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Sample records for 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

  1. Decontamination of 2-Chloroethyl Ethyl Sulfide by Pulsed Corona Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanguo; Hu, Zhen; Cao, Peng; Zhao, Hongjie

    2014-11-01

    Decontamination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES, CH3CH2SCH2CH2Cl) by pulsed corona plasma was investigated. The results show that 212.6 mg/m3 of 2-CEES, with the gas flow rate of 2 m3/h, can be decontaminated to 0.09 mg/m3. According to the variation of the inlet and outlet concentration of 2-CEES vapor with retention time, it is found that the reaction of 2-CEES in a pulsed corona plasma system follows the first order reaction, with the reaction rate constant of 0.463 s-1. The decontamination mechanism is discussed based on an analysis of the dissociation energy of chemical bonds and decontamination products. The C-S bond adjacent to the Cl atom will be destroyed firstly to form CH3CH2S· and ·CH2CH2Cl radicals. CH3CH2S· can be decomposed to ·C2H5 and ·S. ·S can be oxidized to SO2, while ·C2H5 can be finally oxidized to CO2 and H2O. The C-Cl bond in the ·CH2CH2Cl radical can be destroyed to form ·CH2CH2. and ·Cl, which can be mineralized to CO2, H2O and HCl. The H atom in the ·CH2CH2Cl radical can also be substituted by ·Cl to form CHCl2-CHCl2.

  2. Mechanistic insights into the hydrolysis of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide: the expanded roles of sulfonium salts.

    PubMed

    Bae, Su Y; Winemiller, Mark D

    2013-07-01

    The hydrolysis of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide has been examined in an effort to better understand its mechanism under more concentrated conditions. Two salts formed during hydrolysis were synthesized, and an emphasis was placed on determining their effect on the reaction as it proceeded. Unexpected changes in mechanism were seen when excess chloride was added to the reaction. By measuring rates and product distributions as the products were added back into the hydrolysis, a mechanism was developed. The formation of these sulfonium salts represents additional products in the disappearance of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide with k3 in particular causing a deviation away from expected first-order behavior. Sulfonium salts 3 and 4 do not appear to interconvert, and the system as a whole had fewer pathways available than previously proposed. Initial conditions for studying the hydrolysis were very important and could lead to different conclusions depending on the conditions used. This work will aid in better understanding the hydrolysis of the very toxic chemical warfare agent mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) in the environment and during its decontamination. PMID:23767819

  3. The chemiluminescence determination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide using luminol-AgNO3-silver nanoparticles system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddah, Bozorgmehr; Shamsi, Javad; Barsang, Mehran Jam; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi

    2015-05-01

    A highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method for the determination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES) was presented. It was found that 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES) could inhibit the CL of the luminol-AgNO3 system in the presence of silver nanoparticles in alkaline solution, which made it applicable for determination of 2-CEES. The presented method is simple, convenient, rapid and sensitive. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.0001-1 ng mL-1, with the correlation coefficient of 0.992; while the limit of detection (LOD), based on signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3, was 6 × 10-6 ng mL-1. Also, the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 5) for determination of 2-CEES (0.50 ng mL-1) was 3.1%. The method was successfully applied for the determination of 2-CEES in environmental aqueous samples.

  4. The chemiluminescence determination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide using luminol-AgNO3-silver nanoparticles system.

    PubMed

    Maddah, Bozorgmehr; Shamsi, Javad; Barsang, Mehran Jam; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi

    2015-05-01

    A highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method for the determination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES) was presented. It was found that 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES) could inhibit the CL of the luminol-AgNO3 system in the presence of silver nanoparticles in alkaline solution, which made it applicable for determination of 2-CEES. The presented method is simple, convenient, rapid and sensitive. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.0001-1ngmL(-1), with the correlation coefficient of 0.992; while the limit of detection (LOD), based on signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3, was 6×10(-6)ngmL(-1). Also, the relative standard deviation (RSD, n=5) for determination of 2-CEES (0.50ngmL(-1)) was 3.1%. The method was successfully applied for the determination of 2-CEES in environmental aqueous samples. PMID:25703367

  5. Rotational spectra, nuclear quadrupole hyperfine tensors, and conformational structures of the mustard gas simulent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubergen, M. J.; Lesarri, A.; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, A. C.; Jensen, J. O.; Ellzy, M. W.; Lochner, J. M.

    2005-10-01

    Rotational spectra have been recorded for both the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopic forms of two structural conformations of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The rotational constants of the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopomers were used to identify the conformational isomers. A total of 236 hyperfine transitions have been assigned for 47 rotational transitions of the 35Cl isotope of a GGT conformer, and 146 hyperfine have been assigned for 37 rotational transitions of the 37Cl isotopomer. For the second conformer, a total of 128 (110) hyperfine and 30 (28) rotational transitions have also been assigned to the 35Cl ( 37Cl) isotopes of a TGT conformation. The extensive hyperfine splitting data, measured to high resolution with a compact Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, were used to determine both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the 35Cl and 37Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors in the inertial tensor principal axis system. The experimental rotational constant data, as well as the 35Cl and 37Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors, were compared to the results from 27 optimized ab initio (HF/6-311++G ∗∗ and MP2/6-311++G ∗∗) model structures.

  6. Synthesis of magnetron sputtered WO₃ nanoparticles-degradation of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and dimethyl methyl phosphonate.

    PubMed

    Verma, Monu; Chandra, Ramesh; Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, tungsten oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using DC magnetron sputtering and investigated their potential for decontamination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP). The tungsten oxide nanoparticles were characterized by Powder XRD, FE-SEM, EDS, TEM, TGA, N2-BET and FT-IR techniques. The XRD patterns of as-deposited and post annealed tungsten oxide nanoparticles reveal that the crystallite size of detected monoclinic phase WO3 nanoparticle was increased with increasing annealing temperatures. The phase and increase in particles size of WO3 nanoparticles were also confirmed by Raman and TEM analyses. The obtained surface area (∼63-33 m(2)/g) of magnetron sputtered WO3 nanoparticles was found to be enhanced significantly as compared to reported surface area of WO3 nanoparticles synthesis by various techniques. The study of degradation reactions of CEES and DMMP on the surface of obtained nanoparticles was carried out by using GC and GC-MS techniques. The decontamination reactions were found to be pseudo first order steady state with rate constant (k) and half life values 0.143-0.109 h(-1) and 4.82-6.49 h for CEES and 0.018-0.010 h(-1) and 36.87-66.65 h for DMMP, respectively. The FT-IR data reveal the role of hydrolysis reactions in the decontamination of CEES as well as DMMP. PMID:25965433

  7. Protection against 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) - induced cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes by an inducer of the glutathione detoxification pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Erika L.; Bubel, Jennifer D.; Simper, Melissa S.; Powell, Leslie; McClellan, S. Alex; Andreeff, Michael; MacLeod, Michael C.; DiGiovanni, John

    2011-09-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM or mustard gas) was first used as a chemical warfare agent almost 100 years ago. Due to its toxic effects on the eyes, lungs, and skin, and the relative ease with which it may be synthesized, mustard gas remains a potential chemical threat to the present day. SM exposed skin develops fluid filled bullae resulting from potent cytotoxicity of cells lining the basement membrane of the epidermis. Currently, there are no antidotes for SM exposure; therefore, chemopreventive measures for first responders following an SM attack are needed. Glutathione (GSH) is known to have a protective effect against SM toxicity, and detoxification of SM is believed to occur, in part, via GSH conjugation. Therefore, we screened 6 potential chemopreventive agents for ability to induce GSH synthesis and protect cultured human keratinocytes against the SM analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). Using NCTC2544 human keratinocytes, we found that both sulforaphane and methyl-2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) stimulated nuclear localization of Nrf2 and induced expression of the GSH synthesis gene, GCLM. Additionally, we found that treatment with CDDO-Me elevated reduced GSH content of NCTC2544 cells and preserved their viability by {approx} 3-fold following exposure to CEES. Our data also suggested that CDDO-Me may act additively with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a nucleophilic scavenging agent, to increase the viability of keratinocytes exposed to CEES. These results suggest that CDDO-Me is a promising chemopreventive agent for SM toxicity in the skin. - Highlights: > CDDO-Me treatment increased intracellular GSH in human keratinocytes. > CDDO-Me increased cell viability following exposure to the half-mustard, CEES. > The cytoprotective effect of CDDO-Me was likely due to scavenging with endogenous GSH.

  8. Airway tissue factor-dependent coagulation activity in response to sulfur mustard analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Rancourt, Raymond C.; Veress, Livia A.; Guo, XiaoLing; Jones, Tara N.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a principal cause of morbidity and mortality in response to mustard gas (SM) inhalation. Obstructive, fibrin-containing airway casts have recently been reported in a rat inhalation model employing the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The present study was designed to identify the mechanism(s) causing activation of the coagulation cascade after CEES-induced airway injury. Here we report that CEES inhalation elevates tissue factor (TF) activity and numbers of detached epithelial cells present in lavage fluid (BALF) from rats after exposure (18 h). In vitro studies using 16HBE cells, or with rat BALF, indicated that detached epithelial cells could convert factor X (FX) to the active form FXa when incubated with factor VII and could elicit rapid clotting of plasma. In addition, immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated elevated cell surface (TF) expression on CEES-exposed 16HBE cells as a function of time. However, total cell TF expression did not increase. Since membrane surfaces bearing TF are important determinants of clot initiation, anticoagulants directed against these entities were tested for ability to limit plasma clotting or FX activation capacity of BALF or culture media. Addition of tifacogin, a TF pathway inhibitor, effectively blocked either activity, demonstrating that the procoagulant actions of CEES were TF pathway dependent. Lactadherin, a protein capable of competing with clotting factors for phospholipid-binding sites, was partially effective in limiting these procoagulant actions. These findings indicate that TF pathway inhibition could be an effective strategy to prevent airway obstruction after SM or CEES inhalation. PMID:21964405

  9. 2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect

    Boulware, Stephen; Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L.; Vasquez, Karen M.; MacLeod, Michael C.

    2012-09-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γ-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ► 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ► This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ► 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

  10. Optical "Turn off" based selective detection and concomitant degradation of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via Mg-porphyrazine complex immobilized on glass.

    PubMed

    Neelam; Singh, Vikram; Gupta, Tarkeshwar

    2014-02-17

    Covalently assembled monolayers (CAMs) of Mg-porphyrazine complex on glass and silicon substrates were fabricated and employed as "Turn off" sensor for ppm level detection and degradation of a sulfur mustard analogue: 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The detection process was read-out optically via an off-the-shelf UV/Vis spectrophotometer in transmission mode. Monolayer based sensor system was shown to be quite robust and stable, sufficiently accurate and reversible under given experimental conditions. Notably, the sensor system exhibited marked selectivity for CEES when exposed exclusively or in mix to different potent analytes. Moreover, action of KMnO4 on monolayer-CEES complex lead to CEES degradation and resetting of the sensor to its native state for reuse. PMID:24491785

  11. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury. PMID:20561902

  12. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury.

  13. Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Hayden, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-12-01

    Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}, a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 {mu}M), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthases, leukotriene (LT) A{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

  14. Role of TNFR1 in lung injury and altered lung function induced by the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-02-01

    Lung toxicity induced by sulfur mustard is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. To elucidate mechanisms mediating pulmonary damage, we used 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. Male mice (B6129) were treated intratracheally with CEES (3 or 6 mg/kg) or control. Animals were sacrificed 3, 7 or 14 days later and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue collected. Treatment of mice with CEES resulted in an increase in BAL protein, an indication of alveolar epithelial damage, within 3 days. Expression of Ym1, an oxidative stress marker also increased in the lung, along with inducible nitric oxide synthase, and at 14 days, cyclooxygenase-2 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, inflammatory proteins implicated in tissue injury. These responses were attenuated in mice lacking the p55 receptor for TNF{alpha} (TNFR1-/-), demonstrating that signaling via TNFR1 is key to CEES-induced injury, oxidative stress, and inflammation. CEES-induced upregulation of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and MnSOD was delayed or absent in TNFR1-/- mice, relative to WT mice, suggesting that TNF{alpha} mediates early antioxidant responses to lung toxicants. Treatment of WT mice with CEES also resulted in functional alterations in the lung including decreases in compliance and increases in elastance. Additionally, methacholine-induced alterations in total lung resistance and central airway resistance were dampened by CEES. Loss of TNFR1 resulted in blunted functional responses to CEES. These effects were most notable in the airways. These data suggest that targeting TNF{alpha} signaling may be useful in mitigating lung injury, inflammation and functional alterations induced by vesicants.

  15. Role of MAP kinases in regulating expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-06-15

    Dermal exposure to sulfur mustard causes inflammation and tissue injury. This is associated with changes in expression of antioxidants and eicosanoids which contribute to oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present studies we analyzed mechanisms regulating expression of these mediators using an in vitro skin construct model in which mouse keratinocytes were grown at an air-liquid interface and exposed directly to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) was found to cause marked increases in keratinocyte protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. This was correlated with increases in expression of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione S-transferases, GSTA1-2, GSTP1 and mGST2. CEES also upregulated several enzymes important in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), leukotriene A{sub 4} (LTA{sub 4}) hydrolase and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) synthase. CEES readily activated keratinocyte JNK and p38 MAP kinases, signaling pathways which are known to regulate expression of antioxidants, as well as prostaglandin and leukotriene synthases. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase suppressed CEES-induced expression of GSTA1-2, COX-2, mPGES-2, PGDS, 5-LOX, LTA{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase, while JNK inhibition blocked PGDS and GSTP1. These data indicate that CEES modulates expression of antioxidants and enzymes producing inflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Increases in antioxidants may be an adaptive process to limit tissue damage. Inhibiting the capacity of keratinocytes to generate eicosanoids may be important in limiting inflammation and protecting the skin from vesicant-induced oxidative stress and injury.

  16. Protection against 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES)-induced cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes by an inducer of the glutathione detoxification pathway.

    PubMed

    Abel, Erika L; Bubel, Jennifer D; Simper, Melissa S; Powell, Leslie; McClellan, S Alex; Andreeff, Michael; MacLeod, Michael C; DiGiovanni, John

    2011-09-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM or mustard gas) was first used as a chemical warfare agent almost 100years ago. Due to its toxic effects on the eyes, lungs, and skin, and the relative ease with which it may be synthesized, mustard gas remains a potential chemical threat to the present day. SM exposed skin develops fluid filled bullae resulting from potent cytotoxicity of cells lining the basement membrane of the epidermis. Currently, there are no antidotes for SM exposure; therefore, chemopreventive measures for first responders following an SM attack are needed. Glutathione (GSH) is known to have a protective effect against SM toxicity, and detoxification of SM is believed to occur, in part, via GSH conjugation. Therefore, we screened 6 potential chemopreventive agents for ability to induce GSH synthesis and protect cultured human keratinocytes against the SM analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). Using NCTC2544 human keratinocytes, we found that both sulforaphane and methyl-2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) stimulated nuclear localization of Nrf2 and induced expression of the GSH synthesis gene, GCLM. Additionally, we found that treatment with CDDO-Me elevated reduced GSH content of NCTC2544 cells and preserved their viability by ~3-fold following exposure to CEES. Our data also suggested that CDDO-Me may act additively with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a nucleophilic scavenging agent, to increase the viability of keratinocytes exposed to CEES. These results suggest that CDDO-Me is a promising chemopreventive agent for SM toxicity in the skin. PMID:21723306

  17. Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Hayden, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2011-06-01

    Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

  18. Immunochemical analysis of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in HaCaT keratinocytes induced by the mono-alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES): Impact of experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Debiak, Malgorzata; Lex, Kirsten; Ponath, Viviane; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent with a long history of use as a chemical weapon. Although its last military use is dated for the eighties of the last century, a potential use in terroristic attacks against civilians remains a significant threat. Thus, improving medical therapy of mustard exposed individuals is still of particular interest. PARP inhibitors were recently brought into the focus as a potential countermeasure for mustard-induced pathologies, supported by the availability of efficient compounds successfully tested in cancer therapy. PARP activation after SM treatment was reported in several cell types and tissues under various conditions; however, a detailed characterization of this phenomenon is still missing. This study provides the basis for such studies by developing and optimizing experimental conditions to investigate poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) in HaCaT keratinocytes upon treatment with the monofunctional alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide ("half mustard", CEES). By using an immunofluorescence-based approach, we show that optimization of experimental conditions with regards to the type of solvent, dilution factors and treatment procedure is essential to obtain a homogenous PAR staining in HaCaT cell cultures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that different CEES treatment protocols significantly influence the cytotoxicity profiles of treated cells. Using an optimized treatment protocol, our data reveals that CEES induces a dose- and time-dependent dynamic PARylation response in HaCaT cells that could be completely blocked by treating cells with the clinically relevant pharmacological PARP inhibitor ABT888 (also known as veliparib). Finally, siRNA experiments show that CEES-induced PAR formation is predominantly due to the activation of PARP1. In conclusion, this study provides a detailed analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to study the

  19. 40 CFR 721.10243 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, bis(2... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10243 Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester. (a... phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester (PMN P-09-193; CAS No. 55088-28-3) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10243 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, bis(2... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10243 Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester. (a... phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester (PMN P-09-193; CAS No. 55088-28-3) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10243 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, bis(2... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10243 Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester. (a... phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester (PMN P-09-193; CAS No. 55088-28-3) is subject...

  2. Desorption of bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, mustard agent, from the surface of hardened cement paste (HCP) wafers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hairong; Zhou, Xuezhi; Guan, Yingqiang; Zhou, Liming; Wang, Xinming; Yan, Huijuan

    2013-05-01

    The decontamination of surfaces exposed to chemical warfare agents is an interesting scientific topic. The desorption behavior of bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (sulfur mustard, HD) from the surface of the HD-contaminated hardened cement paste (HCP) was investigated under different weather conditions, which should provide scientific reference data for protection and decontamination projects involving HD-contaminated HCP in different conditions. The desorption of HD from the surface of HCP wafers was studied, and the effects of the purge air flow rate, water content, sorption temperature, and substrate age were investigated. HD desorption was detected from the surface of HD-contaminated HCP, but the desorption velocity was relatively slow. The desorption quantity remained within an order of magnitude throughout a time span of 36h (25°C at 200mL/min of purge air), and the amount of HD that was desorbed from each square meter of HCP surface was approximately 1.1g (25°C at 200mL/min of purge air), which was approximately 5.5 percent of the total HD that was initially applied. A higher flow rate of the purge air, increased water content, and longer substrate age of HCP all increased the HD desorption. In contrast, increased temperatures suppressed HD desorption. PMID:23395389

  3. Zinc oxide nanocubes as a destructive nanoadsorbent for the neutralization chemistry of 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide: A sulfur mustard simulant.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Armin; Dastafkan, Kamran

    2016-09-15

    Zinc oxide nanocubes were surveyed for their destructive turn-over to decontaminate 2-chloro ethyl phenyl sulfide, a sulfur mustard simulant. Prior to the reaction, nanocubes were prepared through sol-gel method using monoethanolamine, diethylene glycol, and anhydrous citric acid as the stabilizing, cross linking/structure directing agents, respectively. The formation of nanoscale ZnO, the cubic morphology, crystalline structure, and chemical-adsorptive characteristics were certified by FESEM-EDS, TEM-SAED, XRD, FTIR, BET-BJH, H2-TPR, and ESR techniques. Adsorption and destruction reactions were tracked by GC-FID analysis in which the effects of polarity of the media, reaction time, and temperature on the destructive capability of the surface of nanocubes were investigated and discussed. Results demonstrated that maximum neutralization occurred in n-heptane solvent after 1/2h at 55°C. Kinetic study construed that the neutralization reaction followed the pseudo-second order model with a squared correlation coefficient and rate constant of 0.9904 and 0.00004gmg(-1)s(-1), respectively. Furthermore, GC-MS measurement confirmed the formation of 2-hydroxy ethyl phenyl sulfide (2-HEPS) and phenyl vinyl sulfide (PVS) as neutralization products that together with Bronsted and Lewis acid/base approaches exemplify the role of hydrolysis and elimination mechanisms on the surface of zinc oxide nanocubes. PMID:27309947

  4. N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) has differential efficacy for causing central noradrenergic lesions in two different rat strains: comparison between Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Schuerger, R J; Balaban, C D

    1995-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Long-Evans (LE) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat strains were equally sensitive to the noradrenergic neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) with respect to central lesions of locus coeruleus (LC) terminals as measured by immunohistochemical localization of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (D beta H). Analysis of D beta H immunoreactivity was made by both qualitative and quantitative methods. Intraperitoneal injections of 50 mg/kg DSP-4 caused a dramatic reduction of noradrenergic terminals in the neocortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of SD, but not LE rats as compared to saline-injected controls. This finding indicates that LE rats are less sensitive than SD rats to the neurotoxic effects of DSP-4 in the central nervous system. PMID:7475238

  5. Neurotoxic compound N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4) depletes endogenous norepinephrine and enhances release of (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine from rat cortical slices

    SciTech Connect

    Landa, M.E.; Rubio, M.C.; Jaim-Etcheverry, G.

    1984-10-01

    The alkylating compound N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4) injected to rodents blocks norepinephrine (NE) uptake and reduces endogenous NE levels in the central nervous system and in the periphery. To investigate the processes leading to these alterations, rat cortical slices were incubated in the presence of DSP4. Cortical NE was depleted by 40% after incubation of slices in 10(-5) M DSP4 for 60 min and this was blocked by desipramine. The spontaneous outflow of radioactivity from cortical slices labeled previously with (/sup 3/H)NE was enhanced markedly both during exposure to DSP4 and during the subsequent washings, suggesting that NE depletion could be due to this stimulation of NE release. The radioactivity released by DSP4 was accounted for mainly by NE and its deaminated metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol. The enhanced release, independent of external Ca++, apparently originated from the vesicular pool as it was absent after reserpine pretreatment. Activities of the enzymes related to NE synthesis were not altered by DSP4 in vitro and only monoamine oxidase activity was inhibited at high concentrations. Thus, the depletion of endogenous NE produced by DSP4 is probably due to a persistent enhancement of its release from the vesicular pool. Fixation of DSP4 to the NE transport system is necessary but not sufficient to produce the acute NE depletion and the characteristic long-term actions of the compound.

  6. Pretreatment of primary rat cutaneous epidermal keratinocyte culture with a low concentration of MNNG: Effect on DNA cross-linking measured in situ after challenge with bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sorsher, D.H.; Conolly, R.B. )

    1989-01-01

    Bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide- (BCES-) induced DNA cross-links in confluent, primary cultures of newborn rat cutaneous epidermal keratinocytes were detected using an assay that includes in situ unwinding of the DNA followed by separation of single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA (DSDNA) with hydroxylapatite. DNA cross-links in BCES-challenged cultures were inferred form increases in the percentage of DNA the remained double-stranded, compared with control cultures, after a 60-min alkaline unwinding incubation. The amount of DNA cross-linking after 5 or 10 {mu}M BCES was increased when keratinocytes were first pretreated with 0.05 {mu}M MNNG for 1 h at 8 a.m., 2 p.m., and 8 p.m. for two consecutive days and challenged with BCES the following morning. This increase was statistically significant. For example, after 5{mu}M BCES challenge, cultures not pretreated with MNNG had 114.14% control DSDNA, whereas MNNG pretreated cultures had 122.78% control DSDNA. The level of BCES-induced cross-linking was maximal immediately after 30-min challenge and decreased during postchallenge incubation. At 24 and 48 h post 5, 10, or 20 {mu}M BCES challenge, the level of DSDNA was actually depressed below unchallenged levels. This postchallenge decreased in the level of DSDNA, indicative of SSB in DNA, suggests repair activity by glycosylases and endonucleases. However completion of repair (i.e., a return to control levels of DSDNA) was not seen in these experiments. The activity that resulted in decreases in the level of DSDNA during postchallenge incubation response was unaffected by MNNG pretreatment.

  7. Synthesis, anti-proliferative and genotoxicity studies of 6-chloro-5-(2-substituted-ethyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ones and 6-chloro-5-(2-chloroethyl)-3-(alkyl/ary-2-ylidene)indolin-2-ones.

    PubMed

    Meti, Gangadhar Y; Kamble, Atulkumar A; Kamble, Ravindra R; Somagond, Shilpa M; Devarajegowda, H C; Kumari, Sandhya; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish K

    2016-10-01

    A series of 6-chloro-5-(2-substituted-ethyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ones (3a-h) and 6-chloro-5-(2-chloroethyl)-3-(alkyl/aryl-2-ylidene)indolin-2-ones (5i-x) were synthesized. Compounds 3a-e, 5i-l and 5q-r were selected by NIH, USA for in vitro anti-proliferative screening. Based on the impressive growth inhibitory (GI %) effect by the compounds 3a-b and 3e which showed growth inhibition in the range 1.22-76.30%, 2.85-76.03% and 10.98-82.05% respectively at 10(-5) concentration, these compounds were further analyzed for anti-proliferative activity at 5 dose concentration and genotoxicity. PMID:27240276

  8. Photooxidation of methyl sulfide, ethyl sulfide, and methanethiol

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.

    1984-06-01

    Products of sunlight-irradiated mixtures of oxides of nitrogen and alkyl sulfides (RSR, R = CH/sub 3/, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/) and methanethiol (CH/sub 3/SH) in air include formaldehyde (R = CH/sub 3/), acetaldehyde and PAN (R = C/sub 2/H/sub 5/), sulfur dioxide, and alkyl nitrates (RONO/sub 2/) as well as particulate alkanesulfonic acids (RSO/sub 2/OH) and inorganic sulfate. The nature and yields of gaseous and particulate products are discussed in terms of OH-initiated reaction pathways, including C-S bond scission, and subsequent reactions of alkythiyl radicals (RS), including those leading to photolabile RSNO and stable RSNO/sub 2/ products for which indirect evidence is presented. SO/sub 2/ yields are found to vary according to the relative importance of the competing pathways RS + O/sub 2/ (a) and RS + NO/sub 2/ (b), for which a ratio k/sub b/ / k/sub a/ approx. 2 x 10/sup 6/ is derived from data for irradiated RSR-NO/sub x/, RSH-Cl/sub 2/, and RSH-Cl/sub 2/-NO/sub 2/ mixtures.

  9. Accurate spectroscopic characterization of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide isotopologues: a route toward their astrophysical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Puzzarini, C.; Senent, M. L.; Domínguez-Gómez, R.; Carvajal, M.; Hochlaf, M.; Al-Mogren, M. Mogren E-mail: senent@iem.cfmac.csic.es E-mail: miguel.carvajal@dfa.uhu.es E-mail: mmogren@ksu.edu.sa

    2014-11-20

    Using state-of-the-art computational methodologies, we predict a set of reliable rotational and torsional parameters for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide monosubstituted isotopologues. This includes rotational, quartic, and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, torsional levels, and torsional splittings. The accuracy of the present data was assessed from a comparison to the available experimental data. Generally, our computed parameters should help in the characterization and the identification of these organo-sulfur molecules in laboratory settings and in the interstellar medium.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10244 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, 2-[bis(2- chloroethoxy)phosphinyl]ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10244 Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2... substance identified as phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2-chloroethyl ester (PMN P-09-195; CAS...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10244 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, 2-[bis(2- chloroethoxy)phosphinyl]ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10244 Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2... substance identified as phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2-chloroethyl ester (PMN P-09-195; CAS...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10244 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, 2-[bis(2- chloroethoxy)phosphinyl]ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10244 Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2... substance identified as phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2-chloroethyl ester (PMN P-09-195; CAS...

  13. Synthesis of unsymmetrical sulfides using ethyl potassium xanthogenate and recyclable copper catalyst under ligand-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Akkilagunta, Vijay Kumar; Kakulapati, Rama Rao

    2011-08-19

    The synthesis of unsymmetrical sulfides has been achieved in good to excellent yields with inexpensive ethyl potassium xanthogenate via cross-coupling reaction using recyclable CuO nanoparticles under ligand-free conditions.The copper oxide nanoparticles can be recovered and reused up to five cycles without loss of activity. PMID:21732640

  14. ACUTE EXPOSURE TO TRIS (2-CHLOROETHYL) PHOSPHATE HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONAL LOSS AND IMPAIRS LEARNING IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult female, Fischer 344 rats were exposed to 275 mg/kg of tris(2- chloroethyl)phosphate (TRCP) by gavage. RCP produced consistent signs of convulsive activity within 60-90 minutes after dosing and extensive loss of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells when examined 7 days after dosi...

  15. Aerobic addition of secondary phosphine oxides to vinyl sulfides: a shortcut to 1-hydroxy-2-(organosulfanyl)ethyl(diorganyl)phosphine oxides

    PubMed Central

    Malysheva, Svetlana F; Artem’ev, Alexander V; Gusarova, Nina K; Belogorlova, Nataliya A; Albanov, Alexander I; Liu, C W

    2015-01-01

    Summary Secondary phosphine oxides react with vinyl sulfides (both alkyl- and aryl-substituted sulfides) under aerobic and solvent-free conditions (80 °C, air, 7–30 h) to afford 1-hydroxy-2-(organosulfanyl)ethyl(diorganyl)phosphine oxides in 70–93% yields. PMID:26664618

  16. Product distribution study of the Cl-atom initiated oxidation of ethyl methyl sulfide and diethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksdath-Mansilla, Gabriela; Peñéñory, Alicia B.; Barnes, Ian; Wiesen, Peter; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2014-03-01

    The products formed in the gas-phase reactions of Cl atoms with (CH3CH2)2S and CH3CH2SCH3 have been investigated in a large volume reactor in NOx-free air at atmospheric pressure and (298 ± 2) K using long path “in situ” FTIR spectroscopy for the analysis. HCl, SO2 and CH3CHO were identified as the major products for both reactions. For the Cl + CH3CH2SCH3 reaction HCHO was also identified as a major product. The yields of the products obtained for the reaction of Cl with (CH3CH2)2S were (59 ± 2) %, (52 ± 5) % and (103 ± 4) % for HCl, SO2 and CH3CHO, respectively. For the reaction of Cl with CH3CH2SCH3 yields of (43 ± 5) %, (55 ± 3) %, (58 ± 3) % and (53 ± 5) % were obtained for HCl, SO2, CH3CHO and HCHO, respectively. This is the first products and mechanistic study for the gas-phase Cl-initiated oxidation of non-CH3SCH3 alkyl sulfides. Comparison with previous results for the reaction of Cl with dimethyl sulfide is made and simple atmospheric degradation mechanisms are postulated to explain the formation of the observed products.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide production during yeast fermentation causes the accumulation of ethanethiol, S-ethyl thioacetate and diethyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Kinzurik, Matias I; Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Gardner, Richard C; Fedrizzi, Bruno

    2016-10-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced by yeast during winemaking and possesses off-flavors reminiscent of rotten eggs. The production of H2S during fermentation has also been associated in the finished wine with the rise of additional volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) with strong aromas of cooked onions and vegetables. To characterize these more complex VSCs produced from H2S, we performed fermentations in synthetic grape juice. H2S production was manipulated experimentally by feeding increasing concentrations of sulfate to mutant strains that are unable to incorporate H2S efficiently as part of the sulfur assimilation pathway. In finished wines from these mutants, three VSCs - ethanethiol, S-ethyl thioacetate and diethyl disulfide - increased proportionally to H2S. (34)S-labeled sulfate fed to the MET17-deleted strain was incorporated into same three VSCs, demonstrating that they are formed directly from H2S. PMID:27173572

  18. Theoretical spectroscopic characterization at low temperatures of detectable sulfur-organic compounds: Ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senent, M. L.; Puzzarini, C.; Domínguez-Gómez, R.; Carvajal, M.; Hochlaf, M.

    2014-03-01

    Highly correlated ab initio methods are used for the spectroscopic characterization of ethyl mercaptan (CH3CH232SH, ETSH) and dimethyl sulfide (CH332SCH3, DMS), considering them on the vibrational ground and excited torsional states. Since both molecules show non-rigid properties, torsional energy barriers and splittings are provided. Equilibrium geometries and the corresponding rotational constants are calculated by means of a composite scheme based on CCSD(T) calculations that accounts for the extrapolation to the complete basis set limit and core-correlation effects. The ground and excited states rotational constants are then determined using vibrational corrections obtained from CCSD/cc-pVTZ force-field calculations, which are also employed to determine anharmonic frequencies for all vibrational modes. CCSD(T) and CCSD force fields are employed to predict quartic and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, respectively. Equilibrium rotational constants are also calculated using CCSD(T)-F12. The full-dimensional anharmonic analysis does not predict displacements of the lowest torsional excited states due to Fermi resonances with the remaining vibrational modes. Thus, very accurate torsional transitions are calculated by solving variationally two-dimensional Hamiltonians depending on the CH3 and SH torsional coordinates of ethyl mercaptan or on the two methyl groups torsions of dimethyl-sulfide. For this purpose, vibrationally corrected potential energy surfaces are computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. For ethyl mercaptan, calculations show large differences between the gauche (g) and trans (t) conformer spectral features. Interactions between rotating groups are responsible for the displacements of the g-bands with respect to the t-bands that cannot therefore be described with one-dimensional models. For DMS, the CCSD(T) potential energy surface has been semi-empirically adjusted to reproduce experimental data. New assignments are suggested for

  19. Theoretical spectroscopic characterization at low temperatures of detectable sulfur-organic compounds: ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Senent, M L; Puzzarini, C; Domínguez-Gómez, R; Carvajal, M; Hochlaf, M

    2014-03-28

    Highly correlated ab initio methods are used for the spectroscopic characterization of ethyl mercaptan (CH3CH2 (32)SH, ETSH) and dimethyl sulfide (CH3 (32)SCH3, DMS), considering them on the vibrational ground and excited torsional states. Since both molecules show non-rigid properties, torsional energy barriers and splittings are provided. Equilibrium geometries and the corresponding rotational constants are calculated by means of a composite scheme based on CCSD(T) calculations that accounts for the extrapolation to the complete basis set limit and core-correlation effects. The ground and excited states rotational constants are then determined using vibrational corrections obtained from CCSD/cc-pVTZ force-field calculations, which are also employed to determine anharmonic frequencies for all vibrational modes. CCSD(T) and CCSD force fields are employed to predict quartic and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, respectively. Equilibrium rotational constants are also calculated using CCSD(T)-F12. The full-dimensional anharmonic analysis does not predict displacements of the lowest torsional excited states due to Fermi resonances with the remaining vibrational modes. Thus, very accurate torsional transitions are calculated by solving variationally two-dimensional Hamiltonians depending on the CH3 and SH torsional coordinates of ethyl mercaptan or on the two methyl groups torsions of dimethyl-sulfide. For this purpose, vibrationally corrected potential energy surfaces are computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. For ethyl mercaptan, calculations show large differences between the gauche (g) and trans (t) conformer spectral features. Interactions between rotating groups are responsible for the displacements of the g-bands with respect to the t-bands that cannot therefore be described with one-dimensional models. For DMS, the CCSD(T) potential energy surface has been semi-empirically adjusted to reproduce experimental data. New assignments are

  20. Biodegradation of Bis(2-Chloroethyl) Ether by Xanthobacter sp. Strain ENV481▿

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Kevin; Schaefer, Charles E.; Vainberg, Simon; Steffan, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Degradation of bis(2-chloroethyl) ether (BCEE) was observed to occur in two bacterial strains. Strain ENV481, a Xanthobacter sp. strain, was isolated by enrichment culturing of samples from a Superfund site located in the northeastern United States. The strain was able to grow on BCEE or 2-chloroethylethyl ether as the sole source of carbon and energy. BCEE degradation in strain ENV481 was facilitated by sequential dehalogenation reactions resulting in the formation of 2-(2-chloroethoxy)ethanol and diethylene glycol (DEG), respectively. 2-Hydroxyethoxyacetic acid was detected as a product of DEG catabolism by the strain. Degradation of BCEE by strain ENV481 was independent of oxygen, and the strain was not able to grow on a mixture of benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes, other prevalent contaminants at the site. Another bacterial isolate, Pseudonocardia sp. strain ENV478 (S. Vainberg et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:5218-5224, 2006), degraded BCEE after growth on tetrahydrofuran or propane but was not able to grow on BCEE as a sole carbon source. BCEE degradation by strain ENV478 appeared to be facilitated by a monooxygenase-mediated O-dealkylation mechanism, and it resulted in the accumulation of 2-chloroacetic acid that was not readily degraded by the strain. PMID:17873075

  1. Identification of the nitrogen-based blister agents bis(2-chloroethyl)methylamine (HN-2) and tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN-3) and their hydrolysis products on soil using ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gresham, G L; Groenewold, G S; Olson, J E

    2000-12-01

    The nitrogen blister agents HN-2 (bis(2-chloroethyl)methylamine) and HN-3 (tris(2-chloroethyl)amine) were directly analyzed on the surface of soil samples using ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In the presence of water, HN-1 (bis(2-choroethyl)ethylamine), HN-2 and HN-3 undergo hydrolysis to form N-ethyldiethanolamine, N-methyldiethanolamine and triethanolamine (TEA), respectively; these compounds can be readily detected as adsorbed species on soil particles. When soil samples spiked with HN-3 in alcohol were analyzed, 2-alkoxyethylamine derivatives were observed on the sample surfaces. This result shows that nitrogen blister agents will undergo condensation reactions with nucleophilic compounds and emphasizes the need for an analytical methodology capable of detecting a range of degradation and condensation products on environmental surfaces. The ability of ion trap SIMS to isolate and accumulate ions, and then perform tandem mass spectrometric analysis improves the detection of low-abundance surface contaminants and the selectivity of the technique. Utilizing these techniques, the limits of detection for HN-3 were studied as a function of surface coverage. It was found that HN-3 could be detected at a surface coverage of 0.01 monolayer, which corresponds to 20 ppm (mass/mass) for a soil having a surface area of 2.2 m(2) g(-1). TEA, the exhaustive hydrolysis product of HN-3, was detected at a surface coverage of 0.001 monolayer, which corresponds to 0.86 ppm. PMID:11180637

  2. Antineoplastic agents LXIV: 1,4-Bis(2'-chloroethyl)-1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane dihydrogen dimaleate.

    PubMed

    Pettit, G R; Gieschen, D P; Pettit, W E

    1979-12-01

    The 1,4-bis(2'-chloroethyl)-1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane dication (II) exhibits remarkable antineoplastic activity. Detailed evaluation of several dianion derivatives showed a curative response level against the murine P-388 lymphocytic leukemia, colon 26, CD8F1 mammary, and the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma (rat) tumor systems. In addition, significant cancer chemotherapeutic activity was found against the murine L-1210 lymphoid leukemia, colon 38, and B16 melanocarcinoma tumor systems. The bicyclo dication (II) first was isolated, evaluated, and stored as the diperchlorate derivative (IIa). Because of the promising anticancer activity of IIa, procedures were developed for obtaining other anion derivatives for comparative biological purposes. Several naturally occurring substances were evaluated, and the dihydrogen dimaleate derivative (IIi) obtained by an ion-exchange technique was the most suitable. PMID:529047

  3. Pigment Changes Associated with Application of Ethephon ((2-Chloroethyl)phosphonic Acid) to Fig (Ficus carica L.) Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Puech, Antoine A.; Rebeiz, Constantin A.; Crane, Julian C.

    1976-01-01

    The application of (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (Ethephon) to `Mission' fig fruits (Ficus carica L.) during late period II of their development stimulated ripening and change in color from green to bluish black within 8 days. Chlorophylls a and b decreased rapidly within 4 days after Ethephon treatment, and degradation continued at a decreasing rate for an additional 4 days, at which time the fruits had attained their maximum diameter and were considered fully ripe. Levels of β-carotene, lutein, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin decreased in a pattern similar to that of chlorophylls a and b. The rates of β-carotene and lutein degradation were initially greater than those of the xanthophyll pigments. Degradation rates of the various carotenoids were comparable 4 to 8 days after treatment. There was no measurable anthocyanin synthesis during a 2- to 4-day period following Ethephon treatment. Beyond this lag phase, anthocyanin accumulation was linear, and the amount of pigment synthesized was a function of both light intensity and duration. Although Ethephon promoted the rate of anthocyanin accumulation, it did not increase the total amount of pigment synthesized in treated fruits. Etiolation of fruits from the time of Ethephon treatment until maturity stimulated an increase in growth and completely inhibited anthocyanin production in the skin. Ethephon-treated fruits which ripened while etiolated were larger in diameter and higher in both fresh and dry weights than nonetiolated controls. Images PMID:16659515

  4. Pigment Changes Associated with Application of Ethephon ((2-Chloroethyl)phosphonic Acid) to Fig (Ficus carica L.) Fruits.

    PubMed

    Puech, A A; Rebeiz, C A; Crane, J C

    1976-04-01

    The application of (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (Ethephon) to ;Mission' fig fruits (Ficus carica L.) during late period II of their development stimulated ripening and change in color from green to bluish black within 8 days. Chlorophylls a and b decreased rapidly within 4 days after Ethephon treatment, and degradation continued at a decreasing rate for an additional 4 days, at which time the fruits had attained their maximum diameter and were considered fully ripe. Levels of beta-carotene, lutein, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin decreased in a pattern similar to that of chlorophylls a and b. The rates of beta-carotene and lutein degradation were initially greater than those of the xanthophyll pigments. Degradation rates of the various carotenoids were comparable 4 to 8 days after treatment.There was no measurable anthocyanin synthesis during a 2- to 4-day period following Ethephon treatment. Beyond this lag phase, anthocyanin accumulation was linear, and the amount of pigment synthesized was a function of both light intensity and duration. Although Ethephon promoted the rate of anthocyanin accumulation, it did not increase the total amount of pigment synthesized in treated fruits. Etiolation of fruits from the time of Ethephon treatment until maturity stimulated an increase in growth and completely inhibited anthocyanin production in the skin. Ethephon-treated fruits which ripened while etiolated were larger in diameter and higher in both fresh and dry weights than nonetiolated controls. PMID:16659515

  5. Potentiation in the intact rat of the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen by 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Nakae, D; Oakes, J W; Farber, J L

    1988-12-01

    Studies of the killing of cultured hepatocytes by acetaminophen indicate that the cells are injured by an oxidative stress that accompanies the metabolism of the toxin (J. L. Farber et al. (1988) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 267, 640-650). The present report documents that the essential features of the killing of cultured hepatocytes by acetaminophen are reproduced in the intact animal. Male rats had no evidence of liver necrosis 24 h after administration of up to 1000 mg/kg of acetaminophen. Induction of mixed function oxidase activity by 3-methylcholanthrene increased the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen. Inhibition of glutathione reductase by 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) potentiated the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen in male rats induced with 3-methylcholanthrene. Whereas the pretreatment with BCNU reduced the GSH content by 40%, a comparable depletion of GSH by diethylmaleate did not potentiate the toxicity of acetaminophen. The antioxidant diphenylphenylenediamine (25 mg/kg) and the ferric iron chelator deferoxamine (1000 mg/kg) prevented the liver necrosis produced by 500 mg/kg acetaminophen in rats pretreated with BCNU. Neither protective agent prevented the fall in GSH produced by acetaminophen. It is concluded the conditions of the irreversible injury of cultured hepatocytes by acetaminophen previously reported are not necessarily different from those that obtain in the intact rat with this toxin. PMID:3214175

  6. Linear free energy relationships and cytotoxicities of para-substituted 2-haloethyl aryl selenides and bis(2-chloroethyl) selenides.

    PubMed

    Kang, S I; Spears, C P

    1987-04-01

    Examples of a new class of alkylating agents, selenium mustards, were prepared for study of their chemical kinetic properties and cytotoxicities against human lymphoblastoid CCRF-CEM cells. In a series of para-substituted aryl 2-chloroethyl selenides, a linear free energy relationship between the first-order rate constant, k'nbp and sigma p gave a rho value of -1.3, indicating that formation of a cyclic ethylene selenonium ion is the rate-controlling step for alkylation of 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP). Consistent with the ethyleneselenonium ion pathway, rates of solvolyses were extremely sensitive to increasing water content, and a positive correlation was found between reactivity with NBP and nucleophilic selectivity (Swain-Scott s constant). The s constant, which predicts for variation in intracellular product spread, varied from 0.53 up to 0.95, equal to aliphatic nitrogen mustards. Alkylating activities based on extent of NBP alkylation, however, showed relatively low values, 8-23% of that of mechlorethamine, possibly due to hydrolysis occurring by a separate pathway from nucleophilic substitution. Reactivities and nucleophilic selectivities both showed positive correlations with cytotoxicities, suggesting that the rate and extent of alkylation of relatively strong nucleophilic centers mediate the biologic effects of these compounds. Two bifunctional selenium mustards were substantially more cytotoxic than monofunctional aromatic selenides. No additional cytotoxicity due to the selenium atom was observed, with the exception of diselenide (-SeSe-) compounds. Thus, selenium alkylating agents kinetically and biologically resemble classical, mustard-type alkylating agents. PMID:3560155

  7. Quantum chemical calculations on the geometrical, conformational, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical parameters of 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Hacer Pir; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-08-14

    The optimized geometry, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts, conformational and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses, thermodynamic parameters, molecular surfaces, Mulliken, NBO and APT charges for 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine [C7H7Cl3N2] were investigated by the ab initio HF and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The calculated structural parameters (bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles) and (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts values are compared with experimental values of the investigated compound. The observed and the calculated values are found to be in good agreement. The energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) were calculated, and the obtained energies displayed that charge transfer occurs in 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine compound. In addition, the linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated compound have been computed by using HF and DFT methods. PMID:24732007

  8. Quantum chemical calculations on the geometrical, conformational, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical parameters of 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, Hacer Pir; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-08-01

    The optimized geometry, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts, conformational and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses, thermodynamic parameters, molecular surfaces, Mulliken, NBO and APT charges for 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine [C7H7Cl3N2] were investigated by the ab initio HF and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The calculated structural parameters (bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles) and 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts values are compared with experimental values of the investigated compound. The observed and the calculated values are found to be in good agreement. The energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) were calculated, and the obtained energies displayed that charge transfer occurs in 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine compound. In addition, the linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated compound have been computed by using HF and DFT methods.

  9. The Reaction of DABCO with 4-Chloro-5H-1,2,3-dithiazoles: Synthesis and Chemistry of 4-[N-(2-Chloroethyl)piperazin-1-yl]-5H-1,2,3-dithiazoles.

    PubMed

    Koyioni, Maria; Manoli, Maria; Koutentis, Panayiotis A

    2016-01-15

    N-(4-Chloro-5H-1,2,3-dithiazol-5-ylidene)anilines react with DABCO in hot PhCl to give N-{4-[N-(2-chloroethyl)piperazin-1-yl]-5H-1,2,3-dithiazol-5-ylidene}anilines in high yields (70-92%). The reaction also works with 4-chloro-5H-1,2,3-dithiazol-5-one and -thione, giving the corresponding products in 85% and 76% yields, respectively. While the reaction of several (4-chloro-5H-1,2,3-dithiazol-5-ylidene)methanes with DABCO failed to give {4-[N-(2-chloroethyl)piperazin-1-yl]-5H-1,2,3-dithiazol-5-ylidene}methanes, these can be prepared in moderate yields via classical cycloaddition-retrocycloaddition strategies from 4-[N-(2-chloroethyl)piperazin-1-yl]-5H-1,2,3-dithiazole-5-thione. The 2-chloroethyl moiety on selected dithiazoles was also modified without cleavage of the 1,2,3-dithiazole by reaction with various nucleophiles, giving access to 4-[N-(2-substituted)piperazin-1-yl]-5H-1,2,3-dithiazoles in moderate to high yields. PMID:26671065

  10. 1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea-loaded bovine serum albumin nanoparticles with dual magnetic resonance–fluorescence imaging for tracking of chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Feng-Wei; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Chen, Ju-Yu; Feng, Li-Ying; Yang, Hung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To date, knowing how to identify the location of chemotherapeutic agents in the human body after injection is still a challenge. Therefore, it is urgent to develop a drug delivery system with molecular imaging tracking ability to accurately understand the distribution, location, and concentration of a drug in living organisms. In this study, we developed bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanoparticles (NPs) with dual magnetic resonance (MR) and fluorescence imaging modalities (fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC]-BSA-Gd/1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea [BCNU] NPs) to deliver BCNU for inhibition of brain tumor cells (MBR 261-2). These BSA-based NPs are water dispersible, stable, and biocompatible as confirmed by XTT cell viability assay. In vitro phantoms and in vivo MR and fluorescence imaging experiments show that the developed FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs enable dual MR and fluorescence imaging for monitoring cellular uptake and distribution in tumors. The T1 relaxivity (R1) of FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs was 3.25 mM−1 s−1, which was similar to that of the commercial T1 contrast agent (R1 =3.36 mM−1 s−1). The results indicate that this multifunctional drug delivery system has potential bioimaging tracking of chemotherapeutic agents ability in vitro and in vivo for cancer therapy. PMID:27601895

  11. Tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate-induced cell growth arrest via attenuation of SIRT1-independent PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Youjian; Wang, Zhiyuan; Xu, Tian; Huang, Cheng; Yin, Wenjun; Wang, Jing; Xiong, Wei; Lu, Wenhong; Zheng, Hongyan; Yuan, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP) as an organophosphorus flame retardant and plasticizer has been widely used in industrial and household products. It not only was detected in residential indoor air and dust, surface and drinking water, but also in human plasma and breast milk, and tissue samples of liver, kidneys and brain from rodents. TCEP is classified as carcinogenic category 2 and toxic for reproduction category 1B. Sufficient evidence from experimental animals indicated carcinogenicity of TCEP in the liver, and kidneys as well as cell loss in the brain. However, the underlying mechanisms of TCEP-induced hepatotoxicity are mostly unknown. We investigated the in vitro effects of TCEP as well as TCEP-induced cell growth in the L02 and HepG2 cells through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. We found that TCEP reduced cell viability of these cell lines, induced the cell growth arrest, upregulated mRNA and protein levels of SIRT1, and attenuated the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. However, growth arrest of the L02 and HepG2 cells were aggravated after inhibiting the SIRT1 expression with EX-527. The findings above suggested that TCEP induced the cell growth arrest of L02 and HepG2 cells via attenuation of the SIRT1-independent PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26378621

  12. 1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea-loaded bovine serum albumin nanoparticles with dual magnetic resonance-fluorescence imaging for tracking of chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Feng-Wei; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Chen, Ju-Yu; Feng, Li-Ying; Yang, Hung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To date, knowing how to identify the location of chemotherapeutic agents in the human body after injection is still a challenge. Therefore, it is urgent to develop a drug delivery system with molecular imaging tracking ability to accurately understand the distribution, location, and concentration of a drug in living organisms. In this study, we developed bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanoparticles (NPs) with dual magnetic resonance (MR) and fluorescence imaging modalities (fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC]-BSA-Gd/1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea [BCNU] NPs) to deliver BCNU for inhibition of brain tumor cells (MBR 261-2). These BSA-based NPs are water dispersible, stable, and biocompatible as confirmed by XTT cell viability assay. In vitro phantoms and in vivo MR and fluorescence imaging experiments show that the developed FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs enable dual MR and fluorescence imaging for monitoring cellular uptake and distribution in tumors. The T1 relaxivity (R1) of FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs was 3.25 mM(-1) s(-1), which was similar to that of the commercial T1 contrast agent (R1 =3.36 mM(-1) s(-1)). The results indicate that this multifunctional drug delivery system has potential bioimaging tracking of chemotherapeutic agents ability in vitro and in vivo for cancer therapy. PMID:27601895

  13. Beam damage of poly(2-chloroethyl methylacrylate) [PCEMA] films as observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at 143 K, 303 K, and 373 K

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Lea, Alan S.

    2003-03-08

    X-ray beam damage is often observed during surface analysis of beam sensitive materials as indicated in the introduction to this issue and in a wide variety of references. While damage occurs in a wide range of materials, those that are most susceptible to damage are materials that contain low energy covalent bonds such as polymers or other organic materials. Even amongst the relatively easily damaged polymers, there is a wide range of damage rates. The focus of this submission is on poly(2-chloroethyl methylacrylate) [PCEMA] films. In order to determine the extent to which localized sample heating could influence damage rates the temperature of the substrate holding the PECMA was controlled during irradiation. PCEMA presumably degrades primarily by photo-ionization, resulting in the production of HCl through H and Cl bond cleavage. PCEMA has been recommended as a polymer for use as a reference for evaluating x-ray damage. PCEMA has been shown to be more sensitive to degradation than PVC which has also been used as a damage sensitive material useful for comparison of damage rates. Measurements of several relatively common materials on one instrument can provide a data base that allows damage rates on one instrument to be linked or compared to other damage data in the literature. Therefore for purposes of comparison, damage rates for bulk PVC at the same three different temperatures used for the PCEMA data have been collected and are also presented in this volume. Other data collected at the same x-ray parameters include thin films of PVC (for which damage rates are essentially identical to the bulk material) and of poly(acrylonitrile) PAN which is more stable that either PCEMA or PVC.

  14. Miscoding properties of 1,N{sup 6}-ethanoadenine, a DNA adduct derived from reaction with antitumor agent 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, Bo; Guliaev, Anton B.; Chenna, Ahmed; Singer, B.

    2003-03-05

    1,N{sup 6}-Ethanoadenine (EA) is an exocyclic adduct formed from DNA reaction with the antitumor agent, 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). To understand the role of this adduct in the mechanism of mutagenicity or carcinogenicity by BCNU, an oligonucleotide with a site-specific EA was synthesized using phosphoramidite chemistry. We now report the in vitro miscoding properties of EA in translesion DNA synthesis catalyzed by mammalian DNA polymerases (pols) {alpha}, {beta}, {eta} and {iota}. These data were also compared with those obtained for the structurally related exocyclic adduct, 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A). Using a primer extension assay, both pols {alpha} and {beta} were primarily blocked by EA or {var_epsilon}A with very minor extension. Pol {eta} a member of the Y family of polymerases, was capable of catalyzing a significant amount of bypass across both adducts. Pol {eta} incorporated all four nucleotides opposite EA and {var_epsilon}A, but with differential preferences and mainly in an error-prone manner. Human pol {iota}, a paralog of human pol {eta}, was blocked by both adducts with a very small amount of synthesis past {var_epsilon}A. It incorporated C and, to a much lesser extent, T, opposite either adduct. In addition, the presence of an A adduct, e.g. {var_epsilon}A, could affect the specificity of pol {iota} toward the template T immediately 3 feet to the adduct. In conclusion, the four polymerases assayed on templates containing an EA or {var_epsilon}A showed differential bypass capacity and nucleotide incorporation specificity, with the two adducts not completely identical in influencing these properties. Although there was a measurable extent of error-free nucleotide incorporation, all these polymerases primarily misincorporated opposite EA, indicating that the adduct, similar to {var_epsilon}A, is a miscoding lesion.

  15. Over-representation of specific regions of chromosome 22 in cells from human glioma correlate with resistance to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea

    PubMed Central

    Hank, Nicole C; Shapiro, Joan Rankin; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2006-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant form of brain tumor. Despite treatment including surgical resection, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation, these tumors typically recur. The recurrent tumor is often resistant to further therapy with the same agent, suggesting that the surviving cells that repopulate the tumor mass have an intrinsic genetic advantage. We previously demonstrated that cells selected for resistance to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) are near-diploid, with over-representation of part or all of chromosomes 7 and 22. While cells from untreated gliomas often have over-representation of chromosome 7, chromosome 22 is typically under-represented. Methods We have analyzed cells from primary and recurrent tumors from the same patient before and after in vitro selection for resistance to clinically relevant doses of BCNU. Karyotypic analyses were done to demonstrate the genetic makeup of these cells, and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses have defined the region(s) of chromosome 22 retained in these BCNU-resistant cells. Results Karyotypic analyses demonstrated that cells selected for BCNU resistance were near-diploid with over-representation of chromosomes 7 and 22. In cells where whole copies of chromosome 22 were not identified, numerous fragments of this chromosome were retained and inserted into several marker and derivative chromosomes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses using whole chromosome paints confirmed this finding. Additional FISH analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome probes spanning the length of chromosome 22 have allowed us to map the over-represented region to 22q12.3–13.32. Conclusion Cells selected for BCNU resistance either in vivo or in vitro retain sequences mapped to chromosome 22. The specific over-representation of sequences mapped to 22q12.3–13.32 suggest the presence of a DNA sequence important to BCNU survival and/or resistance located in this region of chromosome 22

  16. Neurotoxicity after intracarotid 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea administration in the rat: Hemodynamic changes studied by double-tracer autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahiro, S.; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Diksic, M.; Mitsuka, S.; Sugimoto, S.; Feindel, W. )

    1991-07-01

    Changes in blood-brain (BBB) permeability and local cerebral blood flow after intracarotid administration of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) were examined quantitatively in rats with double-tracer autoradiography using (14C)alpha-amino-isobutyric acid and (18F)fluoroantipyrine. Forty-eight female Wistar rats were divided into four groups. The control group (Group 1) received 1 ml of 5% dextrose. The other three groups received three different doses of BCNU dissolved in 5% dextrose: Group 2 rats received 1 mg, Group 3 3 mg, and Group 4 10 mg. The tracer study was performed on Day 1 or Days 4 to 12 after intracarotid administration of BCNU. In 11 rats in Group 2, there were no changes of BBB permeability. Transient BBB permeability changes were seen in the striatum or hippocampus in 3 of the 5 rats (60%) in Group 3 within 24 hours. In 8 of 9 rats (89%) in the same group, late BBB permeability changes were observed in the hypothalamus with or without histological changes. BBB permeability changes were seen in all rats of Group 4. Focal increase of local cerebral blood flow on the infused side compared with the non-infused side of the brain was observed, although not at a significant level, in 5 of 25 rats examined with (18F)fluoroantipyrine. The results of BBB permeability and histological examinations and study of heterogenous distribution by (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose indicated that the ipsilateral subcortical structures such as the hypothalamus, amygdala, internal capsule, and caudate putamen have the highest incidence of neurotoxicity, which are closely related to histopathological damage seen in human BCNU leucoencephalopathy.

  17. Lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress responses in juvenile salmon exposed to waterborne levels of the organophosphate compounds tris(2-butoxyethyl)- and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphates.

    PubMed

    Arukwe, Augustine; Carteny, Camilla Catarci; Eggen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    There is limited knowledge on the toxicological, physiological, and molecular effects attributed to organophosphate (OP) compounds currently used as flame retardants or additives in consumer products. This study investigated the effects on oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in juvenile Atlantic salmon liver and brain samples after exposure to two OP compounds, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP). In this study, groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon were exposed using a semistatic experimental protocol over a 7-d period to 3 different concentrations (0.04, 0.2, or 1 mg/L) of TBOEP and TCEP. When toxicological factors such as bioaccumulation and bioconcentration, and chemical structural characteristics and behavior, including absorption to solid materials, are considered, these concentrations represent environmentally relevant concentrations. The concentrations of the contaminants were derived from levels of their environmental occurrence. The expression of genes related to oxidative stress-glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST)-and to lipid peroxidation-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-were determined using quantitative (real-time) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The presence of PPAR proteins was also investigated using immunochemical methods. Levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in liver were used as a measure of lipid peroxidation. Overall, our data show an increase in lipid peroxidation, and this was associated with an augmented expression of genes from the glutathione family of responses. Interestingly, PPAR expression in liver after exposure to TBOEP and TCEP was consistently decreased compared to controls, while expression in brain did not show a similar trend. The results suggest that OP contaminants may induce oxidative stress and thus production of reactive oxygen substances (ROS), and modulate lipid peroxidation processes

  18. HILIC-MS Determination of Genotoxic Impurity of 2-Chloro-N-(2-Chloroethyl)Ethanamine in the Vortioxetine Manufacturing Process.

    PubMed

    Douša, Michal; Klvaňa, Robert; Doubský, Jan; Srbek, Jan; Richter, Jindřich; Exner, Marek; Gibala, Petr

    2016-02-01

    In the last decade, pharmaceutical regulatory agencies are focused on monitoring and evaluation of trace-level genotoxic impurities (GTIs) in drug substances, which requires manufacturers to deliver innovative approaches for their analysis and control. GTIs in the low p.p.m. level rising from the process of drug production have to be positively identified and quantified. Therefore, sensitive and selective analytical methods are necessary for required quantification level of these GTIs. Unfortunately, general guidance on how to develop strategy of the analysis and control of GTIs is currently missing in the pharmaceutical industry. Therefore, practical example of the analytical control of 2-chloro-N-(2-chloroethyl)ethanamine GTI in the vortioxetine (VOR) manufacturing process was demonstrated in this work. QDa mass detection with electrospray ionization in selected-ion recording mode was utilized for quantitation of GTIs. The method of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry detection (HILIC-MS) was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines and was able to quantitate GTIs at 75 p.p.m. with respect to VOR. The HILIC-MS method was achieved using a Primesep B column (150 × 4.6 mm, 5.0 µm; Sielc, USA) using mobile phase consisting of 10 mM ammonium formate buffer pH 3.0 and acetonitrile (5 : 95, v/v) at 0.8 mL/min flow rate. The QDa mass detector was operated in the positive ion mode. Quadrupole mass analyzer was employed in selected-ion monitoring mode using target ion at m/z 142 as [M+H](+). PMID:26223463

  19. Response of 9L rat brain tumor multicellular spheroids to single and fractionated doses of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Sano, Y; Hoshino, T; Barker, M; Deen, D F

    1984-02-01

    This study was designed to examine the relative effect of each of four fractions of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) against 9L rat brain tumor multicellular spheroids and to compare the results of the cell survival and growth delay assays. Similar levels of cell kill resulted when BCNU was administered either as single fractions of 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, or 6.0 micrograms/ml for 1 hr or as one to four fractions of 1.5 micrograms/ml that were administered sequentially for 1 hr each. Survival was increased if the assay was delayed until 24 hr after drug treatment, which indicates that 9L cells in spheroids recover from BCNU-induced potentially lethal damage. When BCNU was administered in 1.5-micrograms/ml fractions, plating efficiencies depended markedly on the interval between the fractions. The 12-hr protocol produced an overall higher cell kill. Fractionation schedules of 24 and 36 hr produced less cell kill than did the other schedules. Survival plateaued for the last three treatments with BCNU in the 36-hr schedule. Cells in S phase at the time of administration of the initial 1.5-micrograms/ml fraction of BCNU moved into G1- and G2-M phases by 12 hr after treatment. For time periods longer than 12 hr, cells began to appear in the BCNU-resistant S phase. Thus, the movement of cells into the drug-sensitive and -resistant phases after the first fraction correlates well with the corresponding overall cytotoxic effect produced by treatment with the combined BCNU (1.5 micrograms/ml) fractions. For a higher concentration (3.0 micrograms/ml for 1 hr), maximum cell kill was reached within the 12- to 18-hr interval, after which cell kill plateaued. Cells were not found in the S-phase fraction 12 to 36 hr after the first treatment with 3.0 micrograms/ml; maximum cell kill for the fractionated protocols resulted at these times. Therefore, BCNU, which is classified as a cell cycle-nonspecific drug, can induce a partial synchrony in 9L spheroid cells, which determines

  20. Liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of 1-(2-chloroethoxy)-2-[(2-chloroethyl)thio] ethane and related compounds: separation of an eleven component mixture.

    PubMed

    Winemiller, Mark D; Bae, Sue Y

    2008-11-14

    A method of separation for an eleven component mixture comprised of 1-(2-chloroethoxy)-2-[(2-chloroethyl)thio] ethane (4) and its derivatives has been developed using LC-time-of-flight-MS. All analytical figures of merit for compounds 1-11 have been determined. Compound 4 was examined in a substrate extraction study consisting of different sand and soil matrices, and a hydrolysis study of 4 on sand revealed an extremely complex degradation pathway which appeared to be concentration dependent. Substrate extraction and hydrolysis results where compared with sulfur mustard (HD). PMID:18834989

  1. Icosapent Ethyl

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like substance) in your blood. Icosapent ... ethyl may work by decreasing the amount of triglycerides and other fats made in the liver.

  2. DNA damage and sequence specificity of DNA binding of the new anti-cancer agent 1,4-bis(2'-chloroethyl)-1,4-diazabicyclo-[2.2.1] heptane dimaleate (Dabis maleate)

    PubMed Central

    Broggini, M.; Hartley, J. A.; Mattes, W. B.; Ponti, M.; Kohn, K. W.; D'Incalci, M.

    1990-01-01

    The DNA damage and the sequence specificity of guanine-N7 alkylation produced by the novel, positively charged, antineoplastic agent 1,4-bis(2'-chloroethyl)-1,4-diazabicyclo-[2.2.1] heptane dimaleate (Dabis maleate) and its uncharged tertiary amine analogue 1,4-bis(2'-chloroethyl)-1,4-diazacyclohexane (Dabis analogue) were investigated in L1210 cells and isolated DNA. Both compounds are cytotoxic in vitro causing an arrest of L1210 cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle. In isolated DNA, Dabis maleate alkylates guanine at the N7-position with some differences in specificity compared to other alkylating agents (e.g. nitrogen mustard). Significant differences are also evident between Dabis maleate and Dabis analogue, suggesting that Dabis analogue is not the sole alkylating species of Dabis maleate. Using the alkaline elution technique a moderate number of DNA interstrand cross-links were detected in L1210 cells treated with both compounds, which were completely repaired within 24 h. Dabis maleate and Dabis analogue do not cause DNA single strand breaks or DNA protein cross-links at the doses at which DNA interstrand cross-links were detected. PMID:2393411

  3. Ethyl carbamate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl carbamate ; CASRN 51 - 79 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  4. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  5. Ethyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl ether ; CASRN 60 - 29 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  6. Ethyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl acetate ; CASRN 141 - 78 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  7. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  8. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure determination and computational study of a new Cu(II) complex of bis [2-{(E)-[2-chloroethyl)imino]methyl}phenolato)] copper(II) Schiff base complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivani, Gholamhossein; Vakili, Mohammad; Khalaji, Aliakbar Dehno; Bruno, Giuseppe; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri; Taghavi, Maedeh

    2016-07-01

    The copper (II) Schiff base complex of [CuL2] (1), HL = 2-{(E)-[2-chloroethyl) imino]methyl}phenol, has been synthesized and characterized by elemental (CHN) analysis, UV-Vis and FT-IR spectroscopy. The molecular structure of 1 was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The conformational analysis and molecular structures of CuL2 were investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations at B3LYP/6-311G* level. An excellent agreement was observed between theoretical and experimental results. The Schiff base ligand of HL acts as a chelating ligand and coordinates via one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom to the metal center. The copper (II) center is coordinated by two nitrogen atoms and two oxygen atoms from two Schiff base ligands in an approximately square planar trans-[MN2O2] coordination geometry. Thermogravimetric analysis of CuL2 showed that it was decomposed in five stages. In addition, the CuL2 complex thermally decomposed in air at 660 °C and the XRD pattern of the obtained solid showed the formation of CuO nanoparticles with an average size of 34 nm.

  9. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium sulfide usually is used twice a week for the first ... it is irritating. Rinse off all of the lotion.Do not use this medication on children younger ...

  10. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100 gallons... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate....

  11. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100 gallons... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate....

  12. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100 gallons... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate....

  13. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100 gallons... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate....

  14. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100 gallons... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate....

  15. Cross-Linking of Thioredoxin Reductase by the Sulfur Mustard Analogue Mechlorethamine (Methyl bis(2-chloroethyl) amine) in Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Rat Lung: Selective Inhibition of Disulfide Reduction but Not Redox Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Yi-Hua; Heck, Diane E.; Malaviya, Rama; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in mechlorethamine (methyl bis(2-chloroethyl) amine, HN2) toxicity. The thioredoxin system, consisting of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin, and NADPH, is important in redox regulation and protection against oxidative stress. HN2 contains two electrophilic side chains that can react with nucleophilic sites in proteins leading to changes in their structure and function. We report that HN2 inhibits the cytosolic (TrxR1) and mitochondrial (TrxR2) forms of TrxR in A549 lung epithelial cells. TrxR exists as homodimers under native conditions; monomers can be detected by denaturing and reducing SDS-PAGE followed by Western blotting. HN2 treatment caused marked decreases in TrxR1 and TrxR2 monomers along with increases in dimers and oligomers under reducing conditions, indicating that HN2 cross-links TrxR. Cross-links were also observed in rat lung after HN2 treatment. Using purified TrxR1, NADPH reduced, but not oxidized, enzyme was inhibited and cross-linked by HN2. LC-MS/MS analysis of TrxR1 demonstrated that HN2 adducted cysteine- and selenocysteine-containing redox centers forming monoadducts, intramolecule and intermolecule cross-links, resulting in enzyme inhibition. HN2 cross-links two dimeric subunits through intermolecular binding to cysteine 59 in one subunit of the dimer and selenocysteine 498 in the other subunit, confirming the close proximity of the N- and C-terminal redox centers of adjacent subunits. Despite cross-linking and inhibition of TrxR activity by HN2, TrxR continued to mediate menadione redox cycling and generated reactive oxygen species. These data suggest that disruption of the thioredoxin system contributes to oxidative stress and tissue injury induced by HN2. PMID:24274902

  16. Selenium sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenium sulfide ; CASRN 7446 - 34 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  17. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen sulfide ; 7783 - 06 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  18. Carbonyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbonyl sulfide ; CASRN 463 - 58 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  19. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visscher, P.T.; Taylor, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters.

  20. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, P T; Taylor, B F

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters. PMID:8285707

  1. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  2. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1985-11-26

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  3. Chlorimuron-ethyl

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorimuron - ethyl ; CASRN 90982 - 32 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  4. Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl ethyl ketone ( MEK ) ( CASRN 78 - 93 - 3 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  5. Ethyl alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, V.; Hauck, D.

    1980-11-01

    Recent price increases and temporary shortages of petroleum products have caused farmers to search for alternate sources of fuel. The production of ethyl alcohol from grain is described and the processes involved include saccharification, fermentation and distillation. The resulting stillage has potential as a livestock feed.

  6. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1992-07-07

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  7. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1991-10-22

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  8. Sulfide Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, John

    2007-02-01

    Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry Series, Volume 61 David J. Vaughan, Editor Geochemical Society and Mineralogical Society of America; ISBN 0-939950-73-1 xiii + 714 pp.; 2006; $40. Sulfide minerals as a class represent important minor rock-forming minerals, but they are generally known as the chief sources of many economic metallic ores. In the past two decades, sulfide research has been extended to include important roles in environmental geology of sulfide weathering and resultant acid mine drainage, as well as in geomicrobiology in which bacteria make use of sulfides for metabolic energy sources. In the latter respect, sulfides played an important role in early evolution of life on Earth and in geochemical cycling of elements in the Earth's crust and hydrosphere.

  9. Sulfidation of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levard, C.; Michel, F. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Rapid development of nanotechnologies that exploit the properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) raises questions concerning the impact of Ag on the environment. Ag-NPs are currently among the most widely used in the nanotechnology industry and the amount released into the environment is expected to increase along with production (1). When present in geochemical systems, Ag-NPs may undergo a variety of changes due to varying redox, pH, and chemical conditions. Expected changes range from surface modification (e.g., oxidation, sulfidation, chloridation etc.) to complete dissolution and re-precipitation. In this context, the focus of our work is on understanding the behavior of synthetic Ag-NPs with different particle sizes under varying conditions relevant to the environment. Sulfidation of Ag-NPs is of particular interest since it among the processes most likely to occur in aqueous systems, in particular under reducing conditions. Three sizes of Ag-NPs coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone were produced using the polyol process (2) (7 ±1; 20 ±4, and 40 ±9 nm). Batch solutions containing the different Ag-NPs were subsequently reacted with Na2S solutions of different concentrations. The sulfidation process was followed step-wise for 24 hours and the corrosion products formed were characterized by electron microscopy (TEM/SEM), diffraction (XRD), and photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS). Surface charge (pHPZC) of the products formed during this process was also measured, as were changes in solubility and reactivity. Based on experimental observations we infer that the sulfidation process is the result of dissolution-precipitation and find that: (i) acanthite (Ag2S) is formed as a corrosion product; (ii) Ag-NPs aggregation increased with sulfidation rate; (iii) pHPZC increases with the rate of sulfidation; and (iv) the solubility of the corrosion products formed from sulfidation appears lower than that of non-sulfidated Ag-NPs. We observe size-dependent differences in

  10. SULFIDE METHOD PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium solutions. Such a solution is first treated with a soluble sullide, causing precipitation of the plutoniunn and uraniunn values present, along with those impurities which form insoluble sulfides. The precipitate is then treated with a solution of carbonate ions, which will dissolve the uranium and plutonium present while the fission product sulfides remain unaffected. After separation from the residue, this solution may then be treated by any of the usual methods, such as formation of a lanthanum fluoride precipitate, to effect separation of plutoniunn from uranium.

  11. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  12. Sulfidation kinetics of silver nanoparticles reacted with metal sulfides.

    PubMed

    Thalmann, Basilius; Voegelin, Andreas; Sinnet, Brian; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Kaegi, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have documented that the sulfidation of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP), possibly released to the environment from consumer products, occurs in anoxic zones of urban wastewater systems and that sulfidized Ag-NP exhibit dramatically reduced toxic effects. However, whether Ag-NP sulfidation also occurs under oxic conditions in the absence of bisulfide has not been addressed, yet. In this study we, therefore, investigated whether metal sulfides that are more resistant toward oxidation than free sulfide, could enable the sulfidation of Ag-NP under oxic conditions. We reacted citrate-stabilized Ag-NP of different sizes (10-100 nm) with freshly precipitated and crystalline CuS and ZnS in oxygenated aqueous suspensions at pH 7.5. The extent of Ag-NP sulfidation was derived from the increase in dissolved Cu(2+) or Zn(2+) over time and linked with results from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis of selected samples. The sulfidation of Ag-NP followed pseudo first-order kinetics, with rate coefficients increasing with decreasing Ag-NP diameter and increasing metal sulfide concentration and depending on the type (CuS and ZnS) and crystallinity of the reacting metal sulfide. Results from analytical electron microscopy revealed the formation of complex sulfidation patterns that seemed to follow preexisting subgrain boundaries in the pristine Ag-NP. The kinetics of Ag-NP sulfidation observed in this study in combination with reported ZnS and CuS concentrations and predicted Ag-NP concentrations in wastewater and urban surface waters indicate that even under oxic conditions and in the absence of free sulfide, Ag-NP can be transformed into Ag2S within a few hours to days by reaction with metal sulfides. PMID:24678586

  13. Detection of interstellar ethyl cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Lovas, F. J.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Litvak, M. M.; Thaddeus, P.; Guelin, M.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-four millimeter-wave emission lines of ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) have been detected in the Orion Nebula (OMC-1) and seven in Sgr B2. To derive precise radial velocities from the astronomical data, a laboratory measurement of the rotational spectrum of ethyl cyanide has been made at frequencies above 41 GHz. In OMC-1, the rotational temperature of ethyl cyanide is 90 K (in good agreement with other molecules), the local-standard-of-rest radial velocity is 4.5 + or - 1.0 km/s (versus 8.5 km/s for most molecules), and the column density is 1.8 by 10 to the 14th power per sq cm (a surprisingly high figure for a complicated molecule). The high abundance of ethyl cyanide in the Orion Nebula suggests that ethane and perhaps larger saturated hydrocarbons may be common constituents of molecular clouds and have escaped detection only because they are nonpolar or only weakly polar.

  14. S-Ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate (EPTC)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    S - Ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate ( EPTC ) ; CASRN 759 - 94 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessme

  15. Sulfide detoxification in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Birke, Hannah; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to animals, which release the signal molecule sulfide in small amounts from cysteine and its derivates, phototrophic eukaryotes generate sulfide as an essential intermediate of the sulfur assimilation pathway. Additionally, iron-sulfur cluster turnover and cyanide detoxification might contribute to the release of sulfide in mitochondria. However, sulfide is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondria. Thus, efficient sulfide detoxification mechanisms are required in mitochondria to ensure adequate energy production and consequently survival of the plant cell. Two enzymes have been recently described to catalyze sulfide detoxification in mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana, O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase C (OAS-TL C), and the sulfur dioxygenase (SDO) ethylmalonic encephalopathy protein 1 (ETHE1). Biochemical characterization of sulfide producing and consuming enzymes in mitochondria of plants is fundamental to understand the regulatory network that enables mitochondrial sulfide homeostasis under nonstressed and stressed conditions. In this chapter, we provide established protocols to determine the activity of the sulfide releasing enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase as well as sulfide-consuming enzymes OAS-TL and SDO. Additionally, we describe a reliable and efficient method to purify OAS-TL proteins from plant material. PMID:25747485

  16. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  17. Biotreatment of refinery spent sulfidic caustics

    SciTech Connect

    Sublette, K.L.; Rajganesh, B.; Woolsey, M.; Plato, A.

    1995-12-31

    Caustics are used in petroleum refinering to remove hydrogen sulfide from various hydrocarbon streams. Spent sulfidic caustics from two Conoco refineries have been successfully biotreated on bench and pilot scale, resulting in neutralization and removal of active sulfides. Sulfides were completely oxidized to sulfate by Thiobacillus denitrificans. Microbial oxidation of sulfide produced acid, which at least partially neutralized the caustic.

  18. Spectroscopic characterization of ethyl xanthate oxidation products and analysis by ion interaction chromatography

    PubMed

    Hao; Silvester; Senior

    2000-10-15

    An ion interaction chromatographic separation method, coupled with UV spectroscopic detection, has been developed for the analysis of ethyl xanthate (O-ethyl dithiocarbonate) and its oxidative decomposition products in mineral flotation systems. The effects of the ion-pairing agent (tetrabutylammonium ion), pH modifier (phosphoric acid), and organic modifier (acetonitrile) in the eluant upon the retention characteristics of the ethyl xanthate oxidation products have been determined. The optimized separation procedure has been successfully applied to the analysis of ethyl xanthate and its oxidation products in a nickel-iron sulfide mineral suspension containing a number of other anionic species, including cyanide complexes of nickel and iron, as well as sulfur-oxy anions. The ethyl xanthate oxidation products investigated in this study have been isolated as pure compounds and characterized by UV-visible, FT-IR, and NMR spectroscopies. The UV-visible and FT-IR spectroscopic properties of these species are discussed in terms of the chemical modifications of the thiocarbonate group. PMID:11055697

  19. Hydrogen sulfide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Tee L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a hazard primarily in the oil and gas industry, agriculture, sewage and animal waste handling, construction (asphalt operations and disturbing marshy terrain), and other settings where organic material decomposes under reducing conditions, and in geothermal operations. It is an insoluble gas, heavier than air, with a very low odor threshold and high toxicity, driven by concentration more than duration of exposure. Toxicity presents in a unique, reliable, and characteristic toxidrome consisting, in ascending order of exposure, of mucosal irritation, especially of the eye ("gas eye"), olfactory paralysis (not to be confused with olfactory fatigue), sudden but reversible loss of consciousness ("knockdown"), pulmonary edema (with an unusually favorable prognosis), and death (probably with apnea contributing). The risk of chronic neurcognitive changes is controversial, with the best evidence at high exposure levels and after knockdowns, which are frequently accompanied by head injury or oxygen deprivation. Treatment cannot be initiated promptly in the prehospital phase, and currently rests primarily on supportive care, hyperbaric oxygen, and nitrite administration. The mechanism of action for sublethal neurotoxicity and knockdown is clearly not inhibition of cytochrome oxidase c, as generally assumed, although this may play a role in overwhelming exposures. High levels of endogenous sulfide are found in the brain, presumably relating to the function of hydrogen sulfide as a gaseous neurotransmitter and immunomodulator. Prevention requires control of exposure and rigorous training to stop doomed rescue attempts attempted without self-contained breathing apparatus, especially in confined spaces, and in sudden release in the oil and gas sector, which result in multiple avoidable deaths. PMID:26563786

  20. Field method for sulfide determination

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B L; Schwarser, R R; Chukwuenye, C O

    1982-01-01

    A simple and rapid method was developed for determining the total sulfide concentration in water in the field. Direct measurements were made using a silver/sulfide ion selective electrode in conjunction with a double junction reference electrode connected to an Orion Model 407A/F Specific Ion Meter. The method also made use of a sulfide anti-oxidant buffer (SAOB II) which consists of ascorbic acid, sodium hydroxide, and disodium EDTA. Preweighed sodium sulfide crystals were sealed in air tight plastic volumetric flasks which were used in standardization process in the field. Field standards were prepared by adding SAOB II to the flask containing the sulfide crystals and diluting it to the mark with deionized deaerated water. Serial dilutions of the standards were used to prepare standards of lower concentrations. Concentrations as low as 6 ppB were obtained on lake samples with a reproducibility better than +- 10%.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, Box... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and....1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH. (b) The ingredient meets...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  3. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  4. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  5. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  6. Hydrogenation of ethyl 5-cyano-2-oximinovalerate

    SciTech Connect

    Klabunovskii, E.I.; Levitina, E.S.; Kaigorodova, L.N.; Godunova, L.F.; Gogoladze, D.D.; Karpeiskaya, E.I.; Novikova, S.A.

    1987-03-10

    Hydrogenation of ethyl 5-cyano-2-oximinovalerate in acetic anhydride at atmospheric pressure in the presence of strong base leads to a quantitative yield of the ethyl ester of ..cap alpha..,eta-diacetyllysine. Selective reduction of the cyano and oximino groups in ethyl 5-cyano-2-oximinovalerate has been shown in the presence of powdered Ni, Cu-Ni, and LaNi/sub 5/H/sub 6.6/ catalysts. Hydrogenation of ethyl 5-cyano-2-oximinovalerate on Raney Ni at atmospheric pressure in dioxan with addition of acetic anhydride leads to a 50% yield of diacetyllysine.

  7. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by structure type

  8. Electrobioleaching of base metal sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    Bioleaching of base metal sulfides, such as pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite, under the influence of applied direct current (DC) potentials is discussed. Contributions toward mineral dissolution from three effects, namely, galvanic, applied potential, and microbiological, are analyzed and compared. Sphalerite could be selectively bioleached in the presence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans under an applied potential of -500 mV (SCE) from mixed sulfides containing sphalerite, pyrite, and chalcopyrite. Bacterial activity and growth were found to be promoted under electrobioleaching conditions. Probable mechanisms involved in the bioleaching of different sulfides under positive and negative applied potentials are discussed.

  9. A novel method for improving cerussite sulfidization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qi-cheng; Wen, Shu-ming; Zhao, Wen-juan; Cao, Qin-bo; Lü, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of flotation behavior, solution measurements, and surface analyses were performed to investigate the effects of chloride ion addition on the sulfidization of cerussite in this study. Micro-flotation tests indicate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly increase the flotation recovery of cerussite, which is attributed to the formation of more lead sulfide species on the mineral surface. Solution measurement results suggest that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization induces the transformation of more sulfide ions from pulp solution onto the mineral surface by the formation of more lead sulfide species. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy indicate that more lead sulfide species form on the mineral surface when chloride ions are added prior to sulfidization. These results demonstrate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly improve the sulfidization of cerussite, thereby enhancing the flotation performance.

  10. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor....

  11. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  12. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  13. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  14. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT....108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor. (b) Specific gravity at 15.56 °/15.56 °C. Not...

  15. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl...

  16. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl...

  17. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor....

  18. 21 CFR 173.228 - Ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 1 (Ethyl Acetate; p. 372, 3d Ed., 1981), which are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl acetate. 173.228 Section 173.228 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  19. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor....

  20. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor....

  1. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  2. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1987-01-06

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  3. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1987-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  4. Thermoelectric Properties of Lanthanum Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Lockwood, R.; Parker, J. B.; Zoltan, A.; Zoltan, L. D.; Danielson, L.; Raag, V.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes measurement of Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall effect in gamma-phase lanthanum sulfide with composition of La3-x S4. Results of study, part of search for high-temperature thermoelectric energy-conversion materials, indicate this sulfide behaves like extrinsic semiconductor over temperature range of 300 to 1,400 K, with degenerate carrier concentration controlled by stoichiometric ratio of La to S.

  5. Formation and inhibition of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Stachel, Nicole; Skopp, Gisela

    2016-08-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) und ethyl sulfate (EtS) are widely accepted biomarkers in forensic and clinical settings. Even though, levels of EtG and EtS in blood and urine increase with increasing doses of alcohol, a high inter-individual variability in their production has been noticed. Therefore, we investigated the influence of dietary plant phenols on the formation of EtG and EtS and tentatively estimated the magnitude of in vivo inhibitory interactions from our in vitro results. To address these issues, formation of EtS and EtG was investigated using recombinant glucuronosyl- and sulfotransferases as well as human liver microsomes and liver cytosol. After respective kinetics had been established, inhibition experiments using quercetin, kaempferol and resveratrol were performed. These polyphenols are subject to extensive glucuronidation and/or sulfonation. EtG and EtS were determined by LC-MS/MS following solid phase extraction for EtG due to severe matrix effects and by direct injection for EtS. All enzymes investigated were involved in the conjugation of ethanol. Maximal EtG and EtS formation rates were observed with HLM and SULT1A1, respectively. All kinetics could best be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Resveratrol was a competitive inhibitor of UGT1A1, UGT1A9 and HLM; quercetin and kaempferol were inhibitors of all transferases under investigation except UGT2B15. Findings for quercetin with regard to UGT2B7 and SULT2A1 and for kaempferol with regard to SULT1E1 and SULT2A1 suggested a mechanism based inhibition. Competitive inhibition of the glucuronidation and sulfonation of ethanol was estimated as weak to negligible and as moderate to weak, respectively. Beside the known polymorphisms of the transferases involved in EtG and EtS formation, prediction of the inhibitory potential indicates that polyphenols may contribute to the variable formation rate of EtG and EtS. PMID:26829336

  6. A Choline Oxidase Amperometric Bioassay for the Detection of Mustard Agents Based on Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with Prussian Blue Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Arduini, Fabiana; Scognamiglio, Viviana; Covaia, Corrado; Amine, Aziz; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In this work a novel bioassay for mustard agent detection was proposed. The bioassay is based on the capability of these compounds to inhibit the enzyme choline oxidase. The enzymatic activity, which is correlated to the mustard agents, was electrochemically monitored measuring the enzymatic product, hydrogen peroxide, by means of a screen-printed electrode modified with Prussian Blue nanoparticles. Prussian Blue nanoparticles are able to electrocatalyse the hydrogen peroxide concentration reduction at low applied potential (−50 mV vs. Ag/AgCl), thus allowing the detection of the mustard agents with no electrochemical interferences. The suitability of this novel bioassay was tested with the nitrogen mustard simulant bis(2-chloroethyl)amine and the sulfur mustard simulants 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide. The bioassay proposed in this work allowed the detection of mustard agent simulants with good sensitivity and fast response, which are excellent premises for the development of a miniaturised sensor well suited for an alarm system in case of terrorist attacks. PMID:25688587

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation by Myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bostelaar, Trever; Vitvitsky, Victor; Kumutima, Jacques; Lewis, Brianne E; Yadav, Pramod K; Brunold, Thomas C; Filipovic, Milos; Lehnert, Nicolai; Stemmler, Timothy L; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-07-13

    Enzymes in the sulfur network generate the signaling molecule, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), from the amino acids cysteine and homocysteine. Since it is toxic at elevated concentrations, cells are equipped to clear H2S. A canonical sulfide oxidation pathway operates in mitochondria, converting H2S to thiosulfate and sulfate. We have recently discovered the ability of ferric hemoglobin to oxidize sulfide to thiosulfate and iron-bound hydropolysulfides. In this study, we report that myoglobin exhibits a similar capacity for sulfide oxidation. We have trapped and characterized iron-bound sulfur intermediates using cryo-mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Further support for the postulated intermediates in the chemically challenging conversion of H2S to thiosulfate and iron-bound catenated sulfur products is provided by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopy in addition to density functional theory computational results. We speculate that the unusual sensitivity of skeletal muscle cytochrome c oxidase to sulfide poisoning in ethylmalonic encephalopathy, resulting from the deficiency in a mitochondrial sulfide oxidation enzyme, might be due to the concentration of H2S by myoglobin in this tissue. PMID:27310035

  8. Comparative immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide and cyclophosphamide: Evaluation of L1210 tumor cell resistance, cell-mediated immunity, and humoral immunity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.; Joiner, R.L.; Houchens, D.P.; Dill, G.S.; Hobson, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    The immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM),on humoral and cell-mediated immunity was compared with that of the nitrogen mustard 2-(bis(2-chloroethyl) amino)tetrahydro- 2H-1,3,2-oxazophosphorine 2-oxide (cyclophosphamide, CP). SM and CP had similar effects on thymic and splenic weights, spleen cell number, and the formation of antibody producing cells to sheep red blood cells (sRBC) when examined 5 days after exposure, but differed in their effects on body weights. Although there were no differences in the delayed hypersensitivity response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, CP and SM had different effects in the L1210 tumor cell allograft rejection assay. CP, but not SM, decreased the 28 day survival rate of allogeneic mice exposed to a sublethal L1210 tumor challenge. The differing effects on survival to the L1210 tumor challenge could not be attributed to a direct cytotoxic effect of SM on the L1210 tumor cells as SM did not increase the survival rate or mediansurvival time of syngeneic mice exposed to a lethal L1210 tumor cell challenge. In summary, SM and CP had immunosuppressive effects in the humoral immune assay. Although neither compound suppressed the delayed hypersensitivity response, CP was found to suppress host resistance to L1210 tumor cells.

  9. Inhaled Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Gian Paolo; Searles, Robert; Yu, Binglan; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito; Zapol, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Breathing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to induce a suspended animation–like state with hypothermia and a concomitant metabolic reduction in rodents. However, the impact of H2S breathing on cardiovascular function remains incompletely understood. In this study, the authors investigated the cardiovascular and metabolic effects of inhaled H2S in a murine model. Methods The impact of breathing H2S on cardiovascular function was examined using telemetry and echocardiography in awake mice. The effects of breathing H2S on carbon dioxide production and oxygen consumption were measured at room temperature and in a warmed environment. Results Breathing H2S at 80 parts per million by volume at 27°C ambient temperature for 6 h markedly reduced heart rate, core body temperature, respiratory rate, and physical activity, whereas blood pressure remained unchanged. Echocardiography demonstrated that H2S exposure decreased both heart rate and cardiac output but preserved stroke volume. Breathing H2S for 6 h at 35°C ambient temperature (to prevent hypothermia) decreased heart rate, physical activity, respiratory rate, and cardiac output without altering stroke volume or body temperature. H2S breathing seems to induce bradycardia by depressing sinus node activity. Breathing H2S for 30 min decreased whole body oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production at either 27° or 35°C ambient temperature. Both parameters returned to baseline levels within 10 min after the cessation of H2S breathing. Conclusions Inhalation of H2S at either 27° or 35°C reversibly depresses cardiovascular function without changing blood pressure in mice. Breathing H2S also induces a rapidly reversible reduction of metabolic rate at either body temperature. PMID:18362598

  10. Sulfur and sulfides in chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Libourel, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within type I PO, POP and PP chondrules of the carbonaceous chondrite Vigarano (CV3) have been studied by secondary electron microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur predominantly as spheroidal blebs composed entirely of low-Ni iron sulfide (troilite, FeS) or troilite + magnetite but in less abundance in association with metallic Fe-Ni beads in opaque assemblages. Troilites are mainly located within the low-Ca pyroxene outer zone and their amounts increase with the abundance of low-Ca pyroxene within chondrules, suggesting co-crystallization of troilite and low-Ca pyroxene during high-temperature events. We show that sulfur concentration and sulfide occurrence in chondrules obey high temperature sulfur solubility and saturation laws. Depending on the fS2 and fO2 of the surrounding gas and on the melt composition, mainly the FeO content, sulfur dissolved in chondrule melts may eventually reach a concentration limit, the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS), at which an immiscible iron sulfide liquid separates from the silicate melt. The occurrence of both a silicate melt and an immiscible iron sulfide liquid is further supported by the non-wetting behavior of sulfides on silicate phases in chondrules due to the high interfacial tension between their precursor iron-sulfide liquid droplets and the surrounding silicate melt during the high temperature chondrule-forming event. The evolution of chondrule melts from PO to PP towards more silicic compositions, very likely due to high PSiO(g) of the surrounding nebular gas, induces saturation of FeS at much lower S content in PP than in PO chondrules, leading to the co-crystallization of iron sulfides and low-Ca pyroxenes. Conditions of co-saturation of low-Ca pyroxene and FeS are only achieved in non canonical environments characterized by high partial pressures of sulfur and SiO and redox conditions more oxidizing than IW-3. Fe and S mass balance calculations also

  11. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1995-12-19

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50 C to 300 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered. 2 figs.

  12. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50.degree. C. to 300.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1295 - Ethyl formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of concentrated sulfuric acid. Ethyl formate occurs naturally in some plant oils, fruits, and juices but does not occur naturally in the animal kingdom. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1295 - Ethyl formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Ethyl formate occurs naturally in some plant oils, fruits, and juices but does not occur naturally in the animal kingdom. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1295 - Ethyl formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of concentrated sulfuric acid. Ethyl formate occurs naturally in some plant oils, fruits, and juices but does not occur naturally in the animal kingdom. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of...

  16. Mechanistic chemical perspective of hydrogen sulfide signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is now a well-appreciated master regulator in a diverse array of physiological processes. However, as a consequence of the rapid growth of the area, sulfide biology suffers from an increasing number of controversial observations and interpretations. A better understanding of the underlying molecular pathways of sulfide's actions is key to reconcile controversial issues, which calls for rigorous chemical/biochemical investigations. Protein sulfhydration and coordination/redox chemical interactions of sulfide with heme proteins are the two most extensively studied pathways in sulfide biochemistry. These pathways are important mediators of protein functions, generate bioactive sulfide metabolites, contribute to sulfide storage/trafficking and carry antioxidant functions. In addition, inorganic polysulfides, which are oxidative sulfide metabolites, are increasingly recognized as important players in sulfide biology. This chapter provides an overview of our mechanistic perspective on the reactions that govern (i) sulfide's bioavailability (including the delicate enzyme machineries that orchestrate sulfide production and consumption and the roles of the large sulfide-storing pools as biological buffers), (ii) biological significance and mechanisms of persulfide formation (including the reduction of disulfides, condensation with sulfenic acids, oxidation of thiols with polysulfides and radical-mediated pathways), (iii) coordination and redox chemical interactions of sulfide with heme proteins (including cytochrome c oxidase, hemoglobins, myoglobins and peroxidases), and (iv) the chemistry of polysulfides. PMID:25725513

  17. Toluene 2-Monooxygenase-Dependent Growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4/PR1 on Diethyl Ether

    PubMed Central

    Hur, H.; Newman, L. M.; Wackett, L. P.; Sadowsky, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Aerobic bacterial growth on aromatic hydrocarbons typically requires oxygenase enzymes, which are known to fortuitously oxidize nongrowth substrates. In this study, we found that oxidation of diethyl ether by toluene 2-monooxygenase supported more rapid growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4/PR1 than did the aromatic substrates n-propylbenzene and o-xylene. The wild-type Burkholderia cepacia G4 failed to grow on diethyl ether. Purified toluene 2-monooxygenase protein components oxidized diethyl ether stoichiometrically to ethanol and acetaldehyde. Butyl methyl ether, diethyl sulfide, and 2-chloroethyl ethyl ether were oxidized by B. cepacia G4/PR1. PMID:16535583

  18. Niobium(V) saponite clay for the catalytic oxidative abatement of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Carniato, Fabio; Bisio, Chiara; Psaro, Rinaldo; Marchese, Leonardo; Guidotti, Matteo

    2014-09-15

    A Nb(V)-containing saponite clay was designed to selectively transform toxic organosulfur chemical warfare agents (CWAs) under extremely mild conditions into nontoxic products with reduced environmental impact. Thanks to the insertion of Nb(V) sites within the saponite framework, a bifunctional catalyst with strong oxidizing and acid properties was obtained. Remarkable activity and high selectivity were observed for the oxidative abatement of (2-chloroethyl)ethyl sulfide (CEES), a simulant of sulfur mustard, at room temperature with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. This performance was significantly better compared to a conventional commercial decontamination powder. PMID:25056451

  19. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  20. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  1. 40 CFR 721.10595 - Octadecen-1-aminium, N-ethyl-N,N-dimethy-, ethyl sulfate (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Octadecen-1-aminium, N-ethyl-N,N... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10595 Octadecen-1-aminium, N-ethyl-N,N-dimethy... chemical substance identified as octadecen-1-aminium, N-ethyl-N,N-dimethy-, ethyl sulfate (1:1) (PMN...

  2. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604...-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  3. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  4. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  5. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  6. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504...-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  7. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices. PMID:25073046

  8. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of...

  9. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  10. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  11. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.490 Section 250.490 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Hydrogen Sulfide § 250.490 Hydrogen sulfide. (a)...

  12. SULFIDE PRECIPITATION OF HEAVY METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research program was initiated with the objective of evaluating a new process, the sulfide precipitation of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters. The process was expected to effect a more complete removal of heavy metals than conventional lime processing because of the mu...

  13. p-Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide ; CASRN 123 - 09 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for N

  14. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  15. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. PMID:17796685

  16. [Degradation of thiometon in ethyl acetate].

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Shimokawa, S; Kobata, M; Tanaka, T; Nakanishi, Y

    2001-04-01

    When performing multiresidue analysis of pesticides, the recovery of thiometon was less than 20% from carrots and eggplants, but about 100% from garlic chives and welsh onions. The recovery of thiometon was found to depend on the lot of ethyl acetate. A 2-year-old lot of ethyl acetate caused degradation of thiometon, but a fresh lot of ethyl acetate did not. Analysis showed that ethyl acetate stored for 2 years contained about 5 microL/mL of acetaldehyde. Thiometon was also degraded by acetone or acetonitrile, when acetaldehyde was added to them, in the same manner as by aged ethyl acetate. The fact that the recovery of thiometon from welsh onions was about 100% indicated that some of the mercaptans in allium vegetables may prevent thiometon degradation. Mercaptans such as L-cysteine and 3-mercaptoproionic acid were confirmed to prevent the degradation of thiometon and disulfoton. These findings show that mercaptans may be useful additives for analyzing thiometon and disulfoton. PMID:11486375

  17. Study of the Reaction Cl + Ethyl Formate at 700-950 Torr and 297 to 435 K: Product Distribution and the Kinetics of the Reaction C2H5OC(═O) → CO2 + C2H5.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, E W

    2016-05-26

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of atomic chlorine with ethyl formate [Cl + CH3CH2O(C═O)H, reaction 1] have been examined. These experiments were performed at pressures of 760-950 Torr and temperatures from 297 to 435 K. Reactants and products were quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC/FID) analysis. The initial mixture contained ethyl formate, Cl2, and N2. Cl atoms were generated by UV photolysis of this initial mixture at 360 nm, which dissociates Cl2. The rate constant of reaction 1 was measured at 297 K relative to that of the reaction Cl + C2H5Cl (reaction 2), yielding the rate constant ratio k1/k2 = 1.09 ± 0.05. The final products formed from reaction 1 are ethyl chloroformate, 1-chloroethyl formate, and 2-chloroethyl formate. These products result from the reactions with Cl2 of the three free radicals formed by H atom abstraction from ethylformate in reaction 1. Based on the molar yields of these three chlorinated products, the yields of the three radicals formed from reaction 1 at 297 K are (25 ± 3) mole percent of CH3CH2O(C═O); (67 ± 5) mole percent of CH3CHO(C═O)H; and (8 ± 2) mole percent of CH2CH2O(C═O)H. A second phase of this experiment measured the rate constant of the decarboxylation of the ethoxy carbonyl radical [CH3CH2O(C═O) → CO2 + C2H5, reaction 4] relative to the rate constant of its reaction with Cl2 [CH3CH2O(C═O) + Cl2 → CH3CH2O(C═O)Cl + Cl, reaction 3a]. Over the temperature range 297 to 404 K at 1 atm total pressure, this ratio can be expressed by k4/k3a = 10(23.56±0.22) e(-(12700±375)/RT) molecules cm(-3). Estimating the value of k3a (which has not been measured) based on similar reactions, the expression k4 = 5.8 × 10(12) e(-(12700)/RT) s(-1) is obtained. The estimated error of this rate constant is ± a factor of 2 over the experimental temperature range. This rate expression is compared with recent ab initio calculations of the decarboxylation of the analogous methoxy

  18. Marine diagenesis of hydrothermal sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Moammar, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to discuss the artificial and natural oxidation and hydrolysis of hydrothermal sulfide upon interaction with normal seawater. Synthetic and natural ferrosphalerite particles used in kinetic oxidation and hydrolysis studies in seawater develop dense, crystalline coatings consisting of ordered and ferrimagnetic delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH. Due to the formation of this reactive diffusion barrier, the release of Zn into solution decreases rapidly, and sulfide oxidation is reduced to a low rate determined by the diffusion of oxygen through the oxyhydroxide film. This also acts as an efficient solvent for ions such as Zn/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and possibly Cd/sup 2 +/, which contribute to the stabilization of the delta-FeOOH structure. The oxidation of sulfide occurs in many seafloor spreading areas, such as 21/sup 0/N on the East Pacific Ridge. In these areas the old surface of the sulfide chimneys are found to be covered by an orange stain, and sediment near the base of nonactive vents is also found to consist of what has been referred to as amorphous iron oxide and hydroxide. This thesis also discusses the exceedingly low solubility of zinc in seawater, from delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH and the analogous phase (zinc-ferrihydroxide) and the zinc exchange minerals, 10-A manganate and montmorillonite. The concentrations of all four are of the same magnitude (16, 36.4, and 12 nM, respectively) as the zinc concentration in deep ocean water (approx. 10 nM), which suggests that manganates and montmorillonite with iron oxyhydroxides control zinc concentration in the deep ocean.

  19. Sulfide-Driven Microbial Electrosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, YM; Ebrahim, A; Feist, AM; Embree, M; Zhang, T; Lovley, D; Zengler, K

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis, the conversion of carbon dioxide to organic molecules using electricity, has recently been demonstrated for acetogenic microorganisms, such as Sporomusa ovata. The energy for reduction of carbon dioxide originates from the hydrolysis of water on the anode, requiring a sufficiently low potential. Here we evaluate the use of sulfide as an electron source for microbial electrosynthesis. Abiotically oxidation of sulfide on the anode yields two electrons. The oxidation product, elemental sulfur, can be further oxidized to sulfate by Desulfobulbus propionicus, generating six additional electrons in the process. The eight electrons generated from the combined abiotic and biotic steps were used to reduce carbon dioxide to acetate on a graphite cathode by Sporomusa ovata at a rate of 24.8 mmol/day.m(2). Using a strain of Desulfuromonas as biocatalyst on the anode resulted in an acetate production rate of 49.9 mmol/day.m(2), with a Coulombic efficiency of over 90%. These results demonstrate that sulfide can serve effectively as an alternative electron donor for microbial electrosynthesis.

  20. Elastic electron scattering by ethyl vinyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Khakoo, M. A.; Hong, L.; Kim, B.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2010-02-15

    We report measured and calculated results for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by ethyl vinyl ether (ethoxyethene), a prototype system for studying indirect dissociative attachment processes that may play a role in DNA damage. The integral cross section displays the expected {pi}{sup *} shape resonance. The agreement between the calculated and measured cross sections is generally good.

  1. Ethyl p-nitrophenyl phenylphosphorothioate (EPN)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl p - nitrophenyl phenylphosphorothioate ( EPN ) ; CASRN 2104 - 64 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Ha

  2. 21 CFR 184.1295 - Ethyl formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl formate. 184.1295 Section 184.1295 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS §...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1295 - Ethyl formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl formate. 184.1295 Section 184.1295 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS §...

  4. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation...

  5. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  6. Striations in an ethyl alcohol glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, P. G.; Gómez, A.; Torres, C.; Martínez, H.; Castillo, F.; Vergara, J.

    2015-03-01

    This research shows the behavior of striations in glow discharge generated with high purity ethyl alcohol at a pressure of 0.6 Torr. This paper present the number of striations as a function of the of current and voltage discharge.

  7. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  8. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  9. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  10. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  11. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  12. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prescribed for polyethylene in § 177.1520. (1) Specifications—(i) Infrared identification. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (ii) Quantitative determination of ethyl acrylate content. The ethyl acrylate can be determined by the infrared spectra. Prepare...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 177.1520. (1) Specifications—(i) Infrared identification. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (ii) Quantitative determination of ethyl acrylate content. The ethyl acrylate can be determined by the infrared spectra. Prepare a scan from 10.5 microns...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prescribed for polyethylene in § 177.1520. (1) Specifications—(i) Infrared identification. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (ii) Quantitative determination of ethyl acrylate content. The ethyl acrylate can be determined by the infrared spectra. Prepare...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prescribed for polyethylene in § 177.1520. (1) Specifications—(i) Infrared identification. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (ii) Quantitative determination of ethyl acrylate content. The ethyl acrylate can be determined by the infrared spectra. Prepare...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prescribed for polyethylene in § 177.1520. (1) Specifications—(i) Infrared identification. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (ii) Quantitative determination of ethyl acrylate content. The ethyl acrylate can be determined by the infrared spectra. Prepare...

  18. 40 CFR 180.441 - Quizalofop ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the....05 (2) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its... with regional registration are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl,...

  19. 40 CFR 180.441 - Quizalofop ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the....05 (2) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its... with regional registration are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl,...

  20. 40 CFR 180.441 - Quizalofop ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... combined residues of the herbicide quizalofop (2- propanoic acid) and quizalofop ethyl (ethyl-2- propanoate...) Tolerances are established for the combined residues of the herbicide quizalofop (2- propanoic acid... herbicide quizalofop-p ethyl ester , and its acid metabolite quizalofop-p , and the S enantiomers of...

  1. 40 CFR 180.441 - Quizalofop ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the....05 (2) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its... with regional registration are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl,...

  2. Rapid Synthesis of Nonstoichiometric Lanthanum Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, S.; Shapiro, E.; Danielson, L.; Hardister, H.

    1987-01-01

    New process relatively fast and simple. Improved method of synthesizing nonstoichiometric lanthanum sulfide faster and simpler. Product purer because some of prior sources of contamination eliminated.

  3. 40 CFR 180.595 - Flufenpyr-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide, flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], in or on the following...) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl...

  4. 40 CFR 180.595 - Flufenpyr-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide, flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], in or on the following...) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl...

  5. 40 CFR 180.595 - Flufenpyr-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide, flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], in or on the following...) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl...

  6. 40 CFR 180.595 - Flufenpyr-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide, flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], in or on the following...) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl...

  7. 40 CFR 180.595 - Flufenpyr-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide, flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], in or on the following...) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl...

  8. Semiconductor nanoparticles in poly((2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) co-polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trandafilović, L. V.; Bibić, N.; Georges, M. K.; Blanuša, J.; Radhakrishnan, T.; Djoković, V.

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured cadmium selenide (CdSe) and lead sulfide (PbS) semiconductors were prepared in a poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) matrix. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by using optical and structural methods. Co-polymers were synthesized in two different molar ratios of pDMAEMA:acrylic acid monomer units (1:2, 1:1). Transmission electron microscopy analysis confirmed the presence of nano-sized CdSe and PbS particles. In the case of CdSe, a shift of the onset of the optical absorption toward lower wavelengths was observed. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that both CdSe and PbS nanoparticles have cubic crystal structure.

  9. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  10. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  11. Production of ethyl alcohol from bananas

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; Towns, T.

    1983-12-01

    The production of ethyl alcohol from waste bananas presents many special problems. During cooking, matting of the latex fibers from the banana peel recongeal when cooled and left untreated. This problem has been addressed by Alfaro by the use of CaC1/sub 2/. Separation of solids prior to distillation of the mashes in an economical fashion and use of the by product are also of concern to banana processors.

  12. Synthesis of Ethyl Salicylate Using Household Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sally; Hur, Chinhyu; Lee, Alan; Smith, Kurt

    1996-02-01

    Ethyl salicylate is synthesized, isolated, and characterized in a three-step process using simple equipment and household chemicals. First, acetylsalicylic acid is extracted from aspirin tablets with isopropyl alcohol, then hydrolyzed to salicylic acid with muriatic acid, and finally, the salicylic acid is esterified using ethanol and a boric acid catalyst. The experiment can be directed towards high school or university level students who have sufficient background in organic chemistry to recognize the structures and reactions that are involved.

  13. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Provisions § 425.03 Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. (a) The potassium ferricyanide titration... the potassium ferricyanide titration method for the determination of sulfide in wastewaters...

  14. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuebin; Ma, Lun; Zhang, Xing; Joly, Alan G.; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Many methods have been reported for the formation of sulfide nanoparticles by the reaction of metallic salts with sulfide chemical sources in aqueous solutions or organic solvents. Here, we report the formation of sulfide nanoparticles in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by boiling metallic salts without sulfide sources. The sulfide sources are generated from the boiling of DMSO and react with metallic salts to form sulfide nanoparticles. In this method DMSO functions as a solvent and a sulfide source as well as a stabilizer for the formation of the nanoparticles. The recipe is simple and economical making sulfide nanoparticles formed in this way readily available for many potential applications.

  15. Computer assisted modeling of ethyl sulfate pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Georg; Halter, Claudia C; Aderjan, Rolf; Auwaerter, Volker; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2010-01-30

    For 12 volunteers of a drinking experiment the concentration-time-courses of ethyl sulfate (EtS) and ethanol were simulated and fitted to the experimental data. The concentration-time-courses were described with the same mathematical model as previously used for ethyl glucuronide (EtG). The kinetic model based on the following assumptions and simplifications: a velocity constant k(form) for the first order formation of ethyl sulfate from ethanol and an exponential elimination constant k(el). The mean values (and standard deviations) obtained for k(form) and k(el) were 0.00052 h(-1) (0.00014) and 0.561 h(-1) (0.131), respectively. Using the ranges of these parameters it is possible to calculate minimum and maximum serum concentrations of EtS based on stated ethanol doses and drinking times. The comparison of calculated and measured concentrations can prove the plausibility of alleged ethanol consumption and add evidence to the retrospective calculation of ethanol concentrations based on EtG concentrations. PMID:19913378

  16. The binding of ethyl isocyanide to ferroperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Charles; Antonini, Eraldo; Brunori, Maurizio

    1972-01-01

    The equilibrium and kinetics of ethyl isocyanide binding to ferroperoxidase were studied. At pH9.1 the results of both studies are consistent with a single-process model with an affinity constant of 95m−1 and combination and dissociation constants of 2.2×103m−1·s−1 and 23s−1 respectively. Ethyl isocyanide is not bound significantly at pH values lower than 6.0, and in this behaviour and the pH-dependence of the affinity constant, similarities exist between isocyanide and cyanide binding. The enthalpy of the process measured by equilibrium methods is −59kJ/mol (−14kcal/mol). At pH values below 9, the ethyl isocyanide adduct changes in a slow time-dependent manner, giving rise to a new species. These changes are reversible on increasing the pH. The results are discussed in relation to other known information about ligand binding to ferroperoxidase and to myoglobin. PMID:5084796

  17. Response of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase to sulfide exposure in the echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Feng; Shao, Ming-Yu; Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Shi, Xiao-Li; Dong, Ying-Ping; Li, Jin-Long

    2012-04-01

    Sulfide is a natural, widely distributed, poisonous substance, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is responsible for the initial oxidation of sulfide in mitochondria. In this study, we examined the response of SQR to sulfide exposure (25, 50, and 150 μM) at mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels in the body wall and hindgut of the echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus, a benthic organism living in marine sediments. The results revealed SQR mRNA expression during sulfide exposure in the body wall and hindgut increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner that increased significantly at 12 h and continuously increased with time. At the protein level, SQR expression in the two tissues showed a time-dependent relationship that increased significantly at 12 h in 50 μM sulfide and 6 h in 150 μM, and then continued to increase with time while no significant increase appeared after 25 μM sulfide exposure. SQR enzyme activity in both tissues increased significantly in a time-dependent manner after 50 μM sulfide exposure. We concluded that SQR expression could be induced by sulfide exposure and that the two tissues studied have dissimilar sulfide metabolic patterns. A U. unicinctus sulfide-induced detoxification mechanism was also discussed. PMID:21997848

  18. Variation in Sulfide Tolerance of Photosystem II in Phylogenetically Diverse Cyanobacteria from Sulfidic Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological and molecular phylogenetic approaches were used to investigate variation among 12 cyanobacterial strains in their tolerance of sulfide, an inhibitor of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats were found to be phylogenetically diverse and exhibited an approximately 50-fold variation in photosystem II performance in the presence of sulfide. Whereas the degree of tolerance was positively correlated with sulfide levels in the environment, a strain's phenotype could not be predicted from the tolerance of its closest relatives. These observations suggest that sulfide tolerance is a dynamic trait primarily shaped by environmental variation. Despite differences in absolute tolerance, similarities among strains in the effects of sulfide on chlorophyll fluorescence induction indicated a common mode of toxicity. Based on similarities with treatments known to disrupt the oxygen-evolving complex, it was concluded that sulfide toxicity resulted from inhibition of the donor side of photosystem II. PMID:14766549

  19. Variation in sulfide tolerance of photosystem II in phylogenetically diverse cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological and molecular phylogenetic approaches were used to investigate variation among 12 cyanobacterial strains in their tolerance of sulfide, an inhibitor of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats were found to be phylogenetically diverse and exhibited an approximately 50-fold variation in photosystem II performance in the presence of sulfide. Whereas the degree of tolerance was positively correlated with sulfide levels in the environment, a strain's phenotype could not be predicted from the tolerance of its closest relatives. These observations suggest that sulfide tolerance is a dynamic trait primarily shaped by environmental variation. Despite differences in absolute tolerance, similarities among strains in the effects of sulfide on chlorophyll fluorescence induction indicated a common mode of toxicity. Based on similarities with treatments known to disrupt the oxygen-evolving complex, it was concluded that sulfide toxicity resulted from inhibition of the donor side of photosystem II.

  20. 40 CFR 721.3152 - Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates (salts). 721.3152 Section 721... Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates... ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3152 - Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates (salts). 721.3152 Section 721... Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates... ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

  2. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Fullerton; Ward, J.W.; Yorba, L.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  3. New biologically active hydrogen sulfide donors.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thomas; Raynaud, Francoise; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Ransy, Céline; Simonet, Serge; Crespo, Christine; Bourguignon, Marie-Pierre; Villeneuve, Nicole; Vilaine, Jean-Paul; Artaud, Isabelle; Galardon, Erwan

    2013-11-25

    Generous donors: The dithioperoxyanhydrides (CH3 COS)2 , (PhCOS)2 , CH3 COSSCO2 Me and PhCOSSCO2 Me act as thiol-activated hydrogen sulfide donors in aqueous buffer solution. The most efficient donor (CH3 COS)2 can induce a biological response in cells, and advantageously replace hydrogen sulfide in ex vivo vascular studies. PMID:24115650

  4. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain...

  5. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  6. Chemical and thermochemical aspects of the ozonolysis of ethyl oleate: decomposition enthalpy of ethyl oleate ozonide.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Neat ethyl oleate was ozonized in a bubble reactor and the progress of the ozonolysis was followed by infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The ozonolysis was conducted till a molar ratio O3/C=C≈1 when the exothermal reaction spontaneously went to completion. A specific thermochemical calculation on ethyl oleate ozonation has been made to determine the theoretical heat of the ozonization reaction using the group increment approach. A linear relationship was found both in the integrated absorptivity of the ozonide infrared band at 1110 cm(-1) and the ozonolysis time as well as the thermal decomposition enthalpy of the ozonides and peroxides formed as a result of the ozonation. The DSC decomposition temperature of ozonated ethyl oleate occurs with an exothermal peak at about 150-155 °C with a decomposition enthalpy of 243.0 kJ/mol at molar ratio O3/C=C≈1. It is shown that the decomposition enthalpy of ozonized ethyl oleate is a constant value (≈243 kJ/mol) at any stage of the O3/C=C once an adequate normalization of the decomposition enthalpy for the amount of the adsorbed ozone is taken into consideration. The decomposition enthalpy of ozonized ethyl oleate was also calculated using a simplified thermochemical model, obtaining a result in reasonable agreement with the experimental value. PMID:23969233

  7. Weathering of sulfides on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produce degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy and terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni, and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato-and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossan above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite), and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates, and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  8. Percutaneous absorption of selenium sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, J.; Skelly, E.M.; Weber, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine selenium levels in the urine of Tinea patients before and after overnight application of a 2.5% selenium sulfide lotion. Selenium was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Hydride generation and carbon rod atomization were studied. It was concluded from this study that selenium is absorbed through intact skin. Selenium is then excreted, at least partially, in urine, for at least a week following treatment. The data show that absorption and excretion of selenium vary on an individual basis. Selenium levels in urine following a single application of selenium sulfide lotion do not indicate that toxic amounts of selenium are being absorbed. Repeated treatments with SeS/sub 2/ result in selenium concentrations in urine which are significantly higher than normal. Significant matrix effects are observed in the carbon rod atomization of urine samples for selenium determinations, even in the presence of a matrix modifier such as nickel. The method of standard additions is required to obtain accurate results in the direct determination of selenium in urine by carbon rod AAS.

  9. Characterization of low dimensional molybdenum sulfide nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho-Bragado, G. Alejandra; Elechiguerra, Jose Luis; Yacaman, Miguel Jose

    2008-03-15

    It is presented a detailed structural characterization of a nanostructured form of molybdenum disulfide. The material consists of a layer of highly textured molybdenum sulfide growing off a molybdenum dioxide core. The structure and chemical composition of the synthesized nanostructured sulfide was compared to two well-known forms of molybdenum disulfide, i.e. a commercial molybdenite sample and a poorly crystalline sulfide. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction showed that the material reported here presents crystalline nanodomains with a crystal structure corresponding to the 2H polytype of molybdenum disulfide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to demonstrate the differences between our sulfide and other materials such as amorphous MoS{sub 3}, oxysulfides and poorly crystalline MoS{sub 2}, corroborating the molybdenite-2H stacking in this form of sulfide. The material under study showed a high proportion of crystalline planes different from the basal plane.

  10. Synthesis of magnetic rhenium sulfide composite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Naimei; Tu, Weixia

    2009-10-01

    Rhenium sulfide nanoparticles are associated with magnetic iron oxide through coprecipitation of iron salts with tetramethylammonium hydroxide. Sizes of the formed magnetic rhenium sulfide composite particles are in the range 5.5-12.5 nm. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays spectra demonstrate the coexistence of Fe 3O 4 and ReS 2 in the composite particle, which confirm the formation of the magnetic rhenium sulfide composite nanoparticles. The association of rhenium sulfide with iron oxide not only keeps electronic state and composition of the rhenium sulfide nanoparticles, but also introduces magnetism with the level of 24.1 emu g -1 at 14 kOe. Surface modification with monocarboxyl-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG-COOH) has the role of deaggregating the composite nanoparticles to be with average hydrodynamic size of 27.3 nm and improving the dispersion and the stability of the composite nanoparticles in water.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide pollution in wastewater treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect

    AlDhowalia, K.H. )

    1987-01-01

    The hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) found in wastewater collection systems and wastewater treatment facilities results from the bacterial reduction of the sulfate ion (SO{sub 4}). Hydrogen sulfide is a gas that occurs both in the sewer atmosphere and as a dissolved gas in the wastewater. When raw wastewater first enters the wastewater treatment facility by gravity most of the hydrogen sulfide is in the gaseous phase and will escape into the atmosphere at the inlet structures. Also some of the dissolved hydrogen sulfide will be released at points of turbulance such as at drops in flow, flumes, or aeration chambers. Several factors can cause excessive hydrogen sulfide concentrations in a sewerage system. These include septic sewage, long flow times in the sewerage system, high temperatures, flat sewer grades, and poor ventilation. These factors are discussed in this paper.

  12. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  13. Primordial Xenon in Allende Sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. T.; Manuel, O. K.

    1995-09-01

    The Allende C3V carbonaceous chondrite incorporated isotopically anomalous components of several medium-heavy elements (Z=36-62) from nucleosynthesis [1]. Isotopically distinct Xe (Z=54) has been found in grains ranging from several _ to a few mm in size. Diamond [2] is the host of Xe that is enriched in isotopes produced by the very rapid p- and r-processes in a supernova explosion [3]. Silicon carbide [4] is the host of Xe that is enriched in the middle isotopes, 128-132Xe, produced by slow neutron capture [3] before a star reaches the supernova stage. The present study was undertaken to identify the isotopic composition of primitive Xe initially trapped in sulfides of the Allende meteorite. Two FeS mineral separates were analyzed by stepwise heating. One sample was first irradiated in a neutron flux to generate a tracer isotope, 131*Xe, by the 130Te(n, gamma beta-)131*Xe reaction. The release pattern of this tracer isotope, 131*Xe, closely paralleled the release of primordial 132Xe up to 950 degrees C, when the sulfide melted and released the bulk of its trapped Xe (Figure 1). The Xe released from both samples at 950 deg C was terrestrial in isotopic composition, except for enrichments from spallogenic and radiogenic components (Figure 2). From the results of this and earlier analyses of Xe in meteoritic FeS [5, 6, 7], we conclude that terrestrial-type Xe was dominant in the central region of the protoplanetary nebula, and it remains a major component in the FeS of diverse meteorites and in the terrestrial planets that are rich in Fe, S [8]. References: [1] Begemann F. (1993) Origin and Evolution of the Elements (N. Prantzos et al., eds.), 518-527, Cambridge Univ. [2] Lewis R. S. and Anders E. (1988) LPS XIX, 679-680. [3] Burbidge et al. (1957) Rev. Modern Phys., 29, 547-650. [4] Tang M. and Anders E. (1988) GCA, 52, 1235-1244. [5] Niemeyer S. (1979) GCA, 43, 843-860. [6] Lewis et al. (1979) GCA, 43, 1743-1752. [7] Hwaung G. and Manuel O. K. (1982) Nature, 299

  14. Mantle derived economic sulfide mineralization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutskaya, Nadezda; Gongalskiy, Bronislav; Svirskaya, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Sulfide ores of the unique Pt-Cu-Ni Noril'sk deposits are characterized by heavy sulfur isotopic composition (d34S = 6-18 ‰ ; Grinenko, 1985). These data are traditionally explained by the crustal contamination of the mantle melts by Devonian sedimentary rocks with anhydrites at certain depths or in a chamber of crystallization (Naldrett, 1992; Li et al., 2009). However, data on the distribution of major and trace elements and isotopic composition (their eNd, 87Sr/86Sr, d34S) in the contact zones of the intrusions with the host rocks are at variance with any significant in-situ contamination. Moreover , the mechanism of the "digestion" of this high-temperature material (Tm = 1430ºC) by the lower temperature magma (1250ºC) has never been analyzed and questioned. Our pioneering data on the sulfur radiogenic isotopes in the anhydrite are in conflict with the hypothesis that this mineral could serve as a sulfur source for the Noril'sk ores. The fact that the average composition of the intrusions is independent on the stratigraphic setting of these intrusions, which can be hosted by limestone, sandstone, and/or basalt, provides further support for the idea that no assimilation took place at the depths of the chambers in which the melts crystallized.The reason for the heavy sulfur isotopic composition of ores in the Noril'sk district is still uncertain. Last data obtained on the sulfur isotopic composition of basalts and ores from some intrusions in the Taimyr Peninsula likely provide a clue to this problem. The highest d34S values in rocks of all of the trap formations were detected in the Gudchikhinsky picrites (d34S = +8,7; Ripley et al., 2003) formed from a primitive mantle magma. They are geochemically similar to the rocks from the Dyumtaleysky Massif (d34S = 12.2; Krivolutskaya and Gongalsky, 2013) which crystallized from a primitive mantle-derived magma (with no Ta-Nb and Pb anomalies and high Gd/Yb ratio) too. This intrusion comprises economic important

  15. Structural studies in limestone sulfidation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenouil, L.A.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    This study investigates the sulfidation of limestone at high temperatures (700--900{degree}C) as the first step in the design of a High-Temperature Coal-Gas Clean-Up system using millimeter-size limestone particles. Several workers have found that the rate of this reaction significantly decreases after an initial 10 to 15% conversion of CaCO{sub 3} to CaS. The present work attempts to explain this feature. It is first established that millimeter-size limestone particles do not sinter at temperatures up to the CaCO{sub 3} calcination point (899{degree}C at 1.03 bar CO{sub 2} partial pressure). It is then shown that CaS sinters rapidly at 750 to 900{degree}C if CO{sub 2} is present in the gas phase. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) data reveal that the CaS product layer sinters and forms a quasi-impermeable coating around the CaCO{sub 3} grains that greatly hinders more H{sub 2}S from reaching the still unreacted parts of the stone. Moreover, most of the pores initially present within the limestone structure begin to disappear or, at least, are significantly reduced in size. From then on, subsequent conversion is limited by diffusion of H{sub 2}S through the CaS layer, possibly by S{sup 2{minus}} ionic diffusion. The kinetics is then adequately described by a shrinking-core model, in which a sharp front of completely converted limestone is assumed to progress toward the center of the pellet. Finally, experimental evidence and computer simulations using simple sintering models suggest that the CaS sintering, responsible for the sharp decrease in the sulfidation rate, is surface-diffusion controlled.

  16. REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF SULFIDE FROM TANNERY WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recovery of sulfide from tannery waste was accomplished through acidification with sulfuric acid in a closed system and removing hydrogen sulfide formed by blowing with air. Sulfide was then absorbed in caustic solution to produce re-usable sodium sulfide/sulfhydrate liquor for t...

  17. Optimization of ethyl ester production assisted by ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Noipin, K; Kumar, S

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the optimization of the continuous flow potassium hydroxide-catalyzed synthesis of ethyl ester from palm oil with ultrasonic assistance. The process was optimized by application of factorial design and response surface methodology. The independent variables considered were ethanol to oil molar ratio, catalyst concentration, reaction temperature and ultrasonic amplitude; and the response was ethyl ester yield. The results show that ethanol to oil molar ratio, catalyst concentration, and ultrasonic amplitude have positive effect on ethyl ester yield, whereas reaction temperature has negative influence on ethyl ester yield. Second-order models were developed to predict the responses analyzed as a function of these three variables, and the developed models predicts the results in the experimental ranges studied adequately. This study shows that ultrasonic irradiation improved the ethyl ester production process to achieve ethyl ester yields above 92%. PMID:25116594

  18. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  19. Nanostructured lead sulfide: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of recent studies dealing with nanostructured lead sulfide are summarized and analyzed. The key methods for the synthesis of nanostructured lead sulfide are described. The crystal structure of PbS in nanopowders and nanofilms is discussed. The influence of the size of nanostructure elements on the optical and thermal properties of lead sulfide is considered. The dependence of the band gap of PbS on the nanoparticle (crystallite) size for powders and films is illustrated. The bibliography includes 222 references.

  20. Removal of methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, T.; Mikami, E.

    1989-03-01

    Methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide were efficiently removed from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m and oxidized to sulfate stoichiometrically. More than 99.99% of dimethyl sulfide was removed when the load was less than 4.0 g of dimethyl sulfide per g (dry cell weight) per day.

  1. Quenching and radical formation in the reaction of photoexcited benzophenone with thiols and thioethers (sulfides). Nanosecond flash studies

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Laser flash measurements have been made of rate constants and primary radical yields in the reactions of triplet benzophenone with aliphatic and aromatic thiols and with dialkyl and aryl alkyl sulfides. Reaction with n-pentylthiol in benzene leads mainly to quenching, with k/sub ir/ = 9 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and radical yield (ketyl) = 0.14; with mesitylene-2 thiol in benzene k/sub ir/ = 7 x 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and hydrogen transfer is efficient, radical yield (ketyl) approx. 1.0. In reactions with both p-chlorophenyl ethyl and diisopropyl sulfides, k/sub ir/ increases and radical yield (ketyl) decreases with increasing solvent polarity. Values of k/sub ir/ are higher and those of radical yield (ketyl) are lower for the dialkyl than for the aryl alkyl sulfide. Results are discussed in terms of rapid interaction of the triplet with S, followed by quenching and/or hydrogen transfer. Quenching without hydrogen transfer occurs to a much greater extent with sulfides and aliphatic thiols than with amines.

  2. Formation of Copper Sulfide Artifacts During Electrolytic Dissolution of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jia; Pistorius, P. Chris

    2013-06-01

    Based on equilibrium considerations, copper sulfide is not expected to form in manganese-containing steel, yet previous workers reported finding copper sulfide in transmission electron microscope samples which had been prepared by electropolishing. It is proposed that copper sulfide can form during electrolytic dissolution because of the much greater stability of copper sulfide relative to manganese sulfide in contact with an electrolyte containing copper and manganese cations. This mechanism has been demonstrated with aluminum-killed steel samples.

  3. Testing for ethanol markers in hair: discrepancies after simultaneous quantification of ethyl glucuronide and fatty acid ethyl esters.

    PubMed

    Kintz, P; Nicholson, D

    2014-10-01

    The hair of 97 cases were analysed for ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE, including ethyl myristate, ethyl palmitate, ethyl oleate and ethyl stearate) according to the Society of Hair Testing guidelines to examine the role of both tests in documenting chronic excessive alcohol drinking, particularly when the results are in contradiction. 27 (27.8%) results were EtG negative and FAEE positive, when applying the SoHT cut-offs, probably due to the use of alcohol-containing hair products. Four cases (4.1%) were EtG positive and FAEE negative that were attributed to the use of herbal lotions containing EtG. PMID:24794020

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF BIS(2-CHLOROETHYL) ETHER HYDROLYSIS PRODUCTS BY DIRECT AQUEOUS INJECTION GC/FT-IR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatography coupled to Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (GC/FT-IR) is rapidly becoming an accepted analytical technique complementary to GC/mass spectroscopy for identifying organic compounds in mixtures at low to moderate concentrations. irect aqueous injection (DA...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10688 - Copper, chloro[tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphite-.kappa.P]-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Copper, chloro -. 721.10688 Section... Substances § 721.10688 Copper, chloro -. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper, chloro - (PMN P-13-221; CAS No. 24484-01-3)...

  6. Ridding Groundwater of Hydrogen Sulfide. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochrane, Thomas G.

    1979-01-01

    This article is the first in a series reviewing the problems associated with hydrogen sulfide in drinking water sources. Discussion centers on identification of a cost-effective balance between aeration and chlorination treatment operations. (AS)

  7. Upper critical field of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The upper critical field of sintered and sputtered copper molybdenum sulfide Cu(x)Mo6S8 was measured and found to exceed the Werthamer, Helfand, and Hohenberg (1966) value for a type II superconductor characterized by dirty limit, weak isotropic electron phonon coupling, and no paramagnetic limiting. It is suggested that the enhancement results from anisotropy or clean limit or both. Other ternary molybdenum sulfides appear to show similar anomalies.

  8. Effect of Nitrate on Biogenic Sulfide Production

    PubMed Central

    Jenneman, Gary E.; McInerney, M. J.; Knapp, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    The addition of 59 mM nitrate inhibited biogenic sulfide production in dilute sewage sludge (10% [vol/vol]) amended with 20 mM sulfate and either acetate, glucose, or hydrogen as electron donors. Similar results were found when pond sediment or oil field brines served as the inoculum. Sulfide production was inhibited for periods of at least 6 months and was accompanied by the oxidation of resazurin from its colorless reduced state to its pink oxidized state. Lower amounts of nitrate (6 or 20 mM) and increased amounts of sewage sludge resulted in only transient inhibition of sulfide production. The addition of 156 mM sulfate to bottles with 59 mM nitrate and 10% (vol/vol) sewage sludge or pond sediment resulted in sulfide production. Nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide were detected during periods where sulfide production was inhibited, whereas nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide were below detectable levels at the time sulfide production began. The oxidation of resazurin was attributed to an increase in nitrous oxide which persisted in concentration of about 1.0 mM for up to 5 months. The numbers of sulfate-reducing organisms decreased from 106 CFU ml−1 sludge to less than detectable levels after prolonged incubation of oxidized bottles. The addition of 10 mM glucose to oxidized bottles after 14.5 weeks of incubation resulted in rereduction of the resazurin and subsequent sulfide production. The prolonged inhibition of sulfide production was attributed to an increase in oxidation-reduction potential due to biogenic production of nitrous oxide, which appeared to have a cytotoxic effect on sulfate-reducing populations. PMID:16347078

  9. The Search for Interstellar Sulfide Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Messenger, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The lifecycle of sulfur in the galaxy is poorly understood. Fe-sulfide grains are abundant in early solar system materials (e.g. meteorites and comets) and S is highly depleted from the gas phase in cold, dense molecular cloud environments. In stark contrast, sulfur is essentially undepleted from the gas phase in the diffuse interstellar medium, indicating that little sulfur is incorporated into solid grains in this environment. It is widely believed that sulfur is not a component of interstellar dust grains. This is a rather puzzling observation unless Fe-sulfides are not produced in significant quantities in stellar outflows, or their lifetime in the ISM is very short due to rapid destruction. Fe sulfide grains are ubiquitous in cometary samples where they are the dominant host of sulfur. The Fe-sulfides (primarily pyrrhotite; Fe(1-x)S) are common, both as discrete 0.5-10 micron-sized grains and as fine (5-10 nm) nanophase inclusions within amorphous silicate grains. Cometary dust particles contain high abundances of well-preserved presolar silicates and organic matter and we have suggested that they should contain presolar sulfides as well. This hypothesis is supported by the observation of abundant Fe-sulfides grains in dust around pre- and post-main sequence stars inferred from astronomical spectra showing a broad 23 micron IR feature due to FeS. Fe-sulfide grains also occur as inclusions in bona fide circumstellar amorphous silicate grains and as inclusions within deuterium-rich organic matter in cometary dust samples. Our irradiation experiments show that FeS is far more resistant to radiation damage than silicates. Consequently, we expect that Fe sulfide stardust should be as abundant as silicate stardust in solar system materials.

  10. Catalytic dehydroxylation of phenols. [Metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Pieters, W.J.M.

    1984-05-29

    Phenolic compounds are dehydroxylated in the vapor phase by contacting with a reducing atmosphere substantially comprising hydrogen sulfide as the reducing agent in the presence of a sulfur-tolerant metal sulfide catalyst. The additional presence of hydrogen gas helps to desulfurize the catalyst and maintain catalytic activity. The process is useful in the treatment of phenolic naphtha fractions present in coal liquids, produced by pyrolysis or direct coal liquefaction.

  11. Microbiological Leaching of Metallic Sulfides

    PubMed Central

    Razzell, W. E.; Trussell, P. C.

    1963-01-01

    The percentage of chalcopyrite leached in percolators by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was dependent on the surface area of the ore but not on the amount. Typical examples of ore leaching, which demonstrate the role of the bacteria, are presented. In stationary fermentations, changes in KH2PO4 concentration above or below 0.1% decreased copper leaching as did reduction in the MgSO4·7H2O and increase in the (NH4)2SO4 concentration. Bacterial leaching of chalcopyrite was more effective than nonbiological leaching with ferric sulfate; ferric sulfate appeared to retard biological leaching, but this effect was likely caused by formation of an insoluble copper-iron complex. Ferrous sulfate and sodium chloride singly accentuated both bacterial and nonbiological leaching of chalcocite but jointly depressed bacterial action. Sodium chloride appeared to block bacterial iron oxidation without interfering with sulfide oxidation. Bacterial leaching of millerite, bornite, and chalcocite was greatest at pH 2.5. The economics of leaching a number of British Columbia ore bodies was discussed. PMID:16349627

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide as a Gasotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are well established as messenger molecules throughout the body, gasotransmitters, based on striking alterations in mice lacking the appropriate biosynthetic enzymes. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is even more chemically reactive, but till recently there was little definitive evidence for its physiologic formation. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22), and Cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE; EC 4.4.1.1), also known as cytathionase, can generate H2S from cyst(e)ine. Very recent studies with mice lacking these enzymes have established that CSE is responsible for H2S formation in the periphery, while in the brain CBS is the biosynthetic enzyme. Endothelial-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) activity is reduced 80% in the mesenteric artery of mice with deletion of CSE, establishing H2S as a major physiologic EDRF. H2S appears to signal predominantly by S-sulfhydrating cysteines in its target proteins, analogous to S-nitrosylation by NO. Whereas S-nitrosylation typically inhibits enzymes, S-sulfhydration activates them. S-nitrosylation basally affects 1–2% of its target proteins, while 10–25% of H2S target proteins are S-sulfhydrated. In summary, H2S appears to be a physiologic gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO. PMID:20067586

  13. Hydrogen sulfide and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Ze-yu; Zhu, Yi-zhun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule that has undergone large numbers of fundamental investigations. H2S is involved in various physiological activities associated with the regulation of homeostasis, vascular contractility, pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as pro- and anti-apoptotic activities etc. However, the actions of H2S are influenced by its concentration, reaction time, and cell/disease types. Therefore, H2S is a signaling molecule without definite effect. The use of existing H2S donors is limited because of the instant release and short lifetime of H2S. Thus, translational medicine involving the sustained and controlled release of H2S is of great value for both scientific and clinical uses. H2S donation can be manipulated by different ways, including where H2S is given, how H2S is donated, or the specific structures of H2S-releasing drugs and H2S donor molecules. This review briefly summarizes recent progress in research on the physiological and pathological functions of H2S and H2S-releasing drugs, and suggests hope for future investigations. PMID:24096643

  14. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL ETHYL KETONE (2003 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing the release of the final report, "Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)". The updated Summary for Methyl Ethyl Ketone and accompanying Quickview have also been added to the IRIS Database.

  15. 46 CFR 151.50-42 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ethyl ether. 151.50-42 Section 151.50-42 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-42 Ethyl ether. (a)(1) Gravity...

  16. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from ethyl cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Bruze, M; Björkner, B; Lepoittevin, J P

    1995-03-01

    Glues based on cyanoacrylates are widely used as contact adhesives for metal, glass, rubber, plastics and textiles, as well for biological materials, including binding tissues and sealing wounds in surgery. In this paper, an apprentice cobbler with an occupational allergic contact dermatitis from an ethyl cyanoacrylate glue, in which the major monomer was shown to be the sensitizer, is reported. Initial patch testing with the cyanoacrylate glue dissolved in acetone with the Finn Chamber (aluminium) technique yielded false-negative reactions. Positive test reactions were obtained with the same preparations using Van der Bend chambers. With petrolatum as vehicle for the glue, there was no difference between Finn Chamber technique and Van der Bend chamber technique. The role of aluminium in the false-negative reactions is discussed. PMID:7774187

  17. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Villa-Gomez, D K; Cassidy, J; Keesman, K J; Sampaio, R; Lens, P N L

    2014-03-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4(2-) ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing bioreactors. The sulfide was measured using a sulfide ion selective electrode (pS) and the values obtained were used to calculate proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller parameters. The experiments were performed in an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with automated operation using the LabVIEW software version 2009(®). A rapid response and high sulfide increment was obtained through a stepwise increase in the CODin concentration, while a stepwise decrease to the HRT exhibited a slower response with smaller sulfide increment. Irrespective of the way the OLR was decreased, the pS response showed a time-varying behavior due to sulfide accumulation (HRT change) or utilization of substrate sources that were not accounted for (CODin change). The pS electrode response, however, showed to be informative for applications in sulfate reducing bioreactors. Nevertheless, the recorded pS values need to be corrected for pH variations and high sulfide concentrations (>200 mg/L). PMID:24361702

  18. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  19. A morphogenetic regulatory role for ethyl alcohol in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nitin M; Raut, Jayant S; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-11-01

    Regulation of morphogenesis through the production of chemical signalling molecules such as isoamyl alcohol, 2-phenylethyl alcohol, 1-dodecanol, E-nerolidol and farnesol is reported in Candida albicans. The present study focuses on the effect of ethyl alcohol on C. albicans dimorphism and biofilm development. Ethyl alcohol inhibited germ tube formation induced by the four standard inducers in a concentration-dependent manner. The germ tube inhibitory concentration (4%) did not have any effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans cells. Ethyl alcohol also inhibited the elongation of germ tubes. Four percentage of ethyl alcohol significantly inhibited biofilm development on polystyrene and silicone surfaces. We suggest a potential morphogenetic regulatory role for ethyl alcohol, which may influence dissemination, virulence and establishment of infection. PMID:21605190

  20. Fragmentation dynamics of the ethyl bromide and ethyl iodide cations: a velocity-map imaging study.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Sara H; Karsili, Tolga N V; Lipciuc, M Laura; Wilman, Edward; Ashfold, Michael N R; Vallance, Claire

    2014-02-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of ethyl bromide and ethyl iodide cations (C2H5Br(+) and C2H5I(+)) have been studied. Ethyl halide cations were formed through vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of the respective neutral parent molecules at 118.2 nm, and were photolysed at a number of ultraviolet (UV) photolysis wavelengths, including 355 nm and wavelengths in the range from 236 to 266 nm. Time-of-flight mass spectra and velocity-map images have been acquired for all fragment ions and for ground (Br) and spin-orbit excited (Br*) bromine atom products, allowing multiple fragmentation pathways to be investigated. The experimental studies are complemented by spin-orbit resolved ab initio calculations of cuts through the potential energy surfaces (along the RC-Br/I stretch coordinate) for the ground and first few excited states of the respective cations. Analysis of the velocity-map images indicates that photoexcited C2H5Br(+) cations undergo prompt C-Br bond fission to form predominantly C2H5(+) + Br* products with a near-limiting 'parallel' recoil velocity distribution. The observed C2H3(+) + H2 + Br product channel is thought to arise via unimolecular decay of highly internally excited C2H5(+) products formed following radiationless transfer from the initial excited state populated by photon absorption. Broadly similar behaviour is observed in the case of C2H5I(+), along with an additional energetically accessible C-I bond fission channel to form C2H5 + I(+) products. HX (X = Br, I) elimination from the highly internally excited C2H5X(+) cation is deemed the most probable route to forming the C2H4(+) fragment ions observed from both cations. Finally, both ethyl halide cations also show evidence of a minor C-C bond fission process to form CH2X(+) + CH3 products. PMID:24317740

  1. Mechanistic insight into alkylation of the ethyl acetoacetate anion with different ethyl halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, S.; Đurđević, J.; Vukosavljević, M.; Petrović, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The alkylation reactions of the ambident ethyl acetoacetate anion with C2H5X (X = F, Cl, Br, and I) in the O2, C3, and O4 positions of the anion were investigated at the B3LYP/6-311+G( d,p) level of theory. It was found that the ethylation reaction does not occur in the position O4, as well as with ethyl fluoride in any position of the anion, due to very high activation energies and thermodynamic instability of the hypothetic products. The activation energies for the reactions in the position O2 are lower in comparison to the position C3, but the products of the reactions in the C3 position are more stable than those in the position O4, implying that the C/O products ratio is controlled by both thermodynamic and kinetic factors, leading to the O2-product with the chloride, and C3-product with the iodide as leaving group.

  2. Continuous measurement of dissolved sulfide in sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Sutherland-Stacey, L; Corrie, S; Neethling, A; Johnson, I; Gutierrez, O; Dexter, R; Yuan, Z; Keller, J; Hamilton, G

    2008-01-01

    Sulfides are particularly problematic in the sewage industry. Hydrogen sulfide causes corrosion of concrete infrastructure, is dangerous at high concentrations and is foul smelling at low concentrations. Despite the importance of sulfide monitoring there is no commercially available system to quantify sulfide in waste water. In this article we report on our use of an in situ spectrometer to quantify bisulfide in waste water and additional analysis with a pH probe to calculate total dissolved sulfide. Our results show it is possible to use existing commercially available and field proven sensors to measure sulfide to mg/l levels continuously with little operator intervention and no sample preparation. PMID:18309215

  3. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, Dean H.; Nelson, Art J.; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    1996-01-01

    A process for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness.

  4. Animal adaptations for tolerance and exploitation of poisonous sulfide.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber, M K; Völkel, S

    1998-01-01

    Many aquatic animal species can survive sulfide exposure to some extent through oxidation of the sulfide, which results mainly in thiosulfate. In several species, sulfide oxidation is localized in the mitochondria and is accompanied by ATP synthesis. In addition, blood-based and intracellular compounds can augment sulfide oxidation. The formation of thiosulfate requires oxygen, which results in an increase in oxygen consumption of some species. If not all sulfide is detoxified, cytochrome C oxidase is inhibited. Under these conditions, a sulfide-dependent anaerobic energy metabolism commences. PMID:9558453

  5. Antifibrinolytic Mechanisms in Acute Airway Injury after Sulfur Mustard Analog Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aftab; Veress, Livia A.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury in response to mustard gas (sulfur mustard [SM]) inhalation results in formation of fibrin casts, which obstruct the airway. The objective of this study was to identify fibrinolytic pathways that could be contributing to the persistence of airway casts after SM exposure. Rats were exposed to the SM analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, via nose-only aerosol inhalation. At 4 and 18 hours after exposure, animals were killed and airway–capillary leak estimated by measuring bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein and IgM content. The fibrin clot–degrading and plasminogen-activating capabilities of BALF were also assessed by activity assays, whereas Western blotting was used to determine the presence and activities of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, thrombin activatable fibrinolytic inhibitor and α2-antiplasmin. Measurement of tissue-specific steady-state mRNA levels was also conducted for each fibrinolytic inhibitor to assess whether its synthesis occurs in lung or at extrapulmonary sites. The results of this study demonstrate that fibrin-degrading and plasminogen-activating capabilities of the airways become impaired during the onset of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide–induced vascular leak. Findings of functionally active reservoirs of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, and α2-antiplasmin in BALF indicate that airway fibrinolysis is inhibited at multiple levels in response to SM. PMID:24796565

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  7. Stratospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) burden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloss, Corinna; Walker, Kaley A.; Deshler, Terry; von Hobe, Marc

    2015-04-01

    An estimation of the global stratospheric burden of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) calculated using satellite based measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) will be presented. OCS is the most abundant sulfur containing gas in the atmosphere in the absence of volcanic eruptions. With a long lifetime of 2-6 years it reaches the stratosphere where it is photolyzed and the sulfur oxidized and condensed to aerosols, contributing to the stratospheric aerosol layer. The aerosol layer is the one factor of the middle-atmosphere with a direct impact on the Earth's climate by scattering incoming solar radiation back to space. Therefore it is crucial to understand and estimate the different processes and abundances of the species contributing to the aerosol layer. However, the exact amount of OCS in the stratosphere has not been quantified yet. A study on the OCS mixing ratio distribution based on ACE-FTS data has already been made by Barkley et al. (2008), also giving an estimation for the total atmospheric OCS mass. ACE-FTS is an infrared solar occultation spectrometer providing high- resolution profile observations since 2004. In the scope of this work the focus lies on the stratospheric OCS burden, calculated by integrating the ACE profiles. A global overview on the stratospheric OCS amount in the past and present based on the ACE data as well as a look at regional and seasonal variability will be given. Furthermore, the results of this work will be useful for further studies on OCS fluxes and lifetimes, and in quantifying the contribution of OCS to the global stratospheric sulfur burden. Barkley et al., 2008, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L14810.

  8. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  9. Perspectives for the biotechnological production of ethyl acetate by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Löser, Christian; Urit, Thanet; Bley, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Ethyl acetate is an environmentally friendly solvent with many industrial applications. The production of ethyl acetate currently proceeds by energy-intensive petrochemical processes which are based on natural gas and crude oil without exception. Microbial synthesis of ethyl acetate could become an interesting alternative. The formation of esters as aroma compounds in food has been repeatedly reviewed, but a survey which deals with microbial synthesis of ethyl acetate as a bulk product is missing. The ability of yeasts for producing larger amounts of this ester is known for a long time. In the past, this potential was mainly of scientific interest, but in the future, it could be applied to large-scale ester production from renewable raw materials. Pichia anomala, Candida utilis, and Kluyveromyces marxianus are yeasts which convert sugar into ethyl acetate with a high yield where the latter is the most promising one. Special attention was paid to the mechanism of ester synthesis including regulatory aspects and to the maximum and expectable yield. Synthesis of much ethyl acetate requires oxygen which is usually supplied by aeration. Ethyl acetate is highly volatile so that aeration results in its phase transfer and stripping. This stripping process cannot be avoided but requires adequate handling during experimentation and offers a chance for a cost-efficient process-integrated recovery of the synthesized ester. PMID:24788328

  10. Uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres for superior sodium-iron sulfide batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Xiao; Yang, Jianping; Chou, Shu-Lei; Liu, Hua Kun; Zhang, Wei-Xian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Dou, Shi Xue

    2015-01-01

    Sodium-metal sulfide battery holds great promise for sustainable and cost-effective applications. Nevertheless, achieving high capacity and cycling stability remains a great challenge. Here, uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres have been synthesized as cathode materials for the emerging sodium sulfide battery to achieve remarkable capacity of ∼ 545 mA h g(-1) over 100 cycles at 0.2 C (100 mA g(-1)), delivering ultrahigh energy density of ∼ 438 Wh kg(-1). The proven conversion reaction between sodium and iron sulfide results in high capacity but severe volume changes. Nanostructural design, including of nanosized iron sulfide yolks (∼ 170 nm) with porous carbon shells (∼ 30 nm) and extra void space (∼ 20 nm) in between, has been used to achieve excellent cycling performance without sacrificing capacity. This sustainable sodium-iron sulfide battery is a promising candidate for stationary energy storage. Furthermore, this spatially confined sulfuration strategy offers a general method for other yolk-shell metal sulfide-carbon composites. PMID:26507613

  11. Uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres for superior sodium-iron sulfide batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Xiao; Yang, Jianping; Chou, Shu-Lei; Liu, Hua Kun; Zhang, Wei-Xian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Dou, Shi Xue

    2015-10-01

    Sodium-metal sulfide battery holds great promise for sustainable and cost-effective applications. Nevertheless, achieving high capacity and cycling stability remains a great challenge. Here, uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide-carbon nanospheres have been synthesized as cathode materials for the emerging sodium sulfide battery to achieve remarkable capacity of ~545 mA h g-1 over 100 cycles at 0.2 C (100 mA g-1), delivering ultrahigh energy density of ~438 Wh kg-1. The proven conversion reaction between sodium and iron sulfide results in high capacity but severe volume changes. Nanostructural design, including of nanosized iron sulfide yolks (~170 nm) with porous carbon shells (~30 nm) and extra void space (~20 nm) in between, has been used to achieve excellent cycling performance without sacrificing capacity. This sustainable sodium-iron sulfide battery is a promising candidate for stationary energy storage. Furthermore, this spatially confined sulfuration strategy offers a general method for other yolk-shell metal sulfide-carbon composites.

  12. Ethyl pyruvate protects colonic anastomosis from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Unal, B; Karabeyoglu, M; Huner, T; Canbay, E; Eroglu, A; Yildirim, O; Dolapci, M; Bilgihan, A; Cengiz, O

    2009-03-01

    Ethyl pyruvate is a simple derivative in Ca(+2)- and K(+)-containing balanced salt solution of pyruvate to avoid the problems associated with the instability of pyruvate in solution. It has been shown to ameliorate the effects of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in many organs. It has also been shown that I/R injury delays the healing of colonic anastomosis. In this study, the effect of ethyl pyruvate on the healing of colon anastomosis and anastomotic strength after I/R injury was investigated. Anastomosis of the colon was performed in 32 adult male Wistar albino rats divided into 4 groups of 8 individuals: (1) sham-operated control group (group 1); (2) 30 minutes of intestinal I/R by superior mesenteric artery occlusion (group 2); (3) I/R+ ethyl pyruvate (group 3), ethyl pyruvate was administered as a 50-mg/kg/d single dose; and (4) I/R+ ethyl pyruvate (group 4), ethyl pyruvate administration was repeatedly (every 6 hours) at the same dose (50 mg/kg). On the fifth postoperative day, animals were killed. Perianastomotic tissue hydroxyproline contents and anastomotic bursting pressures were measured in all groups. When the anastomotic bursting pressures and tissue hydroxyproline contents were compared, it was found that they were decreased in group 2 when compared with groups 1, 3, and 4 (P < .05). Both anastomotic bursting pressure (P = .005) and hydroxyproline content (P < .001) levels were found to be significantly increased with ethyl pyruvate administration when compared with group 2. When ethyl pyruvate administration doses were compared, a significant difference was not observed (P > .05). Ethyl pyruvate significantly prevents the delaying effect of I/R injury on anastomotic strength and healing independent from doses of administration. PMID:19064591

  13. Labile sulfide and sulfite in phytochelatin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Eannetta, N.T.; Steffens, J.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium induce tomato cell cultures to synthesize the metal binding polypeptides ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 3} and ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 4}-Gly (phytochelatins). Tomato cells selected for growth on normally lethal concentrations of CdCl{sub 2} synthesize higher quantities of these polypeptides. Cd{sup r} cells are not cross-resistant to other heavy metals, and recent work suggests that metal detoxification by these peptides may be Cd-specific. The occurrence of labile sulfur as a component of the metal complex raises questions concerning possible functions of phytochelatins besides that of Cd binding. The presence of acid-labile sulfide ion in phytochelatin complexes has been reported by several groups. We report the additional finding that labile sulfite is also present in these complexes and in higher amounts than sulfide. Sulfide and sulfite are both released from the metal binding complex by acidification or by treatment with EDTA.

  14. Preparation of silver-activated zinc sulfide thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, C.; Swindells, F. E.

    1968-01-01

    Silver improves luminescence and reduces contamination of zinc sulfide phosphors. The silver is added after the zinc sulfide phosphors are deposited in thin films by vapor evaporation, but before calcining, by immersion in a solution of silver salt.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide to the rescue in obstructive kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a gasotransmitter with far reaching effects on cell function. Studies show that depending on the context hydrogen sulfide can function as an ameliorative agent or as a mediator of kidney injury. PMID:24875544

  16. Mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide removal with steel making slag.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghoi; Asaoka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tamiji; Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Takeda, Kazuhiko; Katayama, Misaki; Onoue, Takasumi

    2012-09-18

    In the present study, we experimentally investigated the removal of hydrogen sulfide using steel-making slag (SMS) and clarified the mechanism of hydrogen sulfide removal with the SMS. The results proved that SMS is able to remove hydrogen sulfide dissolved in water, and the maximum removal amount of hydrogen sulfide per unit weight of the SMS for 8 days was estimated to be 37.5 mg S/g. The removal processes of hydrogen sulfide were not only adsorption onto the SMS, but oxidation and precipitation as sulfur. The chemical forms of sulfide adsorbed onto the SMS were estimated to be sulfur and manganese sulfide in the ratio of 81% and 19%, respectively. It is demonstrated here that the SMS is a promising material to remediate organically enriched coastal sediments in terms of removal of hydrogen sulfide. Furthermore, using SMS is expected to contribute to development of a recycling-oriented society. PMID:22894171

  17. Evolution of sulfide mineralization on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.G.; Fisher, D.S. )

    1990-08-30

    The presence of komatiitic igneous rocks on Marks, based on geochemical evidence from SNC meteorites and Viking X ray fluorescence analyses of the regolith, suggests that massive and disseminated iron sulfide mineralization occurs near the Martian surface. Analogies are drawn between possible ultramafic Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars and terrestrial pyrrhotite-pentlandite ore deposits associated with Archean komatiites formed during early crustal development on Earth. Partial melting of the mantle as a result of high radiogenic heat production then, extrusion of turbulent high-temperature ultramafic lavas, segregation of immiscible FeS melts during cooling, gravitational settling and fractional crystallization of sulfide minerals in magma chambers or lava flows produced massive and disseminated sulfide mineralization associated with terrestrial komatiites. Comparable processes probably occurred on Mars where, on account of the inferred higher Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratio of the X ray mantle (estimated to contain {approximately}4.5 wt % S), iron-rich basaltic magmas were produced by partial melting at depths and temperatures exceeding 165 km and 1,400{degree}C, respectively. Adiabatic diapiric emplacement of these iron-rich, very low viscosity basaltic melts transported significant concentrations of dissolved sulfur as S{sup 2{minus}} and HS{sup {minus}} from the mantle. Ensuing sulfide mineralization may have been either thinly disseminated within ultramafic lavas erupting over large areas of Mars or concentrated locally at the base of structural depressions. Cumulate ore deposits several meters thick may occur at the base of intrusions or in near-surface magma chambers. The evidence for insignificant plate tectonic activity on Mars and minimal interactions of Martian mantle with crust, hydrosphere and atmosphere has restricted the evolution of sulfide ore deposits there.

  18. On the cause of low thermal stability of ethyl halodiazoacetates

    PubMed Central

    Mortén, Magnus; Hennum, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Rates for the thermal decomposition of ethyl halodiazoacetates (halo = Cl, Br, I) have been obtained, and reported herein are their half-lives. The experimental results are supported by DFT calculations, and we provide a possible explanation for the reduced thermal stability of ethyl halodiazoacetates compared to ethyl diazoacetate and for the relative decomposition rates between the chloro, bromo and iodo analogs. We have also briefly studied the thermal, non-catalytic cyclopropanation of styrenes and compared the results to the analogous Rh(II)-catalyzed reactions. PMID:27559411

  19. On the cause of low thermal stability of ethyl halodiazoacetates.

    PubMed

    Mortén, Magnus; Hennum, Martin; Bonge-Hansen, Tore

    2016-01-01

    Rates for the thermal decomposition of ethyl halodiazoacetates (halo = Cl, Br, I) have been obtained, and reported herein are their half-lives. The experimental results are supported by DFT calculations, and we provide a possible explanation for the reduced thermal stability of ethyl halodiazoacetates compared to ethyl diazoacetate and for the relative decomposition rates between the chloro, bromo and iodo analogs. We have also briefly studied the thermal, non-catalytic cyclopropanation of styrenes and compared the results to the analogous Rh(II)-catalyzed reactions. PMID:27559411

  20. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  1. Reviewing sulfidation corrosion—Yesterday and today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Norman S.

    1996-11-01

    At one time, sulfidation corrosion threatened to severely limit the use of gas turbines in marine applications, markedly reduce the life of industrial gas turbines, and affect the performance of aircraft engines. Today, gas turbine engines drive U.S. naval ships, produce electricity, and power aircraft. However, the problem of sulfidation corrosion has not disappeared. The rapid rate of degradation of airfoil materials in the presence of condensed sulfates is still a concern for gas turbine engines that operate in industrial and marine environments.

  2. Classification of polytype structures of zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, V.I.

    1994-12-31

    It is suggested that the existing classification of polytype structures of zinc sulfide be supplemented with an additional criterion: the characteristic of regular point systems (Wyckoff positions) including their type, number, and multiplicity. The consideration of the Wyckoff positions allowed the establishment of construction principles of known polytype series of different symmetries and the systematization (for the first time) of the polytypes with the same number of differently packed layers. the classification suggested for polytype structures of zinc sulfide is compact and provides a basis for creating search systems. The classification table obtained can also be used for numerous silicon carbide polytypes. 8 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Sol-gel processing of metal sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, Vesha

    Metal sulfides were synthesised via a sol-gel process using various metal alkoxides and hydrogen sulfide in toluene. Colloidal gels were prepared from germanium ethoxide, germanium isopropoxide, zinc tert-butoxide and tungsten (VI) ethoxide, whereas colloidal powder was produced from tungsten (V) dichloride ethoxide. Special precautions were necessary to protect the reaction mixture from water contamination which produced metal oxides. Results indicated that the main source of water is the hydrogen sulfide gas. In addition, synthesis of metal sulfides from a mixture of metal oxide and sulfide was demonstrated by the example of monoclinic germanium disulfide. It was produced by reaction of the sol-gel product with sulfur. Heat treatment of the sol-gel product and sulfur yielded single phase GeSsb2. The sol-gel prepared materials and their heat treated products were characterized by various methods. A chemical kinetics study of the functional groups -OR, -SH and Ssp{2-} was carried out for the sol-gel processing of GeSsb2 from of hydrogen sulfide and two different alkoxides, germanium ethoxide and germanium isopropoxide. The study was performed for different concentrations of precursors at different molar ratios and temperatures. The results indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism was simplified under appropriate reaction conditions. Experimentally determined rate constants of thiolysis and condensations demonstrate that thiolysis is slow and that condensations are fast steps, regardless of the studied reaction conditions. A study of the temperature effect on the reaction rate constant shows that it increases with temperature in accord with both Arrhenius law and transition-state theory. Activation energies, Esba, and activation parameters DeltaSsp{ddagger}, DeltaHsp{ddagger} and DeltaGsp{ddagger}, were determined for thiolysis and condensation reactions. The potentiometric tiration method was used for quantitative determination of germanium sulfide and

  4. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  5. Method for inhibiting oxidation of metal sulfide-containing material

    DOEpatents

    Elsetinow, Alicia; Borda, Michael J.; Schoonen, Martin A.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2006-12-26

    The present invention provides means for inhibiting the oxidation of a metal sulfide-containing material, such as ore mine waste rock or metal sulfide taiulings, by coating the metal sulfide-containing material with an oxidation-inhibiting two-tail lipid coating (12) thereon, thereby inhibiting oxidation of the metal sulfide-containing material in acid mine drainage conditions. The lipids may be selected from phospholipids, sphingolipids, glycolipids and combinations thereof.

  6. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  7. Hydrotreating with catalysts comprising mixtures of an amorphous sulfide or trivalent chromium and microcrystallites of molybdenum sulfide or tungsten sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.J.; Ho, T.C.; Chianelli, R.R.; Steger, J.J.; Montagna, A.A.

    1989-03-14

    A process is described for hydrorefining a hydrocarbon feed to reduce the contents of nitrogen compounds and sulfur compounds in the feed which comprises contacting the feed at an elevated temperature of at least about 150/sup 0/C and in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a mixture of (i) an amorphous sulfide of trivalent chromium and (ii) microcrystallities of a metal sulfide of a metal selected from the group consisting of Mo, W and mixture thereof, the contacting occurring for a time sufficient to hydrorefine at least a portion of the feed. The patent also describes a process for improving the oxidation stability of a nitrogen and sulfur containing lube oil feed which comprises contacting the feed at an elevated temperature of at least about 150/sup 0/C and in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a mixture of (i) an amorphous sulfide of trivalent chromium and (ii) microcrystallities of metal sulfides of a metal selected from the group consisting of Mo, W and mixture thereof, the contacting occurring for a time sufficient to improve the oxidation stability of the lube oil feed.

  8. 21 CFR 872.1870 - Sulfide detection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1870 Sulfide detection device. (a) Identification. A sulfide detection device is a device consisting of an AC-powered control unit, probe handle, probe... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfide detection device. 872.1870 Section...

  9. 21 CFR 872.1870 - Sulfide detection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1870 Sulfide detection device. (a) Identification. A sulfide detection device is a device consisting of an AC-powered control unit, probe handle, probe... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfide detection device. 872.1870 Section...

  10. 21 CFR 872.1870 - Sulfide detection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1870 Sulfide detection device. (a) Identification. A sulfide detection device is a device consisting of an AC-powered control unit, probe handle, probe... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfide detection device. 872.1870 Section...

  11. The effect of sulfide inhibition on the ANAMMOX process.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ren-Cun; Yang, Guang-Feng; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ma, Chun; Yu, Jin-Jin; Xing, Bao-Shan

    2013-03-01

    The feasibility of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process to treat wastewaters containing sulfide was studied in this work. Serum bottles were used as experimental containers in batch tests to analyze the short-term response of the ANAMMOX process under sulfide stress. The IC(50) of sulfide-S for ANAMMOX biomass was substrates-dependent and was calculated to be 264 mg L(-1) at an initial total nitrogen level of 200 mg L(-1) (molar ratio of ammonium and nitrite was 1:1). The long-term effects and the performance recovery under sulfide stress were continuously monitored and evaluated in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. The performance of the ANAMMOX system was halved at an sulfide-S level of 32 mg L(-1) within 13 days; however, the nitrogen removal rate (NRR) decreased by only 17.2% within 18 days at an sulfide-S concentration of 40 mg L(-1) after long-time acclimatization of sludge in the presence of sulfide. The ANAMMOX performance recovered under sulfide-S level of 8 mg L(-1) with a steady NRR increasing speed, linear relationship between the NRR and operation time. The synchronic reduce in the specific ANAMMOX activity and the biomass extended the apparent doubling time of the nitrogen removal capacity and decreased biomass growth rate. PMID:23273856

  12. Bile-acid-activated farnesoid X receptor regulates hydrogen sulfide production and hepatic microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Migliorati, Marco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates expression of liver cystathionase (CSE), a gene involved in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation. METHODS: The regulation of CSE expression in response to FXR ligands was evaluated in HepG2 cells and in wild-type and FXR null mice treated with 6-ethyl chenodeoxycholic acid (6E-CDCA), a synthetic FXR ligand. The analysis demonstrated an FXR responsive element in the 5’-flanking region of the human CSE gene. The function of this site was investigated by luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Livers obtained from rats treated with carbon tetrachloride alone, or in combination with 6-ethyl chenodeoxycholic acid, were studied for hydrogen sulphide generation and portal pressure measurement. RESULTS: Liver expression of CSE is regulated by bile acids by means of an FXR-mediated mechanism. Western blotting, qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, as well as immunohistochemical analysis, showed that expression of CSE in HepG2 cells and in mice is induced by treatment with an FXR ligand. Administration of 6E-CDCA to carbon tetrachloride treated rats protected against the down-regulation of CSE expression, increased H2S generation, reduced portal pressure and attenuated the endothelial dysfunction of isolated and perfused cirrhotic rat livers. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that CSE is an FXR-regulated gene and provide a new molecular explanation for the pathophysiology of portal hypertension. PMID:19418582

  13. Ethyl Lithiodiazoacetate: Extremely Unstable Intermediate Handled Efficiently in Flow.

    PubMed

    Müller, Simon T R; Hokamp, Tobias; Ehrmann, Svenja; Hellier, Paul; Wirth, Thomas

    2016-08-16

    Ethyl diazoacetate (EDA) is one of the most prominent diazo reagents. It is frequently used in metal-carbene-type reactions. However, EDA can also be used as a nucleophile under base catalysis. Whilst the addition of EDA to aldehydes can be performed using organic bases, the addition of EDA to other carbonyl electrophiles requires the use of organometallics such as lithium diisopropylamide (LDA). The generated ethyl lithiodiazoacetate is highly reactive and decomposes rapidly, even at low temperatures. Herein, we report a continuous flow protocol that overcomes the problems associated with the instantaneous decomposition of ethyl lithiodiazoacetate. The addition of ethyl lithiodiazoacetate to ketones provides direct access to tertiary diazoalcohols in good yields. PMID:27339757

  14. [Reaction of 1,8-naphthyridine azides with ethyl acrylate].

    PubMed

    Livi, O; Ferrarini, P L; Bertini, D; Tonetti, I

    1975-12-01

    The reaction of 1,8-naphthyridine azides with ethyl acrylate leads to the formation of 2-pyrazolines instead of 1,2,3-triazolines. Some of the compounds obtained have undergone pharmacological and microbiological (antibacterial) testing. PMID:1204828

  15. Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

    2012-05-01

    A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

  16. The diagenesis of carbohydrates by hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, Frank D.

    1983-08-01

    Carbohydrates react with hydrogen sulfide under low temperature (100° to 200°C) yielding a variety of organosulfur compounds including thiophenes, thiols, sulfides and sulfones. A polymer is also produced, whose elemental composition is within the range of natural coals. When reductive dehydration is carried out in the presence of hydrocarbon, organosulfur compounds are formed in the carbon number range of the hydrocarbon used. In these processes, an active hydrogen transfer catalyst is produced which facilitates the passage of hydrogen between normal paraffins and saccharide units, distributing sulfur between these two families primarily in the form of thiophene rings. The simplicity of these systems - H 2S, carbohydrates, H 2O, hydrocarbon - and the facility of the chemistry would suggest that the carbohydrates and hydrogen sulfide may be important agents in the diagenetic processes leading to petroleum and coal. Carbohydrate reduction by hydrogen sulfide may constitute an important route through which certain organosulfur compounds found in petroleum and coal entered these materials in early diagenesis.

  17. REACTION PROCESSES OF ARSENIC IN SULFIDIC SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of arsenic in the environment is fundamentally linked to its speciation. Arsenic in aerobic environments is predominantly arsenate, however under reducing conditions arsenite species dominate. In anoxic or sulfidic environments thioarsenite ((As(OH)x(SH)yz-) species alon...

  18. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  19. Comparison of Hydrogen Sulfide Analysis Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethea, Robert M.

    1973-01-01

    A summary and critique of common methods of hydrogen sulfide analysis is presented. Procedures described are: reflectance from silver plates and lead acetate-coated tiles, lead acetate and mercuric chloride paper tapes, sodium nitroprusside and methylene blue wet chemical methods, infrared spectrophotometry, and gas chromatography. (BL)

  20. Sulfide as a signaling molecule in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Gotor, Cecilia; García, Irene; Crespo, José L.; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is already recognized as an important signaling molecule in mammalian systems, and emerging data suggest that H2S is a signaling molecule just as important as nitric oxide (NO) and H2O2 in plants. Although sulfide is generated in chloroplasts and mitochondria, it is present predominantly in the charged HS- form due to the basic pH inside both organelles, thus requiring an active transporter, which is yet to be identified, to be released. In Arabidopsis, we found that the cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase DES1 is involved in the degradation of cysteine, and therefore responsible for the generation of H2S in this cellular compartment. DES1 deficiency leads to the induction of autophagy. Moreover, we have demonstrated that sulfide in particular exerts a general effect on autophagy through negative regulation, in a way unrelated to nutrient deficiency. The mechanisms of H2S action and its molecular targets are largely unknown, although in animal systems, protein S-sulfhydration has been proposed as a mechanism for sulfide-mediated signaling. PMID:23328265

  1. New Sulfide Derivatives of Vegetable Oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable oils containing sulfide group were synthesized using a UV initiated thiol-ene reaction. The reaction involved addition of butyl thiol to the double bonds of the vegetable oil without the presence of a solvent. The effects of temperature, reaction time, type of vegetable oil, thiol to veg...

  2. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  3. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... black lettering as follows: Letter height Wording 12 inches Danger. Poisonous Gas. Hydrogen Sulfide. 7... well-control techniques to prevent formation fracturing in an open hole within the pressure limits of... designed consistent with the anticipated depth, conditions of the hole, and reservoir environment to...

  4. Atomic layer deposition of metal sulfide materials.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Meng, Xiangbo; Elam, Jeffrey W; Martinson, Alex B F

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The field of nanoscience is delivering increasingly intricate yet elegant geometric structures incorporating an ever-expanding palette of materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful driver of this field, providing exceptionally conformal coatings spanning the periodic table and atomic-scale precision independent of substrate geometry. This versatility is intrinsic to ALD and results from sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. This characteristic facilitates digital synthesis, in which the film grows linearly with the number of reaction cycles. While the majority of ALD processes identified to date produce metal oxides, novel applications in areas such as energy storage, catalysis, and nanophotonics are motivating interest in sulfide materials. Recent progress in ALD of sulfides has expanded the diversity of accessible materials as well as a more complete understanding of the unique chalcogenide surface chemistry. ALD of sulfide materials typically uses metalorganic precursors and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As in oxide ALD, the precursor chemistry is critical to controlling both the film growth and properties including roughness, crystallinity, and impurity levels. By modification of the precursor sequence, multicomponent sulfides have been deposited, although challenges remain because of the higher propensity for cation exchange reactions, greater diffusion rates, and unintentional annealing of this more labile class of materials. A deeper understanding of these surface chemical reactions has been achieved through a combination of in situ studies and quantum-chemical calculations. As this understanding matures, so does our ability to deterministically tailor film properties to new applications and more sophisticated devices. This Account highlights the attributes of ALD chemistry that are unique to metal sulfides and surveys recent applications of these materials in photovoltaics, energy storage, and photonics. Within each application

  5. Method of washing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas by the ammonium sulfide method

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, H.

    1985-05-21

    An improved coke oven gas washing process for removing hydrogen sulfide is proposed wherein the coke oven gas is treated in a hydrogen sulfide scrubber by counterflow with an aqueous ammonia wash water. A stream of aqueous weak ammonia liquor is cooled and sprayed through nozzles in the mid-region of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber. A quantity of aqueous ammonia liquor, corresponding to the quantity which is sprayed through the said nozzles, is withdrawn from the hydrogen sulfide scrubber at a level below the nozzles and is introduced into the top of the said hydrogen sulfide scrubber. Ammonia vapor released at the nozzles has a higher partial pressure than the ammonia partial pressure of the coke oven gas in the region of the nozzle. The aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is the source of the cooled aqueous ammonia liquor which is introduced through the nozzles. A portion of the aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is introduced directly into the top of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber as a portion of the required aqueous ammonia wash water.

  6. Oxygen Demand of Fresh and Stored Sulfide Solutions and Sulfide-Rich Constructed Wetland Effluent.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carolyn; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the contribution of hydrogen sulfide to biological oxygen demand (BOD5) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in wastewater effluents, and documented the effect of storage times and conditions on the BOD5 and COD of pH-adjusted sodium sulfide solutions as well as graywater wetland effluent. Initial COD measurements of sulfide solutions were 84-89% of the theoretical oxygen demand (ThOD), 1.996 mg O2/mg S, whereas unseeded BOD5 measurements were 55-77%. For sulfide solutions, all storage conditions led to declines of >15% (COD, BOD5), and >31% (sulfide). For wetland effluent, storage without headspace was effective in reducing COD losses (3.7%), compared to storage with headspace (17%), and affected changes in turbidity, UVA-254 and pH. The results suggest that storage times and conditions should be controlled and reported when reporting BOD5 and COD of sulfide-rich samples. Wetland models representing sulfate reduction as a method of COD removal may need to be reconsidered. PMID:26237688

  7. New treatment for sulfide-laden tannery waste

    SciTech Connect

    Berberich, S.

    1984-02-01

    A new treatment for tannery wastes containing toxic sulfide has been developed using anaerobic microorganisms that thrive alongside sulfide compounds. The new system, using an anaerobic reactor, transforms sulfide-laden tannery wastes into inert matter, methane, and material (including sulfide) readily digested in an aerobic polishing step. An industrial scale-up of the anaerobic reactor could digest between 60-70% of tannery pollutants. The new treatment offers leather tanneries and other industries that generate high-sulfide waste a cheaper way to meet federal water pollution guidelines.

  8. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-02-01

    Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pHIEP of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, CS in the solution declined from 1000 × 10-6 mol/L to 1.4 × 10-6 mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S2- and CO32- ions.

  9. Sulfidization and magnetization above hydrocarbon reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, R.L.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Tuttle, M.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Geochemical and rock magnetic studies of strata over Cement oil field (Anadarko basin, Oklahoma), Simpson oil field (North Slope basin, Alaska), and the Edwards deep gas trend, south Texas coastal plain, document changes in original magnetizations caused by postdepositional iron sulfide minerals that are, or may be, related to hydrocarbon seepage. At Cement, ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 7}S{sub 8}) formed with pyrite and marcasite in Permian red beds. The Fe-S minerals contain isotopically heavy, abiogenic sulfur derived from thermal degradation of petroleum and (or) isotopically light sulfur derived from sulfate-reducing bacteria fed by leaking hydrocarbons. At Simpson, ferrimagnetic greigite (Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4}) dominates magnetizations in Upper Cretaceous nonmarine beds that contain biodegraded oil. Sulfur isotopic data are consistent with, but do not prove, a genetic link between the greigite ({delta}{sup 34}S {gt} +20 per mil) and seepage. In middle Tertiary sandstones of southeast Texas, pyrite and marcasite formed when abiogenic H{sub 2}S migrated upward from deep reservoirs, or when H{sub 2}S was produced at shallow depths by bacteria that utilized organic material dissolved in migrating water from depth. The sulfide minerals replaced detrital magnetite to result in a systematic decrease in magnetic susceptibility toward faults that connect deep petroleum reservoirs to shallow sandstone. The authors results show that abiologic and biologic mechanisms can generate magnetic sulfide minerals in some sulfidic zones of hydrocarbon seepage. The magnetizations in such zones are diminished most commonly by replacement of detrital magnetic minerals with nonmagnetic sulfide minerals or are unchanged if such detrital minerals were originally absent.

  10. Analog Experiments on Sulfide Foams in Magmatic Ore Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, A. M.; Dahn, D.; Zavala, K.

    2009-05-01

    Metal sulfides form as an immiscible phase from silicate magmas. Dynamic mingling and unmingling of the two phases is important for the development of economic deposits: mingling promotes enrichment of the sulfide in valuable metals, and subsequent unmingling generates massive sulfide. Analog experiments were carried out to investigate mingling processes in immiscible systems, using oil, water and small beads to represent magma, sulfide liquid and silicate crystals. Stirring or injection led to the formation of a foam of analog sulfide droplets within an analog silicate framework. We propose that the partial collapse of such a foam explains massive sulfide lenses at the Voisey's Bay magmatic sulfide deposit, and that crystallization of silicate crystals in the remaining foam walls generates 'net-textured' ores. In the experiments, solid particles had a profound effect on unmingling: analog sulfide droplets were stably contained within analog crystal-rich magma and did not coalesce. We therefore suggest that 'net' and 'leopard' textures in disseminated sulfides indicate mingling of sulfide with crystal-poor magma, whereas isolated disseminated patches of sulfide indicate mingling with a crystal-rich magma.

  11. Effect of sulfide on growth of marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mirzoyan, Natella; Schreier, Harold J

    2014-04-01

    Severe hypoxia leads to excess production of hydrogen sulfide in marine environments. In this study, we examined the effect of sulfide on growth of four facultative anaerobic marine bacteria in minimal media under anaerobic conditions. The Gram-negative chemolithoautotrophic Marinobacter sp. tolerated sulfide concentrations up to 0.60 mM, with doubling and lag times increasing as a function of increasing sulfide concentration but with no change in maximum culture yields; growth did not occur at 1.2 mM sulfide. Similar results were obtained for the metabolically diverse Gram-negative denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri, except that growth occurred at 1.2 mM and culture yields at 0.60 and 1.2 mM sulfide were approximately 10-fold lower than at sulfide concentrations between 0 and 0.30 mM. Increases in doubling and lag times accompanied by an overall 10-fold decrease in maximum culture yields were found for the Gram-negative chemoheterotrophic Vibrio sp. at all sulfide concentrations tested. In contrast, growth of a Gram-positive chemoheterotrophic Bacillus sp. was resistant to all sulfide concentrations tested (0.15-1.2 mM). Our results highlight the variable responses of marine bacteria to sulfide and provide some insight into shifts that may occur in microbial community structure and diversity as a consequence of changes in sulfide levels that are the result of hypoxia. PMID:24609188

  12. Microbial oxidation of mixtures of methylmercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan, A; Kolhatkar, R; Sublette, K L; Beitle, R

    1998-01-01

    Refinery spent-sulfidic caustic, containing only inorganic sulfides, has previously been shown to be amenable to biotreatment with Thiobacillus denitrificans strain F with complete oxidation of sulfides to sulfate. However, many spent caustics contain mercaptans that cannot be metabolized by this strict autotroph. An aerobic enrichment culture was developed from mixed Thiobacilli and activated sludge that was capable of simultaneous oxidation of inorganic sulfide and mercaptans using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methylmercaptan (MeSH) gas feeds used to simulate the inorganic and organic sulfur of a spent-sulfidic caustic. The enrichment culture was also capable of biotreatment of an actual mercaptan-containing, spent-sulfidic caustic but at lower rates than predicted by operation on MeSH and H2S fed to the culture in the gas phase, indicating that the caustic contained other inhibitory components. PMID:18576062

  13. Selective chemical dissolution of sulfides: An evaluation of six methods applicable to assaying sulfide-bound nickel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klock, P.R.; Czamanske, G.K.; Foose, M.; Pesek, J.

    1986-01-01

    Six analytical techniques for the selective chemical dissolution of sulfides are compared with the purpose of defining the best method for accurately determining the concentration of sulfide-bound nickel. Synthesized sulfide phases of known elemental content, mixed with well-analyzed silicates, were used to determine the relative and absolute efficiency, based on Ni and Mg recovery, of the techniques. Tested leach-methods purported to dissolve sulfide from silicate phases include: brominated water, brominated water-carbon tetrachloride, nitric-hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide-ammonium citrate, bromine-methanol and hydrogen peroxide-ascorbic acid. Only the hydrogen peroxide-ammonium citrate method did not prove adequate in dissolving the sulfide phases. The remaining five methods dissolved the sulfide phases, but the indicated amount of attack on the silicate portion ranged from 3% to 100%. The bromine-methanol method is recommended for assaying sulfide-Ni deposits when Ni is also present in silicate phases. ?? 1986.

  14. Reactions of VX, HD, and their simulants with NaY and AgY zeolites. Desulfurization of VX on AgY

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.W.; Bartram, P.W.

    1999-11-09

    The room-temperature reactions of the chemical warfare agents VX (O-ethyl S-2-(diisopropylamino)-ethyl methylphosphonothioate), HD (2,2{prime}-dichloroethyl sulfide, or mustard), and their common simulants, O,S-diethyl phenylphosphonothioate (DEPPT) and 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide (CEPS), with NaY and silver-exchanged (AgY) zeolites have been studied using solid-state magic angle spinning NMR. VX hydrolyzes via exclusive cleavage of the P{single{underscore}bond}S bond on both NaY and AgY to yield ethyl methylphosphonate (EMPA). The reaction is significantly faster on AgY than on NaY, suggesting catalysis by silver. On AgY, an intermediate silver salt of EMPA is apparently formed which is slowly converted to ethyl 2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methylphosphonate (QB, the desulfurized analogue of VX) in about a 78% yield. DEPPT similarly hydrolyzes via P{single{underscore}bond}S cleavage on AgY to yield an apparent silver salt of ethyl phenylphosphonate, which does not undergo further reaction to the desulfurized analogue. No reaction is observed for DEPPT on NaY. HD on AgY forms both vinyl sulfide and the cyclic ether 1,4-thioxane. HD reacts faster on NaY to exclusively form the CH-TG sulfonium ion (HOCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}S{sup +}[CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH]{sub 2}). CEPS also reacts faster on NaY, forming 2-hydroxyethyl phenyl sulfide. On AgY, CEPS does not give the vinyl product, but does yield the ether product PhSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SPh. A mechanism is proposed for the silver-catalyzed hydrolysis of VX, the desulfurization of the cleaved thiol, and the formation of QB.

  15. Arsenic speciation in natural sulfidic geothermal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicole S.; Stefánsson, Andri; Sigfússon, Bergur

    2014-10-01

    The speciation of arsenic in natural sulfidic geothermal waters was studied using chemical analyses and thermodynamic aqueous speciation calculations. Samples were collected in three geothermal systems in Iceland, having contrasting H2S concentrations in the reservoir (high vs. low). The sampled waters contained 7-116 ppb As and <0.01-77.6 ppm H2S with pH of 8.56-9.60. The analytical setup used for the determination of arsenic species (Ion Chromatography-Hydride Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, IC-HG-AFS) was field-deployed and the samples analyzed within ∼5 min of sampling in order to prevent changes upon storage, which were shown to be considerable regardless of the sample storage method used. Nine aqueous arsenic species were detected, among others arsenite (HnAsO3n-3), thioarsenite (HnAsS3n-3), arsenate (HnAsO4n-3), monothioarsenate (HnAsSO3n-3), dithioarsenate (HnAsS2O2n-3), trithioarsenate (HnAsS3O) and tetrathioarsenate (HnAsS4n-3). The results of the measured aqueous arsenic speciation in the natural geothermal waters and comparison with thermodynamic calculations reveal that the predominant factors determining the species distribution are sulfide concentration and pH. In alkaline waters with low sulfide concentrations the predominant species are AsIII oxyanions. This can be seen in samples from a liquid-only well, tapping water that is H2S-poor and free of oxygen. At intermediate sulfide concentration AsIII and AsV thio species become important and predominate at high sulfide concentration, as seen in two-phase well waters, which have high H2S concentrations in the reservoir. Upon oxidation, for instance due to mixing of the reservoir fluid with oxygenated water upon ascent to the surface, AsV oxyanions form, as well as AsV thio complexes if the sulfide concentration is intermediate to high. This oxidation process can be seen in samples from hot springs in the Geysir geothermal area. While the thermodynamic modeling allows for a first

  16. [Formation of ethyl carbamate in umeshu (plum liqueur)].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Kamimura, H; Ibe, A; Tabata, S; Yasuda, K; Nishijima, M

    2001-12-01

    Samples of umeshu, a Japanese plum liqueur made from unripe plums, shochu and crystal sugar, were stored under fluorescent light, in the dark and in the refrigerator. The amount of ethyl carbamate formed in umeshu exposed to light or room temperature was larger than that in the dark or at low temperature. The amount of ethyl carbamate formed in umeshu to which cyanide had been added was larger than that in the absence of added cyanide. Thus, the amount of ethyl carbamate formed in the umeshu was increased by not only light and higher temperature, but also cyanide. Samples of model alcoholic beverages were stored under various conditions using red, yellow and blue cellophanes. The amount of ethyl carbamate formed in the model alcoholic beverage with blue cellophane was larger than in the cases of red and yellow cellophanes. It was found that the amount of ethyl carbamate formed in the model alcoholic beverage was increased by light in the wavelength range of 375-475 nm. PMID:11875819

  17. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most of the detoxification occurred in underground tissues, where sulfide intrusion was greatest. Elemental sulfur was a major detoxification compound, precipitating on the inner wall of the aerenchyma of underground tissues. Sulfide was metabolized into thiols and entered the plant sulfur metabolism as well as being stored as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments. PMID:26030258

  18. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    PubMed Central

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most of the detoxification occurred in underground tissues, where sulfide intrusion was greatest. Elemental sulfur was a major detoxification compound, precipitating on the inner wall of the aerenchyma of underground tissues. Sulfide was metabolized into thiols and entered the plant sulfur metabolism as well as being stored as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments. PMID:26030258

  19. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene by sulfidated nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Rajajayavel, Sai Rajasekar C; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-07-01

    Direct injection of reactive nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (NZVI) is considered to be a promising approach for remediation of aquifers contaminated by chlorinated organic pollutants. In this study we show that the extent of sulfidation of NZVI enhances the rate of dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) compared to that by unamended NZVI, and the enhancement depends on the Fe/S molar ratio. Experiments where TCE was reacted with NZVI sulfidated to different extents (Fe/S molar ratios 0.62-66) showed that the surface-area normalized first-order TCE degradation rate constant increased up to 40 folds compared to non-sulfidated NZVI. Fe/S ratios in the range of 12-25 provided the highest TCE dechlorination rates, and rates decreased at both higher and lower Fe/S. In contrast, sulfidated NZVI exposed to water in the absence of TCE showed significantly lower hydrogen evolution rate (2.75 μmol L(-1) h(-1)) compared to that by an unamended NZVI (6.92 μmol L(-1) h(-1)), indicating that sulfidation of NZVI suppressed corrosion reactions with water. Sulfide (HS(-)) ions reacted rapidly with NZVI and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed formation of a surface layer of FeS and FeS2. We propose that more electrons are preferentially conducted from sulfidated NZVI than from unamended NZVI to TCE, likely because of greater binding of TCE on the reactive sites of the iron sulfide outer layer. Resuspending sulfidated NZVI in sulfide-free or sulfide containing solutions altered the TCE degradation rate constants because of changes in the FeS layer thickness. Sulfidated NZVI maintained its high reactivity in the presence of multiple mono and divalent ions and with polyelectrolyte coatings. Thus, sulfide ions in groundwater can significantly alter NZVI reactivity. PMID:25935369

  20. The Evolution of Sulfide Tolerance in the Cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how the function of extant microorganisms has recorded both their evolutionary histories and their past interactions with the environment is a stated goal of astrobiology. We are taking a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the diversification of sulfide tolerance mechanisms in the cyanobacteria, which vary both in their degree of exposure to sulfide and in their capacity to tolerate this inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. Since conditions were very reducing during the first part of Earth's history and detrital sulfides have been found in Archean sediments, mechanisms conferring sulfide tolerance may have been important for the evolutionary success of the ancestors of extant cyanobacteria. Two tolerance mechanisms have been identified in this group: (1) resistance of photosystem II, the principal target of sulfide toxicity; and (2) maintenance of the ability to fix carbon despite photosystem II inhibition by utilizing sulfide as an electron donor in photosystem I - dependent, anoxygenic photosynthesis. We are presently collecting comparative data on aspects of sulfide physiology for laboratory clones isolated from a variety of habitats. These data will be analyzed within a phylogenetic framework inferred from molecular sequence data collected for these clones to test how frequently different mechanisms of tolerance have evolved and which tolerance mechanism evolved first. In addition, by analyzing these physiological data together with environmental sulfide data collected from our research sites using microelectrodes, we can also test whether the breadth of an organism's sulfide tolerance can be predicted from the magnitude of variation in environmental sulfide concentration it has experienced in its recent evolutionary past and whether greater average sulfide concentration and/or temporal variability in sulfide favors the evolution of a particular mechanism of sulfide tolerance.

  1. Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S.

    1992-05-12

    A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

  2. Removal of hydrogen sulfide from drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Gilligan Jr., T. J.

    1985-10-22

    The present invention relates to a process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide which frequently becomes entrained in drilling fluid during the course of drilling operations through subterranean formations. The process consists of introducing a solid oxidant in powdered form into the circulating drilling fluid when hydrogen sulfide is encountered. The solid oxidants are selected from the group consisting of calcium hypochlorite (Ca-(OCl)/sub 2/), sodium perborate (NaBO/sub 3/), potassium permanganate (KMnO/sub 4/), and potassium peroxydisulfate (K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/). The solid oxidants are soluble in the drilling fluid, promoting fast and complete scavenging reactions without adversely altering the drilling fluid rheology.

  3. Absorption of carbonyl sulfide in aqueous methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghawas, H.A.; Ruiz-Ibanez, G.; Sandall, O.C. )

    1988-01-01

    The absorption of carbonyl sulfide in aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) was studied over a range of temperatures and MDEA concentrations. MDEA is commonly used for selective absorption of hydrogen sulfide in the presence of carbon dioxide. However, sulfur in the form of COS may also be present and it is necessary that estimates of absorption rates of this compound be made. The objective of this study is to determine the physiochemical properties needed to predict COS absorption rates in aqueous MDEA. Free gas solubility and the diffusivity of COS in MDEA solutions were measured over the temperature range 15 to 40{sup 0}C for MDEA concentrations up to 30 weight per cent using the nitrous oxide analogy method. Solubilities were measured volumetrically in an equilibrium cell and diffusivities were measured using a laminar liquid jet absorber. The kinetics of the reaction between COS and MDEA were studied by measuring absorption rates in a single wetted-sphere absorber.

  4. Speciation of arsenic in sulfidic waters

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, Richard T; Wallschläger, Dirk; Ford, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    Formation constants for thioarsenite species have been determined in dilute solutions at 25°C, ΣH2S from 10-7.5 to 10-3.0 M, ΣAs from 10-5.6 to 10-4.8 M, and pH 7 and 10. The principal inorganic arsenic species in anoxic aquatic systems are arsenite, As(OH)30, and a mononuclear thioarsenite with an S/As ratio of 3:1. Thioarsenic species with S/As ratios of 1 : 1,2 : 1, and 4 : 1 are lesser components in sulfidic solutions that might be encountered in natural aquatic environments. Thioarsenites dominate arsenic speciation at sulfide concentrations > 10-4.3 M at neutral pH. Conversion from neutral As(OH)30 to anionic thioarsenite species may regulate the transport and fate of arsenic in sulfate-reducing environments by governing sorption and mineral precipitation reactions.

  5. Sulfide stress corrosion cracking of line pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Kimuro, M.; Totsuka, N.; Kurisu, T.; Amano, K.; Matsuyama, J.; Nakai, Y. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper reports the sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSC) behavior of line pipe steel investigated using the SSC test method in NACE Standard TMO177-77, Testing of Metals for Resistance to Sulfide Stress Cracking at Ambient Temperatures. SSC of base metal can be classified into two types, depending on microstructures. In ferrite-perlite steel, the first crack initiates parallel to the pipe surface and propagates perpendicularly to the axis of stress. In ferrite-bainite steel or low C-bainite steel, the crack initiates at the interface between the bainite particle and the ferrite. With decreasing carbon content, the threshold stress of SSC ({sigma}{sub th}) increases, but in low-carbon steel, the {sigma}{sub th} value of weld seam is lower than that of base metal. SSC of weld seams occurs at the softening zone in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) about 2 to 4 mm away from the fusion line.

  6. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  7. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2016-06-14

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  8. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.

    2011-05-31

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  10. Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates

    SciTech Connect

    John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-12-10

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs-a review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  12. Redetermination of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of adventitious water in a reaction between dicyclopentamethylene thiuram-disulfide (C5H10NCS2)(sub 2) and a picoline solution of tricyclopentadienyl indium(III) (C5H5)(sub 3). It resulted in the formation of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide (C5H13NS). The piperidinium hydrogen sulfide produced in this way was unambiguously characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure determination showed that the piperidinium hydrogen sulfide crystal (MW = 119.23 g/mol) has an orthorhombic (Pbcm) unit cell whose parameters are: a = 9.818(2), b = 7.3720(1), c = 9.754(1) A, V = 706.0(3) A(exp 3), Z=4. D(sub chi) = 1.122 g cm(exp -3), Mo K(alpha) (lamda = 0.71073), mu= 3.36 cm(exp -1), F(000) = 264.0, T =293 K, R = 0.036 for 343 reflections with F(sub O)(sup 2) greater than 3 sigma (F(sub O)(sup 2)) and 65 variables. The compound consists of (C5H10NH2)(+) cations and (SH)(-) anions with both species residing on crystallographic mirror planes. N-H -- S hydrogen bonding contributes to the interconnection of neighboring piperidinium components of the compound.

  13. Fragrance material review on 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes physical properties data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. PMID:22414652

  14. NEW GROUND-STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ETHYL CYANIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Pearson, John C.; Drouin, Brian J.; Yu, Shanshan

    2009-09-01

    The spectrum of ethyl cyanide, or propionitrile (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN), has been repeatedly observed in the interstellar medium with large column densities and surprisingly high temperatures in hot core sources. The construction of new, more sensitive, observatories accessing higher frequencies such as Herschel, ALMA, and SOFIA have made it important to extend the laboratory data for ethyl cyanide to coincide with the capabilities of the new instruments. We report extensions of the laboratory measurements of the rotational spectrum of ethyl cyanide in its ground vibrational state to 1.6 THz. A global analysis of the ground state, which includes all of the previous data and 3356 newly assigned transitions, has been fitted to within experimental error to J = 132, K = 36, using both Watson A-reduced and Watson S-reduced Hamiltonians.

  15. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    1999-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  16. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    2001-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  17. Microaeration for hydrogen sulfide removal in UASB reactor.

    PubMed

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Bartacek, Jan; Kolesarova, Nina; Jenicek, Pavel

    2014-11-01

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas by microaeration was studied in Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating synthetic brewery wastewater. A fully anaerobic UASB reactor served as a control while air was dosed into a microaerobic UASB reactor (UMSB). After a year of operation, sulfur balance was described in both reactors. In UASB, sulfur was mainly presented in the effluent as sulfide (49%) and in biogas as hydrogen sulfide (34%). In UMSB, 74% of sulfur was detected in the effluent (41% being sulfide and 33% being elemental sulfur), 10% accumulated in headspace as elemental sulfur and 9% escaped in biogas as hydrogen sulfide. The efficiency of hydrogen sulfide removal in UMSB was on average 73%. Microaeration did not cause any decrease in COD removal or methanogenic activity in UMSB and the elemental sulfur produced by microaeration did not accumulate in granular sludge. PMID:25270045

  18. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, D.H.; Nelson, A.J.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1996-07-30

    A process is described for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness. 12 figs.

  19. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  20. Nitrosamine-induced carcinogenesis. The alkylation of N-7 of guanine of nucleic acids of the rat by diethylnitrosamine, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and ethyl methanesulphonate

    PubMed Central

    Swann, P. F.; Magee, P. N.

    1971-01-01

    1. The extent of ethylation of N-7 of guanine in the nucleic acids of rat tissue in vivo by diethylnitrosamine, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and ethyl methanesulphonate was measured. 2. All compounds produced measurable amounts of 7-ethyl-guanine. 3. A single dose of diethylnitrosamine or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea produced tumours of the kidney in the rat. Three doses of ethyl methanesulphonate produced kidney tumours, but a single dose did not. 4. A single dose of diethylnitrosamine produced twice as much ethylation of N-7 of guanine in DNA of kidney as did N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea. A single dose of both compounds induced kidney tumours, although of a different histological type. 5. A single dose of ethyl methanesulphonate produced ten times as much ethylation of N-7 of guanine in kidney DNA as did N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea without producing tumours. 6. The relevance of these findings to the hypothesis that alkylation of a cellular component is the mechanism of induction of tumours by nitroso compounds is discussed. PMID:5145908

  1. Gold Sulfide Nanoclusters: A Unique Core-in-cage Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Walter, Michael; Dai, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    By using a DFT-based basin-hopping method, we found putative global minima for three gold sulfide nanoclusters, observed in mass spectrometry, that all show a symmetric core-in-cage structure: a metallic Au core inside a cage with S as vertices and Au at the edges. This core-in-cage structure is distinct from bulk gold sulfide. This work fills the knowledge gap regarding the structure of gold sulfide nanoclusters of {approx}1 nm.

  2. Assistance of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in the interpretation of postmortem ethanol findings.

    PubMed

    Krabseth, Hege; Mørland, Jørg; Høiseth, Gudrun

    2014-09-01

    Postmortem ethanol formation is a well-known problem in forensic toxicology. The aim of this study was to interpret findings of ethanol in blood, in a large collection of forensic autopsy cases, by use of the nonoxidative ethanol metabolites, ethyl glucuronide (EtG), and ethyl sulfate (EtS). In this study, according to previously published literature, antemortem ethanol ingestion was excluded in EtS-negative cases. Among 493 ethanol-positive forensic autopsy cases, collected during the study period, EtS was not detected in 60 (12 %) of the cases. Among cases with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of ≤ 0.54 g/kg, antemortem ethanol ingestion was excluded in 38 % of the cases, while among cases with a BAC of ≥ 0.55 g/kg, antemortem ethanol ingestion was excluded in 2.2 % of the cases. For all cases where ethanol was measured at a concentration >1.0 g/kg, EtS was detected. The highest blood ethanol concentration in which EtS was not detected was 1.0 g/kg. The median concentrations of EtG and EtS in blood were 9.5 μmol/L (range: not detected (n.d.) 618.1) and 9.2 μmol/L (range: n.d. 182.5), respectively. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between concentration levels of ethanol and of EtG (Spearman's rho=0.671, p<0.001) and EtS (Spearman's rho=0.670, p<0.001), respectively. In conclusion, this study showed that in a large number of ethanol-positive forensic autopsy cases, ethanol was not ingested before the time of death, particularly among cases where ethanol was present in lower blood concentrations. Routine measurement of EtG and EtS should therefore be recommended, especially in cases with BAC below 1 g/kg. PMID:24935750

  3. Blood kinetics of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulphate in heavy drinkers during alcohol detoxification.

    PubMed

    Høiseth, Gudrun; Morini, Luca; Polettini, Aldo; Christophersen, Asbjørg; Mørland, Jørg

    2009-07-01

    Studies of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) blood kinetics have so far been performed on healthy volunteers with ingestion of low to moderate doses of ethanol. These data are not necessarily transferable to heavy drinkers where the consumed doses of ethanol are much higher. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of EtG and ethyl sulphate (EtS) in blood in heavy drinkers after termination of alcohol ingestion. Sixteen patients from an alcohol withdrawal clinic were included directly after admission. Time of end of drinking, estimated daily intake of ethanol (EDI) and medical history were recorded. Three to five blood samples over 20-43 h were collected from each patient subsequent to admission. The median EDI was 172 g (range 60-564). The first sample was collected median 2.5 h after end of drinking (range 0.5-23.5). Two patients had levels of EtG and EtS below LOQ in all samples, the first collected 19.25 and 23.5 h after cessation of drinking, respectively. Of the remaining 14 patients, one subject, suffering from both renal and hepatic disease, showed concentrations of EtG and EtS substantially higher than the rest of the material. This patient's initial value of EtG was 17.9 mg/L and of EtS 5.9 mg/L, with terminal elimination half lives of 11.9 h for EtG and 12.5 h for EtS. Among the remaining 13 patients, the initial median values were 0.7 g/L (range 0-3.7) for ethanol, 1.7 mg/L (range 0.1-5.9) for EtG and 0.9 mg/L (range 0.1-1.9) for EtS. Elimination occurred with a median half-life of 3.3 h for EtG (range 2.6-4.3) and 3.6 h for EtS (range 2.7-5.4). In conclusion, elimination of EtG in heavy drinkers did not significantly differ from healthy volunteers, and EtS appeared to have similar elimination rate. In the present work, there was one exception to this, and we propose that this could be explained by the patient's renal disease, which would delay excretion of these conjugated metabolites. PMID:19395207

  4. Sulfide clean-up of solutions from heavy metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kislinskaya, G.E.; Kozachek, N.N.; Krasnova, G.M.; Shenk, N.I.

    1982-09-20

    The object of the present research was to determine the conditions for thorough clean-up of solutions from cadmium or mercury contamination by use of iron sulfide. Results indicated that the shape of the dependence of the degree of extraction of copper with iron sulfide on the pH value is analogous to the curve for cadmium; that is, copper, like cadmium, is precipitated by chemical reaction. In distinction from cadmium and copper, mercury is extracted by iron sulfide both in acid and also in neutral solutions, that is, it is possible to attain a direct ion exchange by reaction. At high pH values, only small amounts of iron go into solution, therefore FeS can be used very rationally for the extraction of both small (about 1 mg/liter), and also of large (about 1 mg/liter) amounts of mercury from solutions, which are nearly neutral. By adding sodium sulfide and a flocculant, one can accelerate the process of mercury precipitation, and also reduce the solution of iron sulfide. In the present case, iron sulfide plays the role of a substrate for the crystallization of mercury sulfide, since in dilute solutions the latter forms poorly filterable colloidal solutions. Thus when one uses fused iron sulfide with addition of sodium sulfide, a high degree of mercury extraction is attained, and the spent sorbent is filtered well.

  5. Limitation of Sulfide Capacity Concept for Molten Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, In-Ho; Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira

    2016-04-01

    The sulfide capacity concept has been widely used in pyrometallurgy to define sulfur removal capacities of slags. Typically, the sulfide capacity is considered to be a unique slag property depending only on temperature regardless of partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur. In the present study, it is demonstrated that sulfide capacities of slags in particular those of Na2O-containing slags can vary with partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur due to large solubility of sulfide in Na2O-containing slag systems.

  6. Ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in meconium and hair-potential biomarkers of intrauterine exposure to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Morini, L; Marchei, E; Vagnarelli, F; Garcia Algar, O; Groppi, A; Mastrobattista, L; Pichini, S

    2010-03-20

    This study investigated ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) concentration in meconium and in maternal and neonatal hair (HEtG and HFAEEs, respectively) as potential markers of intrauterine exposure to ethanol together with meconium fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in a cohort of 99 mother-infant dyads, 49 coming from the Arcispedale of Reggio Emilia (Italy) and 50 from the Hospital del Mar of Barcelona (Spain). FAEEs, EtG and EtS were measured in meconium samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A head space-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to test HEtG and HFAEEs in hair samples from mothers and their newborns. Eighty-two meconium samples (82.8%) tested positive for EtG, 19 (19.2%) for EtS while 22 (22.2%) showed FAEEs levels higher than 2 nmol/g, the cut-off used to differentiate daily maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy from occasional or no use. Although EtG and EtS in meconium did not correlate with total FAEEs concentration, a good correlation between EtG, EtS and ethyl stearate was observed. Moreover, EtG correlated well with ethyl palmitoleate, while EtS with ethyl laurate, myristate and linolenate. Neither maternal nor neonatal hair appears as good predictors of gestational ethanol consumption and subsequent fetal exposure in these mother-infant dyads. In conclusion, these data show that meconium is so far the best matrix in evaluating intrauterine exposure to ethanol, with EtG and EtS being potentially good alternative biomarkers to FAEEs. PMID:20060246

  7. Detection of vesicant-induced upper airway mucosa damage in the hamster cheek pouch model using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer-Wilson, Marie J.; Nguyen, Vi; Jung, Woong-Gyu; Ahn, Yehchen; Chen, Zhongping; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Hamster cheek pouches were exposed to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide [CEES, half-mustard gas (HMG)] at a concentration of 0.4, 2.0, or 5.0 mg/ml for 1 or 5 min. Twenty-four hours post-HMG exposure, tissue damage was assessed by both stereomicrography and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Damage that was not visible on gross visual examination was apparent in the OCT images. Tissue changes were found to be dependent on both HMG concentration and exposure time. The submucosal and muscle layers of the cheek pouch tissue showed the greatest amount of structural alteration. Routine light microscope histology was performed to confirm the OCT observations.

  8. Discrimination of chemical warfare simulants via multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Farrell, Mikella E.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2014-02-01

    Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) is used to detect several chemical warfare simulants, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, with high specificity. The spectral bandwidth of the femtosecond laser pulse used in these studies is sufficient to coherently and simultaneously drive all the vibrational modes in the molecule of interest. Evidence shows that MCARS is capable of overcoming common sensitivity limitations of spontaneous Raman scattering, thus allowing for the detection of the target material in milliseconds with standard, uncooled universal serial bus spectrometers as opposed to seconds with cooled, intensified CCD-based spectrometers. In addition, the obtained MCARS spectrum of the investigated sample provides multiple unique signatures. These signatures are used in an off-line multivariate statistical analysis allowing for the material's discrimination with high fidelity.

  9. Detection of vesicant-induced upper airway mucosa damage in the hamster cheek pouch model using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Hammer-Wilson, Marie J; Nguyen, Vi; Jung, Woong-Gyu; Ahn, Yehchen; Chen, Zhongping; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Hamster cheek pouches were exposed to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide [CEES, half-mustard gas (HMG)] at a concentration of 0.4, 2.0, or 5.0 mg/ml for 1 or 5 min. Twenty-four hours post-HMG exposure, tissue damage was assessed by both stereomicrography and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Damage that was not visible on gross visual examination was apparent in the OCT images. Tissue changes were found to be dependent on both HMG concentration and exposure time. The submucosal and muscle layers of the cheek pouch tissue showed the greatest amount of structural alteration. Routine light microscope histology was performed to confirm the OCT observations. PMID:20210463

  10. Dual-Function Metal-Organic Framework as a Versatile Catalyst for Detoxifying Chemical Warfare Agent Simulants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Moon, Su-Young; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-12-22

    The nanocrystals of a porphyrin-based zirconium(IV) metal-organic framework (MOF) are used as a dual-function catalyst for the simultaneous detoxification of two chemical warfare agent simulants at room temperature. Simulants of nerve agent (such as GD, VX) and mustard gas, dimethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, have been hydrolyzed and oxidized, respectively, to nontoxic products via a pair of pathways catalyzed by the same MOF. Phosphotriesterase-like activity of the Zr6-containing node combined with photoactivity of the porphyrin linker gives rise to a versatile MOF catalyst. In addition, bringing the MOF crystals down to the nanoregime leads to acceleration of the catalysis. PMID:26482030

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman as a water monitor for warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.; Clauson, Susan L.; Janni, James A.

    2002-02-01

    The threat of chemical warfare agents being released upon civilian and military personnel continues to escalate. One aspect of chemical preparedness is to analyze and protect the portable water supply for the military. Chemical nerve, blister, and choking agents, as well as biological threats must all be analyzed and low limits of detection must be verified. For chemical agents, this generally means detection down to the low ppb levels. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a spectroscopic technique that can detect trace levels of contaminants directly in the aqueous environment. In this paper, results are presented on the use of SERS to detect chemical and biological agent simulants with an end goal of creating a Joint Service Agent Water Monitor. Detection of cyanide, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, phosphonates, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using SERS has been performed and is discussed herein. Aspects of transferring laboratory results to an unattended field instrument are also discussed.

  12. Technology assessment for the determination of chemical agent vapors in demilitarization facilities: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Wise, M.B.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of analytical methods for the determination of chemical agents GB, VX, and HD was made. HD, or mustard, is bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, and is classified as a blishtering agent. GB, or Sarin, is isopropyl methyl phosphonofluoridate. VX is O-ethyl-S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)methylphosphonothioate. Both GB and VX are nerve agents. Included were methods capable of providing for monitoring requirements at the time weighted average (TWA) and allowable stack concentration (ASC) levels in near real time. A review of the currently used automatic continuous air monitoring system (ACAMS) was made as well as a review of the recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (APIMS). This report recommends a strategy for research and development for near term and medium term improvement of the overall monitoring program. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Evidence supporting biologically mediated sulfide oxidation in hot spring ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. D.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    The sulfide concentration of fluids in hydrothermal ecosystems is one of several factors determining the transition to microbial photosynthesis (Cox et al., 2011, Chem. Geol. 280, 344-351). To investigate the loss of sulfide in Yellowstone hot spring systems, measurements of total dissolved sulfide with respect to time were made in incubation experiments conducted on 0.2-micron filtered (killed controls) vs. unfiltered hot spring water at locations with three different pH:sulfide combinations (pH 2.5 with 50 μM sulfide, 5.2 with 5.6 μM sulfide, and 8.3 with 86 μM sulfide). At the higher pH values, the experiments yielded similar rates of sulfide loss in filtered and unfiltered water of approximately 0.8 (pH 5.2) and 7.6 nmol sulfide L-1s-1 (pH 8.3). At the acidic spring, the unfiltered water lost sulfide at a rate 1.6 times that of the filtered water (8.2 vs. 5 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). These results suggest that the pelagic biomass at the pH 5.2 and 8.3 springs may not affect sulfide loss, whereas in the pH 2.5 spring there appears to be an effect. In addition, the incubation of filamentous biomass with unfiltered water increased the rate of sulfide loss by approximately two-fold at a pH of 2.5 (59 vs. 31 nmol L-1s-1; Cox et al., 2011), five-fold at a pH of 5.2 (3.9 vs. 0.8 nmol sulfide L-1s-1), and barely increased the rate of sulfide loss at a pH of 8.3 (9.1 vs. 8.4 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). Sulfide is predominately present as HS- at a pH of 8.3, which may not be taken up as easily by microorganisms as the H2S (aq) that dominates sulfide speciation at pH 2.5 and 5.2. That the loss of sulfide at acidic pH is due to biotic rather than abiotic factors is further supported by studies with whole mat samples that show greater sulfide consumption than killed controls (D'Imperio et al., 2008, AEM 74, 5802-5808). Taken together, the results of these experiments suggest that the majority of sulfide oxidation occurs in the filamentous biomass of hot spring ecosystems, although

  14. Dissociation of the Ethyl Radical: An Exercise in Computational Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassabeh, Nahal; Tran, Mark; Fleming, Patrick E.

    2014-01-01

    A set of exercises for use in a typical physical chemistry laboratory course are described, modeling the unimolecular dissociation of the ethyl radical to form ethylene and atomic hydrogen. Students analyze the computational results both qualitatively and quantitatively. Qualitative structural changes are compared to approximate predicted values…

  15. Reactivity of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Iniesta García, María Paz; Moreno Sanroma, Alberto; Martín Porrero, María Pilar; Tapia Valle, Araceli; Cabañas Galán, Beatriz; Salgado Muñoz, María Sagrario

    2010-04-01

    Rate coefficients at room temperature for the reaction of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol with OH and NO(3) radicals and with Cl atoms have been determined in a 150 L PTFE chamber using GC-FID/SPME and FTIR as detection systems. The rate coefficients k (in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) obtained were: (1.13 +/- 0.31) 10(-11) for the OH reaction, (2.93 +/- 0.92) 10(-15) for the NO(3) reaction and (1.88 +/- 0.25) 10(-10) for the Cl reaction. Despite the high concentrations of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, especially in indoor air, this is the first kinetic study carried out to date for these reactions. The results are consistent with the expected reactivity given the chemical structure of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Calculated atmospheric lifetimes reveal that the dominant loss process for 2-ethyl-1-hexanol is clearly the daytime reaction with the hydroxyl radical. PMID:20237722

  16. 40 CFR 799.2700 - Methyl ethyl ketoxime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Specific Chemical Test Rules § 799.2700 Methyl ethyl ketoxime. (a) Identification of test substance. (1... signs of cytotoxicity (e.g., a change in the ratio of polychromatic to normochromatic erythrocytes)...

  17. 40 CFR 799.2700 - Methyl ethyl ketoxime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Specific Chemical Test Rules § 799.2700 Methyl ethyl ketoxime. (a) Identification of test substance. (1... signs of cytotoxicity (e.g., a change in the ratio of polychromatic to normochromatic erythrocytes)...

  18. 40 CFR 799.2700 - Methyl ethyl ketoxime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl ethyl ketoxime. 799.2700 Section 799.2700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Specific Chemical Test Rules § 799.2700...

  19. 76 FR 31479 - Pyraflufen-ethyl; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Federal Register of June 23, 2010 (75 FR 35801) (FRL-8831- 3), EPA issued a notice pursuant to section 408...- ethyl. C. Revisions to Petitioned-for Tolerances In the Federal Register of December 8, 2010 (75 FR..., entitled Regulatory Planning and Review (58 FR 51735, ] October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has...

  20. 77 FR 41346 - Trinexapac-ethyl; Proposed Pesticide Tolerance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... tolerance table for trinexapac-ethyl that was published in the Federal Register on March 2, 2012 (77 FR... Planning and Review'' (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this proposed rule has been exempted from..., Distribution, or Use'' (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001). This proposed rule does not contain any...

  1. Synthesis of Ethyl Nalidixate: A Medicinal Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Ray; Leeb, Elaine; Smith, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments that complement a medicinal chemistry lecture course in drug design and development have been developed. The synthesis of ethyl nalidixate covers three separate experimental procedures, all of which can be completed in three, standard three-hour lab classes and incorporate aspects of green chemistry such as…

  2. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  3. Enantioselective Metabolism of Quizalofop-Ethyl in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yiran; Wang, Peng; Liu, Donghui; Shen, Zhigang; Liu, Hui; Jia, Zhixin; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic and distribution of the enantiomers of quizalofop-ethyl and its metabolite quizalofop-acid were studied in Sprague-Dawley male rats. The two pairs of enantiomers were determined using a validated chiral high-performance liquid chromatography method. Animals were administered quizalofop-ethyl at 10 mg kg−1 orally and intravenously. It was found high concentration of quizalofop-acid in the blood and tissues by both intragastric and intravenous administration, and quizalofop-ethyl could not be detected through the whole study which indicated a quick metabolism of quizalofop-ethyl to quizalofop-acid in vivo. In almost all the samples, the concentrations of (+)-quizalofop-acid exceeded those of (−)-quizalofop-acid. Quizalofop-acid could still be detected in the samples even at 120 h except in brain due to the function of blood-brain barrier. Based on a rough calculation, about 8.77% and 2.16% of quizalofop-acid were excreted through urine and feces after intragastric administration. The oral bioavailability of (+)-quizalofop-acid and (−)-quizalofop-acid were 72.8% and 83.6%. PMID:24964043

  4. Synthesis and degradation behavior of poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate) was synthesized using N, N'-dimethyl-p-toulidine (DMPT) as an initiator through anionic/zwitterionic pathway. The degradability and the degradation mechanism of the prepared polymers were carefully examined from various points of views. It was found that the polymers were...

  5. Mitochondrial adaptations to utilize hydrogen sulfide for energy and signaling.

    PubMed

    Olson, Kenneth R

    2012-10-01

    Sulfur is a versatile molecule with oxidation states ranging from -2 to +6. From the beginning, sulfur has been inexorably entwined with the evolution of organisms. Reduced sulfur, prevalent in the prebiotic Earth and supplied from interstellar sources, was an integral component of early life as it could provide energy through oxidization, even in a weakly oxidizing environment, and it spontaneously reacted with iron to form iron-sulfur clusters that became the earliest biological catalysts and structural components of cells. The ability to cycle sulfur between reduced and oxidized states may have been key in the great endosymbiotic event that incorporated a sulfide-oxidizing α-protobacteria into a host sulfide-reducing Archea, resulting in the eukaryotic cell. As eukaryotes slowly adapted from a sulfidic and anoxic (euxinic) world to one that was highly oxidizing, numerous mechanisms developed to deal with increasing oxidants; namely, oxygen, and decreasing sulfide. Because there is rarely any reduced sulfur in the present-day environment, sulfur was historically ignored by biologists, except for an occasional report of sulfide toxicity. Twenty-five years ago, it became evident that the organisms in sulfide-rich environments could synthesize ATP from sulfide, 10 years later came the realization that animals might use sulfide as a signaling molecule, and only within the last 4 years did it become apparent that even mammals could derive energy from sulfide generated in the gastrointestinal tract. It has also become evident that, even in the present-day oxic environment, cells can exploit the redox chemistry of sulfide, most notably as a physiological transducer of oxygen availability. This review will examine how the legacy of sulfide metabolism has shaped natural selection and how some of these ancient biochemical pathways are still employed by modern-day eukaryotes. PMID:22430869

  6. Surface reactivity of pyrite and related sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Riley; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Pyrite, FeS 2, commonly referred to as "Fool's gold" is the most common sulfide in the Earth's surface region. Not only is the mineral ubiquitous, but the reactivity of pyrite is of central importance in a devastating environmental issue known as acid mine drainage (AMD) and in beneficial commercial processes such as mineral benefaction, which can range from the desulfurization of coal to the isolation of copper or gold ores. Pyrite has even been postulated to be a key constituent of a prebiotic iron-sulfur world existing at the high pressure and temperature conditions common to hydrothermal vents at the oceanic floor. The development of an atomic level picture of the structure and reactivity of pyrite is paramount to understanding the chemistry of this mineral in these wide-ranging environments. This contribution focuses on research carried out over the past three decades that has used modern surface science tools to understand the reactivity of pyrite surfaces. An understanding of the reactivity of the pyrite surfaces has benefited from studies using a wide range of experimental techniques that range from vacuum-based experiments utilizing electron and photon spectroscopies, and probe microscopy to in situ studies using infra-red spectroscopy. Synchrotron-based techniques that include photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy have played a large role in both these environments. These techniques have perhaps been the most useful in establishing the structure of the pristine pyrite surface. Related iron sulfides are also briefly introduced in this review including pyrrhotite (Fe xS 1- x) and the dimorph of pyrite, marcasite. The surface reactivity of these sulfides exhibit both similarities and differences to pyrite, and help to bring forward the unique activity of pyrite in both environmentally and technologically important conditions.

  7. 40 CFR 180.430 - Fenoxaprop-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the...-limited tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including...

  8. 40 CFR 180.430 - Fenoxaprop-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the...-limited tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including...

  9. 40 CFR 180.430 - Fenoxaprop-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the...-limited tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including...

  10. 40 CFR 180.430 - Fenoxaprop-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... combined residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl phenoxy]propanoate] and its metabolites (6-chloro-2... tolerances are established for combined residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, phenoxy]propanoic...

  11. Organic Sulfur Gas Production in Sulfidic Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Engel, A. S.; Bennett, P. C.

    2001-12-01

    Lower Kane Cave, Big Horn Basin, WY, permits access to an environment where anaerobic sulfide-rich groundwater meets the aerobic vadose zone. At this interface microorganisms thrive on diverse metabolic pathways including autotrophic sulfur oxidation, sulfate reduction, and aerobic heterotrophy. Springs introduce groundwater rich in H2S to the cave where it both degasses into the cave atmosphere and is used by chemautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria in the cave spring and stream habitat. The cave atmosphere in the immediate vicinity of the springs has elevated levels of CO2, H2S and methane, mirroring the higher concentration of H2S and methane in the spring water. The high CO2 concentrations are attenuated toward the two main sources of fresh air, the cave entrance and breathing holes at the rear of the cave. Conventional toxic gas monitors permit estimations of H2S concentrations, but they have severe cross sensitivity with other reduced sulfur gases, and thus are inadequate for characterization of sulfur cave gases. However employment of a field-based GC revealed elevated concentrations of carbonyl sulfide in cave atmosphere. Cultures of microorganisms collected from the cave optimized for enriching fermenters and autotrophic and heterophic sulfate reducing bacteria each produced carbonyl sulfide suggesting a biogenic in origin of the COS in addition to H2S. Enrichment cultures also produced methanethiol (methyl mercaptan) and an additional as yet undetermined volatile organic sulfur compound. In culture, the organo-sulfur compounds were less abundant than H2S, whereas in the cave atmosphere the organo-sulfur compounds were the dominant sulfur gases. Thus, these organo-sulfur gases may prove to be important sources of both reduced sulfur and organic carbon to microorganisms living on the cave wall in a subaerial habitat. Moreover groundwater has not yet been recognized as a source of sulfur gases to the atmosphere, but with the abundance of sulfidic

  12. High temperature regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal agents

    DOEpatents

    Copeland, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A system for high temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases using regenerable sorbents. One sorbent is stannic oxide (tin oxide, SnO.sub.2), the other sorbent is a metal oxide or mixed metal oxide such as zinc ferrite (ZnFe.sub.2 O.sub.4). Certain otherwise undesirable by-products, including hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2 S) and sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) are reused by the system, and elemental sulfur is produced in the regeneration reaction. A system for refabricating the sorbent pellets is also described.

  13. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  14. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  15. Alternatives to Sulfide Dehairing: Use of Oxidative Agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dehairing of cattle hides with sodium sulfide generates large quantities of waste that are of environmental concern as they have a large biological and chemical oxygen demand. Additionally, sodium sulfide is a potential workplace hazard. We had worked with industry to develop a rapid dehairing...

  16. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the metal sulfide concentrate may generate toxic or flammable gases, the appropriate gas detection equipment...

  17. Normal state properties of the ternary molybdenum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    By making a large number of normal state and superconducting properties measurements, all on the same ternary molybdenum sulfide samples, we obtain values for Fermi surface and superconducting parameters. From these we conclude that sputtered ternary molybdenum sulfides are not completely in the dirty superconductor limit, and that they are d-band metals with a high electron carrier density.

  18. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 180.430 - Fenoxaprop-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the...-limited tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its... established for residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or...

  3. 40 CFR 180.570 - Isoxadifen-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... residues of isoxadifen-ethyl (ethyl 5,5-diphenyl-2-isoxazoline-3-carboxylate, (CAS No. 163520-33-0), and...-isoxazolecarboxylic acid, 4,5-dihydro-5,5-diphenyl-, ethyl ester (CAS No. 164520-33-0)), and its metabolites...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4250 - Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, ethenyl ester... Substances § 721.4250 Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, ethenyl ester...

  10. 40 CFR 721.7290 - Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)-, ethyl ester. 721.7290 Section 721.7290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7290 Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester (PMN P-01-22; CAS No. 137787-41-8) is subject to...

  11. 40 CFR 721.7290 - Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)-, ethyl ester. 721.7290 Section 721.7290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7290 Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester (PMN P-01-22; CAS No. 137787-41-8) is subject to...

  12. 40 CFR 180.662 - Trinexapac-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trinexapac-ethyl; tolerances for... § 180.662 Trinexapac-ethyl; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for residues of the plant growth inhibitor, trinexapac-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in...

  13. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  14. Physical and microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Thomas; Gallucci, Emanuel; Scrivener, Karen

    2011-03-15

    The microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in dam concrete were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in both dam concrete samples and laboratory concrete. The results show that iron sulfide inclusions with a diameter of a few micrometers in the aggregates are reactive and appear to generate expansion first in the aggregates and consequently in the cement paste. The expansion from the iron sulfides is a consequence of the increase in volume of the reaction products formed. The types of iron sulfide present in the aggregate, mainly pyrrhotite (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), show similar reaction behavior in the aggregates. The released sulfate can lead to a secondary ettringite formation in the concrete matrix, but the degradation associated with this appears to be minor. The reaction of the iron sulfides was found to be very slow even when laboratory samples were exposed to elevated temperatures.

  15. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  16. Clinical Sensitivity and Specificity of Meconium Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters, Ethyl Glucuronide, and Ethyl Sulfate for Detecting Maternal Drinking During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Himes, Sarah K.; Dukes, Kimberly A.; Tripp, Tara; Petersen, Julie M.; Raffo, Cheri; Burd, Larry; Odendaal, Hein; Elliott, Amy J.; Hereld, Dale; Signore, Caroline; Willinger, Marian; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated agreement between self-reported prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) and objective meconium alcohol markers to determine the optimal meconium marker and threshold for identifying PAE. Methods Meconium fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE), ethyl glucuronide (EtG), and ethyl sulfate (EtS) were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 0.1 g meconium from infants of Safe Passage Study participants. Detailed PAE information was collected from women with a validated timeline follow-back interview. As meconium formation begins during weeks 12-20, maternal self-reported drinking at or beyond 19 weeks was our exposure variable. Results Of 107 women, 33 reported no alcohol consumption in pregnancy, 16 stopped drinking by week 19, and 58 drank beyond 19 weeks (including 45 3rd trimester drinkers). There was moderate-substantial agreement between self-reported PAE ≥19 weeks and meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g (kappa: 0.57, 95% CI 0.41-0.73). This biomarker and associated cutoff was superior to a 7 FAEE sum ≥2 nmol/g and all other individual and combination marker cutoffs. With meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g as the gold-standard condition and maternal self-report ≥19 weeks gestation as the test condition, 82% sensitivity (95% CI: 71.6-92.0) and 75% specificity (95% CI: 63.2-86.8) were observed. A significant dose-concentration relationship between self-reported drinks per drinking day and meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g also was observed (P<0.01). Conclusions We assessed meconium EtG, EtS, and FAEE concentrations in the same meconium sample and compared concentrations to detailed self-reported PAE data. Maternal alcohol consumption ≥19 weeks was better represented by meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g compared to current FAEE cutoffs. PMID:25595440

  17. Optical on-line method of ethyl mercaptan detection in liquid phase in motor fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    The letter reports on the experimental research of the absorption spectra of ethyl mercaptan in liquid phase in various motor fuels (petrol, kerosene, and diesel fuel). The values of ethyl mercaptan absorption sections were obtained in the above-mentioned fuels in the spectral range of 280-475 nm, and the dependences of ethyl mercaptan absorption coefficients on its part in the analyzed mixture with motor fuels were researched. On the basis of the obtained results we propose an optical on-line method of ethyl mercaptan detection in motor fuels. The optimal spectral ranges for the highest sensitivity of ethyl mercaptan detection in various motor fuels were determined.

  18. Copper sulfide solid-state electrolytic memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Liang

    Copper sulfide thin films with electrical switching and memory effect were grown using a chemical vapor reaction apparatus. The formation of copper sulfide film undergoes a process which includes nucleation, growth of nucleation, coalescence into continuous film, and film thickening. The initial phase of the sulfide growth was reaction limited followed by a diffusion limited phase involving out-diffusion of copper. The thin film tends to nucleate and grow at energy favorable sites such as twinning boundary. Sulfidation of polycrystalline copper results in formation of voids at the interface between the copper and its sulfide. (111) copper has the highest sulfidation rate followed by (100) and (110) copper planes. Moreover, the sulfidation rate near the microfabricated plug edge was found to be faster than the rate at the center of the plug. A mechanism based on competing sulfidation sites due to the geometry difference between the plugs' center and their edge is presented to explain this phenomenon. We show for the first time that field-assisted solid-electrolyte copper sulfide thin film device can function as a switch by reversing the voltage polarity between copper and inert metal electrodes through a copper-sulfide layer in planar and vertical structures. The copper oxide at the top of copper sulfide greatly increased the turn-on voltage. The turn-on voltage depends linearly on the film thickness. Copper sulfide devices in micrometer dimension were microfabricated using IC compatible techniques and characterized showing the same switching effect. Electrode contact area effect on switching performance was investigated in term of turn-on voltage, turn-off voltage, on-state resistance and off-state resistance. Four-point resistance measurement unit, Hall Effect and transfer length measurement were also fabricated together with copper sulfide switching devices and they were studied in order to determine the CuxS carrier type, carrier concentration, film resistivity

  19. Reactions of methyl and ethyl radicals with uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, John L.; Laguna, Glenn

    1985-01-01

    We have measured the rates of reaction of both methyl and ethyl radicals with uranium hexafluoride (UF6) in the gas phase. The method we used was to photolyze samples of UF6 in the presence of either methane or ethane. The radicals produced by reaction of fluorine atoms with these species then react with either themselves or with UF6. We inferred the rate constants from ratios of the reaction products and the published rate constants for radical recombination. The diagnostic technique was gas chromatography. The resulting rate constants for reaction with UF6 were (1.6±0.8)×10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for methyl radicals and (4±2)×10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for ethyl radicals.

  20. Highly efficient palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of ethyl ethynyl ether

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Ian P.; Kwon, Ohyun

    2008-01-01

    The palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of acetylenes is widely exploited in organic synthesis as a means of forming vinyl stannanes for use in palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. Application of this methodology to ethyl ethynyl ether results in an enol ether that is challenging to isolate from the crude reaction mixture because of incompatibility with typical silica gel chromatography. Reported here is a highly efficient procedure for the palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of ethyl ethynyl ether using 0.1% palladium(0) catalyst and 1.0 equiv of tributyltin hydride. The product obtained is a mixture of regioisomers that can be carried forward with exclusive reaction of the β-isomer. This method is highly reproducible; relative to previously reported procedures, it is more economical and involves a more facile purification procedure. PMID:20011027

  1. Fragrance material review on 2-ethyl-1-hexanol.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2010-07-01

    A summary of the safety data available for 2-ethyl-1-hexanol when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-Ethyl-1-hexanol is a member of the fragrance structural group branched chain saturated alcohols in which the common characteristic structural element is one hydroxyl group per molecule, and a C(4) to C(12) carbon chain with one or several methyl side chains. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. A safety assessment of the entire branched chain saturated alcohol group will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2010) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all other branched chain saturated alcohols in fragrances. PMID:20659633

  2. Fragrance material review on 2-ethyl-1-butanol.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2010-07-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-ethyl-1-butanol when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-Ethyl-1-butanol is a member of the fragrance structural group branched chain saturated alcohols. The common characteristic structural elements of the alcohols with saturated branched chain are one hydroxyl group per molecule, and a C(4)-C(12) carbon chain with one or several methyl side chains. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. A safety assessment of the entire branched chain saturated alcohol group will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2010) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all other branched chain saturated alcohols in fragrances. PMID:20659644

  3. Turbulent Motion in Ethyl Acetate-Water System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Jamil

    2000-09-01

    An overhead projector demonstration is described in which 4 mL of ethyl acetate is added to 10 mL of water contained in a 10-cm diameter Petri dish. Within a minute or so of the addition, image of a turbulent motion appears on the screen, at first at a few centers that eventually organize themselves in a line. The image of the line of turbulence is quite striking and resembles a moving front of dancing flames. The phenomenon arises because as ethyl acetate evaporates from the region where it has spread in the form of a monolayer, fresh material gets transferred to take its place. Because of the viscosity effects, this transfer of the surface film causes movement in the bulk of the material as well, making the process visible.

  4. Enantioselective hydrolysis of naproxen ethyl ester catalyzed by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen-Dan; Yang, Bing-Hui; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Wu, Yu-Lin; Ji, Yong-Yong; Yeh, Ming

    2002-07-01

    This report described that a hapten of racemic phosphonate 3 designed as the mimic of the transition state of hydrolysis of naproxen ethyl ester was successfully synthesized from easily available 2-acetyl-6-methoxy-naphthalene 5. Then BALB/C mice were immunized and one of the monoclonal catalytic antibodies, N116-27, which enantioselectively accelerated the hydrolysis of the R-(-)-naproxen ethyl ester was given. The Michaelis-Menton parameter for the catalyzed reaction was K(M)=6.67 mM and k(cat)/k(uncat)=5.8 x 10(4). This enantioselective result was explained by the fact that the R-isomer of rac-hapten was more immunogenic than the S-isomer. PMID:11983513

  5. SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION AND DETECTION OF ETHYL MERCAPTAN IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, J. L.; Daly, A. M.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Gordon, B. P.; Shipman, S. T. E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es E-mail: terceromb@cab.inta-csic.es E-mail: brittany.gordon@ncf.edu

    2014-03-20

    New laboratory data of ethyl mercaptan, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}SH, in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave domains (up to 880 GHz) provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants that allowed the detection of gauche-CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}SH toward Orion KL. This identification is supported by 77 unblended or slightly blended lines plus no missing transitions in the range 80-280 GHz. A detection of methyl mercaptan, CH{sub 3}SH, in the spectral survey of Orion KL is reported as well. Our column density results indicate that methyl mercaptan is ≅ 5 times more abundant than ethyl mercaptan in the hot core of Orion KL.

  6. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared

  7. [Detection and application of ethyl glucuronide in forensic toxicology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Zhuo, Xian-yi; Shen, Bao-hua

    2009-02-01

    Ethyl glucuronide is a specific metabolite of ethanol. There have been plenty of articles referring its pharmacokinetics, detection and application as a specific bio-marker of alcohol intake. This article reviews various analytical methods of EtG, relationship between EtG quantification and ethanol intake, and criteria for determining chronic alcohol abuse, and origin of ethanol found in the cadavers by EtG analysis. EtG has its potential application in forensic toxicology. PMID:19397218

  8. 21 CFR 172.872 - Methyl ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... a cellulose ether having the general formula [C6H(10 -x-y)O5(CH3)x(C2H5)y]n, where x is the number of methyl groups and y is the number of ethyl groups. The average value of x is 0.3 and the average... the dry sample. (2) The viscosity of an aqueous solution, 2.5 grams of the material in 100...

  9. 21 CFR 172.872 - Methyl ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... a cellulose ether having the general formula [C6H(10 -x-y)O5(CH3)x(C2H5)y]n, where x is the number of methyl groups and y is the number of ethyl groups. The average value of x is 0.3 and the average... the dry sample. (2) The viscosity of an aqueous solution, 2.5 grams of the material in 100...

  10. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of ethyl acetate and ethanol in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Crowell, S R; Smith, J N; Creim, J A; Faber, W; Teeguarden, J G

    2015-10-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed and applied to a metabolic series approach for the ethyl series (i.e., ethyl acetate, ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate). This approach bases toxicity information on dosimetry analyses for metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic data for each compound and toxicity data for parent or individual compounds. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies of ethyl acetate and ethanol were conducted in rats following IV and inhalation exposure. Regardless of route, ethyl acetate was rapidly converted to ethanol. Blood concentrations of ethyl acetate and ethanol following both IV bolus and infusion suggested linear kinetics across blood concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM ethyl acetate and 0.01-0.8 mM ethanol. Metabolic parameters were optimized and evaluated based on available pharmacokinetic data. The respiratory bioavailability of ethyl acetate and ethanol were estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting ethyl series model successfully reproduces blood ethyl acetate and ethanol kinetics following IV administration and inhalation exposure in rats, and blood ethanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to ethanol in humans. The extrapolated human model was used to derive human equivalent concentrations for the occupational setting of 257-2120 ppm ethyl acetate and 72-517 ppm ethyl acetate for continuous exposure, corresponding to rat LOAELs of 350 and 1500 ppm. PMID:26297692

  11. Hydrogen sulfide selectivity with carbonyl sulfide removal to less than PPM levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, T.R.; Pearce, R.L.; Foster, W.R. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Changes in market conditions and plant operating economics require examination of traditional processes and operating practices in gas treating applications for upgrading to more stringent standards of efficiency in order to remain competitive while returning a satisfactory operating profit margin to the company. Anticipated reduction in solvent usage, improvements in Claus sulfur recovery unit performance and lower energy costs induced Ashland's Catlettsburg refinery to convert its entire sulfur removal system from monoethanolamine to methyldiethanolamine. One of the seven product streams being treated required extremely low carbonyl sulfide specifications. When the initial converted operations evidenced a need to improve the carbonyl sulfide removal, GAS/SPEC Tech Service produced an innovative solution which allowed for efficient operation which still achieved these objectives.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of aluminum sulfide thin films using trimethylaluminum and hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Soumyadeep; Sarkar, Shaibal K.; Mahuli, Neha

    2015-01-15

    Sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum and hydrogen sulfide are used to deposit aluminum sulfide thin films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the temperature ranging from 100 to 200 °C. Growth rate of 1.3 Å per ALD cycle is achieved by in-situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements. It is found that the growth rate per ALD cycle is highly dependent on the purging time between the two precursors. Increased purge time results in higher growth rate. Surface limited chemistry during each ALD half cycle is studied by in-situ Fourier transformed infrared vibration spectroscopy. Time of flight secondary ion-mass spectroscopy measurement is used to confirm elemental composition of the deposited films.

  13. Impact of Association Colloids on Lipid Oxidation in Triacylglycerols and Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Suzuki, Karin; Cui, Leqi; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-11-25

    The impact of association colloids on lipid oxidation in triacylglycerols and fatty acid ethyl esters was investigated. Association colloids did not affect lipid oxidation of high oleic safflower and high linoleic safflower triacylglycerols, but were prooxidative in fish triacylglycerols. Association colloids retarded aldehyde formation in stripped ethyl oleate, linoleate, and fish oil ethyl esters. Interfacial tension revealed that lipid hydroperoxides were surface active in the presence of the surfactants found in association colloids. The lipid hydroperoxides from ethyl esters were less surface active than triacylglycerol hydroperoxides. Stripping decreased iron and copper concentrations in all oils, but more so in fatty acid ethyl esters. The combination of lower hydroperoxide surface activity and low metal concentrations could explain why association colloids inhibited lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters. This research suggests that association colloids could be used as an antioxidant technology in fatty acid ethyl esters. PMID:26506263

  14. Sensory reception of the primer pheromone ethyl oleate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenz, Thomas S.; Maisonnasse, Alban; Plettner, Erika; Le Conte, Yves; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    Social work force distribution in honeybee colonies critically depends on subtle adjustments of an age-related polyethism. Pheromones play a crucial role in adjusting physiological and behavioral maturation of nurse bees to foragers. In addition to primer effects of brood pheromone and queen mandibular pheromone—both were shown to influence onset of foraging—direct worker-worker interactions influence adult behavioral maturation. These interactions were narrowed down to the primer pheromone ethyl oleate, which is present at high concentrations in foragers, almost absent in young bees and was shown to delay the onset of foraging. Based on chemical analyses, physiological recordings from the antenna (electroantennograms) and the antennal lobe (calcium imaging), and behavioral assays (associative conditioning of the proboscis extension response), we present evidence that ethyl oleate is most abundant on the cuticle, received by olfactory receptors on the antenna, processed in glomeruli of the antennal lobe, and learned in olfactory centers of the brain. The results are highly suggestive that the primer pheromone ethyl oleate is transmitted and perceived between individuals via olfaction at close range.

  15. Fragrance material review on ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties; acute toxicity; skin irritation; and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. PMID:22433983

  16. Banded sulfide-magnetite ores of Mauk copper massive sulfide deposit, Central Urals: Composition and genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safina, N. P.; Maslennikov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Kotlyarov, V. A.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Large, R. R.; Blinov, I. A.

    2015-05-01

    The results of investigation of metamorphosed sulfide-magnetite ores from the Mauk deposit located within the Main Ural Fault at the junction of Tagil and Magnitogorsk massive sulfide zones are discussed. The ore-hosting sequence comprises metamorphic rocks formed from basalt, carbonaceous and carbonaceous-cherty siltstone, and lenticular serpentinized ultramafic bodies. The ores of the deposit are represented by banded varieties and less frequent breccia. The clastic origin of the banded ore is indicated by load casts at the bottom of sulfide beds, alternation of sulfide and barren beds, and the truncation of the growth zones of pyrite crystals. Pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and magnetite are the major minerals of the banded ores. The internal structure of the listed minerals testifies to the deep metamorphic recrystallization of primary hydrothermal-sedimentary ores accompanied with deformation. Cubanite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite, greigite, and gold are enclosed in metacrysts of pyrite, magnetite, and chalcopyrite. The accessory minerals of the Pb-Bi-Te, Bi-Te, and Ag-Te systems as well as uraninite have been found at the Mauk deposit for the first time. Magnetite predominantly replaces pyrite and less frequently chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and gangue minerals. It was established that the major carriers of As and Co are crystals of metamorphic pyrite. Chalcopyrite is the major carrier of Zn, Sn, Te, Pb, Bi, and Ag. Admixture of Fe and Cu is typical of sphalerite, and Se and Ni are characteristic of pyrrhotite. Ti, V, Mn, Sb, As, Ba, and U are concentrated in magnetite. The banded ores of the Mauk deposit are suggested as having been transformed in several stages: diagenesis, anadiagenesis, epidiagenesis ( t < 300°C), and amphibolite facies metamorphism ( t > 500°C).

  17. Sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanchen; Wu, Chen; Zhou, Xiaohong; Zhu, David Z; Shi, Hanchang

    2015-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen sulfide in biofilms and sediments in sewer systems can cause severe pipe corrosions and health hazards, and requires expensive programs for its prevention. The aim of this study is to propose a new control strategy and the optimal condition for sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments. The study was carried out based on lab-scale experiments and batch tests using real sewer sediments. The intermittent nitrate dosing mode and the optimal control condition were investigated. The results indicated that the sulfide-intermittent-elimination strategy by nitrate dosing is advantageous for controlling sulfide accumulation in sewer sediment. The oxidation-reduction potential is a sensitive indicator parameter that can reflect the control effect and the minimum N/S (nitrate/sulfide) ratio with slight excess nitrate is necessary for optimal conditions of efficient sulfide control with lower carbon source loss. The optimal control condition is feasible for the sulfide elimination in sewer systems. PMID:25597685

  18. Stabilization of mercury-containing wastes using sulfide.

    PubMed

    Piao, Haishan; Bishop, Paul L

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of our studies on mercury stabilization using sulfide. Primary stabilization variables such as stabilization pH and sulfide/mercury molar ratio were tested. Mercury stabilization effectiveness was evaluated using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and the constant pH leaching tests. The influence of interfering ions on mercury immobilization was also tested. The experimental results indicate that the sulfide-induced treatment technology is an effective way to minimize mercury leaching. It was found that the most effective mercury stabilization occurs at pH 6 combined with a sulfide/mercury molar ratio of 1. The combined use of increased dosage of sulfide and ferrous ions ([S]/[Hg]=2 and [Fe]/[Hg]=3 at pH=6) can significantly reduce interferences by chloride and/or phosphate during sulfide-induced mercury immobilization. The sulfide-treated waste stabilization efficiency reached 98%, even with exposure of the wastes to high pH leachants. PMID:16099084

  19. Solubility of hydrogen sulfide in n-methylpyrrolidone

    SciTech Connect

    Yarym-Agaev, N.L.; Matvienko, V.G.; Povalyaeva, N.V.

    1980-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen sulfide in N-methylpyrrolidone was investigated over wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The dynamic variant of the gravimetric method was used at hydrogen sulfide pressures equal to or below atmospheric, and the static variant at higher pressures. In the dynamic variant of the gravimetric method hydrogen sulfide is passed through a known amount of solvent until saturation is reached, and the amount of gas dissolved is found from the weight increase. This method is particularly convenient in studies of highly soluble gases when the solvent has a low vapor pressure. If the vapor pressure of the solvent exceeded this value a correction for entrainment of solvent vapor by undissolved gas was applied. The study showed that the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in N-methylpyrrolidone rose steeply with increase of pressure and decrease of temperature and that it can be used as an effective absorbent of hydrogen sulfide in highly sulfurous natural gas. Since the solubility of hydrogen sulfide under atmospheric pressure is fairly high even at elevated temperatures, effective regeneration of N-methylpyrrolidone is possible by a combination of heating and blowing with an inert gas or by application of vacuum for removal of the hydrogen sulfide.

  20. [Oxidation of sulfide minerals by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans].

    PubMed

    Malakhova, P T; Chebotarev, G M; Kovalenko, E V; Volkov, Iu A

    1981-01-01

    Samples of natural pyrites and sphalerites were subjected to the action of the mineral medium 9K with 1 g of Fe3+ per litre in the presence and in the absence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, and incubated at 28 degrees C under the stationary conditions for 30 days. The chemical composition of the solutions was studied after leaching as well as changes of the surfaces of monoliths. The deepest etching of surfaces with the formation of crusts and films of jarosite, limonite and goslarite occurs upon the combined action of bacteria and Fe3+ in regions of a fine-zonal structure enriched with an isomorphous arsenic admixture which are characterized by a defective weak structure. The pyrite and sphalerite from Charmitan with a higher arsenic and iron content were leached more than the pyrite and sphalerite from Kurgashincan. This was also corroborated by chemical analyses of leaching solutions and by monometric studies of crushed sulfide samples. PMID:7219212

  1. Dibenzyl Sulfide Metabolism by White Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Wong, Eddie T.; Dettman, Heather; Gray, Murray R.; Pickard, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Microbial metabolism of organosulfur compounds is of interest in the petroleum industry for in-field viscosity reduction and desulfurization. Here, dibenzyl sulfide (DBS) metabolism in white rot fungi was studied. Trametes trogii UAMH 8156, Trametes hirsuta UAMH 8165, Phanerochaete chrysosporium ATCC 24725, Trametes versicolor IFO 30340 (formerly Coriolus sp.), and Tyromyces palustris IFO 30339 all oxidized DBS to dibenzyl sulfoxide prior to oxidation to dibenzyl sulfone. The cytochrome P-450 inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole eliminated dibenzyl sulfoxide oxidation. Laccase activity (0.15 U/ml) was detected in the Trametes cultures, and concentrated culture supernatant and pure laccase catalyzed DBS oxidation to dibenzyl sulfoxide more efficiently in the presence of 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) than in its absence. These data suggest that the first oxidation step is catalyzed by extracellular enzymes but that subsequent metabolism is cytochrome P-450 mediated. PMID:12571066

  2. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and wild type'' strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V[sub m] = 376 mg dm[sup [minus]3] h[sup [minus]1] and K 1.27 m[sup 2] g[sup [minus]1].

  3. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and ``wild type`` strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V{sub m} = 376 mg dm{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1} and K 1.27 m{sup 2} g{sup {minus}1}.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  5. Hydrogen sulfide exposure in an adult male

    PubMed Central

    Doujaiji, Bassam; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is responsible for many incidents of occupational toxic exposure, especially in the petroleum industry. The clinical effects of H2S depend on its concentration and the duration of exposure. H2S is immediately fatal when concentrations are over 500-1000 parts per million (ppm) but exposure to lower concentrations, such as 10-500 ppm, can cause various respiratory symptoms that range from rhinitis to acute respiratory failure. H2S may also affect multiple organs, causing temporary or permanent derangements in the nervous, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, and hematological systems. We present a case of occupational exposure to H2S leading to multi-organ involvement, acute respiratory failure, organizing pneumonia, and shock resembling acute sepsis. The patient also developed mild obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disease and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:20103963

  6. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  7. Structure of 4-methylpyridinium Hydrogen Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Martuch, Robert A.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    4-Methylpyridinium hydrogen sulfide, (C6H7NH)HS, M(sub r) = 127.21, consists of C6H7NH(+) cations and HS(-) anions. Z = 2 for the crystal with monoclinic space group Cm (#8), dimensions of a = 8.679(2) A, b = 7.964(1) A, and c = 4.860(2) A, an angle beta of 101.10(2) degrees, and a volume of V = 329.6(3) A(exp 3). R = 0.039 and R(sub w) = 0.048 for 385 reflections with F(sub o)(exp 2) greater than 3 sigma(F(sub o)(exp 2)) and 59 variables. Both the C6H7NH(+) cation and the HS(-) anion lie on crystallographic mirror planes with the N,S, two carbon atoms, and two hydrogen atoms positioned in the planes. The hydrogen atom of the HS(-) anion was not located.

  8. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide exchange in bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, A.; Klinger, L.F.; Erickson, D.J. III )

    1993-01-22

    Measurements of Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes were carried out on bog microcosms using chamber sampling and tunable diode laser analysis. Intact bog microcosms (vascular plants, mosses, and peat) removed ambient levels of OCS in the light and dark with rates from [minus]2.4 to [minus]8.1 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2]. Peat and peat plus mosses emitted OCS in the light with rates of 17.4 and 10.9 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2], respectively. In the dark, the mosses apparently removed OCS at a rate equivalent to the peat emissions. A 3-D numerical tracer model using this data indicated that boreal bog ecosystems remove at most 1% of ambient OCS, not sufficient to account for an observed OCS depletion in boreal air masses. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  10. Reactively evaporated films of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of superconducting Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide CuxMo6S8 were deposited on sapphire substrates by reactive evaporation using H2S as the reacting gas. Two superconducting temperatures (10.0 K and 5.0 K) of the films were found, corresponding to two different phases with different copper concentrations. All films were superconducting above 4.2 K and contained Chevrel-phase compound as well as free molybdenum. The critical current was measured as a function of applied field. One sample was found to deviate from the scaling law found for co-evaporated or sputtered samples, which possibly indicates a different pinning mechanism or inhomogeneity of the sample.

  11. Chemical Foundations of Hydrogen Sulfide Biology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  12. Chemical foundations of hydrogen sulfide biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R

    2013-11-30

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  13. Lanthanum sulfides as high temperature thermoelectric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Matsuda, S.; Raag, V.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoelectric property measurements have been made for the nonstoichiometric lanthanum sulfides, LaS(R) with R in the range 1.33-1.50. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities increase with temperature from 200 to 1100 C. Power factors (defined as Seebeck coefficient squared divided by electrical resistivity) generally increase both as the temperature is increased and as the compound composition is varied from LaS(1.48) to LaS(1.35). The power factor values combined with estimates of thermal conductivities for LaS(1.38) and LaS(1.4) yield figures of merit greater than 0.0005 at 1000 C.

  14. Comparison of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) concentrations in hair for testing abstinence.

    PubMed

    Albermann, M E; Musshoff, F; Madea, B

    2011-04-01

    Hair analysis is a powerful tool for retrospective drug analysis. By determining the minor ethanol metabolites ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in hair, even a previous consumption of alcohol is detectable. However, previous studies showed a lack of correlation if both parameters are determined simultaneously. A further study was conducted to confirm or refute these results. One hundred and sixty hair samples were analyzed for EtG and FAEE in the context of driving ability. In 109 cases, alcohol abstinence was clearly proven and was excluded in 15 cases. In 36 cases, ambiguous results were found. Possible reasons for the deviating results are discussed. It is recommended, that in context of driving ability diagnostics the EtG result is determinant. In critical cases FAEE concentrations can be determined for checking purposes, but a negative FAEE result cannot refute a determined EtG concentration >7 pg/mg. PMID:21127843

  15. Liquid-liquid extraction separation of iron (III) with 2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid mono 2-ethyl hexyl ester.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, J; Dhadke, P M

    1997-07-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction separation of iron(III) with 2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid mono 2-ethyl hexyl ester (PC-88A) in toluene has been studied. Quantitative extraction of iron(III) with 5 x 10(-3) M PC-88A in toluene is observed in the pH range 0.75-2.5. From the extracted complex species in the organic phase iron(III) was stripped with 1-4 M HNO(3), 1.5-4 M H(2)SO(4) and 1.5-4 M HCl, and later determined spectrophotometrically by thiocyanate method. Separation of iron(III) was carried out with some of the first transition metals in binary and multicomponent mixtures. This method was extended for the determination of iron in real samples. PMID:18966864

  16. MODIFICATION OF METHODS 9030 AND 9031 FOR THE ANALYSIS OF SULFIDE BY SPECIFIC ION ELECTRODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two OSW SW-846 methods (Method 9030 and 9031) used for the determination of sulfide have been modified to include the use of sulfide specific ion electrodes (SIE). urrently in both methods sulfide is converted to hydrogen sulfide and distilled into a scrubber solution for subsequ...

  17. Optimization of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Masur, E. A.

    2015-12-15

    The electron and phonon spectra, as well as the densities of electron and phonon states of the SH{sub 3} phase and the stable orthorhombic structure of hydrogen sulfide SH{sub 2}, are calculated for the pressure interval 100–225 GPa. It is found that the I4/mmm phase can be responsible for the superconducting properties of metallic hydrogen sulfide along with the SH{sub 3} phase. Sequential stages for obtaining and conservation of the SH{sub 2} phase are proposed. The properties of two (SH{sub 2} and SH{sub 3}) superconducting phases of hydrogen sulfide are compared.

  18. Integrated thin film cadmium sulfide solar cell module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelsen, R. A.; Abbott, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication and tests of flexible integrated thin-film cadmium sulfide solar cells and modules are discussed. The development of low cost and high production rate methods for interconnecting cells into large solar arrays is described. Chromium thin films were applied extensively in the deposited cell structures as a means to: (1) achieve high adherence between the cadmium sulfide films and the vacuum-metallized copper substrates, (2) obtain an ohmic contact to the cadmium sulfide films, and (3) improve the adherence of gold films as grids or contact areas.

  19. Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, John B. L.; Gorski, Anthony J.; Daniels, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A process for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

  20. Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Gorski, A.J.; Daniels, E.J.

    1993-05-18

    A process is described for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is [dis]associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

  1. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  2. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

    2006-05-02

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  3. Micro-aeration for hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duangmanee, Thanapong

    The presence of sulfur compounds (e.g. protein, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, etc.) in the feed stream generates highly corrosive and odorous hydrogen sulfide during anaerobic digestion. The high sulfide level in the biogas stream is not only poisonous to many novel metal catalysts employed in thermo-catalytic processes but also reduces the quality of methane to produce renewable energy. This study used an innovative, low-maintenance, low-cost biological sulfide removal technology to remove sulfides simultaneously from both gas and liquid phase. ORP (Oxidation-Reduction-Potential) was used as the controlling parameter to precisely regulate air injection to the sulfide oxidizing unit (SOU). The microaeration technique provided just enough oxygen to partially oxidize sulfides to elemental sulfur without inhibiting methanogenesis. The SOU was equipped with a diffuser at the bottom for the dispersion of sulfide-laden biogas and injected air throughout the column. The SOU can be operated as a standalone unit or coupled with an anaerobic digester to simultaneously remove sulfide from the biogas and effluent. The integrated system was capable of reducing hydrogen sulfide in biogas from 2,450 to less than 2 ppmV with minimal sulfate production at the highest available sulfide loading rate of 0.24 kg/m3-day. More than 98% of sulfide removed was recovered as elemental sulfur. However, the standalone SOU was able to operate at high hydrogen sulfide loading of 1.46 kg/m 3-day at inlet sulfide concentration of 3000 ppmV and reduce the off-gas hydrogen sulfide concentrations to less than 10 ppmV. The experiment also revealed that the ORP controlled aeration was sensitive enough to prevent oxygen overdosing (dampening effect) during unexpected surges of aeration. Using generalized linear regression, a model predicting output H2S concentration based on input H2S concentrations, SOU medium heights, and biogas flow rates, was derived. With 95% confidence, output H2S concentration

  4. Enhanced Mantle Conductivity from Sulfides beneath the Sierra Nevada?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. K.

    2002-12-01

    A region of enhanced mantle conductivity (0.03-0.1 S/m) beneath the southern Sierra Nevada, where elevations of over 4000 m are found, has been attributed previously to 3-5% basaltic melt (Park et al., 1996) and to a mix of basaltic and sulfide melt (Ducea and Park, 2000). Because the sulfide melt is assumed to have similar conductivities to its solid counterpart (10,000 S/m), very small amounts (< 0.1%) of sulfide are needed in order to reduce the bulk conductivity from matrix values of about 0.003 S/m or even that of the matrix-basalt melt mix to the values observed. Basaltic melt percentages of less than 1% are needed in the presence of ~0.1% sulfide melt in order to match the observed mantle values. Xenoliths from the Holocene basalts in the Big Pine Volcanic Field contain 0.06-0.4% sulfide, so the estimated values are reasonable. Given the lack of evidence for volumetrically extensive, young (< 10 Ma) basaltic volcanism, calculated residence times of approximately 100 Ka for 3-5% partial melt, the short (about 300 Ka) times needed to develop connected pathways for the basalt, and the young extension of the adjacent Basin and Range province, a mixed melt with both basalt and sulfides seems more reasonable. This conclusion presupposes that the sulfide melt is somehow interconnected in the mantle. Models in which the matrix, the basaltic melt, and the sulfide melt each form interconnected, interlaced networks leads to much higher predictions of mantle conductivity; the sulfide melt fraction must be discontinuous in order to lower bulk conductivity. Petrological studies of sulfide-silicate systems confirm this conclusion; sulfide melts form isolated blebs on the surfaces of olivine within interconnected basaltic melt channels (Holzheid et al., 2000). Simple series-parallel models of ~1% continuous basaltic melt and ~0.01% discontinuous sulfide melt provide bulk conductivities comparable to the observed mantle values. More complicated equivalent media and Hashin

  5. Determination of low concentrations of the flotation reagent ethyl xanthate by sampled DC polarography and flow injection with amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, P; Gutz, I G

    2001-04-12

    A polarographic DC(tast) method with the static mercury drop electrode, SMDE, was developed for determination of the flotation collector ethyl xanthate (EtX) in the concentration range from 1x10(-5) to 8x10(-5) M. The potentiality of the method was demonstrated by evaluating the capacity of powdered galena ore (PbS) to adsorb EtX in a titration-like procedure. Sulfide could be determined simultaneously with EtX because in NaOH electrolyte their anodic waves are well separated (E(1/2) congruent with-0.72 and -0.42 V versus Ag/AgCl, respectively). In addition, a new FIA method was developed by adapting a simple device to the tip of the glass capillary of a mercury electrode and doing amperometric detection at a fixed potential of -0.1 V, always in the DC(tast) mode. No oxygen removal was required. Reproducible results were obtained at a frequency of 72 injections per h, with automatic renewal of the SMDE every second. The calibration curve for freshly prepared EtX standards rendered a straight line from 5x10(-6) to 8x10(-5) M with correlation coefficient of 0.997, suitable for real applications in flotation processes and its effluents. PMID:18968265

  6. 40 CFR 180.483 - O-[2-(1,1-Dimethylethyl)-5-pyrimidinyl] O-ethyl-O-(1-methyl-ethyl) phosphorothioate; tolerances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false O- O-ethyl-O-(1-methyl-ethyl) phosphorothioate; tolerances for residues. 180.483 Section 180.483 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.483...

  7. GENOTOXICITY OF ACRYLIC ACID, METHYL ACRYLATE, ETHYL ACRYLATE, METHYL METHACRYLATE, AND ETHYL METHACRYLATE IN L5178Y MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of monomeric acrylate/methacrylate esters (methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, and ethyl methacrylate) as well as acrylic acid were examined for genotoxic activity in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells without exogenous activation. All five compounds induced c...

  8. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of ethyl palmitate calibration and resolution with ethyl oleate as biomarker ethanol sub acute in urine application study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suaniti, Ni Made; Manurung, Manuntun

    2016-03-01

    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry is used to separate two and more compounds and identify fragment ion specific of biomarker ethanol such as palmitic acid ethyl ester (PAEE), as one of the fatty acid ethyl esters as early detection through conyugated reaction. This study aims to calibrate ethyl palmitate and develop analysis with oleate acid. This methode can be used analysis ethanol and its chemistry biomarker in ethanol sub-acute consumption as analytical forensic toxicology. The result show that ethanol level in urine rats Wistar were 9.21 and decreased 6.59 ppm after 48 hours consumption. Calibration curve of ethyl palmitate was y = 0.2035 x + 1.0465 and R2 = 0.9886. Resolution between ethyl palmitate and oleate were >1.5 as good separation with fragment ion specific was 88 and the retention time was 18 minutes.

  9. Catalytic reduction of CO with hydrogen sulfide. 4. Temperature-programmed desorption of methanethiol on anatase, rutile, and sulfided rutile

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.D.; White, J.M.; Ratcliffe, C.T.

    1986-07-03

    The interaction of methanethiol with anatase, rutile, and sulfided rutile was studied by temperature-programmed desorption. Dissociative adsorption occurs on rutile but is insignificant on anatase. Decomposition products are dominated by H/sub 2/ on rutile and by CH/sub 4/ on sulfided rutile. In both cases desorption occurs between 500 and 775 K. The 5- and 4-coordinate sites on the (110) face of rutile are proposed as the active sites for decomposition. The dominance of methane on a sulfided surface is attributed to the relatively large supply of highly mobile surface hydrogen atoms.

  10. Labeled 1,N6-ethenoadenosine and 3,N4-ethenocytidine in hepatic RNA of mice given[ethyl-1,2(-3)H or ethyl-1(-14)C]ethyl carbamate (urethan).

    PubMed

    Ribovich, M L; Miller, J A; Miller, E C; Timmins, L G

    1982-01-01

    Injection of a single dose of[ethyl-1,2(-3)H]or[ethyl-1(-14C]- ethyl carbamate into 12-day old male[C57BL/6 x C3H/He]F1 mice or of[ethyl-1,2(-3H]ethyl carbamate into adult male A/Jax mice resulted in the formation of labeled 1,N6-ethenoadenosine and 3,N4-ethenocytidine adducts in the hepatic RNA. These adducts were characterized by comigration on h.p.l.c. of 3H or 14C in enzymatic hydrolysates of the RNA with synthetic standards. Both the ethenoadenosine and ethenocytidine were further characterized by their conversion to acetylated products that comigrated with acetylated synthetic standards. The ethenoadenosine was also converted by anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid to a product that comigrated with synthetic 1,N6-ethenoadenine. The levels of adducts in the hepatic RNA 12 h after a single injection of 0.5-0.6 mg of ethyl carbamate/g body weight were 6-10 and 2-3 pmol/mg RNA of ethenoadenosine and ethenocytidine, respectively. No labeled ethenoadenosine or ethenocytidine could be detected in the hepatic RNA of mice given[1-14C]ethanol, an enzymatic hydrolysis product of ethyl carbamate. These data indicate that ethyl carbamate may be metabolically activated by dehydrogenation to vinyl carbamate and subsequent epoxidation of the latter compound as previously proposed. Vinyl carbamate epoxide may form etheno derivatives in a manner analogous to that demonstrated for chloroethylene oxide, an electrophilic metabolite of vinyl chloride. Vinyl carbamate has been shown to have the same spectrum of tumor induction as ethyl carbamate but to be much more active than the latter carcinogen. PMID:6178529

  11. Micro-PIXE Analysis of Trace Elements in Sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Hickmott, D.D.; Wetteland, C.; Stimac, J.; Larocque, A.C.L.; Brearley, A.

    2003-08-26

    Micro-scale Proton-induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) of trace elements (TE) in sulfides provides insights into geologic processes including magmatic system evolution, ore forming events, and fluid-flow processes. The Los Alamos nuclear microprobe was used to determine TE concentrations and ratios in sulfides from diverse geologic environments including hydrothermal ore deposits, coal seams, and metamorphic rocks. Pyrrhotite (Po) from silicic volcanics contains high Cu and Ni; Po from the Clear Lake volcanic field has higher Mo than does Po from other volcanic fields. Coal pyrites contain high Cu, As, Se, Mo and Pb, and show high As/Se and Mo/Se in marine influenced sulfides from the Lower Kittanning coal, but not in other marine-influenced coals. Sulfides are amenable to micro-PIXE studies because of the difficulties in obtaining the homogeneous standards required for many other TE microanalytical techniques.

  12. The hydrogen sulfide metabolite trimethylsulfonium is found in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajin, Bassam; Francesconi, Kevin A.

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is the third and most recently discovered gaseous signaling molecule following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, playing important roles both in normal physiological conditions and disease progression. The trimethylsulfonium ion (TMS) can result from successive methylation reactions of hydrogen sulfide. No report exists so far about the presence or quantities of TMS in human urine. We developed a method for determining TMS in urine using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QQQ), and applied the method to establish the urinary levels of TMS in a group of human volunteers. The measured urinary levels of TMS were in the nanomolar range, which is commensurate with the steady-state tissue concentrations of hydrogen sulfide previously reported in the literature. The developed method can be used in future studies for the quantification of urinary TMS as a potential biomarker for hydrogen sulfide body pools.

  13. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Sulfur in Organic Compounds,” “Determination of the Inherent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sulfide,” and... viscosity: 0.13 deciliters per gram. (3) Maximum residual p-dichlorobenzene: 0.8 ppm. (b) Subject to...

  14. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Sulfur in Organic Compounds,” “Determination of the Inherent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sulfide,” and... viscosity: 0.13 deciliters per gram. (3) Maximum residual p-dichlorobenzene: 0.8 ppm. (b) Subject to...

  15. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...,” “Determination of the Inherent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sulfide,” and “Analysis for Dichlorobenzene in Ryton... percent by weight of finished resin. (2) Minimum inherent viscosity: 0.13 deciliters per gram. (3)...

  16. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Sulfur in Organic Compounds,” “Determination of the Inherent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sulfide,” and... viscosity: 0.13 deciliters per gram. (3) Maximum residual p-dichlorobenzene: 0.8 ppm. (b) Subject to...

  17. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Sulfur in Organic Compounds,” “Determination of the Inherent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sulfide,” and... viscosity: 0.13 deciliters per gram. (3) Maximum residual p-dichlorobenzene: 0.8 ppm. (b) Subject to...

  18. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  19. TREATMENT OF METAL FINISHING WASTES BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project involved precipitating heavy metals normally present in metal finishing wastewaters by a novel process which employs ferrous sulfide addition (Sulfex), as well as by conventional treatment using calcium hydroxide for comparison purposes. These studies consisted of la...

  20. Crystallinity of Fe-Ni Sulfides in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Ohsumi, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Le, L.

    2008-03-01

    We examine the crystallinity and crystal structures of Fe-Ni sulfides in five carbonaceous chondrites - Acfer 094 (CM2), Tagish Lake (C2 ungrouped), Kaidun C1, Bali (CV2/3 oxidized), and Efremovka (CV3 reduced).

  1. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfide in wastewaters discharged by plants operating in all subcategories except the hair save or pulp... by plants operating in the hair save or pulp, non-chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory (subpart...

  2. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfide in wastewaters discharged by plants operating in all subcategories except the hair save or pulp... by plants operating in the hair save or pulp, non-chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory (subpart...

  3. [Activity of hydrogen sulfide production enzymes in kidneys of rats].

    PubMed

    Mel'nyk, A V; Pentiuk, O O

    2009-01-01

    An experimental research of activity and kinetic descriptions of enzymes participating in formation of hydrogen sulfide in the kidney of rats has been carried out. It was established that cystein, homocystein and thiosulphate are the basic substrates for hydrogen sulfide synthesis. The higest activity for hydrogen sulfide production belongs to thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cysteine aminotransferase, less activity is characteristic of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathio-nine gamma-lyase. The highest affinity to substrate is registered for thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. It is discovered that the substrate inhibition is typical of all hydrogen sulfide formation enzymes, although this characteristic is the most expressed thiosulfat-dithiolsulfurtransferase. PMID:20387629

  4. The hydrogen sulfide metabolite trimethylsulfonium is found in human urine.

    PubMed

    Lajin, Bassam; Francesconi, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is the third and most recently discovered gaseous signaling molecule following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, playing important roles both in normal physiological conditions and disease progression. The trimethylsulfonium ion (TMS) can result from successive methylation reactions of hydrogen sulfide. No report exists so far about the presence or quantities of TMS in human urine. We developed a method for determining TMS in urine using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QQQ), and applied the method to establish the urinary levels of TMS in a group of human volunteers. The measured urinary levels of TMS were in the nanomolar range, which is commensurate with the steady-state tissue concentrations of hydrogen sulfide previously reported in the literature. The developed method can be used in future studies for the quantification of urinary TMS as a potential biomarker for hydrogen sulfide body pools. PMID:27247020

  5. The hydrogen sulfide metabolite trimethylsulfonium is found in human urine

    PubMed Central

    Lajin, Bassam; Francesconi, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is the third and most recently discovered gaseous signaling molecule following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, playing important roles both in normal physiological conditions and disease progression. The trimethylsulfonium ion (TMS) can result from successive methylation reactions of hydrogen sulfide. No report exists so far about the presence or quantities of TMS in human urine. We developed a method for determining TMS in urine using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QQQ), and applied the method to establish the urinary levels of TMS in a group of human volunteers. The measured urinary levels of TMS were in the nanomolar range, which is commensurate with the steady-state tissue concentrations of hydrogen sulfide previously reported in the literature. The developed method can be used in future studies for the quantification of urinary TMS as a potential biomarker for hydrogen sulfide body pools. PMID:27247020

  6. Thermal Decomposition of Ethyl Formate behind the Reflected Shock Waves in the Temperature Range of 909-1258K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaganesh, M.; Sudhakar, G.; Rajakumar, B.

    Ethyl formate is the simplest model of ethyl esters which are considered as biodiesel. Systematic tests on properties and reactivity of biodiesel have been reported[1, 2]. Methyl and ethyl ester mix can offer improved physical properties. Generally, ethyl esters are slightly more reactive than the methyl esters[3]. Also ethyl formate is an interstellar molecule. It was first detected in interstellar space by Belloche et al.[4]. So studies of this molecule are required to understand the fuel properties and interstellar chemistry.

  7. A New Preparation Method of Ultrafine Particles of Metallic Sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaito, Chihiro; Saito, Yoshio; Fujita, Kazuo

    1987-12-01

    Ultrafine particles of metallic sulfides have been produced by the reaction of metal and sulfur vapor. The sulfur vapor was prepared by evaporating sulfur powder from a quartz boat using the atmospheric temperature of either the heated metal or boat. Electron microscopic observation of the particles of Mo3S4 and PbS has shown them to be typical examples of the produced sulfides.

  8. Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Muruska, H. Paul; Sansregret, Joseph L.; Young, Archie R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

  9. Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Han Zhaohui Zhu, Huaiyong; Shi, Jeffrey; Parkinson, Gordon; Lu, G.Q.

    2007-03-15

    The preparation of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles that have a moderate pore size is reported. This preparation method involves a hydrothermal process that produces a precursor mixture and a following acid treatment of the precursor to get the porous material. The majority of the particles have a pore size close to 20nm, which complements and fills in the gap between the existing cadmium sulfide materials, which usually have a pore size either less than 10nm or are well above 100nm.

  10. Sulfide catalysts for reducing SO2 to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2001-01-01

    A highly efficient sulfide catalyst for reducing sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur, which maximizes the selectivity of elemental sulfur over byproducts and has a high conversion efficiency. Various feed stream contaminants, such as water vapor are well tolerated. Additionally, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen sulfides can be employed as the reducing gases while maintaining high conversion efficiency. This allows a much wider range of uses and higher level of feed stream contaminants than prior art catalysts.

  11. Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Fermentation Broths Containing SO21

    PubMed Central

    Acree, T. E.; Sonoff, Elisabeth P.; Splittstoesser, D. F.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in fermentation broths containing up to 100 μg of SO2 per ml is described. The method involves the sparging of H2S from the broth into a cadmium hydroxide absorption solution, the formation of methylene blue from the absorbed sulfide, and the measuring of this color spectrophotometrically. The use of cadmium hydroxide instead of zinc acetate, the common absorbent, substantially reduced the interference of SO2 with the analysis. PMID:5111300

  12. Bioavailability and stability of mercury sulfide in Armuchee (USA) soil

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Su, Yi; Monts, David L.; Waggoner, Charles A.; Matta, Frank B.

    2007-07-01

    Because of the adverse effects of elemental mercury and mercury compounds upon human health, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in an on-going effort to monitor and remediate mercury-contaminated DOE sites. In order to more cost effectively implement those extensive remediation efforts, it is necessary to obtain an improved understanding of the role that mercury and mercury compounds play in the ecosystem. We have conducted pilot scale experiments to study the bioavailability of mercury sulfide in an Armuchee (eastern US ) soil. The effects of plants and incubation time on chemical stability and bioavailability of HgS under simulated conditions of the ecosystem have been examined, as has the dynamics of the dissolution of mercury sulfide by various extractants. The results show that mercury sulfide in contaminated Armuchee soil was still to some extent bioavailable to plants. After planting, soil mercury sulfide is more easily dissolved by both 4 M and 12 M nitric acid than pure mercury sulfide reagent. Dissolution kinetics of soil mercury sulfide and pure chemical reagent by nitric acid are different. Mercury release by EDTA from HgS-contaminated soil increased with time of reaction and soil mercury level. Chelating chemicals increase the solubility and bioavailability of mercury in HgS-contaminated soil. (authors)

  13. Sulfide as a soil phytotoxin—a review

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Leon P. M.; Govers, Laura L.; Janssen, Inge C. J. M.; Geurts, Jeroen J. M.; Van der Welle, Marlies E. W.; Van Katwijk, Marieke M.; Van der Heide, Tjisse; Roelofs, Jan G. M.; Smolders, Alfons J. P.

    2013-01-01

    In wetland soils and underwater sediments of marine, brackish and freshwater systems, the strong phytotoxin sulfide may accumulate as a result of microbial reduction of sulfate during anaerobiosis, its level depending on prevailing edaphic conditions. In this review, we compare an extensive body of literature on phytotoxic effects of this reduced sulfur compound in different ecosystem types, and review the effects of sulfide at multiple ecosystem levels: the ecophysiological functioning of individual plants, plant-microbe associations, and community effects including competition and facilitation interactions. Recent publications on multi-species interactions in the rhizosphere show even more complex mechanisms explaining sulfide resistance. It is concluded that sulfide is a potent phytotoxin, profoundly affecting plant fitness and ecosystem functioning in the full range of wetland types including coastal systems, and at several levels. Traditional toxicity testing including hydroponic approaches generally neglect rhizospheric effects, which makes it difficult to extrapolate results to real ecosystem processes. To explain the differential effects of sulfide at the different organizational levels, profound knowledge about the biogeochemical, plant physiological and ecological rhizosphere processes is vital. This information is even more important, as anthropogenic inputs of sulfur into freshwater ecosystems and organic loads into freshwater and marine systems are still much higher than natural levels, and are steeply increasing in Asia. In addition, higher temperatures as a result of global climate change may lead to higher sulfide production rates in shallow waters. PMID:23885259

  14. Sulfide inhibition of and metabolism by cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Peter; Marshall, Doug C; Cooper, Chris E; Wilson, Mike T

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a classic cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor, is also an in vitro oxidase substrate and an in vivo candidate hormonal ('gasotransmitter') species affecting sleep and hibernation. H2S, nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) share some common features. All are low-molecular-mass physiological effectors and also oxidase inhibitors, capable of binding more than one enzyme site, and each is an oxidizable 'substrate'. The oxidase oxidizes CO to CO2, NO to nitrite and sulfide to probable persulfide species. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase in an aerobic steady state with ascorbate and cytochrome c is rapidly inhibited by sulfide in a biphasic manner. At least two successive inhibited species are involved, probably partially reduced. The oxidized enzyme, in the absence of turnover, occurs in at least two forms: the 'pulsed' and 'resting' states. The pulsed form reacts aerobically with sulfide to form two intermediates, 'P' and 'F', otherwise involved in the reaction of oxygen with reduced enzyme. Sulfide can directly reduce the oxygen-reactive a3CuB binuclear centre in the pulsed state. The resting enzyme does not undergo such a step, but only a very slow one-electron reduction of the electron-transferring haem a. In final reactivation phases, both the steady-state inhibition of catalysis and the accumulation of P and F states are reversed by slow sulfide oxidation. A model for this complex reaction pattern is presented. PMID:24059525

  15. Nitrite as an antidote for acute hydrogen sulfide intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, J.F.; Bradbury, C.M.; Connors, A.J.; Donini, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    The detoxification of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) by a heme catalyzed oxidation was examined as part of an on-going study of H/sub 2/S toxicity. Interlocking O/sub 2/ absorption and sulfide depletion data indicate that both oxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin are effective catalytic agents. Although the latter is more efficacious, the life time of excess sulfide in the presence of oxygen and either of the above is of the order of minutes. It has also been established that the formation of methemoglobin following nitrite administration occurs preferentially under oxygen poor conditions. Under an atmospheric or oxygen enriched environment, which favors sulfide depletion, the nitrite retards sulfide oxidation. Thus nitrite as an antidote for acute H/sub 2/S intoxication can only be effective within the first few minutes after the exposure, at which time resuscitation and/or ventilation of the victim is likely to produce conditions in which the nitrite actually slows sulfide removal.

  16. Metal Sulfides as Sensing Materials for Chemoresistive Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Gaiardo, Andrea; Fabbri, Barbara; Guidi, Vincenzo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Giberti, Alessio; Gherardi, Sandro; Vanzetti, Lia; Malagù, Cesare; Zonta, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at a broad overview of the results obtained with metal-sulfide materials in the field of chemoresistive gas sensing. Indeed, despite the well-known electrical, optical, structural and morphological features previously described in the literature, metal sulfides present lack of investigation for gas sensing applications, a field in which the metal oxides still maintain a leading role owing to their high sensitivity, low cost, small dimensions and simple integration, in spite of the wide assortment of sensing materials. However, despite their great advantages, metal oxides have shown significant drawbacks, which have led to the search for new materials for gas sensing devices. In this work, Cadmium Sulfide and Tin (IV) Sulfide were investigated as functional materials for thick-film chemoresistive gas-sensors fabrication and they were tested both in thermo- and in photo-activation modes. Furthermore, electrical characterization was carried out in order to verify their gas sensing properties and material stability, by comparing the results obtained with metal sulfides to those obtained by using their metal-oxides counterparts. The results highlighted the possibility to use metal sulfides as a novel class of sensing materials, owing to their selectivity to specific compounds, stability, and the possibility to operate at room temperature. PMID:26927120

  17. Trace element-sulfide mineral association in eastern oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G.M.

    1989-03-01

    Eastern oil shales including the Chattanooga Shale in Tennessee and the various other time-equivalent black shales in the central portion of the United States represent a major source of hydrocarbons. A primary concern for the development of eastern oil shale and all fossil fuels is the high concentration of sulfide minerals and associated with these materials. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate trace elements in sulfide minerals from a Chattanooga Shale core from central Tennessee and (2) establish mineral residence and stratigraphic distribution of selected trace elements. Previous researchers have suggested the residency of the trace elements As, Cu, Cd, Pb, Mo, Ni, and Zn as being sulfide minerals, either as separate distinct phases, inclusions, or isomorphous substitution. The most significant contribution derived from the present study is the direct observation and association of selected trace and minor elements with sulfide minerals. Rather than an indirect or inferred trace element- sulfide mineral association, sulfide mineral phases were isolated allowing the morphology and composition to be directly evaluated. 9 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Metal Sulfides as Sensing Materials for Chemoresistive Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gaiardo, Andrea; Fabbri, Barbara; Guidi, Vincenzo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Giberti, Alessio; Gherardi, Sandro; Vanzetti, Lia; Malagù, Cesare; Zonta, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at a broad overview of the results obtained with metal-sulfide materials in the field of chemoresistive gas sensing. Indeed, despite the well-known electrical, optical, structural and morphological features previously described in the literature, metal sulfides present lack of investigation for gas sensing applications, a field in which the metal oxides still maintain a leading role owing to their high sensitivity, low cost, small dimensions and simple integration, in spite of the wide assortment of sensing materials. However, despite their great advantages, metal oxides have shown significant drawbacks, which have led to the search for new materials for gas sensing devices. In this work, Cadmium Sulfide and Tin (IV) Sulfide were investigated as functional materials for thick-film chemoresistive gas-sensors fabrication and they were tested both in thermo- and in photo-activation modes. Furthermore, electrical characterization was carried out in order to verify their gas sensing properties and material stability, by comparing the results obtained with metal sulfides to those obtained by using their metal-oxides counterparts. The results highlighted the possibility to use metal sulfides as a novel class of sensing materials, owing to their selectivity to specific compounds, stability, and the possibility to operate at room temperature. PMID:26927120

  19. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    PubMed

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3 < 7 mm) and 35% had severe periodontal breakdown (CAL > 7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. PMID:25280920

  20. Lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, G. L.; Vissers, D. R.

    Lithium-alloy/metal sulfide batteries have been under development at Argonne National Laboratory since 1972. ANL's technology employs a two-phase Li alloy negative electrode, low-melting point LiCl-rich LiCl-LiBr-KBr molten salt electrolyte, and either an FeS or an upper-plateau (UP) FeS 2 positive electrode. These components are assembled in an 'electrolyte-starved' bipolar cell configuration. Use of the multi-phase Li alloy ((α+β)-Li-Al and Li 5Al 5Fe 2) negative electrode provides in situ overcharge tolerance that renders the bipolar design viable. Employing LiCl-rich LiCl-LiBr-KBr electrolyte is 'electrolyte-starved" cells achieves low-burdened cells that possess low area-specific impedance, comparable with that of flooded cells using LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte. The combination of dense UP FeS 2 electrodes and low-melting electrolyte produces a stable and reversible couple, achieving over 1000 cycles in flooded cells, with high power capabilities. In addition, a new class of stable chalcogenide ceramic/sealant materials was developed. These materials produce high-strength bonds between a variety of metals and ceramics, which make fabrication of lithium/iron sulfide bipolar stacks practical. Bipolar Li-Al/FeS and Li-Al/FeS 2 cells and four-cell stacks using these seals have been built and tested for electric vehicle (EV) applications. When cell performance characteristics are used to model full-scale EV ad hybrid vehicle (HV) batteries, they are projected to meet or exceed the performance requirements for a large variety of EV and HV applications. In 1992, the US Advanced Battery Consortium awarded contracts to ANL and SAFT America to continue the development of the bipolar Li-Al/FeS 2 battery to meet their long-term criteria. Both ANL and sAFT are working together to refine this technology for EV applications and scale it up to larger stacks and fully integrated battery modules.

  1. Influence of Gilbert's syndrome on the formation of ethyl glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, Laura M; Gunsilius, Leonie; Lardi, Christelle; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Thierauf-Emberger, Annette

    2015-09-01

    A drinking experiment with participants suffering from Gilbert's syndrome was performed to study the possible influence of this glucuronidation disorder on the formation of ethyl glucuronide (EtG). Gilbert's syndrome is a rather common and, in most cases, asymptomatic congenital metabolic aberration with a prevalence of about 5 %. It is characterized by a reduction of the enzyme activity of the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoform 1A1 up to 80 %. One of the glucuronidation products is EtG, which is formed in the organism following exposure to ethanol. EtG is used as a short-term marker for ethyl alcohol consumption to prove abstinence in various settings. After 2 days of abstinence from ethanol and giving a void urine sample, 30 study participants drank 0.1 L of sparkling wine (9 g ethanol). 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after drinking, urine samples were collected. 3 hours after drinking, an additional blood sample was taken, in which liver enzyme activities, ethanol, hematological parameters, and bilirubin were measured. EtG and ethyl sulfate (EtS), another short-term marker of ethanol consumption, were determined in the urine samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS); creatinine was measured photometrically. In all participants, EtG and EtS were detected in concentrations showing a wide range (EtG: 3 h sample 0.5-18.43 mg/L and 6 h sample 0.67-13.8 mg/L; EtS: 3 h sample 0.87-6.87 mg/L and 6 h sample 0.29-4.48 mg/L). No evidence of impaired EtG formation was found. Thus, EtG seems to be a suitable marker for ethanol consumption even in individuals with Gilbert's syndrome. PMID:25680552

  2. Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Driedger, Arthur R., III

    1993-01-01

    A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer is described for determining atmospheric sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbonyl sulfide from aircraft and ship platforms. Isotopically labelled variants of each analyte were used as internal standards to achieve high precision. The lower limit of detection for each species for an integration time of 3 min was 1 pptv for sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide and 0.2 pptv for carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide. All four species were simultaneously determined with a sample frequency of one sample per 6 min or greater. When only one or two species were determined, a frequency of one sample per 4 min was achieved. Because a calibration is included in each sample, no separate calibration sequence was needed. Instrument warmup was only a few minutes. The instrument was very robust in field deployments, requiring little maintenance.

  3. Micellar phase boundaries under the influence of ethyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Denis E

    2016-03-01

    The Compton spectrum quenching technique is used to monitor the effect of ethyl alcohol (EtOH) additions on phase boundaries in two systems. In toluenic solutions of the nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, EtOH shifts the boundary separating the first clear phase from the first turbid phase to higher water:surfactant ratios. In a commonly used scintillant, Ultima Gold AB, the critical micelle concentration is not shifted. The molecular interactions behind the observations and implications for liquid scintillation counting are discussed. PMID:26585642

  4. Ethyl alcohol boiling heat transfer on multilayer meshed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dåbek, Lidia; Kapjor, Andrej; Orman, Łukasz J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the problem of heat transfer enhancement with the application of multilayer metal mesh structures during boiling of ethyl alcohol at ambient pressure. The preparation of samples involved sintering fine copper meshes with the copper base in the reduction atmosphere in order to prevent oxidation of the samples. The experiments included testing up to 4 layers of copper meshes. Significant augmentation of boiling heat transfer is possible, however, considerable number of meshes actually hinders heat transfer conditions and leads to the reduction in the heat flux transferred from the heater surface.

  5. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of the ethyl cyanoacrylate anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Tang, Xin; Bowen, Kit

    2013-09-01

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory have been utilized to study the parent, ethyl cyanoacrylate molecular anion, ECA-. The measured electron affinity (0.9 ± 0.2 eV), vertical detachment energy (1.3 ± 0.1 eV), and anion-to-triplet neutral, photodetachment transition energies (4.0 ± 0.1 eV and 4.5 ± 0.1 eV) all compare well with their calculated values. The relatively high electron affinity of the ECA monomer is responsible for the fact that its “anionic” polymerization mechanism proceeds even with weak nucleophiles, such as water.

  6. An intercomparison of aircraft instrumentation for tropospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Davis, Douglas D.; Thornton, Donald C.; Johnson, James E.; Bandy, Alan R.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Barrick, John D.

    1993-12-01

    This paper reports results of NASA's Chemical Instrumentation and Test Evaluation (CITE 3) during which airborne measurements for carbonyl sulfide (COS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were intercompared. Instrumentation included a gas chromatograph using flame photometric detection (COS, H2S, and CS2), a gas chromatograph using mass spectrometric detection (COS and CS2), a gas chromatograph using fluorination and subsequent SF6 detection via electron capture (COS and CS2), and the Natusch technique (H2S). The measurements were made over the Atlantic Ocean east of North and South America during flights from NASA's Wallops Flight Center, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil, in August/September 1989. Most of the intercomparisons for H2S and CS2 were at mixing ratios <25 pptv and <10 pptv, respectively, with a maximum mixing ratio of about 100 pptv and 50 pptv, respectively. Carbonyl sulfide intercomparisons were at mixing ratios between 400 and 600 pptv. Measurements were intercompared from data bases constructed from time periods of simultaneous or overlapping measurements. Agreement among the COS techniques averaged about 5%, and individual measurements were generally within 10%. For H2S and at mixing ratio >25 pptv, the instruments agreed on average to about 15%. At mixing ratios <25 pptv the agreement was about 5 pptv. For CS2 (mixing ratios <50 pptv), two techniques agreed on average to about 4 pptv, and the third exhibited a bias (relative to the other two) that varied in the range of 3-7 pptv. CS2 mixing ratios over the ocean east of Natal as measured by the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer technique were only a few pptv and were below the detection limits of the other two techniques. The CITE 3 data are used to estimate the current uncertainty associated with aircraft measurements of COS, H2S, and CS2 in the remote troposphere.

  7. An intercomparison of aircraft instrumentation for tropospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Davis, Douglas D.; Thornton, Donald C.; Johnson, James E.; Bandy, Alan R.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Barrick, John D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports results of NASA's Chemical Instrumentation and Test Evaluation (CITE 3) during which airborne measurements for carbonyl sulfide (COS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were intercompared. Instrumentation included a gas chromatograph using flame photometric detection (COS, H2S, and CS2), a gas chromatograph using mass spectrometric detection (COS) and CS2), a gas chromatograph using fluorination and subsequent SF6 detection via electron capture (COS and CS2), and the Natusch technique (H2S). The measurements were made over the Atlantic Ocean east of North and South America during flights from NASA's Wallops Flight Center, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil, in August/September 1989. Most of the intercomparisons for H2S and CS2 were at mixing ratios less than 25 pptv and less than 10 pptv, respectively, with a maximum mixing ratio of about 100 pptv and 50 pptv, respectively. Carbonyl sulfide intercomparisons were at mixing ratios between 400 and 600 pptv. Measurements were intercompared from data bases constructed from time periods of simultaneous or overlapping measurements. Agreement among the COS techniques averaged about 5%, and individual measurements were generally within 10%. For H2S and at mixing ratio greater than 25 pptv, the instruments agreed on average to about 15%. At mixing ratios less than 25 pptv the agreement was about 5 pptv. For CS2 (mixing ratios less than 50 pptv), two techniques agreed on average to about 4 pptv, and the third exhibited a bias (relative to the other two) that varied in the range of 3-7 pptv. CS2 mixing ratios over the ocean east of Natal as measured by the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer technique were only a few pptv and were below the detection limits of the other two techniques. The CITE 3 data are used to estimate the current uncertainty associated with aircraft measurements of COS, H2S, and CS2 in the remote troposphere.

  8. Ethyl Pyruvate Combats Human Leukemia Cells but Spares Normal Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, Gerd; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Kurz, Susanne; Bigl, Marina; Pieroh, Philipp; Debebe, Tewodros; Buchold, Martin; Thieme, Rene; Wichmann, Gunnar; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate, a known ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory drug was found to combat leukemia cells. Tumor cell killing was achieved by concerted action of necrosis/apoptosis induction, ATP depletion, and inhibition of glycolytic and para-glycolytic enzymes. Ethyl lactate was less harmful to leukemia cells but was found to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Both, ethyl pyruvate and ethyl lactate were identified as new inhibitors of GSK-3β. Despite the strong effect of ethyl pyruvate on leukemia cells, human cognate blood cells were only marginally affected. The data were compiled by immune blotting, flow cytometry, enzyme activity assay and gene array analysis. Our results inform new mechanisms of ethyl pyruvate-induced cell death, offering thereby a new treatment regime with a high therapeutic window for leukemic tumors. PMID:27579985

  9. Nitrogen sulfide in giant molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGonagle, D.; Irvine, W. M.

    1997-01-01

    We report a survey for nitrogen sulfide (NS) toward regions of massive star formation. NS was observed by means of its 2 pi 1/2, J = 3/2 --> 1/2, J = 5/2 --> 3/2, and J = 7/2 --> 5/2 transitions at 69, 115, and 161 GHz, respectively, and was detected toward 12 of 14 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) observed. Analysis of the hyperfine component relative line strengths suggests that NS emission is optically thin toward these sources, with the possible exception of Sgr B2(M). The fractional abundance of NS relative to molecular hydrogen is best defined for the Orion molecular cloud, where it is typically (1-4) x 10(-10), which is about an order of magnitude larger than found by some recent gas-phase chemistry models developed for quiescent clouds. Toward OMC-1, the NS integrated intensity is strongly peaked toward KL, but also extends all along the Orion ridge, resembling the distribution of SO and CH3OH. We have identified a spectral feature seen toward several sources as the ortho-NKK = 4(04) --> 3(13) J = 3 --> 2, fine-structure component of methylene (CH2; cf. Hollis, Jewell, & Lovas). We also report the first detection of the SO+ 2 pi 1/2, J = 3/2 --> 1/2, parity-e transition toward W51(MS) and L134N.

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi-Zhong; Liu, Yang; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1) is also one of the focuses of this review. PMID:26881033

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The current literature regarding the effects of the gaseous signal molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gastrointestinal system is reviewed. Bacterial, host and pharmaceutical-derived H2S are all considered and presented according to the physiological or pathophysiological effects of the gaseous signal molecule. These subjects include the toxicology of intestinal H2S with emphasis on bacterial-derived H2S, especially from sulfate-reducing bacteria, the role of endogenous and exogenous H2S in intestinal inflammation, and the roles of H2S in gastrointestinal motility, secretion and nociception. Recent Advances: While its pro- and anti-inflammatory, smooth muscle relaxant, prosecretory, and pro- and antinociceptive actions continue to remain the major effects of H2S in this system; recent findings have expanded the potential molecular targets for H2S in the gastrointestinal tract. Critical Issues: Numerous discrepancies remain in the literature, and definitive molecular targets in this system have not been supported by the use of competitive antagonism. Future Directions: Future work will hopefully resolve discrepancies in the literature and identify molecular targets and mechanisms of action for H2S. It is clear from the current literature that the long-appreciated relationship between H2S and the gastrointestinal tract continues to be strong as we endeavor to unravel its mysteries. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 818–830. PMID:23582008

  12. Production and Physiological Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a physiological mediator with a variety of functions. It regulates synaptic transmission, vascular tone, inflammation, transcription, and angiogenesis; protects cells from oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury; and promotes healing of ulcers. Recent Advances: In addition to cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase along with cysteine aminotransferase was recently demonstrated to produce H2S. Even in bacteria, H2S produced by these enzymes functions as a defense against antibiotics, suggesting that the cytoprotective effect of H2S is a universal defense mechanism in organisms from bacteria to mammals. Critical Issues: The functional form of H2S—undissociated H2S gas, dissociated HS ion, or some other form of sulfur—has not been identified. Future Directions: The regulation of H2S production by three enzymes may lead to the identification of the physiological signals that are required to release H2S. The identification of the physiological functions of other forms of sulfur may also help understand the biological significance of H2S. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 783–793. PMID:23581969

  13. Nitrogen sulfide in quiescent dark clouds.

    PubMed

    McGonagle, D; Irvine, W M; Ohishi, M

    1994-02-20

    We report the first detection of interstellar nitrogen sulfide (NS) in cold dark clouds. Several components of the 2 pi 1/2, J = 3/2 --> 1/2 and J = 5/2 --> 3/2 transitions were observed in TMC-1 and L134N. The inferred column density for TMC-1 is NNS approximately 8 x 10(12)cm-2 toward the NH3 peak in that cloud, and in L134N is NNS approximately 3 x 10(12)cm-2 toward the position of peak NH3 emission. These values correspond to fractional abundances relative to molecular hydrogen of fNS approximately 8 x 10(-10) for TMC-1, and fNS approximately 6 x 10(-10) for L134N. The NS emission is extended along the TMC-1 ridge and is also extended in L134N. The measured abundances are significantly higher than those predicted by some recent gas phase ion-molecule models. PMID:11539492

  14. Enamel surface changes caused by hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Takao; Hanabusa, Masao; Hosoya, Noriyasu; Chiba, Toshie; Yoshida, Takumasa; Morito, Akiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced inside the mouth are a well-known cause of halitosis. Recent studies have suggested that VSCs modify the pathology of periodontitis by encouraging the migration of bacterial toxins associated with increased permeability of gingival epithelia, and enhancing the production of matrix metalloproteinases in gingival connective tissue. Nonetheless, the effects on the enamel of direct exposure to VSCs within the oral cavity remain unclear. In the present study, we observed the effects of VSCs in the form of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on enamel surfaces and determined their effects on restorations. Materials and Methods: Extracted human tooth and bovine tooth samples were divided into the H2S experimental side and the control side. We observed the effects of H2S on enamel surfaces using electron microscopy and conducted a shear test. Results: We found that exposure to H2S obscured the enamel surface's crystal structure. The surface also exhibited coarseness and reticular changes. Shear testing did not reveal any differences in bond strength. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that H2S occurring inside the mouth causes changes to the crystal structure of the enamel surface that can lead to tooth wear, but that it does not diminish the effects of dental bonding in adhesive restorations. PMID:26752833

  15. Signaling Molecules: Hydrogen Sulfide and Polysulfide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a signaling molecule as well as a cytoprotectant. It modulates neurotransmission, regulates vascular tone, and protects various tissues and organs, including neurons, the heart, and kidneys, from oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury. H2S is produced from l-cysteine by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) along with cysteine aminotransferase. Recent Advances: In addition to these enzymes, we recently identified a novel pathway to produce H2S from d-cysteine, which involves d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) along with 3MST. These enzymes are localized in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. However, some enzymes translocate to organelles under specific conditions. Moreover, H2S-derived potential signaling molecules such as polysulfides and HSNO have been identified. Critical Issues: The physiological stimulations, which trigger the production of H2S and its derivatives and maintain their local levels, remain unclear. Future Directions: Understanding the regulation of the H2S production and H2S-derived signaling molecules and the specific stimuli that induce their release will provide new insights into the biology of H2S and therapeutic development in diseases involving these substances. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 362–376. PMID:24800864

  16. Mercury Sulfide Dimorphism in Thioarsenate Glasses.

    PubMed

    Kassem, M; Sokolov, A; Cuisset, A; Usuki, T; Khaoulani, S; Masselin, P; Le Coq, D; Neuefeind, J C; Feygenson, M; Hannon, A C; Benmore, C J; Bychkov, E

    2016-06-16

    Crystalline mercury sulfide exists in two drastically different polymorphic forms in different domains of the P,T-diagram: red chain-like insulator α-HgS, stable below 344 °C, and black tetrahedral narrow-band semiconductor β-HgS, stable at higher temperatures. Using pulsed neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction, we show that these two mercury bonding patterns are present simultaneously in mercury thioarsenate glasses HgS-As2S3. The population and interconnectivity of chain-like and tetrahedral dimorphous forms determine both the structural features and fundamental glass properties (thermal, electronic, etc.). DFT simulations of mercury species and RMC modeling of high-resolution diffraction data provide additional details on local Hg environment and connectivity implying the (HgS2/2)m oligomeric chains (1 ≤ m ≤ 6) are acting as a network former while the HgS4/4-related mixed agglomerated units behave as a modifier. PMID:27214120

  17. Comparison of Carbon XANES Spectra from an Iron Sulfide from Comet Wild 2 with an Iron Sulfide Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Sanford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, Nakamura K.; Jacobsen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Among one of the first particles removed from the aerogel collector from the Stardust sample return mission was an approx. 5 micron sized iron sulfide. The majority of the spectra from 5 different sections of this particle suggests the presence of aliphatic compounds. Due to the heat of capture in the aerogel we initially assumed these aliphatic compounds were not cometary but after comparing these results to a heated iron sulfide interplanetary dust particle (IDP) we believe our initial interpretation of these spectra was not correct. It has been suggested that ice coating on iron sulfides leads to aqueous alteration in IDP clusters which can then lead to the formation of complex organic compounds from unprocessed organics in the IDPs similar to unprocessed organics found in comets [1]. Iron sulfides have been demonstrated to not only transform halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons but also enhance the bonding of rubber to steel [2,3]. Bromfield and Coville (1997) demonstrated using Xray photoelectron spectroscopy that "the surface enhancement of segregated sulfur to the surface of sulfided precipitated iron catalysts facilitates the formation of a low-dimensional structure of extraordinary properties" [4]. It may be that the iron sulfide acts in some way to protect aliphatic compounds from alteration due to heat.

  18. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assessment of new ethyl-carbamates with ixodicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Prado-Ochoa, María Guadalupe; Muñoz-Guzmán, Marco Antonio; Vázquez-Valadez, Víctor Hugo; Velázquez-Sánchez, Ana María; Salazar, Ana María; Ramírez-Noguera, Patricia; Angeles, Enrique; Alba-Hurtado, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    The mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus test was used on the peripheral blood of Wistar rats exposed to two new ethyl-carbamates: ethyl-4-bromophenyl-carbamate (LQM 919) and ethyl-4-chlorophenyl-carbamate (LQM 996) to analyze their genotoxic potential. The mitotic index and cell proliferation kinetics in human lymphocyte cultures in the presence of these ethyl-carbamates were used to evaluate cytotoxicity and cytostaticity respectively. Exposure to greater acute doses (300mg/kg) and to all of the subchronic doses (12.5, 25 and 50mg/kg daily for 90 days) of these ethyl-carbamates induced an increased frequency (p<0.05) of micro-nucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) compared with rats not exposed to the ethyl-carbamates. Increases in MN-PCE was higher in males than in females exposed to LQM 996 50mg/Kg (p<0.05). All observed changes in rats return 21days after suspending ethyl-carbamate exposure. The highest concentration (0.3mM) of both ethyl-carbamates in lymphocyte cultures increased the percentage of cells in first division metaphase and decreased the percentage of cells in third division metaphase, indicating an increase in cell cycle length or a possible cell cycle arrest in metaphase (cytostatic effect). The results of this study show that the evaluated ethyl-carbamates may induce genotoxic damage in rats and alterations in the human lymphocyte cell cycle. PMID:27542710

  19. Detection of ethyl glucuronide in blood spotted on different surfaces.

    PubMed

    Winkler, M; Kaufmann, E; Thoma, D; Thierauf, A; Weinmann, W; Skopp, G; Alt, A

    2011-07-15

    This study aims to show that sensitive detection of ethyl glucuronide in dried blood spotted onto various surfaces after a period of 24h is feasible. At present, there is insufficient information how tightly ethyl glucuronide (EtG) binds to various materials and how easily it can be eluted. 4ml aliquots of blood samples obtained from seven volunteers after consumption of alcoholic beverages were applied to six different surfaces. After drying and a 24h-storage at 20±2°C the samples were re-dissolved in water, and EtG was subsequently analyzed by a LC-MS Paul-type ion trap. A comparison was made between dried and corresponding fluid samples. EtG was detectable in all subjects' samples following consumption of alcohol. EtG was also detectable after a storage time of four weeks at 4°C in whole blood that had been preserved with EDTA. EtG was detectable in all samples dried on different surfaces and its concentration remained relatively constant irrespective of the particular condition of the material. Detection of EtG in blood spots from the scene may indicate recent alcohol consumption in cases where collection of blood remained undone or could not be performed. PMID:21641739

  20. Protective effects of ethyl pyruvate in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kelle, Ilker; Akkoc, Hasan; Tunik, Selcuk; Nergiz, Yusuf; Erdinc, Meral; Erdinc, Levent

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of ethyl pyruvate on changes in renal functions and oxidative stress related renal injury caused by cisplatin (cis-dichlorodiammine platinum-II; CDDP). Male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups (n = 8): (1) control group (1 ml Ringer's lactate solution i.p.); (2) ethyl pyruvate (EP) group (50 mg/kg Ringer's EP solution (REPS) i.p.); (3) cisplatin group (a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg, i.p.); and (4) cisplatin + EP group (a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg, i.p.) + REPS 50 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for five days. At the sixth day, kidneys of rats were mounted to a Langendorff apparatus. Renal perfusion pressures were recorded. Blood samples were taken for serum urea, creatinine, total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS) and oxidative stres index (OSI) evaluations. Kidney tissues were obtained for malondialdehyde (MDA) analyses and histopathological examination. Perfusion pressures, serum urea, creatinine, TOS, OSI and tissue MDA levels were found significantly higher, whereas TAS was notably lower in cisplatin group. Histopathological examination showed apparent renal paranchymal injury in cisplatin group. In cisplatin + REPS group, perfusion pressures, serum urea, creatinine and tissue MDA levels were decreased. Moreover, EP co-administration provided less inflammatory cell infiltration, tubular dilatation, whereas TOS, TAS and OSI improved significantly versus cisplatin group. These findings show that EP has protective effects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:26019553

  1. DISCOVERY OF METHYL ACETATE AND GAUCHE ETHYL FORMATE IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Lopez, A.; Caro, G. M. Munoz; Kleiner, I.; Nguyen, H. V. L. E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es E-mail: munozcg@cab.inta-csic.es E-mail: nguyen@pc.rwth-aachen.de

    2013-06-10

    We report on the discovery of methyl acetate, CH{sub 3}COOCH{sub 3}, through the detection of a large number of rotational lines from each one of the spin states of the molecule: AA species (A{sub 1} or A{sub 2}), EA species (E{sub 1}), AE species (E{sub 2}), and EE species (E{sub 3} or E{sub 4}). We also report, for the first time in space, the detection of the gauche conformer of ethyl formate, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OCOH, in the same source. The trans conformer is also detected for the first time outside the Galactic center source SgrB2. From the derived velocity of the emission of methyl acetate, we conclude that it arises mainly from the compact ridge region with a total column density of (4.2 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The derived rotational temperature is 150 K. The column density for each conformer of ethyl formate, trans and gauche, is (4.5 {+-} 1.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. Their abundance ratio indicates a kinetic temperature of 135 K for the emitting gas and suggests that gas-phase reactions could participate efficiently in the formation of both conformers in addition to cold ice mantle reactions on the surface of dust grains.

  2. Transesterification process to manufacture ethyl ester of rape oil

    SciTech Connect

    Korus, R.A.; Hoffman, D.S.; Bam, N.; Peterson, C.L.; Drown, D.C.

    1993-12-31

    A process for the production of the ethyl ester of winter rape [EEWR] for use as a biodiesel fuel has been studied. The essential part of the process is the transesterification of rape oil with ethanol, in the presence of a catalyst, to yield the ethyl ester of rape oil as a product and glycerin as a by-product. Experiments have been performed to determine the optimum conditions for the preparation of EEWR. The process variables were: (1) temperature, (2) catalyst, (3) rate of agitation, (4) water content of the alcohol used, and (5) the amount of excess alcohol used. The optimum conditions were: (1) room temperature, (2) 0.5% sodium methoxide or 1% potassium hydroxide catalyst by weight of rapeseed oil, (3) extremely vigorous agitation with some splashing during the initial phase of the reaction and agitation was not necessary after the reaction mixture became homogeneous, (4) absolute ethanol was necessary for high conversion, and (5) 50% excess ethanol with NaOCH{sub 3} or 100% excess with KOH gave a maximum conversion. Viscosity, cloud point and pour point of the EEWR were measured. A preliminary break-even cost for the commercial production of EEWR was found to be $0.55/liter [$2.08/US gallon].

  3. Geochemistry of the Kalatongke Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide deposit, NW China: implications for the formation of magmatic sulfide mineralization in a postcollisional environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xie-Yan; Li, Xiang-Ren

    2009-04-01

    The Kalatongke (also spelt as Karatungk) Ni-Cu-(platinum-group element, PGE) sulfide deposit, containing 33 Mt sulfide ore with a grade of 0.8 wt.% Ni and 1.3 wt.% Cu, is located in the Eastern Junggar terrane, Northern Xinjiang, NW China. The largest sulfide ore body, which occupies more than 50 vol.% of the intrusion Y1, is dominantly comprised of disseminated sulfide with a massive sulfide inner zone. Economic disseminated sulfides also occur at the base of the intrusions Y2 and Y3. The main host rock types are norite in the lower part and diorite in the upper part of each intrusion. Enrichment in large ion lithophile elements and depletion in heavy rare earth elements relative to mid-ocean ridge basalt indicate that the mafic intrusions were produced from magmas derived from a metasomatized garnet lherzolite mantle. The average grades of the disseminated ores are 0.6 wt.% Ni and 1.1 wt.% Cu, whereas those of the massive ores are 2 wt.% Ni and 8 wt.% Cu. The PGE contents of the disseminated ores (14-69 ppb Pt and 78-162 ppb Pd) are lower than those of the massive ores (120-505 ppb Pt and 30-827 ppb Pd). However, on the basis of 100% sulfide, PGE contents of the massive sulfides are lower than those of the disseminated sulfides. Very high Cu/Pd ratios (>4.5 × 104) indicate that the Kalatongke sulfides segregated from PGE-depleted magma produced by prior sulfide saturation and separation. A negative correlation between the Cu/Pd ratio and the Pd content in 100% sulfide indicates that the PGE content of the sulfide is controlled by both the PGE concentrations in the parental silicate magma and the ratio of the amount of silicate to sulfide magma. The negative correlations between Ir and Pd indicate that the massive sulfides experienced fractionation.

  4. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  5. The effects of varying humidity on copper sulfide film formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Missert, Nancy A.; Barbour, John Charles; Sullivan, John Patrick; Copeland, Robert Guild; Campin, Michael J.

    2004-02-01

    Detailed experiments involving extensive high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed significant microstructural differences between Cu sulfides formed at low and high relative humidity (RH). It was known from prior experiments that the sulfide grows linearly with time at low RH up to a sulfide thickness approaching or exceeding one micron, while the sulfide initially grows linearly with time at high RH then becomes sub-linear at a sulfide thickness less than about 0.2 microns, with the sulfidation rate eventually approaching zero. TEM measurements of the Cu2S morphology revealed that the Cu2S formed at low RH has large sized grains (75 to greater than 150 nm) that are columnar in structure with sharp, abrupt grain boundaries. In contrast, the Cu2S formed at high RH has small equiaxed grains of 20 to 50 nm in size. Importantly, the small grains formed at high RH have highly disordered grain boundaries with a high concentration of nano-voids. Two-dimensional diffusion modeling was performed to determine whether the existence of localized source terms at the Cu/Cu2S interface could be responsible for the suppression of Cu sulfidation at long times at high RH. The models indicated that the existence of static localized source terms would not predict the complete suppression of growth that was observed. Instead, the models suggest that the diffusion of Cu through Cu2S becomes restricted during Cu2S formation at high RH. The leading speculation is that the extensive voiding that exists at grain boundaries in this material greatly reduces the flux of Cu between grains, leading to a reduction in the rate of sulfide film formation. These experiments provide an approach for adding microstructural information to Cu sulfidation rate computer models. In addition to the microstructural studies, new micro-patterned test structures were developed in this LDRD to offer insight into the point defect structure of Cu2S and to permit measurement of surface reaction

  6. Airborne sulfur trace species intercomparison campaign: Sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Hoell, James M., Jr.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of sulfur trace gases are presented. The intercomparison was part of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) and was conducted during the summer of 1989. The intercomparisons were conducted on the Wallops Electra aircraft during flights from Wallops Island, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil. Sulfur measurements intercompared included sulfur dioxide (SO2), dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Measurement techniques ranged from filter collection systems with post-flight analyses to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph systems employing various methods for measuring and identifying the sulfur gases during flight. Sampling schedules for the techniques ranged from integrated collections over periods as long as 50 minutes to one- to three-minute samples every ten or fifteen minutes. Several of the techniques provided measurements of more than one sulfur gas. Instruments employing different detection principles were involved in each of the sulfur intercomparisons. Also included in the intercomparison measurement scenario were a host of supporting measurements (i.e., ozone, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, total sulfur, aerosols, etc.) for purposes of: (1) interpreting results (i.e., correlation of any noted instrument disagreement with the chemical composition of the measurement environment); and (2) providing supporting chemical data to meet CITE-3 science objectives of studying ozone/sulfur photochemistry, diurnal cycles, etc. The results of the intercomparison study are briefly discussed.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-09-01

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2 S: (i) H2 S accelerated the recovery of photosynthesis after prolonged exposure to darkness and anoxia. We suggest that this is possibly due to regulatory effects of H2 S on photosystem I components and/or on the Calvin cycle. (ii) H2 S concentrations of up to 210 μM temporarily enhanced the photosynthetic rates at low irradiance. Modelling showed that this enhancement is plausibly based on changes in the light-harvesting efficiency. (iii) Above a certain light-dependent concentration threshold H2 S also acted as an inhibitor. Intriguingly, this inhibition was not instant but occurred only after a specific time interval that decreased with increasing light intensity. That photosynthesis is most sensitive to inhibition at high light intensities suggests that H2 S inactivates an intermediate of the oxygen evolving complex that accumulates with increasing light intensity. We discuss the implications of these three effects of H2 S in the context of cyanobacterial photosynthesis under conditions with diurnally fluctuating light and H2 S concentrations, such as those occurring in microbial mats and biofilms. PMID:25630511

  8. Chemical and colloidal aspects of collectorless flotation behavior of sulfide and non-sulfide minerals.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Sajjad; Mousavinezhad, Seyed Kamal; Gharabaghi, Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Flotation has been widely used for separation of valuable minerals from gangues based on their surface characterizations and differences in hydrophobicity on mineral surfaces. As hydrophobicity of minerals widely differs from each other, their separation by flotation will become easier. Collectors are chemical materials which are supposed to make selectively valuable minerals hydrophobic. In addition, there are some minerals which based on their surface and structural features are intrinsically hydrophobic. However, their hydrophobicities are not strong enough to be floatable in the flotation cell without collectors such as sulfide minerals, coal, stibnite, and so forth. To float these minerals in a flotation cell, their hydrophobicity should be increased in specific conditions. Various parameters including pH, Eh, size distribution, mill types, mineral types, ore characterization, and type of reaction in flotation cells affect the hydrophobicity of minerals. Surface analysis results show that when sulfide minerals experience specific flotation conditions, the reactions on the surface of these minerals increase the amount of sulfur on the surface. These phenomenons improve the hydrophobicity of these minerals due to strong hydrophobic feature of sulfurs. Collectorless flotation reduces chemical material consumption amount, increases flotation selectivity (grade increases), and affects the equipment quantities; however, it can also have negative effects. Some minerals with poor surface floatability can be increased by adding some ions to the flotation system. Depressing undesirable minerals in flotation is another application of collectorless flotation. PMID:26601925

  9. Carbonyl sulfide removal with compost and wood chip biofilters, and in the presence of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Melanie L; Garrepalli, Divya R; Nawal, Chandraprakash S

    2009-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an odor-causing compound and hazardous air pollutant emitted frequently from wastewater treatment facilities and chemical and primary metals industries. This study examined the effectiveness of biofiltration in removing COS. Specific objectives were to compare COS removal efficiency for various biofilter media; to determine whether hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is frequently produced along with COS under anaerobic conditions, adversely impacts COS removal; and to determine the maximum elimination capacity of COS for use in biofilter design. Three laboratory-scale polyvinyl chloride biofilter columns were filled with up to 28 in. of biofilter media (aged compost, fresh compost, wood chips, or a compost/wood chip mixture). Inlet COS ranged from 5 to 46 parts per million (ppm) (0.10-9.0 g/m3 hr). Compost and the compost/wood chip mixture produced higher COS removal efficiencies than wood chips alone. The compost and compost/wood chip mixture had a shorter stabilization times compared with wood chips alone. Fresh versus aged compost did not impact COS removal efficiency. The presence of H2S did not adversely impact COS removal for the concentration ratios tested. The maximum elimination capacity is at least 9 g/m3 hr for COS with compost media. PMID:20066911

  10. Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James E.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

  11. Selenium content of sulfide ores related to ophiolites of Greece.

    PubMed

    Economou-Eliopoulos, M; Eliopoulos, D G

    1998-01-01

    Several deposits of sulfide mineralization have been described in the ophiolites of Greece. Based on their mineralogical and chemical composition and the host rocks, two types can be distinguished: (1) the Fe-Cu-Ni-Co type consisting of pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, Co-pentlandite, pyrite, magnetite + arsenides, +/- chromite, hosted in serpentinites, gabbros or diabases, which have variable geochemical characteristics, and (2) sulfide mineralization of the Cyprus type containing variable proportions of pyrite, chalcopyrite, bornite, and sphalerite. The spatial association with shear zones and fault systems, which is a common feature in both types of mineralization, provided the necessary permeability for the circulation of the responsible mineralized hydrothermal fluids. The selenium (Se) content in representative samples of both types of mineralization from the ophiolites of Pindos (Kondro, Perivoli, and Neropriona), Othrys (Eretria and A. Theodoroi), Veria (Trilofon), and Argolis (Ermioni) shows a wide variation. The highest values of Se (130 to 1900 ppm) were found in massive Fe-Cu sulfide ores from Kondro, in particular the Cu-rich portions (average 1300 ppm Se). The average values of Se for the Othrys sulfides are low (< 40 ppm Se). The Se content in a diabase breccia pipe (50 x 200 m) with disseminated pyrite mineralization (Neropriona) ranges from < 1 to 35 ppm Se. The highest values were noted in strongly altered samples that also exhibited a significant enrichment in platinum (1 ppm Pt). Sulfide mineralization (irregular to lens-like masses and stringers) associated with magnetite, hosted in gabbros exposed in the Perivoli area (Tsouma hill), shows a content ranging from 40 to 350 ppm Se. The distribution of Se in the studied type of the sulfide mineralization may be of genetic significance, indicating that the Se level, which often is much higher than in typical magmatic sulfides related to mafic-ultramafic rocks (average 90-100 ppm Se), may positively affect

  12. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation is coupled to oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria of Solemya reidi

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.; Somero, G.N.

    1986-08-01

    Solemya reidi, a gutless clam found in sulfide-rich habitats, contains within its gills bacterial symbionts thought to oxidize sulfur compounds and provide a reduced carbon food source to the clam. However, the initial step or steps in sulfide oxidation occur in the animal tissue, and mitochondria isolated from both gill and symbiont-free foot tissue of the clam coupled the oxidation of sulfide to oxidative phosphorylation (adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis). The ability of Solemya reidi to exploit directly the energy in sulfide for ATP synthesis is unprecedented, and suggests that sulfide-habitat animals that lack bacterial symbionts may also use sulfide as an inorganic energy source.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide as an Oxygen Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance Although oxygen (O2)-sensing cells and tissues have been known for decades, the identity of the O2-sensing mechanism has remained elusive. Evidence is accumulating that O2-dependent metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is this enigmatic O2 sensor. Recent Advances The elucidation of biochemical pathways involved in H2S synthesis and metabolism have shown that reciprocal H2S/O2 interactions have been inexorably linked throughout eukaryotic evolution; there are multiple foci by which O2 controls H2S inactivation, and the effects of H2S on downstream signaling events are consistent with those activated by hypoxia. H2S-mediated O2 sensing has been demonstrated in a variety of O2-sensing tissues in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, including smooth muscle in systemic and respiratory blood vessels and airways, carotid body, adrenal medulla, and other peripheral as well as central chemoreceptors. Critical Issues Information is now needed on the intracellular location and stoichometry of these signaling processes and how and which downstream effectors are activated by H2S and its metabolites. Future Directions Development of specific inhibitors of H2S metabolism and effector activation as well as cellular organelle-targeted compounds that release H2S in a time- or environmentally controlled way will not only enhance our understanding of this signaling process but also provide direction for future therapeutic applications. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 377–397. “Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution” —Theodosius Dobzhansky (29) PMID:24801248

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide in Biochemistry and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Predmore, Benjamin Lee; Lefer, David Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: An abundance of experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays a prominent role in physiology and pathophysiology. Many targets exist for H2S therapy. The molecular targets of H2S include proteins, enzymes, transcription factors, and membrane ion channels. Recent Advances: Novel H2S precursors are being synthesized and discovered that are capable of releasing H2S in a slow and sustained manner. This presents a novel and advantageous approach to H2S therapy for treatment of chronic conditions associated with a decline in endogenous H2S, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Critical Issues: While H2S is cytoprotective at physiological concentrations, it is not universally cytoprotective, as it appears to have pro-apoptotic actions in cancer cells and is well known to be toxic at supraphysiological concentrations. Many of the pleiotropic effects of H2S on health are associated with the inhibition of inflammation and upregulation of prosurvival pathways. The powerful anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, immunomodulating, and trophic effects of H2S on the vast majority of normal cells seem to be mediated mainly by its actions as an extremely versatile direct and indirect antioxidant and free radical scavenger. While the overall effects of H2S on transformed (i.e., malignant) cells can be characterized as pro-oxidant and pro-apoptotic, they contrast sharply with the cytoprotective effects on most normal cells. Future Directions: H2S has become a molecule of great interest, and several slow-releasing H2S prodrugs are currently under development. We believe that additional agents regulating H2S bioavailability will be developed during the next 10 years. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 119–140. PMID:22432697

  15. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.; Yañez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally considered the dominant sources of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios lasting up to 8 h (up to 160 parts per trillion (ppt)) often occurred within the canopy and near the surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light- and temperature-dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks.

  16. Electrical properties of seafloor massive sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Hannington, Mark; Bairlein, Katharina; Hördt, Andreas; Jegen, Marion; Petersen, Sven; Laurila, Tea

    2016-06-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits are increasingly seen as important marine metal resources for the future. A growing number of industrialized nations are involved in the surveying and sampling of such deposits by drilling. Drill ships are expensive and their availability can be limited; seabed drill rigs are a cost-effective alternative and more suitable for obtaining cores for resource evaluation. In order to achieve the objectives of resource evaluations, details are required of the geological, mineralogical, and physical properties of the polymetallic deposits and their host rocks. Electrical properties of the deposits and their ore minerals are distinct from their unmineralized host rocks. Therefore, the use of electrical methods to detect SMS while drilling and recovering drill cores could decrease the costs and accelerate offshore operations by limiting the amount of drilling in unmineralized material. This paper presents new data regarding the electrical properties of SMS cores that can be used in that assessment. Frequency-dependent complex electrical resistivity in the frequency range between 0.002 and 100 Hz was examined in order to potentially discriminate between different types of fresh rocks, alteration and mineralization. Forty mini-cores of SMS and unmineralized host rocks were tested in the laboratory, originating from different tectonic settings such as the intermediate-spreading ridges of the Galapagos and Axial Seamount, and the Pacmanus back-arc basin. The results indicate that there is a clear potential to distinguish between mineralized and non-mineralized samples, with some evidence that even different types of mineralization can be discriminated. This could be achieved using resistivity magnitude alone with appropriate rig-mounted electrical sensors. Exploiting the frequency-dependent behavior of resistivity might amplify the differences and further improve the rock characterization.

  17. Electrical properties of seafloor massive sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Hannington, Mark; Bairlein, Katharina; Hördt, Andreas; Jegen, Marion; Petersen, Sven; Laurila, Tea

    2016-02-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits are increasingly seen as important marine metal resources for the future. A growing number of industrialized nations are involved in the surveying and sampling of such deposits by drilling. Drill ships are expensive and their availability can be limited; seabed drill rigs are a cost-effective alternative and more suitable for obtaining cores for resource evaluation. In order to achieve the objectives of resource evaluations, details are required of the geological, mineralogical, and physical properties of the polymetallic deposits and their host rocks. Electrical properties of the deposits and their ore minerals are distinct from their unmineralized host rocks. Therefore, the use of electrical methods to detect SMS while drilling and recovering drill cores could decrease the costs and accelerate offshore operations by limiting the amount of drilling in unmineralized material. This paper presents new data regarding the electrical properties of SMS cores that can be used in that assessment. Frequency-dependent complex electrical resistivity in the frequency range between 0.002 and 100 Hz was examined in order to potentially discriminate between different types of fresh rocks, alteration and mineralization. Forty mini-cores of SMS and unmineralized host rocks were tested in the laboratory, originating from different tectonic settings such as the intermediate-spreading ridges of the Galapagos and Axial Seamount, and the Pacmanus back-arc basin. The results indicate that there is a clear potential to distinguish between mineralized and non-mineralized samples, with some evidence that even different types of mineralization can be discriminated. This could be achieved using resistivity magnitude alone with appropriate rig-mounted electrical sensors. Exploiting the frequency-dependent behavior of resistivity might amplify the differences and further improve the rock characterization.

  18. Chemical dosing for sulfide control in Australia: An industry survey.

    PubMed

    Ganigue, Ramon; Gutierrez, Oriol; Rootsey, Ray; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2011-12-01

    Controlling sulfide (H(2)S) production and emission in sewer systems is critical due to the corrosion and malodour problems that sulfide causes. Chemical dosing is one of the most commonly used measures to mitigate these problems. Many chemicals have been reported to be effective for sulfide control, but the extent of success varies between chemicals and is also dependent on how they are applied. This industry survey aims to summarise the current practice in Australia with the view to assist the water industry to further improve their practices and to identify new research questions. Results showed that dosing is mainly undertaken in pressure mains. Magnesium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide and nitrate are the most commonly used chemicals for sewers with low flows. In comparison, iron salts are preferentially used for sulfide control in large systems. The use of oxygen injection has declined dramatically in the past few years. Chemical dosing is mainly conducted at wet wells and pumping stations, except for oxygen, which is injected into the pipe. The dosing rates are normally linked to the control mechanisms of the chemicals and the dosing locations, with constant or profiled dosing rates usually applied. Finally, key opportunities for improvement are the use of mathematical models for the selection of chemicals and dosing locations, on-line dynamic control of the dosing rates and the development of more cost-effective chemicals for sulfide control. PMID:22018528

  19. Synthesis of arsenic transition metal sulfides and metal arsenides

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, G.H.; Brown, L.D.; Ryan, D.F.

    1993-12-31

    One of the chief problems in upgrading shale oil is the presence of inherent arsenic which is known to poison downstream catalysts. Highly dispersed transition metal sulfides formed in situ from the decomposition of dithiocarbamate (DTC) complexes of transition metals show excellent potential as dearsenation agents. The authors have studied the reaction of these sulfides with various arsenic compositions and characterized the metal arsenides and arsenic metal sulfides formed as well as the ease of their formation. Thus, the reaction of bis(butyldithiocarbamato)Ni, (NiBuDTC) with model compounds was very facile and gave NiAs, NiAsS, and NiAs2=xSx. In general the effectiveness of the sulfides for dearsenation followed the sequence Ni>Mo{much_gt}Co, while iron sulfides were totally ineffective. Based upon these results, tests were run in autoclaves (as well as a fixed-bed flow-through unit) with NiBuDTC and shale oil having 73 ppm inherent As. Under optimum conditions, dearsenation down to les than 1 ppm was obtained.

  20. Sulfide inclusion chemistry and carbon isotopes of African diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, Peter; Harris, J. W.

    1995-08-01

    Significant differences in the composition of sulfide mineral inclusions among diamond suites from Koffiefontein, Orapa, Premier, Roberts Victor, Jagersfontein, Sierra Leone, Star, and Mwadui have been found. The mode of the Ni content of the monosulfide (mss) inclusions lies between 8 and 10 wt%, i.e., between the means for mss from Siberian diamonds with inclusion of the eclogitic (3 wt% Ni) and peridotitic (23 wt% Ni) paragenesis. Considering the Ni/Fe ratios of the diamond mss inclusions and mantle olivines, together with experimental and naturally observed Ni/Fe distribution coefficients, we conclude that less than 20% of the mss inclusions of the African diamonds (mostly from Koffiefontein) could have been in chemical equilibrium with mantle olivine. This observation is in sharp contrast with the reported relative abundance of silicate inclusions in Koffiefontein diamonds (93% peridotitic, 7% eclogitic) and lends support to the proposal that a separate sulfide diamond paragenesis should be recognized. The δ 13C distributions of sulfide containing diamonds differs among kimberlites, however, for each kimberlite sulfide and silicate inclusion containing diamonds cover the same δ 13C range. Sulfides with high Ni concentrations can occur in diamonds of low as well as high 13C content. The current observations, in conjunction with other chemical properties of diamonds suggest that fluid reactions rather than silica melt equilibria may be important in diamond formation. A dominance of fluid processes would have significant implications for the interpretation of the chemical and geochronological record of diamond inclusions.