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Sample records for 1st surveillance test

  1. 1st HPV Test for Use with Preservative Fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159789.html 1st HPV Test for Use With Preservative Fluid Human papillomavirus ... Food and Drug Administration has approved Roche's cobas HPV Test -- the first diagnostic to be used with ...

  2. Operation WIGWAM, series volume, oceanic test. 1st edition

    SciTech Connect

    Weary, S.E.; Ozeroff, W.J.; Sperling, J.L.; Collins, B.

    1980-05-30

    This report describes the activities of DoD participants in the atmospheric nuclear test series, Operation WIGWAM, which involved only one deep underwater shot in the Pacific, approximately 500 miles southwest of San Diego, CA. WIGWAM was essentially a single service operation with minimal AEC and contractor participation. The various levels at which Dod personnel participated within the Joint Task Group 7 are identified.

  3. Monitoring North Korea Explosions: Status and Result of 1st and 2nd Tests (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, H.; Lee, H.; Shin, J.; Park, J.; Sheen, D.; Kim, G.; Che, I.; Lim, I.; Kim, T.

    2009-12-01

    Through data exchanging with China, Russia and Japan, KIGAM could monitor North Korea explosion tests in near real time with azimuthal full coverage from the test site. Except for the East Sea (Japan Sea) side, the seismic stations are distributed uniformly along the boundaries of North Korea and adjacent countries, and only stations with the distance of 200 to 550 Km from the test site were considered. Irrespective of azimuthal directions of stations from the test site, the conventional discrimination, Pn/Lg spectral ratio clearly showed that both tests were explosion. But mb-Ms discrimination did not show apparently the known pattern of explosion for both tests. Body wave magnitude, mb(Pn) of 2nd test, which was evaluated as 4.5 by KIGAM, varies with directional location of stations widely from 4.1 to 5.2. The magnitude obtained from Lg, mb(Lg), showed narrow variation between 4.3 to 4.7 with the average of 4.5. In the case of 1st test, both mb(Pn) and mb(Lg) showed equivalently large variation with directional station location. The error ellipses of epicentral determination of test site for 1st and 2nd tests showed almost identical pattern if they were separately calculated with the same configuration of stations. But the combined use of 1st and 2nd test data showed that 2nd test site was moved approximately 2 Km westward from 1st site. The cut-off frequencies of P wave of 1st and 2nd tests showed no or negligible difference even though the estimated yield of 2nd test were much larger than that of 1st one. The ratio of 1st and 2nd P-wave amplitudes showed from 2 to 3.1 times. Correspondingly the estimated energy or yield were ranged from 4 to roughly 10 times. KIGAM evaluated the yield of 2nd test were 8 times in the average larger than that of 1st one.

  4. Regional Observations of North Korea Explosions: 1st and 2nd Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Heon Cheol; Shin, Jin Soo; Lee, Hee-Il; Park, Jung Ho; Sheen, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Geunyoung; Kim, Tea Sung; Che, Il-Young; Lim, In-Seub

    2010-05-01

    Through data exchanging with China, Russia and Japan, KIGAM could monitor North Korea explosion tests in near real time with azimuthally full coverage from the test site. Except for the East Sea (Japan Sea) side, the seismic stations are distributed uniformly along the boundaries of North Korea and adjacent countries. The error ellipses of epicentral determination of test site for 1st and 2nd tests showed almost identical pattern if they were separately calculated with the same configuration of stations. But the combined use of the 1st and the 2nd test data showed that the 2nd test site was moved approximately 2 Km westward from 1st site. The Pn/Lg spectral ratio clearly discriminate these events from two nearby natural earthquakes above 4 Hz. Full moment tensor inversion also indicate the 2nd test had a very large isotropic component. But mb-Ms discrimination, which has been considered one of the most reliable discriminants for separating explosions and earthquakes, did not show apparently the known pattern of explosion for both tests. Body wave magnitude, mb(Pn) of the 2nd test, which was evaluated as 4.5 by KIGAM, varies with directional location of stations widely from 4.1 to 5.2. The magnitude obtained from Lg, mb(Lg), showed narrow variation between 4.3 to 4.7 with the average of 4.5. In the case of both 1st and 2nd tests, both mb(Pn) and mb(Lg) showed equivalently large variation with directional station location. These variations are mainly due to lateral variation of crustal structures surrounding the test site. Remarkably mb(Lg) showed very linear relationship with mb(Pn). By considering attenuation characteristics according to the propagation path, the variations could be effectively reduced. The cut-off frequencies of P wave of both tests showed no or negligible difference even though the estimated yield of the 2nd test were much larger than that of the 1st one. The ratio of P-wave amplitudes of two tests showed from 2 to 3.1 times. Correspondingly the

  5. Surveillance test bed for SDIO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, Michael; Osterheld, Robert; Kyser, Jeff; Farr, Michele; Vandergriff, Linda J.

    1991-08-01

    The Surveillance Test Bed (STB) is a program under development for the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO). Its most salient features are (1) the integration of high fidelity backgrounds and optical signal processing models with algorithms for sensor tasking, bulk filtering, track/correlation and discrimination and (2) the integration of radar and optical estimates for track and discrimination. Backgrounds include induced environments such as nuclear events, fragments and debris, and natural environments, such as earth limb, zodiacal light, stars, sun and moon. At the highest level of fidelity, optical emulation hardware combines environmental information with threat information to produce detector samples for signal processing algorithms/hardware under test. Simulation of visible sensors and radars model measurement degradation due to the various environmental effects. The modeled threat is composed of multiple object classes. The number of discrimination classes are further increased by inclusion of fragments, debris and stars. High fidelity measurements will be used to drive bulk filtering algorithms that seek to reject fragments and debris and, in the case of optical sensors, stars. The output of the bulk filters will be used to drive track/correlation algorithms. Track algorithm output will include sequences of measurements that have been degraded by backgrounds, closely spaced objects (CSOs), signal processing errors, bulk filtering errors and miscorrelations; these measurements will be presented as input to the discrimination algorithms. The STB will implement baseline IR track file editing and IR and radar feature extraction and classification algorithms. The baseline will also include data fusion algorithms which will allow the combination of discrimination estimates from multiple sensors, including IR and radar; alternative discrimination algorithms may be substituted for the baseline after STB completion.

  6. Surveillance systems test and evaluation facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jere J.; Dawbarn, Ronald

    1986-01-01

    In January of 1983, a team was formed to explore test methodologies and test facility concepts required to meet the needs of space-based surveillance systems. The output of this study was a road map of test methodologies and test facilities that will aid the development of this country's critical space-based sensor assets. A condensation of those results is given.

  7. Risk effectiveness evaluation of surveillance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Martorell, S.; Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.; Vesely, W.E.

    1992-07-20

    In nuclear power plants surveillance tests are required to detect failures in standby safety system components as a means of assuring their availability in case of an accident. However, the performance of surveillance tests at power may have adverse impact on safety as evidenced by the operating experience of the plants. The risk associated with a test includes two different aspects: (1) a positive aspect, i.e., risk contribution detected by the test, that results from the detection of failures which occur between tests and are detected by the test, and (2) a negative aspect, i.e., risk contribution caused by the test, that includes failures and degradations which are caused by the test or are related to the performance of the test. In terms of the two different risk contributions, the risk effectiveness of a test can be simply defined as follows: a test is risk effective if the risk contribution detected by the test is greater than the risk contribution caused by the test; otherwise it is risk ineffective. The methodology presentation will focus on two important kinds of negative test risk impacts, that is, the risk impacts of test-caused transients and equipment wear-out. The evaluation results of the risk effectiveness of the test will be presented in the full paper along with the risk assessment methodology and the insights from the sensitivity analysis. These constitute the core of the NUREG/CR-5775.

  8. A composite CBRN surveillance and testing service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Debra M.

    2004-08-01

    The terrorist threat coupled with a global military mission necessitates quick and accurate identification of environmental hazards, and CBRN early warning. The Air Force Institute for Operational Health (AFIOH) provides fundamental support to protect personnel from and mitigate the effects of untoward hazards exposures. Sustaining healthy communities since 1955, the organizational charter is to enhance warfighter mission effectiveness, protect health, improve readiness and reduce costs, assess and manage risks to human heath and safety, operational performance and the environment. The AFIOH Surveillance Directorate provides forward deployed and reach-back surveillance, agent identification, and environ-mental regulatory compliance testing. Three unique laboratories process and analyze over two million environmental samples and clinical specimens per year, providing analytical chemistry, radiological assessment, and infectious disease testing, in addition to supporting Air Force and Department of Defense (DoD) clinical reference laboratory and force health protection testing. Each laboratory has an applied or investigational testing section where new technologies and techniques are evaluated, and expert consultative support to assist in technology assessments and test analyses. The Epidemiology Surveillance Laboratory and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory are critical assets of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Laboratory Response Network. Deployable assets provide direct support to the Combatant Commander and include the Air Force Radiological Assessment Team, and the Biological Augmentation Team. A diverse directorate, the synergistic CBRN response capabilities are a commander"s force protection tool, critical to maintaining combat power.

  9. 2003 Nevada Test Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Nevada Test Site. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  10. Preliminary Entry Trajectory for 1st Orbital Flight Test (OFT). Space Shuttle Engineering and Operations Support, Engineering Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frohme, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary trajectory from entry interface to terminal area energy management interface for the first orbital flight test is presented based on information in the Strawman master flight test assignments document Reference A. The enclosed point-mass trajectory may be utilized for preliminary purposes, meeting the requirements of this document. The trajectory was derived utilizing the January 1975 analytic drag control guidance, the latest thermal protection subsystem model information from NASA ES and December 1974 Aerodynamics for a mid center-of-gravity location.

  11. An unavailability model for errors made during surveillance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, Terry F.

    Periodic testing or examination is conducted routinely for some critical standby equipment or instrumentation, in an attempt to increase its availability. This is often called 'surveillance testing.' There is a finite probability that tested equipment will be left in a degraded or nonfunctioning state because of an error, and this important type of human error is often called a 'restoration error' in probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) parlance. One would expect a trade-off between the reduction in unavailability gained by a surveillance testing and the increase in unavailability incurred by surveillance testing errors. In this paper, a mathematical model of the effect of errors made during surveillance testing on equipment unavailability is described.

  12. Social and Technical Issues in Testing: Implications for Test Construction and Usage. Buros-Nebraska Symposium on Measurement and Testing (1st, Lincoln, Nebraska, 1983). Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plake, Barbara S., Ed.

    An introduction by Barbara S. Plake emphasizes that this volume investigates social and technical influences on test development and usage. Essential preliminary information on how tests can be used and may be interpreted is presented. Under the heading "Social and Technical Influences" are: (1) "Struggles and Possibilities: The Use of Tests in…

  13. Laboratory for testing electro-optical surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, K.

    2011-05-01

    A modern laboratory capable to carry out expanded tests of all types of electro-optical surveillance systems (thermal imagers, TV/LLLTV cameras, night vision devices, laser range finders/designators/illuminators, multi-sensor surveillance systems) and basic modules of such surveillance systems (IR FPA/CCD/CMOS/EBAPS sensors, image intensifier tubes, optical objectives) was developed and is presented in this paper. The laboratory can be treated as a both scientific and technical achievement due to its several features. First, all important parameters of modern electro-optical surveillance systems or parameters of basic modules of such systems can be measured. Second, the laboratory is built using a set of semi-independent modular test stations. This modular concept enables easy creations of many versions optimized for different applications. Third, interpretation of the measurement data is supported by a set of specialized computer simulation programs. Fourth, all tests stations in the laboratory were developed by the same design team and are based on similar test concepts.. Because of these features the laboratory of electro-optical surveillance technology presented in this paper can be an optimal solutions for scientific centers or industrial companies who plan to enter and make quick progress in all main areas of surveillance technology.

  14. Respect versus Surveillance: Drug Testing Our Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Martin, Gordon A., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This launches a new periodic feature in Reclaiming Children and Youth. "Justice Alerts" examines current laws and policies against the twofold standards of solid science and moral values. This inaugural article explores the legal issues and political rhetoric surrounding random drug testing in schools and describes how science is being skewed to…

  15. Surveillance System and Method having an Adaptive Sequential Probability Fault Detection Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickford, Randall L. (Inventor); Herzog, James P. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    System and method providing surveillance of an asset such as a process and/or apparatus by providing training and surveillance procedures that numerically fit a probability density function to an observed residual error signal distribution that is correlative to normal asset operation and then utilizes the fitted probability density function in a dynamic statistical hypothesis test for providing improved asset surveillance.

  16. Surveillance system and method having an adaptive sequential probability fault detection test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickford, Randall L. (Inventor); Herzog, James P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    System and method providing surveillance of an asset such as a process and/or apparatus by providing training and surveillance procedures that numerically fit a probability density function to an observed residual error signal distribution that is correlative to normal asset operation and then utilizes the fitted probability density function in a dynamic statistical hypothesis test for providing improved asset surveillance.

  17. Surveillance system and method having an adaptive sequential probability fault detection test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, James P. (Inventor); Bickford, Randall L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    System and method providing surveillance of an asset such as a process and/or apparatus by providing training and surveillance procedures that numerically fit a probability density function to an observed residual error signal distribution that is correlative to normal asset operation and then utilizes the fitted probability density function in a dynamic statistical hypothesis test for providing improved asset surveillance.

  18. LWR surveillance dosimetry improvement program: PSF metallurgical blind test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, F.B.K.; Maerker, R.E.; Stallmann, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The metallurgical irradiation experiment at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor Poolside Facility (ORR-PSF) was designed as a benchmark to test the accuracy of radiation embrittlement predictions in the pressure vessel wall of light water reactors on the basis of results from surveillance capsules. The PSF metallurgical Blind Test is concerned with the simulated surveillance capsule (SSC) and the simulated pressure vessel capsule (SPVC). The data from the ORR-PSF benchmark experiment are the basis for comparison with the predictions made by participants of the metallurgical ''Blind Test''. The Blind Test required the participants to predict the embrittlement of the irradiated specimen based only on dosimetry and metallurgical data from the SSC1 capsule. This exercise included both the prediction of damage fluence and the prediction of embrittlement based on the predicted fluence. A variety of prediction methodologies was used by the participants. No glaring biases or other deficiencies were found, but neither were any of the methods clearly superior to the others. Closer analysis shows a rather complex and poorly understood relation between fluence and material damage. Many prediction formulas can give an adequate approximation, but further improvement of the prediction methodology is unlikely at this time given the many unknown factors. Instead, attention should be focused on determining realistic uncertainties for the predicted material changes. The Blind Test comparisons provide some clues for the size of these uncertainties. In particular, higher uncertainties must be assigned to materials whose chemical composition lies outside the data set for which the prediction formula was obtained. 16 references, 14 figures, 5 tables.

  19. Physicians’ beliefs about breast cancer surveillance testing are consistent with test overuse

    PubMed Central

    Han, Paul K.J.; Klabunde, Carrie N.; Noone, Anne-Michelle; Earle, Craig C.; Ayanian, John Z.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Virgo, Katherine S.; Potosky, Arnold L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Overuse of surveillance testing for breast cancer survivors is an important problem but its extent and determinants are incompletely understood. The objectives of this study were to determine the extent to which physicians’ breast cancer surveillance testing beliefs are consistent with test overuse, and to identify factors associated with these beliefs. Methods 2009–2010 cross-sectional survey of US medical oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). Physicians responded to a clinical vignette ascertaining beliefs about appropriate breast cancer surveillance testing. Multivariable analyses examined the extent to which test beliefs were consistent with overuse and associated with physician and practice characteristics and physician perceptions, attitudes, and practices. Results 1098 medical oncologists and 980 PCPs completed the survey (response rate 57.5%). Eighty-four percent of PCPs (95% CI: 81.4%–86.5%) and 72% of oncologists (95% CI: 69.8%– 74.7%) reported beliefs consistent with blood test overuse, while 50% of PCPs (95% CI: 47.3%– 53.8%) and 27% of oncologists (95% CI: 23.9%–29.3%) reported beliefs consistent with imaging test overuse. Among PCPs, factors associated with these beliefs included smaller practice size, lower patient volume, and practice ownership. Among oncologists, factors included older age, international medical graduate status, lower self-efficacy (confidence in knowledge), and greater perceptions of ambiguity (conflicting expert recommendations) regarding survivorship care. Conclusions Beliefs consistent with breast cancer surveillance test overuse are common, greater for PCPs and blood tests than for oncologists and imaging tests, and associated with practice characteristics and perceived self-efficacy and ambiguity about testing. These results suggest modifiable targets for efforts to reduce surveillance test overuse. PMID:23269111

  20. Establishment, test and evaluation of a prototype volcano surveillance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, P. L.; Eaton, J. P.; Endo, E.; Harlow, D.; Marquez, D.; Allen, R.

    1973-01-01

    A volcano-surveillance system utilizing 23 multilevel earthquake counters and 6 biaxial borehole tiltmeters is being installed and tested on 15 volcanoes in 4 States and 4 foreign countries. The purpose of this system is to give early warning when apparently dormant volcanoes are becoming active. The data are relayed through the ERTS-Data Collection System to Menlo Park for analysis. Installation was completed in 1972 on the volcanoes St. Augustine and Iliamna in Alaska, Kilauea in Hawaii, Baker, Rainier and St. Helens in Washington, Lassen in California, and at a site near Reykjavik, Iceland. Installation continues and should be completed in April 1973 on the volcanoes Santiaguito, Fuego, Agua and Pacaya in Guatemala, Izalco in El Salvador and San Cristobal, Telica and Cerro Negro in Nicaragua.

  1. 2007 Nevada Test Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  2. 2006 Nevada Test Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-04-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  3. 2008 Nevada Test Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-10-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  4. 28. ENGINE CLUSTER OF 1ST STAGE OF A SATURN I ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. ENGINE CLUSTER OF 1ST STAGE OF A SATURN I ROCKET ENGINE LOCATED ON NORTH SIDE OF STATIC TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. "Hard Science" for Gifted 1st Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGennaro, April

    2006-01-01

    "Hard Science" is designed to teach 1st grade gifted students accurate and high level science concepts. It is based upon their experience of the world and attempts to build a foundation for continued love and enjoyment of science. "Hard Science" provides field experiences and opportunities for hands-on discovery working beside experts in the field…

  6. Analgesic Effects of 1st Generation Anti-histamines in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mebae; Shima, Kazuhiro; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sugawara, Shunji; Fujita, Takuo; Tadano, Takeshi; Watanabe, Makoto; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Endo, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Pain is sensed, transmitted, and modified by a variety of mediators and receptors. Histamine is a well-known mediator of pain. In addition to their anti-histaminic effects, the classical, or 1st generation, anti-histamines (1st AHs) possess, to various degrees, anti-muscarinic, anti-serotonergic, anti-adrenergic, and other pharmacologic effects. Although there have been attempts to use 1st AHs as analgesics and/or analgesic adjuvants, the advent of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) discouraged such trials. We previously reported that in patients with temporomandibular disorders, osteoporosis, and/or osteoarthritis, the analgesic effects of certain 1st AHs (chlorpheniramine and diphenhydramine) are superior to those of the NSAIDs flurbiprofen and indomethacin. Here, we compared analgesic effects among 1st AHs and NSAIDs against responses shown by mice to intraperitoneally injected 0.7% acetic acid. Since 1st AHs are water soluble, we selected water-soluble NSAIDs. For direct comparison, drugs were intravenously injected 30 min before the above tests. Histamine-H1-receptor-deficient (H1R-KO) mice were used for evaluating H1-receptor-independent effects. The tested 1st AHs (especially cyproheptadine) displayed or tended to display analgesic effects comparable to those of NSAIDs in normal and H1R-KO mice. Our data suggest that the anti-serotonergic and/or anti-adrenergic effects of 1st AHs make important contributions to their analgesic effects. Moreover, combination of a 1st AH with an NSAID (cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor) produced remarkably potent analgesic effects. We propose that a 1st AH, by itself or in combination with a cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor, should undergo testing to evaluate its usefulness in analgesia. PMID:27040636

  7. Failures related to surveillance testing of standby equipment. Volume 1. Emergency pumps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mollerus, F.J.; Allen, R.D.; Gilcrest, J.D.

    1985-10-01

    Analysis of recorded failures of standby emergency pumps at nuclear power plants revealed no problems that had been caused by the periodic surveillance testing. Among the failures uncovered during the course of such testing, those occurring in the turbine drives of PWR auxiliary feedwater pumps were most frequent and most significant.

  8. Comparative value of noninvasive testing for diagnosis and surveillance of deep vein thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Comerota, A.J.; Katz, M.L.; Grossi, R.J.; White, J.V.; Czeredarczuk, M.; Bowman, G.; DeSai, S.; Vujic, I.

    1988-01-01

    This is a prospective analysis of 351 patients in two distinct groups undergoing ascending phlebography, impedance plethysmography (IPG), and/or phleborheography (PRG) within the same 24-hour period. One hundred twenty patients also had a /sup 125/I-fibrinogen uptake test (RFUT). The two patient groups consisted of the following: those patients evaluated because of suspicion of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) (diagnostic) and those patients at high risk for postoperative DVT (total joint replacement) who had routine noninvasive testing and ascending phlebography (surveillance). The overall sensitivities for IPG and PRG were significantly better in the diagnosis group (71% (69 of 97 patients) and 78% (82 of 105), respectively) compared with the surveillance group (20% (14 of 71) and 27% (17 of 63), respectively) (p less than 0.0001). The sensitivities for IPG and PRG detecting proximal (A/K) thrombi was 83% (68 of 82 patients) and 92% (79 of 86) in the diagnosis group compared with 32% (11 of 34) and 33% (9 of 27) in the surveillance group (p less than 0.0001). Although there was no difference in overall incidence of DVT between the diagnosis group (56%, 118 of 212 patients) and the surveillance group (55%, 76 of 139), the results can be explained by the difference in A/K thrombi (84% (99 of 118) and 47% (36 of 76)) (p less than 0.001) and occlusive A/K thrombi (84% (58 of 69) and 23% (7 of 31)) (p less than 0.0001), respectively. Of the patients with A/K thrombi, 97% (67 of 69) in the diagnosis group had hemodynamically detectable thrombi compared with only 48% (12 of 25) in the surveillance group (p less than 0.001). Combining the RFUT with the noninvasive studies for surveillance significantly improved the sensitivity for both A/K and distal thrombi.

  9. Point-of-Care Testing as an Influenza Surveillance Tool: Methodology and Lessons Learned from Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Gren, Lisa H.; Porucznik, Christina A.; Joy, Elizabeth A.; Lyon, Joseph L.; Staes, Catherine J.; Alder, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Disease surveillance combines data collection and analysis with dissemination of findings to decision makers. The timeliness of these activities affects the ability to implement preventive measures. Influenza surveillance has traditionally been hampered by delays in both data collection and dissemination. Methods. We used statistical process control (SPC) to evaluate the daily percentage of outpatient visits with a positive point-of-care (POC) influenza test in the University of Utah Primary Care Research Network. Results. Retrospectively, POC testing generated an alert in each of 4 seasons (2004–2008, median 16 days before epidemic onset), suggesting that email notification of clinicians would be 9 days earlier than surveillance alerts posted to the Utah Department of Health website. In the 2008-09 season, the algorithm generated a real-time alert 19 days before epidemic onset. Clinicians in 4 intervention clinics received email notification of the alert within 4 days. Compared with clinicians in 6 control clinics, intervention clinicians were 40% more likely to perform rapid testing (P = 0.105) and twice as likely to vaccinate for seasonal influenza (P = 0.104) after notification. Conclusions. Email notification of SPC-generated alerts provided significantly earlier notification of the epidemic onset than traditional surveillance. Clinician preventive behavior was not significantly different in intervention clinics. PMID:23691297

  10. Point-of-Care Testing as an Influenza Surveillance Tool: Methodology and Lessons Learned from Implementation.

    PubMed

    Gren, Lisa H; Porucznik, Christina A; Joy, Elizabeth A; Lyon, Joseph L; Staes, Catherine J; Alder, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Disease surveillance combines data collection and analysis with dissemination of findings to decision makers. The timeliness of these activities affects the ability to implement preventive measures. Influenza surveillance has traditionally been hampered by delays in both data collection and dissemination. Methods. We used statistical process control (SPC) to evaluate the daily percentage of outpatient visits with a positive point-of-care (POC) influenza test in the University of Utah Primary Care Research Network. Results. Retrospectively, POC testing generated an alert in each of 4 seasons (2004-2008, median 16 days before epidemic onset), suggesting that email notification of clinicians would be 9 days earlier than surveillance alerts posted to the Utah Department of Health website. In the 2008-09 season, the algorithm generated a real-time alert 19 days before epidemic onset. Clinicians in 4 intervention clinics received email notification of the alert within 4 days. Compared with clinicians in 6 control clinics, intervention clinicians were 40% more likely to perform rapid testing (P = 0.105) and twice as likely to vaccinate for seasonal influenza (P = 0.104) after notification. Conclusions. Email notification of SPC-generated alerts provided significantly earlier notification of the epidemic onset than traditional surveillance. Clinician preventive behavior was not significantly different in intervention clinics. PMID:23691297

  11. Lock No. 1 St. Lucie Canal. Sector gates, internal struts ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock No. 1- St. Lucie Canal. Sector gates, internal struts- nose beams. - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  12. Is it time for NESST (National Egg Salmonella Surveillance Testing)?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The logistics required for a National Egg Salmonella sampling Testing (NESST) project are described. Market egg sampling data has never been collected in the United States on a national basis and no regional sampling data has been collected in 10 years. Salmonella outbreaks continue to be attribute...

  13. A system for testing distributed information fusion applications for maritime surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehn, Hans; Happe, Jens; Guitouni, Adel; Valin, Pierre; Bossé, Éloi

    2008-03-01

    A PRECARN partnership project, called CanCoastWatch (CCW), is bringing together a team of researchers from industry, government, and academia for creating an advanced simulation test bed for the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of Network Enabled Operations in a Coastal Wide Area Surveillance situation. The test bed allows experimenting with higher-level distributed information fusion, dynamic resource management and configuration management given multiple constraints on the resources and their communications networks. The test bed provides general services that are useful for testing many fusion applications. This includes a multi-layer plug-and-play architecture, and a general multi-agent framework based on John Boyd's OODA loop.

  14. Initial test and evaluation of the millimeter-wave holographic surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Schur, Anne; Harris, Wyllona M.; Piepel, Gregory F.

    1997-01-01

    A test and evaluation pilot study was conducted in January 1996 at Sea-Tac International Airport in Seattle, Washington to determine the initial effectiveness of the Millimeter- wave Holographic Weapons Surveillance System. This is a new personnel surveillance systems for the detection of concealed metal, plastic, and ceramic weapons and other threatening materials. Two different frequency bands were used in the study: Ku band and Ka band. Over 7000 Millimeter-wave (MM-wave) holographic images were obtained on 21 different models. The 7000 images were used to produce simulated real-time surveillance system videos. The videos were constructed by obtaining 36 images of the models at 10 degree increments for 360 degree coverage. A library of two hundred videos were produced for this pilot study: 100 at Ku band and 100 at Ka band. The videos contained either a threat or no threat. The threats were concealed at different locations on the models. Various innocuous items and different clothing combinations were also used n the construction of these videos. Twenty-nine certified Sea-Tac screeners were used in the initial test and evaluation of this new surveillance technology. Each screener viewed 160 MM-wave videos: 80 Ku band and 80 Ka band. The ratio of non- threat to threat videos per band was three to one. Test and evaluation software was developed to collect data from the screeners on-line for the type and location of threat detected. The primary measures of screener performance used to evaluate this new technology included, the probability of detection, the probability of a false alarm, measures of screener sensitivity and bias, and threat detection time.

  15. Improving national surveillance of Lyme neuroborreliosis in Denmark through electronic reporting of specific antibody index testing from 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Dessau, R B; Espenhain, L; Mølbak, K; Krause, T G; Voldstedlund, M

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the results of automated surveillance of Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) in Denmark using the national microbiology database (MiBa), and to describe the epidemiology of laboratory-confirmed LNB at a national level. MiBa-based surveillance includes electronic transfer of laboratory results, in contrast to the statutory surveillance based on manually processed notifications. Antibody index (AI) testing is the recommend laboratory test to support the diagnosis of LNB in Denmark. In the period from 2010 to 2012, 217 clinical cases of LNB were notified to the statutory surveillance system, while 533 cases were reported AI positive by the MiBa system. Thirty-five unconfirmed cases (29 AI-negative and 6 not tested) were notified, but not captured by MiBa. Using MiBa, the number of reported cases was increased almost 2.5 times. Furthermore, the reporting was timelier (median lag time: 6 vs 58 days). Average annual incidence of AI-confirmed LNB in Denmark was 3.2/100,000 population and incidences stratified by municipality ranged from none to above 10/100,000. This is the first study reporting nationwide incidence of LNB using objective laboratory criteria. Laboratory-based surveillance with electronic data-transfer was more accurate, complete and timely compared to the surveillance based on manually processed notifications. We propose using AI test results for LNB surveillance instead of clinical reporting. PMID:26212143

  16. Failures related to surveillance testing of standby equipment. Volume 2. Diesel generators. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mollerus, F.J.; Allen, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    A study is made of failures of emergency diesel generators at nuclear power plants. The objective is to identify failures in which surveillance testing (in particular, fast starts, fast loading and the large number of starts) has been a contributing factor. The failures are described, corrective actions identified, and information is presented on diesel vendors' recommendations for testing and maintenance. An example of a successful effort to improve diesel generator reliability is detailed. A description of reference documents on nuclear plant stand-by diesel generators is also included. 8 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Composite sequential Monte Carlo test for post-market vaccine safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ivair R

    2016-04-30

    Group sequential hypothesis testing is now widely used to analyze prospective data. If Monte Carlo simulation is used to construct the signaling threshold, the challenge is how to manage the type I error probability for each one of the multiple tests without losing control on the overall significance level. This paper introduces a valid method for a true management of the alpha spending at each one of a sequence of Monte Carlo tests. The method also enables the use of a sequential simulation strategy for each Monte Carlo test, which is useful for saving computational execution time. Thus, the proposed procedure allows for sequential Monte Carlo test in sequential analysis, and this is the reason that it is called 'composite sequential' test. An upper bound for the potential power losses from the proposed method is deduced. The composite sequential design is illustrated through an application for post-market vaccine safety surveillance data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26561330

  18. Interlaboratory trial on TSE rapid tests for the control of the Italian scrapie surveillance network.

    PubMed

    Nappi, R; Ingravalle, F; Di Vietro, D; Ru, G; Bozzetta, E

    2009-10-20

    Scrapie, a neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats and one of several transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) has been subject to mandatory active surveillance in EU through rapid testing since 2002. Regulation EC/999/2001 on TSE surveillance requires that each Member State's National Reference Laboratory for TSE periodically verifies diagnostic standards and methods by comparative testing. In 2007 the Italian Reference Centre carried out the first ring trial for classical scrapie on a set of 21 negative and 9 positive homogenated brainstems, the latter consisting of three replicates of an ARQ/ARQ scrapie positive sample diluted 1:10, 1:20 and 1:50. The purpose of the study was to verify the interlaboratory agreement in term of Cohen's kappa (k) of the rapid systems currently used by the 25 national rapid test laboratories (RTLs) [laboratories: Biorad TeSeE (17 laboratories), Enfer TSE version 2.0 (4 laboratories), Idexx Herd chek BSE-scrapie antigen kit (3 laboratories) and Prionics check LIA SR (1 laboratory)]. Our results show that the agreement among the laboratories using the same rapid test varied between 0.84 and 1, while the estimated overall agreement among the 25 laboratories was very good (k-combined=0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.85-0.89). Nevertheless, as regards differences in analytical sensitivity among the rapid tests in use, under-recognition of pre-clinical scrapie cases by lower performing systems must be expected. PMID:19457624

  19. What we learn from surveillance testing of standby turbine driven and motor driven pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes a comparison of the performance information collected by the author and the respective system engineers from five standby turbine driven pumps at four commercial nuclear electric generating units in the United States and from two standby motor driven pumps at two of these generating units. Information was collected from surveillance testing and from Non-Test actuations. Most of the performance information (97%) came from surveillance testing. {open_quotes}Conditional Probabilities{close_quotes} of the pumps ability to respond to a random demand were calculated for each of the seven standby pumps and compared to the historical record of the Non-Test actuations. It appears that the Conditional Probabilities are comparable to the rate of success for Non-Test actuations. The Conditional Probabilities of the standby motor driven pumps (approximately 99%) are better than the Conditional Probabilities of the standby turbine driven pumps (82%-96% range). Recommendations were made to improve the Conditional Probabilities of the standby turbine driven pumps.

  20. In-orbit test, verification and surveillance of the laser communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianfeng; Wang, Biao; Fei, Ligang; Zhang, Changquan; Liu, Liren

    2015-10-01

    To perform the in-orbit test, verification and surveillance task, the laser simulation and test station must be constructed. Cooperated with the fixed laser communication ground station, we can not only test the main specifications of the laser communication terminals, but also test the performances of the laser backbone link. In this paper, we first give the basic theory of the in-orbit test. Then designed the laser simulation and test station, which consists of laser transmitter module, laser receiver module, and general test module. In the GEO-to-LEO laser communication terminal test progress, the laser simulation and test station responsible for the simulation of the LEO laser communication terminal. In the LEO-GEO-Ground laser link performance test progress, the laser simulation and test station simulate the LEO satellite, which transfer high date rate data flow to GEO satellite, then the GEO satellite route the data flow to the GEO-to-Ground laser communication terminal through optical router, finally GEO satellite transfer the LEO data down to fixed laser receiver on ground.

  1. The AEDC aerospace chamber 7V: An advanced test capability for infrared surveillance and seeker sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced sensor test capability is now operational at the Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for calibration and performance characterization of infrared sensors. This facility, known as the 7V, is part of a broad range of test capabilities under development at AEDC to provide complete ground test support to the sensor community for large-aperture surveillance sensors and kinetic kill interceptors. The 7V is a state-of-the-art cryo/vacuum facility providing calibration and mission simulation against space backgrounds. Key features of the facility include high-fidelity scene simulation with precision track accuracy and in-situ target monitoring, diffraction limited optical system, NIST traceable broadband and spectral radiometric calibration, outstanding jitter control, environmental systems for 20 K, high-vacuum, low-background simulation, and an advanced data acquisition system.

  2. Unequal a priori probability multiple hypothesis testing in space domain awareness with the space surveillance telescope.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Tyler; Cain, Stephen; Blake, Travis

    2016-05-20

    This paper investigates the ability to improve Space Domain Awareness (SDA) by increasing the number of detectable Resident Space Objects (RSOs) from space surveillance sensors. With matched filter based techniques, the expected impulse response, or Point Spread Function (PSF), is compared against the received data. In the situation where the images are spatially undersampled, the modeled PSF may not match the received data if the RSO does not fall in the center of the pixel. This aliasing can be accounted for with a Multiple Hypothesis Test (MHT). Previously, proposed MHTs have implemented a test with an equal a priori prior probability assumption. This paper investigates using an unequal a priori probability MHT. To determine accurate a priori probabilities, three metrics are computed; they are correlation, physical distance, and empirical. Using the calculated a priori probabilities, a new algorithm is developed, and images from the Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) are analyzed. The number of detected objects by both an equal and unequal prior probabilities are compared while keeping the false alarm rate constant. Any additional number of detected objects will help improve SDA capabilities. PMID:27411129

  3. Perceptual Narrowing of Linguistic Sign Occurs in the 1st Year of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephanie Baker; Fais, Laurel; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Werker, Janet F.

    2012-01-01

    Over their 1st year of life, infants' "universal" perception of the sounds of language narrows to encompass only those contrasts made in their native language (J. F. Werker & R. C. Tees, 1984). This research tested 40 infants in an eyetracking paradigm and showed that this pattern also holds for infants exposed to seen language--American Sign…

  4. RELATIVE HUMIDITY TESTS IN SUPPORT OF THE 3013 STORAGE AND SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2011-08-01

    Techniques to control the initial relative humidity over oxide/salt mixtures have been developed using cerium oxide as a surrogate for plutonium oxide. Such control is required to validate certain assumptions in the Department of Energy Standard DOE-STD-3013, and to provide essential information to support field surveillance at the storage sites for excess plutonium oxides. Concern over the validity of the assumption that corrosion induced degradation in 3013 containers could be controlled by assuring that the moisture content of any stored oxide/salt mixture was below 0.5 w t% arose when stress corrosion cracks were found in test samples exposed at room temperature to plutonium oxide/salt mixtures having a moisture content only marginally above 0.5 wt %. Additionally, analysis of the stress corrosion cracking observations suggests that the initial relative humidity over the oxide/salt mixture may play a major role in the cracking process. The investigations summarized in this report provide the procedures necessary to control the initial relative humidity to selected values within the range of 16 to 50% by controlling the loading relative humidity (18 to 60%) and the oxide/salt mixture water content (0.05 to 0.45 wt %). The studies also demonstrated that the initial relative humidity may be estimated by calculations using software EQ3/6. Cerium oxide/salt mixtures were used in this study because qualification tests with non-radioactive materials will reduce costs while increasing the breadth of the test programs required to support field surveillances of stored 3013 containers.

  5. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2009-02-02

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2008 - December 2008) of Fiscal Year 2009.

  6. Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500 Past ... last May's Indy 500 had thousands of personal Electronic Health Records on hand for those attending—and ...

  7. ISS Update: 1st Annual ISS R&D Conference

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries talks by phone on Wednesday with Julie Robinson, ISS Program Scientist, about the 1st Annual International Space Station Research and Development Confere...

  8. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, FY08

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-01-28

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  9. Plans for Testing the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment 10m Diameter HAWT in the NASA Ames Wind Tunnel: Minutes, Conclusions, and Revised Text Matrix from the 1st Science Panel Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, D.; Schreck, S.; Hand, M.; Fingersh, L.; Cotrell, J.; Pierce, K.; Robinson, M.

    2000-08-28

    Currently, the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) research turbine is scheduled to enter the NASA Ames 80-ft x 120-ft wind tunnel in early 2000. To prepare for this 3-week test, a Science Panel meeting was convened at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in October 1998. During this meeting, the Science Panel and representatives from the wind energy community provided numerous detailed recommendations regarding test activities and priorities. The Unsteady Aerodynamics team of the NWTC condensed this guidance and drafted a detailed test plan. This test plan represents an attempt to balance diverse recommendations received from the Science Panel meeting, while taking into account multiple constraints imposed by the UAE research turbine, the NASA Ames 80-ft x 120-ft wind tunnel, and other sources. The NREL-NASA Ames wind tunnel tests will primarily be focused on obtaining rotating blade pressure data. NREL has been making these types of measurements since 1987 and has considerable experience in doing so. The purpose of this wind tunnel test is to acquire accurate quantitative aerodynamic and structural measurements, on a wind turbine that is geometrically and dynamically representative of full-scale machines, in an environment free from pronounced inflow anomalies. These data will be exploited to develop and validate enhanced engineering models for designing and analyzing advanced wind energy machines.

  10. Development and test of video systems for airborne surveillance of oil spills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Arvesen, J. C.; Lewis, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    Five video systems - potentially useful for airborne surveillance of oil spills - were developed, flight tested, and evaluated. The systems are: (1) conventional black and white TV, (2) conventional TV with false color, (3) differential TV, (4) prototype Lunar Surface TV, and (5) field sequential TV. Wavelength and polarization filtering were utilized in all systems. Greatly enhanced detection of oil spills, relative to that possible with the unaided eye, was achieved. The most practical video system is a conventional TV camera with silicon-diode-array image tube, filtered with a Corning 7-54 filter and a polarizer oriented with its principal axis in the horizontal direction. Best contrast between oil and water was achieved when winds and sea states were low. The minimum detectable oil film thickness was about 0.1 micrometer.

  11. Improving space domain awareness through unequal-cost multiple hypothesis testing in the space surveillance telescope.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Tyler; Cain, Stephen; Jeon, Jae; Blake, Travis

    2015-06-10

    This paper investigates algorithms to improve the detection of space objects with the space surveillance telescope (SST) system. These space objects include natural objects such as asteroids and artificial satellites in Earth orbit. Using a proposed multiple hypothesis test (MHT), the detection performance is compared to the currently used algorithm as well as a matched filter and an equal-cost MHT algorithm. To compare these algorithms, a data set collected by the SST of a geosynchronous Earth orbit satellite, ANIK-F1 entering the Earth's eclipse, is utilized. It is found that an unequal-cost MHT gives increased performance over a point detector, a matched filter, and equal-cost MHT over a large range of potential intensities. Results are presented as probability of detection and receiver operating characteristic curves. In addition, the performance of the algorithm as a function of number of hypotheses used is investigated. PMID:26192851

  12. VecTest as Diagnostic and Surveillance Tool for West Nile Virus in Dead Birds

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewski, Joseph C.; Therrien, Joseph E.; Kramer, Laura D.; Kauffman, Elizabeth B.; Eidson, Millicent

    2004-01-01

    The VecTest antigen-capture assay for West Nile virus was performed on oral and tissue swabs from dead birds in New York State from April 2003 through July 2004. Results were compared with those from real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction of kidney or brain. Oral VecTest sensitivity is adequate for surveillance in American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) (87%), Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) (80%), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) (76%). Oral VecTest performed well for small samples of American Kestrels (Falco sparverius), Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), Common Grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), and House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus). Poor sensitivity occurred in most raptors, Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura), Fish Crows (Corvus ossifragus), and American Robins (Turdus migratorius). Specificity was excellent (98%), except for false-positive results that occurred mostly in Gray Catbirds (Dumatella carolinensis), Green Herons (Butorides virescens), and tests of blood and tissues. Feather pulp and kidney may be useful for VecTest assays in corvids. PMID:15663856

  13. VecTest as diagnostic and surveillance tool for West Nile virus in dead birds.

    PubMed

    Stone, Ward B; Okoniewski, Joseph C; Therrien, Joseph E; Kramer, Laura D; Kauffman, Elizabeth B; Eidson, Millicent

    2004-12-01

    The VecTest antigen-capture assay for West Nile virus was performed on oral and tissue swabs from dead birds in New York State from April 2003 through July 2004. Results were compared with those from real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction of kidney or brain. Oral VecTest sensitivity is adequate for surveillance in American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) (87%), Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) (80%), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) (76%). Oral VecTest performed well for small samples of American Kestrels (Falco sparverius), Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), Common Grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), and House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus). Poor sensitivity occurred in most raptors, Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura), Fish Crows (Corvus ossifragus), and American Robins (Turdus migratorius). Specificity was excellent (98%), except for false-positive results that occurred mostly in Gray Catbirds (Dumatella carolinensis), Green Herons (Butorides virescens), and tests of blood and tissues. Feather pulp and kidney may be useful for VecTest assays in corvids. PMID:15663856

  14. Geological & Geophysical findings from seismic, well log and core data for marine gas hydrate deposits at the 1st offshore methane hydrate production test site in the eastern Nankai Trough, offshore Japan: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.; Noguchi, S.; Takayama, T.; Suzuki, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2012-12-01

    In order to evaluate productivity of gas from marine gas hydrate by the depressurization method, Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation is planning to conduct a full-scale production test in early 2013 at the AT1 site in the north slope of Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. The test location was determined using the combination of detailed 3D seismic reflection pattern analysis, high-density velocity analysis, and P-impedance inversion analysis, which were calibrated using well log data obtained in 2004. At the AT1 site, one production well (AT1-P) and two monitoring wells (AT1-MC and MT1) were drilled from February to March 2012, followed by 1 coring well (AT1-C) from June to July 2012. An extensive logging program with logging while drilling (LWD) and wireline-logging tools, such as GeoVISION (resistivity image), EcoScope (neutron/density porosity, mineral spectroscopy etc.), SonicScanner (Advanced Sonic tool), CMR/ProVISION (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Tools), XPT (formation pressure, fluid mobility), and IsolationScanner (ultrasonic cement evaluation tools) was conducted at AT1-MC well to evaluate physical reservoir properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, to determine production test interval in 2013, and to evaluate cement bonding. Methane hydrate concentrated zone (MHCZ) confirmed by the well logging at AT1-MC was thin turbidites (tens of centimeters to few meters) with 60 m of gross thickness, which is composed of lobe type sequences in the upper part of it and channel sand sequences in the lower part. The gross thickness of MHCZ in the well is thicker than previous wells in 2004 (A1, 45 m) located around 150 m northeast, indicating that the prediction given by seismic inversion analysis was reasonable. Well-to-well correlation between AT1-MC and MT1 wells within 40 m distance exhibited that lateral continuity of these sand layers (upper part of reservoir) are fairly good, which representing ideal reservoir for the production

  15. Malaria surveillance in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: comparison of microscopy, PCR, and rapid diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Doctor, Stephanie M; Liu, Yunhao; Whitesell, Amy; Thwai, Kyaw L; Taylor, Steve M; Janko, Mark; Emch, Michael; Kashamuka, Melchior; Muwonga, Jérémie; Tshefu, Antoinette; Meshnick, Steven R

    2016-05-01

    Malaria surveillance is critical for control efforts, but diagnostic methods frequently disagree. Here, we compare microscopy, PCR, and a rapid diagnostic test in 7137 samples from children in the Democratic Republic of the Congo using latent class analysis. PCR had the highest sensitivity (94.6%) and microscopy had the lowest (76.7%). PMID:26915637

  16. Dewarless Logging Tool - 1st Generation

    SciTech Connect

    HENFLING,JOSEPH A.; NORMANN,RANDY A.

    2000-08-01

    This report focuses on Sandia National Laboratories' effort to create high-temperature logging tools for geothermal applications without the need for heat shielding. One of the mechanisms for failure in conventional downhole tools is temperature. They can only survive a limited number of hours in high temperature environments. For the first time since the evolution of integrated circuits, components are now commercially available that are qualified to 225 C with many continuing to work up to 300 C. These components are primarily based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology. Sandia has developed and tested a simple data logger based on this technology that operates up to 300 C with a few limiting components operating to only 250 C without thermal protection. An actual well log to 240 C without shielding is discussed. The first prototype high-temperature tool measures pressure and temperature using a wire-line for power and communication. The tool is based around the HT83C51 microcontroller. A brief discussion of the background and status of the High Temperature Instrumentation program at Sandia, objectives, data logger development, and future project plans are given.

  17. Seismic surveillance: Nuclear test ban verification. Technical report, 1 Jan-31 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Husebye, E.S.; Ruud, B.O.

    1991-02-27

    The project is aimed at seismic surveillance as part of on-going efforts for improving nuclear test ban verification capabilities. The problem is complex in the sense that underground explosions are most efficiently monitored by seismic means, but that the distinction between signals emitted by natural earthquakes and explosions remains unclear, at least at local and regional distances. In other words, seismic wave propagation in a heterogeneous Earth may easily mask specific source signatures. Section 2 presents a new scheme for seismic signal detection on the basis of three-component (3C) seismograph recording systems. A dual test statistics are introduced, namely a conventional STA/LTA on a stand alone basis or a combination of STA/LTA and a P-signal polarity measure. In the latter case a relatively low STA/LTA threshold can be used. An added advantage with the polarity estimate is that a corresponding slowness vector estimate is obtained. The detector is operated in three steps; (1) run detector on a suit of bandpass filtered records, (2) compress raw detection log while retaining parameters from the best filter, and (3) group detected and identified phases into event families and estimate epicenter parameters.

  18. Improving the Space Surveillance Telescope's Performance Using Multi-Hypothesis Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingarelli, J. Chris; Pearce, Eric; Lambour, Richard; Blake, Travis; Peterson, Curtis J. R.; Cain, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    The Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) is a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program designed to detect objects in space like near Earth asteroids and space debris in the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) belt. Binary hypothesis test (BHT) methods have historically been used to facilitate the detection of new objects in space. In this paper a multi-hypothesis detection strategy is introduced to improve the detection performance of SST. In this context, the multi-hypothesis testing (MHT) determines if an unresolvable point source is in either the center, a corner, or a side of a pixel in contrast to BHT, which only tests whether an object is in the pixel or not. The images recorded by SST are undersampled such as to cause aliasing, which degrades the performance of traditional detection schemes. The equations for the MHT are derived in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), which is computed by subtracting the background light level around the pixel being tested and dividing by the standard deviation of the noise. A new method for determining the local noise statistics that rejects outliers is introduced in combination with the MHT. An experiment using observations of a known GEO satellite are used to demonstrate the improved detection performance of the new algorithm over algorithms previously reported in the literature. The results show a significant improvement in the probability of detection by as much as 50% over existing algorithms. In addition to detection, the S/N results prove to be linearly related to the least-squares estimates of point source irradiance, thus improving photometric accuracy. The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

  19. Improving the space surveillance telescope's performance using multi-hypothesis testing

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Zingarelli, J.; Cain, Stephen; Pearce, Eric; Lambour, Richard; Blake, Travis; Peterson, Curtis J. R.

    2014-05-01

    The Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) is a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program designed to detect objects in space like near Earth asteroids and space debris in the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) belt. Binary hypothesis test (BHT) methods have historically been used to facilitate the detection of new objects in space. In this paper a multi-hypothesis detection strategy is introduced to improve the detection performance of SST. In this context, the multi-hypothesis testing (MHT) determines if an unresolvable point source is in either the center, a corner, or a side of a pixel in contrast to BHT, which only tests whether an object is in the pixel or not. The images recorded by SST are undersampled such as to cause aliasing, which degrades the performance of traditional detection schemes. The equations for the MHT are derived in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), which is computed by subtracting the background light level around the pixel being tested and dividing by the standard deviation of the noise. A new method for determining the local noise statistics that rejects outliers is introduced in combination with the MHT. An experiment using observations of a known GEO satellite are used to demonstrate the improved detection performance of the new algorithm over algorithms previously reported in the literature. The results show a significant improvement in the probability of detection by as much as 50% over existing algorithms. In addition to detection, the S/N results prove to be linearly related to the least-squares estimates of point source irradiance, thus improving photometric accuracy.

  20. Design and construction of the 1st proton CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Hurley, F.; Johnson, R.; Rykalin, V.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schulte, R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper discusses the design and operation of the 1st proton CT scanner for 3D imaging. Reduction of proton range uncertainties and improved dose accuracy in the patient for treatment planning are central goals. A central CT slice acquired by reconstruction of 134 million proton tracks through a 14 cm spherical polystyrene phantom with high and low density inserts is presented.

  1. [Granuloma Gravidarum in a 37-year-old 1st Gravida, 1st Para--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Findeklee, S

    2015-10-01

    The granuloma gravidarum is a rare benign tumour with gingival origin. It occurs in circa 0.2% of pregnancies. Mostly we see an asymptomatic course of disease terminated by hormonal changes after delivery. If the granuloma is associated with complaints of the pregnant woman, for example masticational pain or recurrent bleedings, therapeutic options are conservative therapy, surgery or delivery. We report the case of a 37-year-old 1st gravida, 1st para who had an induced delivery in the 39+2 gestational week because of a symptomatic granuloma gravidarum. We saw a spontaneous remission of the granuloma within 3 months post partum. The case report underlines the importance of suitable information for pregnant women about oral hygiene and the necessity of regular dental controls during pregnancy for prophylaxis of granuloma gravidarum. PMID:26402852

  2. Ground Testing of Prototype Hardware and Processing Algorithms for a Wide Area Space Surveillance System (WASSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, N.; Dressler, R. A.; Richtsmeier, S. S.; McLean, J.; Dao, P. D.; Murray-Krezan, J.; Fulcoly, D. O.

    2013-09-01

    Recent ground testing of a wide area camera system and automated star removal algorithms has demonstrated the potential to detect, quantify, and track deep space objects using small aperture cameras and on-board processors. The camera system, which was originally developed for a space-based Wide Area Space Surveillance System (WASSS), operates in a fixed-stare mode, continuously monitoring a wide swath of space and differentiating celestial objects from satellites based on differential motion across the field of view. It would have greatest utility in a LEO orbit to provide automated and continuous monitoring of deep space with high refresh rates, and with particular emphasis on the GEO belt and GEO transfer space. Continuous monitoring allows a concept of change detection and custody maintenance not possible with existing sensors. The detection approach is equally applicable to Earth-based sensor systems. A distributed system of such sensors, either Earth-based, or space-based, could provide automated, persistent night-time monitoring of all of deep space. The continuous monitoring provides a daily record of the light curves of all GEO objects above a certain brightness within the field of view. The daily updates of satellite light curves offers a means to identify specific satellites, to note changes in orientation and operational mode, and to queue other SSA assets for higher resolution queries. The data processing approach may also be applied to larger-aperture, higher resolution camera systems to extend the sensitivity towards dimmer objects. In order to demonstrate the utility of the WASSS system and data processing, a ground based field test was conducted in October 2012. We report here the results of the observations made at Magdalena Ridge Observatory using the prototype WASSS camera, which has a 4×60° field-of-view , <0.05° resolution, a 2.8 cm2 aperture, and the ability to view within 4° of the sun. A single camera pointed at the GEO belt provided a

  3. The 1st All-Russian Workshop on Archaeoastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, Nikolai G.

    2007-08-01

    The 1st All-Russia Workshop on Archaeoastronomy “Astronomical and World-Outlook Meaning of the Archaeological Monuments of South Ural” was held on June 19-25, 2006, at the ground of the archaeological center “Arkaim” (Chelyabinsk Region). Besides about 30 talks, astronomical measurements were performed at two archaeological objects under intensive study: Arkaim Site (Bronze Epoch, XVIII-XVI c. B.C.) and tumuli “with whiskers” complex Kondurovsky (V-VIII c. A.D.). The promising character of the megalithic complex on the Vera Island (Lake Turgoyak) was stated.

  4. ["1st Therapeutic Red Cross Hospital" during the civil war].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, V B; Abashin, V G

    2014-04-01

    The article presents the documentary information about the founding, the establishment and early years of the 1st Therapeutic Red Cross Hospital - in the future - Mandryka Central Military Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. Presented the work of the Hospital during the dificult period of the Civil War, typhus epidemic, famine and devastation. Specified its staffing structure, command, medical and administrative staff, travel and accommodation till the moment of the deployment in the Silver Lane in Moscow. PMID:25051792

  5. Single versus double testing of meat-juice samples for Salmonella antibodies, in the Danish pig-herd surveillance programme.

    PubMed

    Ekeroth, Lars; Alban, Lis; Feld, Niels

    2003-08-01

    In Denmark, a national serological surveillance-and-control programme for Salmonella in pigs has been in operation since 1995. The programme is based on the Danish mix-ELISA and uses double testing (two ELISA-wells used per sample) of meat-juice samples taken in relation to slaughter. All herds are classified monthly into one of the three levels; the classification is based on the percentage of positive serological results in the previous 3 months. In connection with evaluation of the programme in 2001, we investigated whether single testing (testing in one well only) could be expected to be sufficiently precise compared to double testing. Data from the year 2000 were used, and mathematical modelling. Single testing was simulated by randomised selection of one of the two results in the double testing. A slight increase in the prevalence of Salmonella-positive samples (1.02-1.09 times more through the four quarters of the year 2000) was found in the simulated single testing, as compared to the double testing. Around 0.5% of the herds would be allocated to another herd level in single testing-almost equal numbers one level up and one level down. No herd being seronegative in double testing would be allocated to levels 2 or 3 (herds with >40 or >70%, respectively, serological reactors) in single testing. The prevalence of "false-positive" diagnoses (positive in single testing and negative in double testing) and inversely defined "false-negative" diagnoses varied from 4.2 to 8.7% and from 3.2 to 4.5%, respectively, through the four quarters of the year 2000. The probability of allocating a herd to a wrong level due to sampling error was on the average 6.2 (varying from 1.66 to over 100) times higher than the probability of allocating a herd to a wrong level due to the test inaccuracy introduced by going from double to single testing. This is, however, an average; a herd with a true prevalence close to one of the level border cut-offs (40 and 70% weighted seroprevalence

  6. Development of a test of suprathreshold acuity in noise in Brazilian Portuguese: a new method for hearing screening and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Vaez, Nara; Desgualdo-Pereira, Liliane; Paglialonga, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a speech-in-noise test for hearing screening and surveillance in Brazilian Portuguese based on the evaluation of suprathreshold acuity performances. The SUN test (Speech Understanding in Noise) consists of a list of intervocalic consonants in noise presented in a multiple-choice paradigm by means of a touch screen. The test provides one out of three possible results: "a hearing check is recommended" (red light), "a hearing check would be advisable" (yellow light), and "no hearing difficulties" (green light) (Paglialonga et al., Comput. Biol. Med. 2014). This novel test was developed in a population of 30 normal hearing young adults and 101 adults with varying degrees of hearing impairment and handicap, including normal hearing. The test had 84% sensitivity and 76% specificity compared to conventional pure-tone screening and 83% sensitivity and 86% specificity to detect disabling hearing impairment. The test outcomes were in line with the degree of self-perceived hearing handicap. The results found here paralleled those reported in the literature for the SUN test and for conventional speech-in-noise measures. This study showed that the proposed test might be a viable method to identify individuals with hearing problems to be referred to further audiological assessment and intervention. PMID:25247181

  7. Surveillance of Acute Respiratory Infections Using Community-Submitted Symptoms and Specimens for Molecular Diagnostic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Jennifer; Rowe, Aaron; Brownstein, John S.; Chunara, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Participatory systems for surveillance of acute respiratory infection give real-time information about infections circulating in the community, yet to-date are limited to self-reported syndromic information only and lacking methods of linking symptom reports to infection types. We developed the GoViral platform to evaluate whether a cohort of lay volunteers could, and would find it useful to, contribute self-reported symptoms online and to compare specimen types for self-collected diagnostic information of sufficient quality for respiratory infection surveillance. Volunteers were recruited, given a kit (collection materials and customized instructions), instructed to report their symptoms weekly, and when sick with cold or flu-like symptoms, requested to collect specimens (saliva and nasal swab). We compared specimen types for respiratory virus detection sensitivity (via polymerase-chain-reaction) and ease of collection. Participants were surveyed to determine receptivity to participating when sick, to receiving information on the type of pathogen causing their infection and types circulating near them. Between December 1 2013 and March 1 2014, 295 participants enrolled in the study and received a kit. Of those who reported symptoms, half (71) collected and sent specimens for analysis. Participants submitted kits on average 2.30 days (95 CI: 1.65 to 2.96) after symptoms began. We found good concordance between nasal and saliva specimens for multiple pathogens, with few discrepancies. Individuals report that saliva collection is easiest and report that receiving information about what pathogen they, and those near them, have is valued and can shape public health behaviors. Community-submitted specimens can be used for the detection of acute respiratory infection with individuals showing receptivity for participating and interest in a real-time picture of respiratory pathogens near them. PMID:26075141

  8. Evaluation of Multiplex-Based Antibody Testing for Use in Large-Scale Surveillance for Yaws: a Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Gretchen M; Mitja, Oriol; Goodhew, Brook; Pillay, Allan; Lammie, Patrick J; Castro, Arnold; Moses, Penias; Chen, Cheng; Ye, Tun; Ballard, Ronald; Martin, Diana L

    2016-05-01

    WHO has targeted yaws for global eradication by 2020. The program goals are to interrupt the transmission in countries where yaws is endemic and to certify countries as yaws free where yaws was endemic in the past. No new rapid plasmin reagin (RPR) seroreactivity in young children is required for certification of elimination at a country level. We sought to evaluate whether antibody responses to specific treponemal antigens measured in a high-throughput multiplex bead array (MBA) assay differentiate past versus current infection and whether a nontreponemal lipoidal antigen test can be incorporated into the MBA. Serum and dried blood spot specimens collected for yaws surveillance projects in Ghana, Vanuatu, and Papua New Guinea (PNG) were run on MBA to measure antibodies against recombinant p17 (rp17) and treponemal membrane protein A (TmpA) treponemal antigens. Results were compared to standard treponemal laboratory (TPPA or TPHA [TPP(H)A]) and quantitative RPR test data. Of 589 specimens, 241 were TPP(H)A(+)/RPR(+), 88 were TPP(H)A(+)/RPR(-), 6 were TPP(H)A(-)/RPR(+), and 254 were negative for both tests. Compared to TPP(H)A, reactive concordance of rp17 was 93.7%, while reactive concordance of TmpA was only 81.9%. TmpA-specific reactivity showed good correlation with RPR titers (R(2) = 0.41; P < 0.0001). IgG responses to the lipoidal antigen used in RPR testing (cardiolipin) were not detected in the MBA. Our results suggest that TmpA can be used as a treponemal antigen marker for recent or active infection and potentially replace RPR in a high-throughput multiplex tool for large-scale yaws surveillance. PMID:26962086

  9. Evaluation of Multiplex-Based Antibody Testing for Use in Large-Scale Surveillance for Yaws: a Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Gretchen M.; Mitja, Oriol; Goodhew, Brook; Pillay, Allan; Lammie, Patrick J.; Castro, Arnold; Moses, Penias; Chen, Cheng; Ye, Tun; Ballard, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    WHO has targeted yaws for global eradication by 2020. The program goals are to interrupt the transmission in countries where yaws is endemic and to certify countries as yaws free where yaws was endemic in the past. No new rapid plasmin reagin (RPR) seroreactivity in young children is required for certification of elimination at a country level. We sought to evaluate whether antibody responses to specific treponemal antigens measured in a high-throughput multiplex bead array (MBA) assay differentiate past versus current infection and whether a nontreponemal lipoidal antigen test can be incorporated into the MBA. Serum and dried blood spot specimens collected for yaws surveillance projects in Ghana, Vanuatu, and Papua New Guinea (PNG) were run on MBA to measure antibodies against recombinant p17 (rp17) and treponemal membrane protein A (TmpA) treponemal antigens. Results were compared to standard treponemal laboratory (TPPA or TPHA [TPP(H)A]) and quantitative RPR test data. Of 589 specimens, 241 were TPP(H)A+/RPR+, 88 were TPP(H)A+/RPR−, 6 were TPP(H)A−/RPR+, and 254 were negative for both tests. Compared to TPP(H)A, reactive concordance of rp17 was 93.7%, while reactive concordance of TmpA was only 81.9%. TmpA-specific reactivity showed good correlation with RPR titers (R2 = 0.41; P < 0.0001). IgG responses to the lipoidal antigen used in RPR testing (cardiolipin) were not detected in the MBA. Our results suggest that TmpA can be used as a treponemal antigen marker for recent or active infection and potentially replace RPR in a high-throughput multiplex tool for large-scale yaws surveillance. PMID:26962086

  10. SURVEILLANCE REPORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveillance reports are designed to provide useful data to researchers, planners, policymakers, and other professionals interested in alcohol abuse and its associated illnesses and mortality. Other surveillance report topics include apparent per capita consumption of alcoholic b...

  11. Hui and Walter’s latent-class model extended to estimate diagnostic test properties from surveillance data: a latent model for latent data

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Mairead L.; Handel, Ian G.; Glass, Elizabeth J.; Woolliams, John A.; Bronsvoort, B. Mark de Clare; McBride, Stewart H.; Skuce, Robin A.; Allen, Adrian R.; McDowell, Stanley W. J.; Bishop, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic test sensitivity and specificity are probabilistic estimates with far reaching implications for disease control, management and genetic studies. In the absence of ‘gold standard’ tests, traditional Bayesian latent class models may be used to assess diagnostic test accuracies through the comparison of two or more tests performed on the same groups of individuals. The aim of this study was to extend such models to estimate diagnostic test parameters and true cohort-specific prevalence, using disease surveillance data. The traditional Hui-Walter latent class methodology was extended to allow for features seen in such data, including (i) unrecorded data (i.e. data for a second test available only on a subset of the sampled population) and (ii) cohort-specific sensitivities and specificities. The model was applied with and without the modelling of conditional dependence between tests. The utility of the extended model was demonstrated through application to bovine tuberculosis surveillance data from Northern and the Republic of Ireland. Simulation coupled with re-sampling techniques, demonstrated that the extended model has good predictive power to estimate the diagnostic parameters and true herd-level prevalence from surveillance data. Our methodology can aid in the interpretation of disease surveillance data, and the results can potentially refine disease control strategies. PMID:26148538

  12. Serum CEA testing in the post-operative surveillance of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Hine, K. R.; Dykes, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    Six hundred and sixty-three patients were followed with serial serum CEA measurements in addition to routine clinical surveillance after radical resection of colorectal carcinoma. Of 626 available for analysis, 366 (58.4%) remained clinically free of recurrence and had a normal CEA (less than 20 ng ml-1) throughout and 89 (14.2%) had a temporary non-progressive rise in CEA with no evidence of secondary disease. Of 171 patients who developed proven or suggestive recurrence, 114 had a preceding rise in the serum CEA and in further 21 the CEA rose simultaneously with recurrence. In 36 patients secondary disease was detected while the CEA was still within normal limits. CEA was more effective as an early index of distant metastasis, thus in 76% of those patients with a preceding rise in CEA, the secondary disease was disseminated, whereas only 20% had localised recurrence. The pattern of rise in CEA was of no practical value in distinguishing localised from distant recurrence. PMID:6733018

  13. Test and evaluation of the Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR)-8 wind shear detection system (phase 2), revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offi, D. L.; Lewis, W.; Lee, T.; Delamarche, A.

    1980-08-01

    A wind shear detection system developed by the Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) to operate with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR)-8 was installed and is being tested at the FAA technical Center. Initial efforts, previously reported in Report NA-78-59-LR, were directed toward hardware and software shakedown and feasibility determination. Second phase tests compared radar with aircraft and tower winds, evaluated the wind shear measurement capability under various weather conditions, and investigated the effectiveness of a simple two-azimuth pointing strategy and system capabilities and limitations. Results showed the system to be compatible with and to operate satisfactorily with the ASR-8. The processing and spectral display of clear air and precipitation returns is feasible. The accuracy of agreement between radar-measured winds and components of the aircraft-measured winds in both radially oriented flights and runway offset flights, using a two-azimuth pointing technique, was examined. Radar versus tower wind agreement was also examined. Potentially dangerous wind shears associated with weather during these tests were detectable. Certain system limitations also have been defined and considered. It is recommended that tests continue to complete definition of and demonstrate capabilities in all weather situations, to optimize performance, and to provide information to specify system design for possible development of a prototype model.

  14. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: 1. Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; 2. Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; 3. Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; 4. Identify synergies across different industries; 5. Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; 6. Understand who are the leading experts; 7. Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  15. THEOS: The1st Thailand EO System and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peanvijarnpong, Chanchai

    Thailand has engaged in remote sensing satellite technological and scientific development many years since early 1980s. Thailand Landsat Station was established as a regional center of data processing and dissemination for Thai scientists for data applications. Over the years, GISTDA and Thai user community have been gaining technical experience and expertise in satellite data applications around the country such natural resources and environmental management, forest inventory, forest change detections, soil mapping, land-use and land cover mapping, crop type mapping, coastal shrimp farming, flood zone mapping, base mapping, water and drought management. The Government of Thailand realizes that remote sensing satellite technology is an important mechanism for social and economic development of the country. So the 1st Thailand Earth Observation System (THEOS) development program was approved by the Government since 2003. THEOS system is sub-synchronous satellite orbiting around the earth at 822 km. altitude same as SPOT satellites. It carries two imaging instruments; 2-m Panchromatic telescope with 22 km. swath width and 15-m resolution camera with four-multi-spectral band and 90-km swath wide. THEOS is scheduled to launch around March 2008. A number of technological and scientific activities has been implementing for Thailand and international scientific user community. Therefore THEOS is strong endorsement from the Government of Thailand on the value of remote sensing technology. This paper presents Thailand EO activities including THEOS System and its plans.

  16. Foucault, Surveillance, and Carbon Monoxide Testing Within Stop-Smoking Services

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Kathryn; Phillips, Rhiannon

    2015-01-01

    Health professionals have adopted proactive testing for early evidence of disease. Researchers have identified that this leads to enumerated understandings and shapes behavior in productive ways. Smoking-cessation advisors regularly test clients for carbon monoxide (CO), but client views of this had not previously been explored. We interviewed 23 clients of a United Kingdom-based stop-smoking service regarding their experiences of CO testing. The majority of participants were successful quitters. We used ATLAS.ti 7 as a data-management tool during structured qualitative analysis. Our findings reveal that clients believed the results of their CO tests. Many became enumerated in their understanding, and thus placed themselves in a hierarchy with other members of their group. Almost all clients found that knowing their CO test score was motivating. We conclude that additional research is needed to understand the experiences of CO testing among clients who do not quit. PMID:25294348

  17. Foucault, surveillance, and carbon monoxide testing within stop-smoking services.

    PubMed

    Grant, Aimee; Ashton, Kathryn; Phillips, Rhiannon

    2015-07-01

    Health professionals have adopted proactive testing for early evidence of disease. Researchers have identified that this leads to enumerated understandings and shapes behavior in productive ways. Smoking-cessation advisors regularly test clients for carbon monoxide (CO), but client views of this had not previously been explored. We interviewed 23 clients of a United Kingdom-based stop-smoking service regarding their experiences of CO testing. The majority of participants were successful quitters. We used ATLAS.ti 7 as a data-management tool during structured qualitative analysis. Our findings reveal that clients believed the results of their CO tests. Many became enumerated in their understanding, and thus placed themselves in a hierarchy with other members of their group. Almost all clients found that knowing their CO test score was motivating. We conclude that additional research is needed to understand the experiences of CO testing among clients who do not quit. PMID:25294348

  18. Arbovirus Surveillance and First Report of Chikungunya Virus in Wild Populations of Aedes aegypti from Guerrero, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Dzul-Manzanilla, Felipe; Martínez, Norma E; Cruz-Nolasco, Maximina; Gutiérrez-Castro, Cipriano; López-Damián, Leonardo; Ibarra-López, Jesús; Martini, Andres; Torres-Leyva, Joel; Bibiano-Marín, Wilbert; Tornez-Benitez, Citlalli; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe; Manrique-Saide, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    We carried out dengue (DENV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) surveillance in wild populations of Aedes aegypti from Guerrero, Mexico, from 2012 to 2014 following a standard national protocol of the Mexican Dengue Control Program. A total of 284 pools (15-30 specimens/pool) of female mosquitoes were tested with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to detect DENV and CHIKV. We report for the 1st time the detection of CHIKV from field-collected mosquitoes at Acapulco and Juchitán in 2014. Results from DENV are also reported. PMID:26375910

  19. International forum for surveillance and control of mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript provides highlights of presentations given at the 1st International Forum for Surveillance and Control of Mosquitoes and Mosquito-borne Disease in Beijing, China. Topics covered in this 4-day forum included: diseases, surveillance, insecticides, physiology and ecology, behavior, inv...

  20. 94. DETAIL, SAME BEAN AS ABOVE, MARKED 'PATENTED DEC. 1ST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. DETAIL, SAME BEAN AS ABOVE, MARKED 'PATENTED DEC. 1ST 1857' - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. VIEW WEST, 1ST FLOOR, EAST ROOM, HYDRAULIC COTTON PRESS, DETAIL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW WEST, 1ST FLOOR, EAST ROOM, HYDRAULIC COTTON PRESS, DETAIL, CONTINENTAL GIN COMPANY HYDRAULIC TANK - Magnolia Plantation, Cotton Gins & Presses, LA Route 119, Natchitoches, Natchitoches Parish, LA

  2. Comparison of Height, Weight, and Body Mass Index Data from State-Mandated School Physical Fitness Testing and a Districtwide Surveillance Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaokham, Christina B.; Hillidge, Sharon; Serpas, Shaila; McDonald, Eric; Nader, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately one third of California school-age children are overweight or obese. Legislative approaches to assessing obesity have focused on school-based data collection. During 2010-2011, the Chula Vista Elementary School District conducted districtwide surveillance and state-mandated physical fitness testing (PFT) among fifth grade…

  3. Recent HIV Testing Prevalence, Determinants, and Disparities Among US Older Adult Respondents to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Chandra L.; Godette, Dionne C.; Mulatu, Mesfin S.; Gaines, Tommi L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although routine human immune deficiency virus (HIV) testing during health care visits is recommended for most adults, many older adults (i.e., ages 50–64 years) do not receive it. This study identified factors associated with HIV testing in the past 12 months (i.e., recent HIV testing) among US adults in the 3 categories of older adulthood (50–54, 55–59, and 60–64 years) for which routine HIV testing is recommended. Method This was a cross-sectional analysis of data from US older adult respondents to the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. We calculated prevalence (proportions) of HIV testing by age category and race/ethnicity. Using multiple logistic regression, we identified predisposing, enabling, and need factors associated with recent HIV testing within and across age categories, by race/ethnicity and controlling for covariates. Results HIV testing prevalence was low (<5%), varied by race/ethnicity, and decreased with age. Within and across age categories, the odds of testing were highest among blacks (odds ratio [OR], 3.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.82–4.25) and higher among Latinos (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.50–2.84) and the oldest and youngest categories of American Indians/Alaska Natives (OR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.11–5.55; OR, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.49–5.95) than among whites. Those reporting a recent doctor visit (OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.92–2.74) or HIV risk behaviors (OR, 3.50; 95% CI, 2.67–4.59) had higher odds of HIV testing. Conclusion Regardless of risk, the oldest older adults, whites, and older women may forego HIV testing. Doctor visits may facilitate HIV testing. Additional research is needed to understand why eligible older adults seen by providers may not be screened for HIV infection. PMID:26165428

  4. Evaluation of a rapid diagnostic test for yaws infection in a community surveillance setting.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Goncalves, Adriana; Vahi, Ventis; Sokana, Oliver; Puiahi, Elliot; Zhang, Zaixing; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Bottomley, Christian; Mabey, David; Solomon, Anthony W

    2014-09-01

    Yaws is a non-venereal treponemal infection caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue. The WHO has launched a worldwide control programme, which aims to eradicate yaws by 2020. The development of a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for serological diagnosis in the isolated communities affected by yaws is a key requirement for the successful implementation of the WHO strategy. We conducted a study to evaluate the utility of the DPP test in screening for yaws, utilizing samples collected as part of a community prevalence survey conducted in the Solomon Islands. 415 serum samples were tested using both traditional syphilis serology (TPPA and quantitative RPR) and the Chembio DPP Syphilis Screen and Confirm RDT. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of the RDT as compared to gold standard serology. The sensitivity of the RDT against TPPA was 58.5% and the specificity was 97.6%. The sensitivity of the RDT against RPR was 41.7% and the specificity was 95.2%. The sensitivity of the DPP was strongly related to the RPR titre with a sensitivity of 92.0% for an RPR titre of >1/16. Wider access to DPP testing would improve our understanding of worldwide yaws case reporting and the test may play a key role in assessing patients presenting with yaws like lesions in a post-mass drug administration (MDA) setting. PMID:25211018

  5. Development and field testing of a Light Aircraft Oil Surveillance System (LAOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, W.; Herz, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental device consisting of a conventional TV camera with a low light level photo image tube and motor driven polarized filter arrangement was constructed to provide a remote means of discriminating the presence of oil on water surfaces. This polarized light filtering system permitted a series of successive, rapid changes between the vertical and horizontal components of reflected polarized skylight and caused the oil based substances to be more easily observed and identified as a flashing image against a relatively static water surface background. This instrument was flight tested, and the results, with targets of opportunity and more systematic test site data, indicate the potential usefulness of this airborne remote sensing instrument.

  6. RESULTS OF A SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM FOR PERSONS LIVING AROUND THE NEVADA TEST SITE - 1971 TO 1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    A continuing program has been conducted since 1970 to determine levels of radioactive nuclides in adults and children from families residing in communities and ranches surrounding the Nevada Test Site. Twice each year these persons receive a whole-body count and physical examinat...

  7. Field Evaluation of a Coproantigen Detection Test for Fascioliasis Diagnosis and Surveillance in Human Hyperendemic Areas of Andean Countries

    PubMed Central

    Valero, María Adela; Periago, María Victoria; Pérez-Crespo, Ignacio; Angles, René; Villegas, Fidel; Aguirre, Carlos; Strauss, Wilma; Espinoza, José R.; Herrera, Patricia; Terashima, Angelica; Tamayo, Hugo; Engels, Dirk; Gabrielli, Albis Francesco; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Background Emergence of human fascioliasis prompted a worldwide control initiative including a pilot study in a few countries. Two hyperendemic areas were chosen: Huacullani, Northern Altiplano, Bolivia, representing the Altiplanic transmission pattern with high prevalences and intensities; Cajamarca valley, Peru, representing the valley pattern with high prevalences but low intensities. Coprological sample collection, transport and study procedures were analyzed to improve individual diagnosis and subsequent treatments and surveillance activities. Therefore, a coproantigen-detection technique (MM3-COPRO ELISA) was evaluated, using classical techniques for egg detection for comparison. Methodology and Findings A total of 436 and 362 stool samples from schoolchildren of Huacullani and Cajamarca, respectively, were used. Positive samples from Huacullani were 24.77% using the MM3-COPRO technique, and 21.56% using Kato-Katz. Positive samples from Cajamarca were 11.05% using MM3-COPRO, and 5.24% using rapid sedimentation and Kato-Katz. In Huacullani, using Kato-Katz as gold standard, sensitivity and specificity were 94.68% and 98.48%, respectively, and using Kato-Katz and COPRO-ELISA test together, they were 95.68% and 100%. In Cajamarca, using rapid sedimentation and Kato-Katz together, results were 94.73% and 93.58%, and using rapid sedimentation, Kato-Katz and copro-ELISA together, they were 97.56% and 100%, respectively. There was no correlation between coproantigen detection by optical density (OD) and infection intensity by eggs per gram of feces (epg) in Cajamarca low burden cases (<400 epg), nor in Huacullani high burden cases (≥400 epg), although there was in Huacullani low burden cases (<400 epg). Six cases of egg emission appeared negative by MM3-COPRO, including one with a high egg count (1248 epg). Conclusions The coproantigen-detection test allows for high sensitivity and specificity, fast large mass screening capacity, detection in the chronic phase

  8. Spectrum and potency of dalbavancin tested against 3322 Gram-positive cocci isolated in the United States Surveillance Program (2004).

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Stilwell, Matthew G; Sader, Helio S; Fritsche, Thomas R; Goldstein, Beth P

    2006-02-01

    Dalbavancin is an injectable, next generation lipoglycopeptide with an extended serum elimination half-life. Once-weekly dosing has been successful for treatment of skin and skin structure (SSSI) and catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI). Concurrent with clinical trails, dalbavancin resistance surveillance was initiated in 2003, and results are reported here for the 2004 United States (USA) component. A total of 3322 Gram-positive cocci were tested by reference broth microdilution methods. Organism species tested included: Staphylococcus aureus (2102; 49% oxacillin-resistant), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS; 255, 82% oxacillin-resistant), beta-hemolytic streptococci (241), viridans group streptococci (46), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (678). Dalbavancin (MIC90,0.06-0.12 microg/mL) was comparable in spectrum, but superior in potency to vancomycin (MIC90,1-2 microg/mL) against staphylococci. Dalbavancin MIC90 values against the tested streptococci was 0.03 microg/mL. Dalbavancin was more active against tested SSTI pathogens than comparator agents having complete susceptibility rates (100.0%) similar to vancomycin. Vancomycin, (16- to 32-fold), linezolid (8- to 32-fold), daptomycin (4- to 32-fold), and quinupristin/dalfopristin (4- to 32-fold) were less active than dalbavancin. In conclusion, dalbavancin exhibited greater potency than comparison glycopeptides or lipopeptides, streptogramin combinations, and oxazolidinones against Gram-positive pathogens associated with SSSI or CR-BSI. Dalbavancin wild-type MIC distributions remain unchanged compared with prior sampled years (2002-2003) in the USA. PMID:16426793

  9. Wastewater testing compared to random urinalyses for the surveillance of illicit drug use in prisons

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Alex J.; Banta-Green, Caleb J.; Ort, Christoph; Robel, Alix E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Illicit drug use is known to occur among inmate populations of correctional (prison) facilities. Conventional approaches to monitor illicit drug use in prisons include random urinalyses (RUAs). Conventional approaches are expected to be prone to bias because prisoners may be aware of which days of the week RUAs are conducted. Therefore, we wanted to compare wastewater loads for methamphetamine and cocaine during days with RUA testing and without. Design and Methods We collected daily 24-hour composite samples of wastewater by continuous sampling, computed daily loads for one month and compared the frequency of illicit drug detection to the number of positive RUAs. Diurnal data also were collected for three days in order to determine within-day patterns of illicit drugs excretion. Results Methamphetamine was observed in each sample of prison wastewater with no significant difference in daily mass loads between RUA testing and non-testing days. Cocaine and its major metabolite, benzoylecgonine, were observed only at levels below quantification in prison wastewater. Six RUAs were positive for methamphetamine during the month while none were positive for cocaine out of the 243 RUAs conducted. Discussion and Conclusions Wastewater analyses offer data regarding the frequency of illicit drug excretion inside the prison that RUAs alone could not detect. PMID:25100044

  10. Kindergarten to 1st Grade: Classroom Characteristics and the Stability and Change of Children's Classroom Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Paro, Karen M.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the classroom experiences of 192 children followed longitudinally from kindergarten to 1st grade. Time-sampled observations of children were conducted to compare learning formats, teaching activities, and children's engagement in activities between kindergarten and 1st grade. Classroom observations also were conducted to…

  11. Proceedings of the 1st Puerto Rico Biobanking Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Edna; Robb, James A.; Stefanoff, Gustavo; Mellado, Robert Hunter; Coppola, Domenico; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Flores, Idhaliz

    2015-01-01

    The 1st Puerto Rico Biobanking Workshop took place on August 20th, 2014 in the Auditorium of the Comprehensive Cancer Center of the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus in San Juan Puerto Rico. The program for this 1-day, live workshop included lectures by three biobanking experts, followed by presentations from existing biobanks in Puerto Rico and audience discussion. The need for increasing biobanking expertise in Puerto Rico stems from the fact that Hispanics in general are underrepresented in the biobanks in existence in the US, which limits the research conducted specifically to understand the molecular differences in cancer cells compared to other better studied populations. In turn, this lack of information impairs the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for our population. Dr. James Robb, M.D., F.C.A.P., consulting pathologist to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR), opened the workshop with a discussion on the basic aspects of the science of biobanking (e.g., what is a biobank; its goals and objectives; protocols and procedures) in his talk addressing the importance of banking tissues for advancing biomedical research. Next, Dr. Gustavo Stefanoff, from the Cancer Institutes Network of Latin America (RINC by its name in Spanish), explained the mission, objectives, and structure of the Network of Latin-American and Caribbean Biobanks (REBLAC by its name in Spanish), which despite limited resources and many challenges, currently accrue high quality human tissue specimens and data to support cancer research in the region. Dr. Robert Hunter-Mellado, Professor of Internal Medicine, Universidad Central del Caribe, followed with an examination of the ethical and regulatory aspects of biobanking tissues for future research, including informed consent of subjects; protection of human subjects rights; and balancing risks and benefit ratios. In the afternoon, the

  12. Proceedings of the 1st Puerto Rico Biobanking Workshop.

    PubMed

    Mora, Edna; Robb, James A; Stefanoff, Gustavo; Mellado, Robert Hunter; Coppola, Domenico; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Flores, Idhaliz

    2014-01-01

    The 1st Puerto Rico Biobanking Workshop took place on August 20st, 2014 in the Auditorium of the Comprehensive Cancer Center of the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus in San Juan Puerto Rico. The program for this 1-day, live workshop included lectures by three biobanking experts, followed by presentations from existing biobanks in Puerto Rico and audience discussion. The need for increasing biobanking expertise in Puerto Rico stems from the fact that Hispanics in general are underrepresented in the biobanks in existence in the US, which limits the research conducted specifically to understand the molecular differences in cancer cells compared to other better studied populations. In turn, this lack of information impairs the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for our population. Dr. James Robb, M.D., F.C.A.P., consulting pathologist to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR), opened the workshop with a discussion on the basic aspects of the science of biobanking (e.g., what is a biobank; its goals and objectives; protocols and procedures) in his talk addressing the importance of banking tissues for advancing biomedical research. Next, Dr. Gustavo Stefanoff, from the Cancer Institutes Network of Latin America (RINC by its name in Spanish), explained the mission, objectives, and structure of the Network of Latin-American and Caribbean Biobanks (REBLAC by its name in Spanish), which despite limited resources and many challenges, currently accrue high quality human tissue specimens and data to support cancer research in the region. Dr. Robert Hunter-Mellado, Professor of Internal Medicine, Universidad Central del Caribe, followed with an examination of the ethical and regulatory aspects of biobanking tissues for future research, including informed consent of subjects; protection of human subjects rights; and balancing risks and benefit ratios. In the afternoon, the

  13. The Effect of Foot Structure on 1st Metatarsophalangeal Joint Flexibility and Hallucal Loading

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Smita; Song, Jinsup; Kraszewski, Andrew; Backus, Sherry; Ellis, Scott J.; Deland, Jonathan T.; Hillstrom, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine 1st metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint motion and flexibility and plantar loads in individuals with high, normal and low arch foot structure. Asymptomatic individuals (n=61), with high, normal and low arches participated in this study. Foot structure was quantified using malleolar valgus index (MVI) and arch height index (AHI). First MTP joint flexibility was measured using a specially constructed jig. Peak pressure under the hallux, 1st and 2nd metatarsals during walking was assessed using a pedobarograph. A one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni-adjusted post-hoc comparisons was used to assess between-group differences in MVI, AHI, Early and Late 1st MTP joint flexibility in sitting and standing, peak dorsiflexion (DF), and peak pressure under the hallux, 1st and 2nd metatarsals. Stepwise linear regression was used to identify predictors of hallucal loading. Significant between-group differences were found in MVI (F2,56=15.4, p<0.01), 1st MTP late flexibility in sitting (F2,57=3.7, p=0.03), and standing (F2,57=3.7, p=0.03). Post-hoc comparisons demonstrated that 1st MTP late flexibility in sitting was significantly higher in individuals with low arch compared to high arch structure, and that 1st MTP late flexibility in standing was significantly higher in individuals with low arch compared to normal arch structure. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that MVI and 1st MTP joint early flexibility in sitting explain about 20% of the variance in hallucal peak pressure. Our results provide objective evidence indicating that individuals with low arches show increased 1st MTP joint late flexibility compared to individuals with normal arch structure, and that hindfoot alignment and 1st MTP joint flexibility affect hallucal loading. PMID:21536440

  14. Prospective study of surveillance testing for metastasis in 100 high-risk uveal melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Piperno-Neumann, S; Servois, V; Mariani, P; Plancher, C; Lévy-Gabriel, C; Lumbroso-Le Rouic, L; Couturier, J; Asselain, B; Desjardins, L; Cassoux, N

    2015-06-01

    Despite advances in the local treatment of UM, half of patients develop metastases typically to the liver with poor survival. Microscopic complete surgical resection (R0) of liver metastases improves survival in high selected patients. Early identification of high-risk patients might allow detection of asymptomatic metastases, and increase R0 liver surgery rate. From October 2006 to December 2009, we conducted a prospective study to detect early minimal lesions with 6-monthly liver function tests (LFTs) and liver MRI in 100 high-risk patients. High risk was defined by primary tumor clinical or genomic criteria: thickness>8mm or diameter>15 mm, or extra-scleral extension, or monosomy 3 by FISH or aCGH. With a median follow-up of 49 months, the 5-year metastasis-free survival and overall survival were 47 and 33%, respectively. Of the 60 patients who became metastatic, 50 (83%) had exclusive liver metastasis. LFTs screening had no sufficient accurary, but biannual MRI showed high predictive value to detect metastasis and select patients eligible for curative surgery: 25/50 underwent laparotomy and among them, 8/25 (32%) had a R0 surgery. Median survival after metastasis was 14 months, mean survival reached 40 months in the R0 resected population. Six-monthly liver MRI screening is recommended in patients with large tumors or genomic high risk in order to detect early patient candidates to complete resection of liver metastases. PMID:25978872

  15. [Surveillance and testing of domestic installations according to the new drinking water regulations].

    PubMed

    Hauswirth, S

    2003-12-01

    Effective 1.1.2003 the new drinking water regulation (TrinkwV2001) was enacted. For public health authorities new tasks result, for example the monitoring of house installations with supply of drinking water for the public, in particular in hospitals, old person nursing homes, kindergartens, schools, hotels, restaurants etc. Public health authorities are obligated to establish a monitor programme on the basis of suitable controls by random sampling. The investigations of drinking water are to extend to at least the parameters, which can change in the house installation unfavourably. In view of the multiplicity of the plants which can be supervised the question arises, how far public health authorities can conscientiously fulfil their monitoring obligation. The Ministry of Health MFAS of Lower Saxony initiated country-wide a working group developed for a pattern administrative regulation, which, revised by the "Länderarbeitsgemeinschaft Umweltbezogener Gesundheitsschutz" LAUG, has been published in some Lands of the German Federal Republic with changes. The pattern administrative regulation plans to examine hospitals and old person nursing homes at least 1 x annually, schools and kindergartens every 5 years, other communal facilities, sport and leisure facilities, hotels and restaurants after a risk evaluation by random sampling at least however one plant per 10,000 inhabitants. Restaurants in stations, ports and airports are to be controlled at least once annually. The drinking water investigation is to extend to micro-biological parameters, like E. coli, coliform germs, germs tested at 22 degrees C and 36 degrees C as well as the chemical parameters copper and lead. The investigation on Legionella pneumophila in the warm-water system can be arranged in individual cases. In this article the considerations for these defaults are described, and pointers to a practicable risk assessment are given. PMID:14685927

  16. Macroscopic lithotype characterisation of the 1st Middle-Polish (1st Lusatian) Lignite Seam in the Miocene of central Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widera, Marek

    2012-03-01

    The 1st Middle-Polish (1st Lusatian) Lignite Seam is exploited in open-cast mines in central Poland. A large number of lignite lithotypes, grouped in four lithotype associations, are distinguished: xylitic, detritic, xylo-detritic and detro-xylitic lithotype associations, which show various structures. Each lithotype association was produced under specific peat-forming environmental conditions. In the case of the lignite seams under study they represent all the main environments that are known from Neogene mires, i.e.: fen or open water, bush moor, wet forest swamp and dry forest swamp. For a simple and practical description in the field of both the lignite sections and borehole cores, a new codification for lignite lithotypes is proposed. It is based on the codification of clastic deposits (lithofacies). The practical value of the new lignite lithotype codification is examined in three vertical sections of the 1st Middle-Polish Lignite Seam.

  17. Educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop on 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, M A; Villaseñor-Ovies, P; Harfush, L A; Navarro-Zarza, J E; Canoso, J J; Cruz-Domínguez, P; Vargas, A; Hernández-Díaz, C; Chiapas-Gasca, K; Camacho-Galindo, J; Alvarez-Nemegyei, J; Kalish, R A

    2016-05-01

    We aim to study the educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop in 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. First-year rheumatology fellows (N = 17) and a convenience sample of 1st-year orthopedic fellows (N = 14) from Mexico City in the 9th month of training participated in the study. The pre- and the post- workshop tests included the same 20 questions that had to be answered by identification or demonstration of relevant anatomical items. The questions, arranged by anatomical regions, were asked in five dynamic stations. Overall, the 31 participants showed an increase of correct answers, from a median of 6 (range 1 to 12) in the pre-workshop test, to a median of 14 (range 7 to 19) in the post-workshop test. In the pre-workshop test, the correct median answers were 7 (range 2 to 12) in the orthopedic fellows and 5 (range 1 to 10) in the rheumatology fellows (p = 0.297). Corresponding scores in the post-workshop were 15 (range 10 to 19) and 12 (range 7 to 18) (p = 0.026) showing a significant difference favoring the orthopedic group. Our clinical anatomy workshop was efficacious, in the short term, as a teaching instrument for 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. The post-workshop scores, although significantly improved in both groups, particularly in the orthopedic fellows, were still suboptimal. Further refinements of our workshop might yield better results. PMID:26400643

  18. Urban Habitat Evaluation For West Nile Virus Surveillance In Mosquitoes In Albuquerque, New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    DiMenna, Mark A.; Bueno, Rudy; Parmenter, Robert R.; Norris, Douglas E.; Sheyka, Jeff M.; Molina, Josephine L.; LaBeau, Elisa M.; Hatton, Elizabeth S.; Roberts, Christine M.; Glass, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    As part of an ongoing mosquito surveillance program, 27 sites in the greater metropolitan Albuquerque area (Bernalillo County, New Mexico) were trapped from May through September 2004. Each site was sampled for 1 night weekly, using a standard CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light trap and a gravid trap. Captured mosquitoes were catalogued by location, species, and date, and selected pools were tested for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Based on previous surveillance, WNV was already established in the state of New Mexico. Surveillance during 2003, the 1st year of WNV detection in New Mexico mosquitoes, was focused on the bosque forest of the Rio Grande river valley. Surveillance during summer of 2004 was extended to additional areas around the city of Albuquerque, the state's largest population center. In addition to the standard surveillance objectives, a secondary goal was to determine whether foci of WNV activity were detectable in other habitats besides the riparian ecosystem of the Rio Grande, and in other species not previously identified as vectors. There was no demonstrable advantage to extending the traditional trapping area outside of the Rio Grande valley. Sites in the valley area had WNV-positive mosquitoes earlier in the season, and for a longer period than the added sites. In addition, riparian sites had the highest diversity of species, the largest numbers of Culex spp. captured, and the largest proportion of the WNV-positive mosquito pools from the study. Species found in other areas of the metropolitan area were also represented in the valley. Although WNV activity was detected in other areas of the city, its activity began later and ended earlier than in the river valley. We surmise that the greatest benefit to mosquito surveillance could be achieved by focusing on the river valley area. PMID:17847847

  19. Urban habitat evaluation for West Nile virus surveillance in mosquitoes in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Mark A; Bueno, Rudy; Parmenter, Robert R; Norris, Douglas E; Sheyka, Jeff M; Molina, Josephine L; LaBeau, Elisa M; Hatton, Elizabeth S; Roberts, Christine M; Glass, Gregory E

    2007-06-01

    As part of an ongoing mosquito surveillance program, 27 sites in the greater metropolitan Albuquerque area (Bernalillo County, New Mexico) were trapped from May through September 2004. Each site was sampled for 1 night weekly, using a standard CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light trap and a gravid trap. Captured mosquitoes were catalogued by location, species, and date, and selected pools were tested for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on previous surveillance, WNV was already established in the state of New Mexico. Surveillance during 2003, the 1st year of WNV detection in New Mexico mosquitoes, was focused on the bosque forest of the Rio Grande river valley. Surveillance during summer of 2004 was extended to additional areas around the city of Albuquerque, the state's largest population center. In addition to the standard surveillance objectives, a secondary goal was to determine whether foci of WNV activity were detectable in other habitats besides the riparian ecosystem of the Rio Grande, and in other species not previously identified as vectors. There was no demonstrable advantage to extending the traditional trapping area outside of the Rio Grande valley. Sites in the valley area had WNV-positive mosquitoes earlier in the season, and for a longer period than the added sites. In addition, riparian sites had the highest diversity of species, the largest numbers of Culex spp. captured, and the largest proportion of the WNV-positive mosquito pools from the study. Species found in other areas of the metropolitan area were also represented in the valley. Although WNV activity was detected in other areas of the city, its activity began later and ended earlier than in the river valley. We surmise that the greatest benefit to mosquito surveillance could be achieved by focusing on the river valley area. PMID:17847847

  20. Investigating Students' Academic Numeracy in 1st Level University Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galligan, Linda; Hobohm, Carola

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how an online test ("Self-Test" developed at the University of Southern Queensland) can enrich students' understanding of their academic numeracy, through a purpose-built, self-assessment tool aligned with online modules. Since its creation and evaluation, the tool has been developed and tailored to suit other…

  1. 19. Detail of brick courses 116, back side, between 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Detail of brick courses 1-16, back side, between 1st and 2nd windows from the right - Oklahoma State University, Boys Dormitory, Northwest corner of Hester Street & Athletic Avenue, Stillwater, Payne County, OK

  2. 20. Detail of brick courses 4675, back side, between 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Detail of brick courses 46-75, back side, between 1st and 2nd windows from the right - Oklahoma State University, Boys Dormitory, Northwest corner of Hester Street & Athletic Avenue, Stillwater, Payne County, OK

  3. 1st International consensus guidelines for advanced breast cancer (ABC 1).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, F; Costa, A; Norton, L; Cameron, D; Cufer, T; Fallowfield, L; Francis, P; Gligorov, J; Kyriakides, S; Lin, N; Pagani, O; Senkus, E; Thomssen, C; Aapro, M; Bergh, J; Di Leo, A; El Saghir, N; Ganz, P A; Gelmon, K; Goldhirsch, A; Harbeck, N; Houssami, N; Hudis, C; Kaufman, B; Leadbeater, M; Mayer, M; Rodger, A; Rugo, H; Sacchini, V; Sledge, G; van't Veer, L; Viale, G; Krop, I; Winer, E

    2012-06-01

    The 1st international Consensus Conference for Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC 1) took place on November 2011, in Lisbon. Consensus guidelines for the management of this disease were developed. This manuscript summarizes these international consensus guidelines. PMID:22425534

  4. VIEW SOUTH/SOUTHEAST LOOKING DOWN ON 2ND AQUEDUCT AND 1ST AQUEDUCT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTH/SOUTHEAST LOOKING DOWN ON 2ND AQUEDUCT AND 1ST AQUEDUCT CASCADES TOWARDS FILTRATION PLANT AND LOS ANGELES RESERVOIR - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Cascades Structures, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. MAGAZINE E30. VIEW FROM BETWEEN 1ST AND 2ND BLAST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAGAZINE E-30. VIEW FROM BETWEEN 1ST AND 2ND BLAST WALL LOOKING TO THE REAR OF THE MAGAZINE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. 14. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, 1st floor, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, 1st floor, crib area of building, showing electrical and plumbing cribs, wall and ceiling detail, looking S. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building 105, South Broadway, on Hudson River, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  7. 4. VIEW WEST, WEST SIDE, SHOWING CHANNELS 1ST AND 2ND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW WEST, WEST SIDE, SHOWING CHANNELS 1ST AND 2ND VERTICAL BRACED DOUBLE ANGLES, DIAGONAL BRACING AND CROSS BRACED RAILING - Thirty-Sixth Street Bridge, Spanning Rabbit River, Hamilton, Allegan County, MI

  8. 62. Neg. No. F75A, Jun 18, 1930, INTERIORWAREHOUSE, 1ST FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. Neg. No. F-75A, Jun 18, 1930, INTERIOR-WAREHOUSE, 1ST FLOOR, STORAGE OF AUTOMOBILE COMPONENTS - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 45. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Turn span from SE. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  10. 46. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Overall view, from S. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  11. BLOEDNER MONUMENT (32ND INDIANA, 1ST GERMAN MONUMENT), SECTION C, FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLOEDNER MONUMENT (32ND INDIANA, 1ST GERMAN MONUMENT), SECTION C, FRONT ELEVATION DETAIL OF GERMAN TEXT. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Cave Hill National Cemetery, 701 Baxter Avenue, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  12. Poliomyelitis surveillance.

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    Attention to the 4 poliomyelitis surveillance indicators approved by the International Commission for the Certification of Poliomyelitis Eradication (ICCPE) in 1994, has deteriorated since the Americas were declared free from wild poliovirus. The indicators are designed to measure the performance of health services and the sensitivity of the surveillance system to detect wild poliovirus circulating in the community. Sensitivity is the most important characteristic of the poliomyelitis surveillance system and it is measured by the rate of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) per 100,000 under age 15 years. As of March 21, 1998, the AFP rate reached its lowest level yet in the Americas, with only Bolivia, Chile, and Honduras presenting an acceptable rate (the analysis does not include the US and Canada). The other countries in the Caribbean region and Latin America had rates under 1 AFP case per 100,000 children under age 15. It follows that only 6% of children under age 15 in the region are currently protected by a sensitive AFP surveillance system. Poliovirus may therefore be circulating silently in the region. Renewed attention must be given to the AFP surveillance indicators. PMID:12321498

  13. Investigating students' academic numeracy in 1st level university courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galligan, Linda; Hobohm, Carola

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates how an online test (`Self-Test' developed at the University of Southern Queensland) can enrich students' understanding of their academic numeracy, through a purpose-built, self-assessment tool aligned with online modules. Since its creation and evaluation, the tool has been developed and tailored to suit other first year courses based around an academic numeracy framework of competence, confidence and critical awareness (Galligan 2013a). This paper will highlight how the new Self-Test is underpinned by this framework and how students' levels of numeracy can be better understood by the lecturer through Self-Test in a first year nursing for numeracy course and a maths for teachers course. It particularly addresses over- and under-confidence, error analysis and students' reflective comments, and how this understanding can better inform course development and teaching.

  14. Equine Disease Surveillance: Quarterly Summary.

    PubMed

    2016-01-23

    West Nile virus in Europe and the USA. Evidence that the spread of vesicular stomatitis in the USA is beginning to slow. Summary of UK surveillance testing, July to September 2015 These are among matters discussed in the most recent quarterly equine disease surveillance report, prepared by Defra, the Animal Health Trust and the British Equine Veterinary Association. PMID:26795859

  15. Equine disease surveillance: quarterly summary.

    PubMed

    2016-07-30

    National and international disease outbreaksAfrican horse sickness in South AfricaRising EHV-1 abortion cases in the UKSummary of surveillance testing, January to March 2016 These are among matters discussed in the most recent quarterly equine disease surveillance report, prepared by Defra, the Animal Health Trust and the British Equine Veterinary Association. PMID:27474057

  16. 1st- and 2nd-order motion and texture resolution in central and peripheral vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. A.; Sperling, G.

    1995-01-01

    STIMULI. The 1st-order stimuli are moving sine gratings. The 2nd-order stimuli are fields of static visual texture, whose contrasts are modulated by moving sine gratings. Neither the spatial slant (orientation) nor the direction of motion of these 2nd-order (microbalanced) stimuli can be detected by a Fourier analysis; they are invisible to Reichardt and motion-energy detectors. METHOD. For these dynamic stimuli, when presented both centrally and in an annular window extending from 8 to 10 deg in eccentricity, we measured the highest spatial frequency for which discrimination between +/- 45 deg texture slants and discrimination between opposite directions of motion were each possible. RESULTS. For sufficiently low spatial frequencies, slant and direction can be discriminated in both central and peripheral vision, for both 1st- and for 2nd-order stimuli. For both 1st- and 2nd-order stimuli, at both retinal locations, slant discrimination is possible at higher spatial frequencies than direction discrimination. For both 1st- and 2nd-order stimuli, motion resolution decreases 2-3 times more rapidly with eccentricity than does texture resolution. CONCLUSIONS. (1) 1st- and 2nd-order motion scale similarly with eccentricity. (2) 1st- and 2nd-order texture scale similarly with eccentricity. (3) The central/peripheral resolution fall-off is 2-3 times greater for motion than for texture.

  17. [Use of a program-specific website to disseminate data on antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates from the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST)].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, R; Goulenok, C; Loncle-Provot, V

    2008-03-01

    Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST) is an international surveillance study designed to assess the in vitro activity of tigecycline and 11 comparators against a range of important clinical pathogens from both the community and the hospital. The updated data obtained from the TEST program are integrated in a database server and available with a web application. The website has been designed to disseminate data collected from the international TEST program to the medical community and has been developed to be user-friendly. The use of this program-specific website can be made in a timely manner to extract antimicrobial resistance data of major microorganisms based on chosen selection criteria. This article describes how to use this web-based program for different analyse-types and the multiple options to display search results. Data can be presented in a table or as a graph or diagram, according to the source of the isolate, type of unit, resistance pattern of the pathogen. The website also allows the user to compare the data of antimicrobial testing at a national or regional level. It provides within a few minutes details on the activity of tigecycline and 11 comparators against clinical isolates collected all around the world. Main results of the TEST program on the in vitro activities of tigecyline against more 65,000 clinical isolates throughout the world are presented. The internet gives infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists the opportunity to have immediate access to continuously updated surveillance data. The TEST website should be helpful to clinicians to better select agents in severe infections, particularly for empirical treatment, that is at a time when the choice of the most appropriate antibiotic is essential for the outcome of the patient. PMID:18276097

  18. Diagnostics and surveillance methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection and diagnosis of influenza A virus (IAV) infection in animals requires a laboratory test since disease from IAV presents no pathognomonic signs. Diagnosis and surveillance of animal influenza focuses on the detection of virus or type specific antibodies. Whether one targets the virus or ...

  19. [Influenza surveillance].

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Karolina; Hallmann-Szelińska, Ewelina; Kondratiuk, Katarzyna; Brydak, Lidia B

    2016-01-01

    Influenza surveillance was established in 1947. From this moment WHO (World Health Organization) has been coordinating international cooperation, with a goal of monitoring influenza virus activity, effective diagnostic of the circulating viruses and informing society about epidemics or pandemics, as well as about emergence of new subtypes of influenza virus type A. Influenza surveillance is an important task, because it enables people to prepare themselves for battle with the virus that is constantly mutating, what leads to circulation of new and often more virulent strains of influenza in human population. As vaccination is the most effective method of fighting the virus, one of the major tasks of GISRS is developing an optimal antigenic composition of the vaccine for the current epidemic season. European Influenza Surveillance Network (EISN) has also developed over the years. EISN is running integrated epidemiological and virological influenza surveillance, to provide appropriate data to public health experts in member countries, to enable them undertaking relevant activities based on the current information about influenza activity. In close cooperation with GISRS and EISN are National Influenza Centres--national institutions designated by the Ministry of Health in each country. PMID:27117107

  20. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance involves the collection and analysis of data for the detection and monitoring of threats to public health. Surveillance should also inform as to the epidemiology of the threat and its burden in the population. A further key component of surveillance is the timely feedback of data to stakeholders with a view to generating action aimed at reducing or preventing the public health threat being monitored. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance involves the collection of antibiotic susceptibility test results undertaken by microbiology laboratories on bacteria isolated from clinical samples sent for investigation. Correlation of these data with demographic and clinical data for the patient populations from whom the pathogens were isolated gives insight into the underlying epidemiology and facilitates the formulation of rational interventions aimed at reducing the burden of resistance. This article describes a range of surveillance activities that have been undertaken in the UK over a number of years, together with current interventions being implemented. These activities are not only of national importance but form part of the international response to the global threat posed by antibiotic resistance. PMID:25918439

  1. 28 CFR 550.41 - Urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Urine surveillance. 550.41 Section 550.41... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.41 Urine surveillance. A program of urine testing for drug use shall be established in contract CTCs. (a)...

  2. 28 CFR 550.41 - Urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Urine surveillance. 550.41 Section 550.41... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.41 Urine surveillance. A program of urine testing for drug use shall be established in contract CTCs. (a)...

  3. 28 CFR 550.41 - Urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Urine surveillance. 550.41 Section 550.41... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.41 Urine surveillance. A program of urine testing for drug use shall be established in contract CTCs. (a)...

  4. 28 CFR 550.41 - Urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Urine surveillance. 550.41 Section 550.41... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.41 Urine surveillance. A program of urine testing for drug use shall be established in contract CTCs. (a)...

  5. Wind-US Results for the AIAA 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis; Dippold, Vance, III; Georgiadis, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    This presentation contains Wind-US results presented at the 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop. The The workshop was organized by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Air Breathing Propulsion Propulsion Systems Integration Technical Committee with the purpose of assessing the accuracy of computational computational fluid dynamics for air breathing propulsion applications. Attendees included representatives from representatives from government, industry, academia, and commercial software companies. Participants were were encouraged to explore and discuss all aspects of the simulation process including the effects of mesh type and mesh type and refinement, solver numerical schemes, and turbulence modeling. The first set of challenge cases involved computing the thrust and discharge coefficients for a series of convergent convergent nozzles for a range of nozzle pressure ratios between 1.4 and 7.0. These configurations included a included a reference axisymmetric nozzle as well as 15deg , 25deg , and 40deg conical nozzles. Participants were also asked also asked to examine the plume shock structure for two cases where the 25deg conical nozzle was bifurcated by a bifurcated by a solid plate. The final test case was a serpentine inlet diffuser with an outlet to inlet area ratio of 1.52 ratio of 1.52 and an offset of 1.34 times the inlet diameter. Boundary layer profiles, wall static pressure, and total and total pressure at downstream rake locations were examined.

  6. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - 1st Quarter 2014 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  7. Performance indicators for 1st quarter CY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established a Department-wide Performance Indicator (PI) Program for trending and analysis of operational data as directed by DOE Order 5480.26. The PI Program was established to provide a means for monitoring the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) performance of the DOE at the Secretary and other management levels. This is the ninth in a series of quarterly reports generated for the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (DOE-ID) by EG&G Idaho, Inc. to meet the requirements of the PI Program as directed by the DOE Standard. DOE-STD-1048-92 identifies four general areas of PIs. They are: Personnel Safety, Operational Incidents, Environment and Management. These four areas have been subdivided into 26 performance indicators. Approximately 115 performance indicator control and distribution charts comprise the body of this report A brief summary of PIs contained in each of these general areas is provided in the following pages. The four EG&G facilities whose performance is charted herein are as follows: (1) The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); (2) The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC); (3) The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) and (4) The Test Reactor Area (TRA) Hot Cells.

  8. When should orthostatic blood pressure changes be evaluated in elderly: 1st, 3rd or 5th minute?

    PubMed

    Soysal, Pinar; Aydin, Ali Ekrem; Koc Okudur, Saadet; Isik, Ahmet Turan

    2016-01-01

    Detection of orthostatic hypotension (OH) is very important in geriatric practice, since OH is associated with mortality, ischemic stroke, falls, cognitive failure and depression. It was aimed to determine the most appropriate time for measuring blood pressure in transition from supine to upright position in order to diagnose OH in elderly. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) including Head up Tilt Table (HUT) test was performed in 407 geriatric patients. Orthostatic changes were assessed separately for the 1st, 3rd and 5th minutes (HUT1, HUT3 and HUT5, respectively) taking the data in supine position as the basis. The mean age, recurrent falls, presence of dementia and Parkinson's disease, number of drugs, alpha-blocker and anti-dementia drug use, and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the patients with versus without OH; whereas, albumin and 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were significantly lower (p<0.05). However, different from HUT3 and HUT5, Charlson Comorbidity Index and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus were higher, the use of antidiabetics, antipsychotics, benzodiazepine, opioid and levodopa were more common (p<0.05). Statistical significance of the number of drugs and fasting blood glucose level was prominent in HUT1 as compared to HUT3 (p<0.01, p<0.05). Comparison of the patients that had OH only in HUT1, HUT3or HUT5 revealed no difference in terms of CGA parameters. These results suggests that orthostatic blood pressure changes determined at the 1st minute might be more important for geriatric practice. Moreover, 1st minute measurement might be more convenient in the elderly as it requires shorter time in practice. PMID:27077324

  9. Surveillance of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance Using Matched Plasma and Dried Blood Spot Specimens From Voluntary Counseling and Testing Sites in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Hien, Bui Thu; Wagar, Nick; Tram, Tran Hong; Giang, Le Truong; Yang, Chunfu; Wolfe, Mitchell I.; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2012-01-01

    During 2007–2008, surveillance of transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance (TDR) was performed following World Health Organization guidance among clients with newly diagnosed HIV infection attending voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) sites in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. Moderate (5%–15%) TDR to nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was observed among VCT clients aged 18–21 years. Follow-up surveillance of TDR in HCMC and other geographic regions of Vietnam is warranted. Data generated will guide the national HIV drug resistance surveillance strategy and support selection of current and future first-line antiretroviral therapy and HIV prevention programs. PMID:22544201

  10. Self evolution: 1st domain of spiritual health

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Neera; Chaturvedi, Suresh K.; Nandan, Deoki

    2012-01-01

    While measuring physical, mental, and social health as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), the basis of measurement is in terms of Determinants. Recently with the advent of health promotion activities, the emphasis is on enabling individuals, groups, and societies to have control on these Determinants. To measure the spiritual health, the 4th Dimension, a Spiritual Health Scale consisting of 3 Domains, 6 Constructs, and 27 Determinants of spiritual health were identified through a scientific process. A statistically reliable and valid Spiritual Health Scale (SHS 2011) containing 114 items has been developed. Construct validity and test-retest reliability has been established. The 3 Domains are: Self-Evolution, Self-Actualization, and Transcendence. In this article, the process of self evolution in terms of “Wider Perspective” and “Nurturance-Art” have been captured through the Determinants like Commitment, Introspection, Honesty, Creativity, Contemplation, Prayer, Philanthropy, Extending Self, Empathy, Yoga and Exercise, Questioning Injustice, Aesthetics, Value for Time, and Being Away From Comparisons. PMID:23559785

  11. [Human ehrlichiosis: report of the 1st case in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Arraga-Alvarado, C; Montero-Ojeda, M; Bernardoni, A; Anderson, B E; Parra, O

    1996-03-01

    Human ehrlichiosis is a zoonotic disease, caused by a rickettsia that infects leukocytes. It was described for the first time in the United States of America in 1986. More than 300 cases have been reported in that country. One case has been reported in Portugal, two in France and one more in a tourist coming from Mali (Africa). In Venezuela, a tropical country, where ehrlichiosis is endemic in dogs and horses, the first case of human ehrlichiosis is reported in a seventeen month old girl. She initially had symptoms compatible with a viral illness. Then she developed a rash, acute respiratory failure, hepato-splenomegaly, neurologic abnormalities, renal failure and hematologic alterations including pancytopenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Different diagnoses were given before it was concluded that it was a case of ehrlichiosis. She was treated with tetracycline and very soon recovered. The initial diagnosis was made using buffy coat blood smears stained with Diff Quick Stain. Indirect Immunofluorescence (IFA) test was used to detect antibodies against Ehrlichia chaffeensis (1:126) but not to other rickettsias. Also the presence of platelets with ehrlichia bodies similar to E. platys from dogs, it was demonstrated, in peripheral blood from the child. The presence of these bodies in human platelets has not been previously reported. In this case, it could not be proved that the disease was transmitted by a tick bite. The presence of ehrlichia bodies in platelets from the girl's peripheral blood is also described. PMID:8920030

  12. The Surveyor Mobile Surveillance System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    This paper reports that KLM Technologies, Inc. delivered the Surveyor Mobile Surveillance System to Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMPC) in May 1986 for a long-term test and evaluation program at the Nine Mile Point Nuclear Plant. NMPC is leasing the Surveyor, and KLM personnel will be providing training and support during the test and evaluation program, which will cover various surveillance, inspection, and possible light maintenance tasks in high radiation and contamination areas of the plant. Prior to delivery to NMPC, the surveyor was demonstrated at Detroit Edison Company's Fermi II Nuclear Plant where it was judged to be rugged, compact, and easy to use for surveillance and inspection tasks.

  13. DEFENSE MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM (DMSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    AMSA operates the Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS), an executive information system whose database contains up-to-date and historical data on diseases and medical events (e.g., hospitalizations, ambulatory visits, reportable diseases, HIV tests, acute respiratory diseas...

  14. Air surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the air surveillance and monitoring programs currently in operation at that Hanford Site. Atmospheric releases of pollutants from Hanford to the surrounding region are a potential source of human exposure. For that reason, both radioactive and nonradioactive materials in air are monitored at a number of locations. The influence of Hanford emissions on local radionuclide concentrations was evaluated by comparing concentrations measured at distant locations within the region to concentrations measured at the Site perimeter. This section discusses sample collection, analytical methods, and the results of the Hanford air surveillance program. A complete listing of all analytical results summarized in this section is reported separately by Bisping (1995).

  15. Minimally Invasive Arthrodesis of 1st Metatarsophalangeal Joint for Hallux Rigidus.

    PubMed

    Sott, A H

    2016-09-01

    First metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis plays a significant role in the management of symptomatic hallux rigidus/osteoarthritis of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint. Several open and few percutaneous techniques have been described in the literature. This article describes and discusses a percutaneous technique that has been successfully used to achieve a pain-free stable and functional 1st metatarsophalangeal joint. All aspects of surgical indication and operative technique and details of patient-reported outcomes are presented with a referenced discussion. PMID:27524706

  16. Evaluation of a rapid immunodiagnostic rabies field surveillance test on samples collected from military operations in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Voehl, Kristen M; Saturday, Greg A

    2014-01-01

    The Anigen Rapid Rabies Antigen Test Kit (Bionote, Inc, Hwaseong, Korea) was evaluated using 80 clinical samples collected by US military veterinary units. Samples for the study were obtained from brain specimens of domestic and wildlife animals that were submitted to the US Army Public Health Command's Veterinary Laboratory Europe in Landstuhl, Germany, for rabies testing with the direct fluorescent antibody test. The rapid immunodiagnostic test was able to detect rabies virus antigen in clinical samples of brain tissue. The rapid immunodiagnostic test had an overall sensitivity of 96.9% and specificity of 100% when compared to the direct fluorescent antibody test. The rapid immunodiagnostic test for rabies virus antigen detection is a straightforward test that can be run under field conditions and without a microscope or electricity, and yield results in 5 to 10 minutes. This rapid immunodiagnostic test is a quick, inexpensive, and easy to use surveillance tool that can identify rabies positive animals and help focus targeted control measures with the goal of reducing the rabies burden. PMID:25074599

  17. Extended result reading window in lateral flow tests detecting exposure to Onchocerca volvulus: a new technology to improve epidemiological surveillance tools.

    PubMed

    Golden, Allison; Steel, Cathy; Yokobe, Lindsay; Jackson, Emily; Barney, Rebecca; Kubofcik, Joseph; Peck, Roger; Unnasch, Thomas R; Nutman, Thomas B; de los Santos, Tala; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2013-01-01

    Onchocerciasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by infection with the parasite Onchocerca volvulus (Ov). An estimated 180 million people are at risk for Ov infection, and 37 million people are infected, mostly in Africa. A lateral flow-based assay to detect human IgG4 antibodies to the Ov-specific antigen Ov-16 was developed as a rapid tool to detect exposure to Ov. The test, when performed on 449 sera specimens from patients with microfiladermia and Ov-negative patients, has a sensitivity of 89.1% (95% confidence interval: 86.2%-92.0%), and specificity of 97% (95% confidence interval: 95.4%-98.6%). Because the intended use of the test is for surveillance, it is highly desirable to have a stable, long-lasting result. An extended read window is thus desirable for a high-volume, busy workflow and facilitates post-surveillance quality assurance. The main restriction on achieving an extended read window for this assay was the erythrocyte lysis that can alter the signal-to-noise ratio, especially in those with low IgG4 levels (weak positives). We describe a test housing that incorporates a user-independent feature driven by assay fluid and an expanding wick that detaches the blood separation membrane from the nitrocellulose used in the assay, but before hemolysis occurs. We demonstrated material functionality at extreme operational conditions (37°C, 80% relative humidity) and a read window of a minimum of 70 days. The fluid-driven assay device performs equally as well with whole blood as with plasma, as demonstrated with 100 spiked clinical specimens (with a correlation coefficient of 0.96). We show a novel, inexpensive, and simple approach to actuating the detachment of the blood separation membrane from the nitrocellulose test with no impact on the performance characteristics of the test. PMID:23935960

  18. Patterns of Irregular Burials in Western Europe (1st-5th Century A.D.)

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Marco; Mariotti, Valentina; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Knüsel, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Irregular burials (IB—burials showing features that contrast with the majority of others in their geographic and chronological context) have been the focus of archaeological study because of their relative rarity and enigmatic appearance. Interpretations of IB often refer to supposed fear of the dead or to social processes taking place in time-specific contexts. However, a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of IB for various geographical contexts is still lacking, a fact that hampers any discussion of these burials on a larger scale. Methods Here, we collected a bibliographic dataset of 375 IB from both Britain and Continental Europe, altogether spanning a time period from the 1st to the 5th century AD. Each burial has been coded according to ten dichotomous variables, further analyzed by means of chi-squared tests on absolute frequencies, non-metric multidimensional scaling, and cluster analysis. Results Even acknowledging the limits of this study, and in particular the bias represented by the available literature, our results point to interesting patterns. Geographically, IB show a contrast between Britain and Continental Europe, possibly related to historical processes specific to these regions. Different types of IB (especially prone depositions and depositions with the cephalic extremity displaced) present a series of characteristics and associations between features that permit a more detailed conceptualization of these occurrences from a socio-cultural perspective that aids to elucidate their funerary meaning. Conclusions and Significance Altogether, the present work stresses the variability of IB, and the need to contextualize them in a proper archaeological and historical context. It contributes to the discussion of IB by providing a specific geographic and chronological frame of reference that supports a series of hypotheses about the cultural processes possibly underlying their occurrence. PMID:26115408

  19. 25. PRIMARY POWER TRANSMISSION BELT HOLES IN 1st FLOOR MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. PRIMARY POWER TRANSMISSION BELT HOLES IN 1st FLOOR MILL NO. 1 CEILING. WATER-POWERED MACHINERY LOCATED IN BASEMENT RAN LEATHER BELTS THROUGH THESE HOLES. POWER WAS THEN TRANSMITTED TO SHAFTS AND PULLEYS TO RUN MACHINERY ON MILL FLOORS. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  20. 77 FR 22574 - Filing Dates for the Washington Special Election In the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Washington Special Election In the 1st Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Washington has...

  1. 76 FR 51366 - Filing Dates for the Oregon Special Election in the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... information on these requirements, see Federal Register Notice 2009-03, 74 FR 7285 (February 17, 2009... November 8, 2011, and January 31, 2012, to fill the U.S. House seat in the 1st Congressional District... forms: One form to cover 2011 activity, labeled as the Year-End Report; and the other form to cover...

  2. 26. Photograph of original Fresnel lens a 1st order fixed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photograph of original Fresnel lens a 1st order fixed white light. (Installed 1874 and first illuminated Feb. 1, 1875. This is the only known photograph of this lens - - removed in 1929.)ca. 1918. - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  3. How Many Attempts Until Success in Some Core 1st. Year Disciplines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, Graça Leão; Andrade e Silva, João; Lopes, Margarida Chagas

    2012-01-01

    Due to a general development in education brought about by democracy, Portugal has witnessed tremendous development in Higher Education (HE) since the beginning of the 1980s. Nevertheless, the percentage of graduates among the Portuguese population still ranks far below most European countries. This is why academic performance in HE 1st cycle…

  4. 130. Post1911. Photograph labeled, 'SEASON 1913. CAPTAIN, 1st MATE, SUPT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    130. Post-1911. Photograph labeled, 'SEASON 1913. CAPTAIN, 1st MATE, SUPT AND STOREKEEPER, A.P. ASS'N CANNERY, SHIP STAR OF ALASKA.' View forward from mizzenmast, post side. - Ship BALCLUTHA, 2905 Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. First-Generation College Students' 1st-Year College Experiences: Challenges Attending a Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    First-generation college students (FGCS) face challenges when switching from high school to college and during their 1st-year in college. Additionally, FGCS may have difficulty understanding the steps required to prepare for and enroll in postsecondary education. The social capital theory examines support of social, academic, and cultural networks…

  6. 48. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms Latching mechanism, E end of turn span, view from N. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, MS. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  7. 42. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Copy of postcard ca. 1900. Copy owned and made by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Shows two-span steel truss, built by Phoenix Bridge Co. in 1878. Negative copied by: Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  8. 49. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Top of pier and underside of w end of turn span. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  9. 47. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Latching mechanism, E end of turn span, viewed from W. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  10. Highlights of the 1st Student Symposium of the ISCB RSG UK

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Farzana; Farmer, Rohit; Das, Sayoni; Vayani, Fatima; Hassan, Mehedi

    2015-01-01

    This short report summarises the scientific content and activities of a student-led event, the 1st student symposium by the UK Regional Student Group of the International Society for Computational Biology. The event took place on the 8th of October 2014. PMID:26998223

  11. The Course of Psychological Disorders in the 1st Year After Cancer Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Maria; Henry, Jane L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comorbid anxiety, depressive, and substance use disorders over the first 12-month period following a cancer diagnosis. Individuals recently diagnosed with 1st onset head and neck or lung malignancy were assessed for ASD within…

  12. Information surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiders, Barbara; McQuerry, Dennis; Ferryman, Thomas A.; Whitney, Paul D.; Rybka, Anthony

    2002-07-01

    Biological weapons are within reach of individuals, small groups, terrorist organizations, as well as nations. With pervasive integration of civilian and military populations worldwide, the ill winds of biological warfare stand to affect military troops and civilians alike. A variety of technologies are emerging - such as pathogen detection devices, streaming internet characterization tools, information exploitation techniques, automated feature extraction, and ubiquitous wireless communication - that can help. These technologies, if taken together within an integrated analytical framework, could make possible the monitoring of diverse parameters that may indicate a change in the state of health of a given population - either the emergence of a naturally occurring disease or the outbreak of a disease as a result of hostile intent. This presentation will discuss the application of new information surveillance tools and technologies as they apply to health and disease monitoring, particularly within the context of potential terrorist or hostile nation use of biological warfare. Although discussed within the specific context of health surveillance, the tools and processes described here are generally applicable within other domains of subject matter expertise.

  13. Information surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Seiders, Barbara AB; McQuerry, Dennis L.; Ferryman, Thomas A.; Whitney, Paul D.; Rybka, Anthony J.

    2002-07-15

    Biological weapons are within reach of individuals, small groups, terrorist organizations, as well as nations. With pervasive integration of civilian and military populations worldwide, the ill winds of biological warfare stand to affect military troops and civilians alike. A variety of technologies are emerging - such as pathogen detection devices, streaming internet characterization tools, information exploitation techniques, automated feature extraction, and ubiquitous wireless communication - that can help. These technologies, if taken together within an integrated analytical framework, could make possible the monitoring of diverse parameters that may indicate a change in the state of health of a given population - either the emergence of a naturally occurring disease or the outbreak of a disease as a result of hostile intent. This presentation will discuss the application of new information surveillance tools and technologies as they apply to health and disease monitoring, particularly within the context of potential terrorist or hostile nation use of biological warfare. Although discussed within the specific context of health surveillance, the tools and processes described here are generally applicable within other domains of subject matter expertise.

  14. Increases in HIV Testing among Men Who Have Sex with Men — National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System, 20 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 2008 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Laura A.; Oster, Alexandra M.; Rose, Charles E.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Le, Binh C.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, 62% of estimated new HIV diagnoses in the United States were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact (men who have sex with men, MSM); 39% of these MSM were black or African American. HIV testing, recommended at least annually by CDC for sexually active MSM, is an essential first step in HIV care and treatment for HIV-positive individuals. A variety of HIV testing initiatives, designed to reach populations disproportionately affected by HIV, have been developed at both national and local levels. We assessed changes in HIV testing behavior among MSM participating in the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System in 2008 and 2011. We compared the percentages tested in the previous 12 months in 2008 and 2011, overall and by race/ethnicity and age group. In unadjusted analyses, recent HIV testing increased from 63% in 2008 to 67% in 2011 overall (P<0.001), from 63% to 71% among black MSM (P<0.001), and from 63% to 75% among MSM of other/multiple races (P<0.001); testing did not increase significantly for white or Hispanic/Latino MSM. Multivariable model results indicated an overall increase in recent HIV testing (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] = 1.07, P<0.001). Increases were largest for black MSM (aPR = 1.12, P<0.001) and MSM of other/multiple races (aPR = 1.20, P<0.001). Among MSM aged 18–19 years, recent HIV testing was shown to increase significantly among black MSM (aPR = 1.20, P = 0.007), but not among MSM of other racial/ethnic groups. Increases in recent HIV testing among populations most affected by HIV are encouraging, but despite these increases, improved testing coverage is needed to meet CDC recommendations. PMID:25180514

  15. Impact of volcanic eruptions on the climate of the 1st millennium AD in a comprehensive climate simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sebastian; Zorita, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The climate of the 1st millennium AD shows some remarkable differences compared to the last millennium concerning variation in external forcings. Together with an orbitally induced increased solar insolation during the northern hemisphere summer season and a general lack of strong solar minima, the frequency and intensity of large tropical and extratropical eruptions is decreased. Here we present results of a new climate simulation carried out with the comprehensive Earth System Model MPI-ESM-P forced with variations in orbital, solar, volcanic and greenhouse gas variations and land use changes for the last 2,100 years. The atmospheric model has a horizontal resolution of T63 (approx. 125x125 km) and therefore also allows investigations of regional-to-continental scale climatic phenomena. The volcanic forcing was reconstructed based on a publication by Sigl et al. (2013) using the sulfate records of the NEEM and WAIS ice cores. To obtain information on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) these sulfate records were scaled to an established reconstruction from Crowley and Unterman (2010), which is also a standard forcing in the framework of CMIP5/PMIP3. A comparison between the newly created data set with the Crowley and Unterman dataset reveals that the new reconstruction shows in general weaker intensities, especially of the large tropical outbreaks and fewer northern hemispheric small-to-medium scale eruptions. However, the general pattern in the overlapping period is similar. A hypothesis that can be tested with the simulation is whether the reduced volcanic intensity of the 1st millennium AD contributed to the elevated temperature levels over Europe, evident within a new proxy-based reconstruction. On the other hand, the few but large volcanic eruptions, e.g. the 528 AD event, also induced negative decadal-scale temperature anomalies. Another interesting result of the simulation relates to the 79 AD eruption of the Vesuvius, which caused the collapse of the city of

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 1st Quarter FY2015

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Lisbeth A.

    2015-03-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 73 reportable events (27 from the 1St Qtr FY-15 and 46 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 38 other issue reports (including nine not reportable events and Significant Category A and B conditions reported during the1st Qtr FY-15) identified at INL during the past 12 months.

  17. 46. NORTH END OF MILL NO. 2, 1st FLOOR, BELOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. NORTH END OF MILL NO. 2, 1st FLOOR, BELOW PICKER AND CLOTH ROOM AREA. FUNCTION OF THIS SPACE UNKNOWN AT PRESENT. NOTE THAT EYE BEAM REPLACES ORIGINAL WALL OF 1892 PICKER HOUSE. CENTER (OR LEFT) DOOR IS ENTRY TO MILL NO. 2. RIGHT DOOR IS ENTRY TO 1892 NAPPER ROOM. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  18. 1st Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference and 3rd Czech Proteomic Conference.

    PubMed

    Kovarova, Hana; Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Archakov, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    The 1st Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference was organized together with the 3rd Czech Proteomic Conference in the TOP Hotel, Prague in the Czech Republic from the 29th to the 31st October, 2007. The aim was to strengthen links with scientists from Central and Eastern Europe including Russia, which until now have been weak or nonexistent, and to highlight the emergence of excellent proteomic studies from various countries, which until now were not visible. PMID:18282121

  19. 7. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, ELECTRICAL 1ST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, ELECTRICAL 1ST AND 2ND FLOOR PLANS, SHEET 10 of 11, DRAWING NO. 35-03-05 SF 5/1677, U.S. Army Engineer District, Detroit, Corps of Engineers, 9 June, 1959, on file Selfridge Base Museum. - Selfridge Field, Building No. 1041, West of E Street, north of D Street, Mount Clemens, Macomb County, MI

  20. Ruthenium indenylidene “1st generation” olefin metathesis catalysts containing triisopropyl phosphite

    PubMed Central

    Guidone, Stefano; Nahra, Fady; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reaction of triisopropyl phosphite with phosphine-based indenylidene pre-catalysts affords “1st generation” cis-complexes. These have been used in olefin metathesis reactions. The cis-Ru species exhibit noticeable differences with the trans-Ru parent complexes in terms of structure, thermal stability and reactivity. Experimental data underline the importance of synergistic effects between phosphites and L-type ligands. PMID:26425210

  1. 43. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Copy of photo 1900. Shows 1878 M&O RR bridge. The steamboat, 'Gopher,' in foreground, was an archeological survey vessel from the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. Published in Art in Mississippi (1901). Credit: Copied from print in Lowndes Co. Public Library by Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  2. 44. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Detail from Camille Drie's map: A Bird's Eye View of Columbus, Mississippi ca. 1875-76. Shows M&O RR bridge before the Phoenix Bridge Co. erected iron truss spans in 1878. Credit: Photostat of map in Lowndes Co. Public Library Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  3. 1st International Symposium on Stress-Associated RNA Granules in Human Disease and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Banfield, Bruce W.; Mouland, Andrew J.; McCormick, Craig

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, important linkages have been made between RNA granules and human disease processes. On June 8-10 of this year, we hosted a new symposium, dubbed the 1st International Symposium on Stress-Associated RNA Granules in Human Disease and Viral Infection. This symposium brought together experts from diverse research disciplines ranging from cancer and neuroscience to infectious disease. This report summarizes speaker presentations and highlights current challenges in the field. PMID:25256393

  4. PREFACE: 1st-2nd Young Researchers Meetings in Rome - Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YRMR Organizing Committee; Cannuccia, E.; Mazzaferro, L.; Migliaccio, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Stellato, F.; Veneziani, M.

    2011-03-01

    Students in science, particularly in physics, face a fascinating and challenging future. Scientists have proposed very interesting theories, which describe the microscopic and macroscopic world fairly well, trying to match the quantum regime with cosmological scales. Between the extremes of this scenario, biological phenomena in all their complexity take place, challenging the laws we observe in the atomic and sub-atomic world. More and more accurate and complex experiments have been devised and these are now going to test the paradigms of physics. Notable experiments include: the Large Hadronic Collider (LHC), which is going to shed light on the physics of the Standard Model of Particles and its extensions; the Planck-Herschel satellites, which target a very precise measurement of the properties of our Universe; and the Free Electron Lasers facilities, which produce high-brilliance, ultrafast X-ray pulses, allowing the investigation of the fundamental processes of solid state physics, chemistry, and biology. These projects are the result of huge collaborations spread across the world, involving scientists belonging to different and complementary research fields: physicists, chemists, biologists and others, keen to make the best of these extraordinary laboratories. Even though each branch of science is experiencing a process of growing specialization, it is very important to keep an eye on the global picture, remaining aware of the deep interconnections between inherent fields. This is even more crucial for students who are beginning their research careers. These considerations motivated PhD students and young post-docs connected to the Roman scientific research area to organize a conference, to establish the background and the network for interactions and collaborations. This resulted in the 1st and 2nd Young Researchers Meetings in Rome (http://ryrm.roma2.infn.it), one day conferences aimed primarily at graduate students and post-docs, working in physics in Italy

  5. Magnetic field induced 1st order transitions: Recent studies, and some new concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddah, P.

    2015-05-01

    Phase transitions are caused by varying temperature, or pressure, or magnetic field. The observation of 1st order magneto-structural transitions has created application possibilities based on magnetoresistance, magnetocaloric effect, magnetic shape memory effect, and magneto-dielectric effect. Magnetic field induced transitions, and phase coexistence of competing magnetic phases down to the lowest temperature, gained prominence over a decade ago with theoretical models suggesting that the ground state is not homogeneous. Researchers at Indore pushed an alternative view that this phase coexistence could be due to glasslike "kinetic arrest" of a disorder-broadened first-order magnetic transition between two states with long-range magnetic order, resulting in phase coexistence down to the lowest temperatures. The CHUF (cooling and heating in unequal field) protocol created at Indore allows the observation of `devitrification', followed by `melting'. I show examples of measurements establishing kinetic arrest in various materials, emphasizing that glasslike arrest of 1st order magnetic transitions may be as ubiquitous as glass formation following the arrest of 1st order structural transitions.

  6. Correlates of HIV Testing among Female Sex Workers in Iran: Findings of a National Bio-Behavioural Surveillance Survey

    PubMed Central

    Shokoohi, Mostafa; Karamouzian, Mohammad; Khajekazemi, Razieh; Osooli, Mehdi; Sharifi, Hamid; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Kamali, Kianoush; Mirzazadeh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Female sex workers (FSWs) are the second most affected population by HIV in Iran. However, their HIV testing practices are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate testing and its associated factors among HIV negative FSWs. Materials and Methods Using facility based sampling, 1005 FSWs were recruited in 14 cities of Iran in 2010. Biological and survey data were collected through dried blood spot testing and standardized risk assessment questionnaire, respectively. In this paper, the prevalence of HIV testing and its correlates were explored among 714 HIV-negative FSWs using descriptive statistics and logistic regression models. Results Overall 65.4% had not tested in the past year. Only 27.5% had tested in the past year and received their results. FSWs who perceived themselves at risk of HIV (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 8.35, 95% CI: 1.46, 47.6), had received free condom during past year (AOR = 3.90, 95% CI: 1.67, 9.14), started sex work at an older age (AOR18–24 = 2.83, 95% CI: 1.14, 7.0; AOR >24 = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.11, 6.84), and knew an HIV testing site (AOR = 5.67, 95% CI: 2.60, 12.4) had a significantly higher chance of having a recent HIV test result. Conclusions Less than one third of FSWs in Iran knew their recent HIV status. Interventions to help FSWs evaluate their potential risk for HIV and integrate HIV testing services in condom distribution programs, could be viable strategies in increasing HIV testing uptake among FSWs. Health policy makers should also try to de-stigmatize HIV testing, identify the barriers to HIV testing, and make HIV testing sites more visible to FSWs. PMID:26807584

  7. Report on: "The 1st Workshop on National Immunization Programs and Vaccine Coverage in ASEAN Countries, April 30, 2015, Pattaya, Thailand".

    PubMed

    Hattasingh, Weerawan; Pengsaa, Krisana; Thisyakorn, Usa

    2016-03-01

    The 1st Workshop on National Immunization Programs and Vaccine Coverage in Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Countries Group (WNIPVC-ASEAN) held a meeting on April 30, 2015, Pattaya, Thailand under the auspices of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the World Health Organization (WHO). Reports on the current status and initiatives of the national immunization program (NIP) in each ASEAN countries that attended were presented. These reports along with survey data collected from ministries of health in ASEAN countries NIPs demonstrate that good progress has been made toward the goal of the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP). However, some ASEAN countries have fragile health care systems that still have insufficient vaccine coverage of some basic EPI antigens. Most ASEAN countries still do not have national coverage of some new and underused vaccines, and raising funds for the expansion of NIPs is challenging. Also, there is insufficient research into disease burden of vaccine preventable diseases and surveillance. Health care workers must advocate NIPs to government policy makers and other stakeholders as well as improve research and surveillance to achieve the goals of the GVAP. PMID:26805596

  8. The surveillant assemblage.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, K D; Ericson, R V

    2000-12-01

    George Orwell's 'Big Brother' and Michel Foucault's 'panopticon' have dominated discussion of contemporary developments in surveillance. While such metaphors draw our attention to important attributes of surveillance, they also miss some recent dynamics in its operation. The work of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari is used to analyse the convergence of once discrete surveillance systems. The resultant 'surveillant assemblage' operates by abstracting human bodies from their territorial settings, and separating them into a series of discrete flows. These flows are then reassembled in different locations as discrete and virtual 'data doubles'. The surveillant assemblage transforms the purposes of surveillance and the hierarchies of surveillance, as well as the institution of privacy. PMID:11140886

  9. Surveillance of compliance with tobacco regulations in Örebro County, Sweden: a mixed methods study after the ban of test purchases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tobacco has long been known to be one of the most common reasons for sickness and premature deaths in the world. An important aspect of tobacco use is the youth's access to tobacco, and surveillance visits are one way to make sure how retailers are complying with age limit in the tobacco law. In Örebro County, Sweden, a project to reinforce the tobacco legislation was carried out in 2009-2010. One part of the project was surveillance visits that were done according to three different themes, called thematic surveillance. Methods This study is an evaluation of the results from thematic surveillance and has a mixed methods approach. The quantitative analyses concerns protocols from 217 surveillance visits, where questions were asked about three themes (self-monitoring programs; marketing; labeling of products and pricing). In addition, questionnaires filled out by six tobacco administrators who worked within the project were analyzed qualitatively by content analysis in order to study their perceptions and opinions of the project. Results This study shows that half of the visited retailers had self-monitoring programs. Lack of self-monitoring programs was significantly more common in smaller stores/kiosks and at restaurants. Further, the tobacco administrators who worked within the project perceived thematic surveillance as a good method for accomplishing better structure in surveillance work, but not as effective as purchase attempts (mystery shopping). Conclusions Thematic surveillance was perceived as positive and the method was also regarded to be a good way to work with surveillance. However, the method could be developed further for optimal use and better effect at the retailers. It is clear that people who work with tobacco prevention at the local level in Örebro County want to use purchase attempts as a surveillance method, and that they believe that purchase attempts is the best way to make sure if store comply with the tobacco law. PMID

  10. Relationship between a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded HIV testing initiative and past-year testing by race/ethnicity: a multilevel analysis of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Tommi L; Caldwell, Julia T; Ford, Chandra L; Mulatu, Mesfin S; Godette, Dionne C

    2016-05-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) expanded testing initiative (ETI) aims to bolster HIV testing among populations disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic by providing additional funding to health departments serving these communities. ETI prioritizes testing in clinical settings; therefore, we examined the relationship between state-level ETI participation and past-year HIV testing among a racially/ethnically diverse sample of adult respondents to the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System who accessed health services within the 12 months prior to being interviewed. Controlling for individual- and state-level characteristics in a multilevel logistic regression model, ETI participation was independently and positively associated with past-year testing, but this association varied by race/ethnicity. Hispanics had higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.11-2.02) and American Indian/Alaska Natives had lower odds (AOR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.43-0.99) of testing if they resided in states with (vs. without) ETI participation. State-level ETI participation did not significantly alter past-year testing among other racial/ethnic groups. Prioritizing public health resources in states most affected by HIV can improve testing patterns, but other mechanisms likely influence which racial/ethnic groups undergo testing. PMID:27045327

  11. Relationship between a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded HIV testing initiative and past-year testing by race/ethnicity: a multilevel analysis of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Tommi L.; Caldwell, Julia T.; Ford, Chandra L.; Mulatu, Mesfin S.; Godette, Dionne C.

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) expanded testing initiative (ETI) aims to bolster HIV testing among populations disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic by providing additional funding to health departments serving these communities. ETI prioritizes testing in clinical settings; therefore, we examined the relationship between state-level ETI participation and past-year HIV testing among a racially/ethnically diverse sample of adult respondents to the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System who accessed health services within the 12 months prior to being interviewed. Controlling for individual- and state-level characteristics in a multilevel logistic regression model, ETI participation was independently and positively associated with past-year testing, but this association varied by race/ethnicity. Hispanics had higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.11–2.02) and American Indian/Alaska Natives had lower odds (AOR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.43–0.99) of testing if they resided in states with (vs. without) ETI participation. State-level ETI participation did not significantly alter past-year testing among other racial/ethnic groups. Prioritizing public health resources in states most affected by HIV can improve testing patterns, but other mechanisms likely influence which racial/ethnic groups undergo testing. PMID:27045327

  12. In vitro efficacy of six cephalosporins tested against Enterobacteriaceae isolated at 38 North American medical centres participating in the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, 1997-1998.

    PubMed

    Jones, R N; Jenkins, S G; Hoban, D J; Pfaller, M A; Ramphal, R

    2000-07-01

    The SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program is an ongoing international collaboration that monitors the predominant bacterial and fungal pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns associated with community-acquired and nosocomial infections. SENTRY data on the current cephalosporin susceptibility patterns (1997-98) of North American isolates of clinically important Enterobacteriaceae were analyzed. Susceptibility to a selection of cephalosporins was assessed at a central laboratory using reference broth microdilution methods and interpretive criteria specified by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins tested demonstrated excellent activity against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, whereas some of the older agents maintained good efficacy. Extended spectrum beta-lactamases were detected in all regions of the United States and Canada (1.8-10.7%). Cefepime was the most active agent tested against pathogens with the potential for enzyme-mediated resistance due to Amp C. The third-generation agents maintained acceptable efficacy against Serratia marcescens, but were less effective against Citrobacter and Enterobacter species. The older cephalosporins were generally inadequate against these pathogens, in contrast to cefepime, which was the widest spectrum cephalosporin overall. Some significant regional variations in spectrum were detected. PMID:10854806

  13. ACTIVE SURVEILLANCE FOR SCRAPIE UTILIZING THIRD EYELID BIOPSY AND GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TESTING IN FLOCKS OF SHEEP IN WYOMING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of scrapie, an ovine transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disorder, has been hampered by the lack of conventional antemortem diagnostic tests. Currently, scrapie is diagnosed by postmortem examination of the brain and lymphoid tissues for PrP-Sc, the protein marker for this grou...

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility among important pathogens collected as part of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) in Spain, 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    Marco, Francesc; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Here we report in vitro activity data from the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) for tigecycline and comparators against Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms collected from 27 medical centres in Spain between 2004 and 2014. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined according to the broth microdilution methodology of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and susceptibility were determined according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) interpretive criteria. Susceptibility was >97% for all antimicrobials tested against Enterococcus faecalis, and >98% of Enterococcus faecium tested were susceptible to tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin. A total of 34.1% (1071/3143) of Staphylococcus aureus were meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and all MRSA were susceptible to tigecycline and vancomycin. Among the Streptococcus pneumoniae, 5.2% (74/1430) were penicillin-resistant and all isolates were susceptible to linezolid and vancomycin. Among the Enterobacteriaceae, 17.1% (542/3167) of Escherichia coli, 2.8% (19/682) of Klebsiella oxytoca and 19.0% (441/2327) of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates produced extend-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). Against ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae, susceptibility was highest for meropenem, amikacin and tigecycline with rates of >92% and >80%, respectively. Among the Acinetobacter baumannii, susceptibility ranged between 23.5% for levofloxacin and 51.4% for amikacin, and an MIC90 of 2mg/L was observed for tigecycline. In conclusion, monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility among organisms such as S. aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and A. baumannii is of continuing importance as a guide to clinicians. Depending on the organism to be treated, carbapenems, linezolid, vancomycin and tigecycline continue to be active in Spain. PMID:27530839

  15. Date of first positive HIV test: reliability of information collected for HIV/AIDS surveillance in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, H. Irene; Li, Jianmin; Campsmith, Michael; Sweeny, Patricia; Lee, Lisa M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the reliability of the first positive HIV test date reported in the U.S. HIV/AIDS Reporting System (HARS). This date is essential to determine case counts for resource allocation for HIV treatment and prevention efforts. METHODS: The dates of first positive HIV tests reported by individuals with HIV in an interview survey conducted in 16 states (n=16,394, interviewed 1995-2002) were compared with the dates of HIV diagnosis reported to HARS. The percentage of agreement for the year of diagnosis and the weighed kappa (k) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was calculated. RESULTS: Self-reported year of diagnosis agreed with the year of diagnosis in HARS for 56% of date pairs (k=0.69; 95% CI 0.68, 0.70); 30% reported an earlier diagnosis year. Agreement differed by sex, age, race, exposure, and reason or place of testing (p<.01). Lower agreement was found when the self-reported diagnostic test was anonymous (k=0.57; 95% CI 0.52, 0.62) compared with confidential tests (k=0.66; 95% CI 0.64, 0.68). Lower agreement was also found for cases first reported with AIDS (k=0.58; 95% CI 0.55, 0.62) compared with cases first reported with HIV not AIDS (k=0.71; 95% CI 0.70, 0.73) as well as for participants interviewed three years or more after their HARS diagnosis date (k=0.55; 95% CI 0.52, 0.57) compared with those interviewed within one year (k=0.62; 95% CI 0.61, 0.63). More than 20% of participants in almost all groups, however, reported earlier diagnosis years than those recorded in HARS. CONCLUSION: As many as 30% of HIV diagnoses may have occurred earlier than recorded in HARS. Additional studies need to determine mechanisms to adequately capture diagnosis dates in HARS. PMID:15736337

  16. Space Debris Symposium (A6.) Measurements and Space Surveillance (1.): Measurements of the Small Particle Debris Cloud from the 11 January, 2007 Chinese Anti-satellite Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark J.; Stansbery, Eugene; J.-C Liou; Stokely, Christopher; Horstman, Matthew; Whitlock, David

    2008-01-01

    On January 11, 2007, the Chinese military conducted a test of an anti-satellite (ASAT) system, destroying their own Fengyun-1C spacecraft with an interceptor missile. The resulting hypervelocity collision created an unprecedented number of tracked debris - more than 2500 objects. These objects represent only those large enough for the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN) to track - typically objects larger than about 5-10 cm in diameter. There are expected to be even more debris objects at sizes too small to be seen and tracked by the SSN. Because of the altitude of the target satellite (865 x 845 km orbit), many of the debris are expected to have long orbital lifetimes and contribute to the orbital debris environment for decades to come. In the days and weeks following the ASAT test, NASA was able to use Lincoln Laboratory s Haystack radar on several occasions to observe portions of the ASAT debris cloud. Haystack has the capability of detecting objects down to less than one centimeter in diameter, and a large number of centimeter-sized particles corresponding to the ASAT cloud were clearly seen in the data. While Haystack cannot track these objects, the statistical sampling procedures NASA uses can give an accurate statistical picture of the characteristics of the debris from a breakup event. For years computer models based on data from ground hypervelocity collision tests (e.g., the SOCIT test) and orbital collision experiments (e.g., the P-78 and Delta-180 on-orbit collisions) have been used to predict the extent and characteristics of such hypervelocity collision debris clouds, but until now there have not been good ways to verify these models in the centimeter size regime. It is believed that unplanned collisions of objects in space similar to ASAT tests will drive the long-term future evolution of the debris environment in near-Earth space. Therefore, the Chinese ASAT test provides an excellent opportunity to test the models used to predict the future debris

  17. Reuse fo a Cold War Surveillance Drone to Flight Test a NASA Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. M.; Smith, Norm

    1999-01-01

    Plans for and early feasibility investigations into the modification of a Lockheed D21B drone to flight test the DRACO Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine are discussed. Modifications include the addition of oxidizer tanks, modern avionics systems, actuators, and a vehicle recovery system. Current study results indicate that the D21B is a suitable candidate for this application and will allow demonstrations of all DRACO engine operating modes at Mach numbers between 0.8 and 4.0. Higher Mach numbers may be achieved with more extensive modification. Possible project risks include low speed stability and control, and recovery techniques.

  18. Surveillance of Populations at Risk of Cholangiocarcinoma Development in Rural Communities of Thailand Using the Korat-CCA Verbal Screening Test.

    PubMed

    Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Rujirakul, Ratana; Loyd, Ryan A; Panpimanmas, Sukij; Matrakool, Likit; Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kompor, Porntip; Norkaew, Jun; Chavengkun, Wasugree; Wakkhuwattapong, Parichart; Kujapun, Jirawoot; Ponphimai, Sukanya; Phatisena, Tanida; Eaksunti, Thawatchai; Polsripradist, Poowadol; Joosiri, Apinya; Sukkasam, Inchat; Padchasuwan, Natnapa; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a serious problem in Thailand, particularly in the northeastern region. Active surveillance in rural communities with an appropriat low-cost screening tool is required to facilitate early detection. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the population at risk of CCA in Bua Yai district, Nakhon Ratchasima province, Northeastern Thailand using the Korat-CCA verbal screening test (KCVST) during June to October 2015. Reliability of KCVST demonstrated a Cronbach alpha coefficient=0.75 Stepwise-multiple regression showed that alcohol consumption was important for CCA screened, followed by agriculture and pesticide use, under-cooked cyprinoid fish consumption, praziquantel use, naïve northeastern people, opisthorchiasis, family relatives with CCA, and cholangitis or cholecystitis or gallstones, respectively. Population at risk for CCA was classified to low risk (63.4%), moderate risk (33.7%), and high risk (1.32%) for CCA. When CCA was screened using ultrasonography, 4 of 32 high risk participants had an abnormal biliary tract with dilated bile ducts. This study indicates that KCVST is a potential useful too which decrease the cost of large scale CCA screening. PMID:27221919

  19. General Medical Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is presented. The purpose of the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the program are discussed.

  20. Performance of public health surveillance systems during the influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in the Americas: testing a new method based on Benford's Law.

    PubMed

    Idrovo, A J; Fernández-Niño, J A; Bojórquez-Chapela, I; Moreno-Montoya, J

    2011-12-01

    The A(H1N1) influenza pandemic has been a challenge for public health surveillance systems in all countries. An objective evaluation has not been conducted, as yet, of the performance of those systems during the pandemic. This paper presents an algorithm based on Benford's Law and the mortality ratio in order to evaluate the quality of the data and the sensitivity of surveillance systems. It analyses records of confirmed cases reported to the Pan American Health Organization by its 35 member countries between epidemiological weeks 13 and 47 in 2009. Seventeen countries did not fulfil Benford's Law, and mortality exceeded the regional average in 40% of the countries. The results suggest uneven performance by surveillance systems in the different countries, with the most frequent problem being low diagnostic coverage. Benford's Law proved to be a useful tool for the evaluation of a public health surveillance system's performance. PMID:21342609

  1. Instrumental Surveillance of Water Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, J. A.; And Others

    The role analytical instrumentation performs in the surveillance and control of the quality of water resources is reviewed. Commonly performed analyses may range from simple tests for physical parameters to more highly sophisticated radiological or spectrophotometric methods. This publication explores many of these types of water quality analyses…

  2. Dipolar interactions and hydrogen bonding in supramolecular aggregates: understanding cooperative phenomena for 1st hyperpolarizability.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ayan; Pati, Swapan K

    2006-12-01

    Weak intermolecular forces like dipolar interactions and hydrogen-bonding lead to a variety of different packing arrangements of molecules in crystals and self-assemblies. Such differences in the arrangements change the extent of excitonic splitting and excitation spectra in the multichromophore aggregates. In this tutorial review, the role of such interactions in fine tuning the linear and 1st non-linear optical (NLO) responses in molecular aggregates are discussed. The non-additivity of these optical properties arise specifically due to such cooperative interactions. Calculations performed on dimers, trimers and higher aggregates for model systems provide insights into the interaction mechanisms and strategies to enhance the 1st hyperpolarizabilities of pi-conjugated molecular assemblies. Flexible dipole orientations in the alkane bridged chromophores show odd-even variations in their second-harmonic responses that are explained through their dipolar interactions in different conformations. Parameters for the optical applications of molecules arranged in constrained geometry, like in Calix[n]arene, have been elucidated. We also highlight the recent developments in this field of research together with their future prospects. PMID:17225890

  3. Autopsy as a tool for learning gross anatomy during 1st year MBBS

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Parmod Kumar; Gupta, Monika; Kaur, Jaswinder

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Embalmed cadavers are the primary tool for teaching anatomy. However, difficulties are encountered due to changed color/texture of organs, hardening of tissues, and smell of formaldehyde. To overcome these difficulties, dissections on a fresh human body were shown to the 1st year MBBS students, and their perception was noted. Materials and Methods: After taking universal precautionary measures, postmortem dissections were shown to students on voluntary donated bodies in the dissection hall, in addition to the traditional teaching on embalmed cadavers. Feedback was taken from students and faculty regarding the utility of these sessions. Results: Better appreciation of texture, orientation, location, and relations of organs in fresh body, integration of teaching, awareness of the process and laws related to body donations were the outcomes of the study. However, the smell and sight of blood was felt to be nauseating by some students, and some students were worried about the spread of infectious diseases. Conclusions: Visualizing single fresh body dissection during 1st year professional MBBS is recommended either on medicolegal autopsy or on voluntarily-donated bodies. PMID:27563594

  4. Public participation in radiological surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hanf, R W; Schreckhise, R G; Patton, G W; Poston, T M; Jaquish, R E

    1997-10-01

    In 1989, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a program, for the U.S. Department of Energy, to involve local citizens in environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site. The Community-Operated Environmental Surveillance Program was patterned after similar community-involvement efforts at the Nevada Test Site and the Three Mile Island nuclear facility. Its purpose is to increase the flow of information to the public, thereby enhancing the public's awareness and understanding of surveillance activities. The program consists of two components: radiological air monitoring at nine offsite locations and agricultural product sampling at selected locations near the site. At each air-monitoring station, two local school teachers collect air particulate samples and operate equipment to monitor ambient radiation levels. Atmospheric tritium samples (as water vapor) are also collected at some locations. Four of the air-monitoring stations include large, colorful informational displays for public viewing. These displays provide details on station equipment, sample types, and sampling purposes. Instruments in the displays also monitor, record, and show real-time ambient radiation readings (measured with a pressurized ionization chamber) and meteorological conditions. Agricultural products, grown primarily by middle-school-aged students, are obtained from areas downwind of the site. Following analysis of these samples, environmental surveillance staff visit the schools to discuss the results with the students and their teachers. The data collected by these air and agricultural sampling efforts are summarized with other routinely collected sitewide surveillance data and reported annually in the Hanford Site environmental report. PMID:9314235

  5. Child gender and weight status moderate the relation of maternal feeding practices to body esteem in 1st grade children.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Lenka H; Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Harrist, Amanda W; Topham, Glade; Page, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    Prevention of body dissatisfaction development is critical for minimizing adverse effects of poor body esteem on eating behaviors, self-esteem, and overall health. Research has examined body esteem and its correlates largely in pre-adolescents and adolescents; however, important questions remain about factors influencing body esteem of younger children. The main purpose of this study was to test moderation by children's gender and weight status of the relation of maternal controlling feeding practices to 1st graders' body esteem. The Body Esteem Scale (BES) and anthropometric measurements were completed during one-on-one child interviews at school. Mothers completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire (restriction, monitoring, concern, self-assessed maternal weight). A total of 410 mother/child dyads (202 girls) participated. Percent of children classified as overweight (BMI-for-age ≥85th) was: girls - 29%; boys - 27%. Gender moderated the relation between restriction and body esteem (β = -.140, p = .05), with maternal restriction predicting body esteem in girls but not boys. The hypothesized three-way interaction among gender, child weight status, and monitoring was confirmed. Monitoring was significantly inversely related to body esteem only for overweight/obese girls (b = -1.630). The moderating influence of gender or gender and weight status on the link between maternal feeding practices and body esteem suggests the importance of body esteem interventions for girls as early as first grade. PMID:25624022

  6. The U.S.-Mexico Border Infectious Disease Surveillance Project: Establishing Binational Border Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Stephen; Lucas, Carlos Alvarez; Falcon, Veronica Carrion; Morales, Pablo Kuri; Lopez, Luis Anaya; Peter, Chris; Gutiérrez, Alejandro Escobar; Gonzalez, Ernesto Ramirez; Flisser, Ana; Bryan, Ralph; Valle, Enrique Navarro; Rodriguez, Alfonso; Hernandez, Gerardo Alvarez; Rosales, Cecilia; Ortiz, Javier Arias; Landen, Michael; Vilchis, Hugo; Rawlings, Julie; Leal, Francisco Lopez; Ortega, Luis; Flagg, Elaine; Conyer, Roberto Tapia; Cetron, Martin

    2003-01-01

    In 1997, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Mexican Secretariat of Health, and border health officials began the development of the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) project, a surveillance system for infectious diseases along the U.S.-Mexico border. During a 3-year period, a binational team implemented an active, sentinel surveillance system for hepatitis and febrile exanthems at 13 clinical sites. The network developed surveillance protocols, trained nine surveillance coordinators, established serologic testing at four Mexican border laboratories, and created agreements for data sharing and notification of selected diseases and outbreaks. BIDS facilitated investigations of dengue fever in Texas-Tamaulipas and measles in California–Baja California. BIDS demonstrates that a binational effort with local, state, and federal participation can create a regional surveillance system that crosses an international border. Reducing administrative, infrastructure, and political barriers to cross-border public health collaboration will enhance the effectiveness of disease prevention projects such as BIDS. PMID:12533288

  7. EDITORIAL: The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008) The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jack Jiqui; Fang, Fengzhou

    2009-05-01

    Nanomanufacturing is an emerging technology in the field of synthesis of nanomaterials, manufacture of nanodevices, nanosystems and the relevant characterization technologies, and will greatly impact our society and environment: speeding up scientific discovery, technological development, improving healthcare and living standards and slowing down the exhaustion of energy resources, to name but few. The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008) was held on the 13-16 July 2008 in Singapore in conjunction with ThinFilm2008 (The 4th International Conference on Technological Advances of Thin Films & Surface Coatings). Approximately 140 delegates from all over the world have participated in the conference and presented their latest discoveries and technological developments. The main focuses of the conference were modern nanomanufacturing by laser machining, focused ion beam fabrication, nano/micro-molding/imprinting, nanomaterial synthesis and characterization, nanometrology and nano/microsystems fabrication and characterization. There was also great interest in applications of nanomanufacturing technologies in traditional areas such as free form machining, polishing and grinding with nano-scale precision and the smoothness of surfaces of objects, and applications in space exploration, military and medicine. This special issue is devoted to NanoMan2008 with a collection of 9 invited talks presented at the conference, covering all the topics of nanomanufacturing technology and development. These papers have been upgraded by the authors with new results and discoveries since the preparation of the conference manuscripts, hence presenting the latest developments. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all the delegates who attended the conference and made the conference successful, and to the authors who contributed papers to this special issue. Thanks also go to the conference committee for their efforts and devotion to the conference. We

  8. Statistical Ring Opening Metathesis Copolymerization of Norbornene and Cyclopentene by Grubbs' 1st-Generation Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Nikovia, Christiana; Maroudas, Andreas-Philippos; Goulis, Panagiotis; Tzimis, Dionysios; Paraskevopoulou, Patrina; Pitsikalis, Marinos

    2015-01-01

    Statistical copolymers of norbornene (NBE) with cyclopentene (CP) were prepared by ring-opening metathesis polymerization, employing the 1st-generation Grubbs' catalyst, in the presence or absence of triphenylphosphine, PPh₃. The reactivity ratios were estimated using the Finemann-Ross, inverted Finemann-Ross, and Kelen-Tüdos graphical methods, along with the computer program COPOINT, which evaluates the parameters of binary copolymerizations from comonomer/copolymer composition data by integrating a given copolymerization equation in its differential form. Structural parameters of the copolymers were obtained by calculating the dyad sequence fractions and the mean sequence length, which were derived using the monomer reactivity ratios. The kinetics of thermal decomposition of the copolymers along with the respective homopolymers was studied by thermogravimetric analysis within the framework of the Ozawa-Flynn-Wall and Kissinger methodologies. Finally, the effect of triphenylphosphine on the kinetics of copolymerization, the reactivity ratios, and the kinetics of thermal decomposition were examined. PMID:26343620

  9. Correlates and Phenomenology of 1st and 3rd Person Memories

    PubMed Central

    Sutin, Angelina R.; Robins, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    The present research addressed fundamental questions about the visual perspective of autobiographical memories: Are stable personality characteristics associated with visual perspective? Does visual perspective influence the memory's phenomenological qualities? Participants in Study 1 (N = 1,684) completed individual-difference measures and indicated the perspective from which they generally retrieve memories. Participants in Study 2 (N = 706) retrieved a memory from their natural or manipulated perspective, rated its phenomenology, and completed the same individual-difference measures. Dissociation and anxiety were associated with 3rd person retrieval style; the Big Five personality traits were primarily unrelated to perspective. Compared to 3rd person memories, naturally-occurring 1st person memories were higher on Vividness, Coherence, Accessibility, Sensory Detail, Emotional Intensity, and Time Perspective and lower on Distancing; manipulating perspective eliminated these differences. Visual perspective is associated with clinically-relevant constructs and, although associated with the memory's phenomenology, perspective does not shape it. PMID:20665336

  10. Meeting report for the 1st skin microbiota workshop, boulder, CO October 15-16 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This report details the outcome of the 1st Skin Microbiota Workshop, Boulder, CO, held on October 15th-16th 2012. The workshop was arranged to bring Department of Defense personnel together with experts in microbial ecology, human skin physiology and anatomy, and computational techniques for interrogating the microbiome to define research frontiers at the intersection of these important areas. The workshop outlined a series of questions and created several working groups to address those questions, specifically to promote interdisciplinary activity and potential future collaboration. The US Army provided generous grant support and the meeting was organized and hosted by the University of Colorado at Boulder. A primary forward vision of the meeting was the importance of understanding skin microbial communities to improve the health and stealth of US Army warfighters.

  11. Eosinophilic airway disease in a patient with a negative skin prick test, but a positive patch test with platinum salts--implications for medical surveillance.

    PubMed

    Merget, Rolf; Fartasch, Manigé; Sander, Ingrid; Van Kampen, Vera; Raulf, Monika; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a 52-year-old woman with a topic dermatitis since adolescence who developed work-related hand eczema, cough and runny nose 12 years after she had started working as a laboratory technician at a precious metals refinery. While skin prick test with sodium hexachloroplatinate (SPTPt ) was negative, patch testing with ammonium tetrachloroplatinate was positive after 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr. Inhalation challenge with sodium hexachloroplatinate yielded cough, mild shortness of breath, and a maximal decrease of FEV1 of 8% from baseline 24 hr after the challenge. Significant increases of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, exhaled nitric monoxide and sputum eosinophils were documented after the challenge. We conclude that eosinophilic airway disease due to platinum salts may occur in SPTPt negative subjects. Both, patch testing and inhalation challenge with platinum salts should be considered in SPT negative subjects with occupational exposure to precious metal salts and work-related allergic symptoms. PMID:26010732

  12. POLE and POLD1 mutations in 529 kindred with familial colorectal cancer and/or polyposis: review of reported cases and recommendations for genetic testing and surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Fernando; Pineda, Marta; Aiza, Gemma; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Navarro, Matilde; Puente, Diana A.; Pons, Tirso; González, Sara; Iglesias, Silvia; Darder, Esther; Piñol, Virginia; Soto, José Luís; Valencia, Alfonso; Blanco, Ignacio; Urioste, Miguel; Brunet, Joan; Lázaro, Conxi; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S.; Valle, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Germ-line mutations in the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 have been recently associated with polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. Here, we aimed to gain a better understanding of the phenotypic characteristics of this syndrome to establish specific criteria for POLE and POLD1 mutation screening and to help define the clinical management of mutation carriers. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Methods: The exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 were studied in 529 kindred, 441 with familial nonpolyposis CRC and 88 with polyposis, by using pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Results: Seven novel or rare genetic variants were identified. In addition to the POLE p.L424V recurrent mutation in a patient with polyposis, CRC and oligodendroglioma, six novel or rare POLD1 variants (four of them, p.D316H, p.D316G, p.R409W, and p.L474P, with strong evidence for pathogenicity) were identified in nonpolyposis CRC families. Phenotypic data from these and previously reported POLE/POLD1 carriers point to an associated phenotype characterized by attenuated or oligo-adenomatous colorectal polyposis, CRC, and probably brain tumors. In addition, POLD1 mutations predispose to endometrial and breast tumors. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Conclusion: Our results widen the phenotypic spectrum of the POLE/POLD1-associated syndrome and identify novel pathogenic variants. We propose guidelines for genetic testing and surveillance recommendations. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. PMID:26133394

  13. Modernization of existing VVER-1000 surveillance programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kochkin, V.; Erak, D.; Makhotin, D.

    2011-07-01

    According to generally accepted world practice, evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material behavior during operation is carried out using tests of surveillance specimens. The main objective of the surveillance program consists in insurance of safe RPV operation during the design lifetime and lifetime-extension period. At present, the approaches of pressure vessels residual life validation based on the test results of their surveillance specimens have been developed and introduced in Russia and are under consideration in other countries where vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactors- (VVER-) 1000 are in operation. In this case, it is necessary to ensure leading irradiation of surveillance specimens (as compared to the pressure vessel wall) and to provide uniformly irradiated specimen groups for mechanical testing. Standard surveillance program of VVER-1000 has several significant shortcomings and does not meet these requirements. Taking into account program of lifetime extension of VVER-1000 operating in Russia, it is necessary to carry out upgrading of the VVER-1000 surveillance program. This paper studies the conditions of a surveillance specimen's irradiation and upgrading of existing sets to provide monitoring and prognosis of RPV material properties for extension of the reactor's lifetime up to 60 years or more. (authors)

  14. Species identification and antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida bloodstream isolates from population-based surveillance studies in two U.S. cities from 2008 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Shawn R; Iqbal, Naureen; Cleveland, Angela A; Farley, Monica M; Harrison, Lee H; Bolden, Carol B; Baughman, Wendy; Stein, Betsy; Hollick, Rosemary; Park, Benjamin J; Chiller, Tom

    2012-11-01

    Between 2008 and 2011, population-based candidemia surveillance was conducted in Atlanta, GA, and Baltimore, MD. Surveillance had been previously performed in Atlanta in 1992 to 1993 and in Baltimore in 1998 to 2000, making this the first population-based candidemia surveillance conducted over multiple time points in the United States. From 2,675 identified cases of candidemia in the current surveillance, 2,329 Candida isolates were collected. Candida albicans no longer comprised the majority of isolates but remained the most frequently isolated species (38%), followed by Candida glabrata (29%), Candida parapsilosis (17%), and Candida tropicalis (10%). The species distribution has changed over time; in both Atlanta and Baltimore the proportion of C. albicans isolates decreased, and the proportion of C. glabrata isolates increased, while the proportion of C. parapsilosis isolates increased in Baltimore only. There were 98 multispecies episodes, with C. albicans and C. glabrata the most frequently encountered combination. The new species-specific CLSI Candida MIC breakpoints were applied to these data. With the exception of C. glabrata (11.9% resistant), resistance to fluconazole was very low (2.3% of isolates for C. albicans, 6.2% for C. tropicalis, and 4.1% for C. parapsilosis). There was no change in the proportion of fluconazole resistance between surveillance periods. Overall echinocandin resistance was low (1% of isolates) but was higher for C. glabrata isolates, ranging from 2.1% isolates resistant to caspofungin in Baltimore to 3.1% isolates resistant to anidulafungin in Atlanta. Given the increase at both sites and the higher echinocandin resistance, C. glabrata should be closely monitored in future surveillance. PMID:22875889

  15. Surveillance for West Nile Virus in Clinic-admitted Raptors, Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Gail; Edwards, Eric; Scherpelz, Judy; Bowen, Richard; Komar, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, 13.5% of clinic-admitted raptors in northern Colorado tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV). Clinic-admitted–raptor surveillance detected WNV activity nearly 14 weeks earlier than other surveillance systems. WNV surveillance using live raptor admissions to rehabilitation clinics may offer a novel surveillance method and should be considered along with other techniques already in use. PMID:17479898

  16. Autonomous surveillance for biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Jurdak, Raja; Elfes, Alberto; Kusy, Branislav; Tews, Ashley; Hu, Wen; Hernandez, Emili; Kottege, Navinda; Sikka, Pavan

    2015-04-01

    The global movement of people and goods has increased the risk of biosecurity threats and their potential to incur large economic, social, and environmental costs. Conventional manual biosecurity surveillance methods are limited by their scalability in space and time. This article focuses on autonomous surveillance systems, comprising sensor networks, robots, and intelligent algorithms, and their applicability to biosecurity threats. We discuss the spatial and temporal attributes of autonomous surveillance technologies and map them to three broad categories of biosecurity threat: (i) vector-borne diseases; (ii) plant pests; and (iii) aquatic pests. Our discussion reveals a broad range of opportunities to serve biosecurity needs through autonomous surveillance. PMID:25744760

  17. [Entomological surveillance in Mauritius].

    PubMed

    Gopaul, R

    1995-01-01

    The entomological surveillance is an essential link in the fight against malaria in Mauritius. Because of the large number of malaria-infected travellers in Mauritius and the presence of the vector Anopheles arabiensis, the risk of local transmission is very real. The medical entomology division together with the malaria control unit and the health appointees exert a rigorous entomological surveillance of malaria. Field agents make entomological investigations of pilot villages and around the harbor and airport, where there have been cases of malaria, in addition to a few randomly chosen regions. All of the inhabited regions are accessible because of a good highway infrastructure, which enables a complete coverage for the entomological prospectives. Entomological controls are also conducted in the airplanes and the ships. All of the captured mosquitos and the harvested larva are transferred to a laboratory for identification, dissection or sensibility tests, etc. The larva of A. arabiensis have not yet developed resistance to Temephos and the adults are still sensitive to DDT. Thus, the larval habitats are treated with Temephos and DDT is sprayed in the residences where there have been native cases of malaria. The entomology division studies the ecology and the evolution of the larval habitats, as well as the impact of the anti-larval fight on the anophelene density. In addition to the chemical fight, a biological control is being tried with larva-eating fish such as Lebistes and Tilapia. In general, the anophelene density in Mauritius is low, but after the big summer rains, especially during a period of cyclones, there is a considerable increase of larval habitats and consequently a higher number of A. arabiensis. Therefore during this season, it is necessary to make an even more rigorous entomological surveillance. A. arabiensis has a strong exophile tendency even if it is endophage and exophage. This mosquito is zoophile, mostly towards cattle, and the

  18. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gömze, László A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the rheological properties of materials and their rheological behaviors during their manufacturing processes and in their applications in many cases can help to increase the efficiency and competitiveness not only of the finished goods and products but the organizations and societies also. The more scientific supported and prepared organizations develop more competitive products with better thermal, mechanical, physical, chemical and biological properties and the leading companies apply more competitive knowledge, materials, equipment and technology processes. The idea to organize in Hungary the 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials we have received from prospective scientists, physicists, chemists, mathematicians and engineers from Asia, Europe, North and South America including India, Korea, Russia, Turkey, Estonia, France, Italy, United Kingdom, Chile, Mexico and USA. The goals of ic-rmm1 the 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials are the following: • Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of modeling and measurements of rheological properties and behavior of materials under processing and applications. • Change information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implantations. • Promote the communication between the scientists of different disciplines, nations, countries and continents. The international conference ic-rmm1 provides a platform among the leading international scientists, researchers, PhD students and engineers for discussing recent achievements in measurement, modeling and application of rheology in materials technology and materials science of liquids, melts, solids, crystals and amorphous structures. Among the major fields of interest are the influences of material structures, mechanical stresses temperature and deformation speeds on rheological and physical properties, phase transformation of

  19. PREFACE: 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows (GasMems 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijns, Arjan; Valougeorgis, Dimitris; Colin, Stéphane; Baldas, Lucien

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is to advance research in Europe and worldwide in the field of gas micro flows as well as to improve global fundamental knowledge and to enable technological applications. Gas flows in microsystems are of great importance and touch almost every industrial field (e.g. fluidic microactuators for active control of aerodynamic flows, vacuum generators for extracting biological samples, mass flow and temperature micro-sensors, pressure gauges, micro heat-exchangers for the cooling of electronic components or for chemical applications, and micro gas analyzers or separators). The main characteristic of gas microflows is their rarefaction, which for device design often requires modelling and simulation both by continuous and molecular approaches. In such flows various non-equilibrium transport phenomena appear, while the role played by the interaction between the gas and the solid device surfaces becomes essential. The proposed models of boundary conditions often need an empirical adjustment strongly dependent on the micro manufacturing technique. The 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is organized under the umbrella of the recently established GASMEMS network (www.gasmems.eu/) consisting of 13 participants and six associate members. The main objectives of the network are to structure research and train researchers in the fields of micro gas dynamics, measurement techniques for gaseous flows in micro experimental setups, microstructure design and micro manufacturing with applications in lab and industry. The conference takes place on June 6-8 2012, at the Skiathos Palace Hotel, on the beautiful island of Skiathos, Greece. The conference has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement ITN GASMEMS no. 215504. It owes its success to many people. We would like to acknowledge the support of all members of the Scientific Committee and of all

  20. Improvements to Technical Specifications surveillance requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Lobel, R.; Tjader, T.R.

    1992-12-01

    In August 1983 an NRC task group was formed to investigate problems with surveillance testing required by Technical Specifications, and to recommend approaches to effect improvements. NUREG-1024 ( Technical Specifications-Enhancing Safety Impact'') resulted, and it contained recommendations to review the basis for test frequencies; to ensure that the tests promote safety and do not degrade equipment; and to review surveillance tests so that they do not unnecessarily burden personnel. The Technical Specifications Improvement Program (TSIP) was established in December 1984 to provide the framework for rewriting and improving the Technical Specifications. As an element of the TSIP, all Technical Specifications surveillance requirements were comprehensively examined as recommended in NUREG-1024. The results of that effort are presented in this report. The study found that while some testing at power is essential to verify equipment and system operability, safety can be improved, equipment degradation decreased, and unnecessary personnel burden relaxed by reducing the amount of testing at power.

  1. [Tuberculosis Laboratory Surveillance Network (TuLSA) study group. The first step for national tuberculosis laboratory surveillance: Ankara, 2011].

    PubMed

    Sezen, Figen; Albayrak, Nurhan; Özkara, Şeref; Karagöz, Alper; Alp, Alpaslan; Duyar Ağca, Filiz; İnan Süer, Asiye; Müderris, Tuba; Ceyhan, İsmail; Durmaz, Rıza; Ertek, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    The most effective method for monitoring country-level drug resistance frequency and to implement the necessary control measures is the establishment of a laboratory-based surveillance system. The aim of this study was to summarize the follow up trend of the drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) cases, determine the load of resistance and evaluate the capacities of laboratories depending on laboratory quality assurance system for the installation work of National Tuberculosis Laboratory Surveillance Network (TuLSA) which has started in Ankara in 2011. TuLSA studies was carried out under the coordination of National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory (NRL) with the participation of TB laboratories and dispensaries. Specimens of TB patients, reported from health institutions, were followed in TB laboratories, and the epidemiological information was collected from the dispensaries. One isolate per patient with the drug susceptibility test (DST) results were sent to NRL from TB laboratories and in NRL the isolates were rechecked with the genotypical (MTBDRplus, Hain Lifescience, Germany) and phenotypical (MGIT 960, BD, USA) DST methods. Molecular epidemiological analysis were also performed by spoligotyping and MIRU/VNTR. Second-line DST was applied to the isolates resistant to rifampin. A total of 1276 patients were reported between January 1st to December 31th 2011, and 335 cases were defined as "pulmonary TB from Ankara province". The mean age of those patients was 43.4 ± 20 years, and 67.5% were male. Three hundred seventeen (94.6%) patients were identified as new cases. The average sample number obtained from pulmonary TB cases was 3.26 ± 2.88, and 229 (68.3%) of them was culture positive. DST was applied to all culture positive isolates; 90.4% (207/229) of cases were susceptible to the five drugs tested (ethambutol, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, rifampicin, streptomycin). Eight (3.5%) of the isolates were multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), while no extensively drug

  2. Identifying 1st instar larvae for three forensically important blowfly species using "fingerprint" cuticular hydrocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hannah E; Adam, Craig D; Drijfhout, Falko P

    2014-07-01

    Calliphoridae are known to be the most forensically important insects when it comes to establishing the minimum post mortem interval (PMImin) in criminal investigations. The first step in calculating the PMImin is to identify the larvae present to species level. Accurate identification which is conventionally carried out by morphological analysis is crucial because different insects have different life stage timings. Rapid identification in the immature larvae stages would drastically cut time in criminal investigations as it would eliminate the need to rear larvae to adult flies to determine the species. Cuticular hydrocarbon analysis on 1st instar larvae has been applied to three forensically important blowflies; Lucilia sericata, Calliphora vicina and Calliphora vomitoria, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and principal component analysis (PCA). The results show that each species holds a distinct "fingerprint" hydrocarbon profile, allowing for accurate identification to be established in 1-day old larvae, when it can be challenging to apply morphological criteria. Consequently, this GC-MS based technique could accelerate and strengthen the identification process, not only for forensically important species, but also for other entomological samples which are hard to identify using morphological features. PMID:24815992

  3. [POPIN Advisory Committee, 1st session. Geneva, March 22-25, 1982: report].

    PubMed

    1982-09-01

    A report of the POPIN, (International Population Information Network), Advisory Committee on its 1st session. The chairman presented a progress report on the activities of the Network in general and the POPIN coordinating unit in particular. More active participation by the developing countries was stressed to share information. The working group reported the efforts made by various groups for the translation of the population multilingual thesaurus into other languages. It also reviewed the draft manuscript on inventory and evaluation of training materials to identify gaps and make suggestions for improvement. The advisory committee suggested the development of a series of shorter guides which would deal with specific subjects. The development of a common classification scheme was considered of utmost importance since it would facilitate the processing, retrieval and exchange of information. A proposed work plan for 1983 and 1984 was discussed. This included publication of the POPIN Bulletin and newsletter, preparation of documentations for the sessions of the Advisory Committee, publication of the specific guides and a directory of POPIN members. Recommendations of the committee included measures for expansion of membership, publication of Popline multilingual thesaurus and guides for specific subjects. The committee considered and adopted the recommendations. Annexes include, 1) list of participants, documents and agenda, 2) recommendations of the POPIN working group on the management of the population multilingual thesaurus, and 3) recommendations on the inventory and evaluation of teaching materials for population information services. PMID:12279381

  4. The relation between 1st grade grey matter volume and 2nd grade math competence.

    PubMed

    Price, Gavin R; Wilkey, Eric D; Yeo, Darren J; Cutting, Laurie E

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and numerical competence is a critical foundation for individual success in modern society yet the neurobiological sources of individual differences in math competence are poorly understood. Neuroimaging research over the last decade suggests that neural mechanisms in the parietal lobe, particularly the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) are structurally aberrant in individuals with mathematical learning disabilities. However, whether those same brain regions underlie individual differences in math performance across the full range of math abilities is unknown. Furthermore, previous studies have been exclusively cross-sectional, making it unclear whether variations in the structure of the IPS are caused by or consequences of the development of math skills. The present study investigates the relation between grey matter volume across the whole brain and math competence longitudinally in a representative sample of 50 elementary school children. Results show that grey matter volume in the left IPS at the end of 1st grade relates to math competence a year later at the end of 2nd grade. Grey matter volume in this region did not change over that year, and was still correlated with math competence at the end of 2nd grade. These findings support the hypothesis that the IPS and its associated functions represent a critical foundation for the acquisition of mathematical competence. PMID:26334946

  5. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop: April 5-7, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: (1) Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; (2) Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; (3) Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; (4) Identify synergies across different industries; (5) Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; (6) Understand who are the leading experts; (7) Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  6. PROPAGATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE JUNE 1st 2008 CME IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Lamb, D. A.; Davila, J. M.; Vinas, A. F.; Moestl, C.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Malandraki, O.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2009-12-01

    In this work we present a study of the coronal mass ejection (CME) of June 1st of 2008 in the interplanetary medium. This event has been extensively studied by others because of its favorable geometry and the possible consequences of its peculiar initiation for space weather forecasting. We show an analysis of the evolution of the CME in the interplanetary medium in order to shed some light on the propagation mechanism of the ICME. We have determined the typical shock associated characteristics of the ICME in order to understand the propagation properties. Using two different non force-free models of the magnetic cloud allows us to incorporate expansion of the cloud. We use in-situ measurements from STEREO B/IMPACT to characterize the ICME. In addition, we use images from STEREO A/SECCHI-HI to analyze the propagation and visual evolution of the associated flux rope in the interplanetary medium. We compare and contrast these observations with the results of the analytical models.

  7. 1st paleomagnetic investigation of Nubia Sandstone at Kalabsha, south Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, R.; Khashaba, A.; El-Hemaly, I. A.; Takla, E. M.; Abdel Aal, E.; Odah, H.

    2016-06-01

    Two profiles have been sampled from the Nubia Sandstone at Aswan, south Western Desert: the 1st profile has been taken from Abu Aggag Formation and the 2nd one was from Sabaya Formation (23.25 °N, 32.75 °E). 136 oriented cores (from 9 sites) have been sampled. Abu Aggag Formation is of Late Cretaceous (Turonian) and Sabaya Formation is of early Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian). The studied rocks are subjected to rock magnetic measurements as well as demagnetization treatment. It has been found that hematite is the main magnetic mineral in both formations. Four profile sections from Abu Aggag Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 352.7°, I = 36.6° with α95 = 5.2° and the corresponding pole lies at Lat. = 82.8 °N and Long. = 283.1 °E. Five profile sections from Sabaya Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 348.6°, I = 33.3° with α95 = 5.8° and the corresponding pole lies at Lat. = 78.3 °N and Long. = 280.4 °E. The obtained paleopole for the two formations lies at Lat. = 80.5 °N and Long. = 281.7 °E. The obtaind magnetic components are considered primary and the corresponding paleopole reflects the age of Nubia Sandstone when compared with the previously obtained Cretaceous poles for Egypt.

  8. [Struggle against typhus in the Caucasian front during the 1st World War].

    PubMed

    Karatepe, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    As an infectious disease, typhus has triggered many epidemics during the course of wars and caused thousands of death all through the ages. The French physician Charles Nicolle (1886-1936) defined its agent as a louse transferring the disease from man to man in 1909 and was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1928. Many cases were reported during the 1st World War both in the European and the Ottoman armies; and one of the most severe epidemics broke in the Caucasian front; a great number of civilians and soldiers died at winter in 1914 and 1915. Lice had to be destroyed in order to prevent the epidemic, but etuves in the Caucasian front was too few to achieve it. Clothes were cleansed in ovens by means of a method proposed by Dr. Abdülkadir Noyan (1886-1977). On March 28, 1915 the first typhus vaccination, obtained from the infected blood of the patients, was applied by Dr. Tevfik Salim (Saklam) (1882-1963). In 1916 Dr. Ahmet Fikri Tüzer discovered a disinfection apparatus called "buğu sandiği" (vapour box) which was widely used in the Caucasian front after 1917. This apparatus was highly useful in controlling the typhus epidemics. 164 health officers lost their lifes in the Caucasian front between 1914-1918, in addition, 7310 military casualties were recorded from 1915 to the end of the war. PMID:17152154

  9. Enhanced surveillance program FY1998 accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, J

    1998-10-01

    This report highlights the accomplishments of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP), the highest-priority research and development effort in stockpile management today. This is volume one of eleven, the unclassified summary of selected program highlights. These highlights fall into the following focus areas: pits, high explosives, organics, dynamics, diagnostics, systems, secondaries, materials-aging models, non-nuclear components, and routine surveillance testing system upgrades. Principal investigators from around the DOE complex contributed to this report.

  10. Small airway dysfunction by impulse oscillometry in asthmatic patients with normal forced expiratory volume in the 1st second values.

    PubMed

    Pisi, Roberta; Tzani, Panagiota; Aiello, Marina; Martinelli, Enrico; Marangio, Emilio; Nicolini, Gabriele; Olivieri, Dario; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Small airways are relevant to the pathophysiology of asthma. We investigated whether in asthmatic patients with normal forced expiratory volume in the 1st second (FEV(1)) values, impulse oscillometry system (IOS), as a measure of small airway function, contributed additional information to spirometry either at baseline or after bronchodilator, and whether it was related to the disease control. The fall in resistance from 5 to 20 Hz (R5-R20) and reactance at 5 Hz (X5) by IOS and spirometry measures of small airway function (forced expiratory flow at 25-75% [FEF(25-75)] and forced vital capacity/slow inspiratory vital capacity [FVC/SVC]) at baseline and after 400 micrograms of salbutamol were prospectively measured in 33 asthmatic patients (18 women; age range, 18-66 years). Disease control was assessed by the Asthma Control Test (ACT). R5-R20 but not X5 values were significantly related to FEF(25-75) and FVC/SVC values (p < 0.05 for both correlations). When the bronchodilator response was assessed, no correlation was found among IOS and spirometry changes. ACT scores were related to R5-R20, FEF(25-75), and FVC/SVC values (p < 0.01 for all correlations). In asthmatic patients with normal FEV(1) values, R5-R20 values were related to spirometry measures of small airway function. However, when the bronchodilator response was assessed, IOS and spirometry provided quite different results. Moreover, small airway dysfunction, as assessed by IOS and spirometry, was associated with poor disease control and history of asthma exacerbations. The results of this study confirm the value of IOS, as an investigative tool, and suggest that in asthmatic patients with normal FEV(1) values and poor disease control, small airway function should be investigated. PMID:23406931

  11. Mercury Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on mercury exposure is presented including forms, sources, permissible exposure limits, and physiological effects. The purpose of the Mercury Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Mercury Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  12. Soil and vegetation surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    Soil sampling and analysis evaluates long-term contamination trends and monitors environmental radionuclide inventories. This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the soil and vegetation surveillance programs which were conducted during 1994. Vegetation surveillance is conducted offsite to monitor atmospheric deposition of radioactive materials in areas not under cultivation and onsite at locations adjacent to potential sources of radioactivity.

  13. Arsenic surveillance program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background information about arsenic is presented including forms, common sources, and clinical symptoms of arsenic exposure. The purpose of the Arsenic Surveillance Program and LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Arsenic Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  14. Asbestos Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on asbestos is presented including the different types and the important medical distinctions between those different types. The four diseases associated with asbestos exposure are discussed: mesothelioma, lung cancer, asbestosis, and benign pleural disorders. The purpose of the LeRC Asbestos Surveillance Program is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Asbestos Monitoring at LeRC are discussed.

  15. Lead Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on lead exposure is presented including forms of lead, sources, hematologic effects, neurologic effects, endocrine effects, renal effects, and reproductive and developmental effects. The purpose of the Lead Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Lead Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  16. 78 FR 7781 - Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special elections. SUMMARY: South Carolina...

  17. Addressing the Effects of Reciprocal Teaching on the Receptive and Expressive Vocabulary of 1st-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Eliana; Osana, Helena P.; Venkatesh, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Adapted Reciprocal Teaching (ART) on the receptive and expressive flight-word vocabulary of 1st-grade students. During ART, classroom interactions produced narrative contexts within which students assumed responsibility for applying new flight words in personally meaningful ways. Students in the control group…

  18. Jordanian Kindergarten and 1st-Grade Teachers' Beliefs about Child-Based Dimensions of School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Oliemat, Enass

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the beliefs of Jordanian kindergarten and 1st-grade teachers regarding six child-based dimensions of school readiness: academic knowledge, basic thinking skills, socioemotional maturity, physical well-being and motor development, self-discipline, and communication skills. Questionnaires were used to collect…

  19. Laying a Foundation for Lifelong Learning: Case Studies of E-Assessment in Large 1st-Year Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, David

    2007-01-01

    Concerns about noncompletion and the quality of the 1st-year student experience have been linked to recent changes in higher education such as modularisation, increased class sizes, greater diversity in the student intake and reduced resources. Improving formative assessment and feedback processes is seen as one way of addressing academic failure,…

  20. Self tuning system for industrial surveillance

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Wegerich W; Jarman, Kristin K.; Gross, Kenneth C.

    2000-01-01

    A method and system for automatically establishing operational parameters of a statistical surveillance system. The method and system performs a frequency domain transition on time dependent data, a first Fourier composite is formed, serial correlation is removed, a series of Gaussian whiteness tests are performed along with an autocorrelation test, Fourier coefficients are stored and a second Fourier composite is formed. Pseudorandom noise is added, a Monte Carlo simulation is performed to establish SPRT missed alarm probabilities and tested with a synthesized signal. A false alarm test is then emperically evaluated and if less than a desired target value, then SPRT probabilities are used for performing surveillance.

  1. Computational Simulations of Convergent Nozzles for the AIAA 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippold, Vance F., III

    2014-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were completed for a series of convergent nozzles in participation of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop. The simulations were performed using the Wind-US flow solver. Discharge and thrust coefficients were computed for four axisymmetric nozzles with nozzle pressure ratios (NPR) ranging from 1.4 to 7.0. The computed discharge coefficients showed excellent agreement with available experimental data; the computed thrust coefficients captured trends observed in the experimental data, but over-predicted the thrust coefficient by 0.25 to 1.0 percent. Sonic lines were computed for cases with NPR >= 2.0 and agreed well with experimental data for NPR >= 2.5. Simulations were also performed for a 25 deg. conic nozzle bifurcated by a flat plate at NPR = 4.0. The jet plume shock structure was compared with and without the splitter plate to the experimental data. The Wind-US simulations predicted the shock structure well, though lack of grid resolution in the plume reduced the sharpness of the shock waves. Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations and Detached Eddy Simulations (DES) were performed at NPR = 1.6 for the 25 deg conic nozzle with splitter plate. The simulations predicted vortex shedding from the trailing edge of the splitter plate. However, the vortices of URANS and DES solutions appeared to dissipate earlier than observed experimentally. It is believed that a lack of grid resolution in the region of the vortex shedding may have caused the vortices to break down too soon

  2. PREFACE: 1st Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science 2013 (LPBMS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumai, Reiji; Murakami, Youichi

    2014-04-01

    From 29-31 August 2013, the 1st International Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science, LPBMS 2013, took place in the Tsukuba International Congress Center in the city of Tsukuba, Japan. The conference was a continuation of the international series Synchrotron Radiation in Materials Science (SRMS), which started in 1994. The last one, SRMS-7, was held in Oxford UK 11-14 July 2010, where the International Advisory Committee (IAC) recommended the conference be enlarged to incorporate Materials Research from Neutron, Muon, and Slow Positron Sources, as well as the science emerging from Synchrotron Light Sources. The conference brought together contributions from academics and industrial researchers with a diverse background and experience from the physics, chemistry and engineering communities. The topics covered in the LPBMS2013 include strongly correlated electron systems, magnetism and magnetic materials, soft matter, interface and surface defects, catalysts, biomaterials, and ceramics. In the 3-day scientific program, the conference consisted of 9 plenary talks, 33 invited talks, 20 oral presentations, and 126 poster presentations. We are pleased to publish the proceedings of the LPBMS2013 in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. This volume contains 58 papers representing the work that was presented and discussed at the conference. We hope that this volume will promote further development of this interdisciplinary materials research emerging from synchrotron light, neutron, muon, and slow positron sciences. Finally, we would like to thank the International Advisory Committee (Chair: Professor G N Greaves), sponsors, all the participants and contributors for making possible this international meeting of researchers. Reiji Kumai & Youichi Murakami Conference photograph Details of the program and organizing committees are available in the pdf

  3. Foreword to Selected presentations from the 1st European Hip Sport Meeting.

    PubMed

    Dallari, Dante; Ribas, Manuel

    2016-05-14

    Recent years have witnessed a growing number of people practising sports both at professional and amateur level. This trend led to a progressive rise in the incidence and prevalence of acute and chronic hip damage. The treatment of hip disease in subjects practising sports is a major challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon. The evaluation of patients, in particular those of young age with high functional demands, is inevitably complex and should be performed with a multidisciplinary approach; from a surgical point of view, it is essential to carefully assess whether the indication is towards conservative surgery or hip replacement surgery. The advent of arthroscopic surgery in recent years has allowed us to improve our knowledge of hip joint diseases, such as femoroacetabular impingement that is typical of sports and overuse activity. A correct and early diagnosis of the disease can direct the patient promptly to a conservative surgical treatment that could reduce the progression of degenerative pathology. However, when the joint is permanently damaged, the only reliable solution remains prosthetic surgery, leading to a series of issues that the orthopaedic surgeon should be able to master, leading to a thoughtful decision on, for example, which implant to use, which biomaterials, which surgical approach or which sport to practise after surgery. This supplement contains selected contributions stemming from the work performed by internationally recognised experts in the field and presented during the 1st European Hip Sport Meeting held in Bologna on May 19th, 20th, 2016 that we had the honour to co-chair. We hope that these contributions will help the orthopaedic surgeon, the sports physician and physiotherapist in their day-to-day practice, and will help in fulfilling our ultimate aim to improve the knowledge of the hip pathology related to sports and overuse activities. PMID:27174057

  4. Medical Surveillance Requirements For Nonionizing Radiation Workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, James A.

    1980-10-01

    The potential value of medical surveillance examinations for laser workers and other workers potentially exposed to high intensity optical radiation is evaluated. A review of the known adverse biological effects leads to the conclusion that most effects are related to acute and subacute exposures which do not lend themselves to effective medical surveillance. In addition, surveys of thousands of laser workers conducted since 1965 demonstrated that routine periodic medical surveillance has been unnecessary and/or impractical using currently available ophthalmic screening methods. Examination techniques to detect early changes in cataract formation or retinal degeneration (two potential chronic effects of optical radiation) are not sufficiently reliable or specific to be of value as routine screening tests. Epidemiologic studies of large worker groups are suggested to evaluate the potential for these chronic conditions to develop as the result of job exposure; however, specific recommendations for routine medical surveillance are limited to preplacement and termination examinations with appropriate evaluation of individuals following acute injury.

  5. Unattended optical surveillance equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangan, D. L.; Johnson, C. S.; Schneider, S. L.

    In many security situations, it is necessary to utilize unattended optical surveillance systems. Sandia National Laboratories has developed three optical surveillance systems which operate in the unattended surveillance mode. The first of these systems is known as the Modular Integrated Video System (MIVS). The MIVS is a microprocessor controlled video system which records scenes at selectable intervals. Each scene consists of six to ten frames recorded on a 8 mm videotape. A MIVS video recorder has the capacity to record approximately 26,000 scenes. Scenes can be recorded at intervals ranging from 1 to 99 minutes between recordings. The unit has been designed for permanent installation with facility power. The camera can be located up to 30 m from the recording module with the authentication technology protecting the cable connecting the camera to the recording unit. The Portable Surveillance unit (PSU) is a second system which has been designed for unattended operation. The PSU is designed for situations where quick set up of an optical surveillance device is required. The PSU operates in a manner similar to the MIVS and can be operated off of facility power for long time periods, or from an internal battery pack for short term surveillance applications. The Video Surveillance Unit (VSU) provides similar capabilities for permanent rack mounted installations. This paper describes the MIVS, the PSU, and the VSU, and discusses potential applications for the system. Equipment for reviewing the videotapes produced by the systems is also described.

  6. JANNAF 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee, 37th Combustion Subcommittee and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee Joint Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S.; Becker, Dorothy L.

    2000-01-01

    Volume I, the first of three volumes, is a compilation of 24 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee, 37th Combustion Subcommittee and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee (MSS) meeting held jointly with the 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee. The meeting was held 13-17 November 2000 at the Naval Postgraduate School and Hyatt Regency Hotel, Monterey, California. Topics covered include: a Keynote Address on Future Combat Systems, a review of the new JANNAF Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee, and technical papers on Hyper-X propulsion development and verification; GTX airbreathing launch vehicles; Hypersonic technology development, including program overviews, fuels for advanced propulsion, ramjet and scramjet research, hypersonic test medium effects; and RBCC engine design and performance, and PDE and UCAV advanced and combined cycle engine technologies.

  7. Breast cancer surveillance.

    PubMed

    Rachetta, Eleonora; Osano, Silvia; Astegiano, Francesco; Martincich, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Since several studies have demonstrated the inadequate diagnostic performance of mammography in high risk women, over the past two decades, different breast imaging tests have been evaluated as additional diagnostic methods to mammography, and the most relevant ones are the techniques that do not imply the use of X-rays, considering the young age of these patients and the higher radio-sensitivity. Breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has risen growing interest not only because of the absence of use of X-rays, but also because it provides morpho-functional features, which may depict biological characteristics of breast tissues, including invasive and in situ cancers. Different multicenter non-randomized prospective studies aimed to evaluate breast DCE-MRI as an integral part of surveillance programs, agreed about the evidence that in high risk women screening with DCE-MRI is more effective than either mammography and/or ultrasound. Moreover, this modality leads to the identifications of cancers at a more favorable stage, allowing a real advantage in terms of tumor size and nodal involvement. The medical community is evaluating to suggest DCE-MRI alone as screening modality in high-risk women, as it was reported that in these cases the sensitivity of MRI plus conventional imaging was not significantly higher than that of MRI alone. Breast MRI is now recommended as part of screening program for high risk women by both European and American guidelines. PMID:26924173

  8. Circuits of Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Robin; Johnson, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the increasing police use of DNA profiling and databasing as a developing instrumentality of modern state surveillance. It briefly notes previously published work on a variety of surveillance technologies and their role in the governance of social action and social order. It then argues that there are important differences amongst the ways in which several such technologies construct and use identificatory artefacts, their orientations to human subjectivity, and their role in the governmentality of citizens and others. The paper then describes the novel and powerful form of bio-surveillance offered by DNA profiling and illustrates this by reference to an ongoing empirical study of the police uses of the UK National DNA Database for the investigation of crime. It is argued that DNA profiling and databasing enable the construction of a ‘closed circuit’ of surveillance of a defined population. PMID:16467920

  9. IMPROVING WATERBORNE DISEASE SURVEILLANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public health surveillance has played a key role in controlling the spread of communicable disease and identifying the need for specific publich health practices, such as the filteration and chlorination of drinking water supplies. However, the characteristics of waterborne ou...

  10. DIALYSIS SURVEILLANCE NETWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A voluntary national surveillance system monitoring bloodstream and vascular infections. This is a yearly survey, done in collaboration with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that collects data on infection control practices, and the frequency of certain dialys...

  11. Mobile Surveillance and Monitoring Robots

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberly, Howard R.; Shipers, Larry R.

    1999-07-14

    Long-term nuclear material storage will require in-vault data verification, sensor testing, error and alarm response, inventory, and maintenance operations. System concept development efforts for a comprehensive nuclear material management system have identified the use of a small flexible mobile automation platform to perform these surveillance and maintenance operations. In order to have near-term wide-range application in the Complex, a mobile surveillance system must be small, flexible, and adaptable enough to allow retrofit into existing special nuclear material facilities. The objective of the Mobile Surveillance and Monitoring Robot project is to satisfy these needs by development of a human scale mobile robot to monitor the state of health, physical security and safety of items in storage and process; recognize and respond to alarms, threats, and off-normal operating conditions; and perform material handling and maintenance operations. The system will integrate a tool kit of onboard sensors and monitors, maintenance equipment and capability, and SNL developed non-lethal threat response technology with the intelligence to identify threats and develop and implement first response strategies for abnormal signals and alarm conditions. System versatility will be enhanced by incorporating a robot arm, vision and force sensing, robust obstacle avoidance, and appropriate monitoring and sensing equipment.

  12. Adaptive and Effortful Control and Academic Self-Efficacy Beliefs on Achievement: A Longitudinal Study of 1st through 3rd Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liew, Jeffrey; McTigue, Erin M.; Barrois, Lisa; Hughes, Jan N.

    2008-01-01

    The linkages between self-regulatory processes and achievement were examined across 3 years in 733 children beginning at 1st grade (M = 6.57 years, S.D. = 0.39 at 1st grade) who were identified as lower achieving in literacy. Accounting for consistencies in measures (from 1 year prior) and for influences of child's age, gender, IQ, ethnicity and…

  13. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research 2011 (ICMER2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Bakar, Rosli

    2012-09-01

    The year 2010 represented a significant milestone in the history of the Mechanical Engineering community with the organization of the first and second national level conferences (National Conference in Mechanical Engineering for Research, 1st and 2nd NCMER) at Universiti Malaysia Pahang on 26-27 May and 3-4 December 2010. The conferences attracted a large number of delegates from different premier academic and research institutions in the country to participate and share their research experiences at the conference. The International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER 2011) followed on from the first and second conferences due to good support from researchers. The ICMER 2011 is a good platform for researchers and postgraduate students to present their latest finding in research. The conference covers a wide range of topics including the internal combustion engine, machining processes, heat and mass transfer, fuel, biomechanical analysis, aerodynamic analysis, thermal comfort, computational techniques, design and simulation, automotive transmission, optimization techniques, hybrid electric vehicles, engine vibration, heat exchangers, finite element analysis, computational fluid dynamics, green energy, vehicle dynamics renewable energy, combustion, design, product development, advanced experimentation techniques, to name but a few. The international conference has helped to bridge the gap between researchers working at different institutions and in different countries to share their knowledge and has helped to motivate young scientists with their research. This has also given some clear direction for further research from the deliberations of the conference. Several people have contributed in different ways to the success of the conference. We thank the keynote speakers and all authors of the contributed papers, for the cooperation rendered to us in the publication of the CD conference proceedings. In particular, we would like to place on record our

  14. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuja Syed, Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    The 1st International Conference on Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies (ICSICCST-2013), took place in Karachi, Pakistan, from 24-26 June 2013. It was organized by Indus University, Karachi, in collaboration with HEJ Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi. More than 80 abstracts were submitted to the conference and were double blind-reviewed by an international scientific committee. The topics of the Conference were: Video, Image & Voice Sensing Sensing for Industry, Environment, and Health Automation and Controls Laser Sensors and Systems Displays for Innovative Applications Emerging Technologies Unmanned, Robotic, and Layered Systems Sensing for Defense, Homeland Security, and Law Enforcement The title of the conference, 'Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies' is very apt in capturing the main issues facing the industry of Pakistan and the world. We believe the sensing industry, particularly in Pakistan, is currently at a critical juncture of its development. The future of the industry will depend on how the industry players choose to respond to the challenge of global competition and opportunities arising from strong growth in the Asian region for which we are pleased to note that the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues with an international perspective. This will certainly assist industry players to make informed decisions in shaping the future of the industry. The conference gathered qualified researchers from developed countries like USA, UK, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, China, South Korea and Malaysia etc whose expertise resulting from the research can be drawn upon to build an exploitable area of new technology that has potential Defense, Homeland Security, and Military applicability. More than 250 researchers/students attended the event and made the event great success as the turnout was 100%. An exceptional line-up of speakers spoke at the occasion. We want

  15. Effects of the April 1st, 2014 GLONASS Outage on GNSS Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, F.; Berglund, H. T.; Romero, I.; D'Anastasio, E.

    2014-12-01

    The use of multi-constellation GNSS receivers has been assumed as a way to increase system integrity both by increased coverage during normal operations and failover redundancy in the event of a constellation failure. At approximately 21:00 UTC on April 1st the entire GLONASS constellation was disrupted as illegal ephemeris uploaded to each satellite took effect simultaneously. The outage continued for more than 10 hours. While ephemeris were incorrect, pseudoranges were correctly broadcast on both L1 and L2 and carrier phases were not affected; in the best case, GNSS receivers could be expected to continue to track all signals including GLONASS and at the worst to continue to track GPS and other constellations. It became clear to operators of the GeoNet network in New Zealand that the majority of their 79 GLONASS-enabled receivers experienced total tracking failures. Further detailed analysis of data from these and 315 additional GLONASS-enabled stations worldwide showed that receiver tracking behavior was affected for most receiver brands and models, both for GLONASS and GPS. Findings regarding the impacts of the GLONASS outage on receiver behavior will be highlighted. We use data recorded by GLONASS enabled global sites for the days during, preceding and following the outage to evaluate the impact of the outage on tracking and positioning performance. We observe that for some receiver types the onboard receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) failed to ignore the incorrect messages, resulting in degraded GLONASS and GPS tracking and in some cases complete tracking failures and significant data loss. In addition, many of the receivers with clock steering enabled showed outliers in their receiver clock bias estimates that also coincided with the outage. Our results show in detail how different brands, configurations, and distributions of receivers were affected to varying extents, but no common factors are apparent. This event shows that many manufacturers

  16. Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance (MEOWWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Donald G.

    2002-03-11

    The objective of this study was to identify and field test a new, low cost, wireless oil well surveillance system. A variety of suppliers and technologies were considered. One supplier and system was chosen that was low cost, new to the oil field, and successfully field tested.

  17. Surveillance and Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmorris, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an important cause of cancer-related death worldwide. If the disease is detected early, the treatment is more likely to be curative. This article discusses the current evidence regarding the surveillance and diagnosis of HCC, focusing on recent articles and the recommendations of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), which are briefly compared with the recommendations of other liver disease organizations. HCC surveillance aims to detect disease at an early stage in order to augment the likelihood of curative treatment. According to AASLD recommendations, patients who have cirrhosis and those who do not have cirrhosis but are at high risk for HCC should be screened. Ultrasonogra-phy (USG) at 6-month intervals is recommended. The available serologic markers, including serum alpha-fetoprotein, are inadequate for surveillance, even when combined with USG. Despite achievements in HCC management, physicians continue to underutilize surveillance. Quadruple-phase, contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans or magnetic resonance images with characteristic radiologic findings are commonly used to diagnose HCC in suspicious cases. The available surveillance and diagnostic tests effectively identify HCC at an early stage, and as a result, the chances of cure are increased. Physicians caring for patients who have cirrhosis and chronic liver disease should be familiar with HCC surveillance recommendations and the prognostic importance of early diagnosis. PMID:27099571

  18. Does the length of specimen storage affect influenza testing results by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction? an analysis of influenza surveillance specimens, 2008 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Caselton, Dl; Arunga, G; Emukule, G; Muthoka, P; Mayieka, L; Kosgey, A; Ochola, R; Waiboci, Lw; Feikin, Dr; Mott, Ja; Breiman, Rf; Katz, Ma

    2014-01-01

    In some influenza surveillance systems, timely transport to laboratories for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing is challenging.Guidelines suggest that samples can be stored at 4°Cfor up to 96 hours but the effect of longer storage times has not been systematically evaluated. We collected nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens from patients in Kenya and stored them in viral transport medium at 2 to 8°C before testing for influenza A and B using real-time RT-PCR. From April 2008 to November 2010, we collected 7,833 samples; 940 (12%) were positive for influenza. In multivariable analysis, specimens stored for six days were less likely to be influenza-positive compared to specimens stored between zero and one day (adjusted odds ratio (a OR): 0.49, 95%confidence interval (CI): 0.27–0.93). There was no statistically significant difference in influenza positivity of specimens stored for five days compared to zero to one day. There was no statistically significant relationship between days in refrigeration and cycle threshold(Ct) values for positive samples (p=0.31). We found that samples could remain in storage for at least five days without affecting the proportion-positive of samples,potentially increasing the feasibility of including influenza surveillance sites in remote areas. PMID:25232920

  19. Teachers' Spatial Anxiety Relates to 1st-and 2nd-Graders' Spatial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Elizabeth A.; Ramirez, Gerardo; Beilock, Sian L.; Levine, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers' anxiety about an academic domain, such as math, can impact students' learning in that domain. We asked whether this relation held in the domain of spatial skill, given the importance of spatial skill for success in math and science and its malleability at a young age. We measured 1st-and 2nd-grade teachers' spatial anxiety…

  20. Creating Research-Rich Learning Experiences and Quantitative Skills in a 1st Year Earth Systems Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. L.; Eggins, S.; Jones, S.

    2014-12-01

    We are creating a 1st year Earth Systems course at the Australian National University that is built around research-rich learning experiences and quantitative skills. The course has top students including ≤20% indigenous/foreign students; nonetheless, students' backgrounds in math and science vary considerably posing challenges for learning. We are addressing this issue and aiming to improve knowledge retention and deep learning by changing our teaching approach. In 2013-2014, we modified the weekly course structure to a 1hr lecture; a 2hr workshop with hands-on activities; a 2hr lab; an assessment piece covering all face-to-face activities; and a 1hr tutorial. Our new approach was aimed at: 1) building student confidence with data analysis and quantitative skills through increasingly difficult tasks in science, math, physics, chemistry, climate science and biology; 2) creating effective learning groups using name tags and a classroom with 8-person tiered tables; 3) requiring students to apply new knowledge to new situations in group activities, two 1-day field trips and assessment items; 4) using pre-lab and pre-workshop exercises to promote prior engagement with key concepts; 5) adding open-ended experiments to foster structured 'scientific play' or enquiry and creativity; and 6) aligning the assessment with the learning outcomes and ensuring that it contains authentic and challenging southern hemisphere problems. Students were asked to design their own ocean current experiment in the lab and we were astounded by their ingenuity: they simulated the ocean currents off Antarctica; varied water density to verify an equation; and examined the effect of wind and seafloor topography on currents. To evaluate changes in student learning, we conducted surveys in 2013 and 2014. In 2014, we found higher levels of student engagement with the course: >~80% attendance rates and >~70% satisfaction (20% neutral). The 2014 cohort felt that they were more competent in writing

  1. Gene-Environment Interaction Effects on the Development of Immune Responses in the 1st Year of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hoffjan, Sabine; Nicolae, Dan; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Roberg, Kathy; Evans, Michael; Mirel, Daniel B.; Steiner, Lori; Walker, Karen; Shult, Peter; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Gern, James E.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Ober, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Asthma is a common disease that results from both genetic and environmental risk factors. Children attending day care in the 1st year of life have lower risks for developing asthma, although the mechanism for this “day care” effect is largely unknown. We investigated the interactions between day care exposure in the 1st 6 mo of life and genotypes for 72 polymorphisms at 45 candidate loci and their effects on cytokine response profiles and on the development of atopic phenotypes in the 1st year of life in the Childhood Onset of Asthma (COAST) cohort of children. Six interactions (at four polymorphisms in three loci) with “day care” that had an effect on early-life immune phenotypes were significant at P<.001. The estimated false-discovery rate was 33%, indicating that an estimated four P values correspond to true associations. Moreover, the “day care” effect at some loci was accounted for by the increased number of viral infections among COAST children attending day care, whereas interactions at other loci were independent of the number of viral infections, indicating the presence of additional risk factors associated with day care environment. This study identified significant gene-environment interactions influencing the early patterning of the immune system and the subsequent development of asthma and highlights the importance of considering environmental risk factors in genetic analyses. PMID:15726497

  2. The theoretical simulation on electrostatic distribution of 1st proximity region in proximity focusing low-light-level image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liandong; Bai, Xiaofeng; Song, De; Fu, Shencheng; Li, Ye; Duanmu, Qingduo

    2015-03-01

    Low-light-level night vision technology is magnifying low light level signal large enough to be seen by naked eye, which uses the photons - photoelectron as information carrier. Until the micro-channel plate was invented, it has been possibility for the realization of high performance and miniaturization of low-light-level night vision device. The device is double-proximity focusing low-light-level image intensifier which places a micro-channel plate close to photocathode and phosphor screen. The advantages of proximity focusing low-light-level night vision are small size, light weight, small power consumption, no distortion, fast response speed, wide dynamic range and so on. It is placed parallel to each other for Micro-channel plate (both sides of it with metal electrode), the photocathode and the phosphor screen are placed parallel to each other. The voltage is applied between photocathode and the input of micro-channel plate when image intensifier works. The emission electron excited by photo on the photocathode move towards to micro-channel plate under the electric field in 1st proximity focusing region, and then it is multiplied through the micro-channel. The movement locus of emission electrons can be calculated and simulated when the distributions of electrostatic field equipotential lines are determined in the 1st proximity focusing region. Furthermore the resolution of image tube can be determined. However the distributions of electrostatic fields and equipotential lines are complex due to a lot of micro-channel existing in the micro channel plate. This paper simulates electrostatic distribution of 1st proximity region in double-proximity focusing low-light-level image intensifier with the finite element simulation analysis software Ansoft maxwell 3D. The electrostatic field distributions of 1st proximity region are compared when the micro-channel plates' pore size, spacing and inclination angle ranged. We believe that the electron beam movement

  3. Community -and hospital laboratory-based surveillance for respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, Philip; Whittier, Susan; Reed, Carrie; LaRussa, Philip; Larson, Elaine L; Vargas, Celibell Y; Saiman, Lisa; Stockwell, Melissa S

    2016-09-01

    Traditional surveillance for respiratory viruses relies on symptom detection and laboratory detection during medically attended encounters for acute respiratory infection/influenza-like illness (ARI/ILI). Ecological momentary reporting using text messages is a novel method for surveillance. This study compares respiratory viral activity detected through longitudinal community-based surveillance using text message responses for sample acquisition and testing to respiratory viral activity obtained from hospital laboratory data from the same community. We demonstrate a significant correlation between community- and hospital laboratory-based surveillance for most respiratory viruses, although the relative proportions of viruses detected in the community and hospital differed significantly. PMID:26987664

  4. Surveillance for Occupational Respiratory Diseases in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Antao, Vinicius C.; Pinheiro, Germania A.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic diseases, including occupational respiratory diseases (ORDs), is increasing worldwide. Nevertheless, epidemiological data on these conditions are scarce in most countries. Therefore, it is important to conduct surveillance to monitor ORDs, particularly in developing countries, where the working population is especially vulnerable and the health system infrastructure is usually weak. This article provides a general framework for the implementation of ORD surveillance in developing countries. The main objectives of surveillance are to describe incidence and prevalence of ORDs, as well as to identify sentinel events and new associations between occupational exposures and health outcomes. Diseases with high morbidity and mortality and those in which early diagnosis with standardized tests are available are especially suitable for surveillance activities. Simple strategies, preferably using existing resources and technology, are the best option for surveillance in developing countries. This article offers examples of specific surveillance systems that are in place in Brazil, China, Cuba, India, and South Africa. PMID:26024351

  5. Anomaly detection for internet surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Henri; Raaijmakers, Stephan; Halma, Arvid; Wedemeijer, Harry

    2012-06-01

    Many threats in the real world can be related to activity of persons on the internet. Internet surveillance aims to predict and prevent attacks and to assist in finding suspects based on information from the web. However, the amount of data on the internet rapidly increases and it is time consuming to monitor many websites. In this paper, we present a novel method to automatically monitor trends and find anomalies on the internet. The system was tested on Twitter data. The results showed that it can successfully recognize abnormal changes in activity or emotion.

  6. [Quality guidelines for presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and operative epilepsy therapy: 1st revised version].

    PubMed

    Rosenow, F; Bast, T; Czech, T; Hans, V; Helmstaedter, C; Huppertz, H-J; Seeck, M; Trinka, E; Wagner, K

    2014-06-01

    In patients with pharmacorefractory epilepsy, preoperative epilepsy evaluation and subsequent epilepsy surgery lead to a significant improvement of seizure control, proportion of seizure-free patients, quality of life and social participation. The aims of preoperative epilepsy evaluation are to define the chance of complete seizure freedom and the likelihood of inducing new neurological deficits in a given patient. As epilepsy surgery is an elective procedure quality standards are particularly high. As detailed in the first edition of these practice guidelines, quality control relates to seven different domains: (1) establishing centres with a sufficient number of sufficiently and specifically trained personnel, (2) minimum technical standards and equipment, (3) continuing medical education of employees, (4) surveillance by trained personnel during the video electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring (VEM), (5) systematic acquisition of clinical and outcome data, (6) the minimum number of preoperative evaluations and epilepsy surgery procedures and (7) cooperation of epilepsy centres. In the first edition of these practice guidelines published in 2000 it was defined which standards were desirable and that their implementation should be aimed for. These standards related especially to the certification required for different groups of medical doctors involved and to the minimum numbers of procedures required. In the subsequent decade quite a number of colleagues have been certified by the trinational Working Group (Arbeitsgemeinschaft, AG) for Presurgical Epilepsy Diagnosis and Operative Epilepsy Treatment (http://www.ag-epilepsiechirurgie.de) and therefore, on 8 May 2013 the executive board of the AG decided to now make these standards obligatory. PMID:24861193

  7. The 1st October 2009 Messina debris flows: first analysis for a susceptibility model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, Valerio; Cappadonia, Chiara; Conoscenti, Christian; Costanzo, Dario; Pino, Paolo; Puglisi, Claudio; Rotigliano, Edoardo

    2010-05-01

    In the evening of the 1st of October 2009, a sector of the Messina district (Sicily, Italy) was struck by a number of debris flows, triggered by extraordinary intense rainfall that, from 2 pm to 10 pm, discharged an amount of more than 160 mm and that followed the ones of September 23-24 (more than 200 mm in 10 hours). A number of villages (Altolia, Briga, Giampilieri, Guidomandri, Itala, Molino, Pezzolo, Scaletta), suffered for severe damages, including the destruction of houses and small buildings and more of 30 deaths. The area is located South from the city of Messina and mainly includes five short fluvial basins, that from the Peloritanian chain drain south-eastward for some kilometres to the Ionian sea. The area is characterized by the outcropping of metamorphic rocks and, due to the closeness of the chain (ranging up to 1200 meters a.s.l.) to the sea, the steepness of the slopes is typically very high. The debris flows involved the shallow layer made up of colluvial/eluvial and landslide deposits, having a thickness of some decimetres; both pure debris flow and debris slide movements have been inferred at the initiation zones, in light of the morphologic features of the source area (scarps). Also, according to the specific patterns recognized for the flow track zone, four typologies have been distinguished: ribbon-shaped, triangular, arch-shaped and multi-lobed debris flow. The landslides moved fast, as single or multiple/successive confluent style, so that already at the medium sector of the slopes, where the villages are, huge volumes of the debris flowed. Due to the shallowness of the failure zone, the high water content and velocity, the tracks of the debris flows have been highly controlled by hydrography, reaching, where no obstacles were present, the valley floor, with kilometric run-out distances. To each of the 379 recognized debris flows, which produced a total landslide area of about 7 km2, a landslide identification point (LIP) has been assigned

  8. PREFACE: PAGES 1st Young Scientists Meeting (YSM) - 'Retrospective views on our planet's future'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margrethe Basse, Ellen

    2010-03-01

    more recent pollution. The concept and format of the 1st PAGES YSM worked very well, and

  9. System For Surveillance Of Spectral Signals

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.; Criss-Puszkiewicz, Cynthia; Wilks, Alan D.

    2004-10-12

    A method and system for monitoring at least one of a system, a process and a data source. A method and system have been developed for carrying out surveillance, testing and modification of an ongoing process or other source of data, such as a spectroscopic examination. A signal from the system under surveillance is collected and compared with a reference signal, a frequency domain transformation carried out for the system signal and reference signal, a frequency domain difference function established. The process is then repeated until a full range of data is accumulated over the time domain and a Sequential Probability Ratio Test ("SPRT") methodology applied to determine a three-dimensional surface plot characteristic of the operating state of the system under surveillance.

  10. System for surveillance of spectral signals

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.; Criss-Puszkiewicz, Cynthia; Wilks, Alan D.

    2006-02-14

    A method and system for monitoring at least one of a system, a process and a data source. A method and system have been developed for carrying out surveillance, testing and modification of an ongoing process or other source of data, such as a spectroscopic examination. A signal from the system under surveillance is collected and compared with a reference signal, a frequency domain transformation carried out for the system signal and reference signal, a frequency domain difference function established. The process is then repeated until a full range of data is accumulated over the time domain and a Sequential Probability Ratio Test ("SPRT") methodology applied to determine a three-dimensional surface plot characteristic of the operating state of the system under surveillance.