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Sample records for 2-11 mev gamma

  1. Gamma-ray burst variability above 4 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Ling, J. C.; Wheaton, W. A.; Jacobson, A. S.; Mahoney, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the hard X-ray and gamma ray emissions during four bursts using the anti-coincidence shields of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 3 (HEAO 3) Gamma Ray Spectrometer is explored. Recent observations of gamma ray bursts by the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) have shown that high energy emission above 1 MeV is a common and energetically important feature (Matz et al. 1985). Time histories of four gamma ray bursts in 3 energy bands ( keV, around 511 keV, and 4 MeV) with 10.24 a resolution show that the 4 MeV flux is only weakly coupled to the spectrum below approximately 600 keV.

  2. Solar Gamma Rays Above 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Crannell, H.; Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    Processes which lead to the production of gamma rays with energy greater than 8 MeV in solar flares are reviewed and evaluated. Excited states produced by inelastic scattering, charge exchange, and spallation reactions in the abundant nuclear species are considered in order to identify nuclear lines which may contribute to the Gamma ray spectrum of solar flares. The flux of 15.11 MeV Gamma rays relative to the flux of 4.44 MeV Gamma rays from the de-excitation of the corresponding states in C12 is calculated for a number of assumed distributions of exciting particles. This flux ratio is a sensitive diagnostic of accelerated particle spectra. Other high energy nuclear levels are not so isolated as the 15.11 MeV state and are not expected to be so strong. The spectrum of Gamma rays from the decay of Pi dey is sensitive to the energy distribution of particles accelerated to energies greater than 100 MeV.

  3. Energy spectrum and flux of 3- to 20-Mev neutrons and 1- to 10-Mev gamma rays in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Lockwood, J. A.; Saint Onge, R. N.; Friling, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment is described which was designed to measure the neutron and gamma ray energy spectrums and fluxes in the energy intervals 3 to 20 MeV and 1 to 10 MeV, respectively. In addition, from the 3 to 20-MeV proton recoil spectrums it is possible to infer the shape of the neutron energy spectrum from 20 to 50 MeV. The detecting system utilized a separate charged particle rejection scheme and a two-parameter display system for the output from the pulse shape discrimination which separated gamma rays from neutrons (n). Two long-duration flights were made with this detector in 1970 at Palestine, Tex. (P sub c = 4.6 Gv) and at Ft. Churchill, Canada (P sub c = 0.3 Gv).

  4. An improved time of flight gamma-ray telescope to monitor diffuse gamma-ray in the energy range 5 MeV - 50 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui-Van, A.; Sabaud, C.; Vedrenne, G.; Agrinier, B.; Gouiffes, C.; Dacostafereiraneri, A.; Lavigne, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A time of flight measuring device is the basic triggering system of most of medium and high energy gamma-ray telescopes. A simple gamma-ray telescope has been built in order to check in flight conditions the functioning of an advanced time of flight system. The technical ratings of the system are described. This telescope has been flown twice with stratospheric balloons, its axis being oriented at various Zenital directions. Flight results are presented for diffuse gamma-rays, atmospheric secondaries, and various causes of noise in the 5 MeV-50 MeV energy range.

  5. Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corvan, D. J. Sarri, G.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-15

    A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Preliminary results on SAS-2 observations of greater than 30 MeV gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.

    1963-01-01

    A description is given of the SAS-2 detector and its measurements of gamma ray sources greater than 30 MeV. Results indicate that gamma rays come from discrete energetic sources, the galactic plane, and diffuse presumably extragalactic regions not associated with the galactic plane.

  7. A three-dimensional study of 30- to 300-MeV atmospheric gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional study of atmospheric gamma rays with energy greater than 30 MeV has been carried out. A knowledge of these atmospheric secondaries has significant applications to the study of cosmic gamma rays. For detectors carried on balloons, atmospherically produced gamma rays are the major source of background. For satellite detectors, atmospheric secondaries provide a calibration source. Experimental results were obtained from four balloon flights from Palestine, Texas, with a 15 cm by 15 cm digitized wire grid spark chamber. The energy spectrum for downward-moving gamma rays steepens with increasing atmospheric depth. Near the top of the atmosphere, the spectrum steepens with increasing zenith angle. A new model of atmospheric secondary production has calculated the depth, the energy, and the zenith angle dependence of gamma rays above 30 MeV, using a comprehensive three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the nucleon-meson-electromagnetic cascade.

  8. Neutron-induced 2.2 MeV background in gamma ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanrosso, E. M.; Long, J. L.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron-induced gamma ray production is an important source of background in Compton scatter gamma ray telescopes where organic scintillator material is used. Most important is deuteron formation when atmospheric albedo and locally produced neutrons are thermalized and subsequently absorbed in the hydrogenous material. The resulting 2.2 MeV gamma ray line radiation essentially represents a continuous isotropic source within the scintillator itself. Interestingly, using a scintillator material with a high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio to minimize the scintillator material with a high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio to minimize the neutron-induced 4.4 MeV carbon line favors the np reaction. The full problem of neutron-induced background in Compton scatter telescopes has been previously discussed. Results are presented of observations with the University of California balloon-borne Compton scatter telescope where the 2.2 MeV induced line emission is prominently seen.

  9. Effect of 1.33 Mev gamma radiation and 0.5 Mev electrons on the mechanical properties of graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.; Naranong, N.

    1982-01-01

    Epoxy/graphite fiber, polyimide/graphite fiber, and polysulfone/graphite fiber composites were exposed to 1.33 Mev gamma irradiation and 0.5 Mev electron bombardment for varying periods of time. The effects of the irradiation treatments on the breaking stress and Young's modulus were studied by a three point bending test. Effects were small; both electron radiation up to 5000 Mrad and gamma radiation up to 350 Mrad resulted in slight increases in both stress and modulus.

  10. Observations of gamma radiation between 0.4 MeV and 7 MeV at balloon altitudes using a Compton telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; Webber, W. R.; Friling, L. A.; Macri, J.; Hsieh, L.

    1981-09-01

    Balloon-borne measurements of the atmospheric and diffuse gamma-ray flux in the energy range 0.4-7.0 MeV with a Compton telescope, which included pulse-shape discrimination of the first scattering detector and a time-of-flight system between the first and second detector elements, are reported. Comparison of the diffuse cosmic gamma-ray flux to the atmospheric gamma rays indicates that 0.2-5.0 MeV is the optimum energy range for measurements made at the top of the earth's atmosphere. The measured total atmospheric gamma-ray flux between zero and 40 deg has an energy spectrum that agrees with the calculations of Ling (1975). Observations indicate that the ratio of the diffuse to atmospheric gamma ray fluxes at 3.5 g/sq cm is a maximum, about 1.0, between 0.7 and 3.0 MeV.

  11. SAS 2 observations of the earth albedo gamma radiation above 35 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Simpson, G. A.; Ozel, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The earth albedo gamma radiation above 35 MeV in the equatorial region is investigated using observations from the second Small Astronomy Satellite. The zenith angle distribution of the gamma radiation has a peak toward the horizon which is about an order of magnitude more intense than the radiation coming from the nadir, and nearly two orders of magnitude more intense than the gamma radiation from most parts of the sky. The gamma radiation originating from the western horizon is a factor of four more intense than the radiation from the eastern horizon and a factor of three more intense than that from the northern and southern directions. This reflects the geomagnetic effects on the incident cosmic rays whose interactions produce the albedo gamma rays. The variation of the upcoming gamma ray intensity with vertical cutoff rigidity is consistent with the empirical relationship found by Gur'yan et al. (1979).

  12. Observations of 1-30 MeV gamma rays from the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanrosso, E.; Long, J. L.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported for gamma ray observations of the galactic center region made during a 15-hour balloon flight from Alice Springs, Australia on April 18, 1979. The observations were carried out with the UGR double-scatter gamma-ray telescope at energies of 1 to 30 MeV. The observations are compatible with a galactic source of approximately equal brightness along the region of system II galactic longitudes between 300 and 60 deg. The energy distribution joins smoothly to previous spark chamber results at energies above 30 MeV and to scintillator results below 1 MeV. It appears to be a combination of nuclear gamma ray lines superimposed on a power-law bremsstrahlung spectrum. The metastable C-12 line at 4.4 MeV appears to be present with a significance of about 16 standard deviations. The flux in the line is 0.0006 + or - 0.0003 photons/sq cm per sec per rad. The oxygen line at 6.1 MeV does not seem to appear significantly above background.

  13. ICF burn-history measurments using 17-MeV fusion gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.; Cable, M.D.; Dendooven, P.G.

    1995-04-12

    Fusion reaction rate for inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the Nova Laser Facility is measured with 30-ps resolution using a high-speed neutron detector. We are investigating a measurement technique based on the 16.7-MeV gamma rays that are released in deuterium-tritium fusion. Our concept is to convert gamma-ray energy into a fast burst of Cerenkov light that can be recorded with a high-speed optical detector. We have detected fusion gamma rays in preliminary experiments conducted at Nova where we used a tungsten/aerogel converter to generate Cerenkov light and an optical streak camera to record the signal.

  14. Celestial diffuse gamma radiation above 30 MeV observed by SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)-2, launched on November 15, 1972, carried into orbit a 32-deck magnetic-core digitized spark chamber gamma ray telescope to study celestial gamma radiation in the energy range above 30 MeV. In the study of several regions with b sub 2 15 deg, a finite, diffuse flux of gamma rays with a steep energy spectrum in the energy region from 35 to 200 MeV is observed. Representing the energy spectrum by a power law of the form dJ/dE = AE to - alpha power over this energy range, alpha is found along with the integral flux above 100 MeV. Combining this result with existing low energy gamma ray data yields an energy spectrum which is not a simple power law in energy, as in the X-ray region, but which demonstrates first an increase and then a decrease in slope, consistent within uncertainties with that predicted by cosmological theories, including the continuous production of high energy gamma rays primarily from neutral pi mesons throughout the history of the universe.

  15. Gamma rays of 0.3 to 30 MeV from PSR 0531+21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.; Sweeney, W.; Tuemer, T.

    1985-01-01

    Pulsed gamma rays from the Crab Pulsar PSR 0531+21 are reported for energies of 0.3 to 30 MeV. The observations were carried out with the UCR gamma ray double Compton scatter telescope launched on a balloon from Palestine, Texas at 4.5 GV, at 2200 LT, September 29, 1978. Two 8 hr observations of the pulsar were made, the first starting at 0700 UT (0200 LT) September 30 just after reaching float altitude of 4.5 g/sq cm. Analysis of the total gamma ray flux from the Crab Nebula plus pulsar using telescope vertical cell pairs was published previously. The results presented supersede the preliminary ones. The double scatter mode of the UCR telescope measures the energy of each incident gamma ray from 1 to 30 MeV and its incident angle to a ring on the sky. The time of arrival is measured to 0.05 ms. The direction of the source is obtained from overlapping rings on the sky. The count rate of the first scatter above a threshold of 0.3 MeV is recorded every 5.12 ms. The Crab Pulsar parameters were determined from six topocentric arrival times of optical pulses.

  16. Dipole strength in the {sup 235}U(gamma,gamma{sup '}) reaction up to 2.8 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Yevetska, O.; Enders, J.; Fritzsche, M.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Romig, C.; Savran, D.; Sonnabend, K.; Oberstedt, S.; Richter, A.

    2010-04-15

    Spectra of the {sup 235}U(gamma,gamma{sup '}) reaction were measured at the S-DALINAC at bremsstrahlung end-point energies E{sub 0}=3.5 and 4.4 MeV and scattering angles of 90 deg. and 135 deg. with respect to the beam axis. Discrete transitions are observed at excitation energies below 2.3 MeV only. The deduced cross sections are in rough agreement with the findings of Bertozzi et al. [Phys. Rev. C 78, 041601(R) (2008)] except for the most prominent transition, where the present result is lower by a factor of about 2. Evidence for unresolved dipole strength is found in the spectra by means of a fluctuation analysis, which was carried out up to an excitation energy of 2.8 MeV. If this unresolved strength exhibits the same ratio of E1/M1 cross sections as observed in the even-mass neighbor {sup 236}U, then the energy centroid E{sub x}=2.5(3) MeV and total strength SIGMAB(M1)arrow up=3.6(1.3)mu{sub N}{sup 2} of the M1 part are in good agreement with the systematics of the scissors mode in even-even actinide nuclei.

  17. SAS-2 observations of celestial diffuse gamma radiation above 30 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The small astronomy satellite, SAS-2, used a 32-deck magnetic core digitized spark chamber to study gamma rays with energies above 30 MeV. Data for four regions of the sky away from the galactic plane were analyzed. These regions show a finite, diffuse flux of gamma rays with a steep energy spectrum, and the flux is uniform over all the regions. Represented by a power law, the differential energy spectrum shows an index of 2.5 + or - 0.4. The steep SAS-2 spectrum and the lower energy data are reasonably consistent with a neutral pion gamma-ray spectrum which was red-shifted (such as that proposed by some cosmological theories). It is concluded that the diffuse celestial gamma ray spectrum observed presents the possibility of cosmological studies and possible evidence for a residual cosmic ray density, and supports the galactic superclusters of matter and antimatter remaining from baryon-symmetric big bang.

  18. Gamma ray lines from solar flares. [with 2.2 MeV line being strongest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The strongest line, both predicted theoretically and detected observationally at 2.2 MeV, is due to neutron capture by protons in the photosphere. The neutrons are produced in nuclear reactions of flare accelerated particles which also positrons and prompt nuclear gamma rays. From the comparison of the observed and calculated intensities of the lines at 4.4 or 6.1 MeV to that of the 2.2 MeV line, it is possible to deduce the spectrum of accelerated nuclei in the flare region; and from the absolute intensities of these lines, it is possible to obtain the total number of accelerated nuclei at the sun. The study of the 2.2 MeV line also gives information on the amount of He-3 in the photosphere. The study of the line at 0.51 MeV resulting from positron annihilation complements the data obtained from the other lines; in addition it gives information on the temperature and density in the annihilation region.

  19. GRH Characterization using 4.4 MeV ^12C Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Young, C. S.; Barton, B. T.; Mack, J. M.; McEvoy, A. M.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Miller, E. K.; Grafil, E.

    2010-11-01

    The OMEGA Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic has been characterized using a relatively well-known source of 4.43 MeV gamma rays produced from inelastic scattering of DT-neutrons off of a graphite puck placed near an imploding capsule at the OMEGA laser facility. An independently measured neutron yield, combined with the known ^12C density and ^12C(n,n'γ)^12C cross-section, allows an in-situ calibration of the GRH detection efficiency at 4.43 MeV. GRH data were collected at two different ^12C target locations to confirm the published angular distribution of gamma rays and were compared with MCNP modeling predictions. These in-situ calibrations were used to validate the GRH simulation code based on a coupled MCNP/ACCEPT Monte-Carlo method. By combining these results with other absolute calibration methods, we are able to infer a DT branching ratio for gamma to neutron production and to make an accurate plastic ablator areal density measurement.

  20. /sup 232/Th(. gamma. ,f) and (. gamma. ,n) reactions between 5 and 10 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, D.J.S.; Edwards, G.; Hawkes, N.P.; Sene, M.R.

    1985-01-15

    Cross sections for the photofission /sup 232/Th(..gamma..,f) and photoproduction /sup 232/Th(..gamma..,n) reactions have been measured with a photon energy resolution of 130, 200, 390 keV for data points taken in intervals of 100, 200, and 400 keV. (AIP)

  1. The galactic gamma-ray flux in the 0.06-5 MeV range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, D.; Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Trombka, J. I.

    1979-01-01

    The observed variation of the 72-200-keV count rate in the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometer on Apollo 16 are interpreted as being due to cosmic gamma rays associated with the Crab Nebula, Cyg X-1, and the galactic-center source. A low-resolution map is presented which shows a great enhancement in the galactic-center region; a spectrum for this region is obtained. The shape of the spectrum suggests that the emission originates from an ensemble of discrete sources. It is concluded that the gamma-ray line at 4.4 MeV is not emitted as a constant fraction of the continuum in the whole region of the galactic plane between longitudes of -50 and +22 deg.

  2. Nuclear gamma rays from 720-MeV alpha-induced reactions on Al-27 and Si-28

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieb, B. J.; Plendl, H. S.; Funsten, H. O.; Stronach, C. E.; Lind, V. G.

    1980-01-01

    Prompt gamma rays from the interaction of 720-MeV alpha particles with Al-27 and Si-28 were detected and analyzed to identify residual nuclei and to determine cross sections for production of specific levels. No gamma-ray transitions were detected from nuclei heavier than the target. From Doppler broadening, the momentum of the residual nuclei was estimated. The results are compared with previous results for 140- and 1600-MeV alphas on Al-27 and approximately 200-MeV positive or negative pions on Al-27 and Si-28 and fitted to a spallation-yield formula.

  3. The Spectrum of Isotropic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission Between 100 Mev and 820 Gev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Brandt, T. J.; Hays, E.; Perkins, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The gamma-ray sky can be decomposed into individually detected sources, diffuse emission attributed to the interactions of Galactic cosmic rays with gas and radiation fields, and a residual all-sky emission component commonly called the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background (IGRB). The IGRB comprises all extragalactic emissions too faint or too diffuse to be resolved in a given survey, as well as any residual Galactic foregrounds that are approximately isotropic. The first IGRB measurement with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) used 10 months of sky-survey data and considered an energy range between 200 MeV and 100 GeV. Improvements in event selection and characterization of cosmic-ray backgrounds, better understanding of the diffuse Galactic emission, and a longer data accumulation of 50 months, allow for a refinement and extension of the IGRB measurement with the LAT, now covering the energy range from 100 MeV to 820 GeV. The IGRB spectrum shows a significant high-energy cutoff feature, and can be well described over nearly four decades in energy by a power law with exponential cutoff having a spectral index of 2.32 plus or minus 0.02 and a break energy of (279 plus or minus 52) GeV using our baseline diffuse Galactic emission model. The total intensity attributed to the IGRB is (7.2 plus or minus 0.6) x 10(exp -6) cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) sr(exp -1) above 100 MeV, with an additional +15%/-30% systematic uncertainty due to the Galactic diffuse foregrounds.

  4. Gamma-rays of 3 to 25 MeV from the galactic anti-center and pulsar NP 0532

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Moon, S. H.; Ryan, J. M.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.; Dayton, B.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma-rays of 3 to 25 MeV are reported from the galactic anticenter region and the Crab Pulsar, NP 0532. The observations were carried out from Palestine, Texas, on May 13, 1975. Gamma-rays from the galactic anticenter were observed as the Crab Nebula passed overhead within 10 deg of the zenith. Pulsed gamma-rays from NP 0532 were observed at a 4.4-sigma significance level. The total flux from 3-25 MeV is 0.0049 + or - 0.002 photon/sq cm-sec. The pulsed flux from NP 0532 from 3 to 25 MeV is 0.00043 + or - 0.00026 photon/sq cm-sec. The ratio of the total to the pulsed flux from 3 to 25 MeV is 11 + or - 8.

  5. Development of a Quasi-monoenergetic 6 MeV Gamma Facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Hunter, Stanley D.; Parsons, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    The 6 MeV Gamma Facility has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to allow in-house characterization and testing of a wide range of gamma-ray instruments such as pixelated CdZnTe detectors for planetary science and Compton and pair-production imaging telescopes for astrophysics. The 6 MeV Gamma Facility utilizes a circulating flow of water irradiated by 14 MeV neutrons to produce gamma rays via neutron capture on oxygen (O-16(n,p)N-16 yields O-16* yields O-16 + gamma). The facility provides a low cost, in-house source of 2.742, 6.129 and 7.117 MeV gamma rays, near the lower energy range of most accelerators and well above the 2.614 MeV line from the Th-228 decay chain, the highest energy gamma ray available from a natural radionuclide. The 7.13 s half-life of the N-16 decay allows the water to be irradiated on one side of a large granite block and pumped to the opposite side to decay. Separating the irradiation and decay regions allows for shielding material, the granite block, to be placed between them, thus reducing the low-energy gamma-ray continuum. Comparison between high purity germanium (HPGe) spectra from the facility and a manufactured source, Pu-238/C-13, shows that the low-energy continuum from the facility is reduced by a factor approx. 30 and the gamma-ray rate is approx.100 times higher at 6.129 MeV.

  6. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  7. Liquid xenon time projection chamber for gamma rays in the MeV region: Development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, E.; Bolotnikov, A.; Chen, D.; Mukherjee, R.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of a large volume Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber (LXe-TPC) for three dimensional imaging and spectroscopy of cosmic gamma ray sources, was tested with a 3.5 liter prototype. The observation of induction signals produced by MeV gamma rays in liquid xenon is reported, with a good signal-to-noise ratio. The results represent the first experimental demonstration with a liquid xenon ionization chamber of a nondestructive readout of the electron image produced by point-like charges, using a sense wire configuration of the type originally proposed in 1970 by Gatti et al. An energy resolution as good as that previously measured by the millimeter size chambers, was achieved with the large prototype of 4.4 cm drift gap.

  8. The solar gamma ray spectrum between 4 and 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Suri, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    The properties of nuclear gamma ray emission in the 4 to 8 MeV range were evaluated. This emission consists of broad and narrow lines resulting from nuclear reactions of energetic H, He, C and O nuclei with ambient matter. Calculations were compared with observations of the 1972, August 4 flare and show that: (1) essentially all the observed radiation in the 4 to 8 MeV region is to the superposition of broad and narrow lines of nuclear origin with almost no contribution from other mechanisms; (2) the accelerated particles in the energy region from about 10 to 100 MeV/amu have a relatively flat Energy spectrum; (3) the calculated gamma ray spectrum, obtained from an isotropic distribution of accelerated particles, fits the observed spectrum better than the spectrum derived from an anisotropic distribution for which the particles' velocity vectors point towards the photosphere; and (4) it is possible to set a stringent upper limit on the ratio of relativistic electrons to protons in flares, consistent with the small, but finite, electron-to-proton ratio in galactic cosmic rays.

  9. Measurements of galactic plane gamma ray emission in the energy range from 10 - 80 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A spark chamber gamma ray telescope was developed and flown to observe diffuse gamma ray emission from the central region of the galaxy. The extension of observations down to 10 MeV provides important new data indicating that the galactic diffuse gamma ray spectrum continues as a power law down to about 10 MeV, an observation in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Data from other experiments in the range from 100 keV to 10 MeV show a significant departure from the extension of the power-law fit to the medium energy observations reported here, possibly indicating that a different mechanism may be responsible for the emissions below and above a few MeV. The intensity of the spectrum above 10 MeV implies a galactic electron spectrum which is also very intense down to about 10 MeV. Electrons in this energy range cannot be observed in the solar cavity because of solar modulation effects. The galactic gamma ray data are compared with recent theoretical predictions.

  10. The Origin of the Cosmic Gamma-ray Background in the MeV Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; The, Lih-Sin; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Ajello, Marco; Canal, Ramon; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    There has been much debate about the origin of the diffuse γ-ray background in the MeV range. At lower energies, AGNs and Seyfert galaxies can explain the background, but not above ≃0.3 MeV. Beyond ˜10 MeV blazars appear to account for the flux observed. That leaves an unexplained gap for which different candidates have been proposed, including annihilations of WIMPS. One candidate is Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Early studies concluded that they were able to account for the γ-ray background in the gap, while later work attributed a significantly lower contribution to them. All those estimates were based on SN Ia explosion models that did not reflect the full 3D hydrodynamics of SN Ia explosions. In addition, new measurements obtained since 2010 have provided new, direct estimates of high-z SN Ia rates beyond z ˜ 2. We take into account these new advances to see the predicted contribution to the gamma-ray background. We use here a wide variety of explosion models and a plethora of new measurements of SN Ia rates. SNe Ia still fall short of the observed background. Only for a fit, which would imply ˜150% systematic error in detecting SN Ia events, do the theoretical predictions approach the observed fluxes. This fit is, however, at odds at the highest redshifts with recent SN Ia rate estimates. Other astrophysical sources such as flat-spectrum radio quasars do match the observed flux levels in the MeV regime, while SNe Ia make up to 30%-50% of the observed flux.

  11. Gamma rays of 1-30 MeV from the Vela Pulsar PSR 0833-45

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, T.; Long, J.; Oneill, T.; Zych, A.; White, R. S.; Dayton, B.

    1983-01-01

    Results are reported for observations of gamma rays of 1-30 MeV from the Vela Pulsar PSR 0833 - 45 carried out with the UCR double scatter gamma ray telescope on a balloon launched from Alice Springs, Australia on November 10, 1981. An integrated flux of (5.3 + or - 1.3) x 10 to the -4th photons/sq cm/s is found for the Vela region above 2 MeV. This value, together with those for the energy intervals of 2-4, 4-7, and 7-15 MeV are in reasonable agreement with the power law found by COS-B at energies above 50 MeV. A sky contour map of the fluxes is shown.

  12. Neutron propagation and 2.2 MeV gamma-ray line production in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.; Ramaty, R.

    1974-01-01

    The 2.2 MeV gamma ray line intensity from the sun was calculated using a Monte Carlo method for neutron propagation in the solar atmosphere. Detailed results are provided on the total gamma ray yield per neutron and on the time profile of the 2.2 MeV line from an instantaneous and monoenergetic neutron source. The parameters which have the most significant effects on the line intensity are the energies of the neutrons, the position of the neutron source on the sun, and the abundance of He-3 in the photosphere. For an isotropic neutron source which is not too close to the limb of the sun, the gamma ray yield is between about 0.02 to 0.2 photons per neutron, provided that the neutron energies are in the range 1 to 100 MeV and the ratio He-3/H is less than about .00005.

  13. MeV Gamma Ray Detection Algorithms for Stacked Silicon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMurray, Robert E. Jr.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Wercinski, Paul F.; Keller, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    By making use of the signature of a gamma ray event as it appears in N = 5 to 20 lithium-drifted silicon detectors and applying smart selection algorithms, gamma rays in the energy range of 1 to 8 MeV can be detected with good efficiency and selectivity. Examples of the types of algorithms used for different energy regions include the simple sum mode, the sum-coincidence mode used in segmented detectors, unique variations on sum-coincidence for an N-dimensional vector event, and a new and extremely useful mode for double escape peak spectroscopy at pair-production energies. The latter algorithm yields a spectrum similar to that of the pair spectrometer, but without the need of the dual external segments for double escape coincidence, and without the large loss in efficiency of double escape events. Background events due to Compton scattering are largely suppressed. Monte Carlo calculations were used to model the gamma ray interactions in the silicon, in order to enable testing of a wide array of different algorithms on the event N-vectors for a large-N stack.

  14. Space Detectors for Gamma Rays (100 MeV-100 GeV): from Egret to Fermi LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The design of spaceborne high-energy (E is greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray detectors depends on two principal factors: (1) the basic physics of detecting and measuring the properties of the gamma rays; and (2) the constraints of operating such a detector in space for an extended period. Improvements in technology have enabled major advances in detector performance, as illustrated by two successful instruments, EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and LAT on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  15. Tracking and imaging gamma-ray experiment (TIGRE) for 300-keV to 100-MeV gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Bhattacharya, Dipen; Blair, Scott C.; Case, Gary; Dixon, David D.; Liu, Chia-Ling; O'Neill, Terrence J.; White, R. Stephen; Zych, Allen D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tracking and Imaging Gamma-Ray Experiment (TIGRE) uses multilayers of silicon strip detectors both as a gamma-ray converter and to track Compton recoil electrons and positron-electron pairs. The silicon strip detectors also measure the energy losses of these particles. For Compton events, the direction and energy of the Compton scattered gamma ray are measured with arrays of small CsI(TI)-photodiode detectors so that an unique direction and energy can be found for each incident gamma ray. The incident photon direction for pair events is found from the initial pair particle directions. TIGRE is the first Compton telescope with a direct imaging capability. With a large (pi) -steradian field-of-view, it is sensitive to gamma rays from 0.3 to 100 MeV with a typical energy resolution of 3% (FWHM) and a 1-(sigma) angular resolution of 40 arc-minutes at 2 MeV. A small balloon prototype instrument is being constructed that has a high absolute detection efficiency of 8% over the full energy range and a sensitivity of 10 milliCrabs for an exposure of 500,000 s. TIGRE's innovative design also uses the polarization dependence of the Klein-Nishina formula for gamma-ray source polarization measurements. The telescope will be described in detail and new results from measurements at 0.5 MeV and Monte Carlo calculations from 1 to 100 MeV will be presented.

  16. The galactic gamma-ray flux in the 0.06 to 5 MeV range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, D. A.; Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Trombka, J. I.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma ray emission from the longitude range -50 deg less than or equal to lambda less than or equal to 22 deg recorded by the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometer and by individual observers is discussed. Agreement of the galactic emission spectra near 1 MeV with hard X-ray observations of the galactic central regions suggests that an ensemble of point sources is responsible for the emissions. Apollo 16 upper limits to the cosmic 4.4 MeV line flux imply that the ratio of line strength to continuum emission for the region observed by Haymes et al is higher than the galactic average.

  17. The first AGILE low-energy (< 30 MeV) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Fuschino, Fabio; Pittori, Carlotta; Verrecchia, Francesco; Giommi, Paolo; Tavani, Marco; Dietrich, Stefano; Price, Colin; Argan, Andrea; Labanti, Claudio; Galli, Marcello; Longo, Francesco; Del Monte, Ettore; Barbiellini, Guido; Giuliani, Andrea; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo; Trois, Alessio

    2014-05-01

    We present the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected by the Minicalorimeter (MCAL) instrument on-board the AGILE satellite. The catalog includes 308 TGFs detected during the period March 2009 - July 2012 in the +/- 2.5° latitude band and selected to have the maximum photon energy up to 30 MeV. The characteristics of the AGILE events are analysed and compared to the observational framework established by the two other currently active missions capable of detecting TGFs from space, RHESSI and Fermi. A detailed model of the MCAL dead time is presented, which is fundamental to properly interpret our observations, particularly concerning duration, intensity and correlation with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network. The TGFs cumulative spectrum supports a low production altitude, in agreement with previous measurements. The AGILE TGF catalog below 30 MeV is publicly accessible online at the website of the ASI Science Data Center (ASDC) http://www.asdc.asi.it/mcaltgfcat/ In addition to the TGF sample properties we also present the catalog website functionalities available to users.

  18. Limit on galactic 6.13 MeV gamma-ray line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    The University of New Hampshire large gamma-ray detector observed the galactic center region during a balloon flight from Alice Springs, Australia on 1977 November 21-22. The absence of any observable line at 6.13 MeV or its escape-peak energy makes it possible to place an upper limit of 8.1 x 10 to the -4th photons/(sq cm s) at the 99% confidence level on the 0-16 de-excitation line at this energy from the galactic disk in the direction of the center. This limit restricts the interpretation given by Willett et al. (1979) of the line at 6.13 MeV which they observed while viewing the galactic anticenter. The present results indicate that it is highly unlikely that the line which these authors report is due to dark nebulae or the quiet sun. Possible explanations for their observation are atmospheric background, local production in the detector, a localized cosmic source in the direction of the galactic anticenter, or a statistical fluctuation.

  19. A comparison of radiation damage in transistors from cobalt-60 gamma rays and 2.2 MeV electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Price, W. E.; Gauthier, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    The total ionizing dose response of ten bipolar transistor types has been measured using Co-60 gamma rays and 2.2 MeV electrons from exposure levels of 750, 1500, and 3000 Gy(Si). Gain measurements were made for a range of collector-emitter voltages and collector currents.

  20. Thermal-neutron-capture prompt-gamma emission spectra of representative coals. [1. 5 to 11 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, C L; Olson, I K

    1981-12-01

    Prompt gamma ray emission spectra have been calculated from 1.5 to 11 MeV for a wide range of coal compositions exposed to a thermal neutron flux. These include contributions to the spectra from all of the major and minor elements present in the coals. Characteristics of the spectra are discussed and correlated with the coal compositions.

  1. COMPTEL Studies of Gamma-Ray Bursts at MeV Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to analyse and interpret gamma-ray burst (GRB) data using both telescope mode data and single detector burst mode data from COMPTEL. Collectively, these data span the energy range from 300 keV up to 30 MeV. The initial goal of our proposal was to perform a standard analysis for each significant GRB event seen by COMPTEL. This includes GRBs that are registered by the telescope mode data as well as GRBs that are registered only in the burst mode data. (The latter category includes both GRBs that he outside of the FoV as well as GRBs within the FoV that are too weak to be seen in the telescope mode.) A second goal of our proposal was to define a set of data products (including deconvolved photon spectra) that, for each detected GRB event, would be made available via the COMPTEL GRB Web Page. The third goal of our program was to perform more detailed studies of selected GRB events. This represented a continuation of past GRB studies by the COMPTEL team. In general, we have met with only limited success in achieving these goals, in part due to the limited resources provided and our philosophy of utilizing local high school students to participate in this effort. Using local high school student support, however, we expect that considerable progress will be made in our efforts to catalog the COMPTEL gamma-ray burst data between now and the end of the current academic year. In addition, observations with COMPTEL contributed to an analysis of GRB 990123, the first gamma-ray burst with simultaneous optical observations.

  2. The (4)He(gamma,dd) reaction at E(gamma) = 150--250 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Bryan Joseph

    1998-09-01

    We have performed a measurement of the cross section for the 4He(/gamma,d)2H reaction with Eγ=150[-]250 MeV at the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory (SAL). The experiment was performed using bremsstrahlung γ rays produced by a 273 MeV electron beam. The target was liquid helium contained in a simple cryostat. Two detector arms consisting of plastic scintillator telescopes were utilized to detect both reaction particles in coincidence. We obtained relative and absolute cross sections at six angles in two energy bins (150-190 and 190-250 MeV). The angular distribution of the cross section shows peaking behavior at 90o in the center-of-mass frame. A Legendre polynomial fit to the data shows this distribution can be described by a sin2/theta angular distribution. This distribution suggests the presence of electric dipole or E1 radiation, but isospin selection rules and identical bosons in the exit channel forbid the dominant /Delta S=0 E1 transition. Performing a transition-matrix element (TME) analysis using only strictly allowed transitions, we found that the observed angular distribution could be described by the constructive interference of just two TME's: electric quadrupole (E2) s- and d-wave capture to the D-state of 4He. We performed a direct-capture calculation in order to determine if the D-state could contribute to such a high degree to the cross section. Our calculations, which used an optical model potential from elastic scattering data at lower energies, yielded the result that 90% of the cross section arises from capture to the D-state. The calculation, however, places all capture strength to the D-state into g-wave capture and, as a result, fails to reproduce the observed sin2/theta angular distribution. The lack of existing theoretical work for this system at these energies conspires to keep the mechanism for this angular distribution unclear, but we hope this result will motivate four-body theorists to extend their calculations to this energy

  3. Probing the Cosmic X-Ray and MeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Murase, Kohta; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Uchiyama, Yasunobu

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once the future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve the sensitivity better than 10-12 erg/cm2/s-1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV - although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors - angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  4. INTEGRAL Observations of the Galactic 511 keV Emission and MeV Gamma-ray Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Although there are a number of interesting phenomena, such as Nucleosynthesis in stars, in the MeV energy region, the observations have been difficult due to a small signal to noise (background) ratio (less than 1%). While NASA's Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO) enabled us to explore the Gamma-ray universe, ESA's INTEGRAL mission, launched in 2002, is providing us more detailed information with its superior energy and angular resolution. We will briefly discuss some of the current issues in MeV Gamma-ray Astrophysics. Then, we will focus on the Galactic 511 keV emission with the latest INTEGRAL observations, and talk about challenges we currently have.

  5. COMPTEL observations of the 1.809 MeV gamma-ray line from galactic Al-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, R.; Dpraz, C.; Bennett, K.; Bloemen, H.; Deboer, H.; Hermsen, W.; Lichti, G. G.; Mcconnell, M.; Morris, D.; Ryan, J.

    1994-01-01

    The COMPTEL experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) has been demonstrated to be capable of imaging the Galaxy within its field of view of about 1 steradian in the 1.809 MeV gamma-ray line originating from radioactive Al-26. The combined data from the CGRO sky survey in 1991/1992 have been analyzed to provide a first map of the inner Galaxy in this gamma-ray line. The 1.809 MeV emission appears extended along the inner 70 deg of the Galactic plane, with a relatively sharp falloff outside this regime. Correlations with massive stars and supernova remnants as possible tracers of the candidate Al-26 sources are discussed.

  6. Properties of terrestrial gamma ray flashes detected by AGILE MCAL below 30 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Fuschino, F.; Tavani, M.; Dietrich, S.; Price, C.; Galli, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Mereghetti, S.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Colafrancesco, S.; Argan, A.; Labanti, C.; Longo, F.; Del Monte, E.; Barbiellini, G.; Giuliani, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; Campana, R.; Chen, A.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Lazzarotto, F.; Morselli, A.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.; Vercellone, S.

    2014-02-01

    We present the characteristics of 308 terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) detected by the Minicalorimeter (MCAL) instrument on board the AGILE satellite during the period March 2009-July 2012 in the ±2.5° latitude band and selected to have the maximum photon energy up to 30 MeV. The characteristics of the AGILE events are analyzed and compared to the observational framework established by the two other currently active missions capable of detecting TGFs from space, RHESSI and Fermi. A detailed model of the MCAL dead time is presented, which is fundamental to properly interpret our observations. The most significant contribution to dead time is due to the anticoincidence shield in its current configuration and not to the MCAL detector itself. Longitude and local time distributions are compatible with previous observations, while the duration distribution is biased toward longer values because of dead time. The intensity distribution is compatible with previous observations, when dead time is taken into account. The TGFs cumulative spectrum supports a low production altitude, in agreement with previous measurements. We also compare our sample to lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network and suggest a new method to assess quantitatively the consistency of two TGF populations based on the comparison of the associated lightning activity. According to this method, AGILE and RHESSI samples are compatible with the same parent population. The AGILE TGF catalog below 30 MeV is accessible online at the website of the ASI Science Data Center http://www.asdc.asi.it/mcaltgfcat/.

  7. Discovery of a transient MeV range gamma-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD)/MIT hard X-ray and gamma-ray instrument on the HEAO 1 surveyed the region near the Galactic center 3 times during its lifetime in 1977-1979. During the 1977 September-October scan, a gamma-ray source was detected south of the Galactic center. The source was below the threshold sensitivity in the spring and fall of 1978. The source was detected with the medium energy phoswich scintillation counters which operated over the 80 keV-2 MeV range, had an area of 42 sq cm each, and a 17 deg FWHM aperture. The error box for the source is centered on l = 2.4 deg, b = -12.2 deg, with a 90% confidence error circle of approximately 3.5 deg radius. The flux in the 333-635 keV range was (1.89 +/- 0.29) x 10(exp -5) photons/(sq cm s keV) and was constant within statistics during the 1 month period the source was in the field of view. The spectrum can be characterized as a Gaussian in the range 300 less than or = E less than or = 650 keV, with a FWHM of 249 +/- 51 keV centered on 461 +/- 22 keV. The flux of this broad Gaussian is (6.6 +/- 1.1) x 10(exp -3) photons/(sq cm s). The source is tentatively identified with the 5.57 hr period low-mass X-ray-emitting binary system 1H 1822-371. Assuming this is correct, the ratio of gamma-ray to X-ray luminosity during the outburst was about 5; at a distance of 8 kpc, the gamma ray luminosity is 4 x 10(exp 37) ergs. The emission may be interpreted as a positron-pair plasma ejected from a compact object, possibly a black hole, and annihilating in a thick accretion disk surrounding the object.

  8. Measurement and Analysis of Gamma-Rays Emitted From Spent Nuclear Fuel Above 3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Anderson, Elaina R.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Campbell, Luke W.; Fast, James E.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Orton, Christopher R.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.

    2013-12-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of spent nuclear fuel in the 3- to 6-MeV energy range is important for active interrogation since emitted gamma rays emitted from nuclear decay are not expected to interfere with measurements in this energy region. There is, unfortunately, a dearth of empirical measurements from spent nuclear fuel in this region. This work is an initial attempt to partially ll this gap by presenting an analysis of gamma-ray spectra collected from a set of spent nuclear fuel sources using a high-purity germanium detector array. This multi-crystal array possesses a large collection volume, providing high energy resolution up to 16 MeV. The results of these measurements establish the continuum count-rate in the energy region between 3- and 6-MeV. Also assessed is the potential for peaks from passive emissions to interfere with peak measurements resulting from active interrogation delayed emissions. As one of the first documented empirical measurements of passive emissions from spent fuel for energies above 3 MeV, this work provides a foundation for active interrogation model validation and detector development.

  9. Measurement and analysis of gamma-rays emitted from spent nuclear fuel above 3 MeV.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Douglas C; Anderson, Elaina; Anderson, Kevin K; Campbell, Luke W; Fast, James E; Jarman, Kenneth; Kulisek, Jonathan; Orton, Christopher R; Runkle, Robert C; Stave, Sean

    2013-12-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of spent nuclear fuel in the 3-6 MeV energy range is important for active interrogation since gamma rays emitted from nuclear decay are not expected to interfere with measurements in this energy region. There is, unfortunately, a dearth of empirical measurements from spent nuclear fuel in this region. This work is an initial attempt to partially fill this gap by presenting an analysis of gamma-ray spectra collected from a set of spent nuclear fuel sources using a high-purity germanium detector array. This multi-crystal array possesses a large collection volume, providing high energy resolution up to 16 MeV. The results of these measurements establish the continuum count-rate in the energy region between 3 and 6 MeV. Also assessed is the potential for peaks from passive emissions to interfere with peak measurements resulting from active interrogation delayed emissions. As one of the first documented empirical measurements of passive emissions from spent fuel for energies above 3 MeV, this work provides a foundation for active interrogation model validation and detector development. PMID:24035928

  10. Slowing down of 2-11 MeV 12C, 16O, 28Si and 63Cu heavy ions through Si3N4 thin foil by using Time-of-Flight spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesmia, A.; Msimanga, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Ammi, H.; Dib, A.; Ster, M.

    2016-03-01

    The stopping force and the energy-loss straggling of 63Cu, 28Si, 16O and 12C partially stripped heavy ions crossing silicon nitride foil has been determined over a continuous range of energies 2-11 MeV, by using a method based on the Heavy Ion-Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HI-ERDA) technique using a Time of Flight (ToF) spectrometer. The obtained energy loss straggling values corrected for non-statistical straggling and the thickness variation using the Besenbacher's method have been analyzed and compared with the corresponding computed values. For computed electronic straggling we have used alternatively the widely used formulations such as, the universal Bohr straggling deduced from the Bohr stopping model, and the Lindhard-Scharff formula including the Bunching effect given by Hvelplund-Firsov formula according to the Besenbacher approach. The aim of such comparison is to check the reliability and accuracy of the existing energy loss straggling formulations, in the light of the present experimental results. The experimental results of energy loss straggling of all ions are found to be greater than those predicted by the Bohr stopping model or Lindhard-Scharff prediction model. The introduction of the bunching effect improves the comparison and gives an estimation of other effects such as charge exchange.

  11. Research and development of a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range in Barcelona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, José-Manuel; Galvez, José-Luis; Hernanz, Margarita; Isern, Jordi; Lozano, Manuel; Pellegrini, Giulio; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Cabruja, Enric; Ullán, Miguel

    2010-07-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics in the MeV energy range plays an important role for the understanding of cosmic explosions and acceleration mechanisms in a variety of galactic and extragalactic sources, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Through the development of focusing telescopes in the MeV energy range, it will be possible to reach unprecedented sensitivities, compared with those of the currently operating gamma ray telescopes. In order to achieve the needed performance, a detector with mm spatial resolution and very high peak efficiency is required. It will be also desirable that the detector could detect polarization of the source. Our research and development activities in Barcelona aim to study a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range suited for the focal plane of a gamma-ray telescope mission, based on CdTe pixel detectors arranged in multiple layers with increasing thicknesses, to enhance gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. We have developed an initial prototype based on several CdTe module detectors, with 11x11 pixels, a pixel pitch of 1mm and a thickness of 2mm. Each pixel is stud-bump bonded to a fanout board and routed to a readout ASIC to measure pixel position, pulse height and rise time information for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report on the results of an optimization study based on simulations, to select the optimal thickness of each CdTe detector within the module to get the best energy resolution of the spectrometer.

  12. GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF CYGNUS X-1 ABOVE 100 MeV IN THE HARD AND SOFT STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Tavani, M.; Del Santo, M.; Campana, R.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Del Monte, E.; Giusti, M.; Striani, E.; Pooley, G.; Chen, A.; Giuliani, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of multi-year gamma-ray observations by the AGILE satellite of the black hole binary system Cygnus X-1. In a previous investigation we focused on gamma-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 in the hard state during the period mid-2007/2009. Here we present the results of the gamma-ray monitoring of Cygnus X-1 during the period 2010/mid-2012 which includes a remarkably prolonged 'soft state' phase (2010 June-2011 May). Previous 1-10 MeV observations of Cyg X-1 in this state hinted at a possible existence of a non-thermal particle component with substantial modifications of the Comptonized emission from the inner accretion disk. Our AGILE data, averaged over the mid-2010/mid-2011 soft state of Cygnus X-1, provide a significant upper limit for gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV of F{sub soft} < 20 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} , excluding the existence of prominent non-thermal emission above 100 MeV during the soft state of Cygnus X-1. We discuss theoretical implications of our findings in the context of high-energy emission models of black hole accretion. We also discuss possible gamma-ray flares detected by AGILE. In addition to a previously reported episode observed by AGILE in 2009 October during the hard state, we report a weak but important candidate for enhanced emission which occurred at the end of 2010 June (2010 June 30 10:00-2010 July 2 10:00 UT) exactly coinciding with a hard-to-soft state transition and before an anomalous radio flare. An appendix summarizes all previous high-energy observations and possible detections of Cygnus X-1 above 1 MeV.

  13. A Compton scatter camera for spectral imaging of 0.5 to 3.0 MeV gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.B.

    1994-12-31

    A prototype Compton scatter camera for imaging gamma rays has been built and tested. This camera addresses unique aspects of gamma-ray imaging at nuclear industrial sites, including gamma-ray energies in the 0.5 to 3.0 MeV range and polychromatic fields. Analytic models of camera efficiency, resolution and contaminating events are developed. The response of the camera bears strong similarity to emission computed tomography devices used in nuclear medicine. A direct Fourier based algorithm is developed to reconstruct two-dimensional images of measured gamma-ray fields. Iterative ART and MLE algorithms are also investigated. The point response of the camera to gamma rays of energies from 0.5 to 2.8 MeV is measured and compared to the analytic models. The direct reconstruction algorithm is at least ten times more efficient than the iterative algorithms are also investigated. The point response of the camera to gamma rays energies from 0.5 to 2.8 MeV is measured and compared to the analytic models. The direct reconstruction algorithm is at least ten times more efficient than the iterative algorithms and produces images that are, in general, of the same quality. Measured images of several phantoms are shown. Important results include angular resolutions as low as 4.4{degrees}, reproduction of phantom size and position within 7%, and contrast recovery of 84% or better. Spectral imaging is demonstrated with independent images from a multi-energy phantom consisting of two sources imaged simultaneously.

  14. High resolution inelastic gamma-ray measurements with a white neutron source from 1 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Laymon, C.M.; Wender, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of prompt gamma rays following neutron-induced reactions have recently been made at the spallation neutron source at the WNR target area of LAMPF using germanium detectors. These experiments provide extensive excitation function data for inelastic neutron scattering as well as for other reactions such as (n,{alpha}), (n,n{alpha}), (n,p), (n,np), (n,nnp) and (n,xn) for 1 {le} {times} {le} 11. The continuous energy coverage available from 1 MeV to over 200 MeV is ideal for excitation function measurements and greatly extends the energy range for such data. The results of these measurements will provide a database for interpretation of gamma-ray spectra from the planned Mars Observer mission, aid in radiation transport calculations, allow verification of nuclear reaction models, and improve the evaluated neutron reaction data base.

  15. Backward-going MeV electrons and gamma rays from 1018 W/cm2 laser interactions with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feister, Scott; Morrison, John T.; Frische, Kyle D.; Orban, Chris; Ovchinnikov, Vladimir M.; Nees, John A.; Austin, Drake R.; Chowdhury, Enam A.; Freeman, Richard R.; Roquemore, W. Melvyn

    2015-05-01

    Gamma rays with ~1 MeV energy are measured following the relativistic interaction of a 3 mJ, 1018 W/cm2 short pulse laser with a 30 μm diameter flowing water column. Contrary to expectations, radiation emission is peaked in the direction opposite to the normally-incident laser propagation (specular direction). Experimental measurements and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of laser-plasma interaction show a pre-formed-plasma-dependent, backward-going, beam-like primary electron source. The MeV component of the electron and gamma ray spectrum, which is more than five times the ponderomotive energy scale of the laser, is highly sensitive to the presence of a nanosecond-timescale laser pre-pulse. This research was sponsored by the Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes Division of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, under the management of Dr. Enrique Parra, Program Manager.

  16. Diffuse cosmic gamma rays at 1-20 MeV: a trace of the dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Kyle; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R E-mail: arz@phas.ubc.ca

    2008-01-15

    Several independent observations of the galactic core suggest hitherto unexplained sources of energy. The most well known case is the 511 keV line which has proven very difficult to explain with conventional astrophysical positron sources. A similar, but less well known mystery is the excess of gamma ray photons detected by COMPTEL across a broad energy range {approx}1-20 MeV. Such photons are found to be very difficult to produce via known astrophysical sources. We show in this work that dark matter in the form of dense antimatter droplets provides a natural explanation for the observed flux of gamma rays in the {approx}1-20 MeV range. We argue that such photons must always accompany the 511 keV line as they are produced by the same mechanism within our framework. We calculate the spectrum and intensity of the {approx}1-20 MeV gamma rays, and find it to be consistent with the COMPTEL data.

  17. MeV gamma-ray Compton camera using a gaseous electron tracker for background-suppressed observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Parker, J. D.; Mizumoto, T.; Mizumura, Y.; Sawano, T.; Nakamura, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Komura, S.; Nakamura, S.; Oda, M.; Miuchi, K.; Kurosawa, S.

    2014-07-01

    As a next generation MeV gamma-ray telescope, we develop an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) that consists of a gaseous electron tracker surrounded by pixel scintillator arrays. The tracks of the Compton-recoil electron measured by the tracker restrict the incident gamma-ray direction to an arc region on the sky and reject background by using the energy loss rate dE/dx and a Compton-kinematics test. In 2013, we constructed, for a balloon experiment, a 30-cm-cubic ETCC with an effective area of ~1 cm2 for detecting sub-MeV gamma rays (5 σ detection of the Crab Nebula for 4 h). In future work, we will extend this ETCC to an effective area of ~10 cm2. In the present paper, we report the performance of the current ETCC.

  18. The gamma rays associated with the inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons in large samples of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shalabi, B.; Cox, A. J.

    1983-02-01

    Iron is likely to be a common construction material in the first generation of fusion reactors and a knowledge of the effect of multiple scattering processes in large samples of this material is important for reactor design. In the present work, the angular distributions of gamma rays produced after the inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons in increasing thicknesses of iron samples have been measured. The measurements were performed using an associated particle time of flight system to gate the gamma-ray signals and reduce the background to an acceptable level. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by the T(d, n) 4He reaction with the deuterons being accelerated in a 150 KV SAMES type J accelerator at Aston and in the 3 MeV dynamitron at the Joint Radiation Centre, Birmingham. The incident neutron flux was monitored by counting the alpha particles associated with the neutrons passing through the sample. The gamma rays were detected by a NaI(Tl) scintillator mounted on a 56 AVP photo-multiplier tube. The samples of iron varied in thickness from 2 to 10.5 cm. In each case, the differential cross sections for gamma ray production at angles varying between 20° and 90° to the incident neutron beam were measured. The results were fitted to an even order Legendre polynomial. The increase in effective cross section σ due to multiple scattering effects as the sample thickness increased was found to obey the law σ = σ0 exp αx in the region considered for each sample where x is the sample thickness in mean free paths and α has an average value of 0.17 ± 1 (mean free paths) -1. The results have been analysed on a semi-empirical model based on the assumption of continuous slowing down.

  19. Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope: Extending Fermi-LAT Discoveries into MeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Regina; ComPair Team

    2016-01-01

    The gamma-ray energy range from several hundred keV to a hundred MeV has remained largely unexplored, since the observations by instruments on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (1991- 2000) and on INTEGRAL (since 2002). Accurate measurements in this energy range are critical for answering a broad range of astrophysical questions, but they are particularly challenging because this range encompasses the Compton scattering/pairproduction transition zone (~10 MeV) where the interaction cross section is minimized. These interaction processes require different optimizations in both detection and event reconstruction. We are developing a MIDEX-scale wide-aperture discovery mission, Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope (ComPair), to investigate the energy range from 200 keV to >500 MeV with high energy and angular resolution and with sensitivity approaching a factor of 20-50 better than COMPTEL. This instrument will be capable of measuring both Compton-scattering events at lower energy and pair-production events at higher energy. ComPair will build on the heritage of successful space missions including Fermi-LAT, CGRO, INTEGRAL, AGILE, AMS and PAMELA, and will utilize well-developed space-qualified detector technologies including Si-strip and CdZnTe-strip detectors, heavy inorganic scintillators, and plastic scintillators.

  20. Dual sightline measurements of MeV range deuterons with neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Nocente, M.; Binda, F.; Cazzaniga, C.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Hellesen, C.; Hellsten, T.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Johnson, T.; Kiptily, V.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Salewski, M.; Schneider, M.; Sharapov, S.; Skiba, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Weiszflog, M.; Contributors, JET

    2015-11-01

    Observations made in a JET experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to the MeV range by third harmonic radio-frequency (RF) heating coupled into a deuterium beam are reported. Measurements are based on a set of advanced neutron and gamma-ray spectrometers that, for the first time, observe the plasma simultaneously along vertical and oblique lines of sight. Parameters of the fast ion energy distribution, such as the high energy cut-off of the deuteron distribution function and the RF coupling constant, are determined from data within a uniform analysis framework for neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy based on a one-dimensional model and by a consistency check among the individual measurement techniques. A systematic difference is seen between the two lines of sight and is interpreted to originate from the sensitivity of the oblique detectors to the pitch-angle structure of the distribution around the resonance, which is not correctly portrayed within the adopted one dimensional model. A framework to calculate neutron and gamma-ray emission from a spatially resolved, two-dimensional deuteron distribution specified by energy/pitch is thus developed and used for a first comparison with predictions from ab initio models of RF heating at multiple harmonics. The results presented in this paper are of relevance for the development of advanced diagnostic techniques for MeV range ions in high performance fusion plasmas, with applications to the experimental validation of RF heating codes and, more generally, to studies of the energy distribution of ions in the MeV range in high performance deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  1. Effects of 1-MeV gamma radiation on a multi-anode microchannel array detector tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Bybee, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector tube without a photocathode was exposed to a total dose of 1,000,000 rads of 1-MeV gamma radiation from a Co-60 source. The high-voltage characteristic of the microchannel array plate, average dark count, gain, and resolution of pulse height distribution characteristics showed no degradation after this total dose. In fact, the degassing of the microchannels induced by the high radiation flux had the effect of cleaning up the array plate and improving its characteristics.

  2. {sup 208}Pb(n,pxn{gamma}) reactions for neutron energies up to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, A.; Vonach, H.; Nelson, R.O.; Haight, R.C.; Wender, S.A.; Young, P.G.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    The prompt gamma-radiation from the interaction of fast neutrons with enriched samples of {sup 208}Pb was measured using the white neutron beam of the WNR facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The samples were positioned at about 40 m distance from the neutron production target. The spectra of the emitted gamma-rays were measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector. The incident neutron energy was determined by the time-of-flight method and the neutron fluence was measured with a {sup 238}U fission chamber. In addition to the primary purpose of this experiment, the study of (n,xn{gamma}) reactions leading to various lead isotopes, gamma transitions in the residual nuclei {sup 207,205,203,201}Tl were analyzed. From these data gamma-production cross sections in the neutron energy range from the effective thresholds to 200 MeV were derived. The lines for the analysis had to be chosen carefully as the (n,pnx{gamma}) cross sections are rather small and the interference with unresolved lead lines (even weak ones) would cause significant errors. The effect due to isomers with half-lives exceeding a few nanoseconds was taken into account and corrected for, if necessary. The measured cross sections were compared with the results of nuclear model calculations based on the exciton model for preequilibrium particle emission and the Hauser-Feshbach theory for compound nucleus decay. Unlike in the case of (n,xn{gamma}) reactions the calculated results in general did not give a good description of the measured cross sections.

  3. Gamma-ray astronomy in the medium energy (10-50 MeV) range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Morris, D. J.; Palmeira, R. A. R.; Rao, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    To observe the medium energy component of the intense galactic center gamma-ray emission, two balloon flights of a medium energy gamma-ray spark chamber telescope were flown in Brazil in 1975. The results indicate the emission is higher than previously thought and above the predictions of a theoretical model proposed.

  4. Calibration of a thermoluminescent dosimetry system to measure effective dose equivalent for 6- to 7-MeV gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, M.L.; Facey, R.A.

    1986-02-01

    Uncertainty exists as to expected responses of personnel dosimeters when worn in fields of 16N gamma's. Doses to internal organs are also not well known. Accordingly, the response of the Ontario Hydro (OH) TLD badge in terms of the effective dose equivalent (EDE) concept of ICRP Publication 26 was evaluated. Photons at 6-7 MeV were generated from accelerator protons using the 19F (p, alpha gamma)16O* reaction, which closely simulates a 16N-decay gamma field. A phantom containing more than 300 internal TLDs and wearing the OH TLD badges was exposed in stationary and rotational configurations. Ratios of organ dose equivalents (gonads, mean bone marrow, lung and thyroid) to chest badge exposures were 0.6-0.7 for the stationary (frontal) field and 0.7-0.9 for the rotational field. Ratios of EDE to chest badge were 0.60 and 0.77, respectively. The OH TLD badge (and other badges of the same design) will perform satisfactorily in a 16N gamma field under the EDE concept.

  5. Calibration of a thermoluminescent dosimetry system to measure effective dose equivalent for 6- to 7-MeV gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M L; Facey, R A

    1986-02-01

    Uncertainty exists as to expected responses of personnel dosimeters when worn in fields of 16N gamma's. Doses to internal organs are also not well known. Accordingly, the response of the Ontario Hydro (OH) TLD badge in terms of the effective dose equivalent (EDE) concept of ICRP Publication 26 was evaluated. Photons at 6-7 MeV were generated from accelerator protons using the 19F (p, alpha gamma)16O* reaction, which closely simulates a 16N-decay gamma field. A phantom containing more than 300 internal TLDs and wearing the OH TLD badges was exposed in stationary and rotational configurations. Ratios of organ dose equivalents (gonads, mean bone marrow, lung and thyroid) to chest badge exposures were 0.6-0.7 for the stationary (frontal) field and 0.7-0.9 for the rotational field. Ratios of EDE to chest badge were 0.60 and 0.77, respectively. The OH TLD badge (and other badges of the same design) will perform satisfactorily in a 16N gamma field under the EDE concept. PMID:3949516

  6. Stacking Searches for Greater Than 100 MeV Gamma Ray Emission from Radio Galaxies and Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cillis, A. N.; Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    The EGRET telescope on CGRO detected more than sixty sources of high-energy gamma radiation associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN). All but one of those belong to the blazar subclass; the only exception is the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A. Since there is no obvious reason other than proximity to expect Cen A to be the only non-blazar AGN emitting in high-energy gamma rays, we have utilized the "stacking" technique to search for $>100$-MeV emission from two non-blazar AGN subclasses, radio galaxies and Seyfert galaxies. Maps of gamma-ray counts, exposure, and diffuse background have been created, then co-added in varying numbers based on sorts by redshift, 5-GHZ flux density, and optical brightness, and finally tested for gamma-ray emission. No detection significance greater than $2\\sigma$ has been found for any subclass, sorting parameter, or number of objects co-added. Monte Carlo simulations have also been performed, to validate the technique and estimate the significance of the results.

  7. Response of a lead collimator for a gamma-ray telescope to gamma radiation in the energy range 1-100 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcarate, I. N.

    2003-03-01

    The Monte Carlo method is applied to study the response of a lead collimator 3 cm thick to gamma radiation in the energy range 1-100 MeV, which was part of a gamma-ray telescope. The computation gives the continuum spectrum and the 511 keV line intensity emerging from the inner face of the collimator as a result of the electromagnetic interactions occurring inside it. It is also discussed the resulting background from the decay of the radioactive nuclei generated by the nuclear interactions ( spallation ) of cosmic rays. and neutron capture in lead. The overall results show that the induced instrumental background does not significantly reduce the detector sensitivity as compared to that expected of an ideally ``clean" collimator. This research was partially supported by Grant PIP 0430/98, from CONICET, Argentina.

  8. Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope (ComPair) for MeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The gamma-ray energy range from a few hundred keV to a few hundred MeV has remained largely unexplored, mainly due to the challenging nature of the measurements, since the pioneering, but limited, observations by COMPTEL on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (1991- 2000). This energy range is a transition region between thermal and nonthermal processes, and accurate measurements are critical for answering a broad range of astrophysical questions. We are developing a MIDEX-scale wide-aperture discovery mission, ComPair (Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope), to investigate the energy range from 200 keV to > 500 MeV with high energy and angular resolution and with sensitivity approaching a factor of 100 better than COMPTEL. This instrument will be equally capable to detect both Compton-scattering events at lower energy and pair-production events at higher energy. ComPair will build on the heritage of successful space missions including Fermi LAT, AGILE, AMS and PAMELA, and will utilize well-developed space-qualified detector technologies including Si-strip and CdZnTe-strip detectors, heavy inorganic scintillators, and plastic scintillators.

  9. Solar gamma ray monitor for OSO-H (0.3-10 MeV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Gleske, I. U.; Forrest, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    A gamma ray experiment to be flown aboard the OSO-7 spacecraft is described along with a history of the development of the experiment, a description of the gamma ray detector and its operation, and a short preliminary review of the scientific information obtained during the instruments' lifetime. The gamma ray detector operated an average of 18 hours a day for approximately 15 months. The majority of the data was collected in the solar and antisolar direction, but data at right angles to the spacecraft-sun line was also accumulated. In all, at least two full scans of the celestial sphere were completed.

  10. Gamma rays from the de-excitation of C-12 resonance 15.11 MeV and C-12 resonance 4.44 MeV as probes of energetic particle spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Crannell, H.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The flux of 15.11 MeV gamma rays relative to the flux 4.44 MeV gamma rays was calculated from measured cross sections for excitation of the corresponding states of C-12 and from experimental determinations of the branching ratios for direct de-excitation of these states to the ground state. Because of the difference in threshold energies for excitation of these two levels, the relative intensities in the two lines are particularly sensitive to the spectral distribution of energetic particles which excite the corresponding nuclear levels. For both solar and cosmic emission, the observability of the 15.11 MeV line is expected to be enhances by low source-background continuum in this energy range.

  11. Cosmic gamma-ray background from type Ia supernovae reexamined: Evidence for missing gamma rays at MeV energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Hoeflich, Peter

    2005-06-15

    The observed cosmic {gamma}-ray background at {approx}MeV has often been attributed to Type Ia supernovae (SNIa). Since SNIa is close to a standard candle, one can calculate the {gamma}-ray intensity of SNIa integrated over redshifts fairly accurately, once the evolution of the SNIa rate is known. The latest SNIa rate measured at z < or approx. 1.6 [Dahlen et al., Astrophys. J. 613, 189 (2004)] indicates that the previous calculations of the {gamma}-ray background consistently overestimated the SNIa rate. With the new rate, we find that the SNIa contribution is an order of magnitude smaller than observed, and thus new population(s) of sources should be invoked.

  12. Experimental and Calculation Study of Absolute Efficiency of {gamma}-Ray Detection with the Coaxial HPGe-Detector GC 5019 at E{gamma}=0.24-18.565 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Generalov, L.N.; Lebedev, B.L.; Livke, A.V.; Modenov, A.B.; Chirkin, V.A.

    2005-05-24

    In the range E{gamma}=0.24-18.565 MeV investigations were carried out of the absolute efficiency of {gamma}-ray detection with the HPGe-detector GC 5019 (CANBERRA). The investigations were performed in connection with measurements of proton radiation capture reaction cross sections on the lightest nuclei.

  13. The search for MeV gamma-ray pulsars with COMPTEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, K.; Buccheri, R.; Busetta, M.; Carraminana, A.; Connors, A.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Lichti, G. G.; Much, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) completed a full sky survey in November 1993 during which the number of known gamma-ray pulsars more than doubled. During this survey the Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) observed the classical isolated pulsars Crab and Vela and detected PSR 1509-58. Attempts to detect the newly discovered pulsars, Geminga, PSR 1706-44 and PSR 1055-52, in the COMPTEL energy range provide only upper limits. The results of these analyses are presented together with the outcome of a search for further candidate radio pulsars whose ephemerides are given in the Princeton Pulsar Catalogue.

  14. Local electron spectrum above 100 MeV derived from gamma-ray emissivity spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Two new determinations of the local gamma-ray emmissivity spectrum are in good accord and were used to derive constraints on the local electron spectrum. The requirement for an electron intensity above 1 GeV larger than previously believed is confirmed and no low energy upturn is then needed.

  15. Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope: Extending Fermi-LAT Discoveries into MeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew; ComPair Team

    2016-03-01

    The keV-MeV gamma-ray energy range has remained largely unexplored over the last decade despite offering an exciting window into many astrophysical questions. This energy range is particularly challenging because it is firmly in the Compton-dominated regime where the interaction cross section is minimized. We are developing a MIDEX-scale wide-aperture discovery mission, Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope (ComPair), to investigate the energy range from 200 keV to >500 MeV with good energy and angular resolution and with sensitivity approaching a factor of 20-50 better than previous instruments. ComPair will build on the heritage of successful space missions including Fermi-LAT, AGILE, AMS and PAMELA, and will use well-developed space-qualified detector technologies including Si-strip and CdZnTe-strip detectors, heavy inorganic scintillators, and plastic scintillators. on behalf of the ComPair Team.

  16. Photofission of sup 238 U with monochromatic gamma rays in the energy range 11--16 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, W.; Kneissl, U.; Weber, T. ); Stroeher, H. ); Cardman, L.S.; Debevec, P.T.; Hoblit, S.D.; Jones, R.T.; Nathan, A.M. Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL )

    1990-11-01

    We have measured the angular and mass distributions of the fragments from photofission of {sup 238}U using tagged photons with energies between 11 and 16 MeV. The fission fragments were detected by a 4{pi} arrangement of position-sensitive parallel-plate avalanche counters. Anisotropic angular distributions have been observed for the first time in the energy range where second-chance fission becomes energetically possible. A consistent assignment of {ital J}{sup {pi}} and {ital K} for the fission channels in {sup 237}U has been deduced from a combined analysis of ({gamma},{ital nf}) and ({ital e},{ital e}{prime}{ital f}) data. A clear relationship between the anisotropies and the fragment mass asymmetry has also been established. This correlation, together with the energy dependence of the angular distribution parameters, points to a possible interpretation of the results in terms of a recent theoretical model incorporating multiple exit channels in fission.

  17. A liquid xenon imaging telescope for 1-30 MeV gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Suzuki, Masayo

    1989-01-01

    A study of the primary scintillation light in liquid xenon excited by 241 Am alpha particles and 207 Bi internal conversion electrons are discussed. The time dependence and the intensity of the light at different field strengths have been measured with a specifically designed chamber, equipped with a CaF sub 2 light transmitting window coupled to a UV sensitive PMT. The time correlation between the fast light signal and the charge signal shows that the scintillation signals produced in liquid xenon by ionizing particles provides an ideal trigger in a Time Projection type LXe detector aiming at full imaging of complex gamma-ray events. Researchers also started Monte Carlo calculations to establish the performance of a LXe imaging telescope for high energy gamma-rays.

  18. Correlation analysis of 1 to 30 MeV celestial gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of a method of producing celestial sky maps from the data generated by the University of California, Riverside's double Compton scatter gamma ray telescope. The method makes use of a correlation between the telescope's data and theoretical calculated response functions. The results of applying this technique to northern hemisphere data obtained from a 1978 balloon flight from Palestine, Texas are included.

  19. Predictions of Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Cluster Millisecond Pulsars Above 100 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, C.; de Jaker, O.C.; Clapson, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The recent Fermi detection of the globular cluster (GC) 47 Tucanae highlighted the importance of modeling collective gamma-ray emission of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in GCs. Steady flux from such populations is also expected in the very high energy (VHE) domain covered by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. We present pulsed curvature radiation (CR) as well as unpulsed inverse Compton (IC) calculations for an ensemble of MSPs in the GCs 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. We demonstrate that the CR from these GCs should be easily detectable for Fermi, while constraints on the total number of MSps and the nebular B-field may be derived using the IC flux components.

  20. Astronomical telescope for photons-gamma rays of low energy (approximately 4 MeV using the difference method like a Venetian blind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Aguiar, O. D.; Martin, I. M.

    1980-07-01

    A description of a gamma ray telescope, which is sensitive to photons in the energy range of 3 - 10 MeV is presented. Collimation was provided by a passive shield which functioned somewhat like a 'venetian blind' to block the signal from one of the detectors. Signal subtraction techniques were used to obtain the desired information.

  1. Measurement of cross sections for the 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga reaction from 5.9-8.7 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Basunia, M. Shamsuzzoha; Norman, Eric B.; Shugart, Howard A.; Smith, Alan R.; Dolinski, Michelle J.; Quiter, Brian J.

    2004-09-23

    We have measured cross sections for the 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga reaction in the 5.9-8.7 MeV energy range using an activation technique. Natural Cu foils were bombarded with alpha beams from the 88 Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Activated foils were counted using gamma spectrometry system at LBNL's Low Background Facility. The 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga cross-sections were determined and compared with the latest NON-SMOKER theoretical values. Experimental cross sections were found to be in agreement with theoretical values.

  2. Skyshine Contribution to Gamma Ray Background Between 0 and 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Allison L.; Borgardt, James D.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-08-14

    Natural gamma-ray background is composed of four components; which include cosmic rays, cosmic ray produced atmospheric activity, terrestrial sources, and skyshine from terrestrial sources. Skyshine is radiation scattered from the air above a source that can produce a signal in radiation detection instrumentation. Skyshine has been studied for many years but its contribution to the natural background observed in a detector has not been studied. A large NaI(Tl) detector was used to investigate each of the four components of the natural background using a series of 48-hour measurements and appropriate lead shielding configured to discriminate contributions from each component. It was found that while the contribution from skyshine decreases rapidly with energy, it represents a significant portion of the background spectrum below ~500keV. A similar campaign of measurements using a HPGe detector is underway.

  3. Design of a 2 MeV Compton scattering gamma-ray source for DNDO missions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F

    2009-08-24

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence-based isotope-specific detection and imaging is a powerful new technology that can enable access to new mission spaces for DNDO. Within this context, the development of advanced mono-energetic gamma ray sources plays an important role in the DNDO R&D portfolio, as it offers a faster, more precise, and safer alternative to conventional Bremsstrahlung sources. In this report, a specific design strategy is presented, along with a series of theoretical and computational tools, with the goal of optimizing source parameters for DNDO applications. In parallel, key technologies are outlined, along with discussions justifying specific choices and contrasting those with other alternatives. Finally, a complete conceptual design is described, and machine parameters are presented in detail.

  4. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: An observational overview (50 keV-20 MeV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    The observational status of gamma ray astronomy based on results reported prior to April 1978 is discussed. Specific line observations are reviewed from the Sun, the galactic plane, the Galactic Center region, the active Galaxy NGC 5128 (Cen A), the Crab Nebula region, and a transient source in the general direction of the anti-Galactic Center region. A statistical method is described which determines the relative probability that a given, reported observation is due to an external source as compared to a random fluctuation in the experimental background counting rate. Only a few of the many reported observations can be considered likely extraterrestrial observations of an extraterrestrial source made with a confidence level of 99%.

  5. Comparison of bactericidal efficiency of 7.5 MeV X-rays, gamma-rays, and 10 MeV e-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Yunjong; Moon, Byeong-Geum; Go, Seon-Min; Park, Jong-Heum; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Jung, Koo; Kim, Dong-Ho; Ryu, Sang-Ryeol

    2016-08-01

    This study was performed to verify the feasibility of 7.5 MeV X-rays for food pasteurization through a comparison of the bactericidal efficiency with those of other sources for selected bacterial pathogens. No significant differences were observed between the overall bactericidal efficiency for beef-inoculated pathogens based on the uncertainty of the absorbed dose and variations in bacterial counts. This result supported that all three irradiation sources were effective for inactivation of food-borne bacteria and that 7.5 MeV X-rays may be used for food pasteurization.

  6. {sup 48}Ti(n,xnpa{gamma}) reaction cross sections using spallation neutrons for E{sub n} = 1 to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Cooper, J R; Hoffman, R D; Younes, W; Devlin, N; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O

    2005-01-06

    {gamma}-ray excitation functions have been measured for the interaction of fast neutrons with {sup 48}Ti (neutron energy from 1 MeV to 250 MeV). The Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source, at the LANSCE/WNR facility, provided a ''white'' neutron beam which is produced by bombarding a natural W target with a pulsed proton beam. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were measured with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Ge spectrometer, GEANIE. Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections, taking into account the dead-time correction, the target thickness, the detector efficiency, and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). The data analysis is presented here for neutron energies between 1 to 20 MeV. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for transitions in {sup 47,48}Ti, {sup 48}Sc, and {sup 45}Ca have been determined. These results are compared to Hauser-Feshbach predictions calculated using the STAPRE code, which includes compound nuclear and pre-equilibrium emission. The partial cross sections for {gamma} rays, whose discrete {gamma}-ray cascade path leads to the ground state in {sup 48}Ti, {sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Sc, and {sup 45}Ca have been summed to obtain estimates of the lower limits for reaction cross sections. Partial cross sections for unobserved {gamma}-rays are predicted from the STAPRE code. These lower limits are combined with Hauser-Feshbach calculations to deduce {sup 48}Ti(n,n'){sup 48}Ti, {sup 48}Ti(n,2n){sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Ti(n,p){sup 48}Sc, and {sup 48}Ti(n,{alpha}){sup 45}Ca reaction channel cross sections.

  7. A comparison of 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma irradiation induced degradation in the electrical characteristics of N-channel MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, Arshiya; Vinayakprasanna, N. H.; Pradeep, T. M.; Pushpa, N.; Krishna, J. B. M.; Gnana Prakash, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    N-channel depletion MOSFETs were irradiated with 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad(Si) to 100 Mrad(Si). The electrical characteristics of MOSFET such as threshold voltage (Vth), density of interface trapped charges (ΔNit), density of oxide trapped charges (ΔNot), transconductance (gm), mobility (μ), leakage current (IL) and drain saturation current (ID Sat) were studied as a function of dose. A considerable increase in ΔNit and ΔNot and decrease in Vth,gm, μ, and ID Sat was observed after irradiation. The results of 4 MeV Proton irradiation were compared with that of Co-60 gamma radiation and it is found that the degradation is more for the devices irradiated with 4 MeV Protons when compared with the Co-60 gamma radiation. This indicates that Protons induce more trapped charges in the field oxide region when compared to the gamma radiation.

  8. A high resolution liquid xenon imaging telescope for 0.3-10 MeV gamma-ray astrophysics: Construction and initial balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena

    1994-01-01

    An instrument is described which will provide a direct image of gamma-ray line or continuum sources in the energy range 300 keV to 10 MeV. The use of this instrument to study the celestial distribution of the (exp 26)Al isotope by observing the 1.809 MeV deexcitation gamma-ray line is illustrated. The source location accuracy is 2' or better. The imaging telescope is a liquid xenon time projection chamber coupled with a coded aperture mask (LXe-CAT). This instrument will confirm and extend the COMPTEL observations from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) with an improved capability for identifying the actual Galactic source or sources of (exp 26)Al, which are currently not known with certainty. sources currently under consideration include red giants on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), novae, Type 1b or Type 2 supernovae, Wolf-Rayet stars and cosmic-rays interacting in molecular clouds. The instrument could also identify a local source of the celestial 1.809 MeV gamma-ray line, such as a recent nearby supernova.

  9. New readout and data-acquisition system in an electron-tracking Compton camera for MeV gamma-ray astronomy (SMILE-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, T.; Matsuoka, Y.; Mizumura, Y.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Nakamura, K.; Komura, S.; Nakamura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Parker, J. D.; Tomono, D.; Sonoda, S.; Miuchi, K.; Kurosawa, S.

    2015-11-01

    For MeV gamma-ray astronomy, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a MeV gamma-ray telescope capable of rejecting the radiation background and attaining the high sensitivity of near 1 mCrab in space. Our ETCC comprises a gaseous time-projection chamber (TPC) with a micro pattern gas detector for tracking recoil electrons and a position-sensitive scintillation camera for detecting scattered gamma rays. After the success of a first balloon experiment in 2006 with a small ETCC (using a 10×10×15 cm3 TPC) for measuring diffuse cosmic and atmospheric sub-MeV gamma rays (Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I; SMILE-I), a (30 cm)3 medium-sized ETCC was developed to measure MeV gamma-ray spectra from celestial sources, such as the Crab Nebula, with single-day balloon flights (SMILE-II). To achieve this goal, a 100-times-larger detection area compared with that of SMILE-I is required without changing the weight or power consumption of the detector system. In addition, the event rate is also expected to dramatically increase during observation. Here, we describe both the concept and the performance of the new data-acquisition system with this (30 cm)3 ETCC to manage 100 times more data while satisfying the severe restrictions regarding the weight and power consumption imposed by a balloon-borne observation. In particular, to improve the detection efficiency of the fine tracks in the TPC from ~10% to ~100%, we introduce a new data-handling algorithm in the TPC. Therefore, for efficient management of such large amounts of data, we developed a data-acquisition system with parallel data flow.

  10. Atmospheric gamma ray angle and energy distributions from sea level to 3.5 g/sq cm and 2 to 25 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Jennings, M. C.; Radwin, M. D.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Differential fluxes of gamma rays were calculated for energies of 2-25 MeV, zenith angles of 0-50 deg and 180-130 deg, and atmospheric depths from nominal sea level, 1000 g/sq cm, to float altitude, 3.5 g/sq cm residual atmosphere. Above 100 g/sq cm growth curves were constructed to estimate the contribution of the extraterrestrial gamma ray flux to the total downward-moving flux, while the upward-moving gamma rays were taken to be strictly of atmospheric origin. Below 100 g/sq cm, all gamma rays originate in the atmosphere. The downward atmospheric flux increases by almost two orders of magnitude between float altitude and the Pfotzer maximum, while the extraterrestrial flux is attenuated exponentially. Gamma rays produced by neutron interactions with the carbon in the scintillator liquid are eliminated by constructing growth curves for downward-moving gamma rays at high altitudes and are negligible compared with downward-moving gamma rays at lower altitudes and upward-moving gamma rays at all altitudes.

  11. Search with VERITAS and SGARFACE for bursts of gamma-rays with energy greater than 100 MeV and with duration shorter than 15 μs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroedter, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Bursts of gamma rays above 100 MeV and with duration less than 15 μs might be produced by pulsars (Lyutikov, 2007), by explosions of primordial black holes (Hawking, 1974), or via some as-yet undiscovered mechanism, for example during gamma-ray bursts. Bursts of nearly simultaneous gamma-rays above 100 MeV can be detected by their Cherenkov radiation using ground-based telescopes. SGARFACE piggy-backs on the Whipple 10 m imaging air-Cherenkov telescope to search for bursts of gamma-rays with duration less than 15 μs. To eliminate cosmic- ray background events that mimic the expected image parameters of bursts, we search for correlations with VERITAS. VERITAS is the most sensitive array of air-Cherenkov telescopes in the northern hemisphere and is located about 7 km distant from the SGARFACE experiment. The fluence sensitivity of this search is 0.2 (0.01) photons/m^2 for 1 (10) GeV gamma-rays during a 100 ns burst. About 80 hours of observations have been taken with both instruments pointed at the same source in the sky. We present results of the search for bursts produced by the Crab pulsar, by GRBs, and by the explosion of primordial black holes.

  12. Establishment of M1 multipolarity of a 6.5 (micro)2n resonance in 172Yb at E(gamma) = 3.3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, A; Voinov, A; Algin, E; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garrett, P E; Guttormsen, M; Nelson, R O; Rekstad, J; Siem, S

    2004-02-04

    Two-step-cascade spectra in {sup 172}Yb have been measured after thermal neutron capture. they are compared to calculations based on experimental values of the level density and radiative strength function (RSF) obtained from the {sup 173}Yb(3{sup 3}He,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 172}Yb reaction. The multipolarity of a 6.5(15) {mu}{sub N}{sup 2} resonance at E{sub {gamma}} = 3.3(1) MeV in the RSF is determined to be M1 by this comparison.

  13. Cross sections for production of the 15.10 MeV and other astrophysically significant gamma-ray lines through excitation and spallation of sup 12 C and sup 16 O with protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, F. L.; Werntz, C. W.; Crannell, C. J.; Trombka, J. I.; Chang, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The ratio of the flux of 15.10-MeV gamma rays to the flux of 4.438-MeV gamma rays resulting from excitation of the corresponding states in C-12 as a sensitive measure of the spectrum of the exciting particles produced in solar flares and other cosmic sources. These gamma rays are produced predominantly by interactions with C-12 and O-16, both of which are relatively abundant in the solar photosphere. Gamma ray production cross sections for proton interactions have been reported previously for all important channels except for the production of 15.10-MeV gamma rays from O-16. The first reported measurement of the 15.10-MeV gamma ray production cross section from p + O-16 is presented here. The University of Maryland cyclotron was employed to produce 40-, 65-, and 86-MeV protons which interacted with CH2 and BeO targets. The resultant gamma ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector at 70, 90, 110, 125, and 140 degrees relative to the direction of the incident beam for each proton energy. Other gamma ray lines resulting from direct excitation and spallation reactions with C-12 and 0-16 were observed as well, and their gamma ray production cross sections described.

  14. DESIGN OF A 250 MeV, X-BAND PHOTOINJECTOR LINAC FOR A PRECISION COMPTON-SCATTERING BASED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Albert, F; Gibson, D J; McNabb, D; Messerly, M; Rusnak, B; Shverdin, M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C J; Tantawi, S; Vlieks, A

    2009-05-07

    We present a compact, X-band, high-brightness accelerator design suitable for driving a precision gamma-ray source. Future applications of gamma-rays generated by Compton-scattering of laser and relativistic electron beams place stringent demands on the brightness and stability of the incident electron beam. This design identifies the beam parameters required for gamma-ray production, including position, and pointing stability. The design uses an emittance compensated, 11.4 GHz photo-gun and linac to generate 400 pC, 1-2 mm-mrad electron bunches at up to 250 MeV and 120 Hz repetition rate. The effects of jitter in the RF power system are analyzed as well as structure and optic misalignments. Finally, strategies for the mitigation of on-axis Bremsstrahlung noise are discussed.

  15. Spectra and angular distributions of atmospheric gamma rays from 0.3 to 10 MeV at lambda = 40 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, J. C.; Gruber, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the spectral and angular distributions of atmospheric gamma sq cm rays in the energy range 0.3-10 MeV over Palestine, Texas, at residual depths of 2.5 and 70 g/sq cm are reported. In confirmation of the general features of a model prediction, the measurements show at 2.5 g/sq cm upward moving fluxes greater than the downward moving fluxes, the effect increasing with energy, and approximate isotropy at 70 g/sq cm. Numerous characteristic gamma-ray lines were observed, most prominently at 0.511, 1.6, 2.3, 4.4, and 6.1 MeV. Their intensities were also compared with model predictions. Observations were made with an actively shielded scintillator counter with two detectors, one of aperture 50 deg FWHM and the other of 120 deg FWHM. Above 1 MeV, contributions to the counting rate from photons penetrating the shield annulus and from neutron interactions were large; they were studied by means of a Monte Carlo code and are extensively discussed.

  16. SMM Observations of Gamma-Ray Transients. I. A Search for Variable Emission at MeV Energies from Five Galactic and Extragalactic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M. J.; Share, G. H.; Leising, M. D.; Grove, J. E.

    1993-10-01

    Transient emission at energies near 1 MeV has been reported by previous experiments on time scales of weeks to months from the Galactic center, the Crab Nebula, and Cyg X-1, and on shorter time-scales from NGC 4151 and Cen A. The spectra of these events fall into two broad classes: a broad line-like feature centered near 1 MeV, and continuum emission (or a very broad feature) extending from ˜600 keV up to several MeV. These features have been interpreted theoretically in terms of emission from hot pair-dominated plasmas, which may be the necessary positron source implied by reports of narrow e- e+ annihilation lines from Cyg X- 1 and the Galactic center. In this paper, data accumulated by the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) between 1980 and 1989 have been searched for evidence of these two types of features. We find no compelling evidence for transient 1 MeV broad-line emission on time scales of order 12 d or longer when any of the sources are in the GRS field of view; upper limits on the transient line flux during any 12 d period are typically ˜4.5 × 10-3γ (cm2 s)-1. The same is true of variability of the continuum between 0.6-7 MeV, for which the upper limits are characteristically ˜2 times the nominal flux from the Crab for any 12 d period. Our analysis was not sensitive enough either to confirm or to reject several reports from other experiments of transient emission in the 0.6-7 MeV continuum during 1980-1989. We withdraw the statement in Share et al. (1993) that our upper limit for one such event, a transient from the Crab Nebula in 1980 Spring, is inconsistent with the measurement of Ling & Dermer (1991). We did not detect any transient emission in the 1 MeV feature preceding or coinciding with reported emission of the 0.511 MeV annihilation line from the Galactic center in 1988-1989. We discuss briefly the implications of this result for models of the annihilation of positrons produced in the Galactic center source 1E 1740.7-2942.

  17. A study of gamma-ray and neutron radiation in the interaction of a 2 MeV proton beam with various materials.

    PubMed

    Kasatov, D; Makarov, A; Shchudlo, I; Taskaev, S

    2015-12-01

    Epithermal neutron source based on a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and lithium target has been proposed, developed and operated in Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The source is regarded as a prototype of a future compact device suitable for carrying out BNCT in oncology centers. In this work the measurements of gamma-ray and neutron radiation are presented for the interaction of a 2 MeV proton beam with various materials (Li, C, F, Al, V, Ti, Cu, Mo, stainless steel, and Ta). The obtained results enabled the optimization of the neutron-generating target and the high energy beam transportation path. PMID:26298434

  18. CGRO Guest Investigator Program: Cycle 7. Pt. 1; Exploring the Gamma-Ray Sky at 2.2 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to search for a counterpart to an apparent point source of 2.2 MeV gamma-rays that had been detected using data from the COMPTEL experiment on CGRO. The source detected by COMPTEL was of marginal significance (less than 4(sigma)) and a further, independent, confirmation by OSSE was highly desired. Unfortunately, the planned CGRO observations (with both COMPTEL and OSSE) during cycle 7 were superseded by ToO observations of SN 1998bu.

  19. A comparison of radiation damage in liner ICs from cobalt-60 gamma rays and 2.2-MeV electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Nichols, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    The total ionizing dose response of fourteen IC types from eight manufacturers was measured using Co-60 gamma rays and 2.2-MeV electrons for exposure levels of 100 to 20,000 Gy(Si). Key parameter measurements were made and compared for each device type. The data show that a Co-60 source is not a suitable simulation source for some systems because of the generally more damaging nature of electrons as well as the unpredictable nature of the individual device response to the two types of radiations used here.

  20. A comparison of radiation damage in linear ICs from Cobalt-60 gamma rays and 2.2 MeV electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Nichols, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    The total ionizing dose response of fourteen IC types from eight manufacturers have been measured using Co-60 gamma rays and 2.2 MeV electrons for exposure levels of 100 to 20,000 Gy(Si). Key parameter measurements were made and compared for each device type. The data show that a Co-60 source may not be a suitable simulation source for some systems, because of the generally more damaging nature of electrons as well as the unpredictable nature of the individual device response to the two types of radiations used here.

  1. The Fermi LAT/GBM detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from PSR J1846-0258 up to 100 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Lucien; Dekker, Ariane

    2016-05-01

    Applying phase coherent timing models, created using RXTE PCA and Swift XRT monitoring data of PSR J1846-0258 covering the period August 4, 2008 - March 11, 2016 (MJD 54682 - 57458), in timing analyses of Fermi LAT (PASS8) and Fermi GBM (TTE) data yielded for the first time the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from PSR J1846-0258 up to 100 MeV. Phase folding the barycentered Fermi LAT events (period MJD 56185-56338, i.e. Sept.

  2. The HYDROGEN(2)(DEUTERON, GAMMA)HELIUM(4) Reaction at 20 TO 50 Mev and the D-State in HELIUM(4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitton, Robert Mark

    Tensor and vector analyzing powers for the ^2H (vec{d} , gamma) ^4 He reaction have been obtained as a function of angle at E_{beam}= 30 and 50 MeV. These data augment an extensive set of data obtained at TUNL andWisconsin at E_ {beam}< 15 MeV, and a measurement from IUCF at E_{beam} = 95 MeV. A direct capture calculation was performed and compared to the data, using Woods-Saxon potentials for the ground state of ^4He, and scattering wave-functions obtained from an optical model potential that was constructed by fitting the elastic scattering data. The model assumes that this reaction proceeds primarily via E2 radiation in this energy region. While the validity of this assumption has been questioned at lower energies, it is supported at these energies by the shape of the angular distributions of the tensor analyzing powers and by the small magnitude of the vector analyzing power. A value of the probability for the D-state in ^4 He can be extracted by fitting the predictions of this model to the data. This calculation differs from previous direct capture calculations in that the optical model takes absorption into account in the region of the continuum state. The results of this calculation are compared to the results of a microscopic 7-channel resonating group model calculation. The polarized beam data were obtained at the 88 -inch Cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), and the unpolarized differential cross section at E _{beam} = 30 MeV was obtained at the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) in Groningen, The Netherlands. All measurements were made using large anticoincidence-shielded NaI gamma-ray spectrometers. The measurements at 50 MeV required the detection of the recoiling ^4He nuclei in coincidence with the gamma-rays, along with time of flight criteria for clean event identification. The targets used in this work were gas cells cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. The gas was contained within the cell by 0.0254 mm Kapton windows. The

  3. The gamma-ray spectrum of Centaurus A: A high-resolution observation between 70 keV and 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Tueller, J.; Durouchoux, P.; Hameury, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Low Energy Gamma ray Spectrometer (LEGS) observed the nearby active nucleus galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) during a balloon flight on 1981 November 19. There is no evidence of a break in the spectrum or of any line features. The 1.6 MeV limit is a factor of 8 lower than the 1974 line flux, indicating that, if the 1974 feature was real, and, if it was narrow, then the line intensity decreased significantly between 1974 and 1981. The lack of observed annihilation radiation from Cen A, combined with the temporal variations that are seen in the X-ray and gamma-ray intensities, constrain the size of the emission region to be between 10 to the 13th power and 5 x 10 to the 17th power cm.

  4. The gamma-ray spectrum of Centaurus A - A high-resolution observation between 70 keV and 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Tueller, J.; Durouchoux, PH.; Hameury, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Low Energy Energy Gamma ray Spectrometer (LEGS) observed the nearby active nucleus galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) during a balloon flight on 1981 November 19. There is no evidence of a break in the spectrum or of any line features. The 1.6 MeV limit is a factor of 8 lower than the 1974 line flux, indicating that, if the 1974 feature was real, and, if it was narrow, then the line intensity decreased significantly between 1974 and 1981. The lack of observed annihilation radiation from Cen A, combined with the temporal variations that are seen in the X-ray and gamma-ray intensities, constrain the size of the emission region to be between 10 to the 13th power and 5 x 10 to the 17th power cm. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35990

  5. Cross sections for {sup 238}U(n,n{sup '}{gamma}) and {sup 238}U(n,2n{gamma}) reactions at incident neutron energies between 5 and 14 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheson, A.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Kwan, E.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Angell, C.; Karwowski, H. J.; Becker, J. A.; Macri, R. A.; Dashdorj, D.; Fotiades, N.; Kawano, T.; Nelson, R. O.; Kelley, J. H.; Pedroni, R. S.

    2009-07-15

    Precision measurements of {sup 238}U(n,n{sup '}{gamma}) and {sup 238}U(n,2n{gamma}) partial cross sections have been performed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to improve crucial data needed for testing nuclear reaction models in the actinide mass region. A pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beam was used in combination with high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to obtain partial cross sections for incident neutron energies between 5 and 14 MeV. {gamma}-ray yields were measured with high-purity germanium clover and planar detectors. Measured partial cross-section data are compared with previous results using white and monoenergetic neutron beams and calculations from the GNASH and TALYS Hauser-Feshbach statistical-model codes. Present experimental results are in fair to good agreement with most of the existing data for the {sup 238}U(n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reaction. However, significant discrepancies are observed for the {sup 238}U(n,2n{gamma}) reaction.

  6. Formation of the 0.511.-MeV line in solar flares. [statistical mechanics of line spectra for gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Joyce, G.; Ramaty, R.; Werntz, C.

    1976-01-01

    The gamma-ray line produced at 0.51-MeV was studied and is shown to be the result of either of free annihilation of positrons with electrons or of the decay of positronium by 2-photon emission. Positron annihilation from the bound state of positronium may also proceed by 3-photon emission, resulting in a continuum with energies up to 0.51-MeV. Accurate calculations of the rates of free annihilation and positronium formation in a solar-flare plasma are presented. Estimates of the positronium-formulation rates by charge exchange and the rates of dissociation and quenching are also considered. The temperature and density dependence of the ratio of 3-photon to 2-photon emission was obtained. It is shown that when the ratio of free electrons to neutral atoms in the plasma is approximately unity or greater, the Doppler width of the 0.51-MeV line is a function of the temperature of the annihilation region. For the small ion densities characteristics of the photosphere, the width is predominantly a function of the density.

  7. Preliminary investigation of scintillator materials properties: SrI2:Eu, CeBr3 and GYGAG:Ce for gamma rays up to 9 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaz, A.; Hull, G.; Fossati, V.; Cherepy, N.; Camera, F.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Coelli, S.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we measured the performance of a 2ʺ×2ʺ cylindrical tapered crystal of SrI2:Eu, a 2ʺ×3ʺ cylindrical sample of CeBr3 and a 2ʺ×0.3ʺ cylindrical sample of GYGAG:Ce. These scintillators are prototypes in volume or material and were provided by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and by the Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay. The gamma-ray energy resolution was measured in the energy range of 0.1-9 MeV using different sources. Each scintillator was scanned along x, y and z axes, using a 400 MBq collimated 137Cs source. Owing to the GYGAG:Ce thickness, it was not possible to obtain the value of the energy resolution at 9 MeV and to scan the crystal along the z axis. The 662 keV full energy peak position and its FWHM were measured relative to the full energy peaks positions produced by a non-collimated 88Y source. The signals of the detectors were additionally digitized and compared, up to 9 MeV, using a 12 bit LeCroy 600 MHz oscilloscope.

  8. Calibration of TLD badges for photons of energy above 6 MeV and dosimetric intricacies in high energy gamma ray fields encountered in nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, A S; Bakshi, A K

    2002-01-01

    CaSO4:Dy and LiF TLDs do not exhibit photon energy dependence beyond +/-55% for photons in the energy range from 1 MeV to about 7 MeV. However, when sandwiched between metal filters or used in TLD badge holders having metal filters, the response changes for irradiation from high energy photons as compared to that from 60Co gamma rays (generally used for reference calibrations). This effect is about the same for both the lower atomic number TLD (LiF) and higher atomic number TLD (CaSO4:Dy). For TLDs held on the surface of the phantom and irradiated in collimated photon beams, the response of TLDs without any filter or those under the open window of the TLD badge is considerably reduced due to insufficient build-up to high energy photons, whereas for uncollimated radiation fields from power reactors, an over-response is observed. It is observed that the use of inappropriate encapsulation of dosemeters would cause a significant error not only in the estimation of doses due to penetrating radiations but also in the estimation of beta doses in the mixed fields of beta radiation, high energy gamma rays and high energy electrons often encountered in the fields of pressurised heavy water reactors. PMID:12018745

  9. A LINGERING NON-THERMAL COMPONENT IN THE GAMMA-RAY BURST PROMPT EMISSION: PREDICTING GeV EMISSION FROM THE MeV SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R. E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in

    2013-09-20

    The high-energy GeV emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Fermi/LAT has a significantly different morphology compared to the lower energy MeV emission detected by Fermi/GBM. Though the late-time GeV emission is believed to be synchrotron radiation produced via an external shock, this emission as early as the prompt phase is puzzling. A meaningful connection between these two emissions can be drawn only by an accurate description of the prompt MeV spectrum. We perform a time-resolved spectroscopy of the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data of long GRBs with significant GeV emission, using a model consisting of two blackbodies and a power law. We examine in detail the evolution of the spectral components and find that GRBs with high GeV emission (GRB 090902B and GRB 090926A) have a delayed onset of the power-law component in the GBM spectrum, which lingers at the later part of the prompt emission. This behavior mimics the flux evolution in the Large Area Telescope (LAT). In contrast, bright GBM GRBs with an order of magnitude lower GeV emission (GRB 100724B and GRB 091003) show a coupled variability of the total and the power-law flux. Further, by analyzing the data for a set of 17 GRBs, we find a strong correlation between the power-law fluence in the MeV and the LAT fluence (Pearson correlation: r = 0.88 and Spearman correlation: ρ = 0.81). We demonstrate that this correlation is not influenced by the correlation between the total and the power-law fluences at a confidence level of 2.3σ. We speculate the possible radiation mechanisms responsible for the correlation.

  10. A Lingering Non-thermal Component in the Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emission: Predicting GeV Emission from the MeV Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R.

    2013-09-01

    The high-energy GeV emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Fermi/LAT has a significantly different morphology compared to the lower energy MeV emission detected by Fermi/GBM. Though the late-time GeV emission is believed to be synchrotron radiation produced via an external shock, this emission as early as the prompt phase is puzzling. A meaningful connection between these two emissions can be drawn only by an accurate description of the prompt MeV spectrum. We perform a time-resolved spectroscopy of the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data of long GRBs with significant GeV emission, using a model consisting of two blackbodies and a power law. We examine in detail the evolution of the spectral components and find that GRBs with high GeV emission (GRB 090902B and GRB 090926A) have a delayed onset of the power-law component in the GBM spectrum, which lingers at the later part of the prompt emission. This behavior mimics the flux evolution in the Large Area Telescope (LAT). In contrast, bright GBM GRBs with an order of magnitude lower GeV emission (GRB 100724B and GRB 091003) show a coupled variability of the total and the power-law flux. Further, by analyzing the data for a set of 17 GRBs, we find a strong correlation between the power-law fluence in the MeV and the LAT fluence (Pearson correlation: r = 0.88 and Spearman correlation: ρ = 0.81). We demonstrate that this correlation is not influenced by the correlation between the total and the power-law fluences at a confidence level of 2.3σ. We speculate the possible radiation mechanisms responsible for the correlation.

  11. Inter-pulse high-resolution gamma-ray spectra using a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, L.G.; Trombka, J.I.; Jensen, D.H.; Stephenson, W.A.; Hoover, R.A.; Mikesell, J.L.; Tanner, A.B.; Senftle, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    A neutron generator pulsed at 100 s-1 was suspended in an artificial borehole containing a 7.7 metric ton mixture of sand, aragonite, magnetite, sulfur, and salt. Two Ge(HP) gamma-ray detectors were used: one in a borehole sonde, and one at the outside wall of the sample tank opposite the neutron generator target. Gamma-ray spectra were collected by the outside detector during each of 10 discrete time windows during the 10 ms period following the onset of gamma-ray build-up after each neutron burst. The sample was measured first when dry and then when saturated with water. In the dry sample, gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering, neutron capture, and decay were counted during the first (150 ??s) time window. Subsequently only capture and decay gamma rays were observed. In the wet sample, only neutron capture and decay gamma rays were observed. Neutron capture gamma rays dominated the spectrum during the period from 150 to 400 ??s after the neutron burst in both samples, but decreased with time much more rapidly in the wet sample. A signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N) analysis indicates that optimum conditions for neutron capture analysis occurred in the 350-800 ??s window. A poor S/N in the first 100-150 ??s is due to a large background continuum during the first time interval. Time gating can be used to enhance gamma-ray spectra, depending on the nuclides in the target material and the reactions needed to produce them, and should improve the sensitivity of in situ well logging. ?? 1984.

  12. MeV Science with the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT), a High Sensitivity Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venters, Tonia M.; Hunter, Stanley D.; De Nolfo, Georgia; Hanu, Andrei R.; Krizmanic, John F.; Stecker, Floyd W.; Timokhin, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Many high-energy astrophysical phenomena exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares below ~200 MeV. However, while significant progress in gamma-rays has been made by instruments such as Fermi and AGILE, a significant sensitivity gap remains in the medium-energy regime (0.75 - 200 MeV) that has been explored only by COMPTEL and EGRET on CGRO. Tapping into this unexplored regime requires development of a telescope with significant improvement in sensitivity. Our mission concept, covering ~5 to ~200 MeV, is the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT). The AdEPT telescope will achieve angular resolution of ~0.6 deg at 70 MeV, similar to the angular resolution of Fermi/LAT at ~1 GeV that brought tremendous success in identifying new sources. AdEPT will also provide unprecedented polarization sensitivity, ~1% for a 1 Crab source. The enabling technology for AdEPT is the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) a low-density, large volume, gas time-projection chamber with a 2-dimensional readout. The 3-DTI provides high-resolution three-dimensional electron tracking with minimal Coulomb scattering that is essential to achieve high angular resolution and polarization sensitivity. We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of the 3-DTI detector, describe the development of a 50x50x100 cm3 AdEPT prototype, and highlight a few of the key science questions that AdEPT will address.

  13. Analysis of gamma-ray spectra from foils activated in a range-thick lead target by 800-MeV protons. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Laird, C.E.; Mullins, D.H.

    1995-06-12

    Approximately 400 gamma-ray spectra have been analyzed to obtain the types and quantities of radioisotopes produced when 800-MeV protons interact with a range-thick lead target. These spectra were obtained from the radioactive decay of product isotopes in lead disks placed at various depths and radial positions within the target. These spectra were analyzed with the computer code HYPERMET and the photopeak areas were reduced to nuclei produced per incident proton per cubic centimeter of material. Product nuclei ranged from atomic mass 160 to mass 206 and over a range of half lives from a few minutes to several weeks. The results of this analysis have been outlined in this report and transmitted on computer disk to Los Alamos National Laboratory. The consistency of these analyses have been confirmed by a comparison of photopeak areas obtained at LANL with the computer code GAMANAL with those from HYPERMET for two gamma-ray spectra. Also, the nuclear production per proton per cm{sub 3} obtained from these two spectra analyzed both at LANL and at EKU have been found to agree to within the statistical accuracy of the peak-fitting programs. This analysis of these 400 gamma-ray spectra has determined the nuclear production per incident proton per cm{sub 3} at five regularly-spaced radial positions and depths up to 40 cm into a range-thick lead target.

  14. Lifetime Measurement of the 6.79 MeV Excited State of 15O to Help Constrain the 14N(p,gamma)15O Reaction Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinski, Naomi

    2013-12-01

    In main sequence stars such as our Sun, the source of energy comes from converting hydrogen into helium. There are two competing mechanisms via which this can happen: the pp chain and CNO cycle. The latter is a cycle of reactions involving carbon, nitrogen and oxygen which are catalysts for the conversion of hydrogen into helium. The slowest reaction 14N(p, gamma) 15O in the cycle will affect the energy generation timescale and the amount of helium ash produced via the CNO cycle. This has several astrophysical impacts. It affects the evolutionary timescale of main sequence stars from which the ages of globular clusters can be calculated, the nucleosynthesis of heavier elements in H burning shells of red giant stars, and the fraction of energy produced by the CNO cycle compared to the pp chain in our Sun which helps determine the interior composition of the Sun. For main sequence stars the CNO cycle dominates over the pp chain for core temperatures T ≳ 0.02 GK. For the 14N(p, gamma)15O reaction this corresponds to a low center of mass energy Ecm = 30 keV. This is lower than the low energy limit of the reaction rate measurable in the laboratory. This means that we need to extrapolate down to low energy using theory. The largest remaining uncertainty in the theoretical calculations is due to the lifetime tau of the 6.79 MeV state of 15O. In this work the lifetimes of three excited states of 15O were measured using the Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM) populating the states via the 3He(16O,alpha)15O reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. The low lifetime limit measurable using the DSAM is ˜1 fs. The lifetime of the 6.79 MeV state is near that limit, making this measurement challenging. A 1.8 fs upper limit (68.3% C.L.) on this lifetime is reported here. In addition we measured the lifetimes of the 6.17 and 6.86 MeV state in 15O which were < 2.5 fs and 13.3+0.8-1.2 fs (68.3% C.L.) respectively. iii Acknowledgments

  15. Observation and search for gamma rays 1-20 MeV from the Crab, NGC 4151, Cyg X-1, Cyg X-3, CG 135+1 and 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. S.; Gibbons, R.; Long, J. L.; Zanrosso, E. M.; Zych, A. D.; Dayton, B.

    1980-01-01

    Observations and limiting values for the flux of 1-20 MeV gamma rays from the Crab, the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151, the black hole candidate Cyg X-1, Cyg X-3 and the two nearest quasars CG 135+1 and 3C 273 are reported. Measurements of the energy and scatter angle of gamma rays at zenith angles between 10 and 30 deg were obtained by a balloon-borne double-scatter gamma-ray telescope. The flux from the Crab from 1.2 to 10 MeV is found to be 0.0039 + or - 0.0020 photons/sq cm per sec, and the energy distribution of the flux from 1.2 to 20 MeV is determined. Two-standard-deviation upper limits to the gamma-ray flux in the intervals 1.2-3, 3-5, 5-10 and 10-20 MeV of 0.0003, 0.0002, 0.00006 and 0.00004 photons/sq cm/sec are found for NGC 4151, Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3, while those of 0.0005, 0.0003, 0.0001 and 0.00004 photons/sq cm per sec are determined for both quasars. These upper limits are interpreted as restricting confirmed gamma-ray sources to the Crab and NP 0532, and as evidence against Seyfert galaxies as the source of cosmic diffuse radiation.

  16. Compton MeV Gamma-ray Source on Texas Petawatt Laser-Driven GeV Electron Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph M.; Tsai, Hai-En; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Chang, Vincent; Fazel, Neil; Henderson, Watson; Downer, M. C.; Texas Petawatt Laser Team

    2015-11-01

    Compton Backscatter (CBS) from laser wakefield accelerated (LWFA) electron bunches is a promising compact, femtosecond (fs) source of tunable high-energy photons. CBS x-rays have been produced from LWFAs using two methods: (1) retro-reflection of the LWFA drive pulse via an in-line plasma mirror (PM); (2) scattering of a counter-propagating secondary pulse split from the drive pulse. Previously MeV photons were only demonstrated by the latter method, but the former method is self-aligning. Here, using the Texas Petawatt (TPW) laser and a self-aligned near-retro-reflecting PM, we generate bright CBS γ-rays with central energies higher than 10 MeV. The 100 μm focus of TPW delivers 100 J in 100 fs pulses, with intensity 6x1018 W/cm2 (a0 =1.5), to the entrance of a 6-cm long Helium gas cell. A thin, plastic PM immediately following the gas cell exit retro-reflects the LWFA driving pulse into the oncoming 0.5 - 2 GeV electron beam to produce a directional beam of γ-rays without significant bremsstrahlung background. A Pb-filter pack on a thick, pixelated, CsI(Tl) scintillator is used to estimate the spectrum via differential transmission and to observe the beam profile. Recorded beam profiles indicate a low divergence. Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin

  17. Measurement and analysis of gamma-rays emitted from spent nuclear fuel above 3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Anderson, Elaina R.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Campbell, Luke W.; Fast, James E.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Orton, Christopher R.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean

    2013-08-28

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) includes an effort to determine the mass content of fissile isotopes contained within spent fuel through the spectroscopy of high-energy delayed gamma rays. Studies being performed indicate the primary difficulty is the ability to detect the desired signal in the presence of the intense background associated with spent fuel fission products. An enabling technology for this application is high-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors capable of operating efficiently in at extremely high count rates. This presentation will describe the prospects of high-rate germanium detectors and delayed-gamma techniques, primarily discussing the efforts to merge these into a unique and viable system for measuring spent fuel.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of runaway MeV electron breakdown with application to red sprites and terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, N. G.; Bell, T. F.; Inan, U. S.

    1999-11-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the uniform relativistic runaway electron breakdown in air in the presence of static electric and magnetic fields is used to calculate electron distribution functions, avalanche rates, and the direction and velocity of avalanche propagation. We also derive the conditions required for an electron with a given momentum to start an avalanche in the absence of a magnetic field. The results are compared to previously developed kinetic and analytical models and our own analytical estimates, and it is concluded that the rates used in many early models [e.g., Lehtinen et al., 1997; Taranenko and Roussel-Dupré, 1996; Yukhimuk et al., 1998; Roussel-Dupré et al., 1998] are overestimated by a factor of ~10. The Monte Carlo simulation results are applied to a fluid model of runaway electron beams in the middle atmosphere accelerated by quasi-electrostatic fields following a positive lightning stroke. In particular, we consider the case of lightning discharges which drain positive charge from remote regions of a laterally extensive (>100 km) thundercloud, using a Cartesian two-dimensional model. The resulting optical emission intensities in red sprites associated with the runaway electrons are found to be negligible compared to the emissions from thermal electrons heated in the conventional type of breakdown. The calculated gamma ray flux is of the same order as the terrestrial gamma ray flashes observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory.

  19. Atmospheric gamma-ray lines at low latitudes in the energy range : 0.3-8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcarate, I. N.

    2003-12-01

    An experiment carried out with a collimated gamma-ray detector is described. The detector system was transported by an stratospheric balloon, that was launched from Parana, Provincia de Entre Rios, Argentina, on 18 November 1992 ( geomagnetic cut-off 11.1 GV). The presence of a peak was observed, as a characteristic feature of the energy-loss spectrum in the detector. That peak corresponds to the 511 keV line produced by positron annihilation in both the atmopsphere and the lead collimator. The contribution to the counting rate ``below" the peak due to the 511 keV photons produced in the lead is computed. The resulting flux for the atmospheric 511 keV line, at an atmospheric depth of 4.5 g.cm-2, is (9 ± 0.07) x 10-2 phot. cm-2.s-1, which is compatible with measurements performed at other geomagnetic latitudes. Upper limits for other atmospheric gamma-ray lines fluxes are obtained. Acknowledgements : This research was partially supported by grant PIP 0430/98 from CONICET, from Argentina. I.N. Azcarate is a member of the Carrera del Investigador Cientifico y Tecnologico from CONICET, Argentina.

  20. Benchmark test of 14-MeV neutron-induced gamma-ray production data in JENDL-3.2 and FENDL/E-1.0 through analysis of the OKTAVIAN experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maekawa, F.; Oyama, F.

    1996-06-01

    Secondary gamma rays play an important role along with neutrons in influencing nuclear design parameters, such as nuclear heating, radiation dose, and material damage on the plasma-facing components, vacuum vessel, and superconducting magnets, of fusion devices. Because evaluated nuclear data libraries are used in the designs, one must examine the accuracy of secondary gamma-ray data in these libraries through benchmark tests of existing experiments. The validity of the data should be confirmed, or problems with the data should be pointed out through these benchmark tests to ensure the quality of the design. Here, gamma-ray production data of carbon, fluorine, aluminum, silicon, titanium, chromium, manganese, cobalt, copper, niobium, molybdenum, tungsten, and lead in JENDL-3.2 and FENDL/E-1.0 induced by 14-MeV neutrons are tested through benchmark analyses of leakage gamma-ray spectrum measurements conducted at the OKTAVIAN deuterium-tritium neutron source facility. The MCNP transport code is used along with the flagging method for detailed analyses of the spectra. As a result, several moderate problems are pointed out for secondary gamma-ray data of titanium, chromium, manganese, and lead in FENDL/E-1.0. Because no fatal errors are found, however, secondary gamma-ray data for the 13 elements in both libraries are reasonably well validated through these benchmark tests as far as 14-MeV neutron incidence is concerned.

  1. Proposal of balloon and satellite observations of MeV gammas using Electron Tracking Compton Camera for reaching a high sensitivity of 1 mCrab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru

    2016-04-01

    ETCC with a gas Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and pixel GSO scintillators, by measuring electron tracks precisely, provides both a strong background rejection by dE/dx of the track and well-defined 2-dimensional Point Spread Function (PDF) with better than several degrees by adding the arc direction of incident gammas (SPD: Scatter Plane Deviation) with the ARM (angular Resolution Measure) direction measured in standard Compton Camera (CC). In 2006 its background rejection was revealed by SMILE-I balloon experiment with 10cm-cubic ETCC using the dE/dx of tracks. In 2013, 30cm-cube-ETCC has been developed to catch gammas from Crab in next SMILE-II balloon with >5sigma detection for 4 hrs. Now its sensitivity has been improved to 10sigma by attaining the angular resolution of the track (SPD angle) to that determined by multiple scattering of the gas. Thus, we show the ability of ETCC to give a better significance by a factor of 10 than that of standard CCs having same detection area by electron tracking?and we have found that SPD is an essential to define the PSF of Compton imaging quantitatively. Such a well-defined PSF is, for the first time, able to provide reliable sensitivity in Compton imaging without assuming the use of optimization algorithm. These studies uncover the uncertainties of CCs from both points of view of the intense background and the difficulty of the definition of the PSF, and overcome the above problems. Based on this technology, SMILE-II with 3atm CF4 gas is expected to provide a 5times better sensitivity than COMPTEL in one month balloon, and 4modules of 50cm-cube ETCCs would exceed over 10^-12 erg/cm^2s^1 (1mCrab) in satellite. Here we summarize the performance of the ETCC and new astrophysics opened in near future by high sensitive observation of MeV gamma-rays.

  2. Gamma Cherenkov-transition radiation of high energy electrons and methods for the measurement of the refractive index of MeV photons using total internal and external reflections (Invited talk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ispirian, K. A.

    2014-05-01

    It is given a review of the theoretical works showing that gamma ray Cherenkov-transition radiation (GCTR) is produced in some materials the refractive index of which in gamma region is greater than 1 according to the famous results of [1]. Since there are some published doubts [2] on the theoretical results of [1], and taking into account the difficulties of the experiment [1], in order to confirm or decline the results [1] it is proposed to study experimentally GCTR and an experimental method for the measurement of refractive index of MeV photons.

  3. 29 CFR 2.11 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General principles. 2.11 Section 2.11 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Audiovisual Coverage of Administrative Hearings § 2.11 General... involve administrative hearings. If such administrative hearings are held, we encourage their...

  4. 29 CFR 2.11 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true General principles. 2.11 Section 2.11 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Audiovisual Coverage of Administrative Hearings § 2.11 General... involve administrative hearings. If such administrative hearings are held, we encourage their...

  5. Measurement of the {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) cross section from 20 meV to 500 keV with a high efficiency, highly segmented 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} detector

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, E.-I.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Glover, S. E.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Mertz, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Schwantes, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Greife, U.; Hatarik, A. M.; Hatarik, R.

    2008-03-15

    The {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}){sup 238}Np cross section has been measured in the neutron energy range from 20 meV to 500 keV using the DANCE array at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new facility allows experiments with submilligram samples and is therefore well suited to investigate isotopes with half-lives as low as a few hundred days. In this benchmark measurement, only 0.42 mg of {sup 237}Np was sufficient to determine differential cross sections relative to the well-known resonance at 0.5 eV. The thermal cross section was measured to {sigma}{sub 2200m/s}=177{+-}5 barn, {sigma}{sub kT=25.3meV}=167{+-}4 barn and the resonance integral to RI=693{+-}6 barn.

  6. The gamma-ray telescope Gamma-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akimov, V. V.; Nesterov, V. E.; Rodin, V. G.; Kalinkin, L. F.; Balibanov, V. M.; Prilutsky, O. F.; Leikov, N. G.; Bielaoussov, A. S.; Dobrian, L. B.; Poluektov, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    French and Soviet specialists have designed and built the gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-1 to detect cosmic gamma rays above 50 MeV. The sensitive area of the detector is 1400 sq cm, energy resolution is 30% at 300 MeV, and angular resolution 1.2 deg at 300 MeV (and less than 20' arc when a coded aperture mask is used). Results on calibration of the qualification model and Monte-Carlo calculations are presented.

  7. ON THE SPECTRUM OF THE PULSED GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF THE CRAB PULSAR FROM 10 MeV TO 400 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chkheidze, N.; Machabeli, G.; Osmanov, Z.

    2013-08-20

    In the present paper, a self-consistent theory, interpreting VERITAS and the MAGIC observations of the very high-energy pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar, is considered. The photon spectrum between 10 MeV and 400 GeV can be described by two power-law functions with spectral indices of 2.0 and 3.8. The source of the pulsed emission above 10 MeV is assumed to be synchrotron radiation, which is generated near the light cylinder during the quasi-linear stage of the cyclotron instability. The emitting particles are the primary beam electrons with Lorentz factors up to 10{sup 9}. Such high energies of beam particles can be reached due to Landau damping of the Langmuir waves in the light cylinder region.

  8. A Multigroup Library of Neutron and Gamma Cross Sections and Response Functions in the Energy Range up to 800 MeV.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1987-05-20

    Version 00 The energy range of the library, from thermal to 800 MeV is relevant to the solution of shielding, nuclear heating, and other radiation protection problems connected with the accelerator neutron sources e.g. spallation target. The data contains 10 elements of shielding and biological importance. They can be easily implemented to the neutron transport codes like ANISN and DOT by using the activity option.

  9. Yield and cross section of {sup 232}Th and {sup 236}U fission induced by {gamma} quanta with energies up to 11 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, A.S.; Smirenkin, G.N.

    1995-02-01

    The results of relative measurements of photofission yields are presented for {sup 232}Th and {sup 236}U nuclei in the region 7-11 MeV of end-point bremsstrahlung energies. The cross section and yield of {sup 238}U photofission is taken as the standard. The photofission cross sections for the {sup 232}Th and {sup 236}U nuclei are reconstructed from these data. The experimental data processing is refined, and the information obtained is revised. This paper is a continuation of the earlier publication. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Tests of a Compton imaging prototype in a monoenergetic 4.44 MeV photon field—a benchmark setup for prompt gamma-ray imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golnik, C.; Bemmerer, D.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Hueso-González, F.; Pausch, G.; Römer, K.; Rohling, H.; Schöne, S.; Wagner, L.; Kormoll, T.

    2016-06-01

    The finite range of a proton beam in tissue opens new vistas for the delivery of a highly conformal dose distribution in radiotherapy. However, the actual particle range, and therefore the accurate dose deposition, is sensitive to the tissue composition in the proton path. Range uncertainties, resulting from limited knowledge of this tissue composition or positioning errors, are accounted for in the form of safety margins. Thus, the unverified particle range constrains the principle benefit of proton therapy. Detecting prompt γ-rays, a side product of proton-tissue interaction, aims at an on-line and non-invasive monitoring of the particle range, and therefore towards exploiting the potential of proton therapy. Compton imaging of the spatial prompt γ-ray emission is a promising measurement approach. Prompt γ-rays exhibit emission energies of several MeV. Hence, common radioactive sources cannot provide the energy range a prompt γ-ray imaging device must be designed for. In this work a benchmark measurement-setup for the production of a localized, monoenergetic 4.44 MeV γ-ray source is introduced. At the Tandetron accelerator at the HZDR, the proton-capture resonance reaction 15N(p,α γ4.439)12C is utilized. This reaction provides the same nuclear de-excitation (and γ-ray emission) occurrent as an intense prompt γ-ray line in proton therapy. The emission yield is quantitatively described. A two-stage Compton imaging device, dedicated for prompt γ-ray imaging, is tested at the setup exemplarily. Besides successful imaging tests, the detection efficiency of the prototype at 4.44 MeV is derived from the measured data. Combining this efficiency with the emission yield for prompt γ-rays, the number of valid Compton events, induced by γ-rays in the energy region around 4.44 MeV, is estimated for the prototype being implemented in a therapeutic treatment scenario. As a consequence, the detection efficiency turns out to be a key parameter for prompt

  11. Measurement of deuteron induced gamma-ray emission differential cross sections on natCl from 1.0 to 2.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokar, A.; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this research work, measured differential cross sections for gamma-ray emission from the nuclear reactions 35Cl(d,pγ1-0)36Cl (Eγ = 788 keV), 35Cl(d,pγ2-0)36Cl (Eγ = 1165 keV), 37Cl(d,pγ1-0)38Cl (Eγ = 671 keV) and 37Cl(d,pγ2-0)38Cl (Eγ = 755 keV) are presented. For these measurements a thin natural BaCl2 target evaporated onto a 50 μm-thick Mo foil was used. The gamma-rays and backscattered deuterons were detected simultaneously. An HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction was employed to collect gamma-rays while an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165° was used to detect backscattered deuterons. The validity of the obtained differential cross sections was verified through a thick target benchmarking experiment. The overall systematic uncertainty of cross section values was estimated to be ±10%.

  12. Comparison of the biological effectiveness of 45 MeV C-ions and {gamma}-rays in inducing early and late effects in normal human primary fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Fratini, E.; Balduzzi, M.; Antonelli, F.; Sorrentino, E.; Esposito, G.; Cuttone, G.; Romano, F.; Dini, V.; Simone, G.; Campa, A.; Tabocchini, M. A.; Belli, M.

    2013-07-18

    Investigation of the mechanisms underlying the biological effects induced by densely ionizing radiation has relevant implications in both radiation protection and therapy. In particular, the possible advantages of hadrontherapy with respect to conventional radiotherapy in terms of high conformal tumor treatment and sparing of healthy tissues are well known. Further improvements are limited by lack of radiobiological knowledge, particularly about the specific cellular response to the damage induced by particles of potential interest for tumor treatment. This study compares early and late effects induced in AG01522 normal human primary fibroblasts by {gamma}-rays and C-ions having E {approx} 45 MeV/u at the cell entrance, corresponding to LET (in water) {approx} 49 keV/{mu}m. Different end points have been investigated, namely: cell killing and lethal mutation, evaluated as early and delayed reproductive cell death, respectively; chromosome damage, as measured by micronuclei induction (MN); DNA damage, in terms of DSB induction and repair, as measured by the H2AX phosphorylation/dephosphorylation kinetics. Linear dose-response relationships were found for cell killing and induction of lethal mutations, with RBEs of about 1.3 and 1.6 respectively, indicating that the presence of genomic instability is greater in the progeny of C-ions irradiated cells. H2AX phosphorylation/dephosphorylation kinetics have shown a maximum foci number at 30 min after irradiation, higher for {gamma}-rays than for C-ions. However, in the first 12 h the fraction of residual {gamma}-H2AX foci was higher for C-ions irradiated cells, indicating a lower removal rate, possibly related to multiple/more complex damage along the particle track, with respect to the sparse lesions produced by {gamma}-rays. MN induction, observed after 72 h from irradiation, was also greater for C-ions. Overall, these data indicate a more severe DNA damage induced by 45 MeV/u C-ions with respect to {gamma}-rays, likely

  13. Establishment of 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration fields produced using the 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the Facility of Radiation Standards, Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Tanimura, Yoshihiko

    2016-03-01

    A 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field, produced by the nuclear reaction of (19)F(p, αγ)(16)O, has been established at the Facility of Radiation Standards (FRS) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency for calibration purposes. Basic dosimetric quantities (i.e. averaged gamma-ray energy, air-kerma-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients and air kerma rates at the point of test) have been precisely determined through a series of measurements using the NaI(Tl) spectrometer and an ionisation chamber coupled with an appropriate build-up material. The measurements obtained comply with values recommended by the International Organization for Standardization for an 'R-F field'. The neutron contamination component for the field has also been measured by means of a conventional neutron dose equivalent meter (the so-called neutron rem-counter) and determined to be ∼ 0.5 % of the total dose equivalent. PMID:26012483

  14. 42 CFR 2.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to prevent or treat child abuse or neglect, including training on nutrition and child care and... DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.11 Definitions. For purposes of these regulations: Alcohol abuse means the use of an alcoholic beverage which impairs the physical, mental, emotional,...

  15. 42 CFR 2.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to prevent or treat child abuse or neglect, including training on nutrition and child care and... DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.11 Definitions. For purposes of these regulations: Alcohol abuse means the use of an alcoholic beverage which impairs the physical, mental, emotional,...

  16. 42 CFR 2.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to prevent or treat child abuse or neglect, including training on nutrition and child care and... DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.11 Definitions. For purposes of these regulations: Alcohol abuse means the use of an alcoholic beverage which impairs the physical, mental, emotional,...

  17. 42 CFR 2.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to prevent or treat child abuse or neglect, including training on nutrition and child care and... DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.11 Definitions. For purposes of these regulations: Alcohol abuse means the use of an alcoholic beverage which impairs the physical, mental, emotional,...

  18. 42 CFR 2.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to prevent or treat child abuse or neglect, including training on nutrition and child care and... DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.11 Definitions. For purposes of these regulations: Alcohol abuse means the use of an alcoholic beverage which impairs the physical, mental, emotional,...

  19. A High Resolution Liquid Xenon Imaging Telescope for 0.3-10 MeV Gamma Ray Astrophysics: Construction and Initial Balloon Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena

    1993-01-01

    The results achieved with a 3.5 liter liquid xenon time projection chamber (LXe-TPC) prototype during the first year include: the efficiency of detecting the primary scintillation light for event triggering has been measured to be higher than 85%; the charge response has been measured to be stable to within 0.1% for a period of time of about 30 hours; the electron lifetime has been measured to be in excess of 1.3 ms; the energy resolution has been measured to be consistent with previous results obtained with small volume chambers; X-Y gamma ray imaging has been demonstrated with a nondestructive orthogonal wires readout; Monte Carlo simulation results on detection efficiency, expected background count rate at balloon altitude, background reduction algorithms, telescope response to point-like and diffuse sources, and polarization sensitivity calculations; and work on a 10 liter LXe-TPC prototype and gas purification/recovery system.

  20. 9 CFR 2.11 - Denial of initial license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Denial of initial license application. 2.11 Section 2.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Licensing § 2.11 Denial of initial license application....

  1. 9 CFR 2.11 - Denial of initial license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Denial of initial license application. 2.11 Section 2.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Licensing § 2.11 Denial of initial license application....

  2. 7 CFR 2.11 - New principles and periodic reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false New principles and periodic reviews. 2.11 Section 2.11 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE... Agriculture § 2.11 New principles and periodic reviews. In the exercise of authority delegated by...

  3. 7 CFR 2.11 - New principles and periodic reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false New principles and periodic reviews. 2.11 Section 2.11 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE... Agriculture § 2.11 New principles and periodic reviews. In the exercise of authority delegated by...

  4. Gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W. (Editor); Trombka, J. I. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

  5. COMPTEL neutron response at 17 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, Terrence J.; Ait-Ouamer, Farid; Morris, Joann; Tumer, O. Tumay; White, R. Stephen; Zych, Allen D.

    1992-01-01

    The Compton imaging telescope (COMPTEL) instrument of the Gamma Ray Observatory was exposed to 17 MeV d,t neutrons prior to launch. These data were analyzed and compared with Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP(LANL) code. Energy and angular resolutions are compared and absolute efficiencies are calculated at 0 and 30 degrees incident angle. The COMPTEL neutron responses at 17 MeV and higher energies are needed to understand solar flare neutron data.

  6. Time-dependent 2.2 MeV and 0.5 MeV lines from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.; Ramaty, R.

    1975-01-01

    The time dependences of the 2.2 MeV and 0.51 MeV gamma ray lines from solar flares are calculated and the results are compared with observations of the 1972, August 4 and 7 flares. Time lag between the nuclear reactions and the formation of these two lines are caused, respectively, by capture of the neutrons, and by deceleration of the positrons and decay of the radioactive nuclei. Results show that the calculation is consistent with the observed rise of the 2.2 MeV line on August 4, and it does not require different time dependences for the accelerated protons and electrons in the flare region. The above lags can explain the delayed gamma ray emission observed on August 7. Positrons of energies greater than about 10 MeV could be detected in interplanetary space following large solar flares.

  7. Absorbed Dose to Water Determination Using IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU Protocols for 1.25 MeV Gamma Ray 6 MV and 10 MV X-Rays: An Intercomparison of Results when IAEA was taken as a Standard Protocol.

    PubMed

    Dolah, M T; Samat, S B; Kadni, T

    2000-01-01

    Absorbed dose to water was measured with ionisation chambers NE 2561 (#267), NE 2581 (#334), NE 2571 (#1028), using the IAEA standard water phantom. The ionisation chamber was inserted in the water phantom at a reference depth dependent on the type of the radiation quality used. Three radiation qualities were used namely 1.25 MeV gamma ray, 6 MV x-rays and 10 MV x-rays. The values of the absorbed dose to water were determined by the N(K)- and N(X)- based methods, i.e with the use of IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols. The aim of this study was to make an intercomparison of the results, by taking the IAEA protocol as a standard. The largest deviation contributed by any of these protocols was recorded for each quality. It was found that AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols contributed 0.94% for 1.25 MeV gamma ray, NACP contributed 2.12% for the 6 MV x-rays, and NACP contributed 2.35% for 10 MV x-rays. Since the acceptable limit of deviation set by the IAEA for this absorbed dose work is ± 3%, it is clear that the overall deviations obtained were all satisfactory. PMID:22844215

  8. Gamma ray astronomy and black hole astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.

    1990-01-01

    The study of soft gamma emissions from black-hole candidates is identified as an important element in understanding black-hole phenomena ranging from stellar-mass black holes to AGNs. The spectra of Cyg X-1 and observations of the Galactic Center are emphasized, since thermal origins and MeV gamma-ray bumps are evident and suggest a thermal-pair cloud picture. MeV gamma-ray observations are suggested for studying black hole astrophysics such as the theorized escaping pair wind, the anticorrelation between the MeV gamma bump and the soft continuum, and the relationship between source compactness and temperature.

  9. Time-dependent 2.2-MeV and 0.5-MeV lines from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.; Ramaty, R.

    1975-01-01

    The time dependences of the 2.2- and 0.51-MeV gamma-ray lines from solar flares are calculated, and the results are compared with observations of the 1972 August 4 and 7 flares. The time lag between the nuclear reactions and the formation of these two lines is caused by capture of the neutrons and subsequent deceleration of the positrons and decay of the radioactive nuclei. Our main results are that the calculation is consistent with the observed rise of the 2.2-MeV line on August 4, and it does not require different time dependences for the accelerated protons and high-energy electrons in the flare region. The above lags can explain the delayed gamma-ray emission observed on August 7. Positrons of energies greater than about 10 MeV could be detected in interplanetary space following large solar flares.

  10. Photon detector for MEGA. [53 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, C.A.; Tribble, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    The MEGA photon detector is designed to observe the 52.83-MeV photon produced in a [mu] [yields] e[gamma] decay with an energy resolution of 1.25 MeV, a position resolution of 2 [times] 5 mm[sup 2], a directional resolution of 10[degree], a time resolution of 500 ps, and an efficiency of about 5.4%. It will consist of three independent concentric cylindrical pair spectrometers mounted within a 1.5 T magnetic field produced by a superconducting solenoid magnet. Each pair spectrometer includes two thin Pb foils to convert photons into e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  11. Moisture effect in prompt gamma measurements from soil samples.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Khiari, F Z; Liadi, F A; Khateeb-Ur-Rehman; Raashid, M A; Isab, A H

    2016-09-01

    The variation in intensity of 1.78MeV silicon, 6.13MeV oxygen, and 2.22MeV hydrogen prompt gamma rays from soil samples due to the addition of 5.1, 7.4, 9.7, 11.9 and 14.0wt% water was studied for 14MeV incident neutron beams utilizing a LaBr3:Ce gamma ray detector. The intensities of 1.78MeV and 6.13MeV gamma rays from silicon and oxygen, respectively, decreased with increasing sample moisture. The intensity of 2.22MeV hydrogen gamma rays increases with moisture. The decrease in intensity of silicon and oxygen gamma rays with moisture concentration indicates a loss of 14MeV neutron flux, while the increase in intensity of 2.22MeV gamma rays with moisture indicates an increase in thermal neutron flux due to increasing concentration of moisture. The experimental intensities of silicon, oxygen and hydrogen prompt gamma rays, measured as a function of moisture concentration in the soil samples, are in good agreement with the theoretical results obtained through Monte Carlo calculations. PMID:27337651

  12. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence from Uranium above 2 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, E.; Howell, C. R.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Adekola, A.; Hammond, S. L.; Karwowski, H. J.; Tompkins, J. R.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Johnson, B.

    2009-10-01

    The detection of special nuclear materials is critical to the nation's efforts to counter serious threat from nuclear terrorist attacks. A research program has been initiated at TUNL to address the need for new nuclear data on the actinides using the High-Intensity Gamma-Ray Source (HIγS). The high-intensity nearly monoenergic and 100% polarized γ-ray beams from HγS were utilized to search for dipole states in ^235U and ^238U above 2 MeV. This information is necessary for developing technologies using Nuclear-Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) to nonintrusively scan cargo for specific nuclei. The existence of strong nuclear dipole transitions in the actinides above 2 MeV is important for nuclear forensics, because interrogation photons using NRF are the most penetrating at these energies. Results from our experiments at Eγ> 2.0 MeV on uranium will be presented.

  13. Solar gamma-ray lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite has observed emissions produced by nuclear reactions in over 20 separate solar flares. The observed intensity from different flares ranges over a factor of 100, and the time scale for their production ranges from 10-s pulses to complete events lasting over 1000 s. The emissions include narrow and broadened prompt gamma-ray lines from numerous isotopes from Li-7 to Fe-56 and cover the energy range from 0.431 MeV (Be-7) to 7.12 MeV (O-16). The instrument has also observed emissions at energies greater than 10 MeV from the decay of pi0 mesons, from electron bremsstrahlung, and from the direct observation of greater-than-100-MeV solar neutrons. The intensity, temporal and spectral properties of these emissions are reviewed from the point of view that solar flares represent an astrophysical particle-acceleration site.

  14. The Andromeda galaxy in gamma-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oezel, M. E.; Berkhuijsen, E. M.

    1987-01-01

    Implications of high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Andromeda galaxy with the next generation of satellites Gamma-1 and GRO are discussed in the context of the origin of cosmic rays and gamma-ray processes. The present estimate of the total gamma-ray flux of this galaxy at energies above 100 MeV is a factor of about three less than previous estimates.

  15. Gamma-ray astrophysics with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.

    2003-09-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics above 30 MeV will soon be revitalized by a new generation of high-energy detectors in space. We discuss here the AGILE Mission that will be dedicated to gamma-ray astrophysics above 30 MeV during the period 2005-2006. The main characteristics of AGILE are: (1) excellent imaging and monitoring capabilities both in the γ-ray (30 MeV - 30 GeV) and hard X-ray (10-40 keV) energy ranges (reaching an arcminute source positioning), (2) very good timing (improving by three orders of magnitude the instrumental deadtime for γ-ray detection compared to previous instruments), and (3) excellent imaging and triggering capability for Gamma-Ray Bursts. The AGILE scientific program will emphasize a quick response to gamma-ray transients and multiwavelength studies of gamma-ray sources.

  16. Status of the GAMMA-400 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Farber, M. O.; Fradkin, M. I.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leoniv, A. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mazets, E. P.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.

    2013-01-01

    The preliminary design of the new space gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-400 for the energy range 100 MeV-3 TeV is presented. The angular resolution of the instrument, 1-2 deg at E(gamma) approximately 100 MeV and approximately 0.01 at E(gamma) greater than 100 GeV, its energy resolution is approximately 1% at E(gamma) greater than 100 GeV, and the proton rejection factor is approximately 10(exp 6) are optimized to address a broad range of science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, studies of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, gamma-ray bursts, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of cosmic-ray electrons, positrons, and nuclei.

  17. Gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Cosmic gamma rays, the physical processes responsible for their production and the astrophysical sites from which they were seen are reported. The bulk of the observed gamma ray emission is in the photon energy range from about 0.1 MeV to 1 GeV, where observations are carried out above the atmosphere. There are also, however, gamma ray observations at higher energies obtained by detecting the Cerenkov light produced by the high energy photons in the atmosphere. Gamma ray emission was observed from sources as close as the Sun and the Moon and as distant as the quasar 3C273, as well as from various other galactic and extragalactic sites. The radiation processes also range from the well understood, e.g. energetic particle interactions with matter, to the still incompletely researched, such as radiation transfer in optically thick electron positron plasmas in intense neutron star magnetic fields.

  18. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  19. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A.M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A.I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Picozza, P.; Rodin, V. G.; Runtso, M. F.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Vacchi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approx. 0.01 deg (E(sub gamma) > 100 GeV), the energy resolution approx. 1% (E(sub gamma) > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approx 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  20. Detectors for energies less than 10 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    In the energy domain 100 keV to 10 MeV, both crystal scintillations and semiconductors are widely used for gamma ray detectors in spectrometer systems. These detectors' operation depend on the fact that gamma rays lose energy by ionization in these materials and electrons and holes are produced. In the case of semiconductors, these electrons and holes are collected by an electric field, and they provide an electric signal that is a direct measure of the energy lost by the gamma ray in the material. Scintillation detectors depend on a further conversion of the energy lost in electron hole pair production to the production of photons. A photomultiplier tube measures the intensity of the photon flux, and an electrical pulse proportional to the photon intensity is produced at the photomultiplier output.

  1. First experimental results from 2MeV proton tandem accelerator for neutron productiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A.; Belchenko, Yu.; Burdakov, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Krivenko, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Mekler, K.; Sanin, A.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.; Sulyaev, Yu.; Tiunov, M.

    2008-02-01

    A 2MeV proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation was developed and first experiments are carried out in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). The accelerator is designed for neutron production via reaction Li7(p,n)Be7 for the boron neutron-capture therapy of the brain tumors, and for explosive detection based on 9.1724MeV resonance gamma, which are produced via reaction C13(p,γ)N14, absorption in nitrogen.

  2. Galaxies and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The nature of the high-energy spectra of several types of active galaxies and their contribution to the measured diffuse gamma-ray emission between 1 and 150 MeV are considered, using X-ray spectra of active galaxies and SAS 2 data regarding the intensity upper limits to the gamma-ray emission above 35 MeV. It is found that a substantial increase in slope of the photon energy spectrum must occur in the low energy gamma-ray region for Seyfert galaxies, BL Lac objects, and emission line galaxies; the power-law spectra observed in the X-ray range must steepen substantially between 50 keV and 50 MeV. In addition, a cosmological integration shows that Seyfert galaxies, BL Lac objects, and quasars may account for most of the 1-150 MeV diffuse background, even without significant evolution.

  3. The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope for precision gamma-ray emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gascon, D.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Martinez, M.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Ward, J. E.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The GAMMA-400 energy range is expected to be from ∼20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 10 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 1015 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For 100-GeV gamma rays, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution is ∼0.01° and energy resolution is ∼1% the proton rejection factor is ∼5x105. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.

  4. Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

    1951-01-31

    The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

  5. First experimental results from 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, A.; Belchenko, Yu.; Burdakov, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Krivenko, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Mekler, K.; Sanin, A.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.; Sulyaev, Yu.; Tiunov, M.

    2008-02-15

    A 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation was developed and first experiments are carried out in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). The accelerator is designed for neutron production via reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be for the boron neutron-capture therapy of the brain tumors, and for explosive detection based on 9.1724 MeV resonance gamma, which are produced via reaction {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N, absorption in nitrogen.

  6. First experimental results from 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator for neutron production.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, A; Belchenko, Yu; Burdakov, A; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Khilchenko, A; Konstantinov, S; Krivenko, A; Kuznetsov, A; Mekler, K; Sanin, A; Shirokov, V; Sorokin, I; Sulyaev, Yu; Tiunov, M

    2008-02-01

    A 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation was developed and first experiments are carried out in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). The accelerator is designed for neutron production via reaction (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be for the boron neutron-capture therapy of the brain tumors, and for explosive detection based on 9.1724 MeV resonance gamma, which are produced via reaction (13)C(p,gamma)(14)N, absorption in nitrogen. PMID:18315262

  7. Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie E.; Michelson, Peter F.; Paclesas, William S.; Ritz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in June 2008, is an observatory designed to survey the high-energy gamma-ray sky. The primary instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), provides observations from 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. A second instrument, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), provides observations of transients from less than 10 keV to 40 MeV. We describe the design and performance of the instruments and their subsystems, the spacecraft and the ground system.

  8. ART: Surveying the Local Universe at 2-11 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Adams, M. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Bubarev, M. V.; Hassinger, G.; Pravlinski, M.; Predehl, P.; Romaine, S. E.; Swartz, D. A.; Urry, C. M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    The Astronomical Rontgen Telescope (ART) is a medium-energy x-ray telescope system proposed for the Russian-led mission Spectrum Rontgen-Gamma (SRG). Optimized for performance over the 2-11-keV band, ART complements the softer response of the SRG prime instrument-the German eROSITA x-ray telescope system. The anticipated number of ART detections is 50,000-with 1,000 heavily-obscured (N(sub H)> 3x10(exp 23)/sq cm) AGN-in the SRG 4-year all-sky survey, plus a comparable number in deeper wide-field (500 deg(sup 2) total) surveys. ART's surveys will provide a minimally-biased, nearly-complete census of the local Universe in the medium-energy x-ray band (including Fe-K lines), at CCD spectral resolution. During long (approx.100-ks) pointed observations, ART can obtain statistically significant spectral data up to about 15 keY for bright sources and medium-energy x-ray continuum and Fe-K-line spectra of AGN detected with the contemporaneous NuSTAR hard-x-ray mission.

  9. Measuring high-energy {gamma} rays with Ge detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lipoglavsek, M.; Likar, A.; Vencelj, M.; Vidmar, T.; Bark, R. A.; Gueorguieva, E.; Komati, F.; Lawrie, J. J.; Maliage, S. M.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Ramashidzha, T. M.

    2006-04-26

    Gamma rays with energies up to 21 MeV were measured with Ge detectors. Such {gamma} rays were produced in the 208Pb(p,{gamma})209Bi reaction. The position of the 2g9/2 single proton orbit in 209Bi has been determined indicating the size of the Z=126 shell gap.

  10. Gamma-Ray background spectrum and annihilation rate in the baryon-symmetric big-bang cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puget, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt was made to extract experimental data on baryon symmetry by observing annihilation products. Specifically, gamma rays and neutrons with long mean free paths were analyzed. Data cover absorption cross sections and radiation background of the 0.511 MeV gamma rays from positron annihilations and the 70 MeV gamma rays from neutral pion decay.

  11. Polarization observables in deuteron photodisintegration below 360 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Glister, Jacqueline; Lee, Byungwuek; Gilman, R; Sarty, Adam; Strauch, Steffen; Higinbotham, Douglas; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Allada, Kalyan; Armstrong, Whitney; Arrington, John; Beck, Arie; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Berman, Barry; Boeglin, Werner; Brash, Edward; Camsonne, Alexandre; Calarco, John; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Coman, Luminita; Craver, Brandon; Cusanno, Francesco; Dumas, Jonathan; Dutta, Chiranjib; Feuerbach, Robert; Freyberger, Arne; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Holmstrom, Timothy; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim, Hassan; Ilieva, Yordanka; De Jager, Cornelis; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jones, Mark; Kang, Hoyoung; Kelleher, Aidan; Khrosinkova, Elena; Kuchina, Elena; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Markowitz, Pete; Beck, S. May-Tal; McCullough, Emily; Meekins, David; Meziane, Mehdi; Meziane, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Norum, Blaine; Oh, Yongseok; Olson, Michael; Paolone, Michael; Paschke, Kent; Perdrisat, Charles; Potokar, Milan; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Pomerantz, Ishay; Puckett, Andrew; Punjabi, Vina; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Ransome, Ronald; Reyhand, Meral; Roche, Julie; Rousseau, Yannick; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Schulte, Elaine; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Shneor, R; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Song, JeongSeog; Sparks, Rachel; Subedi, Ramesh; Urciuoli, Guido; Wang, Kebin; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, Xinhu; Yao, Huan; Zhan, Xiaohui

    2011-03-01

    High precision measurements of induced and transferred recoil proton polarization in d(polarized gamma, polarized p})n have been performed for photon energies of 277--357 MeV and theta_cm = 20 degrees -- 120 degrees. The measurements were motivated by a longstanding discrepancy between meson-baryon model calculations and data at higher energies. At the low energies of this experiment, theory continues to fail to reproduce the data, indicating that either something is missing in the calculations and/or there is a problem with the accuracy of the nucleon-nucleon potential being used.

  12. Level Density of COBALT-57 in the Energy Region 1 Mev to 14 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vivek

    The level density of ^{57 }Co is studied in the energy region of 1-14 MeV using three experimental techniques. Levels are counted in the resolved region, evaporation spectra are measured in the resolved to continuum region, and the coherence width is measured in the region of level overlap. Use of Hauser-Feshbach fits to the evaporation cross sections requires level densities of the residual nucleus. A two -parameter based Fermi gas form is used for the calculation of level density as a function of the nuclear excitation energy. This procedure enables level density calculation beyond the energy region in which the two fixed parameters provide the best fits to the data. A comparison is made between the level density obtained from the above described methods and the predictions of the microscopic model in an energy range of 1-20 MeV. This model utilizes a BCS pairing Hamiltonian and specific sets of single particle states and calculates numerical values of the level density. Comparisons are also made with level density of ^{57 }Co obtained in various other studies. Both the resolved level studies and the fits to the evaporation spectra were conducted using the ^{56}Fe(d,n)^{57 }Co and ^{57}Fe(p,n) ^{57}Co reactions. Standard neutron time-of-flight techniques including pulse shape discrimination for elimination of gamma -rays were employed. An energy resolution as good as 6 keV at 1-1.5 MeV neutron energy was obtained for high resolution measurements. For Ericson fluctuation measurements, the excitation functions corresponding to the ground state and the first two excited states of the residual nucleus in the ^{56}Fe(p,n) ^{56}Co reaction were obtained for lab angles between 0^circ and 150^circ. The ^{56}Fe(d,n) ^{57}Co reaction proves to be very selective in populating resolved states and includes substantial contributions from mechanisms other than the compound nuclear. The ^{57 }Fe(p,n)^{57}Co reaction populated 14 previously unknown levels. The fits to the

  13. Monte Carlo calibration of the SMM gamma ray spectrometer for high energy gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Reppin, C.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was primarily designed and calibrated for nuclear gamma ray line measurements, but also has a high energy mode which allows the detection of gamma rays at energies above 10 MeV and solar neutrons above 20 MeV. The GRS response has been extrapolated until now for high energy gamma rays from an early design study employing Monte Carlo calculations. The response to 50 to 600 MeV solar neutrons was estimated from a simple model which did not consider secondary charged particles escaping into the veto shields. In view of numerous detections by the GRS of solar flares emitting high energy gamma rays, including at least two emitting directly detectable neutrons, the calibration of the high energy mode in the flight model has been recalculated by the use of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer codes. New results presented show that the GRS response to gamma rays above 20 MeV and to neutrons above 100 MeV is significantly lower than the earlier estimates.

  14. Design and performance of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Picozza, P.; Rodin, V. G.; Runtso, M. F.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Yurkin, Yu. T.; Zampa, N.; Zverev, V. G.; Zirakashvili, V. N.

    2013-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is ~0.01° (Eγ > 100 GeV), the energy resolution ~1% (Eγ > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor ~106. GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  15. Gamma-400 Science Objectives Built on the Current HE Gamma-Ray and CR Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Mitchell, John; Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    The main scientific interest of the Russian Gamma-400 team: Observe gamma-rays above approximately 50 GeV with excellent energy and angular resolution with the goals of: (1) Studying the fine spectral structure of the isotropic high-energy gamma-radiation, (2) Attempting to identify the many still-unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources. Gamma-400 will likely be the only space-based gamma-ray observatory operating at the end of the decade. In our proposed Gamma-400-LE version, it will substantially improve upon the capabilities of Fermi LAT and AGILE in both LE and HE energy range. Measuring gamma-rays from approx 20 MeV to approx 1 TeV for at least 7 years, Gamma-400-LE will address the topics of dark matter, cosmic ray origin and propagation, neutron stars, flaring pulsars, black holes, AGNs, GRBs, and actively participate in multiwavelength campaigns.

  16. The gamma ray spectrometer for the Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Ryan, J. M.; Cherry, M. L.; Gleske, I. U.; Reppin, C.; Pinkau, K.; Rieger, E.; Kanbach, G.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes an actively shielded, multicrystal scintillation spectrometer for measurement of the solar gamma ray flux used by the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma Ray Experiment. The instrument provides a 476-channel pulse height spectrum every 16.38 s over the 0.3-9 MeV energy range; the gamma ray spectral analysis can be extended to at least 15 MeV on command. The instrument is designed to measure the intensity, energy, and Doppler shift of narrow gamma ray lines, the intensity of extremely broadened lines, and the photon continuum.

  17. Calculated neutron-induced cross sections for /sup 53/Cr from 1 to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, K.; Hetrick, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    Neutron-induced cross sections of /sup 53/Cr have been calculated in the energy regions from 1 to 20 MeV. The quantities obtained are the cross sections for the reactions (n,n'..gamma..), (n,2n), (n,np), (n,n..cap alpha..), (n,p..gamma..), (n,pn), (n,..cap alpha gamma..), (n,..cap alpha..n), (n,d), (n,t), (n,/sup 3/He), and (n,..gamma..), as well as the spectra of emitted neutrons, protons, alpha particles, and gamma rays. The precompound process was included above 5 MeV in addition to the compound process. For the inelastic scattering, the contribution of the direct interaction was calculated with DWBA. 36 refs., 23 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. The background model in the energy range from 0.1 MeV up to several MeV for low altitude and high inclination satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.

    2016-02-01

    The gamma-ray background physical origin for low altitude orbits defined by: diffuse cosmic gamma-emission, atmospheric gamma-rays, gamma-emission formed in interactions of charged particles (both prompt and activation) and transient events such as electrons precipitations and solar flares. The background conditions in the energy range from 0.1 MeV up to several MeV for low altitude orbits differ due to frequency of Earth Radiation Belts - ERBs (included South Atlantic Anomaly - SAA) passes and cosmic rays rigidity. The detectors and satellite constructive elements are activated by trapped in ERBs and moving along magnetic lines charged particles. In this case we propose simplified polynomial model separately for polar and equatorial orbits parts: background count rate temporal profile approximation by 4-5 order polynomials in equatorial regions, and linear approximations, parabolas or constants in polar caps. The polynomials’ coefficients supposed to be similar for identical spectral channels for each analyzed equatorial part taken into account normalization coefficients defined due to Kp-indexes study within period corresponding to calibration coefficients being approximately constants. The described model was successfully applied for the solar flares hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission characteristic studies by AVS-F apparatus data onboard CORONAS-F satellite.

  19. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  20. A Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer conceptual design is discussed for performing gamma spectral measurements in monodirectional gamma fields from 100 R per hour to 1,000,000 R per hour. Selectable Compton targets are used to scatter gamma photons onto an otherwise heavily shielded detector with changeable scattering efficiencies such that the count rate is maintained between 500 and 10,000 per second. Use of two sum-Compton coincident detectors, one for energies up to 1.5 MeV and the other for 600 keV to 10 MeV, will allow good peak to tail pulse height ratios to be obtained over the entire spectrum and reduces the neutron recoil background rate.

  1. Gamma-ray spectroscopy - Requirements and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The only previous space instrument which had sufficient spectral resolution and directionality for the resolution of astrophysical sources was the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer carried by HEAO-3. A broad variety of astrophysical investigations entail gamma-ray spectroscopy of E/Delta-E resolving power of the order of 500 at 1 MeV; it is presently argued that a sensitivity to narrow gamma-ray lines of a few millionths ph/sq cm, from about 10 keV to about 10 MeV, should typify the gamma-ray spectrometers of prospective missions. This performance is achievable with technology currently under development, and could be applied to the NASA's planned Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer.

  2. Search for monenergetic gamma rays from psi /3684/ decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. W.; Beron, B. L.; Ford, R. L.; Hofstadter, R.; Howell, R. L.; Hughes, E. B.; Liberman, A. D.; Martin, T. W.; Oneill, L. H.; Hilger, E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported of a search for monoenergetic gamma rays with energies above 50 MeV arising from psi (3684) decay. The measurements were made by operating an electron-positron storage ring at a center-of-mass energy of 3684 MeV and detecting the secondary gamma rays with large-crystal NaI(T1) spectrometers. No significant evidence is found for the emission of such radiation, and upper limits are placed on such emissions for energies above 50 MeV.

  3. Gravitino decay and the cosmic gamma-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB) spectrum does not exhibit evidence for the decay of light gravitinos, in contradiction to the suggestion by Olive and Silk (1985), who observed a bump near 1 MeV in the CGB radiation spectrum. It is suggested that better fits to the CGB spectrum would be provided by mechanisms generating a power-law spectrum which is flattened below about 2 MeV. Olive and Silk maintain that the decays of a long-lived particle such as the gravitino may be responsible for features in the gamma-ray spectrum near 1 MeV.

  4. Width of the level at E sub x congruent 18 MeV in sup 5 Li

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, N.; Cavallaro, S. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Catania, Italy); D'Arrigo, A.; Fazio, G.; Giardina, G.; Italiano, A.; Herman, M.; Lombardi, M.

    1989-09-01

    The {alpha}{alpha} bidimensional spectra for the {sup 6}Li({sup 3}He, {alpha}{ital p}){sup 4}He reaction at 11, 13, and 14 MeV incident energy have been measured. The {sup 5}Li state at {ital E}{sub {ital x}}=(17.9{plus minus}0.4) MeV has been observed and its width has been determined as (3.5{plus minus}0.8) MeV. The excitation energy is in line with the shell-model calculations while the {Gamma} value is the first quantitative estimate of the width of the above state.

  5. GRB spectra in the MeV range: hints from INTEGRAL

    SciTech Connect

    Bulik, Tomasz; Denis, Miroslaw; Marcinkowski, Radoslaw; Goldoni, Paolo; Laurent, Philip; Osuch, Lukasz

    2007-07-12

    INTEGRAL detects a large number of gamma-ray bursts outside of its field of view with the SPI ACS. Several of these bursts are also detected by IBIS. We present the results of the spectral analysis using the ISRGI, PICSIT and Compton mode data of several bursts. These bursts show very hard spectra with the high energy index reaching -2 above 1 MeV We show that there is a group of bursts with the peak energy Epeak in the MeV range. We discuss the implications of these findings for GLAST.

  6. Effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the mechanical properties of polyimide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David J. T.; Hopewell, Jefferson L.

    1996-11-01

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the elongation to break, fracture energy and Young's Modulus have been investigated for films of Kapton and Ultem over the dose range 0-75 MGy at ambient temperature. The results have been compared with those reported by other workers for irradiation by 60Co gamma rays and 2 MeV electron beams under similar conditions, and little difference was found between the damage to the mechanical properties of the films induced by these three beam types.

  7. Compact Gamma-Beam Source for Nuclear Security Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkikh, P.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    A compact gamma-beam source dedicated to the development of the nuclear security technologies by use of the nuclear resonance fluorescence is described. Besides, such source is a very promising tool for novel technologies of the express cargoes inspection to prevent nuclear terrorism. Gamma-beam with the quanta energies from 0.3MeV to 7.2MeV is generated in the Compton scattering of the "green" laser photons on the electron beam with energies from 90MeV to 430MeV. The characteristic property of the proposed gammabeam source is a narrow spectrum (less than 1%) at high average gamma-yield (of 1013γ/s) due to special operation mode.

  8. Enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, R.; Ciprini, S.

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary LAT analysis indicates enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula. The daily-averaged gamma-ray emission (E > 100 MeV) from the direction of the Crab Nebula has surpassed 4.0 x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 five times in the last 12 days.

  9. Gamma rays from accretion onto rotating black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    Ionized matter falling onto an isolated, rotating black hole will be heated sufficiently that proton-proton collisions will produce mesons, including neutral pions, which decay into gamma rays. For massive (1000 M sub circled dot), black holes, the resulting gamma-ray luminosity may exceed 10 to the 36th power engs/s, with a spectrum peaked near 20 MeV.

  10. Gamma rays from accretion onto rotating black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    Ionized matter falling onto an isolated rotating black hole will be heated sufficiently that proton-proton collisions will produce mesons, including neutral pions, which decay into gamma rays. For massive (1000-solar mass) black holes, the resulting gamma-ray luminosity may exceed 10 to the 36th erg/s with a spectrum peaked near 20 MeV.

  11. Monte Carlo calculation of flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies between 0. 01 and 1. 00 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tapia, C.S.

    1980-12-08

    Gamma-ray flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies between 0.01 and 1.0 MeV were computed using the Monte Carlo method for a 30-cm-thick slab having the standard-man composition. Agreement between the computed factors and standard factors (ANSI/ANS-6.1.1-1977) was optimal for energies above 0.1 MeV and was at most 30% lower (at 0.02 MeV) for energies below 0.1 MeV. The computed factors were also in agreement with experimentally-obtained factors.

  12. The energy dependence of the cosmic-ray neutron leakage flux in the range 0.01-10 MeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. W.; Ifedili, S. O.; Lockwood, J. A.; Razdan, H.

    1971-01-01

    Measurement of the cosmic-ray neutron leakage flux and energy spectrum in the range 1 to 10 MeV by a neutron detector on the Ogo 6 satellite from June 7 to Sept. 30, 1969. The same detector simultaneously measured the total leakage flux, having 75% of its response to the leakage flux in the interval from 1 keV to 1 MeV. For a neutron energy spectrum of the form AE to the minus gamma in the range from 1 to 10 MeV, the upper limit to gamma for polar regions was found to be 1.0 and for the equatorial regions was 1.2. For the polar regions, the lower limit to gamma was found to be 0.8. This energy spectrum at 1 to 10 MeV is slightly flatter than Newkirk (1963) predicted.

  13. Tabulated data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tuner, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    The second small astronomy satellite (SAS-2) carried a high energy gamma ray telescope into an equitorial orbit with a 2 D inclination, an apogee of 610 km, and a perigee of 440 km. The energy threshold of the instrument was about 30 MeV, the energy of the gamma rays could be measured up to about 200 MeV, and the integral intensity above 200 MeV could also be measured. Summary tables of the gamma ray data are presented in two energy bands, 35-100 MeV and 100 MeV. The sky was divided into 144 solid angle elements, and, in each solid angle element for which data exist, the number of gamma rays observed is given and also the exposure factor. Information is provided to permit conversion of these data into approximate intensities.

  14. Pulsed pyroelectric crystal-powered gamma source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.

    2013-04-19

    A compact pulsed gamma generator is being developed to replace radiological sources used in commercial, industrial and medical applications. Mono-energetic gammas are produced in the 0.4 - 1.0 MeV energy range using nuclear reactions such as {sup 9}Be(d,n{gamma}){sup 10}B. The gamma generator employs an RF-driven inductively coupled plasma ion source to produce deuterium ion current densities up to 2 mA/mm{sup 2} and ampere-level current pulses can be attained by utilizing an array extraction grid. The extracted deuterium ions are accelerated to approximately 300 keV via a compact stacked pyroelectric crystal system and then bombard the beryllium target to generate gammas. The resulting microsecond pulse of gammas is equivalent to a radiological source with curie-level activity.

  15. Feasibility study of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of explosives simulants and bulk material using DD/DT neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishnoi, S.; Sarkar, P. S.; Patel, T.; Adhikari, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2013-04-01

    Elemental characterization of low Z elements (C,H,Cl,Fe) inside bulk materials were performed using PGNAA technique. Samples having elemental composition similar to explosives were used for such experimentations using moderated DD neutrons as well as DT(14MeV) neutrons. We could observe characteristic prompt capture gamma rays of hydrogen (2.224MeV), nitrogen (10.83 MeV), chlorine (6.11 MeV) and Fe (6.02MeV and 7.63MeV) also (n,n'γ) prompt gamma signal (4.43MeV) of carbon. BGO detector has been used for gamma spectrum acquisition. These experimentations has been carried out for initial feasibility studies of detecting prompt gamma lines as a part of PGNAA technique based explosive detection system development. A detail description of experimental set up and procedure has been discussed in paper.

  16. Prospects for High Energy Detection of Microquasars with the AGILE and GLAST Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Santolamazza, Patrizia; Pittori, Carlotta; Verrecchia, Francesco

    2007-08-21

    We estimate the sensitivities of the AGILE and GLAST {gamma}-ray experiments taking into account two cases for the galactic {gamma}-ray diffuse background (at high galactic latitude and toward the galactic center). Then we use sensitivities to estimate microquasar observability with the two experiments, assuming the {gamma}-ray emission above 100 MeV of a recent microquasar model.

  17. High-resolution photofission measurements in /sup 238/U and /sup 232/Th. Progress report, June 1, 1979-February 10, 1980. [5 to 12 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lancman, H.

    1980-02-01

    High-intensity proton beams have been used to generate gamma rays of well-defined and variable energy from the (p,..gamma..) reaction on a number of targets. Spectra of photofission fragments of /sup 238/U and /sup 232/Th have been measured at gamma ray energies from 5.8 to 11.5 MeV. The photofission cross sections have been determined and preliminary values of barrier parameters, derived by fitting the data to model predictions.

  18. Is (d,p{gamma}) a surrogate for neutron capture?

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Cizewski, J. A.; O'Malley, P. D.; Bernstein, L. A.; Burke, J. T.; Lesher, S. R.; Gibelin, J. D.; Phair, L. W.; Swan, T.

    2008-04-17

    To benchmark the validity of using the (d,p{gamma}) reaction as a surrogate for (n,{gamma}), the {sup 171,173}Yb(d,p{gamma}) reactions were measured and compared with the neutron capture cross sections measured by Wisshak et al. The (d,p{gamma}) ratios were measured using an 18.5 MeV deuteron beam from the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Preliminary results comparing the surrogate ratios with the known (n,{gamma}) cross sections are discussed.

  19. First Light: MeV Astrophysics from the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Richard S.; Lawrence, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We report evidence of the first astrophysical source detected from the Moon at MeV energies. Our detection of Cygnus X-1 is a validation of a new investigative paradigm in which the lunar environment is intrinsic to the detection approach: the Lunar Occultation Technique (LOT). NASA’s Lunar Prospector mission served as a proxy for a dedicated LOT-based mission. The characteristic signature of temporal modulation, generated by repeated lunar occultations and encoded within acquired gamma-ray data (0.5–9 MeV), is consistent with an unambiguous detection of Cygnus X-1 at 5.4σ significance. Source localization and long-term monitoring capabilities of the LOT are also demonstrated. This “first light” detection verifies the basic tenets of the LOT methodology, reinforces its feasibility as an alternative astronomical detection paradigm for nuclear astrophysics investigations, and is an illustration of the fundamental benefits of the Moon as a platform for science.

  20. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S.

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  1. Neutron induced fission of U isotopes up to 100 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lestone, J.P.; Gavron, A.

    1993-10-01

    We have developed a statistical model description of the neutron induced fission of U isotopes using densities of intrinsic states and spin cut off parameters obtained directly from appropriate Nilsson model single particle levels. The first chance fission cross sections are well reproduced when the rotational contributions to the nuclear level densities are taken into account. In order to fit the U(n,f) cross sections above the threshold of second chance fission, we need to: (1) assume that the triaxial level density enhancement is washed out at an excitation energy of {approximately}7 MeV above the triaxial barriers with a width of {approximately}1 MeV, implying a {gamma} deformation for the first barriers of 10{degree} < {gamma} < 20{degree}; and (2) include pre-equilibrium particle emission in the calculations. Above an incoming neutron kinetic energy of {approximately}17 MeV our statistical model U(n,f) cross sections increasingly overestimate the experimental data when so called ``good`` optical model potentials are used to calculate the compound nucleus formation cross sections. This is not surprising since at these high energies little data exists on the scattering of neutrons to help guide the choice of optical model parameters. A satisfactory reproduction of all the available U(n,f) cross sections above 17 MeV is obtained by a simple scaling of our calculated compound nucleus formation cross sections. This scaling factor falls from 1.0 at 17 MeV to 0.82 at 100 MeV.

  2. Development of an encapsulated scintillating fiber detector as a 14-MeV neutron sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singkarat, S.; Boonyawan, D.; Hoyes, G. G.; Tippawan, U.; Vilaithong, T.; Garis, N. S.; Kobus, H.

    1997-02-01

    A scintillating fiber detector has been developed and tested for use as a 14-MeV neutron sensor. The detector, designated an "Encapsulated Scintillating Fiber Detector (EFD)", is composed of a parallel array of 0.5 × 0.5 × 15 mm BCF-12 plastic scintillating fibers encapsulated in clear BC-600 optical cement. The 85 fibers from a 12 × 12 mm square array, with a separation gap of 0.8-1 mm, in the center of the 40 mm diameter × 15 mm thick hardened optical cement. It can be directly coupled to an ordinary 2 in. diameter photomultiplier tube and its simple electronics. The response of the detector to gamma-rays from isotopic sources, as well as to 2.6- and 14-MeV monoenergetic neutrons from a neutron generator has been evaluated. The detector shows 3 distinct properties simultaneously, i.e. (1) good gamma-ray pulse height reduction, (2) discrimination against 14-MeV neutrons entering at angles non-parallel to the fiber axis, and (3) production of a full energy peak of 14-MeV recoil protons in the direction of the fiber axes. Investigations by Monte Carlo simulation are also included.

  3. ORELA measurements to meet fusion energy neutron cross section needs. [2 to 80 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D C

    1980-01-01

    Major neutron cross section measurements made at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) that are useful to the fusion energy program are reviewed. Cross sections for production of gamma rays with energies 0.3 < E/sub ..gamma../ < 10.5 MeV were measured as a function of neutron energy over the range 0.1 < E/sub n/ < 20.0 MeV for Li, C, N, O, F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Nb, Mo, Ag, Sn, Ta, W, Au, Pb, and Th. Neutron emission cross sections have been measured for /sup 7/Li, Al, Ti, Cu, and Nb for 1 < E/sub n/ < 20 MeV. Some results of recent neutron total cross section measurements from 2 to 80 MeV for eleven materials (C, O, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Au, and Pb) of interest to the FMIT project are presented. Finally, future directions of the ORELA program are outlined. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Solar gamma ray astronomy on solar maximum mission. [experimental design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SMM gamma ray experiment and the important scientific capabilities of the instrument are discussed. The flare size detectable as a function of spectrum integration time was studied. A preliminary estimate indicates that a solar gamma ray line at 4.4 MeV one-fifth the intensity of that believed to have been emitted on 4 August 1972 can be detected in approximately 1000 sec with a confidence level of 99%.

  5. New COMPTEL results on pulsar studies at MeV energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Schoenfelder, V.; Strong, A. W.; Bennett, K.; Much, R.; McConnell, M.; Ryan, J.; Carraminana, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Compton telescope (COMPTEL) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) detected the pulsar PSR B1951-32 at MeV energies, and found indications of a signal from PSR B0656+14. In the combined spectra from COMPTEL and the energetic gamma ray experiment telescope (EGRET) onboard CGRO, it can be seen that the maximum luminosities of these objects are reached in the COMPTEL energy range. These spectra can be compared with those from four other pulsars observed in MeV energies with COMPTEL. The spectral properties of five of the six pulsars, Vela, PSR B1509-58, PSR B1951-32 and PSR B0656+14, require breaks and bends at MeV energies. The sixth pulsar, the Crab pulsar, approximately follows a power law flux relation from keV to GeV energies. It is concluded that this spectral behavior may play a role in the discrimination between current gamma ray emission models.

  6. The C3H2 2(20)-2(11) transition - Absorption in cold dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, H. E.; Avery, L. W.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    The first observations of the 2(20)-2(11) transition of cyclopropenylidene (C3H2) at 21.6 GHz are described. The most significant finding is that the 2(20)-2(11) transition line is always seen in absorption, in contrast to the 18.3-GHz 1(10)-1(01) resonance line of the ortho species which always appears in emission in cold dust clouds. Thus the former must have an excitation temperature less than the brightness temperature of the universal microwave background and becomes only the second molecule to exhibit such 'refrigeration' below this temperature in cold, dark dust clouds.

  7. High-energy gamma rays from the intense 1993 January 31 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommer, M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Hurley, K.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    The intense gamma-ray burst of 1993 January 31 was detected by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. Sixteen gamma rays above 30 MeV were imaged in the telescope when only 0.04 gamma rays were expected by chance. Two of these gamma rays have energies of approximately 1 GeV, and the five bin spectrum of the 16 events is fitted by a power law of photon spectral index -2.0 +/- 0.4. The high-energy emission extends for at least 25 s. The most probable direction for this burst is determined from the directions of the 16 gamma rays observed by Egret and also by requiring the position to lie on annulus derived by the Interplanetary Network.

  8. 43 CFR 2.11 - Why is it important to send my request to the right office?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Why is it important to send my request to the right office? 2.11 Section 2.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior RECORDS AND TESTIMONY; FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Requests for Records under the FOIA § 2.11 Why is...

  9. 43 CFR 2.11 - Why is it important to send my request to the right office?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Why is it important to send my request to the right office? 2.11 Section 2.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior RECORDS AND TESTIMONY; FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Requests for Records under the FOIA § 2.11 Why is...

  10. Measurement of the {sup 241}Am(n,2n) reaction cross section from 7.6 MeV to 14.5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tonchev, A. P.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Tornow, W.; Angell, C. T.; Boswell, M.; Hammond, S.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Pedroni, R. S.; Becker, J. A.; Dashdorj, D.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Bond, E.; Chadwick, M. B.

    2008-05-15

    The (n,2n) cross section of the radioactive isotope {sup 241}Am (T{sub 1/2}=432.6 y) has been measured in the incident neutron energy range from 7.6 to 14.5 MeV in steps of a few MeV using the activation technique. Monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction by bombarding a pressurized deuterium gas cell with an energetic deuteron beam at the TUNL 10-MV Van de Graaff accelerator facility. The induced {gamma}-ray activity of {sup 240}Am was measured with high-resolution HPGe detectors. The cross section was determined relative to Al, Ni, and Au neutron activation monitor foils, measured in the same geometry. Good agreement is obtained with previous measurements at around 9 and 14 MeV, whereas for a large discrepancy is observed when our data are compared to those reported by Perdikakis et al. near 11 MeV. Very good agreement is found with the END-B/VII evaluation, whereas the JENDL-3.3 evaluation is in fair agreement with our data.

  11. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  12. SAS-2 gamma-ray observations of PSR 1747-46. [radio pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence is reported for the observation of gamma-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 1747-46 by the gamma-ray telescope aboard SAS 2. The evidence is based on the presence of both an approximately 3-sigma enhancement of gamma rays at the pulsar's location and an approximately 4-sigma peak in the phase plot of 79 gamma-ray events whose phase was calculated from the pulsar's known period. The gamma-ray pulsation is found to appear at a phase lag of about 0.16 from that predicted by the radio observations. The pulsed gamma-ray fluxes above 35 MeV and 100 MeV are estimated, and it is shown that the gamma-ray pulse width is similar to the radio pulse width. It is concluded that PSR 1747-46 is a most likely candidate for pulsed gamma-ray emission.

  13. COMPTEL gamma-ray observations of the quasars CTA 102 and 3C 454.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, J. J.; Bloemen, H.; Bennett, K.; Collmar, W.; Hermsen, W.; Mcconnell, M.; Schoenfelder, V.; Stacy, J. G.; Steinle, H.; Strong, A.

    1994-01-01

    The blazar-type active galactic nuclei CTA 102 (QSO 2230+114) and 3C 454.3 (QSO 2251+158), located about 7 deg apart, were observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory at four epochs in 1992. Both were detected by Energy Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The combined Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) observations in the 10-30 MeV energy range clearly indicate a source of MeV emission, which is likely due to a contribution from both quasars. These observations strongly suggest that the power-law spectra measured by EGRET above approximately 50 MeV flatten at lower MeV energies. A comparison with observations at other wavelengths shows that the power spectra of CTA 102 and 3C 454.3 peak at MeV energies. This behavior appears to be a common feature of gamma-ray active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  14. Losing Our Way? The Downward Path for Outdoor Learning for Children Aged 2-11 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Sue

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on three related empirical studies in the South West of England: a survey of outdoor experiential learning opportunities, examining attitudes, practice and aspirations of practitioners and children in educational and care settings for children between 2-11 years within a rural county; a follow-up series of five case studies; and…

  15. Renewed Gamma-Ray Emission from the blazar PKS 1510-089 Detected by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Pittori, C.; Bulgarelli, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Piano, G.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Tavani, M.; Vercellone, S.; Minervini, G.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-09-01

    AGILE is currently detecting enhanced gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source which position is consistent with the blazar PKS 1510-089. (the last activity of this source was reported in ATel #9350).

  16. Performance of the Laser Compton Scattering Gamma-Ray Source at SAGA-LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyasu, T.; Takabayashi, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Koda, S.

    2013-03-01

    A laser Compton scattering gamma-ray source was constructed at the SAGA light source facility. To produce high-flux gamma rays in the few MeV region, we used a CO2 laser with a 10.6 μm wavelength. Head-on collisions between the laser photons and the 1.4 GeV electron beam in the storage ring can produce gamma rays up to a maximum energy of 3.5 MeV without affecting the light source performance. The performance of the LCS source with respect to the stability of gamma-ray flux during continuous operation is reported.

  17. Observation of a Charmoniumlike Enhancement in the {gamma}{gamma}->{omega}J/{psi} Process

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, S.; Haba, J.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Sakai, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uno, S.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; McOnie, S.; Yabsley, B. D.; Belous, K.; Shapkin, M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Singh, J. B.; Bischofberger, M.; Hayashii, H.

    2010-03-05

    We report the results of a search for a charmoniumlike state produced in the process {gamma}{gamma}->{omega}J/{psi} in the 3.9-4.2 GeV/c{sup 2} mass region. We observe a significant enhancement, which is well described by a resonant shape with mass M=(3915+-3+-2) MeV/c{sup 2} and total width {Gamma}=(17+-10+-3) MeV. This enhancement may be related to one or more of the three charmoniumlike states so far reported in the 3.90-3.95 GeV/c{sup 2} mass region.

  18. Gamma-ray pulsar studies with COMPTEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Diehl, R.; Lichti, G.; Schoenfelder, V.; Strong, A. W.; Connors, A.; Ryan, J.; Bennett, K.; Busetta, M.; Carraminana, A.; Buccheri, R.; Grenier, I. A.

    1994-06-01

    Since the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) the number of detected gamma-ray pulsars increased from two to six. COMPTEL, on-board CGRO and sensitive to gamma-rays with energies between approximately 0.7 and 30 MeV, detected three of these unambiguously. The classical Crab and Vela pulsars have been observed on several occasions and detailed pulse patterns and spectral parameters have been derived. The new CGRO gamma-ray pulsar PSR B1509-58 has been detected by COMPTEL at a significance level above 4 sigma, consistently in a timing and spatial analysis. A likely detection of Geminga has been obtained at an approximately 3 sigma level. This indication is found in a phase interval in which COS B data showed the presence of a new variable component, Interpeak 2, exhibiting a very soft spectrum above 50 MeV. The diversities in light-curve sphapes and spectral distributions, the apparent time variabilities, and the significant differences in the fractions of the spin-down power radiated at gamma-ray energies in this small sample of gamma-ray pulsars pose important constraints to pulsar modeling.

  19. Gamma-ray Astrophysics with AGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Francesco |; Tavani, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Argan, A.; Basset, M.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P.; Chen, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M.

    2007-07-12

    AGILE will explore the gamma-ray Universe with a very innovative instrument combining for the first time a gamma-ray imager and a hard X-ray imager. AGILE will be operational in spring 2007 and it will provide crucial data for the study of Active Galactic Nuclei, Gamma-Ray Bursts, unidentified gamma-ray sources. Galactic compact objects, supernova remnants, TeV sources, and fundamental physics by microsecond timing. The AGILE instrument is designed to simultaneously detect and image photons in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV and 15 - 45 keV energy bands with excellent imaging and timing capabilities, and a large field of view covering {approx} 1/5 of the entire sky at energies above 30 MeV. A CsI calorimeter is capable of GRB triggering in the energy band 0.3-50 MeV AGILE is now (March 2007) undergoing launcher integration and testing. The PLSV launch is planned in spring 2007. AGILE is then foreseen to be fully operational during the summer of 2007.

  20. Influence of the chemical composition on gamma ray attenuation by fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bhandal, G S; Singh, K

    1992-04-01

    The dependence of gamma ray attenuation on the chemical composition of fatty acids is investigated in the energy range from 10(-3) to 10(5) MeV. The mass attenuation coefficients (muF) and effective atomic numbers (Zeff) have been calculated for 27 different fatty acids. They show appreciable variation with the chemical composition of fatty acids in the region of gamma ray energies from 10(-3) to 10(5) MeV. PMID:1314792

  1. The solar gamma ray and neutron capabilities of COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.; Lockwood, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging Compton telescope COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has unusual spectroscopic capabilities for measuring solar gamma-ray and neutron emission. The launch of the GRO is scheduled for June 1990 near the peak of the sunspot cycle. With a 30 to 40 percent probability for the Sun being in the COMPTEL field-of-view during the sunlit part of an orbit, a large number of flares will be observed above the 800 keV gamma-ray threshold of the telescope. The telescope energy range extends to 30 MeV with high time resolution burst spectra available from 0.1 to 10 MeV. Strong Compton tail suppression of instrumental gamma-ray interactions will facilitate improved spectral analysis of solar flare emissions. In addition, the high signal to noise ratio for neutron detection and measurement will provide new neutron spectroscopic capabilities. Specifically, a flare similar to that of 3 June 1982 will provide spectroscopic data on greater than 1500 individual neutrons, enough to construct an unambiguous spectrum in the energy range of 20 to 200 MeV. Details of the instrument and its response to solar gamma-rays and neutrons will be presented.

  2. Gas Desorption and Electron Emission from 1 MeV Potassium Iion Bombardment of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A; Covo, M K; Bieniosek, F; Prost, L; Seidl, P; Baca, D; Coorey, A; Sakumi, A

    2004-03-25

    Gas desorption and electron emission coefficients were measured for 1 MeV potassium ions incident on stainless steel at grazing angles (between 80 and 88 degrees from normal incidence) using a new gas-electron source diagnostic (GESD). Issues addressed in design and commissioning of the GESD include effects from backscattering of ions at the surface, space-charge limited emission current, and reproducibility of desorption measurements. We find that electron emission coefficients {gamma}{sub e} scale as 1/cos({theta}) up to angles of 86 degrees, where {gamma}{sub e} = 90. Nearer grazing incidence, {gamma}{sub e} is reduced below the 1/cos({theta}) scaling by nuclear scattering of ions through large angles, reaching {gamma}{sub e} = 135 at 88 degrees. Electrons were emitted with a measured temperature of {approx}30 eV. Gas desorption coefficients {gamma}{sub 0} were much larger, of order {gamma}{sub 0} = 10{sub 4}. They also varied with angle, but much more slowly than 1/cos({theta}). From this we conclude that the desorption was not entirely from adsorbed layers of gas on the surface. Two mitigation techniques were investigated: rough surfaces reduced electron emission by a factor of ten and gas desorption by a factor of two; a mild bake to {approx}220 degrees had no effect on electron emission, but decreased gas desorption by 15% near grazing incidence. We propose that gas desorption is due to electronic sputtering.

  3. Gas Desorption and Electron Emission from 1 MeV Potassium Ion Bombardment of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Covo, M K; Bieniosek, F M; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Baca, D; Coorey, A; Sakumi, A

    2004-07-19

    Gas desorption and electron emission coefficients were measured for 1 MeV potassium ions incident on stainless steel at grazing angles (between 80 and 88 from normal incidence) using a new gas-electron source diagnostic (GESD). Issues addressed in design and commissioning of the GESD include effects from backscattering of ions at the surface, space-charge limited emission current, and reproducibility of desorption measurements. We find that electron emission coefficients {gamma}{sub e} scale as 1/cos({theta}) up to angles of 86, where {gamma}{sub e} = 90. Nearer grazing incidence, {gamma}{sub e} is reduced below the 1/cos({theta}) scaling by nuclear scattering of ions through large angles, reaching {gamma}{sub e} = 135 at 88. Electrons were emitted with a measured temperature of {approx}30 eV. Gas desorption coefficients {gamma}{sub sigma} were much larger, of order {gamma}{sub sigma} = 104. They also varied with angle, but much more slowly than 1/cos({theta}). From this we conclude that the desorption was not entirely from adsorbed layers of gas on the surface. Two mitigation techniques were investigated: rough surfaces reduced electron emission by a factor of ten and gas desorption by a factor of two; a mild bake to 230 had no effect on electron emission, but decreased gas desorption by 15% near grazing incidence. We propose that gas desorption is due to electronic sputtering.

  4. Lifetime measurement of the 6.79 MeV state in 15O with the AGATA demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Ur, C. A.; Bazzacco, D.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Erhard, M.; Farnea, E.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Keeley, N.; Lunardi, S.; Marta, M.; Mengoni, D.; Mijatović, T.; Recchia, F.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Szücs, T.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Agata Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The 14N(p,γ)15O reaction is the slowest process of the CN cycle, and thus it is of high astrophysical interest since it regulates the total rate of energy and neutrinos production through the cycle. The 14N+p ground state capture is strongly influenced by a sub-threshold resonance corresponding to the 6.79 MeV state in 15O. The width of this resonance is a major source of uncertainty in the extrapolation of the reaction cross section in the Gamow energy window. Preliminary results of a new Doppler Shift Attenuation measurement of the lifetime of the 6.79 MeV state in 15O are discussed. The level of interest was populated via the 2H(14N,n)15O reaction in inverse kinematics at 32 MeV beam energy. The gamma-rays emitted in the decay of the 6.79 MeV level to the ground state were detected with the AGATA Demonstrator array of high-purity germanium detectors. The sensitivity of the shape of the peak in the gamma-ray energy spectrum to the level lifetime is investigated comparing the experimental peaks with detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the reaction mechanisms and the gamma-ray emission and detection. Nuclear levels in 15N (also populated in the 14N+2H reaction) for which the lifetimes are known in the literature provided a test of the analysis technique.

  5. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, Thompson H.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  6. Synthesis and Evaluation of a 2,11‐Cembranoid‐Inspired Library

    PubMed Central

    Welford, Amanda J; Liu, Manjuan; Richards, Meirion; Brown, Nathan; Lomas, Cara; Tizzard, Graham J.; Pitak, Mateusz B.; Coles, Simon J.; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Raynaud, Florence I.; Collins, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The 2,11‐cembranoid family of natural products has been used as inspiration for the synthesis of a structurally simplified, functionally diverse library of octahydroisobenzofuran‐based compounds designed to augment a typical medicinal chemistry library screen. Ring‐closing metathesis, lactonisation and SmI2‐mediated methods were exemplified and applied to the installation of a third ring to mimic the nine‐membered ring of the 2,11‐cembranoids. The library was assessed for aqueous solubility and permeability, with a chemical‐space analysis performed for comparison to the family of cembranoid natural products and a sample set of a screening library. Preliminary investigations in cancer cells showed that the simpler scaffolds could recapitulate the reported anti‐migratory activity of the natural products. PMID:26929153

  7. Diffuse gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma-radiation observed by SAS-2 satellite away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV has shown that it consists of two components. One component is generally correlated with galactic latitudes, the atomic hydrogen column density was deduced from 21 cm measurements, and the continuum radio emission, believed to be synchrotron emission. It has an energy spectrum similar to that in the plane and joins smoothly to the intense radiation from the plane. It is therefore presumed to be of galactic origin. The other component is apparently isotropic, at least on a coarse scale, and has a steep energy spectrum. No evidence is found for a cosmic ray halo surrounding the galaxy in the shape of a sphere or oblate spheroid with galactic dimensions. Constraints for a halo model with significantly larger dimensions are set on the basis of an upper limit to the gamma-ray anisotropy.

  8. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) was launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on 5 April 1991. The spacecraft and instruments are in good health and returning exciting results. The mission provides nearly six orders of magnitude in spectral coverage, from 30 keV to 30 GeV, with sensitivity over the entire range an order of magnitude better than that of previous observations. The 16,000 kilogram observatory contains four instruments on a stabilized platform. The mission began normal operations on 16 May 1991 and is now over half-way through a full-sky survey. The mission duration is expected to be from six to ten years. A Science Support Center has been established at Goddard Space Flight Center for the purpose of supporting a vigorous Guest Investigator Program. New scientific results to date include: (1) the establishment of the isotropy, combined with spatial inhomogeneity, of the distribution of gamma-ray bursts in the sky; (2) the discovery of intense high energy (100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 3C 279 and other quasars and BL Lac objects, making these the most distant and luminous gamma-ray sources ever detected; (3) one of the first images of a gamma-ray burst; (4) the observation of intense nuclear and position-annihilation gamma-ray lines and neutrons from several large solar flares; and (5) the detection of a third gamma-ray pulsar, plus several other transient and pulsing hard X-ray sources.

  9. The Sneg-3 gamma-ray astronomy experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedrenne, G.; Niel, M.; Chambon, G.

    The scientific objectives of the Sneg-3 experiment are examined. The gamma-ray spectrometer installed on the French Sneg-3 satellite has 14 differential channels in the 20 keV to 10 MeV range and 256 channels for amplitude analysis in the 200 keV to 2.5 MeV range. The processing of Helios, Prognoz-6 (Sneg-2MP), and Sneg-3 data has made it possible to localize transient gamma-ray sources by the triangulation method.

  10. Lifetime measurement of the 6.79 MeV state in {sup 15}O with the AGATA demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Michelagnoli, C.; Depalo, R.; Ur, C. A.; Menegazzo, R.; Broggini, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Caciolli, A.; Farnea, E.; Lunardi, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Keeley, N.; Erhard, M.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Marta, M.; Mengoni, D.; Mijatovic, T.; Recchia, F.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Szuecs, T.; and others

    2012-11-12

    The preliminary results of a new direct measurement of the lifetime of the first excited 3/2{sup +} state in {sup 15}O are discussed. An accurate evaluation of this lifetime is of paramount importance for the determination of the cross section of the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction, the slowest one in the CNO cycle, at the energies of the solar Gamow peak. The {sup 2}H({sup 14}N,{sup 15}O)n reaction in inverse kinematics at 32MeV beam energy (XTU Tandem, LNL) was used to populate the level of interest, which decays via a 6.79 MeV E1 gamma-ray transition to the ground state. Gamma rays were detected with 4 triple clusters of HPGe detectors of the AGATA Demonstrator array. The energy resolution and position sensitivity of this state-of-the-art gamma-ray spectrometer have been exploited to investigate the Doppler Shift Attenuation effect on the lineshape of the gamma-ray peak in the energy spectrum. The deconvolution of the lifetime effects from those due to the kinematics of the emitting nuclei has been performed using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the gamma emission and detection. CDCC-CRC calculations for the nucleon transfer process have been used for this purpose and preliminary results are shown.

  11. 511 keV line and diffuse gamma rays from moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2006-03-15

    We obtain the spectrum of gamma-ray emissions from the moduli whose decay into e{sup +}e{sup -} accounts for the 511 keV line observed by SPI/INTERGRAL. The moduli emit gamma rays through internal bremsstrahlung, and also decay directly into two gammas via tree and/or one-loop diagrams. We show that the internal bremsstahlung constrains the mass of the moduli below {approx}40 MeV model-independently. On the other hand, the flux of two gammas directly decayed from the moduli through one-loop diagrams will exceed the observed galactic diffuse gamma-ray background if the moduli mass exceeds {approx}20 MeV in the typical situation. Moreover, forthcoming analysis of SPI data in the range of 1-8 MeV may detect the line emisson with the energy half the moduli mass in the near future, which confirms the decaying moduli scenario.

  12. Compton telescope observations of gamma rays from SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ait-Ouamer, Farid; Kerrick, Alan D.; O'Neill, Terrence J.; Tumer, O. T.; Zych, Allen D.; White, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    Results are reported of observations of a significant excess of gamma rays at energies of 1.0-2.5 MeV from the direction of SN 1987A, 418 days after detonation. Two features at 1.21 and 1.88 MeV are attributed to the 1.238 MeV and the combined 1.771, 2.015, and 2.035 MeV line emissions from the decay of Co-56 in the expanding ejecta with respective fluxes of (4.6 +/-1.4 +/-1.2) x 10 exp -4 and (3.5 +/-0.9 +/-0.9) x 10 exp -4 gamma/sq cm s, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The obtained energy resolution of 11 percent did not permit a definite separation of the 1.771-MeV line from the two other lines at 2.015 and 2.035 MeV that form the group at 1.88 MeV. The line fluxes were obtained after correcting for the north-south effect and the continuum.

  13. Relative biological effectiveness and microdosimetry of a mixed energy field of protons up to 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. B.; Eaddy, J. M.; Archambeau, J. O.; Coutrakon, G. B.; Miller, D. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Siebers, J. V.; Slater, J. M.; Dicello, J. F.

    1994-10-01

    We have studied radiation effects utilizing the new 250 MeV Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. In this paper we present the data collected for the survival of Chinese hamster lung (V79) cells, that were irradiated with a beam of mixed energy protons up to 200 MeV. The RBE for protons, when compared to 60Co gamma rays, ranged from a low of 1.2 at the high energy portion of the field to 1.3+ at the low energy portion of the field. These results are consistent with the measured lineal energy (microdosimetric) spectra.

  14. Relative biological effectiveness and microdosimetry of a mixed energy field of protons up to 200 MeV.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J B; Eaddy, J M; Archambeau, J O; Coutrakon, G B; Miller, D W; Moyers, M F; Siebers, J V; Slater, J M; Dicello, J F

    1994-10-01

    We have studied radiation effects utilizing the new 250 MeV Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. In this paper we present the data collected for the survival of Chinese hamster lung (V79) cells, that were irradiated with a beam of mixed energy protons up to 200 MeV. The RBE for protons, when compared to 60Co gamma rays, ranged from a low of 1.2 at the high energy portion of the field to 1.3+ at the low energy portion of the field. These results are consistent with the measured lineal energy (microdosimetric) spectra. PMID:11539961

  15. Implications of Gamma-Ray Transparency Constraints in Blazars: Minimum Distances and Gamma-Ray Collimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Peter A.; Kafatos, Menas

    1995-01-01

    in gamma - ray blazars, then these objects should appear as bright MeV sources when viewed along off-axis lines of sight.

  16. Gamma beam system at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Ur, Calin Alexandru

    2015-02-24

    The Gamma Beam System of ELI-NP will produce brilliant, quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beams via Inverse Compton Scattering of short laser pulses on relativistic electron beam pulses. The scattered radiation is Doppler upshifted by more than 1,000,000 times and is forward focused in a narrow, polarized, tunable, laser-like beam. The gamma-ray beam at ELI-NP will be characterized by large spectral density of about 10{sup 4} photons/s/eV, narrow bandwidth (< 0.5%) and tunable energy from 200 keV up to about 20 MeV. The Gamma Beam System is a state-of-the-art equipment employing techniques and technologies at the limits of the present-day's knowledge.

  17. Some problems of gamma-astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogiel, V. A.; Ginzburg, V. L.

    1989-04-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of gamma-ray emission (GRE) from astronomical objects are reviewed. Topics addressed include the basic observational parameters, bremsstrahlung GRE, the Compton effect, synchrotron and curvature radiation, pi0-meson and analogous decays, gamma line generation, gamma-ray absorption, and the Galactic GRE band. Consideration is given to discrete sources of soft GRE, gamma-ray bursts, the annihilation GRE line from the Galactic center, the Al-26 decay line, GRE lines from SN, diffuse GRE from the Galactic disk and halo, discrete GRE sources at 30-5000 MeV, and sources of GRE at energies greater than 1 TeV or 1 PeV. Diagrams, maps, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  18. Gamma ray astronomy from satellites and balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of gamma ray astronomy topics presented at the Cosmic Ray Conference. The major conclusions at the Cosmic Ray Conference in the field of gamma ray astronomy are given. (1) MeV-emission of gamma-ray bursts is a common feature. Variations in duration and energy spectra from burst to burst may explain the discrepancy between the measured log N - log S dependence and the observed isotropy of bursts. (2) The gamma-ray line at 1.809 MeV from Al(26) is the first detected line from a radioactive nucleosynthesis product. In order to understand its origin it will be necessary to measure its longitude distribution in the Milky Way. (3) The indications of a gamma-ray excess found from the direction of Loop I is consistent with the picture that the bulk of cosmic rays below 100 GeV is produced in galactic supernova remnants. (4) The interpretation of the large scale distribution of gamma rays in the Milky Way is controversial. At present an extragalactic origin of the cosmic ray nuclei in the GeV-range cannot be excluded from the gamma ray data. (5) The detection of MeV-emission from Cen A is a promising step towards the interesting field of extragalactic gamma ray astronomy.

  19. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Candidates for GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be launched this year, and its Large Area Telescope (LAT) is expected to discover scores to hundreds of gamma-ray pulsars. This poster discusses which of the over 1700 known pulsars, mostly visible only at radio frequencies, are likely to emit greater than 100 MeV gamma rays with intensities detectable by the LAT. The main figure of merit used to select gamma-ray pulsar candidates is sqrt(E-dot)/d2, where E-dot is the energy loss due to rotational spin-down, and d is the distance to the pulsar. The figure of merit incorporates spin-down flux at earth (proportional to E-dot/d2) times efficiency, assumed proportional to l/sqrt(E-dot). A few individual objects are cited to illustrate the issues. Since large E-dot pulsars also tend to have large timing noise and occasional glitches, their ephemerides can become inaccurate in weeks to months. To detect and study the gamma-ray emission the photons must be accurately tagged with the pulse phase. With hours to days between gamma-ray photon arrival times from a pulsar and months to years of LAT exposure needed for good detections, GLAST will rely on radio and X-ray timing measurements throughout the continuous gamma-ray observations. The poster will describe efforts to coordinate pulsar timing of the candidate gamma-ray pulsars.

  20. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Candidates for GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.; Smith, D. A.; Dumora, D.; Guillemot, L.; Parent, D.; Reposeur, T.; Grove, E.; Romani, R. W.; Thorsett, S. E.

    2007-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be launched less than a year from now, and its Large Area Telescope (LAT) is expected to discover scores to hundreds of gamma-ray pulsars. This poster discusses which of the over 1700 known pulsars, mostly visible only at radio Erequencies, are likely to emit greater than l00 MeV gamma rays with intensities detectable by the LAT. The main figure of merit used to select gamma-ray pulsar candidates is sqrt(E-dot)/d^2, where E-dot is the energy loss due to rotational spindown, and d is the distance to the pulsar. The figure of merit incorporates spin-down flux at earth (proportional to E-dot/d^2) times efficiency, assumed proportional to 1/sqrt(E-dot). A few individual objects are cited to illustrate the issues. Since large E-dot pulsars also tend to have large timing noise and occasional glitches, their ephemerides can become inaccurate in weeks to months. To detect and study the gamma-ray emission the photons must be accurately tagged with the pulse phase. With hours to days between gamma-ray photon arrival times from a pulsar and months to years of LAT exposure needed for good detections, GLAST will need timing measurements throughout the continuous gamma-ray observations. The poster will describe efforts to coordinate pulsar timing of the candidate gamma-ray pulsars.

  1. AGILE DETECTION OF DELAYED GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 090510

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, A.; Vianello, G.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A. W.; Contessi, T.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Moretti, E.; Cattaneo, P. W.

    2010-01-10

    Short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), typically lasting less than 2 s, are a special class of GRBs of great interest. We report the detection by the AGILE satellite of the short GRB 090510 which shows two clearly distinct emission phases: a prompt phase lasting {approx}200 ms and a second phase lasting tens of seconds. The prompt phase is relatively intense in the 0.3-10 MeV range with a spectrum characterized by a large peak/cutoff energy near 3 MeV; in this phase, no significant high-energy gamma-ray emission is detected. At the end of the prompt phase, intense gamma-ray emission above 30 MeV is detected showing a power-law time decay of the flux of the type t {sup -1.3} and a broadband spectrum remarkably different from that of the prompt phase. It extends from sub-MeV to hundreds of MeV energies with a photon index {alpha} {approx_equal} 1.5. GRB 090510 provides the first case of a short GRB with delayed gamma-ray emission. We present the timing and spectral data of GRB 090510 and briefly discuss its remarkable properties within the current models of gamma-ray emission of short GRBs.

  2. Observing Gamma-ray Bursts with GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) is a satellite-based observatory to study the high-energy gamma-ray sky. The Large Area Telescope, the main instrument, is a pair-conversion telescope which will survey the sky in the energy range 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. The LAT's wide field of view (greater than 2 sr), large effective area and low deadtime combine to provide excellent high-energy gamma-ray observations of GRB. To tie these frontier high-energy observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 8 keV to 30 MeV range. Upon detection of a GRB by the LAT or the GBM, the spacecraft can autonomously repoint to keep the GRB location within the LAT field of view, allowing high-energy afterglow observations. We describe how the instruments, spacecraft, and ground system work together to provide observations of gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to over 300 GeV and provide rapid notification of these observations to the wider gamma-ray burst community. Analysis and simulation tools dedicated to the GRB science have been developed. In this contribution we show the expected LAT sensitivity obtained with such simulations, and illustrate the results we expect from GLAST observations with spectral and temporal analysis of simulated GRB.

  3. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed 79 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds.

  4. Gamma ray spectrometer for Lunar Scout 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C. E.; Burt, W. W.; Edwards, B. C.; Martin, R. A.; Nakano, George H.; Reedy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    We review the current status of the Los Alamos program to develop a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer for the Lunar Scout-II mission, which is the second of two Space Exploration Initiative robotic precursor missions to study the Moon. This instrument will measure gamma rays in the energy range of approximately 0.1 - 10 MeV to determine the composition of the lunar surface. The instrument is a high-purity germanium crystal surrounded by an CsI anticoincidence shield and cooled by a split Stirling cycle cryocooler. It will provide the abundance of many elements over the entire lunar surface.

  5. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  6. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  7. GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 25 MeV. With its upcoming launch in 2008, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the collaboration between particle physicists and astrophysicists, the opportunities for guest observers, and the mission status.

  8. A scintillating-fiber 14-MeV neutron detector on TFTR during DT operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A.; Chrien, R.E.; Barnes, C.W.; Sailor, W.C.; Roquemore, A.L.; Lavelle, M.J.; O`Gara, P.M.; Jordan, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    A compact 14-MeV neutron detector using an array of scintillating fibers has been tested on the TFTR tokamak under conditions of a high gamma background. This detector uses a fiber-matrix geometry, a magnetic field-insensitive phototube with an active HV base and pulse-height discrimination to reject low-level pulses from 2.5 MeV neutron and intense gammas. Laboratory calibrations have been performed at EG&G Las Vegas using a pulsed DT neutron generator and a 30 kCi {sup 60}Co source as background, at PPPL using DT neutron sources, and at LANL using an energetic deuterium beam and target at a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. During the first high power DT shots on TFTR in December 1993, the detector was 15.5 meters from the torus in a large collimator. For a rate of 1 {times} 10{sup 18} n/sec from the tokamak, it operated in an equivalent background of 1 {times} 10{sup 10} gammas/cm{sup 2}/sec ({approximately}4 mA current drain) at a DT count rate of 200 kHz.

  9. Discovery of an Extreme MeV Blazar with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, R. M.; Markwardt, C. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Tueller, J.; Hartman, R.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D> P.; Falcone, A.; Cucchiara, A.; Aller, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift detected bright emission from 15-195 keV from the source SWIFT J0746.3+2548 (J0746 in the following), identified with the optically-faint (R approx. 19), z=2.979 quasar SDSS J074625.87+244901.2. Here we present Swift and multiwavelength observations of this source. The X-ray emission from J0746 is variable on timescales of hours to weeks in 0.5-8 keV and of a few months in 15-195 keV, but there is no accompanying spectral variability in the 0.5-8 keV band. There is a suggestion that the BAT spectrum, initially very hard (photon index Gamma approx. 0.7), steepened to Gamma approx. 1.3 in a few months, together with a decrease of the 15-195 keV flux by a factor approx. 2. The 0.5-8 keV continuum is well described by a power law with Gamma approx. 1.3, and spectral flattening below 1 keV. The latter can be described with a column density in excess of the Galactic value with intrinsic column density Nz(sub H) approx. 10(exp 22)/sq cm , or with a flatter power law, implying a sharp (Delta(Gamma) less than or approx. 1) break across 16 keV in the quasar's rest-frame. The Spectral Energy Distribution of J0746 is double-humped, with the first component peaking at IR wavelengths and the second component at MeV energies. These properties suggest that J0746 is a a blazar with high gamma-ray luminosity and low peak energy (MeV) stretching the blazar sequence to an extreme.

  10. Lifetime of {sup 19}Ne*(4.03 MeV)

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Ball, G. C.; Churchman, R.; Davids, B.; Hackman, G.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Tanihata, I.; Walden, P.; Yen, S.; Alexander, T. K.; Andreyev, A. N.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Ruiz, C.; Chicoine, M.; Forster, J. S.; Gujrathi, S.; Howell, D.; Leslie, J. R.; Mythili, S.

    2006-10-15

    The Doppler-shift attenuation method was applied to measure the lifetime of the 4.03 MeV state in {sup 19}Ne. By utilizing a {sup 3}He-implanted Au foil as a target, the state was populated using the {sup 20}Ne({sup 3}He, {alpha}){sup 19}Ne reaction in inverse kinematics at a {sup 20}Ne beam energy of 34 MeV. De-excitation {gamma} rays were detected in coincidence with {alpha} particles. At the 1{sigma} level, the lifetime was determined to be 11{sub -3}{sup +4} fs and at the 95.45% confidence level the lifetime is 11{sub -7}{sup +8} fs.