with a decrease from 2.65 by 0.02 per year of ageing. PCr/β-ATP ratios further correlated with MM (r =  -0.371; p<0.001) and E/A ratios (r = 0.213; p<0.02). Moreover, E/A ratios (r =  -0.502, p<0.001), MM (r = 0.304, p<0.001), glucose-levels (r = 0.157, p<0.05) and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.224, p<0.005) showed significant correlations with age. The ejection fraction did not significantly differ between the groups. This study shows that cardiac PCr/β-ATP ratios decrease moderately with age indicating an impairment of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism due to age. Furthermore, MM increases, and E/A ratio decreases with age. Both correlate with left-ventricular PCr/β-ATP ratios. The findings of the present study confirm numerous experimental studies showing an impairment of cardiac mitochondrial function with age. PMID:24940736

  20. Assessment of Lung Function in Asthma and COPD using Hyperpolarized 129Xe Chemical Shift Saturation Recovery Spectroscopy and Dissolved-Phase MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Kun; Mugler, John P.; Altes, Talissa A.; Jiang, Yun; Mata, Jaime F.; Miller, G. Wilson; Ruset, Iulian C.; Hersman, F. William; Ruppert, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic-resonance spectroscopy and imaging using hyperpolarized xenon-129 show great potential for evaluation of the most important function of the human lung -- gas exchange. In particular, Chemical Shift Saturation Recovery (CSSR) xenon-129 spectroscopy provides important physiological information for the lung as a whole by characterizing the dynamic process of gas exchange, while dissolved-phase xenon-129 imaging captures the time-averaged regional distribution of gas uptake by lung tissue and blood. Herein, we present recent advances in assessing lung function using CSSR spectroscopy and dissolved-phase imaging in a total of 45 subjects (23 healthy, 13 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and 9 asthma). From CSSR acquisitions, the COPD subjects showed red blood cell to tissue/plasma (RBC-to-TP) ratios below the average for the healthy subjects (p<0.001), but significantly higher septal wall thicknesses, as compared with the healthy subjects (p<0.005); the RBC-to-TP ratios for the asthmatics fell outside 2 standard deviations (either higher or lower) from the mean of the healthy subjects although there was no statistically significant difference for the average ratio of the study group as a whole. Similarly, from the 3D DP imaging acquisitions, we found all the ratios (TP-to-GP, RBC-to-GP, RBC-to-TP) measured in the COPD subjects were lower than those from the healthy subjects (p<0.05 for all ratios), while these ratios in the asthmatics differed considerably between subjects. Despite having been performed at different lung inflation levels, the RBC-to-TP ratios measured by CSSR and 3D DP imaging were fairly consistent with each other, with a mean difference of 0.037 (ratios from 3D DP imaging larger). In ten subjects the RBC-to-GP ratios obtained from the 3D DP imaging acquisitions were also highly correlated with their DLCO/Va ratios measured by pulmonary function testing (R=0.91). PMID:25146558