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Sample records for 2-d acar measurements

  1. First 2D-ACAR Measurements on Cu with the new Spectrometer at TUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. A.; Böni, P.; Ceeh, H.; Leitner, M.; Hugenschmidt, Ch

    2013-06-01

    The two-dimensional measurement of the angular correlation of the positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) is a powerful tool to investigate the electronic structure of materials. Here we report on the first results obtained with the new 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the Technische Universitat München (TUM). To get experience in processing and interpreting 2D-ACAR data, first measurements were made on copper. The obtained data are treated with standard procedures and compared to theoretical calculations. It is shown that the measurements are in good agreement with the calculations and that the Fermi surface can be entirely reconstructed using three projections only.

  2. First measurements with the Munich 2D-ACAR spectrometer on Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Leitner, Michael; Böni, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The Munich 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the Maier-Leibnitz accelerator laboratory in Garching has recently become operational. In the present implementation a 2D-ACAR spectrometer is set up, with a baseline of 16.5 m, a conventional 22Na positron source and two Anger-type gamma-cameras. The positrons are guided onto the sample by a magnetic field generated by a normal conducting electromagnet. The sample can be either cooled by a standard closed-cycle-cryostat to low temperatures or heated by a resistive filament to temperatures up to 500 K. We present the key features of this new 2D-ACAR spectrometer and, in addition, discuss first measurements on the pure metal system Cr. The 2D-ACAR measurements have been performed on Cr at different temperatures: at 5 K and at room temperature in the anti-ferromagnetic phase and at 318K slightly above the paramagnetic phase transition.

  3. 2-D ACAR measurements of Ni/sub 3/A1

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; DasGupta, A.; Legnini, D.G.; Stahulak, M.D.

    1987-07-01

    In connection with a detailed study of the electronic structure and stability of the aluminides (Ni,Fe)/sub 3/Al, 2-D ACAR positron annihilation measurements were made on a Ni/sub 3/Al single crystal to study the Fermi surface. The results for Ni/sub 3/Al have been compared with results for pure Ni. Strong similarities were found for the electronic structures of these materials. Theoretical calculations of the Fermi surface for Ni/sub 3/Al are in good agreement with the experimental results. The GAMMA/sub 16/ sheet, not previously observed in any experiment, has now been observed for the first time in Ni/sub 3/Al. 14 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Spin-dependent momentum density distribution and Fermi surface of Ho via 2D-ACAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, A. S.; Uedono, A.

    2004-03-01

    The first direct measurements of the spin-dependent positron-electron momentum density and Fermi surface of Ho are presented. The measurements were performed using two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) experiments with reversal magnetic field directions parallel and anti-parallel to the polarization direction of the positron. The analysis confirmed that two hybrid bands influence the Fermi surface of Ho. They are 5d-6s conduction hybrid bands and partial hybridization of 4f-5d bands. In fact, the measured Fermi surface revealed the behavior of the magnetic electrons. Further, the reciprocal lattice points revealed the electronic spin density distribution behavior. The general layout of the Fermi surface of Ho showed a multiply connected surface as an open hole running along the A axis with minority spin distribution and two electron surfaces centered on K and H points, respectively. Furthermore, this Fermi surface showed anti-ferromagnetic character. The measured Fermi surface of Ho showed agreement with the results of a previous band structure calculation method. (

  5. In-situ Hydrogen Sorption 2D-ACAR Facility for the Study of Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legerstee, W. J.; de Roode, J.; Anastasopol, A.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W. H.

    We developed a dedicated hydrogen sorption setup coupled to a positron 2D-ACAR (two-dimensional Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation) setup employing a 22Na-source, which will enable to collect 2D-ACAR momentum distributions in-situ as a function of temperature, hydrogen pressure and hydrogen content. In parallel, a dedicated glovebox was constructed for handling air-sensitive metal and metal hydride samples, with a special entrance for the 2D-ACAR sample insert. The 2D-ACAR setup was tested in first measurements on a Pd0.75Ag0.25 foil and on a ball-milled MgH2 powder in both the hydrogen loaded and desorbed states. The hydrogen loaded Pd0.75Ag0.25Hx sample was kept under a 1 bar hydrogen pressure to prevent partial desorption during measurements at room temperature. The collected 2D-ACAR distributions of Pd0.75Ag0.25 and Pd0.75Ag0.25Hx showed similar features as observed in previous studies. The broadening of the ACAR distributions observed for the Mg to MgH2 metal-insulator transition was compared in a quantitative manner to ab-initio calculations reported in the literature.

  6. Recovering the Fermi surface with 2D-ACAR spectroscopy in samples with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugdale, S. B.; Laverock, J.

    2014-04-01

    When two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) experiments are performed in metals containing defects, conventional analysis in which the measured momentum distribution is folded back into the first Brillouin zone is rendered ineffective due to the contribution from positrons annihilating from the defect. However, by working with the radial anisotropy of the spectrum, it is shown that an image of the Fermi surface can be recovered since the defect contribution is essentially isotropic.

  7. Positron Annihilation 3-D Momentum Spectrometry by Synchronous 2D-ACAR and DBAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burggraf, Larry W.; Bonavita, Angelo M.; Williams, Christopher S.; Fagan-Kelly, Stefan B.; Jimenez, Stephen M.

    2015-05-01

    A positron annihilation spectroscopy system capable of determining 3D electron-positron (e--e+) momentum densities has been constructed and tested. In this technique two opposed HPGe strip detectors measure angular coincidence of annihilation radiation (ACAR) and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) in coincidence to produce 3D momentum datasets in which the parallel momentum component obtained from the DBAR measurement can be selected for annihilation events that possess a particular perpendicular momentum component observed in the 2D ACAR spectrum. A true 3D momentum distribution can also be produced. Measurement of 3-D momentum spectra in oxide materials has been demonstrated including O-atom defects in 6H SiC and silver atom substitution in lithium tetraborate crystals. Integration of the 3-D momentum spectrometer with a slow positron beam for future surface resonant annihilation spectrometry measurements will be described. Sponsorship from Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  8. Positron beam optics for the 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the NEPOMUC beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, H.; Weber, J. A.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Leitner, M.; Boni, P.

    2014-04-01

    In the last year a conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer has been set up and brought to operation at TUM. Once the NEPOMUC beamline is extended to the new experimental hall at the research reactor FRM-II the conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer will be upgraded with a second sample chamber in order to be integrated to the NEPOMUC beamline facility. This spectrometer will add a complete new quality to 2D-ACAR experiments as it allows to track the evolution of the electronic structure from the surface to the bulk. We present the design features of the positron beam optics and the sample environment.

  9. Methods for defect characterisation in thin film materials by depth-selective 2D-ACAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eijt, S. W. H.; Falub, C. V.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Mijnarends, P. E.

    2002-06-01

    The advent of intense positron beams makes it possible to perform depth-selective 2D-ACAR (two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation) studies. The Delft POSH-ACAR setup employs a strong permanent magnet for focusing of the POSH beam on the sample, which leads to a ˜15% spread in implantation energy. The effects of this spread on positron depth-profiling data are discussed, and are shown to be consistent with Doppler experiments on Si(1 0 0) with a subsurface layer of nanocavities. A method is presented to decompose depth-selective 2D-ACAR spectra reliably into their various (layer) components. This is used to reveal strong positron trapping in the nanocavities in Si(1 0 0).

  10. Simultaneous, coincident 2-D ACAR and DBAR using segmented HPGe detectors incorporating sub-pixel interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christopher S.; Burggraf, Larry W.; Adamson, Paul E.; Petrosky, James C.; Oxley, Mark E.

    2010-04-01

    A three-dimensional Positron Annihilation Spectrometry System (3D PASS) for determination of 3D electron-positron (e--e+) momentum densities by measuring coincident annihilation photons was designed, constructed and characterized. 3D PASS collects a single data set including correlated photon energies and coincident photon positions which are typically collected separately by two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D ACAR) and two-detector coincident Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (CDBAR) spectrometry. 3D PASS is composed of two position-sensitive, high-purity germanium (HPGe) double-sided strip detectors (DSSD(s)) linked together by a 32-channel, 50 MHz digital electronics suite. The DSSDs data were analyzed to determine location of photon detection events using an interpolation method to achieve a spatial resolution less than the 5-mm width of the DSSDs' charge collection strips. The interpolation method relies on measuring a figure-of-merit proportional to the area of the transient charges observed on both strips directly adjacent to the charge collection strip detecting the full charge deposited by the annihilation photon. This sub-pixel resolution, corresponding to the error associated with event location within a sub-pixel was measured for both DSSDs using the approach outlined in Williams et al [1] and was on the order of ± 0.20 mm (± one-standard deviation). As a result of the sub-pixel resolution, the distance between the DSSDs and material sample was reduced by a factor of five compared to what is typically required in 2D ACAR systems was necessary to achieve 0.5-mrad angular resolution. This reduction in the system's footprint decreases attenuation of the annihilation photons in the air between the material sample and the DSSDs and increases the solid angle between the sample and the DSSDs, ultimately resulting in higher system detection efficiency. 3D PASS was characterized in the same manner comparable to state

  11. 2D ACAR momentum density study of the nature of the positron surface state on Al(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Berko, S.; Canter, K.F.; Lynn, K.G.; Mills, A.P.; Roellig, L.O.; West, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    The two-dimensional angular correlation of the 2..gamma.. annihilation radiation (2D ACAR) has been measured from an Al(100) surface bombarded by 200-eV positrons. After removing the contribution of fast para-positronium annihilation, the spectrum from positrons annihilating at the surface exhibits a nearly isotropic conical shape with a (7.1 +- 0.5) mrad FWHM. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Electronic structure of disordered CuPd alloys by positron-annihilation 2D-ACAR

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Benedek, R.; Siegel, R.W.; Legnini, D.G.; Stahulak, M.D.; Bansil, A.

    1988-01-01

    We report 2D-ACAR experiments and KKR CPA calculations on alpha-phase single-crystal Cu/sub 1-x/Pd/sub x/ in the range x less than or equal to 0.25. The flattening of the Fermi surface near (110) with increasing x predicted by theory is confirmed by our experimental results. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G.; Bansil, A.

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a ``background corrected`` experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  14. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G. ); Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a background corrected'' experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  15. A temperature dependent 2D-ACAR study of untwinned metallic YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x}

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G.; Bansil, A.

    1992-02-01

    The authors have carried out 2D-ACAR measurements in the c-axis projection on an untwinned single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. These temperature dependent 2D-ACAR spectra can be approximated by a superposition of two temperature independent spectra with temperature dependent weighting factors. The authors discuss how the temperature dependence of the data can be exploited to obtain a {open_quote}background corrected{close_quote} experimental spectrum, which is found to be in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory based predictions, including for the first time the overall amplitude of the anisotropy in the 2D-ACAR. The corrected data also show clear signatures of the ridge Fermi surface and an indication of the pillbox surface.

  16. The Bristol HIDAC 2D-ACAR Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugdale, S. B.; Laverock, J.; Utfeld, C.; Alam, M. A.; Haynes, T. D.; Billington, D.; Ernsting, D.

    2013-06-01

    We describe the Bristol spectrometer for positron annihilation Fermi surface studies utilising high-density avalanche chambers (HIDACs) as position sensitive detectors. Measurements on α-SiO2 show, through the momentum distribution of para-positronium, the substantial improvement in resolution compared to Anger cameras. Measurements of the Fermi surface of V are used to determine the resolution. The new spectrometer is found to have an efficiency of 12.5 ± 0.6 % and a (coincidence) contribution to the position resolution of 0.96 ± 0.1 mm.

  17. Depth-selective 2D-ACAR studies on low- k dielectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eijt, S. W. H.; van Veen, A.; Falub, C. V.; Galindo, R. Escobar; Schut, H.; Mijnarends, P. E.; de Theije, F. K.; Balkenende, A. R.

    2003-10-01

    Depth-selective 2D-ACAR investigations on ordered mesoporous silica thin films provide direct evidence that para-positronium ( p-Ps) created deep in the films can escape through a network of interconnected pores. The depth dependence of the escape fraction and of the average kinetic energy of non-thermally excited p-Ps is in quantitative agreement with Monte Carlo modeling, assuming classical collisions of p-Ps with the pore walls. The model provides insight in the shape of the angular correlation distributions and their sensitivity to, e.g., the effective wall mass Ms and pore dimensions.

  18. Positron-annihilation 2D-ACAR studies of disordered and defected alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A.; Prasad, R.; Smedskjaer, L.C.; Benedek, R.; Mijnarends, P.E.

    1987-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental progess in connection with 2D-ACAR positron annihilation studies of ordered, disordered, and defected alloys is discussed. We present, in particular, some of the recent developments concerning the electronic structure of disordered alloys, and the work in the area of annihilation from positrons trapped at vacancy-type defects in metals and alloys. The electronic structure and properties of a number of compounds are also discussed briefly; we comment specifically on high T/sub c/ ceramic superconductors, Heusler alloys, and transition-metal aluminides. 58 refs., 116 figs.

  19. 2D-ACAR spectra of insulating and superconducting Y-123

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Bansil, A.

    1992-09-01

    An overview of the two-dimensional angular correlation (2D-ACAR) positron annihilation results for the three fundamental phases of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, namely, the normal metal, the superconductor, and the insulator, is presented. In addition to the c-axis projected momentum density, the recent results for the a-axis projection as well as the insulating Y123 are discussed. The experimental results are compared and contrasted with the corresponding band theory predictions as far as possible in order to gain insight into the electronic structure and Fermiology of this archetypal high-{Tc} superconductor.

  20. Momentum density and 2D-ACAR experiments in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics); Smedskjaer, L.C. )

    1991-12-01

    We compare measured c-projected 2D-ACAR spectrum from an untwinned single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} with the corresponding band theory predictions. Many different one-dimensional sections through the spectrum are considered, together with the characteristic amplitudes and shapes of the spectral anisotropies, with a focus on identifying and delineating Fermi surface signatures in the spectra. The positron data clearly show several distinct features of the ridge Fermi surface predicted by the band theory, and give an indication of the pillbox Fermi sheet. The good agreement between theory and experiment suggests that the band theory framework based on the local density approximation (LDA) is capable of providing a substantially correct description of the momentum density and Fermiology of the normal ground state electronic structure of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

  1. 2D-ACAR Studies on Swift Heavy Ion Si-Implanted GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaji, K.; Selvakumar, S.

    Material properties modification by high energy heavy ion implantation is a prospective technology leading to many device fabrications. This technique induces defects and hence the physical properties of the materials are modified. The effects of swift heavy ion implantation induced defects by 120 MeV 28+Si ion implantation and doping in SI-GaAs are presented from the electron momentum distribution (EMD) of vacancy-type defects studied by two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The positron trapping due to the influence of high-energy Si- implantation in GaAs (n-type) is compared with the corresponding spectra of SI- GaAs and with Si-doped (n-type) GaAs. The EMD of the implanted sample shows a distinct increased isotropic distribution with a characteristic transform of its structure as evident from the low momentum region compared to the pristine sample. The characteristics of defects created by Si doping and by 120 MeV 28+Si ion implantation of undoped semi-insulating (SI) GaAS are discussed. These results indicate the nature of positron trapping in open volume defects such as vacancy clusters created by implantation.

  2. Surfaces of nanomaterials for sustainable energy applications: thin-film 2D-ACAR and PALS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiellini, B.; Chai, L.; Al-Sawai, W.; Eijt, S. W. H.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Schut, H.; Gao, Y.; Houtepen, A. J.; Ravelli, L.; Egger, W.; van Huis, M. A.; Bansil, A.

    2013-03-01

    Positron (e+) annihilation spectroscopy is one of only a few techniques to probe the surfaces of nanoparticles. We investigated thin films of PbSe colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) in the range 2-10 nm as prospective highly efficient absorbers for solar cells. We compare and contrast our findings with previous studies on CdSe NCs. Evidence obtained from our e+ lifetime spectroscopy study using the PLEPS spectrometer shows that 90-95% of the implanted positrons are effectively trapped and confined at the surfaces of these NCs. The remaining 5-10% of the e+ annihilate in the relatively large oleic acid ligands, in fair agreement with the estimated positron stopping power of the PbSe nanoparticle ``core'' relative to the ligand ``shell.'' 2D-ACAR measurements on the same set of films using the low-energy e+ beam POSH showed that the e+ wavefunction at the surfaces of the PbSe NCs is more localized than for the case of CdSe NCs. Comparison with calculated e+ - e- momentum densities indicates a Pb deficiency at the surfaces of the PbSe NCs, which correlates with e+ lifetime and the NCs morphology. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy.

  3. Electron Momentum Distribution Mapping of Trans-Stilbene Projected to [101] by Positron 2D-ACAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, S.; Sivaji, K.; Smith, S. V.

    Electron momentum distribution (EMD) on trans-stilbene single crystal projected along [101] direction has been studied by using positron two dimensional -angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The projected EMD is explained with respect to the molecular arrangement in the plane. The EMD features reflected the delocalized electronic states in [101] direction. The results of EMD mapping did not show a characteristic ellipsoidal distribution at lower momentum region (LMR) as observed in trans-stilbene projected to [010] direction at room temperature. The LMR region exhibits a hexagonal contour projected to [101] direction.

  4. Electron-positron momentum density distribution of Gd from 2D ACAR data via Maximum Entropy and Cormack's methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylak, M.; Kontrym-Sznajd, G.; Dobrzyński, L.

    2011-08-01

    A successful application of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to the reconstruction of electron-positron momentum density distribution in gadolinium out of the experimental of 2D ACAR data is presented. Formally, the algorithm used was prepared for two-dimensional reconstructions from line integrals. For the first time the results of MEM, applied to such data, are compared in detail with the ones obtained by means of Cormack's method. It is also shown how the experimental uncertainties may influence the results of the latter analysis. Preliminary calculations, using WIEN2k code, of band structure and Fermi surface have been done as well.

  5. Positron annihilation 2D-ACAR study of semi-coherent Li nanoclusters in MgO( 1 0 0 ) and MgO( 1 1 0 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falub, C. V.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Eijt, S. W. H.; van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.

    2002-05-01

    Depth selective positron annihilation two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) is used to determine the electronic structure of Li nanoclusters formed by implantation of 10 16 cm -26Li ions (with an energy of 30 keV) in MgO(1 0 0) and (1 1 0) crystals, and subsequently annealed at 950 K. The 2D-ACAR spectra of Li-implanted MgO obtained with 4 keV positrons reveal the semi-coherent ordering state of the embedded metallic Li nanoclusters. The results agree with ab initio Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker calculations.

  6. Study of colloidal quantum dot surfaces using an innovative thin-film positron 2D-ACAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiellini, B.; Bansil, A.; Eijt, S. W. H.; Schut, H.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Denison, A. B.

    2006-03-01

    Despite a wealth of information, many fundamental questions regarding the nature of the surface of nanosized inorganic particles and its relationship with the electronic structure remain unsolved. We have investigated the electron momentum density (EMD) of colloidal CdSe quantum-dots via depth-resolved positron 2D angular correlation of annihilation (2D-ACAR) spectroscopy at the Delft intense variable-energy positron beam. This method, in combination with first-principles calculations of the EMD, shows that implanted positrons are trapped at the surface of CdSe nanocrystals. They annihilate mostly with the Se electrons and monitor changes in composition and structure of the surface while hardly sensing the ligand molecules. We thus unambiguously confirm [1] the strong surface relaxation predicted by first-principles calculations [2]. Work supported by the USDOE.[1] S.W.H. Eijt et al., Nature Materials (in press).[2] A. Puzder, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 217401 (2004).

  7. Momentum density and 2D-ACAR experiments in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A.; Smedskjaer, L.C.

    1991-12-01

    We compare measured c-projected 2D-ACAR spectrum from an untwinned single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} with the corresponding band theory predictions. Many different one-dimensional sections through the spectrum are considered, together with the characteristic amplitudes and shapes of the spectral anisotropies, with a focus on identifying and delineating Fermi surface signatures in the spectra. The positron data clearly show several distinct features of the ridge Fermi surface predicted by the band theory, and give an indication of the pillbox Fermi sheet. The good agreement between theory and experiment suggests that the band theory framework based on the local density approximation (LDA) is capable of providing a substantially correct description of the momentum density and Fermiology of the normal ground state electronic structure of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

  8. Electronic Structure and Fermi Surface of the Quaternary Intermetallic Borocarbide Superconductor YNi2B2C from 2D-ACAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, A. S.

    We measured the angular momentum density distribution of YNi2B2C to acquire information about its electronic structure. The measurements were performed using the full-scale utility of the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The measured spectra clarified that Ni (3d) like state, predominantly, affected the Fermi surface of YNi2B2C. Further, s- and p-like-states enhanced its superconducting properties. The Fermi surface of YNi2B2C. was reconstructed using Fourier transformation followed by the LCW (Loucks, Crisp and West) folding procedure. It showed a large and complex surface similar to that of the high temperature superconductors HTS, with anisotropic properties. It also disclosed the effect of d-like state. Nevertheless, the current Fermi surface could deliver the needed topological information to isolate its features. The general layouts of this Fermi surface are; two large electron surfaces running along Γ-Z direction; as well as an additional large electron surface centered on X point; beside one hole surface centered on 100 point. This Fermi surface was interpreted in view of the earlier results.

  9. Electron momentum distribution and singlet-singlet annihilation in the organic anthracene molecular crystals using positron 2D-ACAR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Sellaiyan; Sivaji, Krishnan; Arulchakkaravarthi, Arjunan; Sankar, Sambasivam

    2014-08-14

    We present the mapping of electron momentum distribution (EMD) in a single crystal of anthracene by two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The projected EMD is explained on the basis of the crystallographic features of the material. The EMD spectra provide information about the positron states and their behavior and also about the hindrance of the positronium (Ps) formation in this material. The EMD has exhibited evidence for the absence of free volume defects. The characteristic EMD features regarding the delocalized electronic states are explained. Further, scintillation characteristics such as fluorescence and time-correlated single photon counting have also been studied. The emission peaks are attributed to vibrational bands of fluorescence emission from the singlet excitons and lifetime components are observed to be due to singlet fission and the singlet-singlet excitons annihilation. PMID:24963608

  10. A position-sensitive γ-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koji; Saito, Haruo; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Muramatsu, Shinichi; Nagai, Shota; Masuda, Keisuke

    2002-07-01

    A new position-sensitive γ-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi 4Ge 3O 12 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mm×2.6 mm×18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV γ-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mm×160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the γ-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation γ-rays.

  11. Measurement of 2D birefringence distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Masato; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Masahiro; Tachihara, Satoru

    1992-10-01

    A new measuring method of 2-D birefringence distribution has been developed. It has not been an easy job to get a birefringence distribution in an optical element with conventional ellipsometry because of its lack of scanning means. Finding an analogy between the rotating analyzer method in ellipsometry and the phase-shifting method in recently developed digital interferometry, we have applied the phase-shifting algorithm to ellipsometry, and have developed a new method that makes the measurement of 2-D birefringence distribution easy and possible. The system contains few moving parts, assuring reliability, and measures a large area of a sample at one time, making the measuring time very short.

  12. ACARS wind measurements - An intercomparison with radiosonde, cloud motion and VAS thermally derived winds. [Communications, Addressing and Reporting System VISSR Atmospheric Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, R. J.; Menzel, W. P.; Pecht, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    Statistical comparisons between winds measured by ACARS and winds obtained from radiosondes, geostationary satellite image cloud motions, and VAS are presented. Observations from three separate comparisons reveal over 60 percent of wind vector magnitude differences are within 9 m/s, and 70 percent of the directional differences are within 15 deg. The comparisons indicate that the ACARS system provides an independent source of wind data that complements other sources of wind data for constructing composite wind field analyses.

  13. Fermi-surface reconstruction from two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) data using maximum-likelihood fitting of wavelet-like functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G, A., Major; Fretwell, H. M.; Dugdale, S. B.; Alam, M. A.

    1998-11-01

    A novel method for reconstructing the Fermi surface from experimental two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) projections is proposed. In this algorithm, the 3D electron momentum-density distribution is expanded in terms of a basis of wavelet-like functions. The parameters of the model, the wavelet coefficients, are determined by maximizing the likelihood function corresponding to the experimental data and the projections calculated from the model. In contrast to other expansions, in the case of that in terms of wavelets a relatively small number of model parameters are sufficient for representing the relevant parts of the 3D distribution, thus keeping computation times reasonably short. Unlike other reconstruction methods, this algorithm takes full account of the statistical information content of the data and therefore may help to reduce the amount of time needed for data acquisition. An additional advantage of wavelet expansion may be the possibility of retrieving the Fermi surface directly from the wavelet coefficients rather than indirectly using the reconstructed 3D distribution.

  14. Study of the equilibrium vacancy ensemble in aluminum using 1D- and 2D-angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Berko, S.; Chakraborty, B.; Hoffmann, K.R.; Lippel, P.; Siegel, R.W.

    1985-03-12

    One- and two-dimensional angular correlation of positron-electron annihilation radiation (1D and 2D-ACAR) data have been obtained between 293 and 903 K for single crystals of aluminum. The peak counting rates vs temperature, which were measured using the 1D-ACAR technique, provide a model independent value for the temperature dependence of the positron trapping probability. Using these results it is possible to strip out the Bloch state contribution from the observed 2D-ACAR surfaces and then compare the resulting defect ACAR surfaces to calculated 2D-ACAR surfaces for positrons annihilating from the Bloch, monovacancy, and divacancy-trapped states. The result of this comparison is that the presence of an increasing equilibrium divacancy population is consistent with the observed temperature dependence of ACAR data at high temperature in Al and that the present results when compared to earlier studies on Al indicate that the ratio of the trapping rates at divacancies and monovacancies is of order two.

  15. NASA High-Speed 2D Photogrammetric Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismond, Harriett R.

    2012-01-01

    The object of this report is to provide users of the NASA high-speed 2D photogrammetric measurement system with procedures required to obtain drop-model trajectory and impact data for full-scale and sub-scale models. This guide focuses on use of the system for vertical drop testing at the NASA Langley Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility.

  16. Thermal conductivity measurements in a 2D Yukawa system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, V.; Ivlev, A.; Zhdanov, S.; Morfill, G.; Goree, J.; Piel, A.

    2007-03-01

    Thermal conductivity was measured for a 2D Yukawa system. First, we formed a monolayer suspension of microspheres in a plasma, i.e., a dusty plasma, which is like a colloidal suspension, but with an extremely low volume fraction and a partially-ionized rarefied gas instead of solvent. In the absence of manipulation, the suspension forms a 2D triangular lattice. To melt this lattice and form a liquid, we used a laser-heating method. Two focused laser beams were moved rapidly around in the monolayer. The kinetic temperature of the particles increased with the laser power applied, and above a threshold a melting transition occurred. We used digital video microscopy for direct imaging and particle tracking. The spatial profiles of the particle kinetic temperature were calculated. Using the heat transport equation with an additional term to account for the energy dissipation due to the gas drag, we analyzed the temperature distribution to derive the thermal conductivity.

  17. 3D track initiation in clutter using 2D measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    2001-11-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for initiating 3-D tracks using range and azimuth (bearing) measurements from a 2-D radar on a moving platform. The work is motivated by the need to track possibly low-flying targets, e.g., cruise missiles, using reports from an aircraft-based surveillance radar. Previous work on this problem considered simple linear motion in a flat earth coordinate frame. Our research extends this to a more realistic scenario where the earth"s curvature is also considered. The target is assumed to be moving along a great circle at a constant altitude. After the necessary coordinate transformations, the measurements are nonlinear functions of the target state and the observability of target altitude is severely limited. The observability, quantified by the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), is very sensitive to the sensor-to-target geometry. The paper presents a Maximum Likelihood (ML) estimator for estimating the target motion parameters in the Earth Centered Earth Fixed coordinate frame from 2-D range and angle measurements. In order to handle the possibility of false measurements and missed detections, which was not considered in, we use the Probabilistic Data Association (PDA) algorithm to weight the detections in a frame. The PDA-based modified global likelihood is optimized using a numerical search. The accuracies obtained by the resulting ML-PDA estimator are quantified using the CRLB for different sensor-target configurations. It is shown that the proposed estimator is efficient, that is, it meets the CRLB. Of particular interest is the achievable accuracy for estimating the target altitude, which is not observed directly by the 2-D radar, but can be only inferred from the range and bearing observations.

  18. A two-dimensional ACAR study of untwinned YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C. ); Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    We have carried out 2D-ACAR measurements on an untwinned single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. We show that these temperature dependent 2D-ACAR spectra can be described to a good approximation as a superposition of two temperature independent spectra with temperature dependent weighting factors. We show further how the data can be used to correct for the background'' in the experimental spectrum. Such a background corrected'' spectrum is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  19. Measurement of topological invariants in a 2D photonic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Sunil; Ganeshan, Sriram; Fan, Jingyun; Vaezi, Abolhassan; Hafezi, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    A hallmark feature of topological physics is the presence of one-way propagating chiral modes at the system boundary. The chirality of edge modes is a consequence of the topological character of the bulk. For example, in a non-interacting quantum Hall model, edge modes manifest as mid-gap states between two topologically distinct bulk bands. The bulk-boundary correspondence dictates that the number of chiral edge modes, a topological invariant called the winding number, is completely determined by the bulk topological invariant, the Chern number. Here, for the first time, we measure the winding number in a 2D photonic system. By inserting a unit flux quantum at the edge, we show that the edge spectrum resonances shift by the winding number. This experiment provides a new approach for unambiguous measurement of topological invariants, independent of the microscopic details, and could possibly be extended to probe strongly correlated topological orders.

  20. A two-dimensional ACAR study of untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Bansil, A.

    1991-12-01

    We have carried out 2D-ACAR measurements on an untwinned single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. We show that these temperature dependent 2D-ACAR spectra can be described to a good approximation as a superposition of two temperature independent spectra with temperature dependent weighting factors. We show further how the data can be used to correct for the ``background`` in the experimental spectrum. Such a ``background corrected`` spectrum is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  1. Probing 2D black phosphorus by quantum capacitance measurements.

    PubMed

    Kuiri, Manabendra; Kumar, Chandan; Chakraborty, Biswanath; Gupta, Satyendra N; Naik, Mit H; Jain, Manish; Sood, A K; Das, Anindya

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional materials and their heterostructures have emerged as a new class of materials, not only for fundamental physics but also for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Black phosphorus (BP) is a relatively new addition to this class of materials. Its strong in-plane anisotropy makes BP a unique material for making conceptually new types of electronic devices. However, the global density of states (DOS) of BP in device geometry has not been measured experimentally. Here, we report the quantum capacitance measurements together with the conductance measurements on an hBN-protected few-layer BP (∼six layers) in a dual-gated field effect transistor (FET) geometry. The measured DOS from our quantum capacitance is compared with density functional theory (DFT). Our results reveal that the transport gap for quantum capacitance is smaller than that in conductance measurements due to the presence of localized states near the band edge. The presence of localized states is confirmed by the variable range hopping seen in our temperature dependence conductivity. A large asymmetry is observed between the electron and hole side. This asymmetric nature is attributed to the anisotropic band dispersion of BP. Our measurements establish the uniqueness of quantum capacitance in probing the localized states near the band edge, hitherto not seen in conductance measurements. PMID:26559656

  2. Measurements of Laser Imprinting Using 2-D Velocity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehly, T. R.; Fiksel, G.; Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Celliers, P. M.

    2014-10-01

    Evaluating laser imprinting and its effect on target performance is critical to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion research. Using high-resolution velocity interferometry, we measure modulations in the velocity of shock waves produced by the 351-nm beams on OMEGA. These modulations result from nonuniformities in the drive laser beams. We use these measurements to evaluate the effect on imprinting of multibeam irradiation and metal layers on both plastic and cryogenic deuterium targets driven with 100-ps pulses. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Interface adhesion between 2D materials and elastomers measured by buckle delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Christopher; Lu, Nanshu

    2015-03-01

    A major application for 2D materials is creating electronic devices, including flexible and wearable devices. These applications require complicated fabrication processes where 2D materials are either mechanically exfoliated or grown via chemical vapor deposition and then transferred to a host substrate. Both processes require intimate knowledge of the interactions between the 2D material and the substrate to allow for a controllable transfer. Although adhesion between 2D materials and stiff substrates such as silicon and copper have been measured by bulge or peeling tests, adhesion between 2D materials and soft polymer substrates are hard to measure by conventional methods. Here we propose a simple way of measuring the adhesion between 2D materials and soft, stretchable elastomers using mature continuum mechanics equations. By creating buckle delamination in 2D atomic layers and measuring the buckle profile using an atomic force microscope, we can readily extract 2D-elastomer adhesion energy. Here we look at the adhesion of MoS2 and graphene to PDMS. The measured adhesion values are found insensitive to the applied strains in the substrate and are one order smaller than 2D-silicon oxide adhesion which is mainly attributed substrate surface roughness differences.

  4. 2D Sub-Pixel Disparity Measurement Using QPEC / Medicis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cournet, M.; Giros, A.; Dumas, L.; Delvit, J. M.; Greslou, D.; Languille, F.; Blanchet, G.; May, S.; Michel, J.

    2016-06-01

    In the frame of its earth observation missions, CNES created a library called QPEC, and one of its launcher called Medicis. QPEC / Medicis is a sub-pixel two-dimensional stereo matching algorithm that works on an image pair. This tool is a block matching algorithm, which means that it is based on a local method. Moreover it does not regularize the results found. It proposes several matching costs, such as the Zero mean Normalised Cross-Correlation or statistical measures (the Mutual Information being one of them), and different match validation flags. QPEC / Medicis is able to compute a two-dimensional dense disparity map with a subpixel precision. Hence, it is more versatile than disparity estimation methods found in computer vision literature, which often assume an epipolar geometry. CNES uses Medicis, among other applications, during the in-orbit image quality commissioning of earth observation satellites. For instance the Pléiades-HR 1A & 1B and the Sentinel-2 geometric calibrations are based on this block matching algorithm. Over the years, it has become a common tool in ground segments for in-flight monitoring purposes. For these two kinds of applications, the two-dimensional search and the local sub-pixel measure without regularization can be essential. This tool is also used to generate automatic digital elevation models, for which it was not initially dedicated. This paper deals with the QPEC / Medicis algorithm. It also presents some of its CNES applications (in-orbit commissioning, in flight monitoring or digital elevation model generation). Medicis software is distributed outside the CNES as well. This paper finally describes some of these external applications using Medicis, such as ground displacement measurement, or intra-oral scanner in the dental domain.

  5. 2D measurements of cup orientation are less reliable than 3D measurements

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Niall; Cobb, Justin P; Hart, Alister J

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose 2D analysis of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasty (HA) has been conducted in several large series on conventional radiographs with the use of Ein Bild Roentegen Analyse (EBRA) software, but there have been no comparisons with 3D analysis in the literature. The main aim of this study was to quantify the agreement in measurements of cup version of large-diameter MoM hips obtained by EBRA and by 3D computed tomography (3D-CT). The secondary aim was to quantify the agreement for cup inclination. Lastly, we wanted to determine the inter- and intra-observer reliability of both methods. Patients and methods 87 MoM hips in 81 patients were analyzed for cup inclination and version in 2D on conventional radiographs using EBRA software. The results were compared with 3D measurements using CT. Results Cup version was underestimated by EBRA when compared to 3D-CT, by 6° on average with the pelvis supine and by 8° on average with the pelvis orientated to the anterior pelvic plane (APP). For inclination, the mean difference was no more than 1°. 53% of hips were within a 10° safe zone of 45° inclination and 20° version when measured by 3D-CT with the pelvis supine (and 54% with the pelvis in the APP). The proportion was only 24% when measured by EBRA. Inter- and intra-observer reliability of cup version is poorer using 2D analysis than when using 3D-CT. Interpretation Errors in version in 2D were due to the difficulty in delineating the cup rim, which was obscured by a large-diameter metal head of the same radio-opacity. This can be overcome with 3D analysis. The present study demonstrates that measurements using EBRA have poor agreement and are less reliable than those with 3D-CT when measuring cup version and inclination in MoM hips. PMID:25674698

  6. Measurements of Schottky barrier heights formed from metals and 2D transition metal dichalcogedides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changsik; Moon, Inyong; Nam, Seunggeol; Cho, Yeonchoo; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Park, Seongjun; Yoo, Won Jong

    Schottky barrier height (SBH) is an important parameter that needs to be considered for designing electronic devices. However, for two dimensional (2D) materials based devices, SBH control is limited by 2D structure induced quantum confinement and 2D surface induced Fermi level pinning. In this work, we explore differences in measuring SBH between 2D and 3D materials. Recently, low temperature I-V measurement has been reported to extract SBH based on thermionic emission equation for Schottky diode. However, 2D devices are not real Schottky diode in that both source and drain metal electrodes make Schottky contact. According to our experimental results, SBH extracted from linear slope of ln (I/T3/2) against 1/T show widely diverse values, dependent on applied voltage bias and tested temperature which affect carrier transport including tunneling or thermionic emission across the metal-2D material interface. In this work, we wish to demonstrate the method to determine SBH and Fermi level pinning which are attributed to 2D transition metal dichalcogedides, differently from conventional 3D materials. .

  7. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  8. A three-dimensional measuring system based on 2D laser displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Sulun; Fu, Yuegang; Zhu, Wangbin; Zhang, Yingwei; Wang, Weichen

    2014-12-01

    3D(Three-dimensional) measurement has found its applications in the fields of automation process, Reverse engineering(RE), machine vision, as well as medical diagnostic. There are some disadvantages in the present 3D measurement methods. In this paper, a 2D laser displacement sensor-based and fast-dimensional surface measurement method for small size objects was proposed after analyzing the existing three-dimensional measurement methods. This method uses the information collected by 2D laser displacement sensor and encoder in pan-tilt to three-dimensional reconstruct 3D model. And then discuss the restrictive relation between angular velocity of pan-tilt and parameters (measurement range, signal sample rate, precision, etc.) of 2D laser displacement sensor. The sources of error and methods of improving precision were analyzed. Theoretical analyses and experiments have proved the feasibility, high-precision and practical of this method.

  9. Enhancement of MS2D Bartington point measurement of soil magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabijańczyk, Piotr; Zawadzki, Jarosław

    2015-04-01

    Field magnetometry is fast method used to assess the potential soil pollution. The most popular device used to measure the soil magnetic susceptibility on the soil surface is a MS2D Bartington. Single reading using MS2D device of soil magnetic susceptibility is low time-consuming but often characterized by considerable errors related to the instrument or environmental and lithogenic factors. Typically, in order to calculate the reliable average value of soil magnetic susceptibility, a series of MS2D readings is performed in the sample point. As it was analyzed previously, such methodology makes it possible to significantly reduce the nugget effect of the variograms of soil magnetic susceptibility that is related to the micro-scale variance and measurement errors. The goal of this study was to optimize the process of taking a series of MS2D readings, whose average value constitutes a single measurement, in order to take into account micro-scale variations of soil magnetic susceptibility in proper determination of this parameter. This was done using statistical and geostatistical analyses. The analyses were performed using field MS2D measurements that were carried out in the study area located in the direct vicinity of the Katowice agglomeration. At 150 sample points 10 MS2D readings of soil magnetic susceptibility were taken. Using this data set, series of experimental variograms were calculated and modeled. Firstly, using single random MS2D reading for each sample point, and next using the data set increased by adding one more MS2D reading, until their number reached 10. The parameters of variogram: nugget effect, sill and range of correlation were used to determine the most suitable number of MS2D readings at sample point. The distributions of soil magnetic susceptibility at sample point were also analyzed in order to determine adequate number of readings enabling to calculate reliable average soil magnetic susceptibility. The research leading to these results has

  10. Highly resolved measurements of atmospheric turbulence with the new 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeromin, A.; Schaffarczyk, A. P.; Puczylowski, J.; Peinke, J.; Hölling, M.

    2014-12-01

    For the investigation of atmospheric turbulent flows on small scales a new anemometer was developed, the so-called 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-ALCA). It performs highly resolved measurements with a spatial resolution in millimeter range and temporal resolution in kHz range, thus detecting very small turbulent structures. The anemometer is a redesign of the successfully operating 2d-LCA for laboratory application. The new device was designed to withstand hostile operating environments (rain and saline, humid air). In February 2012, the 2d-ALCA was used for the first time in a test field. The device was mounted in about 53 m above ground level on a lattice tower near the German North Sea coast. Wind speed was measured by the 2d-ALCA at 10 kHz sampling rate and by cup anemometers at 1 Hz. The instantaneous wind speed ranged from 8 m/s to 19 m/s at an average turbulence level of about 7 %. Wind field characteristics were analyzed based on cup anemometer as well as 2d-ALCA. The combination of both devices allowed the study of atmospheric turbulence over several magnitudes in turbulent scales.

  11. Online measurement for geometrical parameters based on 2D laser sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongtao; Shao, Shuangyun; Feng, Qibo

    2015-02-01

    Based on 2-D laser sensor, an optimized system for dynamically measuring geomet rical parameters of train wheels is proposed in this paper. The calibrat ion of the system is simplified by combining a 1-D laser sensor and a 2-D laser sensor. Accuracy of the 2-D laser sensor reaches 0.2mm and it ensures that most information of the wheel tread surface is acquired. The geometrical parameters including wheel diameter, flange thickness, flange height, tread wear and rim width can be calculated once the information is processed. In order to improve the measurement accuracy of wheel diameter, a new method for spatial circle fitting is proposed. According to the results acquired in the field, the measurement system can satisfy the requirements of dynamically measuring the geometrical parameters of train wheels.

  12. Combination 3D TOP with 2D PC MRA Techique for cerebral blood flow volume measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, G; Wu, R H; Zhang, Y P; Guan, J T; Guo, Y L; Cheng, Y; terBrugge, K; Mikulis, D J

    2006-01-01

    To demonstrate the discrepancy of cerebral blood flow volume (BFV) estimation with 2D phase-contrast (2D PC) MRA guided with 3D time-of-flight (3D TOF) MR localization by using an "internal" standard. 20 groups of the common (CCA), internal (ICA), and external (ECA) carotid arteries in 10 healthy subjects were examined with 2D PC MRA guided by 3D TOF MR angiograms. The sum BFV of the internal and external carotid arteries was then compared with the ipsilateral common carotid artery flow. An accurate technique would demonstrate no difference. The difference was therefore a measure of accuracy of the method. 3D TOF MRA localization is presented to allow the determination of a slice orientation to improve the accuracy of 2D PC MRA in estimate the BFV. By using the combined protocols, there was better correlation in BFV estimate between the sum of ICA+ECA with the ipsilateral CCA (R2=0.729, P=0.000). The inconsistency (mean +/- SD) was found to be 6.95 +/- 5.95% for estimate the BFV in ICA+ECA and ipsilateral CCA. The main inconsistency was contributed to the ECA and its branches. Guided with 3D TOF MRA localization, 2D PC MRA is more accurate in the determination of blood flow volume in the carotid arteries. PMID:17946401

  13. Ultrasonic tissue characterization via 2-D spectrum analysis: theory and in vitro measurements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian; Lizzi, Frederic L.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Silverman, Ronald H.; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical model is described for application in ultrasonic tissue characterization using a calibrated 2-D spectrum analysis method. This model relates 2-D spectra computed from ultrasonic backscatter signals to intrinsic physical properties of tissue microstructures, e.g., size, shape, and acoustic impedance. The model is applicable to most clinical diagnostic ultrasound systems. Two experiments employing two types of tissue architectures, spherical and cylindrical scatterers, are conducted using ultrasound with center frequencies of 10 and 40 MHz, respectively. Measurements of a tissue-mimicking phantom with an internal suspension of microscopic glass beads are used to validate the theoretical model. Results from in vitro muscle fibers are presented to further elucidate the utility of 2-D spectrum analysis in ultrasonic tissue characterization. PMID:17441250

  14. Measurements of laboratory turbulence with the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Peinke, Joachim; Hoelling, Michael

    2013-11-01

    A newly developed anemometer, the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer, was used to measure the two-dimensional wind speed vector in laboratory-generated turbulence. The anemometer provides a temporal and spatial resolution comparable or even higher to those of commercial hot-wires and thus is an excellent alternative for high-resolution measurements. The 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer uses a previously unseen measurement technique in the range of anemometers. The principle is adopted from atomic force microscopes (AFM). A tiny micro-structured cantilever is brought into the airflow, where it experiences a drag force due to the moving fluid. The resulting deflection is measured using the laser pointer principle. Unlike the measuring principle of hot-wires this technique can be applied in challenging environments such as in liquids or very close to walls. Our comparing measurements with the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer and an x-wire were carried out in the wake of rigid bodies and grids. The results show a great agreement with regards to the increment statistics on various scales, power spectra and turbulence intensity, thus proving the new anemometer.

  15. Automatic computation of 2D cardiac measurements from B-mode echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, JinHyeong; Feng, Shaolei; Zhou, S. Kevin

    2012-03-01

    We propose a robust and fully automatic algorithm which computes the 2D echocardiography measurements recommended by America Society of Echocardiography. The algorithm employs knowledge-based imaging technologies which can learn the expert's knowledge from the training images and expert's annotation. Based on the models constructed from the learning stage, the algorithm searches initial location of the landmark points for the measurements by utilizing heart structure of left ventricle including mitral valve aortic valve. It employs the pseudo anatomic M-mode image generated by accumulating the line images in 2D parasternal long axis view along the time to refine the measurement landmark points. The experiment results with large volume of data show that the algorithm runs fast and is robust comparable to expert.

  16. Laboratory measurements of the O+/2D/ + N2 and O+/2D/ + O2 reaction rate coefficients and their ionospheric implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, R.; Biondi, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Rate coefficients which have been measured at thermal energies for the charge transfer reactions of metastable O+/2D/ ions with N2 and O2 are reported. It is found that at an effective temperature of about 550 K, k(n2) = (8 + or - 2) x 10 to the -10 cu cm/sec and k(O2) = (7 + or - 2) x 10 to the -10 cu cm/sec. Drift tube-mass spectrometer measurements employ the reaction He(+) + O2 as the source of metastable O+ ions, showing that the ions produced in this manner are in the 2D state rather than the 2P state, a possible alternative identification. Finally, consideration is given to the ionospheric implications of the laboratory measurements.

  17. Exhaust environment measurements of a turbofan engine equipped with an afterburner and 2D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brase, L. O.

    1990-01-01

    A test to measure the acoustic noise and static pressure environment on a structure exposed to engine exhaust flow was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center Propulsion Systems Laboratory by using an F100 derivative engine with a two-dimensional convergent-divergent (2D/CD) non-flight-weight demonstrator nozzle. A highly instrumented, water cooled flat panel was placed behind the 2D/CD nozzle, and tests were conducted at simulated Mach/altitude flight conditions with the engine at military or maximum-afterburner power setting. The panel instrumentation consisted of acoustic pressure microphones, thermocouples, and static-pressure pickups. Measurements indicated that the exhaust environment may excite structural resonances up to 10,000 HZ and that overall sound pressure levels decrease with increasing altitude.

  18. Multiple Stokes wavelength generation in H2, D2, and CH4 for lidar aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Zhiping; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results are reported of multiple Stokes generation of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser in H2, D2, and CH4 in a focusing geometry. The energies at four Stokes orders were measured as functions of pump energy and gas pressure. The characteristics of the Stokes radiation generated in these gases are compared for optical production of multiple wavelengths. The competition between Raman components is analyzed in terms of cascade Raman scattering and four-wave mixing. The results indicate the possibility of using these generation processes for atmospheric aerosol measurements by means of multiwavelength lidar systems. Also, this study distinguishes between the gases, as regards the tendency to produce several wavelengths (H2,D2) versus the preference to produce mainly first Stokes radiation (CH4).

  19. The use of 2D ultrasound elastography for measuring tendon motion and strain.

    PubMed

    Chernak Slane, Laura; Thelen, Darryl G

    2014-02-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate the fidelity of a 2D ultrasound elastography method for the measurement of tendon motion and strain. Ultrasound phantoms and ex vivo porcine flexor tendons were cyclically stretched to 4% strain while cine ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data and video data were simultaneously collected. 2D ultrasound elastography was used to estimate tissue motion and strain from RF data, and surface tissue motion and strain were separately estimated using digital image correlation (DIC). There were strong correlations (R(2)>0.97) between DIC and RF measurements of phantom displacement and strain, and good agreement in estimates of peak phantom strain (DIC: 3.5±0.2%; RF: 3.7±0.1%). For tendon, elastographic estimates of displacement profiles also correlated well with DIC measurements (R(2)>0.92), and exhibited similar estimated peak tendon strain (DIC: 2.6±1.4%; RF: 2.2±1.3%). Elastographic tracking with B-Mode images tended to under-predict peak strain for both the phantom and tendon. This study demonstrates the capacity to use quantitative elastographic techniques to measure tendon displacement and strain within an ultrasound image window. The approach may be extendible to in vivo use on humans, which would allow for the non-invasive analysis of tendon deformation in both normal and pathological states. PMID:24388164

  20. The Use of 2D Ultrasound Elastography for Measuring Tendon Motion and Strain

    PubMed Central

    Slane, Laura Chernak; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate the fidelity of a 2D ultrasound elastography method for the measurement of tendon motion and strain. Ultrasound phantoms and ex vivo porcine flexor tendons were cyclically stretched to 4% strain while cine ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data and video data were simultaneously collected. 2D ultrasound elastography was used to estimate tissue motion and strain from RF data, and surface tissue motion and strain were separately estimated using digital image correlation (DIC). There were strong correlations (R2 > 0.97) between DIC and RF measurements of phantom displacement and strain, and good agreement in estimates of peak phantom strain (DIC: 3.5 ± 0.2%; RF: 3.7 ± 0.1%). For tendon, elastographic estimates of displacement profiles also correlated well with DIC measurements (R2 > 0.92), and exhibited similar estimated peak tendon strain (DIC: 2.6 ± 1.4%; RF: 2.2 ± 1.3%). Elastographic tracking with B-Mode images tended to under-predict peak strain for both the phantom and tendon. This study demonstrates the capacity to use quantitative elastographic techniques to measure tendon displacement and strain within an ultrasound image window. The approach may be extendible to in vivo use on humans, which would allow for the non-invasive analysis of tendon deformation in both normal and pathological states. PMID:24388164

  1. Investigation of 2D-Trace Gas Field Reconstruction Techniques From Tomographic AMAX-DOAS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laepple, T.; Heue, K.; Friedeburg, C. V.; Wang, P.; Knab, V.; Pundt, I.

    2002-12-01

    Tomographic-Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectroscopy (Tom-DOAS) is a new application of the DOAS method designed to measure 2-3-dimensional concentration fields of different trace gases (e.g. NO2, HCHO, Ozone) in the troposphere. Numerical reconstruction techniques are used to obtain spatially resolved data from the slant column densities provided by DOAS instruments. We discuss the detection of emission plumes by AMAX (Airborne Multi AXis) DOAS Systems which measure sunlight by telescopes pointing in different directions. 2D distributions are reconstructed from slant columns by using airmass factor matrices and inversion techniques. We discuss possibilities and limitations of this technique gained with the use of simulated test fields. Therefore the effect of the parameter choice (e.g. flight track, algorithm changes) and measurement errors is investigated. Further, first results from the Partenavia aircraft measurements over Milano (Italy) during the European FORMAT campaign will be presented.

  2. A scale space based persistence measure for critical points in 2D scalar fields.

    PubMed

    Reininghaus, Jan; Kotava, Natallia; Günther, David; Kasten, Jens; Hagen, Hans; Hotz, Ingrid

    2011-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel importance measure for critical points in 2D scalar fields. This measure is based on a combination of the deep structure of the scale space with the well-known concept of homological persistence. We enhance the noise robust persistence measure by implicitly taking the hill-, ridge- and outlier-like spatial extent of maxima and minima into account. This allows for the distinction between different types of extrema based on their persistence at multiple scales. Our importance measure can be computed efficiently in an out-of-core setting. To demonstrate the practical relevance of our method we apply it to a synthetic and a real-world data set and evaluate its performance and scalability. PMID:22034322

  3. Laser Absorption spectrometer instrument for tomographic 2D-measurement of climate gas emission from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Anne; Wagner, Steven; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    One of the most intricate effects in climate modelling is the role of permafrost thawing during the global warming process. Soil that has formerly never totally lost its ice cover now emits climate gases due to melting processes[1]. For a better prediction of climate development and possible feedback mechanisms, insights into physical procedures (like e.g. gas emission from underground reservoirs) are required[2]. Therefore, a long-term quantification of greenhouse gas concentrations (and further on fluxes) is necessary and the related structures that are responsible for emission need to be identified. In particular the spatial heterogeneity of soils caused by soil internal structures (e.g. soil composition changes or surface cracks) or by surface modifications (e.g. by plant growth) generate considerable complexities and difficulties for local measurements, for example with soil chambers. For such situations, which often cannot be avoided, a spatially resolved 2D-measurement to identify and quantify the gas emission from the structured soil would be needed, to better understand the influence of the soil sub-structures on the emission behavior. Thus we designed a spatially scanning laser absorption spectrometer setup to determine a 2D-gas concentration map in the soil-air boundary layer. The setup is designed to cover the surfaces in the range of square meters in a horizontal plane above the soil to be investigated. Existing field instruments for gas concentration or flux measurements are based on point-wise measurements, so structure identification is very tedious or even impossible. For this reason, we have developed a tomographic in-situ instrument based on TDLAS ('tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy') that delivers absolute gas concentration distributions of areas with 0.8m × 0.8m size, without any need for reference measurements with a calibration gas. It is a simple and robust device based on a combination of scanning mirrors and reflecting foils, so

  4. Automatic angle measurement of a 2D object using optical correlator-neural networks hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, N.; Neil, M. A. A.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper a novel method is proposed and demonstrated for automatic rotation angle measurement of a 2D object using a hybrid architecture, consisting of a 4f optical correlator with a binary phase only multiplexed matched filter and a single layer neural network. The hybrid set-up can be considered as a two-layer perceptron-like neural network; an optical correlator is the first layer and the standard single layer neural network is the second layer. The training scheme used to train the hybrid architecture is a combination of a Direct Binary Search algorithm, to train the optical correlator, and an Error Back Propagation algorithm, to train the neural network. The aim is to perform the major information processing by the optical correlator with a small additional processing by the neural network stage. This allows the system to be used for real-time applications as optics has the inherent ability to process information in a parallel manner at high speed. The neural network stage gives an extra dimension of freedom so that complicated tasks like automatic rotation angle measurement can be achieved. Results of both computer simulation and experimental set-up are presented for rotation angle measurement of an English alphabetic character as a 2D object. The experimental set-up consists of a real optical correlator using two spatial light modulators for both input and frequency plane representations and a PC based model of a single layer network.

  5. Development of Micro-Raman Spectroscopic Instrumentation for Measurement of Novel 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Michael; Thompson, Zach; Simpson, Jeff; Towson University Team

    2013-03-01

    Recent research activity in mono-atomic layer graphene stimulates interest in other novel 2D materials, including molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) . Raman spectroscopy, based on the inelastic scattering of light, provides a powerful and high-throughput spectroscopic technique to probe low energy excitations, e.g., phonons, in graphene and related novel 2D materials. The accurate measurement of phonon frequency, especially its sensitive dependence on physical parameters such as temperature, carrier doping, and defects, requires an appropriately calibrated spectrometer. We report on the implementation and calibration of a homebuilt Raman system. Specifically we correlated peak wavelength from known atomic spectral lines with the pixel number detected on a thermoelectrically-cooled CCD camera attached to a grating monochromator. Additionally we developed software to control the grating position and maintain calibration while acquiring spectra. Once calibrated, we interfaced the spectrometer to a microscope to acquire spatial maps of small samples. Single-layer MoS2 flakes were prepared using the mechanical exfoliation of bulk MoS2 and transferred to substrates using techniques pioneered in graphene research. Using HeNe and Ar ion lasers for excitation, we measured the Raman spectra of single-layer MoS2 flakes. The temperature-dependence of the observed Raman-active phonons will be discussed.

  6. Breast density measurement: 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images versus 2D digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer. However, breast density is currently estimated using mammograms which are intrinsically 2D in nature and cannot accurately represent the real breast anatomy. In this study, a novel technique for measuring breast density based on the segmentation of 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) images was developed and the results were compared to those obtained from 2D digital mammograms. 16 mastectomy breast specimens were imaged with a bench top flat-panel based CBCT system. The reconstructed 3D CT images were corrected for the cupping artifacts and then filtered to reduce the noise level, followed by using threshold-based segmentation to separate the dense tissue from the adipose tissue. For each breast specimen, volumes of the dense tissue structures and the entire breast were computed and used to calculate the volumetric breast density. BI-RADS categories were derived from the measured breast densities and compared with those estimated from conventional digital mammograms. The results show that in 10 of 16 cases the BI-RADS categories derived from the CBCT images were lower than those derived from the mammograms by one category. Thus, breasts considered as dense in mammographic examinations may not be considered as dense with the CBCT images. This result indicates that the relation between breast cancer risk and true (volumetric) breast density needs to be further investigated.

  7. Reliability of 2D ultrasound measurements of testis size in dolphins taken under voluntary behavior.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Queeny W H; Ying, Michael T C; Brook, Fiona M; Kinoshita, Reimi E

    2009-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the reliability of two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound in measuring testis size in dolphins, in vivo, with the subject presenting for examination under voluntary or trained behaviour. The testes of five bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) were measured once by two operators to test inter-operator variability (reproducibility) and repeatedly measured by the same operator to test intra-operator variability (repeatability). Ultrasound examinations for each test were conducted on the same day to avoid measurement variability due to time difference. The evaluation of reproducibility and repeatability were conducted on separate days. In the ultrasound examination, the length, circumference, depth and width of both testes of the animal were measured. To prevent bias, measurements were not communicated between the operators on-site and repeated measurements were masked. Results showed that both reproducibility and repeatability of all the testis measurements were high (>90%). Overall, measurement variability of the technique was found to be of a satisfactory level. Ultrasound is a useful imaging tool for routine long-term monitoring of the testes in this species of animals. Sources of error due to movements as a result of the subject being in the water during examinations were inevitable and must be taken into account. PMID:19171415

  8. 2D MEMS scanning for LIDAR with sub-Nyquist sampling, electronics, and measurement procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Thorsten; Janes, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    Electrostatic driven 2D MEMS scanners resonantly oscillate in both axes leading to Lissajous trajectories of a digitally modulated laser beam reflected from the micro mirror. A solid angle of about 0.02 is scanned by a 658nm laser beam with a maximum repetition rate of 350MHz digital pulses. Reflected light is detected by an APD with a bandwidth of 80MHz. The phase difference between the scanned laser light and the light reflected from an obstacle is analyzed by sub-Nyquist sampling. The FPGA-based electronics and software for the evaluation of distance and velocity of objects within the scanning range are presented. Furthermore, the measures to optimize the Lidar accuracy of about 1mm and the dynamic range of up to 2m are examined. First measurements demonstrating the capability of the system and the evaluation algorithms are discussed.

  9. 2D X-ray scanner and its uses in laboratory reservoir characterization measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.

    1997-08-01

    X-ray techniques are used in petroleum laboratories for a variety of reservoir characterization measurements. This paper describes the configuration of a 2D X-ray scanner and many of the ways in which it simplifies and improves accuracy`s of laboratory measurements. Linear X-ray scanners are most often used to provide descriptions of fluid saturations within core plugs during flow tests. We configured our linear scanner for both horizontal and vertical movement. Samples can be scanned horizontally, vertically, or according to horizontal and vertical grids. X-ray measurements are fast, allowing measurements of two- and three-phase fluid saturations during both steady- and unsteady-state flow processes. Rock samples can be scanned while they are subjected to stress, pore pressure, and temperature conditions simulating those of a petroleum reservoir. Many types of measurements are possible by selecting appropriate X-ray power settings, dopes, filters, and collimator configurations. The scanner has been used for a variety of applications besides fluid saturation measurements. It is useful for measuring porosity distributions in rocks, concentrations of X-ray dopes within flow streams during tracer tests, gap widths in fracture flow cells, fluid interface levels in PVT cells and fluid separators, and other features and phenomena.

  10. Measurement of electrostatic potential variations between 2D materials using low-energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Barrera, Sergio; Mende, Patrick; Li, Jun; Feenstra, Randall; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Robinson, Joshua; Vishwanath, Suresh; Xing, Huili

    Among the many properties that evolve as isolated 2D materials are brought together to form a heterostructure, rearrangement of charges between layers due to unintentional doping results in dipole fields at the interface, which critically affect the electronic properties of the structure. Here we report a method for directly measuring work function differences, and hence electrostatic potential variations, across the surface of 2D materials and heterostructures thereof using low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Study of MoSe2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on epitaxial graphene on SiC with LEEM reveals a large work function difference between the MoSe2 and the graphene, indicating charge transfer between the layers and a subsequent dipole layer. In addition to quantifying dipole effects between transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene, direct imaging of the surface, diffraction information, and the spectroscopic dependence of electron reflectivity will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST), one of the six SRC STARnet Centers, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  11. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ε ~ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ε ~ 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  12. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ɛ ˜ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ɛ ˜ 0.1-0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  13. 2D and 3D endoanal and translabial ultrasound measurement variation in normal postpartum measurements of the anal sphincter complex

    PubMed Central

    MERIWETHER, Kate V.; HALL, Rebecca J.; LEEMAN, Lawrence M.; MIGLIACCIO, Laura; QUALLS, Clifford; ROGERS, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women may experience anal sphincter anatomy changes after vaginal or Cesarean delivery. Therefore, accurate and acceptable imaging options to evaluate the anal sphincter complex (ASC) are needed. ASC measurements may differ between translabial (TL-US) and endoanal ultrasound (EA-US) imaging and between 2D and 3D ultrasound. The objective of this analysis was to describe measurement variation between these modalities. Methods Primiparous women underwent 2D and 3D TL-US imaging of the ASC six months after a vaginal birth (VB) or Cesarean delivery (CD). A subset of women also underwent EA-US measurements. Measurements included the internal anal sphincter (IAS) thickness at proximal, mid, and distal levels and the external anal sphincter (EAS) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 o’clock positions as well as bilateral thickness of the pubovisceralis muscle (PVM). Results 433 women presented for US: 423 had TL-US and 64 had both TL-US and EA-US of the ASC. All IAS measurements were significantly thicker on TL-US than EA-US (all p<0.01), while EAS measurements were significantly thicker on EA-US (p<0.01). PVM measurements with 3D or 2D imaging were similar (p>0.20). On both TL-US and EA-US, there were multiple sites where significant asymmetry existed in left versus right measurements. Conclusion The ultrasound modality used to image the ASC introduces small but significant changes in measurements, and the direction of the bias depends on the muscle and location being imaged. PMID:25344221

  14. 2D Spatial Frequency Considerations in Comparing 1D Power Spectral Density Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Barber, S.; Church, E.L.; Kaznatcheev, K.; McKinney, W.R.; Yashchuk, V.Y.

    2010-06-14

    The frequency footprint of ID and 2D profiling instruments needs to be carefully considered in comparing ID surface roughness spectrum measurements made by different instruments. Contributions from orthogonal direction frequency components can not be neglected. The use of optical profiling instruments is ubiquitous in the measurement of the roughness of optical surfaces. Their ease-of-use and non-contact measurement method found widespread use in the optics industry for measuring the quality of delicate optical surfaces. Computerized digital data acquisition with these instruments allowed for quick and easy calculation of surface roughness statistics, such as root-mean-square (RMS) roughness. The computing power of the desktop computer allowed for the rapid conversion of spatial domain data into the frequency domain, enabling the application of sophisticated signal processing techniques to be applied to the analysis of surface roughness, the most powerful of which is the power spectral density (PSP) function. Application of the PSD function to surface statistics introduced the concept of 'bandwidth-limited' roughness, where the value of the RMS roughness depends critically upon the spatial frequency response of the instrument. Different instruments with different spatial frequency response characteristics give different answers when measuring the same surface.

  15. On the consistency of 2-D video disdrometers in measuring microphysical parameters of solid precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, F.; Hürkamp, K.; Rühm, W.; Tschiersch, J.

    2015-08-01

    Detailed characterization and classification of precipitation is an important task in atmospheric research. Line scanning 2-D video disdrometer devices are well established for rain observations. The two orthogonal views taken of each hydrometeor passing the sensitive area of the instrument qualify these devices especially for detailed characterization of nonsymmetric solid hydrometeors. However, in case of solid precipitation, problems related to the matching algorithm have to be considered and the user must be aware of the limited spatial resolution when size and shape descriptors are analyzed. Clarifying the potential of 2-D video disdrometers in deriving size, velocity and shape parameters from single recorded pictures is the aim of this work. The need of implementing a matching algorithm suitable for mixed- and solid-phase precipitation is highlighted as an essential step in data evaluation. For this purpose simple reproducible experiments with solid steel spheres and irregularly shaped Styrofoam particles are conducted. Self-consistency of shape parameter measurements is tested in 38 cases of real snowfall. As a result, it was found that reliable size and shape characterization with a relative standard deviation of less than 5 % is only possible for particles larger than 1 mm. For particles between 0.5 and 1.0 mm the relative standard deviation can grow up to 22 % for the volume, 17 % for size parameters and 14 % for shape descriptors. Testing the adapted matching algorithm with a reproducible experiment with Styrofoam particles, a mismatch probability of less than 3 % was found. For shape parameter measurements in case of real solid-phase precipitation, the 2-DVD shows self-consistent behavior.

  16. Multichannel reconfigurable measurement system for hot plasma diagnostics based on GEM-2D detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojenski, A. J.; Kasprowicz, G.; Pozniak, K. T.; Byszuk, A.; Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Jablonski, S.; Juszczyk, B.; Zienkiewicz, P.

    2015-12-01

    In the future magnetically confined fusion research reactors (e.g. ITER tokamak), precise determination of the level of the soft X-ray radiation of plasma with temperature above 30 keV (around 350 mln K) will be very important in plasma parameters optimization. This paper presents the first version of a designed spectrography measurement system. The system is already installed at JET tokamak. Based on the experience gained from the project, the new generation of hardware for spectrography measurements, was designed and also described in the paper. The GEM detector readout structure was changed to 2D in order to perform measurements of i.e. laser generated plasma. The hardware structure of the system was redesigned in order to provide large number of high speed input channels. Finally, this paper also covers the issue of new control software, necessary to set-up a complete system of certain complexity and perform data acquisition. The main goal of the project was to develop a new version of the system, which includes upgraded structure and data transmission infrastructure (i.e. handling large number of measurement channels, high sampling rate).

  17. Inversion Method for Evapotranspiration from 2D Measurements of Water Vapor Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, W. E.; Barnhart, B. L.; Plenner, S.; Thompson, A.; Winsky, B.

    2011-12-01

    A method has been developed to use 2D measurements of water vapor concentration to make spatial estimates of evapotranspiration. The method is based on theoretical solutions to the conservation of water vapor equation (similar to Sutton, Sienfeld) and is related to methods used to generate footprints. The method uses a diffusion coefficient to close the conservation equation and assumes uniformity of the surface with respect to turbulent processes. This solution allows the development of a transfer coefficient between each location at the surface and each of the water vapor measurements. The problem has been constrained to two dimensions for development, but is easily expanded to three. The method assumes water vapor concentration measurements in a plane at arbitrary positions above the field. Evapotranspiration is allowed to vary in increments across the field. This geometry and the transfer coefficients allow the water vapor concentration at each of the measured locations to be expressed as the sum of the contributions from the entire surface. A least squares solution is found that estimates the evapotranspiration across the field as a function of position. To evaluate the accuracy of the approach in solving for evaporation rates two artificial data sets of water vapor concentration (with varying amounts of artificial noise added) for known evaporation rates were generated and used to estimate the surface evaporation. The method is sensitive to the assumptions made near the edges of field. Results and details of the methods used to resolve edge effects will be shown.

  18. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams.

    PubMed

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E; Voss, B

    2008-09-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies. PMID:18695295

  19. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seravalli, E.; de Boer, M.; Geurink, F.; Huizenga, J.; Kreuger, R.; Schippers, J. M.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Voss, B.

    2008-09-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies.

  20. Optimization of three-dimensional positron annihilation spectroscopy system (3DPASS) for three-dimensional momentum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christopher S.; Burggraf, Larry W.; Adamson, Paul E.; Petrosky, James C.

    2011-02-01

    A three-dimensional positron annihilation spectroscopy system (3DPASS) was characterized. 3DPASS permits determination of three-dimensional electron-positron ( e-- e+) momentum distributions by simultaneously measuring angles and energies for coincident two-gamma annihilation photons. 3DPASS collects a single dataset of correlated energies and positions for two coincident annihilation photons from a pair of solid-state double-sided strip detectors (DSSDs). Subpixel-interpolated positions are determined by transient charge analysis. 3DPASS performs simultaneous two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D ACAR) and two-detector coincidence Doppler-broadening of annihilation radiation (CDBAR) measurements, which are typically collected independently. The 2D ACAR response of 3DPASS was measured for single-crystal Cu and 6H-SiC, with and without compensation for subpixel detection efficiency. Variation of efficiency across the width of DSSD charge collection electrodes was dominated by the event selection criteria required by the subpixel interpolation method. The DBAR resolution was optimized by adjusting the energy range of CDBAR events included in the Doppler-broadening (DB) lineshape. 2D ACAR and DBAR spectra from 3DPASS were compared to previously published results for single-crystal Cu and 6H-SiC. Detailed analysis of the ACAR spectra and the DB lineshapes highlighted momentum features not previously reported.

  1. Comparison of 2D and 3D flame topography measured by planar laser-induced fluorescence and tomographic chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Wu, Yue; Xu, Wenjiang; Hammack, Stephen D; Lee, Tonghun; Carter, Campbell D

    2016-07-10

    The goal of this work was to contrast and compare the 2D and 3D flame topography of a turbulent flame. The 2D measurements were obtained using CH-based (methylidyne radical-based) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), and the 3D measurements were obtained through a tomographic chemiluminescence (TC) technique. Both PLIF and TC were performed simultaneously on a turbulent premixed Bunsen flame. The PLIF measurements were then compared to a cross section of the 3D TC measurements, both to provide a validation to the 3D measurements and also to illustrate the differences in flame structures inferred from the 2D and 3D measurements. PMID:27409304

  2. Comprehensive 2D measurements of radiative divertor plasmas in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Wood, R.D.; Allen, S.L.; Hill, D.N.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the total radiated power profile and impurity line emission distributions in the SOL and divertor of DIII-D. This is done for ELMing H-mode plasmas with heavy deuterium injection (Partially Detached Divertor operation, PDD) and those without deuterium puffing. Results are described from a series of dedicated experiments performed on DIII-D to systematically measure the 2-D (R,Z) structure of the divertor plasma. The discharges were designed to optimize measurements with new divertor diagnostics including a divertor Thomson scattering system. Discharge sequences were designed to produce optimized data sets against which SOL and divertor theories and simulation codes could be benchmarked. During PDD operation the regions of significant radiated power shift from the inner divertor leg and SOL to the outer leg and X-point regions. D{alpha} emission shifts from the inner strikepoint to the outer strikepoint. Carbon emissions (visible CII and CIII) shift from the inner SOL near the X-point to a distributed region from the X-point to partially down the outer leg during moderate D2 puffing. In heavy puffing discharges the carbon emission coalesces on the outer separatrix near the X-point and for very heavy puffing it appears inside the last closed flux surface above the X-point. Calibrated spectroscopic measurements indicate that hydrogenic and carbon radiation can account for all of the radiated power. L{alpha} and CIV radiation are comparable and when combined account for as much as 90% of the total radiated power along chords viewing the significant radiating regions of the outer leg.

  3. Measuring (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings with a universal REDOR dephasing curve

    PubMed

    Gullion

    2000-09-01

    A (13)C-observe REDOR experiment is described which allows (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings to be obtained by a universal dipolar dephasing curve. Previous (13)C-observe REDOR experiments on (13)C-(2)D spin pairs generally relied on numerical simulations to obtain the dipolar coupling. The REDOR experiment described in this article is based on a deuterium composite pulse, and the data analysis eliminates the need for numerical simulations and is the same as the traditional REDOR analysis performed on pairs of spin-12 nuclei. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10968975

  4. DNAPL MAPPING AND WATER SATURATION MEASUREMENTS IN 2-D MODELS USING LIGHT TRANSMISSION VISUALIZATION (LTV) TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    • LTV can be used to characterize free phase PCE architecture in 2-D flow chambers without using a dye. • Results to date suggest that error in PCE detection using LTV can be less than 10% if the imaging system is optimized. • Mass balance calculations show a maximum error of 9...

  5. A MODIFIED LIGHT TRANSMISSION VISUALIZATION METHOD FOR DNAPL SATURATION MEASUREMENTS IN 2-D MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this research, a light transmission visualization (LTV) method was used to quantify dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) saturation in two-dimensional (2-D), two fluid phase systems. The method is an expansion of earlier LTV methods and takes into account both absorption an...

  6. Study of Positronium in Low-k Dielectric Films by means of 2D-Angular Correlation Experiments at a High-Intensity Slow-Positron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gessmann, T; Petkov, M P; Weber, M H; Lynn, K G; Rodbell, K P; Asoka-Kumar, P; Stoeffl, W; Howell, R H

    2001-06-20

    Depth-resolved measurements of the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) were performed at the high-intensity slow-positron beam of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We studied the formation of positronium in thin films of methyl-silsesquioxane (MSSQ) spin-on glass containing open-volume defects in the size of voids. Samples with different average void sizes were investigated and positronium formation could be found in all cases. The width of the angular correlation related to the annihilation of parapositronium increased with the void size indicating the annihilation of non-thermalized parapositronium.

  7. Measuring the equation of state for a 2D colloidal membrane: A microfluidic approach to buffer exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balchunas, Andrew; Cabanas, Rafael; Fraden, Seth; Dogic, Zvonimir

    Previous work has shown that monodisperse rod-like colloidal particles, such as a filamentous bacteriophage, self assemble into a 2D monolayer smectic in the presence of a non-adsorbing depleting polymer. These structures have the same functional form of bending rigidity and lateral compressibility as conventional lipid bi-layers, so we name the monolayer smectic a colloidal membrane. We have developed a microfluidic device such that the osmotic pressure acting on a colloidal membrane may be controlled via a full in situ buffer exchange. Rod density within individual colloidal membranes was measured as a function of osmotic pressure and a first order phase transition, from 2D fluid to 2D solid, was observed. kon and koff rates of rod to membrane binding were measured by lowering the osmotic pressure until membrane evaporation occurred.

  8. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity of Superfluid Helium Near its Transition Temperature T(sub lambda) in a 2D Confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerebets, Sergei

    2004-01-01

    We report our recent experiments on thermal conductivity measurements of superfluid He-4 near its phase transition in a two-dimensional (2D) confinement under saturated vapor pressure. A 2D confinement is created by 2-mm- and 1-mm-thick glass capillary plates, consisting of densely populated parallel microchannels with cross-sections of 5 x 50 and 1 x 10 microns, correspondingly. A heat current (2 < Q < 400 nW/sq cm) was applied along the channels long direction. High-resolution measurements were provided by DC SQUID-based high-resolution paramagnetic salt thermometers (HRTs) with a nanokelvin resolution. We might find that thermal conductivity of confined helium is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Our 2D results will be compared with those in a bulk and 1D confinement.

  9. 3D structural measurements of the proximal femur from 2D DXA images using a statistical atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Omar M.; Ramamurthi, Krishna; Wilson, Kevin E.; Engelke, Klaus; Bouxsein, Mary; Taylor, Russell H.

    2009-02-01

    A method to obtain 3D structural measurements of the proximal femur from 2D DXA images and a statistical atlas is presented. A statistical atlas of a proximal femur was created consisting of both 3D shape and volumetric density information and then deformably registered to 2D fan-beam DXA images. After the registration process, a series of 3D structural measurements were taken on QCT-estimates generated by transforming the registered statistical atlas into a voxel volume. These measurements were compared to the equivalent measurements taken on the actual QCT (ground truth) associated with the DXA images for each of 20 human cadaveric femora. The methodology and results are presented to address the potential clinical feasibility of obtaining 3D structural measurements from limited angle DXA scans and a statistical atlas of the proximal femur in-vivo.

  10. Precise measurements of droplet-droplet contact forces in quasi-2D emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowensohn, Janna; Orellana, Carlos; Weeks, Eric

    2015-03-01

    We use microscopy to visualize a quasi-2D oil-in-water emulsion confined between two parallel slides. We then use the droplet shapes to infer the forces they exert on each other. To calibrate our force law, we set up an emulsion in a tilted sample chamber so that the droplets feel a known buoyant force. By correlating radius of the droplet and length of contacts with the buoyant forces, we validate our empirical force law. We improve upon prior work in our lab by using a high-resolution camera to image each droplet multiple times, thus providing sub-pixel resolution and reducing the noise. Our new technique identifies contact forces with only a 1% uncertainty, five times better than prior work. We demonstrate the utility of our technique by examining the normal modes of the droplet contact network in our samples.

  11. Using Microfluidics to Measure the Equation of State for a 2D Colloidal Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balchunas, Andrew; Cabanas, Rafael; Fraden, Seth; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-03-01

    In the presence of non-adsorbing polymer, monodisperse filamentous viruses assembles into colloidal membranes which are 2D liquid-like one-rod-length-thick monolayers of aligned rods. Colloidal membranes are of particular interest because their properties are accounted for by the same theoretical models that are used to describe biophysics of conventional lipid bilayers. However, bulk membrane formation only occurs over a very limited range of depletant concentrations and ionic strengths. In order to explore the properties of the colloidal membranes under a much wider range of molecular parameters, we have develop a microfluidics technique that allows for in-site exchange of the enveloping polymer suspension thus allowing us to access the region of phase space where membranes are metastable. Using our technique we determine how the colloidal membrane area depends on applied osmotic pressure allowing us to determine its equation of state. We also characterize the dynamics of the constituent rods by using single molecules tracking techniques.

  12. Micro PIV measurements of turbulent flow over 2D structured roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartenberger, Joel; Perlin, Marc

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the turbulent boundary layer over surfaces with 2D spanwise square and triangular protrusions having nominal heights of 100 - 300 microns for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ~ 1500 through Reτ ~ 4500 using a high speed, high magnification imaging system. Micro PIV analysis gives finely resolved velocity fields of the flow (on the order of 10 microns between vectors) enabling a detailed look at the inner region as well as the flow in the immediate vicinity of the roughness elements. Additionally, planar PIV with lower resolution is performed to capture the remainder of the boundary layer to the freestream flow. Varying the streamwise distance between individual roughness elements from one to ten times the nominal heights allows investigation of k-type and d-type roughness in both the transitionally rough and fully rough regimes. Preliminary results show a shift in the mean velocity profile similar to the results of previous studies. Turbulent statistics will be presented also. The authors would like to acknowledge the support of NAVSEA which funded this project through the Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC).

  13. Signal Scaling Improves the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of Measurements with Segmented 2D-Selective Radiofrequency Excitations

    PubMed Central

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Busch, Martin G.; Larson, Peder E. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Segmented 2D-selective radiofrequency excitations can be used to acquire irregularly shaped target regions, e.g., in single-voxel MR spectroscopy, without involving excessive radiofrequency pulse durations. However, segments covering only outer k-space regions nominally use reduced B1 amplitudes (i.e., smaller flip angles) and yield lower signal contributions, which decreases the efficiency of the measurement. The purpose of this study was to show that applying the full flip angle for all segments and scaling down the acquired signal appropriately (signal scaling) retains the desired signal amplitude but reduces the noise level accordingly and, thus, increases the signal-to-noise ratio. Methods The principles and improvements of signal scaling were demonstrated with MR imaging and spectroscopy experiments at 3 T for a single-line segmentation of a blipped-planar trajectory. Results The observed signal-to-noise ration gain depended on the 2D-selective radiofrequency excitation’s resolution, field-of-excitation, and its excitation profile and was between 40 and 500% for typical acquisition parameters. Conclusion Signal scaling can further improve the performance of measurements with segmented 2D-selective radiofrequency excitations, e.g., for MR spectroscopy of anatomically defined voxels. PMID:23440633

  14. Positron-sensitive vacancy-type centres in the nitrides: 1D-ACAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, N. Yu.; Emtsev, V. V.; Mikhailin, A. V.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    The measurements of one-dimensional angular correlation of the annihilation radiation (1D-ACAR) have been carried out for BN, AlN, and GaN as well as for some related materials that have been used as the reference samples for the analysis of results. The electron-positron ion radii reconstructed by 1D-ACAR for the cation and anion sublattices of the nitrides as well as the estimated average electron density around the positron suggest that: (a) the positron annihilates in the vacancy complexes NGaVN in GaN and NAlVN in AlN, and (b) the cation nearest neighbours are, probably, shifted inward to the VN vacancy where the electron density is sufficiently lower in comparison with that estimated for the bulk.

  15. 2D velocity and temperature measurements in high speed flows based on spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1992-01-01

    The use of molecular Rayleigh scattering for measurements of gas velocity and temperature is evaluated. Molecular scattering avoids problems associated with the seeding required by conventional laser anemometry and particle image velocimetry. The technique considered herein is based on the measurement of the spectrum of the scattered light. Planar imaging of Rayleigh scattering using a laser light sheet is evaluated for conditions at 30 km altitude (typical hypersonic flow conditions). The Cramer-Rao lower bounds for velocity and temperature measurement uncertainties are calculated for an ideal optical spectrum analyzer and for a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer used in a static, imaging mode. With this technique, a single image of the Rayleigh scattered light from clean flows can be analyzed to obtain temperature and one component of velocity. Experimental results are presented for planar velocity measurements in a Mach 1.3 air jet.

  16. Maximum Value Measured by 2-D Shear Wave Elastography Helps in Differentiating Malignancy from Benign Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wen-Shuo; Lin, Man-Xia; Zhou, Lu-Yao; Pan, Fu-Shun; Huang, Guang-Liang; Wang, Wei; Lu, Ming-De; Xie, Xiao-Yan

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the work described here was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of 2-D shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) in differentiating malignancy from benign focal liver lesions (FLLs). The maxima, minima, means and the standard deviations of 2-D SWE measurements, expressed in kilopascals (Emax, Emin, Emean, ESD), were obtained for 221 patients with 229 FLLs. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 2-D SWE. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to assess inter-group differences. Emax, Emin, Emean and ESD were significantly higher in the 164 malignant lesions than in the 65 benign lesions (p < 0.001). For identification of malignant FLLs, the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves for Emax, Emin, Emean and ESD were 0.920, 0.710, 0.879 and 0.915, respectively. Emax was 96.21 ± 35.40 for 19 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 90.32 ± 54.71 for 35 liver metastatic lesions, which were significantly higher than 61.83 ± 28.87 for 103 hepatocellular carcinomas (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0237). Emax was 38.72 ± 18.65 for 15 focal nodular hyperplasias, which was significantly higher than 20.56 ± 10.74 for 37 hemangiomas (p = 0.0009). The Emax values for adjacent liver parenchyma of hepatocellular carcinomas and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas were significantly higher than those for the other three lesion types (p < 0.005). In conclusion, Emax values of FLLs and adjacent liver parenchyma could help in differentiating malignant from benign FLLs. PMID:27283039

  17. Quantitative comparisons between experimentally measured 2-D carbon radiation and Monte Carlo impurity (MCI) code simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Leonard, A.W.; West, W.P.; Finkenthal, D.F.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Porter, G.D.

    1998-08-01

    Experimentally measured carbon line emissions and total radiated power distributions from the DIII-D divertor and Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) are compared to those calculated with the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) model. A UEDGE background plasma is used in MCI with the Roth and Garcia-Rosales (RG-R) chemical sputtering model and/or one of six physical sputtering models. While results from these simulations do not reproduce all of the features seen in the experimentally measured radiation patterns, the total radiated power calculated in MCI is in relatively good agreement with that measured by the DIII-D bolometric system when the Smith78 physical sputtering model is coupled to RG-R chemical sputtering in an unaltered UEDGE plasma. Alternatively, MCI simulations done with UEDGE background ion temperatures along the divertor target plates adjusted to better match those measured in the experiment resulted in three physical sputtering models which when coupled to the RG-R model gave a total radiated power that was within 10% of measured value.

  18. Laser probe for measuring 2-D wave slope spectra of ocean capillary waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, C. S.; Anderson, R. C.; Reece, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    A laser-optical instrument for use in determining the two-dimensional wave-slope spectrum of ocean capillary waves is described. The instrument measures up to a 35-deg tip angle of the surface normal by measuring the position of a refracted laser beam directed vertically upward through a water surface. A telescope, a continuous two-dimensional Schottky barrier photodiode, and a pair of analog dividers render the signals independent of water height and insensitive to laser-beam intensity fluctuations. Calibration is performed entirely in the laboratory before field use. Sample records and wave-slope spectra are shown for one-dimensional wave-tank tests and for two-dimensional ocean tests. These are presented along with comparison spectra for calm and choppy water conditions. A mechanical wave follower was used to adjust the instrument position in the presence of large ocean swell and tides.

  19. Temperature Effects on the Wind Direction Measurement of 2D Solid Thermal Wind Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bei; Zhu, Yan-Qing; Yi, Zhenxiang; Qin, Ming; Huang, Qing-An

    2015-01-01

    For a two-dimensional solid silicon thermal wind sensor with symmetrical structure, the wind speed and direction information can be derived from the output voltages in two orthogonal directions, i.e., the north-south and east-west. However, the output voltages in these two directions will vary linearly with the ambient temperature. Therefore, in this paper, a temperature model to study the temperature effect on the wind direction measurement has been developed. A theoretical analysis has been presented first, and then Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations have been performed. It is found that due to symmetrical structure of the thermal wind sensor, the temperature effects on the output signals in the north-south and east-west directions are highly similar. As a result, the wind direction measurement of the thermal wind sensor is approximately independent of the ambient temperature. The experimental results fit the theoretical analysis and simulation results very well. PMID:26633398

  20. Precision in 2D temperature measurements using the thermographic phosphor BAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindén, J.; Knappe, C.; Richter, M.; Aldén, M.

    2012-08-01

    Investigation of optimized spatial precision for surface temperature measurements is performed. The temperature is measured by means of two-color ratio imaging with ICCD cameras, using the thermographic phosphor BAM. The precision in temperature is put in relation to the spatial resolution, two quantities which involve a trade-off in this case: the more spatial smoothing the better precision, but also the worse spatial resolution. Two different setups are used in order to investigate the influence of laser shot-to-shot variations, the flat-field correction and image registration process on the precision. In order to achieve high precision it is crucial to operate the ICCD cameras with a gain setting that does not introduce nonlinearity effects at the present level of irradiance. The results provide guidance on the precision to be expected from surface temperature measurements using the two-color ratio technique in combination with thermographic phosphors and also confirm the importance of highly stable and linear ICCD detectors. At room temperature and low spatial resolution the precision is evaluated to 0.4%.

  1. Measurements and Interpretive 2D Edge Modeling of Lithiated NSTX Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Travis; Ahn, Joon-Wook; Canik, John; Jaworski, Michael; Maingi, Rajesh; Goldston, Robert; Kaita, Robert; Ono, Masa; Scotti, Filippo; McLean, Adam; Soukhanovskii, Vsevolod

    2013-10-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has made extensive use of evaporative lithium coatings for improved discharge performance such as reduced divertor recycling, increased plasma stored energy and duration, and the elimination of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs). Measurements of divertor heat flux are accomplished with a unique dual-band IR (DBIR) thermography system to mitigate the effects of changing surface emissivity. Measurements from the DBIR system show reduced divertor surface temperature at the outer strike point for the case with 300 mg of lithium deposition. This results in the divertor heat flux being reduced from 5 to 2.5 MW/m2. In turn, a reduction in divertor power accounting at the outer strike point is measured with increased lithium evaporation such that PdivIR /Ploss ~ 0.3 - 0.5 for discharges with 150 mg of lithium and 0.12 - 0.2 for discharges with 300 mg of lithium. The reduction in divertor power is correlated with an increase in divertor radiation for discharges with 300 mg of lithium evaporation. This work was supported by DoE Contracts: DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  2. Measurement of residual radioactive surface contamination by 2-D laser heated TLD

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.C.

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of applying and adapting a two-dimensional laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry system to the problem of surveying for radioactive surface contamination was studied. The system consists of a CO{sub 2} laser-based reader and monolithic arrays of thin dosimeter elements. The arrays consist of 10,201 thermoluminescent phosphor elements of 40 micron thickness, covering a 900 cm{sup 2} area. Array substrates are 125 micron thick polyimide sheets, enabling them to easily conform to regular surface shapes, especially for survey of surfaces that are inaccessible for standard survey instruments. The passive, integrating radiation detectors are sensitive to alpha and beta radiation at contamination levels below release guideline limits. Required contact times with potentially contaminated surfaces are under one hour to achieve detection of transuranic alpha emission at 100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2}. Positional information obtained from array evaluation is useful for locating contamination zones. Unique capabilities of this system for survey of sites, facilities and material include measurement inside pipes and other geometrical configurations that prevent standard surveys, and below-surface measurement of alpha and beta emitters in contaminated soils. These applications imply a reduction of material that must be classified as radioactive waste by virtue of its possibility of contamination, and cost savings in soil sampling at contaminated sites.

  3. Single-snapshot 2D color measurement by plenoptic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kensuke; Yamanaka, Yuji; Maruyama, Go; Nagai, Sho; Hirai, Hideaki; Meng, Lingfei; Tosic, Ivana

    2014-03-01

    Plenoptic cameras enable capture of directional light ray information, thus allowing applications such as digital refocusing, depth estimation, or multiband imaging. One of the most common plenoptic camera architectures contains a microlens array at the conventional image plane and a sensor at the back focal plane of the microlens array. We leverage the multiband imaging (MBI) function of this camera and develop a single-snapshot, single-sensor high color fidelity camera. Our camera is based on a plenoptic system with XYZ filters inserted in the pupil plane of the main lens. To achieve high color measurement precision of this system, we perform an end-to-end optimization of the system model that includes light source information, object information, optical system information, plenoptic image processing and color estimation processing. Optimized system characteristics are exploited to build an XYZ plenoptic colorimetric camera prototype that achieves high color measurement precision. We describe an application of our colorimetric camera to color shading evaluation of display and show that it achieves color accuracy of ΔE<0.01.

  4. Impact of lens distortions on strain measurements obtained with 2D digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lava, P.; Van Paepegem, W.; Coppieters, S.; De Baere, I.; Wang, Y.; Debruyne, D.

    2013-05-01

    The determination of strain fields based on displacements obtained via digital image correlation (DIC) at the micro-strain level (≤1000 μm/m) is still a cumbersome task. In particular when high-strain gradients are involved, e.g. in composite materials with multidirectional fibre reinforcement, uncertainties in the experimental setup and errors in the derivation of the displacement fields can substantially hamper the strain identification process. In this contribution, the aim is to investigate the impact of lens distortions on strain measurements. To this purpose, we first perform pure rigid body motion experiments, revealing the importance of precise correction of lens distortions. Next, a uni-axial tensile test on a textile composite with spatially varying high strain gradients is performed, resulting in very accurately determined strains along the fibers of the material.

  5. Development of 2D soft X-ray measurement system in the large helical device.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Y; Ohdachi, S; Watanabe, K Y; Du, X D

    2014-11-01

    A fast two-dimensional soft X-ray camera using silicon photo diode array is being developed in order to investigate high frequency MHD instability with high mode number. The advantage of the adopted diode is a large sensor area of 10 mm × 10 mm and small diode capacitance which enable us to measure signals with the short response time. The characteristic of the prototype is summarized as follows: Channel number is 6 × 8 = 48, detection range 1∼10 keV, the spatial resolution 128 mm at the plasma location, and frequency range DC∼100 kHz. Synthetic image of the prototype in the Large Helical Device is estimated by using perturbation model of MHD mode. PMID:25430317

  6. Dynamic force measurement of rearrangements in a 2D network of droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkley, Solomon; Backholm, Matilda; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between two liquid droplets in an immiscible liquid is well understood. However, the emulsions relevant to biological and industrial processes involve high concentrations of these droplets, and multi-body effects cannot be ignored. As droplets rearrange in response to a disturbance, the importance of individual pair-wise interactions between droplets changes with the geometry of neighbours. Here we report on an experimental setup consisting of a two- dimensional network of monodisperse droplets stabilized with a surfactant. The system is studied with micropipette deflection, which permits direct measurement of forces along with simultaneous imaging of the droplet network. One micropipette is used to apply a tensile or compressive force to the droplet cluster, while a second pipette acts as a force-transducing cantilever, deflecting in response to rearrangements of the droplets.

  7. Turbulence Measurements on a 2D NACA 0036 with Synthetic Jet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    An active flow control experiment was conducted on a 2-ft chord NACA 0036 airfoil in a 3-ft by 4-ft Wind Tunnel at Re = 1 x 10(exp 6). The model was equipped with synthetic jet actuators at x/c = 0.30 and 0.65 that provided 120 Hz periodic excitation at a C(sub mu) 0.86% through 0.06-in wide slots. Three different slot con gurations were tested, including a baseline with no slots. Surface pressure data was collected to compare to previous tests and to combine with turbulence data to aid future CFD modeling efforts. Turbulence data, measured by hot-wire, was compared with and without flow control. Pressure data corroborates previous test data and provides more points for CFD validation. Hot-wire results showed ow control reduced the separated wake size and brought the high Reynolds stress shear layer closer to the airfoil surface. The position of this layer to the surface was altered more significantly than the magnitude of the peak stresses. Flow control was shown to increase turbulent energy in the attached boundary layer downstream of the slot but to have little effect upstream. These results provide further justification to continue assessing the potential of active flow control to reduce drag of helicopter airframe components.

  8. Measuring Chern numbers in Atomic Gases: 2D and 4D Quantum Hall Physics in the Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Nathan

    Optical-lattice experiments have recently succeeded in probing the geometry of 2D Bloch bands with cold neutral atoms. Beyond these local geometrical effects, which are captured by the Berry curvature, 2D Bloch bands may also display non-trivial topology, a global property captured by a topological invariant (e.g. the first Chern number). Such topological properties have dramatic consequences on the transport of non-interacting atoms, such as quantized responses whenever the bands are uniformly populated. In this talk, I will start with the first experimental demonstration of topological transport in a gas of neutral particles, which revealed the Chern number through a cold-atom analogue of quantum-Hall measurements. I will then describe how this Chern-number measurement could be extended in order to probe the topology of higher-dimensional systems. In particular, I will show how the second Chern number - an emblematic topological invariant associated with 4D Bloch bands - could be extracted from an atomic gas, using a 3D optical lattice extended by a synthetic dimension. Finally, I will describe a general scheme by which optical lattices of subwavelength spacing could be realized. This method leads to topological band structures with significantly enhanced energy scales, offering an interesting route towards the experimental realization of strongly-correlated topological states with cold atoms.

  9. Theoretical analysis on the measurement errors of local 2D DIC: Part I temporal and spatial uncertainty quantification of displacement measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Yueqi; Lava, Pascal; Reu, Phillip; Debruyne, Dimitri; Van Houtte, Paul

    2015-12-23

    This study presents a theoretical uncertainty quantification of displacement measurements by subset-based 2D-digital image correlation. A generalized solution to estimate the random error of displacement measurement is presented. The obtained solution suggests that the random error of displacement measurements is determined by the image noise, the summation of the intensity gradient in a subset, the subpixel part of displacement, and the interpolation scheme. The proposed method is validated with virtual digital image correlation tests.

  10. Micro-PIV measurements of multiphase flow of water and supercritical CO2 in 2D heterogeneous porous micromodels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Kazemifar, F.; Blois, G.; Christensen, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow of water and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) in porous media is central to geological sequestration of CO2 into saline aquifers. However, our fundamental understanding of the coupled flow dynamics of CO2 and water in complex geologic media still remains limited, especially at the pore scale. Recently, studies have been carried out in 2D homogeneous models with the micro-PIV technique, yielding very interesting observations of pore-scale flow transport. The primary aim of this work is to leverage this experimental protocol to quantify the pore-scale flow of water and liquid/supercritical CO2 in 2D heterogeneous porous micromodels under reservoir-relevant conditions. The goal is to capture the dynamics of this multi-phase flow in a porous matrix that mimics the heterogeneity of natural rock. Fluorescent microscopy and the micro-PIV technique are employed to simultaneously measure the spatially-resolved instantaneous velocity field in the water and quantify the instantaneous spatial configuration of both phases. The results for heterogeneous micromodels will be presented and compared with those for homogeneous micromodels, yielding valuable insight into flow processes at the pore scale in natural rock.

  11. Improvement of vertical profiles of raindrop size distribution from micro rain radar using 2D video disdrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, E.; Baldini, L.; Roberto, N.; Gatlin, P.; Tokay, A.

    2016-03-01

    A measurement scheme aimed at investigating precipitation properties based on collocated disdrometer and profiling instruments is used in many experimental campaigns. Raindrop size distribution (RSD) estimated by disdrometer is referred to the ground level; the collocated profiling instrument is supposed to provide complementary estimation at different heights of the precipitation column above the instruments. As part of the Special Observation Period 1 of the HyMeX (Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) project, conducted between 5 September and 6 November 2012, a K-band vertically pointing micro rain radar (MRR) and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) were installed close to each other at a site in the historic center of Rome (Italy). The raindrop size distributions collected by 2D video disdrometer are considered to be fairly accurate within the typical sizes of drops. Vertical profiles of raindrop sizes up to 1085 m are estimated from the Doppler spectra measured by the micro rain radar with a height resolution of 35 m. Several issues related to vertical winds, attenuation correction, Doppler spectra aliasing, and range-Doppler ambiguity limit the performance of MRR in heavy precipitation or in convection, conditions that frequently occur in late summer or in autumn in Mediterranean regions. In this paper, MRR Doppler spectra are reprocessed, exploiting the 2DVD measurements at ground to estimate the effects of vertical winds at 105 m (the most reliable MRR lower height), in order to provide a better estimation of vertical profiles of raindrop size distribution from MRR spectra. Results show that the reprocessing procedure leads to a better agreement between the reflectivity computed at 105 m from the reprocessed MRR spectra and that obtained from the 2DVD data. Finally, vertical profiles of MRR-estimated RSDs and their relevant moments (namely median volume diameter and reflectivity) are presented and discussed in order to investigate the

  12. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L. Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2014-11-15

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  13. On the potential of 2-D-Video Disdrometer technique to measure micro physical parameters of solid precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, F.; Hürkamp, K.; Rühm, W.; Tschiersch, J.

    2015-03-01

    Detailed characterization and classification of precipitation is an important task in atmospheric research. Line scanning 2-D-video disdrometer technique is well established for rain observations. The two orthogonal views taken of each hydrometeor passing the sensitive area of the instrument qualify this technique especially for detailed characterization of non symmetric solid hydrometeors. However, in case of solid precipitation problems related to the matching algorithm have to be considered and the user must be aware of the limited spacial resolution when size and shape descriptors are analyzed. This work has the aim of clarifying the potential of 2-D-video disdrometer technique in deriving size, velocity and shape parameters from single recorded pictures. The need of implementing a matching algorithm suitable for mixed and solid phase precipitation is highlighted as an essential step in data evaluation. For this purpose simple reproducible experiments with solid steel spheres and irregularly shaped styrofoam particles are conducted. Self-consistency of shape parameter measurements is tested in 40 cases of real snow fall. As result it was found, that reliable size and shape characterization with a relative standard deviation of less than 5% is only possible for particles larger than 1 mm. For particles between 0.5 and 1.0 mm the relative standard deviation can grow up to 22% for the volume, 17% for size parameters and 14% for shape descriptors. Testing the adapted matching algorithm with a reproducible experiment with styrofoam particles a mismatch probability of less than 2.5% was found. For shape parameter measurements in case of real solid phase precipitation the 2DVD shows self-consistent behavior.

  14. Comparisons of 2D IR measured spectral diffusion in rotating frames using pulse shaping and in the stationary frame using the standard method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick Kumar, S. K.; Tamimi, A.; Fayer, M. D.

    2012-11-01

    Multidimensional visible spectroscopy using pulse shaping to produce pulses with stable controllable phases and delays has emerged as an elegant tool to acquire electronic spectra faster and with greatly reduced instrumental and data processing errors. Recent migration of this approach using acousto-optic modulator (AOM) pulse shaping to the mid-infrared region has proved useful for acquiring two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectra. The measurement of spectral diffusion in 2D IR experiments hinges on obtaining accurate 2D line shapes. To date, pulse shaping 2D IR has not been used to study the time-dependent spectral diffusion of a vibrational chromophore. Here we compare the spectral diffusion data obtained from a standard non-collinear 2D IR spectrometer using delay lines to the data obtained from an AOM pulse shaper based 2D IR spectrometer. The pulse shaping experiments are performed in stationary, partially rotating, and fully rotating reference frames and are the first in the infrared to produce 2D spectra collected in a fully rotating frame using a phase controlled pulse sequence. Rotating frame experiments provide a dramatic reduction in the number of time points that must be measured to obtain a 2D IR spectrum, with the fully rotating frame giving the greatest reduction. Experiments were conducted on the transition metal carbonyl complex tricarbonylchloro(1,10-phenanthroline)rhenium(I) in chloroform. The time dependent data obtained from the different techniques and with different reference frames are shown to be in agreement.

  15. The effect of bone fracture unevenness on ultrasound axial transmission measurements: A pilot 2D simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Christiano B.; Pereira, Wagner C. A.; Padilla, Frédéric; Laugier, Pascal

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasound axial transmission (UAT) has been proposed to the diagnosis and follow-up of fracture healing. Some researchers have already pointed out the influence of fracture length, geometry and callus composition on the ultrasound time-of-flight and attenuation, with experimental and simulation studies. The aim of this work was to develop a pilot study on the effect of bone fracture unevenness on UAT measurements. Two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations of ultrasound wave propagation were run using a custom-made finite-difference time domain code (SimSonic2D). Numerical models were composed of two 4-mm thick bone plates, with fracture lengths varying from 0 to 4 mm. For each case, an upward (UWun) and downward (DWun) unevenness of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mm was implemented in the second plate. The 1-MHz emitter and receptor transducers were placed at 40 mm from each other, 20 mm apart from the center fracture. Two configurations were considered: 1.5 mm above the plates (for the 0-mm unevenness case) and transducers in contact with bone plate. For each situation, the time-of-flight of the first arriving signal (TOFFAS) and the FAS energy amplitude loss measured by the sound pressure level (SPLFAS) were computed. Results showed that there was a linear increase in TOFFAS with increasing fracture length, and a decrease of SPLFAS with the presence of a discontinuity. TOFFAS values were decreased with UWun (-0.87 μs for UWun = 1.5 mm), and increased with DWun (+0.99 μs for DWun = 1.5 mm). The SPLFAS increased with both UWun (+3.54 dB for UWun = 1.5 mm) and DWun (+8.15 dB for DWun = 1.5 mm). Both parameters showed the same variability. When transducers were put in contact with bone surface, fracture unevenness had no influence on TOF and SPL estimates. Previous works have already demonstrated that a fracture of 3 mm can increase TOFFAS in an order of 1 μs. Considering these preliminary results, it can be concluded that, although the variable fracture unevenness (until 1

  16. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-01

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach. PMID:20681586

  17. The Validity of a New Low-Dose Stereoradiography System to Perform 2D and 3D Knee Prosthetic Alignment Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Marrigje F.; Velleman, Ton; Boerboom, Alexander L.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Otten, Egbert; Stevens, Martin; Reininga, Inge H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The EOS stereoradiography system has shown to provide reliable varus/valgus (VV) measurements of the lower limb in 2D (VV2D) and 3D (VV3D) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Validity of these measurements has not been investigated yet, therefore the purpose of this study was to determine validity of EOS VV2D and VV3D. Methods EOS images were made of a lower limb phantom containing a knee prosthesis, while varying VV angle from 15° varus to 15° valgus and flexion angle from 0° to 20°, and changing rotation from 20° internal to 20° external rotation. Differences between the actual VV position of the lower limb phantom and its position as measured on EOS 2D and 3D images were investigated. Results Rotation, flexion or VV angle alone had no major impact on VV2D or VV3D. Combination of VV angle and rotation with full extension did not show major differences in VV2D measurements either. Combination of flexion and rotation with a neutral VV angle showed variation of up to 7.4° for VV2D; maximum variation for VV3D was only 1.5°. A combination of the three variables showed an even greater distortion of VV2D, while VV3D stayed relatively constant. Maximum measurement difference between preset VV angle and VV2D was 9.8°, while the difference with VV3D was only 1.9°. The largest differences between the preset VV angle and VV2D were found when installing the leg in extreme angles, for example 15° valgus, 20° flexion and 20° internal rotation. Conclusions After TKA, EOS VV3D were more valid than VV2D, indicating that 3D measurements compensate for malpositioning during acquisition. Caution is warranted when measuring VV angle on a conventional radiograph of a knee with a flexion contracture, varus or valgus angle and/or rotation of the knee joint during acquisition. PMID:26771177

  18. Ground Based In-situ Measurements of Snowfall with a 2D-Video Distrometer on Mt. Zugspitze, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, F.; Schwinzerl, M.; Huerkamp, K.; Tschiersch, J.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring micro physical properties of snowfall is a challenging task that is essential in many areas of research. Some examples are wet deposition of atmospheric pollution, electromagnetic wave propagation during snowfall, avalanche and glacier research. In recent years the 2D-video-disdrometer (2DVD, Joanneum Research) has been established for ground based in-situ rain measurements. The 2DVD is an optical device that delivers shape, size and velocity information derived from a front and a side view taken from each hydrometeor falling through the sensitive area. In case of snowfall the user has to be aware of certain diffculties that are addressed in this contribution.For our study we installed the 2DVD at the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus (UFS) on Mt. Zugspitze, Germany (2650m a.s.l.). We analyzed a data set consisting of 150 days with snowfall and 70 man made observations including a classification according to the World Meteorologic Organization code 4677. We compared measured micro physical parameters with man made observations of shape, degree of riming and humidity of single hydrometeors and correlated the precipitation rate and total water equivalent from the 2DVD with measurements of a weighing precipitation sensor (in cooperation with the Institute for Geophysics and Meteorology, University Cologne).We show that the implementation of a matching algorithm that finds appropriate pairs of pictures is essential for reliable measurement results. Without the improved matching algorithm the data sets contain about 80% of hydrometeors with extreme geometries and velocities. Applying the new matching algorithm 2DVD measurements and man made observations fit in most of the cases of calm winds. Simply summing up hydrometeor volumes derived from the measured apparent diameters leads to an overestimation of water equivalent by a factor of 10. The measurement of water equivalent is improved significantly with the use of a size-density relation for

  19. Influence of sea ice cover on high latitude precipitation: Inferences from precipitation isotope measurements and a 2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posmentier, E. S.; Faiia, A.; Feng, X.; Michel, F. A.

    2009-12-01

    The most widely cited climate feedback in the Arctic region is ice cover. Warming climate reduces the sea ice extent, which causes a lower surface albedo, resulting in more absorbed insolation and further warming - a positive feedback. Conversely, warming is also likely to result in increased Arctic evaporation and precipitation, leading to increased snow cover and a higher Arctic terrestrial albedo, which would cause cooling - a negative feedback. The balance between these feedbacks must be understood and quantified in order to predict climate response to influences such as increased greenhouse gases. Here, we use measurements of high latitude precipitation isotopes and a 2D model to investigate interannual variability in the contributions of subtropical and Arctic vapor sources to Arctic precipitation. In a previous study, we used isotopic ratios alone to investigate the sources of moisture to the Arctic. We found significant positive relationships between ice area and the d-excess of precipitation on both interannual and seasonal timescales, an expected result under the assumption that sea ice prevents evaporation from the sea surface and consequently reduces the contribution of Arctic moisture with low d-excess values to Arctic precipitation. In this work, we go a step further with an attempt to estimate the influence of sea ice cover on Arctic evaporation using a 2D model and constraining it with high latitude isotopic measurements. The 2D model is a vertical-meridional mass conservation model for H2O, HDO, and H218O with prescribed atmospheric circulation and temperatures. For each isotope, the rates of surface evaporation, sublimation, precipitation, and reevaporation of falling hydrometeors are calculated, and values of the humidity and isotopic concentrations of both vapor and hydrometeors are computed interdependently with the four process rates.. The model fractionation associated with the four processes is based primarily on the work of Jouzel and

  20. High-throughput critical dimensions uniformity (CDU) measurement of two-dimensional (2D) structures using scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullam, Jennifer; Boye, Carol; Standaert, Theodorus; Gaudiello, John; Tomlinson, Derek; Xiao, Hong; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Zhao, Yan; Jau, Jack

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we tested a novel methodology of measuring critical dimension (CD) uniformity, or CDU, with electron beam (e-beam) hotspot inspection and measurement systems developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). The systems were used to take images of two-dimensional (2D) array patterns and measure CDU values in a custom designated fashion. Because this methodology combined imaging of scanning micro scope (SEM) and CD value averaging over a large array pattern of optical CD, or OCD, it can measure CDU of 2D arrays with high accuracy, high repeatability and high throughput.

  1. Estimation of raindrop drop size distribution vertical profile from simultaneous micro rain radar and 2D video disdrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, Elisa; Baldini, Luca; Roberto, Nicoletta; Montopoli, Mario; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Gatlin, Patrick; Tokay, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Experimental field campaigns of rain precipitation usually require the coexistence of several ground and satellite based observations in order to guarantee a more complete analysis of the collected case studies at the various spatial and temporal scales of interest. In the framework of the Ground Validation programme of the NASAA/JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, several climate regions of the Earth have been interested by various field campaigns involving experimental setup which include one or more ground based disdrometers and profilers. In such situation a typical implementation of the measurement scheme consists of a pair of K-band vertically pointing micro rain radar (MRR) and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) installed close each other. Since 2DVD estimates are referred to the ground level, the co-located MRR is supposed to provide complementary vertical profiles of drop size distribution (DSD) measurements. However, if not properly processed MRR and 2DVD raw data can lead to erroneous interpretations of the underlying microphysics. In this work, we investigate some typical issues occurring when dealing with MRR and 2DVD observations proposing techniques to ensure the adequate data quality required in typical field validation campaigns. More in detail, MRR is an affordable continuous wave frequency-modulated radar (CWFM) typically used at vertical incidence. In the MMR configuration used, DSD profiles are estimated from Doppler spectra determined by drops falling at different velocities and at different heights from 1000 meters almost up to the ground level with a vertical resolution of 35 meters and time resolution up to 10 seconds. The importance of the microphysical measurements from MRR are related to the effects of the vertical gradients of rain precipitation at the sub-resolution scale of the measurements based remote sensing instruments such as those provided by the dual frequency radar of GPM as well as by ground based weather radars

  2. Comparisons of 2D IR measured spectral diffusion in rotating frames using pulse shaping and in the stationary frame using the standard method.

    PubMed

    Karthick Kumar, S K; Tamimi, A; Fayer, M D

    2012-11-14

    Multidimensional visible spectroscopy using pulse shaping to produce pulses with stable controllable phases and delays has emerged as an elegant tool to acquire electronic spectra faster and with greatly reduced instrumental and data processing errors. Recent migration of this approach using acousto-optic modulator (AOM) pulse shaping to the mid-infrared region has proved useful for acquiring two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectra. The measurement of spectral diffusion in 2D IR experiments hinges on obtaining accurate 2D line shapes. To date, pulse shaping 2D IR has not been used to study the time-dependent spectral diffusion of a vibrational chromophore. Here we compare the spectral diffusion data obtained from a standard non-collinear 2D IR spectrometer using delay lines to the data obtained from an AOM pulse shaper based 2D IR spectrometer. The pulse shaping experiments are performed in stationary, partially rotating, and fully rotating reference frames and are the first in the infrared to produce 2D spectra collected in a fully rotating frame using a phase controlled pulse sequence. Rotating frame experiments provide a dramatic reduction in the number of time points that must be measured to obtain a 2D IR spectrum, with the fully rotating frame giving the greatest reduction. Experiments were conducted on the transition metal carbonyl complex tricarbonylchloro(1,10-phenanthroline)rhenium(I) in chloroform. The time dependent data obtained from the different techniques and with different reference frames are shown to be in agreement. PMID:23163363

  3. SATURATION MEASUREMENT OF IMMISCIBLE FLUIDS IN 2-D STATIC SYSTEMS: VALIDATION BY LIGHT TRANSMISSION VISUALIZATION (SAN FRANCISCO, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is a part of an ongoing research project that aims at assessing the environmental benefits of DNAPL removal. The laboratory part of the research project is to examine the functional relationship between DNAPL architecture, mass removal and contaminant mass flux in 2-D ...

  4. A study on symmetrization of 2D ACAR positron annihilation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedskjaer, L. C.; Legnini, D. G.

    1990-07-01

    The important problem of symmetrization of two-dimensional angular correlation positron annihilation data is discussed in detail. Interest in this problem is motivated by the potential for a substantial improvement of the data quality. The artefacts present in our Anger cameras have been studied experimentally, and form the basis for a quantitative discussion of the symmetrization operation. The main conclusion is that symmetrization of the two-dimensional angular correlation spectra is allowed, if the symmetry center can be defined. It is argued that the center can be defined if the instrumental artefacts are small. Finally, it is shown that it is unlikely that the instrumental artefacts interfere constructively during the symmetrization operation.

  5. Raindrop axis ratios, fall velocities and size distribution over Sumatra from 2D-Video Disdrometer measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki; Randeu, Walter L.; Kozu, Toshiaki; Shimomai, Toyoshi; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Schönhuber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution are important in broad list of applications. However, they are not frequently observed in the equatorial region. This paper elucidated the characteristics of raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution based on 2D-Video Disdrometer (2DVD) data that have been collected in the equatorial Indonesia, particularly at Kototabang (hereafter called KT), west Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20°S, 100.32°E, 864 m above sea level). A comprehensive follow-up of the previous study on the natural variability of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) is presented. Precipitation was classified through 1.3-GHz wind profiler observation. The dependence of raindrop falling velocity and axis ratio on rainfall type was not clearly observed. Overall, measured raindrop fall velocities were in good agreement with Gunn-Kinzer's data. Raindrop axis ratio at KT was more spherical than that of artificial rain and equilibrium model, and close to the values reported in the turbulent high shear zone of surface layer which can be partially due to the effect of the instrument errors (e.g., location and container shape). Of some natural variations of DSD investigated, the dependence of DSD on rainfall rate and rainfall type as well as diurnal variation was clearly visible. A striking contrast between the stratiform and convective rains is that the size distributions from the stratiform (convective) rains tend to narrow (broaden) with increasing rainfall rates. For rainfall rate R < 10 mm/h, the size distribution of stratiform was broader than that of convective. On the other hand, at higher rainfall rate more large-sized drops were found in convective rain. During the convective rain, very large-sized drops were found mainly at the very start of rain event while for the stratiform they were found to be associated with a strong bright band. In diurnal basis, the DSDs in the morning hours were narrower than those in the evening which was

  6. Obtaining T1-T2 distribution functions from 1-dimensional T1 and T2 measurements: The pseudo 2-D relaxation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Nathan H.; Röding, Magnus; Galvosas, Petrik; Miklavcic, Stanley J.; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-08-01

    We present the pseudo 2-D relaxation model (P2DRM), a method to estimate multidimensional probability distributions of material parameters from independent 1-D measurements. We illustrate its use on 1-D T1 and T2 relaxation measurements of saturated rock and evaluate it on both simulated and experimental T1-T2 correlation measurement data sets. Results were in excellent agreement with the actual, known 2-D distribution in the case of the simulated data set. In both the simulated and experimental case, the functional relationships between T1 and T2 were in good agreement with the T1-T2 correlation maps from the 2-D inverse Laplace transform of the full 2-D data sets. When a 1-D CPMG experiment is combined with a rapid T1 measurement, the P2DRM provides a double-shot method for obtaining a T1-T2 relationship, with significantly decreased experimental time in comparison to the full T1-T2 correlation measurement.

  7. Obtaining T1-T2 distribution functions from 1-dimensional T1 and T2 measurements: The pseudo 2-D relaxation model.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Nathan H; Röding, Magnus; Galvosas, Petrik; Miklavcic, Stanley J; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-08-01

    We present the pseudo 2-D relaxation model (P2DRM), a method to estimate multidimensional probability distributions of material parameters from independent 1-D measurements. We illustrate its use on 1-D T1 and T2 relaxation measurements of saturated rock and evaluate it on both simulated and experimental T1-T2 correlation measurement data sets. Results were in excellent agreement with the actual, known 2-D distribution in the case of the simulated data set. In both the simulated and experimental case, the functional relationships between T1 and T2 were in good agreement with the T1-T2 correlation maps from the 2-D inverse Laplace transform of the full 2-D data sets. When a 1-D CPMG experiment is combined with a rapid T1 measurement, the P2DRM provides a double-shot method for obtaining a T1-T2 relationship, with significantly decreased experimental time in comparison to the full T1-T2 correlation measurement. PMID:27344611

  8. Photocurrent measurements in Coupled Quantum Well van der Waals Heterostructures made of 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Andrew; Jauregui, Luis; High, Alex; Dibos, Alan; Gulpinar, Elgin; Pistunova, Kateryna; Park, Hongkun; Kim, Philip

    , Luis A. Jauregui, Alex A. High, Alan Dibos, Elgin Gulpinar, Kateryna Pistunova, Hongkun Park, Philip Kim Harvard University, Physics Department -abstract- Single layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) are 2-dimensional (2D) semiconductors van der Waals (vdW) characterized by a direct optical bandgap in the visible wavelength (~2 eV). Characterization of the band alignment between TMDC and the barrier is important for the fabrication of tunneling devices. Here, we fabricate coupled quantum well (CQW) heterostructures made of 2D TMDCs with hexagonal Boron nitride (hBN) as an atomically thin barrier and gate dielectric and with top and bottom metal (or graphite) as gate electrodes. We observe a clear dependence of the photo-generated current with varying hBN thickness, electrode workfunctions, electric field, laser excitation power, excitation wavelength, and temperature. We will discuss the implication of photocurrent in relation to quantum transport process across the vdW interfaces.

  9. High-accuracy 2D digital image correlation measurements using low-cost imaging lenses: implementation of a generalized compensation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bing; Yu, Liping; Wu, Dafang

    2014-02-01

    The ideal pinhole imaging model commonly assumed for an ordinary two-dimensional digital image correlation (2D-DIC) system is neither perfect nor stable because of the existence of small out-of-plane motion of the test sample surface that occurred after loading, small out-of-plane motion of the sensor target due to temperature variation of a camera and unavoidable geometric distortion of an imaging lens. In certain cases, these disadvantages can lead to significant errors in the measured displacements and strains. Although a high-quality bilateral telecentric lens has been strongly recommended to be used in the 2D-DIC system as an essential optical component to achieve high-accuracy measurement, it is not generally applicable due to its fixed field of view, limited depth of focus and high cost. To minimize the errors associated with the imperfectness and instability of a common 2D-DIC system using a low-cost imaging lens, a generalized compensation method using a non-deformable reference sample is proposed in this work. With the proposed method, the displacement of the reference sample rigidly attached behind the test sample is first measured using 2D-DIC, and then it is fitted using a parametric model. The fitted parametric model is then used to correct the displacements of the deformed sample to remove the influences of these unfavorable factors. The validity of the proposed compensation method is first verified using out-of-plane translation, out-of-plane rotation, in-plane translation tests and their combinations. Uniaxial tensile tests of an aluminum specimen were also performed to quantitatively examine the strain accuracy of the proposed compensation method. Experiments show that the proposed compensation method is an easy-to-implement yet effective technique for achieving high-accuracy deformation measurement using an ordinary 2D-DIC system.

  10. A comparison of the 3D kinematic measurements obtained by single-plane 2D-3D image registration and RSA.

    PubMed

    Muhit, Abdullah A; Pickering, Mark R; Ward, Tom; Scarvell, Jennie M; Smith, Paul N

    2010-01-01

    3D computed tomography (CT) to single-plane 2D fluoroscopy registration is an emerging technology for many clinical applications such as kinematic analysis of human joints and image-guided surgery. However, previous registration approaches have suffered from the inaccuracy of determining precise motion parameters for out-of-plane movements. In this paper we compare kinematic measurements obtained by a new 2D-3D registration algorithm with measurements provided by the gold standard Roentgen Stereo Analysis (RSA). In particular, we are interested in the out-of-plane translation and rotations which are difficult to measure precisely using a single plane approach. Our experimental results show that the standard deviation of the error for out-of-plane translation is 0.42 mm which compares favourably to RSA. It is also evident that our approach produces very similar flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and external knee rotation angles when compared to RSA. PMID:21097358

  11. Measured branching ratios for O II2D and 2P transitions in the wavelength range 530 to 800 A. [airglow spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.; Cunningham, A. J.; Christensen, A. B.

    1981-01-01

    Branching ratios for four sets of extreme ultraviolet transitions terminating on the 2D0 and 2P0 metastable levels of ionized oxygen have been measured. The emissions were excited in both an open window hollow cathode and a capillary discharge lamp, and the branching ratios were derived from the observed intensity ratios of the multiplet pairs. The results are in good agreement with theoretical values and compare favorably, within experimental uncertainties, with line ratios obtained by EUV spectroscopy of the airglow.

  12. Rotation is visualisation, 3D is 2D: using a novel measure to investigate the genetics of spatial ability

    PubMed Central

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G.; Rimfeld, Kaili; Schofield, Kerry L.; Selzam, Saskia; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial abilities–defined broadly as the capacity to manipulate mental representations of objects and the relations between them–have been studied widely, but with little agreement reached concerning their nature or structure. Two major putative spatial abilities are “mental rotation” (rotating mental models) and “visualisation” (complex manipulations, such as identifying objects from incomplete information), but inconsistent findings have been presented regarding their relationship to one another. Similarly inconsistent findings have been reported for the relationship between two- and three-dimensional stimuli. Behavioural genetic methods offer a largely untapped means to investigate such relationships. 1,265 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study completed the novel “Bricks” test battery, designed to tap these abilities in isolation. The results suggest substantial genetic influence unique to spatial ability as a whole, but indicate that dissociations between the more specific constructs (rotation and visualisation, in 2D and 3D) disappear when tested under identical conditions: they are highly correlated phenotypically, perfectly correlated genetically (indicating that the same genetic influences underpin performance), and are related similarly to other abilities. This has important implications for the structure of spatial ability, suggesting that the proliferation of apparent sub-domains may sometimes reflect idiosyncratic tasks rather than meaningful dissociations. PMID:27476554

  13. Rotation is visualisation, 3D is 2D: using a novel measure to investigate the genetics of spatial ability.

    PubMed

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Rimfeld, Kaili; Schofield, Kerry L; Selzam, Saskia; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial abilities-defined broadly as the capacity to manipulate mental representations of objects and the relations between them-have been studied widely, but with little agreement reached concerning their nature or structure. Two major putative spatial abilities are "mental rotation" (rotating mental models) and "visualisation" (complex manipulations, such as identifying objects from incomplete information), but inconsistent findings have been presented regarding their relationship to one another. Similarly inconsistent findings have been reported for the relationship between two- and three-dimensional stimuli. Behavioural genetic methods offer a largely untapped means to investigate such relationships. 1,265 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study completed the novel "Bricks" test battery, designed to tap these abilities in isolation. The results suggest substantial genetic influence unique to spatial ability as a whole, but indicate that dissociations between the more specific constructs (rotation and visualisation, in 2D and 3D) disappear when tested under identical conditions: they are highly correlated phenotypically, perfectly correlated genetically (indicating that the same genetic influences underpin performance), and are related similarly to other abilities. This has important implications for the structure of spatial ability, suggesting that the proliferation of apparent sub-domains may sometimes reflect idiosyncratic tasks rather than meaningful dissociations. PMID:27476554

  14. Evaluation of similarity measures for use in the intensity-based rigid 2D-3D registration for patient positioning in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jian; Kim, Minho; Peters, Jorg; Chung, Heeteak; Samant, Sanjiv S.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Rigid 2D-3D registration is an alternative to 3D-3D registration for cases where largely bony anatomy can be used for patient positioning in external beam radiation therapy. In this article, the authors evaluated seven similarity measures for use in the intensity-based rigid 2D-3D registration using a variation in Skerl's similarity measure evaluation protocol. Methods: The seven similarity measures are partitioned intensity uniformity, normalized mutual information (NMI), normalized cross correlation (NCC), entropy of the difference image, pattern intensity (PI), gradient correlation (GC), and gradient difference (GD). In contrast to traditional evaluation methods that rely on visual inspection or registration outcomes, the similarity measure evaluation protocol probes the transform parameter space and computes a number of similarity measure properties, which is objective and optimization method independent. The variation in protocol offers an improved property in the quantification of the capture range. The authors used this protocol to investigate the effects of the downsampling ratio, the region of interest, and the method of the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) calculation [i.e., the incremental ray-tracing method implemented on a central processing unit (CPU) or the 3D texture rendering method implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU)] on the performance of the similarity measures. The studies were carried out using both the kilovoltage (kV) and the megavoltage (MV) images of an anthropomorphic cranial phantom and the MV images of a head-and-neck cancer patient. Results: Both the phantom and the patient studies showed the 2D-3D registration using the GPU-based DRR calculation yielded better robustness, while providing similar accuracy compared to the CPU-based calculation. The phantom study using kV imaging suggested that NCC has the best accuracy and robustness, but its slow function value change near the global maximum requires a

  15. Instantaneous 2D Velocity and Temperature Measurements in High Speed Flows Based on Spectrally Resolved Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for high speed flows is described for the simultaneous, instantaneous measurement of gas temperature and velocity at a number (up to about one hundred) of locations in a plane illuminated by an injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. Molecular Rayleigh scattered light is collected and passed through a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. The resulting image is analyzed to determine the gas temperature and bulk velocity at each of the regions. The Cramer Rao lower bound for measurement uncertainty is calculated. Experimental data is presented for a free jet and for preliminary measurements in the Lewis 4 inch by 10 inch supersonic wind tunnel.

  16. Postpartum translabial 2D and 3D ultrasound measurements of the anal sphincter complex in primiparous women delivering by vaginal birth versus Cesarean delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Rebecca J.; Leeman, Lawrence M.; Migliaccio, Laura; Qualls, Clifford; Rogers, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Consensus on normal translabial ultrasound (TL-US) anal sphincter complex measurements for postpartum women is lacking. We aimed to evaluate normative measurements in 2D and 3D TL-US for the anal sphincter complex (ASC) at 6 months postpartum and compare these measurements in women who had a vaginal birth (VB) and in those who had a Cesarean delivery (CD). Methods A large, prospective cohort of primiparous women underwent 2D and 3D TL-US 6 months after their first delivery. For normative sphincter measurements, we excluded women with third- or fourth-degree lacerations or with sphincter interruption on TL-US. Measurements included the sphincter thickness at the 3, 6, 9, and 12 o'clock positions of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and the internal anal sphincter (IAS) at proximal, mid, and distal levels. We also measured the mean coronal diameter of the pubovisceralis muscle (PVM). Results 696 women consented to participate, and 433 women presented for ultrasound imaging 6 months later. Women who sustained a third- or fourth-degree laceration had significantly thicker EAS measurements at 12 o'clock. Sphincter asymmetry was common (69 %), but was not related to mode of delivery. Only IAS measurements at the proximal and distal 12 o'clock position were significantly thicker for CD patients. There were no significant differences in the EAS or PVM measurements between VB and CD women. Conclusions There appear to be few differences in normative sphincter ultrasound measurements between primiparous patients who had VB or CD. PMID:24105408

  17. First dose-map measured with a polycrystalline diamond 2D dosimeter under an intensity modulated radiotherapy beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringella, M.; Zani, M.; Baldi, A.; Bucciolini, M.; Pace, E.; de Sio, A.; Talamonti, C.; Bruzzi, M.

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of bidimensional dosimeter made on a 2.5×2.5 cm2 active area polycrystalline Chemical Vapour Deposited (pCVD) diamond film, equipped with a matrix of 12×12 contacts connected to the read-out electronics, has been used to evaluate a map of dose under Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) fields for a possible application in pre-treatment verifications of cancer treatments. Tests have been performed under a 6-10 MVRX beams with IMRT fields for prostate and breast cancer. Measurements have been taken by measuring the 144 pixels in different positions, obtained by shifting the device along the x/y axes to span a total map of 14.4×10 cm2. Results show that absorbed doses measured by our pCVD diamond device are consistent with those calculated by the Treatment Planning System (TPS).

  18. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapor concentration field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a fast, spatially scanning direct tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS) that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapor concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m x 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emission from certain soil structures shall be monitored. The whole concentration field was measured with up to 2.5 Hz. In this paper, we present the setup and spectroscopic performance of the instrument regarding the influence of the polygon rotation speed and mode on the absorption signal. Homogeneous H2O distributions were measured and compared to a single channel, bi-static reference TDLAS spectrometer for validation of the instrument. Good accuracy and precision with errors of less than 6% of the absolute concentration and length and bandwidth normalized detection limits of up to 1.1 ppmv . m (Hz)-0.5 were achieved. The spectrometer is a robust and easy to set up instrument for tomographic reconstructions of 2-D-concentration fields that can be considered as a good basis for future field measurements in environmental research.

  19. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapour concentration field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a fast, spatially direct scanning tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS) that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapour concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m × 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emission from certain soil structures shall be monitored. The whole concentration field was measured with up to 2.5 Hz. In this paper, we present the setup and spectroscopic performance of the instrument regarding the influence of the polygon rotation speed and mode on the absorption signal. Homogeneous H2O distributions were measured and compared to a single channel, bi-static reference TDLAS spectrometer for validation of the instrument. Good accuracy and precision with errors of less than 6% of the absolute concentration and length and bandwidth normalized detection limits of up to 1.1 ppmv · m · √Hz-1 were achieved. The spectrometer is a robust and easy to set up instrument for tomographic reconstructions of 2-D-concentration fields that can be considered a good basis for future field measurements in environmental research.

  20. OH and O3 in the MLT: Comparing MAHRSI and ORA measurements With the SOCRATES 2D-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrillat, S.; Kockarts, G.; Brasseur, G.; Fussen, D.; Fonteyn, D.

    2001-12-01

    New space-based measurements of two key chemical species in the MLT, OH and O3\\ , were recently published. The OH radical was measured for the first time in the stratosphere and the mesosphere by the MAHRSI instrument. Conway et al. [2000] showed the difficulty to explain these observations with a one-dimensional model. Ozone measurements were extracted from the ORA instrument, which uses solar occultation in the UV-visible wavelength range. More than 2500 vertical profiles of O3 at sunrise and sunset were obtained, up to 110 km altitude. This is the first ozone data set to extend above the mesopause, capturing the ozone secondary maximum in its totality. We compare these measurements with the results of the SOCRATES two-dimensional interactive model. The latest version of this model includes, among other improvements, an accurate calculation of the absorption of the Lyman-α solar line by O2\\ , molecular diffusion, and a parameterization of the gravity wave drag to accurately match the observed temperature distribution in the MLT - especially the temporal and spatial structure of the mesopause. We show that the observations of mesospheric OH and O3 in the MLT are reproduced in a very satisfactory manner using this new multi-dimensional model.

  1. High spatiotemporal resolution measurement of regional lung air volumes from 2D phase contrast x-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Andrew F. T.; Islam, M. Sirajul; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Fouras, Andreas; Wallace, Megan J.; Hooper, Stuart B.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Described herein is a new technique for measuring regional lung air volumes from two-dimensional propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBI) images at very high spatial and temporal resolution. Phase contrast dramatically increases lung visibility and the outlined volumetric reconstruction technique quantifies dynamic changes in respiratory function. These methods can be used for assessing pulmonary disease and injury and for optimizing mechanical ventilation techniques for preterm infants using animal models. Methods: The volumetric reconstruction combines the algorithms of temporal subtraction and single image phase retrieval (SIPR) to isolate the image of the lungs from the thoracic cage in order to measure regional lung air volumes. The SIPR algorithm was used to recover the change in projected thickness of the lungs on a pixel-by-pixel basis (pixel dimensions {approx}16.2 {mu}m). The technique has been validated using numerical simulation and compared results of measuring regional lung air volumes with and without the use of temporal subtraction for removing the thoracic cage. To test this approach, a series of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups mechanically ventilated at different frequencies was employed. Results: Regional lung air volumes measured from PBI images of newborn rabbit pups showed on average an improvement of at least 20% in 16% of pixels within the lungs in comparison to that measured without the use of temporal subtraction. The majority of pixels that showed an improvement was found to be in regions occupied by bone. Applying the volumetric technique to sequences of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups, it is shown that lung aeration at birth can be highly heterogeneous. Conclusions: This paper presents an image segmentation technique based on temporal subtraction that has successfully been used to isolate the lungs from PBI chest images, allowing the change in lung air volume to be measured over regions as small as the pixel size. Using

  2. 2D-GMAX-DOAS measurements during TCAP: Comparison with MFRSR, HSRL and simultaneous retrievals of trace gases and aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Coburn, S.; Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Berg, L. K.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Volkamer, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    The two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) investigates uncertainties in the aerosol direct effect in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) provide an opportunity for 1) atmospheric radiation closure studies, and 2) test retrievals of aerosol optical properties in the presence and absence of clouds. This presentation discusses innovative means to access column information about aerosol optical properties in the lower atmosphere from ground based measurements of solar stray light spectra in the hyperspectral domain, i.e., measurements of the Raman Scattering Probability (RSP, the probability that an observed photon has undergone a rotational Raman scattering event), and oxygen dimer slant column densities (O4 SCD) by means of the University of Colorado 2D scanning ground Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2D-GMAX-DOAS) instrument that was located at the ARM/MAOS site at Cape Cod, MA. We compare retrievals of aerosol optical properties with those retrieved from the MFRSR and the Cimel Sunphotometer, for case studies in the presence/absence of clouds, and assess the need for atmospheric correction of NO2. 2D-GMAX-DOAS also facilitates a link between the ground-based ARM/MAOS dataset and DoE's G1 aircraft, NASA's King Air aircraft, and NASA's OMI satellite (i.e., NO2 vertical column). Early results that explore these linkages are presented for a case study that combines ground based MFRSR, in-situ observations aboard the G1 aircraft, as well as High Spectral Resolution LIDAR aboard the King Air aircraft.

  3. Modeling and Measurement of 3D Deformation of Scoliotic Spine Using 2D X-ray Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Leow, Wee Kheng; Huang, Chao-Hui; Howe, Tet Sen

    Scoliosis causes deformations such as twisting and lateral bending of the spine. To correct scoliotic deformation, the extents of 3D spinal deformation need to be measured. This paper studies the modeling and measurement of scoliotic spine based on 3D curve model. Through modeling the spine as a 3D Cosserat rod, the 3D structure of a scoliotic spine can be recovered by obtaining the minimum potential energy registration of the rod to the scoliotic spine in the x-ray image. Test results show that it is possible to obtain accurate 3D reconstruction using only the landmarks in a single view, provided that appropriate boundary conditions and elastic properties are included as constraints.

  4. Sound velocity measurement of nuclear-ordered U2D2 solid 3He along the melting curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Suzuki, M.; Yamaguchi, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Mizusaki, T.

    2000-05-01

    The sound velocity of a single-domain 3He crystal was measured in the nuclear-ordered low-field phase and the paramagnetic phase along the melting curve, using 10.98 MHz longitudinal sound. The temperature dependence of the sound velocity along the melting curve was explained by a nuclear spin contribution and the molar volume change along the melting curve. By comparing the measured velocity with thermodynamic quantities, we extracted the Grüneizen constant for the exchange energy. The anisotropy of the velocity in the ordered phase was investigated for three samples and was found to be smaller than 2×10 -5 in Δ v/ v. The attenuation coefficient of the sound was much smaller than 0.2 cm-1.

  5. Classification of precipitation types using fall velocity-diameter relationships from 2D-video distrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Jung, Sung-Hwa; Park, Hong-Mok; Kwon, Soohyun; Lin, Pay-Liam; Lee, GyuWon

    2015-09-01

    Fall velocity-diameter relationships for four different snowflake types (dendrite, plate, needle, and graupel) were investigated in northeastern South Korea, and a new algorithm for classifying hydrometeors is proposed for distrometric measurements based on the new relationships. Falling ice crystals (approximately 40 000 particles) were measured with a two-dimensional video disdrometer (2DVD) during a winter experiment from 15 January to 9 April 2010. The fall velocity-diameter relationships were derived for the four types of snowflakes based on manual classification by experts using snow photos and 2DVD measurements: the coefficients (exponents) for different snowflake types were 0.82 (0.24) for dendrite, 0.74 (0.35) for plate, 1.03 (0.71) for needle, and 1.30 (0.94) for graupel, respectively. These new relationships established in the present study (PS) were compared with those from two previous studies. Hydrometeor types were classified with the derived fall velocity-diameter relationships, and the classification algorithm was evaluated using 3× 3 contingency tables for one rain-snow transition event and three snowfall events. The algorithm showed good performance for the transition event: the critical success indices (CSIs) were 0.89, 0.61 and 0.71 for snow, wet-snow and rain, respectively. For snow events, the algorithm performance for dendrite and plate (CSIs = 1.0 and 1.0, respectively) was better than for needle and graupel (CSIs = 0.67 and 0.50, respectively).

  6. In situ optical measurement of the rapid Li intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in colloidal 2D layered TiS2 nanodiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiageng; Camacho-Forero, Luis E.; Rossi, Daniel; Park, Yerok; Balbuena, Perla B.; Son, Dong Hee

    2016-05-01

    We report the in situ optical measurements of the rapid Li intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in 2-dimensional (2D) layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) with a nanoscale lateral dimension using thin films fabricated with size-controlled colloidal TiS2 nanodiscs. The films exhibiting high optical homogeneity, where the interband absorption changes near-linearly to the amount of intercalated Li, enabled facile optical probing of the intercalation dynamics overcoming the shortcomings of amperometry susceptible to complications from non-Faradaic processes. The time scale of Li intercalation and deintercalation was on the order of seconds in the nanodiscs of ~100 nm lateral dimension, indicating sufficiently rapid dynamic control of the intercalation-induced material properties with a reduced lateral dimension. The change in the rate and reversibility of the dynamics during the multiple intercalation/deintercalation cycles was also measured, providing a unique window to observe the effect of potential structural changes on the intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in 2D layered TMD structures with a nanoscale lateral dimension.We report the in situ optical measurements of the rapid Li intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in 2-dimensional (2D) layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) with a nanoscale lateral dimension using thin films fabricated with size-controlled colloidal TiS2 nanodiscs. The films exhibiting high optical homogeneity, where the interband absorption changes near-linearly to the amount of intercalated Li, enabled facile optical probing of the intercalation dynamics overcoming the shortcomings of amperometry susceptible to complications from non-Faradaic processes. The time scale of Li intercalation and deintercalation was on the order of seconds in the nanodiscs of ~100 nm lateral dimension, indicating sufficiently rapid dynamic control of the intercalation-induced material properties with a reduced lateral dimension

  7. Model-based measurement of food portion size for image-based dietary assessment using 3D/2D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Jia, Wenyan; Yue, Yaofeng; Li, Zhaoxin; Sun, Yung-Nien; Fernstrom, John D.; Sun, Mingui

    2013-10-01

    Dietary assessment is important in health maintenance and intervention in many chronic conditions, such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, there is currently a lack of convenient methods for measuring the volume of food (portion size) in real-life settings. We present a computational method to estimate food volume from a single photographic image of food contained on a typical dining plate. First, we calculate the food location with respect to a 3D camera coordinate system using the plate as a scale reference. Then, the food is segmented automatically from the background in the image. Adaptive thresholding and snake modeling are implemented based on several image features, such as color contrast, regional color homogeneity and curve bending degree. Next, a 3D model representing the general shape of the food (e.g., a cylinder, a sphere, etc) is selected from a pre-constructed shape model library. The position, orientation and scale of the selected shape model are determined by registering the projected 3D model and the food contour in the image, where the properties of the reference are used as constraints. Experimental results using various realistically shaped foods with known volumes demonstrated satisfactory performance of our image-based food volume measurement method even if the 3D geometric surface of the food is not completely represented in the input image.

  8. A volumetric model-based 2D to 3D registration method for measuring kinematics of natural knees with single-plane fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Lu, Tung-Wu; Chen, Chung-Ming; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate measurement of the three-dimensional (3D) rigid body and surface kinematics of the natural human knee is essential for many clinical applications. Existing techniques are limited either in their accuracy or lack more realistic experimental evaluation of the measurement errors. The purposes of the study were to develop a volumetric model-based 2D to 3D registration method, called the weighted edge-matching score (WEMS) method, for measuring natural knee kinematics with single-plane fluoroscopy to determine experimentally the measurement errors and to compare its performance with that of pattern intensity (PI) and gradient difference (GD) methods. Methods: The WEMS method gives higher priority to matching of longer edges of the digitally reconstructed radiograph and fluoroscopic images. The measurement errors of the methods were evaluated based on a human cadaveric knee at 11 flexion positions. Results: The accuracy of the WEMS method was determined experimentally to be less than 0.77 mm for the in-plane translations, 3.06 mm for out-of-plane translation, and 1.13 deg. for all rotations, which is better than that of the PI and GD methods. Conclusions: A new volumetric model-based 2D to 3D registration method has been developed for measuring 3D in vivo kinematics of natural knee joints with single-plane fluoroscopy. With the equipment used in the current study, the accuracy of the WEMS method is considered acceptable for the measurement of the 3D kinematics of the natural knee in clinical applications.

  9. Measurement of sediment and crustal thickness corrected RDA for 2D profiles at rifted continental margins: Applications to the Iberian, Gulf of Aden and S Angolan margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Leanne; Kusznir, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Subsidence analysis of sedimentary basins and rifted continental margins requires a correction for the anomalous uplift or subsidence arising from mantle dynamic topography. Whilst different global model predictions of mantle dynamic topography may give a broadly similar pattern at long wavelengths, they differ substantially in the predicted amplitude and at shorter wavelengths. As a consequence the accuracy of predicted mantle dynamic topography is not sufficiently good to provide corrections for subsidence analysis. Measurements of present day anomalous subsidence, which we attribute to mantle dynamic topography, have been made for three rifted continental margins; offshore Iberia, the Gulf of Aden and southern Angola. We determine residual depth anomaly (RDA), corrected for sediment loading and crustal thickness variation for 2D profiles running from unequivocal oceanic crust across the continental ocean boundary onto thinned continental crust. Residual depth anomalies (RDA), corrected for sediment loading using flexural backstripping and decompaction, have been calculated by comparing observed and age predicted oceanic bathymetries at these margins. Age predicted bathymetric anomalies have been calculated using the thermal plate model predictions from Crosby & McKenzie (2009). Non-zero sediment corrected RDAs may result from anomalous oceanic crustal thickness with respect to the global average or from anomalous uplift or subsidence. Gravity anomaly inversion incorporating a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction and sediment thickness from 2D seismic reflection data has been used to determine Moho depth, calibrated using seismic refraction, and oceanic crustal basement thickness. Crustal basement thicknesses derived from gravity inversion together with Airy isostasy have been used to correct for variations of crustal thickness from a standard oceanic thickness of 7km. The 2D profiles of RDA corrected for both sediment loading and non-standard crustal

  10. Magnetotelluric measurements across the southern Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa: data improving strategies and 2-D inversion results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, S.; Chen, X.; Weckmann, U.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements in areas with electromagnetic (EM) noise sources such as electric fences, power and railway lines pose severe challenges to the standard processing procedures. In order to significantly improve the data quality advanced filtering and processing techniques need to be applied. The presented 5-component MT data set from two field campaigns in 2009 and 2010 in the Barberton/Badplaas area, South Africa, was acquired within the framework of the German-South African geo-scientific research initiative Inkaba yeAfrica. Approximately 200 MT sites aligned along six profiles provide a good areal coverage of the southern part of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (BGB). Since it is one of the few remaining well-preserved geological formations from the Archean, it presents an ideal area to study the tectonic evolution and the role of plate tectonics on Early Earth. Comparing the electric properties, the surrounding high and low grade metamorphic rocks are characteristically resistive whereas mineralized shear zones are possible areas of higher electrical conductivity. Mapping their depth extension is a crucial step towards understanding the formation and the evolution of the BGB. Unfortunately, in the measurement area numerous noise sources were active, producing severe spikes and steps in the EM fields. These disturbances mainly affect long periods which are needed for resolving the deepest structures. The Remote Reference technique as well as two filtering techniques are applied to improve the data in different period ranges. Adjusting their parameters for each site is necessary to obtain the best possible results. The improved data set is used for two-dimensional inversion studies for the six profiles applying the RLM2DI algorithm by Rodi and Mackie (2001, implemented in WinGlink). In the models, areas with higher conductivity can be traced beneath known faults throughout the entire array along different profiles. Resistive zones seem to correlate

  11. Performance of linear and nonlinear texture measures in 2D and 3D for monitoring architectural changes in osteoporosis using computer-generated models of trabecular bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Holger F.; Link, Thomas M.; Monetti, Roberto A.; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Raeth, Christoph W.

    2005-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease leading to de-mineralization and increased risk of fracture. The two major factors that determine the biomechanical competence of bone are the degree of mineralization and the micro-architectural integrity. Today, modern imaging modalities (high resolution MRI, micro-CT) are capable of depicting structural details of trabecular bone tissue. From the image data, structural properties obtained by quantitative measures are analysed with respect to the presence of osteoporotic fractures of the spine (in-vivo) or correlated with biomechanical strength as derived from destructive testing (in-vitro). Fairly well established are linear structural measures in 2D that are originally adopted from standard histo-morphometry. Recently, non-linear techniques in 2D and 3D based on the scaling index method (SIM), the standard Hough transform (SHT), and the Minkowski Functionals (MF) have been introduced, which show excellent performance in predicting bone strength and fracture risk. However, little is known about the performance of the various parameters with respect to monitoring structural changes due to progression of osteoporosis or as a result of medical treatment. In this contribution, we generate models of trabecular bone with pre-defined structural properties which are exposed to simulated osteoclastic activity. We apply linear and non-linear texture measures to the models and analyse their performance with respect to detecting architectural changes. This study demonstrates, that the texture measures are capable of monitoring structural changes of complex model data. The diagnostic potential varies for the different parameters and is found to depend on the topological composition of the model and initial "bone density". In our models, non-linear texture measures tend to react more sensitively to small structural changes than linear measures. Best performance is observed for the 3rd and 4th Minkowski Functionals and for the scaling

  12. Hyperfine structure and lifetime measurements in the 4s2nd 2D3/2 Rydberg sequence of Ga I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunqing; Tian, Yanshan; Yu, Qi; Bai, Wanshuang; Wang, Xinghao; Wang, Chong; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-05-01

    The hyperfine structure (HFS) constants of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=6-18) Rydberg sequence and the 4s26p 2P3/2 level for two isotopes of 69Ga and 71Ga atoms were measured by means of the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique and the quantum beat method. The observed hyperfine quantum beat spectra were analyzed and the magnetic-dipole HFS constants A as well as the electric-quadrupole HFS constants B of these levels were obtained by Fourier transform and a program for multiple regression analysis. Also using TR-LIF method radiative lifetimes of the above sequence states were determined at room temperature. The measured lifetime values range from 69 to 2279 ns with uncertainties no more than 10%. To our knowledge, the HFS constants of this Rydberg sequence and the lifetimes of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=10-18) levels are reported for the first time. Good agreement between our results and the previous is achieved.

  13. In situ optical measurement of the rapid Li intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in colloidal 2D layered TiS2 nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiageng; Camacho-Forero, Luis E; Rossi, Daniel; Park, Yerok; Balbuena, Perla B; Son, Dong Hee

    2016-06-01

    We report the in situ optical measurements of the rapid Li intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in 2-dimensional (2D) layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) with a nanoscale lateral dimension using thin films fabricated with size-controlled colloidal TiS2 nanodiscs. The films exhibiting high optical homogeneity, where the interband absorption changes near-linearly to the amount of intercalated Li, enabled facile optical probing of the intercalation dynamics overcoming the shortcomings of amperometry susceptible to complications from non-Faradaic processes. The time scale of Li intercalation and deintercalation was on the order of seconds in the nanodiscs of ∼100 nm lateral dimension, indicating sufficiently rapid dynamic control of the intercalation-induced material properties with a reduced lateral dimension. The change in the rate and reversibility of the dynamics during the multiple intercalation/deintercalation cycles was also measured, providing a unique window to observe the effect of potential structural changes on the intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in 2D layered TMD structures with a nanoscale lateral dimension. PMID:27189505

  14. 3 dimensional distributions of NO2, CHOCHO, and HCHO measured by the University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS during MAD-CAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan; Sinreich, Roman; Volkamer, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    We present results of 2 dimensional Multi Axis-DOAS (2D-MAX-DOAS) measurements to infer 3-dimensional measurements of trace gases by characterizing boundary layer vertical profiles and near surface azimuth horizontal distribution of NO2 (14 angles covering 360°). We combine the established optimal estimation inversion with a new parameterization approach; the first method to derive NO2 tropospheric vertical profiles and boundary layer height and the second one to retrieve the azimuth horizontal distribution of near surface NO2 mixing ratios, both at multiple wavelengths (350 nm, 450 nm, and 560 nm). This was conducted for three cloud-free days in the framework of the intensive Multi Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) in Mainz, Germany 2013. By retrieving NO2 at multiple wavelengths range-resolved distributions of NO2 are derived using an 'Onion-peeling' approach, i.e., exploiting the fact that the optical path lengths at different wavelengths probe different horizontal air masses. We also measure glyoxal (CHOCHO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) distributions, and present to our knowledge the first 3-dimesional trace-gas distribution measurements of CHOCHO by a ground-based instrument. We expand the 2D-MAX-DOAS capabilities to calculate azimuth ratios of HCHO-to-NO2 (RFN) and CHOCHO-to-NO2 (RGN) to pinpoint volatile organic compound (VOC) oxidation chemistry and CHOCHO-to-HCHO (RGF) ratios as an indicator of biogenic and/or anthropogenic VOC emissions. The results of RFN correlate well with RGN and we identify azimuth variations that indicate gradients in the VOC/NOx chemistry that leads to O3 and secondary aerosol production. While there is a clear diurnal pattern in the RFN and RGN, no such variations are observed in the RGF, which shows rather constant values below 0.04 throughout the day, consistent with previous measurements, and indicative of urban air masses.

  15. Simple method for simultaneously measuring the magnitude and direction of 2D in-plane displacement in white-light speckle photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhao; Shen, Mengfeng; Yu, Hongxiang; Zhang, Ke

    2016-04-01

    A simple method for simultaneously measuring the magnitude and direction (or argument) of a 2D in-plane displacement vector is presented. The theoretical mechanism for extracting the desired displacement signal from random noises produced by the nonoverlapping area of the recorded specklegrams of the test specimen surface is derived in detail. This procedure is realized by establishing a 1D displacement model in a white-light speckle photographic system using discrete Fourier transform shifting theorem. Results of the computer simulation and experiment show that the present method exhibits advantages such as convenient displacement direction determination, better robustness and wider measurement range than those of the traditional fringe analysis-based method. These characteristics make the proposed method a potential approach in practical applications.

  16. Quantification of regional fractional ventilation in human subjects by measurement of hyperpolarized 3He washout with 2D and 3D MRI.

    PubMed

    Horn, Felix C; Deppe, Martin H; Marshall, Helen; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2014-01-15

    Multiple-breath washout hyperpolarized (3)He MRI was used to calculate regional parametric images of fractional ventilation (r) as the ratio of fresh gas entering a volume unit to the total end inspiratory volume of the unit. Using a single dose of inhaled hyperpolarized gas and a total acquisition time of under 1 min, gas washout was measured by dynamic acquisitions during successive breaths with a fixed delay. A two-dimensional (2D) imaging protocol was investigated in four healthy subjects in the supine position, and in a second protocol the capability of extending the washout imaging to a three-dimensional (3D) acquisition covering the whole lungs was tested. During both protocols, subjects were breathing comfortably, only restricted by synchronization of breathing to the sequence timings. The 3D protocol was also successfully tested on one patient with cystic fibrosis. Mean r values from each volunteer were compared with global gas volume turnover, as calculated from flow measurement at the mouth divided by total lung volume (from MRI images), and a significant correlation (r = 0.74, P < 0.05) was found. The effects of gravity on R were investigated, and an average decrease in r of 5.5%/cm (Δr = 0.016 ± 0.006 cm(-1)) from posterior to anterior was found in the right lung. Intersubject reproducibility of r imaging with the 2D and 3D protocol was tested, and a significant correlation between repeated experiments was found in a pixel-by-pixel comparison. The proposed methods can be used to measure r on a regional basis. PMID:24311749

  17. Use of Caval Subtraction 2D Phase-Contrast MR Imaging to Measure Total Liver and Hepatic Arterial Blood Flow: Preclinical Validation and Initial Clinical Translation.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Manil D; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P; Bainbridge, Alan; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Davies, Nathan; Halligan, Steve; Lythgoe, Mark F; Taylor, Stuart A

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To validate caval subtraction two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measurements of total liver blood flow (TLBF) and hepatic arterial fraction in an animal model and evaluate consistency and reproducibility in humans. Materials and Methods Approval from the institutional ethical committee for animal care and research ethics was obtained. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 2D phase-contrast MR imaging of the portal vein (PV) and infrahepatic and suprahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC). TLBF and hepatic arterial flow were estimated by subtracting infrahepatic from suprahepatic IVC flow and PV flow from estimated TLBF, respectively. Direct PV transit-time ultrasonography (US) and fluorescent microsphere measurements of hepatic arterial fraction were the standards of reference. Thereafter, consistency of caval subtraction phase-contrast MR imaging-derived TLBF and hepatic arterial flow was assessed in 13 volunteers (mean age, 28.3 years ± 1.4) against directly measured phase-contrast MR imaging PV and proper hepatic arterial inflow; reproducibility was measured after 7 days. Bland-Altman analysis of agreement and coefficient of variation comparisons were undertaken. Results There was good agreement between PV flow measured with phase-contrast MR imaging and that measured with transit-time US (mean difference, -3.5 mL/min/100 g; 95% limits of agreement [LOA], ±61.3 mL/min/100 g). Hepatic arterial fraction obtained with caval subtraction agreed well with those with fluorescent microspheres (mean difference, 4.2%; 95% LOA, ±20.5%). Good consistency was demonstrated between TLBF in humans measured with caval subtraction and direct inflow phase-contrast MR imaging (mean difference, -1.3 mL/min/100 g; 95% LOA, ±23.1 mL/min/100 g). TLBF reproducibility at 7 days was similar between the two methods (95% LOA, ±31.6 mL/min/100 g vs ±29.6 mL/min/100 g). Conclusion Caval subtraction phase-contrast MR imaging is a simple and clinically

  18. Critical Slowing of Density Fluctuations Approaching the Isotropic-Nematic Transition in Liquid Crystals: 2D IR Measurements and Mode Coupling Theory.

    PubMed

    Sokolowsky, Kathleen P; Bailey, Heather E; Hoffman, David J; Andersen, Hans C; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) data are presented for a vibrational probe in three nematogens: 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, 4-cyano-4'-octylbiphenyl, and 4-(trans-4-amylcyclohexyl)-benzonitrile. The spectral diffusion time constants in all three liquids in the isotropic phase are proportional to [T*/(T - T*)](1/2), where T* is 0.5-1 K below the isotropic-nematic phase transition temperature (TNI). Rescaling to a reduced temperature shows that the decays of the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) for all three nematogens fall on the same curve, suggesting a universal dynamic behavior of nematogens above TNI. Spectral diffusion is complete before significant orientational relaxation in the liquid, as measured by optically heterodyne detected-optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) spectroscopy, and before any significant orientational randomization of the probe measured by polarization selective IR pump-probe experiments. To interpret the OHD-OKE and FFCF data, we constructed a mode coupling theory (MCT) schematic model for the relationships among three correlation functions: ϕ1, a correlator for large wave vector density fluctuations; ϕ2, the orientational correlation function whose time derivative is the observable in the OHD-OKE experiment; and ϕ3, the FFCF for the 2D IR experiment. The equations for ϕ1 and ϕ2 match those in the previous MCT schematic model for nematogens, and ϕ3 is coupled to the first two correlators in a straightforward manner. Resulting models fit the data very well. Across liquid crystals, the temperature dependences of the coupling constants show consistent, nonmonotonic behavior. A remarkable change in coupling occurs at ∼5 K above TNI, precisely where the rate of spectral diffusion in 5CB was observed to deviate from that of a similar nonmesogenic liquid. PMID:27363680

  19. A new general approach for solving the self-calibration problem on large area 2D ultra-precision coordinate measurement machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekberg, Peter; Stiblert, Lars; Mattsson, Lars

    2014-05-01

    The manufacturing of flat panel displays requires a number of photomasks for the placement of pixel patterns and supporting transistor arrays. For large area photomasks, dedicated ultra-precision writers have been developed for the production of these chromium patterns on glass or quartz plates. The dimensional tolerances in X and Y for absolute pattern placement on these plates, with areas measured in square meters, are in the range of 200-300 nm (3σ). To verify these photomasks, 2D ultra-precision coordinate measurement machines are used having even tighter tolerance requirements. This paper will present how the world standard metrology tool used for verifying large masks, the Micronic Mydata MMS15000, is calibrated without any other references than the wavelength of the interferometers in an extremely well-controlled temperature environment. This process is called self-calibration and is the only way to calibrate the metrology tool, as no square-meter-sized large area 2D traceable artifact is available. The only parameter that cannot be found using self-calibration is the absolute length scale. To make the MMS15000 traceable, a 1D reference rod, calibrated at a national metrology lab, is used. The reference plates used in the calibration of the MMS15000 may have sizes up to 1 m2 and a weight of 50 kg. Therefore, standard methods for self-calibration on a small scale with exact placements cannot be used in the large area case. A new, more general method had to be developed for the purpose of calibrating the MMS15000. Using this method, it is possible to calibrate the measurement tool down to an uncertainty level of <90 nm (3σ) over an area of (0.8 × 0.8) m2. The method used, which is based on the concept of iteration, does not introduce any more noise than the random noise introduced by the measurements, resulting in the lowest possible noise level that can be achieved by any self-calibration method.

  20. Aniso2D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  1. Development of a Cryogenic Thermal Distortion Measurement Facility for Testing the James Webb Space Telescope Instrument Support Integration Module 2-D Test Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Franklin; Bagdanove, paul; Blake, Peter; Canavan, Ed; Cofie, Emmanuel; Crane, J. Allen; Dominquez, Kareny; Hagopian, John; Johnston, John; Madison, Tim; Miller, Dave; Oaks, Darrell; Williams, Pat; Young, Dan; Zukowski, Barbara; Zukowski, Tim

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Instrument Support Integration Module (ISIM) is being designed and developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The ISM Thermal Distortion Testing (ITDT) program was started with the primary objective to validate the ISM mechanical design process. The ITDT effort seeks to establish confidence and demonstrate the ability to predict thermal distortion in composite structures at cryogenic temperatures using solid element models. This-program's goal is to better ensure that ISIM meets all the mechanical and structural requirements by using test results to verify or improve structural modeling techniques. The first step to accomplish the ITDT objectives was to design, and then construct solid element models of a series 2-D test assemblies that represent critical building blocks of the ISIM structure. Second, the actual test assemblies consisting of composite tubes and invar end fittings were fabricated and tested for thermal distortion. This paper presents the development of the GSFC Cryo Distortion Measurement Facility (CDMF) to meet the requirements of the ISIM 2-D test. assemblies, and other future ISIM testing needs. The CDMF provides efficient cooling with both a single, and two-stage cryo-cooler. Temperature uniformity of the test assemblies during thermal transients and at steady state is accomplished by using sapphire windows for all of the optical ports on the radiation shields and by using .thermal straps to cool the test assemblies. Numerical thermal models of the test assemblies were used to predict the temperature uniformity of the parts during cooldown and at steady state. Results of these models are compared to actual temperature data from the tests. Temperature sensors with a 0.25K precision were used to insure that test assembly gradients did not exceed 2K lateral, and 4K axially. The thermal distortions of two assemblies were measured during six thermal cycles from 320K to 35K using laser interferometers. The standard

  2. The effect of regularization on the reconstruction of ACAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. A.; Ceeh, H.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Leitner, M.; Böni, P.

    2014-04-01

    The Fermi surface, i.e. the two-dimensional surface separating occupied and unoccupied states in k-space, is the defining property of a metal. Full information about its shape is mandatory for identifying nesting vectors or for validating band structure calculations. With the angular correlation of positron-electron annihilation radiation (ACAR) it is easy to get projections of the Fermi surface. Nevertheless it is claimed to be inexact compared to more common methods like the determination based on quantum oscillations or angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In this article we will present a method for reconstructing the Fermi surface from projections with statistically correct data treatment which is able to increase accuracy by introducing different types of regularization.

  3. Metabolic flux and metabolic network analysis of Penicillium chrysogenum using 2D [13C, 1H] COSY NMR measurements and cumulative bondomer simulation.

    PubMed

    van Winden, Wouter A; van Gulik, Walter M; Schipper, Dick; Verheijen, Peter J T; Krabben, Preben; Vinke, Jacobus L; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2003-07-01

    At present two alternative methods are available for analyzing the fluxes in a metabolic network: (1) combining measurements of net conversion rates with a set of metabolite balances including the cofactor balances, or (2) leaving out the cofactor balances and fitting the resulting free fluxes to measured (13)C-labeling data. In this study these two approaches are applied to the fluxes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway of Penicillium chrysogenum growing on either ammonia or nitrate as the nitrogen source, which is expected to give different pentose phosphate pathway fluxes. The presented flux analyses are based on extensive sets of 2D [(13)C, (1)H] COSY data. A new concept is applied for simulation of this type of (13)C-labeling data: cumulative bondomer modeling. The outcomes of the (13)C-labeling based flux analysis substantially differ from those of the pure metabolite balancing approach. The fluxes that are determined using (13)C-labeling data are shown to be highly dependent on the chosen metabolic network. Extending the traditional nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway with additional transketolase and transaldolase reactions, extending the glycolysis with a fructose 6-phosphate aldolase/dihydroxyacetone kinase reaction sequence or adding a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase reaction to the model considerably improves the fit of the measured and the simulated NMR data. The results obtained using the extended version of the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway model show that the transketolase and transaldolase reactions need not be assumed reversible to get a good fit of the (13)C-labeling data. Strict statistical testing of the outcomes of (13)C-labeling based flux analysis using realistic measurement errors is demonstrated to be of prime importance for verifying the assumed metabolic model. PMID:12740935

  4. TH-C-19A-01: Analytic Design Method to Make a 2D Planar, Segmented Ion Chamber Water-Equivalent for Proton Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W; Hollebeek, R; Teo, B; Maughan, R; Dolney, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quality Assurance (QA) measurements of proton therapy fields must accurately measure steep longitudinal dose gradients as well as characterize the dose distribution laterally. Currently, available devices for two-dimensional field measurements perturb the dose distribution such that routine QA measurements performed at multiple depths require multiple field deliveries and are time consuming. Methods: A design procedure for a two-dimensional detector array is introduced whereby the proton energy loss and scatter are adjusted so that the downstream dose distribution is maintained to be equivalent to that which would occur in uniform water. Starting with the design for an existing, functional two-dimensional segmented ion chamber prototype, a compensating material is introduced downstream of the detector to simultaneously equate the energy loss and lateral scatter in the detector assembly to the values in water. An analytic formalism and procedure is demonstrated to calculate the properties of the compensating material in the general case of multiple layers of arbitrary material. The resulting design is validated with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: With respect to the specific prototype design considered, the results indicate that a graphite compensating layer of the proper dimensions can yield proton beam range perturbation less than 0.1mm and beam sigma perturbation less than 2% across the energy range of therapeutic proton beams. Conclusion: We have shown that, for a 2D gas-filled detector array, a graphite-compensating layer can balance the energy loss and multiple Coulomb scattering relative to uniform water. We have demonstrated an analytic formalism and procedure to determine a compensating material in the general case of multiple layers of arbitrary material. This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-04-2-0022. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations

  5. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  6. Mesh2d

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  7. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  8. Individual bottle brush molecules in dense 2D layers restoring high degree of extension after collapse-decollapse cycle: Directly measured scaling exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallyamov, M. O.; Tartsch, B.; Potemkin, I. I.; Börner, H. G.; Matyjaszewski, K.; Khokhlov, A. R.; Möller, M.

    2009-05-01

    We prepared dense films of adsorbed brush-like macromolecules on mica substrate by transfer of compressed Langmuir monolayers from water subphase. The main macromolecular contours in the dense films were clearly resolved by SFM. The films were subjected to successive treatments by ethanol and water vapours. In accordance with previous results for isolated macromolecules, the films underwent collapse and subsequent decollapse morphological transformations in the changing vapour environment. Statistical analysis of the macromolecular dimensions in the films allowed us to measure the values of the scaling exponent ν determining the correlation between mean lateral and linear dimensions of the macromolecules. The analysis showed that the macromolecular conformations in the film as transferred were similar to the previously described conformations of the same macromolecules deposited directly on mica as isolated chains at much lower surface densities. The determined ν was close to the 0.75 value corresponding to the 2D SAW statistics. We assumed that the molecules retained the high degree of extension during the compression step due to suppressed reorganisation of the side chains. Differently from previous observations for isolated macromolecules, the restored conformations in the dense films after collapse-decollapse cycle were more extended with the ν of about 0.73 value. A theoretical explanation of the high degree of re-extension is proposed.

  9. Individual bottle brush molecules in dense 2D layers restoring high degree of extension after collapse-decollapse cycle: directly measured scaling exponent.

    PubMed

    Gallyamov, M O; Tartsch, B; Potemkin, I I; Börner, H G; Matyjaszewski, K; Khokhlov, A R; Möller, M

    2009-05-01

    We prepared dense films of adsorbed brush-like macromolecules on mica substrate by transfer of compressed Langmuir monolayers from water subphase. The main macromolecular contours in the dense films were clearly resolved by SFM. The films were subjected to successive treatments by ethanol and water vapours. In accordance with previous results for isolated macromolecules, the films underwent collapse and subsequent decollapse morphological transformations in the changing vapour environment. Statistical analysis of the macromolecular dimensions in the films allowed us to measure the values of the scaling exponent nu determining the correlation between mean lateral and linear dimensions of the macromolecules. The analysis showed that the macromolecular conformations in the film as transferred were similar to the previously described conformations of the same macromolecules deposited directly on mica as isolated chains at much lower surface densities. The determined nu was close to the 0.75 value corresponding to the 2D SAW statistics. We assumed that the molecules retained the high degree of extension during the compression step due to suppressed reorganisation of the side chains. Differently from previous observations for isolated macromolecules, the restored conformations in the dense films after collapse-decollapse cycle were more extended with the nu of about 0.73 value. A theoretical explanation of the high degree of re-extension is proposed. PMID:19418079

  10. Oxygen-Atom Defects In 6H Silicon Carbide Implanted Using 24- MeV O3+ Ions Measured Using Three-Dimensional Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy System (3DPASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christopher S.; Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Petrosky, James C.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2011-06-01

    Three dimensional electron-positron (e--e+) momentum distributions were measured for single crystal 6H silicon carbide (SiC); both virgin and having implanted oxygen-atom defects. 6H SiC samples were irradiated by 24- MeV O3+ ions at 20 particle-nanoamps at the Sandia National Laboratory's Ion Beam Facility. O3+ ions were implanted 10.8 μm deep normal to the (0001) face of one side of the SiC samples. During positron annihilation measurements, the opposite face of the 254.0-μm thick SiC samples was exposed to positrons from a 22Na source. This technique reduced the influence on the momentum measurements of vacancy-type defects resulting from knock-on damage by the O3+ ions. A three-dimensional positron annihilation spectroscopy system (3DPASS) was used to measure e--e+ momentum distributions for virgin and irradiated 6H SiC crystal both before and following annealing. 3DPASS simultaneously measures coincident Doppler-broadening (DBAR) and angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) spectra. DBAR ratio plots and 2D ACAR spectra are presented. Changes in the momentum anisotropies relative to crystal orientation observed in 2D ACAR spectra for annealed O-implanted SiC agree with the local structure of defect distortion predicted using Surface Integrated Molecular Orbital/Molecular Mechanics (SIMOMM). Oxygen atoms insert between Si and C atoms increasing their separation by 0.9 Å forming a Si-O-C bond angle of ˜150°.

  11. Oxygen-Atom Defects In 6H Silicon Carbide Implanted Using 24- MeV O{sup 3+} Ions Measured Using Three-Dimensional Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy System (3DPASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher S.; Petrosky, James C.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2011-06-01

    Three dimensional electron-positron (e{sup -}-e{sup +}) momentum distributions were measured for single crystal 6H silicon carbide (SiC); both virgin and having implanted oxygen-atom defects. 6H SiC samples were irradiated by 24- MeV O{sup 3+} ions at 20 particle-nanoamps at the Sandia National Laboratory's Ion Beam Facility. O{sup 3+} ions were implanted 10.8 {mu}m deep normal to the (0001) face of one side of the SiC samples. During positron annihilation measurements, the opposite face of the 254.0-{mu}m thick SiC samples was exposed to positrons from a {sup 22}Na source. This technique reduced the influence on the momentum measurements of vacancy-type defects resulting from knock-on damage by the O{sup 3+} ions. A three-dimensional positron annihilation spectroscopy system (3DPASS) was used to measure e{sup -}-e{sup +} momentum distributions for virgin and irradiated 6H SiC crystal both before and following annealing. 3DPASS simultaneously measures coincident Doppler-broadening (DBAR) and angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) spectra. DBAR ratio plots and 2D ACAR spectra are presented. Changes in the momentum anisotropies relative to crystal orientation observed in 2D ACAR spectra for annealed O-implanted SiC agree with the local structure of defect distortion predicted using Surface Integrated Molecular Orbital/Molecular Mechanics (SIMOMM). Oxygen atoms insert between Si and C atoms increasing their separation by 0.9 A forming a Si-O-C bond angle of {approx}150 deg.

  12. Assessing the Cr(VI) reduction efficiency of a permeable reactive barrier using Cr isotope measurements and 2D reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, Christoph; Zink, Sonja; Eggenberger, Urs; Mäder, Urs

    2012-04-01

    In Thun, Switzerland, a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for Cr(VI) reduction by gray cast iron was installed in May 2008. The PRB is composed of a double array of vertical piles containing iron shavings and gravel. The aquifer in Thun is almost saturated with dissolved oxygen and the groundwater flow velocities are ca. 10-15 m/day. Two years after PRB installation Cr(VI) concentrations still permanently exceed the Swiss threshold value for contaminated sites downstream of the barrier at selected localities. Groundwater δ53/52CrSRM979 measurements were used to track Cr(VI) reduction induced by the PRB. δ53/52CrSRM979 values of two samples downstream of the PRB showed a clear fractionation towards more positive values compared to four samples from the hotspot, which is clear evidence of Cr(VI) reduction induced by the PRB. Another downstream sample did not show a shift to more positive δ53/52CrSRM979 values. Because this latter location correlates with the highest downstream Cr(VI) concentration it is proposed that a part of the Cr(VI) plume is bypassing the barrier. Using a Rayleigh fractionation model a minimum present-day overall Cr(VI) reduction efficiency of ca. 15% was estimated. A series of 2D model simulations, including the fractionation of Cr isotopes, confirm that only a PRB bypass of parts of the Cr(VI) plume can lead to the observed values. Additionally, the simulations revealed that the proposed bypass occurs due to an insufficient permeability of the individual PRB piles. It is concluded that with this type of PRB a complete and long-lasting Cr(VI) reduction is extremely difficult to achieve for Cr(VI) contaminations located in nearly oxygen and calcium carbonate saturated aquifer in a regime of high groundwater velocities. Additional remediation action would limit the environmental impact and allow to reach target concentrations.

  13. Study of colloidal quantum-dot surfaces using an innovative thin-film positron 2D-ACAR method.

    PubMed

    Eijt, Stephan W H; van Veen, Anton Tom; Schut, Henk; Mijnarends, Peter E; Denison, Art B; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Bansil, Arun

    2006-01-01

    Nanosized inorganic particles are of great interest because their electronic properties can be easily tailored, providing a tremendous potential for applications in optoelectronic devices, light-emitting diodes, solar cells and hydrogen storage. Confinement of electrons and holes to dimensions comparable to their wavelength leads to quantum-well states with modified wavefunctions and density of states. Surface phenomena are crucial in determining nanoparticle properties in view of their large surface-to-volume ratio. Despite a wealth of information, many fundamental questions about the nature of the surface and its relationship with the electronic structure remain unsolved. Ab initio calculations on CdSe nanocrystals suggest that passivating the ligands does not produce the ideal wurtzite structure and that Se atoms relax outwards irrespective of passivation. Here we show that implanted positrons are trapped at the surface of CdSe nanocrystals. They annihilate mostly with the Se electrons, monitor changes in composition and structure of the surface while hardly sensing the ligand molecules, and we thus unambiguously confirm the predicted strong surface relaxation. PMID:16380729

  14. Study of colloidal quantum-dot surfaces using an innovative thin-film positron 2D-ACAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eijt, Stephan W. H.; van Veen, Anton (Tom); Schut, Henk; Mijnarends, Peter E.; Denison, Art B.; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Bansil, Arun

    2006-01-01

    Nanosized inorganic particles are of great interest because their electronic properties can be easily tailored, providing a tremendous potential for applications in optoelectronic devices, light-emitting diodes, solar cells and hydrogen storage. Confinement of electrons and holes to dimensions comparable to their wavelength leads to quantum-well states with modified wavefunctions and density of states. Surface phenomena are crucial in determining nanoparticle properties in view of their large surface-to-volume ratio. Despite a wealth of information, many fundamental questions about the nature of the surface and its relationship with the electronic structure remain unsolved. Ab initio calculations on CdSe nanocrystals suggest that passivating the ligands does not produce the ideal wurtzite structure and that Se atoms relax outwards irrespective of passivation. Here we show that implanted positrons are trapped at the surface of CdSe nanocrystals. They annihilate mostly with the Se electrons, monitor changes in composition and structure of the surface while hardly sensing the ligand molecules, and we thus unambiguously confirm the predicted strong surface relaxation.

  15. Experiments on two-phase flow in a quasi-2D porous medium: investigation of boundary effects in the measurement of pressure-saturation relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Marcel; Fiorentino, Eve-Agnès; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Toussaint, Renaud; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    We have performed two-phase flow experiments to analyze the drainage from a quasi-2D random porous medium. The medium is transparent, which allows for the visualization of the invasion pattern during the flow and is initially fully saturated with a viscous fluid (a dyed glycerol-water mix). As the pressure in the fluid is gradually reduced, air penetrates from an open inlet, thus displacing the fluid which leaves the system from the outlet in the opposite side. A feedback mechanism was devised to control the experiment: the capillary pressure (difference in pressure between the non-wetting and wetting phases) is continuously increased to be just above the threshold value necessary to drive the invasion process. This mechanism is intended to keep the invasion process slow, in the so-called capillary regime, where capillary forces dominate the dynamics. Pressure measurements and pictures of the flow are recorded and the pressure-saturation relationship is computed. The effects of the boundary conditions to this quantity are verified experimentally by repeatedly performing the analysis using porous media of different sizes. We show that some features of the pressure-saturation curve are strongly affected by boundary effects. The invasion close to the inlet and outlet of the model are particularly influenced by the boundaries and this is reflected in the phases of pressure building up in the pressure-saturation curves, in the beginning and end of the invasion process. Conversely, at the central part of the model (away from the boundaries), the invasion process happens at an essentially constant capillary pressure, which is reflected as a plateau in the pressure-saturation curve. Additionally, the use of a high-resolution camera allows us to analyze the images down to the pore scale. We can directly obtain a distribution of pore-throat sizes in the model (and their associated capillary pressure thresholds) and divide it into distributions of invaded / non-invaded pores

  16. 2D Modelling of the Gorkha earthquake through the joint exploitation of Sentinel 1-A DInSAR measurements and geological, structural and seismological information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Novellis, Vincenzo; Castaldo, Raffaele; Solaro, Giuseppe; De Luca, Claudio; Pepe, Susi; Bonano, Manuela; Casu, Francesco; Zinno, Ivana; Manunta, Michele; Lanari, Riccardo; Tizzani, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    A Mw 7.8 earthquake struck Nepal on 25 April 2015 at 06:11:26 UTC, killing more than 9,000 people, injuring more than 23,000 and producing extensive damages. The main seismic event, known as the Gorkha earthquake, had its epicenter localized at ~82 km NW of the Kathmandu city and the hypocenter at a depth of approximately 15 km. After the main shock event, about 100 aftershocks occurred during the following months, propagating toward the south-east direction; in particular, the most energetic shocks were the Mw 6.7 and Mw 7.3 occurred on 26 April and 12 May, respectively. In this study, we model the causative fault of the earthquake by jointly exploiting surface deformation retrieved by the DInSAR measurements collected through the Sentinel 1-A (S1A) space-borne sensor and the available geological, structural and seismological information. We first exploit the analytical solution performing a back-analysis of the ground deformation detected by the first co-seismic S1A interferogram, computed by exploiting the 17/04/2015 and 29/04/2015 SAR acquisitions and encompassing the main earthquake and some aftershocks, to search for the location and geometry of the fault plane. Starting from these findings and by benefiting from the available geological, structural and seismological data, we carry out a Finite Element (FE)-based 2D modelling of the causative fault, in order to evaluate the impact of the geological structures activated during the seismic event on the distribution of the ground deformation field. The obtained results show that the causative fault has a rather complex compressive structure, dipping northward, formed by segments with different dip angles: 6° the deep segment and 60° the shallower one. Therefore, although the hypocenters of the main shock and most of the more energetic aftershocks are located along the deeper plane, corresponding to a segment of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT), the FE solution also indicates the contribution of the shallower

  17. Assessing the Cr(VI) reduction efficiency of a permeable reactive barrier using Cr isotope measurements and 2D reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Christoph; Zink, Sonja; Eggenberger, Urs; Mäder, Urs

    2012-04-01

    In Thun, Switzerland, a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for Cr(VI) reduction by gray cast iron was installed in May 2008. The PRB is composed of a double array of vertical piles containing iron shavings and gravel. The aquifer in Thun is almost saturated with dissolved oxygen and the groundwater flow velocities are ca. 10-15m/day. Two years after PRB installation Cr(VI) concentrations still permanently exceed the Swiss threshold value for contaminated sites downstream of the barrier at selected localities. Groundwater δ(53/52)Cr(SRM979) measurements were used to track Cr(VI) reduction induced by the PRB. δ(53/52)Cr(SRM979) values of two samples downstream of the PRB showed a clear fractionation towards more positive values compared to four samples from the hotspot, which is clear evidence of Cr(VI) reduction induced by the PRB. Another downstream sample did not show a shift to more positive δ(53/52)Cr(SRM979) values. Because this latter location correlates with the highest downstream Cr(VI) concentration it is proposed that a part of the Cr(VI) plume is bypassing the barrier. Using a Rayleigh fractionation model a minimum present-day overall Cr(VI) reduction efficiency of ca. 15% was estimated. A series of 2D model simulations, including the fractionation of Cr isotopes, confirm that only a PRB bypass of parts of the Cr(VI) plume can lead to the observed values. Additionally, the simulations revealed that the proposed bypass occurs due to an insufficient permeability of the individual PRB piles. It is concluded that with this type of PRB a complete and long-lasting Cr(VI) reduction is extremely difficult to achieve for Cr(VI) contaminations located in nearly oxygen and calcium carbonate saturated aquifer in a regime of high groundwater velocities. Additional remediation action would limit the environmental impact and allow to reach target concentrations. PMID:22343010

  18. Results of an attempt to measure increased rates of the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n in a nonelectrochemical cold fusion experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Decker, Arthur J.; Blue, James W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to look for evidence of deuterium fusion in palladium. The experiment, which involved introducing deuterium into the palladium filter of a hydrogen purifier, was designed to detect neutrons produced in the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n as well as heat production. The neutron counts for deuterium did not differ significantly from background or from the counts for a hydrogen control. Heat production was detected when deuterium, but not hydrogen, was pumped from the purifier.

  19. Ionic Liquid Dynamics Measured with 2D IR and IR Pump-Probe Experiments on a Linear Anion and the Influence of Potassium Cations.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    The room-temperature ionic liquid EmimNTf2 (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) was studied with two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) experiments using low-concentration selenocyanate (SeCN(-)) as the vibrational probe. SeCN(-) was added as EmimSeCN, which keeps the cation the same. KSeCN was also used, so K(+) was added. Two 2D IR polarization configurations were employed: ⟨XXXX⟩ (all pulses have the same polarization) and ⟨XXYY⟩ (the first two pulse polarizations are perpendicular to that of the third pulse and the echo). The spectral diffusion differs for the two configurations, demonstrating that reorientation-induced spectral diffusion, in addition to structural spectral diffusion (SSD), plays a role in the observed dynamics. The SSD was extracted from the 2D IR time-dependent data. The samples with EmimSeCN have dynamics on several fast time scales; however, when KSeCN is used, both the PPSP anisotropy decay and the 2D IR decays have low amplitude offsets (nondecaying values at long times). The size of the offsets increased with increased K(+) concentration. These results are explained in terms of a two-ensemble model. A small fraction of the SeCN(-) is located in the regions modified by the presence of K(+), causing a substantial slowing of the SeCN(-) orientational relaxation and spectral diffusion. Having a small ensemble of SeCN(-) that undergoes very slow dynamics is sufficient to explain the offsets. For the major ensemble, the dynamics with and without K(+) are the same. PMID:26872207

  20. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument – Part 2: Raman scattering probability measurements and retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ortega, Ivan; Coburn, Sean; Berg, Larry K.; Lantz, Kathy; Michalsky, Joseph; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-08-23

    The multiannual global mean of aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is ∼ 0.19, and that over oceans is ∼ 0.13. About 45 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions. We present an inherently calibrated retrieval (i.e., no need for radiance calibration) to simultaneously measure AOD and the aerosol phase function parameter, g, based on measurements of azimuth distributions of the Raman scattering probability (RSP), the near-absolute rotational Raman scattering (RRS) intensity. We employ radiative transfer model simulations tomore » show that for solar azimuth RSP measurements at solar elevation and solar zenith angle (SZA) smaller than 80°, RSP is insensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosols and maximally sensitive to changes in AOD and g under near-molecular scattering conditions. The University of Colorado two-dimensional Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument was deployed as part of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA, during the summer of 2012 to measure direct sun spectra and RSP from scattered light spectra at solar relative azimuth angles (SRAAs) between 5 and 170°. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, 0.3  <  AOD430 < 0.6) and (2) near-molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD430 < 0.13) we compare RSP-based retrievals of AOD430 and g with data from a co-located CIMEL sun photometer, Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), and an airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2). The average difference (relative to DOAS) for AOD430 is +0.012 ± 0.023 (CIMEL), −0.012 ± 0.024 (MFRSR), −0.011 ± 0.014 (HSRL-2), and +0.023 ± 0.013 (CIMELAOD − MFRSRAOD) and yields the following expressions for correlations between different instruments

  1. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  2. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  3. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  4. Studying the effect of noise on the performance of 2D and 3D texture measures for quantifying the trabecular bone structure as obtained with high resolution MR imaging at 3 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monetti, Roberto; Bauer, Jan; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Matsuura, Maiko; Eckstein, Felix; Sidorenko, Irina; Raeth, Christoph W.

    2008-03-01

    3.0 Tesla MRI devices are becoming popular in clinical applications since they render images with a higher signal-tonoise ratio than the former 1.5 Tesla MRI devices. Here, we investigate if higher signal-to-noise ratio can be beneficial for a quantitative image analysis in the context of bone research. We performed a detailed analysis of the effect of noise on the performance of 2D morphometric linear measures and a 3D nonlinear measure with respect to their correlation with biomechanical properties of the bone expressed by the maximum compressive strength. The performance of both 2D and 3D texture measures was relatively insensitive to superimposed artificial noise. This finding suggests that MR sequences for visualizing bone structures at 3T should rather be optimized to spatial resolution (or scanning time) than to signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  6. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  7. Changes in the Capillarity of the Rat Extensor Digitorum Longus Muscle 4 Weeks after Nerve Injury Studied by 2D Measurement Methods.

    PubMed

    Čebašek, Vita; Ribarič, Samo

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown by 3D study that 2 weeks after nerve injury there was no change in the length of capillaries per muscle fibre length in rat extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL). The primary goal of the present 2D study was to determine the capillarity of rat EDL 4 weeks after various modes of nerve injury. Additionally, we wished to calculate the same capillary/fibre parameters that were used in our 3D stereological study. EDL muscles derived from denervated (4 weeks after nerve injury), re-innervated (4 weeks after two successive nerve crushes) and age-matched controls from the beginning (CON-1) and the end (CON-2) of the experiment were analysed in two ways. Global indices of capillarity, such as capillary density (CD) and capillary/fibre (C/F) ratio, were determined by automatic analysis, local indices as the number (CAF) and the length of capillaries around individual muscle fibres (Lcap) in relation to muscle fibre size were estimated manually by tracing the muscle fibre outlines and the transversally and longitudinally cut segments of capillaries seen in 5-µm-thin muscle cross sections. Four weeks after both types of nerve injury, CD increased in comparison to the CON-2 group (p < 0.001) due to atrophied muscle fibres in denervated muscles and probably proliferation of capillaries in re-innervated ones. Higher C/F, CAF (both p < 0.001) and Lcap (p < 0.01) in re-innervated than denervated EDL confirmed this assumption. Calculated capillary/fibre parameters were comparable to our previous 3D study, which strengthens the practical value to the adapted 2D method used in this study. PMID:27023720

  8. A simplified quasi-2d model of the Po River for the identification of large-scale flood-risk mitigation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, A.; Castellarin, A.; Brath, A.; Colombo, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Flood Directive 2007/60/EC (European Commission, 2007) promotes a paradigm shift from engineering defences to flood-risk mitigation and management strategies. The actual implementation of the Directive necessarily implies the development of reliable procedures for assessing the flood-risk associated with flood prone areas. These procedures can then be adopted by Institutions and public bodies in charge of formulating robust flood risk management strategies for large European rivers for identifying optimal policies for a given area. Optimal policies need to be identified at catchment scale through a holistic approach, and this applies also to large European rivers. Our study focuses on the middle-lower reach of the River Po (~350 km), the longest Italian river and the largest in terms of streamflow. We show a large-scale application of a quasi two-dimensional (quasi-2D) model to support the identification of the optimal management strategy of an extreme flood event (recurrence interval ~500 years) by means of controlled flooding (flooding of portions of the flood-prone area located outside the main embankments through ad-hoc lateral structures) for a flood-prone area of ~6,1x103 square kilometres. Different flooding scenarios associated with several possible geometric configurations of the system of lateral structures are compared in terms of flood losses, characterized through the analysis of CORINE land cover data relative to the period 1990-2006. The results of the study show how a simplified quasi-2D model may be effectively used to: (1) provide useful indications on the flood-risk associated with a large flood prone area; (2) support the identification of optimal flood-risk mitigation strategies and (3) assess the impact of recent land-use dynamics (i.e. population-growth, changes agricultural practices, etc.) on flood-risk.

  9. Ab initio calculation of positron distribution, ACAR and lifetime in TTF-TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Shoji; Kohyama, Masanori

    2000-06-01

    We have performed ab initio calculations of positron distribution, ACAR and lifetime in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor TTF-TCNQ. The electronic structure is obtained within the LDA, while the positron state is calculated either with the LDA or with the GGA. Except the positron lifetime, differences between the LDA and GGA results are rather small. The obtained results are compared with our previous experiments and calculations.

  10. AnisWave 2D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  11. Baby universes in 2d quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, Jan; Jain, Sanjay; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1993-06-01

    We investigate the fractal structure of 2d quantum gravity, both for pure gravity and for gravity coupled to multiple gaussian fields and for gravity coupled to Ising spins. The roughness of the surfaces is described in terms of baby universes and using numerical simulations we measure their distribution which is related to the string susceptibility exponent γstring.

  12. 2D potential measurements by applying automatic beam adjustment system to heavy ion beam probe diagnostic on the Large Helical Devicea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, A.; Ido, T.; Kurachi, M.; Makino, R.; Nishiura, M.; Kato, S.; Nishizawa, A.; Hamada, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Two-dimensional potential profiles in the Large Helical Device (LHD) were measured with heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). To measure the two-dimensional profile, the probe beam energy has to be changed. However, this task is not easy, because the beam transport line of LHD-HIBP system is very long (˜20 m), and the required beam adjustment consumes much time. To reduce the probe beam energy adjustment time, an automatic beam adjustment system has been developed. Using this system, required time to change the probe beam energy is dramatically reduced, such that two-dimensional potential profiles were able to be successfully measured with HIBP by changing the probe beam energy shot to shot.

  13. Analysis of downregulation of cellular energy demand by 2D measurements of intracapillary HbO2, Hb, pO2, and redox state of cytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, Alfons; Kessler, Manfred D.; Hoeper, Jens; Zellner, S.; Sourdoulaud, Valerie

    1995-04-01

    Rapid microlightguide spectrometers (EMPHO IIa/b) and a multiwire pO2 electrode are applied for measurements of heterogeneous distribution of tissue oxygenation and redox state of respiratory enzymes in heart and rat liver. Optical and pO2 measurements are noninvasively performed by use of sensors placed on the surface of tissue. Measurements in isolated perfused rat and in dog heart in situ were performed in order to investigate the relation between myocardial oxygenation and function. The tissue monitoring in liver was initiated by optical and polarographic monitoring in the hemoglobin free perfused organ. Subsequently, erythrocytes were added to the perfusate in several steps. The experiments reveal clear evidence that a protective system of tissue is activated when critical pO2 values at the lethal corner of micro vessels fall off a critical threshold around 5 mmHg, thus causing a depletion of oxidative metabolism.

  14. 2D potential measurements by applying automatic beam adjustment system to heavy ion beam probe diagnostic on the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, A. Ido, T.; Kato, S.; Hamada, Y.; Kurachi, M.; Makino, R.; Nishiura, M.; Nishizawa, A.

    2014-11-15

    Two-dimensional potential profiles in the Large Helical Device (LHD) were measured with heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). To measure the two-dimensional profile, the probe beam energy has to be changed. However, this task is not easy, because the beam transport line of LHD-HIBP system is very long (∼20 m), and the required beam adjustment consumes much time. To reduce the probe beam energy adjustment time, an automatic beam adjustment system has been developed. Using this system, required time to change the probe beam energy is dramatically reduced, such that two-dimensional potential profiles were able to be successfully measured with HIBP by changing the probe beam energy shot to shot.

  15. Shubnikov-de Haas measurements of the 2-D electron gas in pseudomorphic In(0.1)Ga(0.9)As grown on GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szydlic, P. P.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Segall, B.; Henderson, T. S.

    1988-01-01

    Shubnikov-de Hass (SdH) measurements performed on a 200 A layer of pseudomorphic In(0.10)Ga(0.90)As grown by MBE on undoped GaAs with an overlayer of Al(0.15)Ga(0.85)As are presented. These measurements were performed in magnetic fields up to 1.4 tesla at T in the range of 1.4-10 K. It was found that only one subband was populated with a density of 5.8 x 10 to the 11/cm-squared and an effective mass at the Fermi level m(asterisk) = (0.060 + or - 0.001)m(0).

  16. Measurements of photoionization cross section of the 4p levels and oscillator strength of the 4p→nd 2D3/2,5/2 transitions of potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyar, M. A.; Yar, A.; Iqbal, J.; Ali, R.; Baig, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out measurements of absolute photoionization cross sections of the 4p excited levels and oscillator strengths of the 4p→nd Rydberg transitions in potassium using a two-step photo-excitation and ionization technique in conjunction with a thermionic diode ion detector. The measurements were conducted using the linearly polarized laser light and the absolute values of the cross sections from the 4p 2P3/2 and 2P1/2 excited levels have been determined at the ionization threshold as (6.3±0.9) Mb and (5.4±0.8) Mb respectively. In addition, photoionization cross sections have been determined at various ionizing wavelengths above the first ionization threshold to explore different energy regions of the continuum. The oscillator strengths for the 4p 2P1/2→nd 2D3/2 and 4p 2P3/2→nd 2D3/2,5/2 Rydberg transitions have been deduced by using the measured cross sections of the 4p 2P1/2 and 2P3/2 levels at the ionization threshold. The new results are in good agreement with the available theoretical and experimental data.

  17. Quantitative planar and volumetric cardiac measurements using 64 MDCT and 3T MRI versus standard 2D and M-mode echocardiography: Does anesthetic protocol matter?

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Stepien, Rebecca L; Rio, Alejandro Munoz Del; Saunders, Jimmy H; François, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of the heart utilizing computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be superior for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and systolic function in humans compared to echocardiography. The purpose of this prospective study was to test the effects of two different anesthetic protocols on cardiac measurements in 10 healthy beagle dogs using 64-multidetector row computed tomographic angiography (64-MDCTA), 3T magnetic resonance (MRI) and standard awake echocardiography. Both anesthetic protocols used propofol for induction and isoflourane for anesthetic maintenance. In addition, protocol A used midazolam/fentanyl and protocol B used dexmedetomedine as premedication and constant rate infusion during the procedure. Significant elevations in systolic and mean blood pressure were present when using protocol B. There was overall good agreement between the variables of cardiac size and systolic function generated from the MDCTA and MRI exams and no significant difference was found when comparing the variables acquired using either anesthetic protocol within each modality. Systolic function variables generated using 64-MDCTA and 3T MRI were only able to predict the left ventricular end diastolic volume as measured during awake echocardiogram when using protocol B and 64-MDCTA. For all other systolic function variables, prediction of awake echocardiographic results was not possible (P = 1). Planar variables acquired using MDCTA or MRI did not allow prediction of the corresponding measurements generated using echocardiography in the awake patients (P=1). Future studies are needed to validate this approach in a more varied population and clinically affected dogs. PMID:26082285

  18. PIV, 2D-LIF and 1D-Raman measurements of flow field, composition and temperature in premixed gas turbine flames

    SciTech Connect

    Stopper, U.; Aigner, M.; Ax, H.; Meier, W.; Sadanandan, R.; Stoehr, M.; Bonaldo, A.

    2010-04-15

    Several laser diagnostic measurement techniques have been applied to study the lean premixed natural gas/air flames of an industrial swirl burner. This was made possible by equipping the burner with an optical combustion chamber that was installed in the high-pressure test rig facility at the DLR Institute of Combustion Technology in Stuttgart. The burner was operated with preheated air at various operating conditions with pressures up to p = 6 bar and a maximum thermal power of P = 1 MW. The instantaneous planar flow field inside the combustor was studied with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals on a single-shot basis was used to determine the shape and the location of the flame front as well as the spatial distribution of reaction products. 1D laser Raman spectroscopy was successfully applied for the measurement of the temperature and the concentration of major species under realistic gas turbine conditions. Results of the flow field analysis show the shape and the size of the main flow regimes: the inflow region, the inner and the outer recirculation zone. The highly turbulent flow field of the inner shear layer is found to be dominated by small and medium sized vortices. High RMS fluctuations of the flow velocity in the exhaust gas indicate the existence of a rotating exhaust gas swirl. From the PLIF images it is seen that the primary reactions happened in the shear layers between inflow and the recirculation zones and that the appearance of the reaction zones changed with flame parameters. The results of the multiscalar Raman measurements show a strong variation of the local mixture fraction allowing conclusions to be drawn about the premix quality. Furthermore, mixing effects of unburnt fuel and air with fully reacted combustion products are studied giving insights into the processes of the turbulence-chemistry interaction. (author)

  19. QUANTITATIVE PLANAR AND VOLUMETRIC CARDIAC MEASUREMENTS USING 64 MDCT AND 3T MRI VS. STANDARD 2D AND M-MODE ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY: DOES ANESTHETIC PROTOCOL MATTER?

    PubMed

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Stepien, Rebecca L; Munoz Del Rio, Alejandro; Saunders, Jimmy H; François, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of the heart utilizing computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be superior for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and systolic function in humans compared to echocardiography. The purpose of this prospective study was to test the effects of two different anesthetic protocols on cardiac measurements in 10 healthy beagle dogs using 64-multidetector row computed tomographic angiography (64-MDCTA), 3T magnetic resonance (MRI) and standard awake echocardiography. Both anesthetic protocols used propofol for induction and isoflourane for anesthetic maintenance. In addition, protocol A used midazolam/fentanyl and protocol B used dexmedetomedine as premedication and constant rate infusion during the procedure. Significant elevations in systolic and mean blood pressure were present when using protocol B. There was overall good agreement between the variables of cardiac size and systolic function generated from the MDCTA and MRI exams and no significant difference was found when comparing the variables acquired using either anesthetic protocol within each modality. Systolic function variables generated using 64-MDCTA and 3T MRI were only able to predict the left ventricular end diastolic volume as measured during awake echocardiogram when using protocol B and 64-MDCTA. For all other systolic function variables, prediction of awake echocardiographic results was not possible (P = 1). Planar variables acquired using MDCTA or MRI did not allow prediction of the corresponding measurements generated using echocardiography in the awake patients (P = 1). Future studies are needed to validate this approach in a more varied population and clinically affected dogs. PMID:26082285

  20. Temperature-dependent kinetic measurements and quasi-classical trajectory studies for the OH+ + H2/D2 → H2O+/HDO+ + H/D reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Oscar; Ard, Shaun G.; Li, Anyang; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2015-09-01

    We have measured the temperature-dependent kinetics for the reactions of OH+ with H2 and D2 using a selected ion flow tube apparatus. Reaction occurs via atom abstraction to result in H2O+/HDO+ + H/D. Room temperature rate coefficients are in agreement with prior measurements and resulting temperature dependences are T0.11 for the hydrogen and T0.25 for the deuterated reactions. This work is prompted in part by recent theoretical work that mapped a full-dimensional global potential energy surface of H3O+ for the OH+ + H2 → H + H2O+ reaction [A. Li and H. Guo, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11168 (2014)], and reported results of quasi-classical trajectory calculations, which are extended to a wider temperature range and initial rotational state specification here. Our experimental results are in excellent agreement with these calculations which accurately predict the isotope effect in addition to an enhancement of the reaction rate constant due to the molecular rotation of OH+. The title reaction is of high importance to astrophysical models, and the temperature dependence of the rate coefficients determined here should now allow for better understanding of this reaction at temperatures more relevant to the interstellar medium.

  1. 2-D time evolution of T/sub e/ during sawtooth crash based on fast ECE (electron cyclotron emission) measurements on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo-Petravic, G.

    1988-12-01

    Electron cyclotron emission measurements taken at 20 locations in the horizontal midplane during a sawtooth crash have been analysed based on the assumption of fast rigid rotation of the plasma. Due to this fast rotation (approx.100..mu..sec), which remains fairly constant throughout the sawtooth crash, we have been able to make time-to-space reconstructions of half the poloidal plane using points which are separated in time by not more than 40..mu..sec. The existence of a temperature flattening in the precursor phase, which we interpret as an m = 1 temperature island, is clearly demonstrated, and its location and width agree well with local emissivity measurements from soft x-ray tomography viewing the same poloidal plane. The rotating temperature island in the precursor phase, the outward movement of the region of high T/sub c/ during the crash phase, and the shape of T/sub e/ during the crash phase, and the shape of T/sub e/ distribution after the crash during the successor phase have all been documented in a time sequence of color contours. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Small-angle shubnikov-de haas measurements in a 2D electron system: the effect of a strong In-plane magnetic field

    PubMed

    Vitkalov; Zheng; Mertes; Sarachik; Klapwijk

    2000-09-01

    Measurements in magnetic fields applied at small angles relative to the electron plane in silicon MOSFETs indicate a factor of 2 increase of the frequency of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at H>H(sat). This signals the onset of full spin polarization above H(sat), the parallel field above which the resistivity saturates to a constant value. For H

  3. 2-D Interferometric Measurements of Electron Density in an Air Breakdown Plasma Using a 124.5 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, S. C.; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    A 1 MW, 124.5 GHz gyrotron was used to produce a linearly polarized, quasioptical beam in 2.2 μs pulses. The beam was focused to a 2.6 mm spot size, producing a peak electric field of 70 kV/cm, after transmission losses. This electric field is great enough to produce a breakdown plasma in air at pressures ranging from a few Torr up to atmospheric pressure. The resulting breakdown plasma spontaneously forms a two-dimensional array of filaments, oriented parallel to the polarization of the beam, that propagate toward the microwave source. A needlepoint initiator was placed at the focal point of the beam, creating highly reproducible plasma arrays. An intensified CCD, with a minimum exposure of 2 ns, was combined with a two-wavelength laser interferometer, operating at 532 and 635 nm, to make spatially and temporally resolved electron density measurements of the plasma array.

  4. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sodium Nightglow D2/D1 Ratio, and Future Prospects for Measuring the Mesopause [O]/[O2] Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, C. Y.; Plane, J. M. C.; Yuan, T.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanism for sodium nightglow was proposed by Chapman in 1939, in which the emitting sodium atoms in the Na(2P) state were produced by the reaction of NaO and O in the mesopause region. Laboratory experiments in the early 1990s have shown that the NaO produced by the reaction Na + O3 are in the low-lying NaO(A2S+) excited electronic state, rather than the NaO(X2P) ground state, suggesting that the intensity ratio RD between the D2 line and the D1 line should be 2.0, in accord with their statistical spin-orbit weights. However, observed high resolution airglow spectra during the past decade clearly showed, surprisingly, that RD is quite variable. This led Slanger et al. (2005) to propose a modified Champman model, based on the fact that the ground state, NaO(X2P), resulting from quenching of NaO(A2S+) by atmospheric O2, provides a competitive pathway for the production of Na(2P). The paper also published a laboratory measured relationship between RD and [O]/[O2]. Harrell et al. (2010) then noted that the Na(2P) atoms produced from NaO(A2S+) and NaO(X2P) will have different kinetic energies and hence emission linewidths, so that the D line ratio arising from each state, RA and RX respectively, should be separately measurable. They developed a Faraday-filter-based sodium spectrometer which in addition to RD measures RA and RX: values of RA = 2.22 ± 0.72 and RX = 1.44 ± 0.48 were reported from 5 nights of data. They also showed that the ratio R2 (the ratio of the D2 emission intensity from NaO(A2S+) to that from NaO(X2P)), and similarly R1 for the D1 emission ratio, are directly proportional to [O]/[O2]. Plane et al. (2012) then showed by considering correlation of the electronic potential energy surfaces connecting the reactants NaO(A2S+)+O and NaO(X2P) +O with the products Na+O2 through the NaO2 intermediate that the theoretical values of RA and RX should be 2.0 and 1.5, respectively, in good agreement with the observations. In this paper, we will provide a

  5. A supervised texton based approach for automatic segmentation and measurement of the fetal head and femur in 2D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Ye, Xujiong; Lambrou, Tryphon; Duan, Wenting; Allinson, Nigel; Dudley, Nicholas J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a supervised texton based approach for the accurate segmentation and measurement of ultrasound fetal head (BPD, OFD, HC) and femur (FL). The method consists of several steps. First, a non-linear diffusion technique is utilized to reduce the speckle noise. Then, based on the assumption that cross sectional intensity profiles of skull and femur can be approximated by Gaussian-like curves, a multi-scale and multi-orientation filter bank is designed to extract texton features specific to ultrasound fetal anatomic structure. The extracted texton cues, together with multi-scale local brightness, are then built into a unified framework for boundary detection of ultrasound fetal head and femur. Finally, for fetal head, a direct least square ellipse fitting method is used to construct a closed head contour, whilst, for fetal femur a closed contour is produced by connecting the detected femur boundaries. The presented method is demonstrated to be promising for clinical applications. Overall the evaluation results of fetal head segmentation and measurement from our method are comparable with the inter-observer difference of experts, with the best average precision of 96.85%, the maximum symmetric contour distance (MSD) of 1.46 mm, average symmetric contour distance (ASD) of 0.53 mm while for fetal femur, the overall performance of our method is better than the inter-observer difference of experts, with the average precision of 84.37%, MSD of 2.72 mm and ASD of 0.31 mm.

  6. A supervised texton based approach for automatic segmentation and measurement of the fetal head and femur in 2D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Ye, Xujiong; Lambrou, Tryphon; Duan, Wenting; Allinson, Nigel; Dudley, Nicholas J

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a supervised texton based approach for the accurate segmentation and measurement of ultrasound fetal head (BPD, OFD, HC) and femur (FL). The method consists of several steps. First, a non-linear diffusion technique is utilized to reduce the speckle noise. Then, based on the assumption that cross sectional intensity profiles of skull and femur can be approximated by Gaussian-like curves, a multi-scale and multi-orientation filter bank is designed to extract texton features specific to ultrasound fetal anatomic structure. The extracted texton cues, together with multi-scale local brightness, are then built into a unified framework for boundary detection of ultrasound fetal head and femur. Finally, for fetal head, a direct least square ellipse fitting method is used to construct a closed head contour, whilst, for fetal femur a closed contour is produced by connecting the detected femur boundaries. The presented method is demonstrated to be promising for clinical applications. Overall the evaluation results of fetal head segmentation and measurement from our method are comparable with the inter-observer difference of experts, with the best average precision of 96.85%, the maximum symmetric contour distance (MSD) of 1.46 mm, average symmetric contour distance (ASD) of 0.53 mm; while for fetal femur, the overall performance of our method is better than the inter-observer difference of experts, with the average precision of 84.37%, MSD of 2.72 mm and ASD of 0.31 mm. PMID:26758386

  7. A dosimetric study of a heterogeneous phantom for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy comparing Monte Carlo and pencil beam calculations to dose distributions measured with a 2-D diode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curley, Casey Michael

    Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) calculations are compared to their measured planar dose distributions using a 2-D diode array for lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). The planar dose distributions were studied for two different phantom types: an in-house heterogeneous phantom and a homogeneous phantom. The motivation is to mimic the human anatomy during a lung SBRT treatment and incorporate heterogeneities into the pre-treatment Quality Assurance process, where measured and calculated planar dose distributions are compared before the radiation treatment. Individual and combined field dosimetry has been performed for both fixed gantry angle (anterior to posterior) and planned gantry angle delivery. A gamma analysis has been performed for all beam arrangements. The measurements were obtained using the 2-D diode array MapCHECK 2(TM). MC and PB calculations were performed using the BrainLAB iPlan RTRTM Dose software. The results suggest that with the heterogeneous phantom as a quality assurance device, the MC calculations result in closer agreements to the measured values, when using the planned gantry angle delivery method for composite beams. For the homogeneous phantom, the results suggest that the preferred delivery method is at the fixed anterior to posterior gantry angle. Furthermore, the MC and PB calculations do not show significant differences for dose difference and distance to agreement criteria 3%/3mm. However, PB calculations are in better agreement with the measured values for more stringent gamma criteria when considering individual beam whereas MC agreements are closer for composite beam measurements.

  8. Stacking up 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Louise

    2016-05-01

    Graphene might be the most famous example, but there are other 2D materials and compounds too. Louise Mayor explains how these atomically thin sheets can be layered together to create flexible “van der Waals heterostructures”, which could lead to a range of novel applications.

  9. Design procedures for Strain Hardening Cement Composites (SHCC) and measurement of their shear properties by mechanical and 2-D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswani, Karan

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the behaviour and applications of strain hardening cement composites (SHCC). Application of SHCC for use in slabs of common configurations was studied and design procedures are prepared by employing yield line theory and integrating it with simplified tri-linear model developed in Arizona State University by Dr. Barzin Mobasher and Dr. Chote Soranakom. Intrinsic material property of moment-curvature response for SHCC was used to derive the relationship between applied load and deflection in a two-step process involving the limit state analysis and kinematically admissible displacements. For application of SHCC in structures such as shear walls, tensile and shear properties are necessary for design. Lot of research has already been done to study the tensile properties and therefore shear property study was undertaken to prepare a design guide. Shear response of textile reinforced concrete was investigated based on picture frame shear test method. The effects of orientation, volume of cement paste per layer, planar cross-section and volume fraction of textiles were investigated. Pultrusion was used for the production of textile reinforced concrete. It is an automated set-up with low equipment cost which provides uniform production and smooth final surface of the TRC. A 3-D optical non-contacting deformation measurement technique of digital image correlation (DIC) was used to conduct the image analysis on the shear samples by means of tracking the displacement field through comparison between the reference image and deformed images. DIC successfully obtained full-field strain distribution, displacement and strain versus time responses, demonstrated the bonding mechanism from perspective of strain field, and gave a relation between shear angle and shear strain.

  10. MOSS2D V1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  11. Nanoimprint lithography: 2D or not 2D? A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is more than a planar high-end technology for the patterning of wafer-like substrates. It is essentially a 3D process, because it replicates various stamp topographies by 3D displacement of material and takes advantage of the bending of stamps while the mold cavities are filled. But at the same time, it keeps all assets of a 2D technique being able to pattern thin masking layers like in photon- and electron-based traditional lithography. This review reports about 20 years of development of replication techniques at Paul Scherrer Institut, with a focus on 3D aspects of molding, which enable NIL to stay 2D, but at the same time enable 3D applications which are "more than Moore." As an example, the manufacturing of a demonstrator for backlighting applications based on thermally activated selective topography equilibration will be presented. This technique allows generating almost arbitrary sloped, convex and concave profiles in the same polymer film with dimensions in micro- and nanometer scale.

  12. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  13. From weakly to strongly interacting 2D Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, Paul; Fenech, Kristian; Lingham, Marcus; Peppler, Tyson; Hoinka, Sascha; Vale, Chris

    2014-05-01

    We study ultracold 2D Fermi gases of 6Li formed in a highly oblate trapping potential. The potential is generated by a cylindrically focused, blue detuned TEM01 mode laser beam. Weak magnetic field curvature provides highly harmonic confinement in the radial direction and we can readily produce single clouds with an aspect ratio of 230. Our experiments investigate the dimensional crossover from 3D to 2D for a two component Fermi gas in the Bose-Einstein Condensate to Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer crossover. Observation of an elbow in measurements of the cloud width vs. atom number is consistent with populating only the lowest transverse harmonic oscillator state for weak attractive interactions. This measurement is extended to the strongly interacting region using the broad Feshbach resonance at 832 G. We also report our progress towards measurement of the 2D equation of state for an interacting 2D Fermi gas via in-situ absorption imaging.

  14. Photocurrent spectroscopy of 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobden, David

    Confocal photocurrent measurements provide a powerful means of studying many aspects of the optoelectronic and electrical properties of a 2D device or material. At a diffraction-limited point they can provide a detailed absorption spectrum, and they can probe local symmetry, ultrafast relaxation rates and processes, electron-electron interaction strengths, and transport coefficients. We illustrate this with several examples, once being the photo-Nernst effect. In gapless 2D materials, such as graphene, in a perpendicular magnetic field a photocurrent antisymmetric in the field is generated near to the free edges, with opposite sign at opposite edges. Its origin is the transverse thermoelectric current associated with the laser-induced electron temperature gradient. This effect provides an unambiguous demonstration of the Shockley-Ramo nature of long-range photocurrent generation in gapless materials. It also provides a means of investigating quasiparticle properties. For example, in the case of graphene on hBN, it can be used to probe the Lifshitz transition that occurs due to the minibands formed by the Moire superlattice. We also observe and discuss photocurrent generated in other semimetallic (WTe2) and semiconducting (WSe2) monolayers. Work supported by DoE BES and NSF EFRI grants.

  15. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  16. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  17. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  18. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  19. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    be noted that clinical 2D versus 3D datasets may have additional differences—for example, if 2D measurements are made with a different dosimeter than 3D measurements. Factors such as inherent dosimeter differences may be an important additional consideration to the extra dimension of available data that was evaluated in this study.

  20. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevector aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of inertial ranged magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between perpendicular and parallel reduced power spectra which is expected for the 2D component but not for the slab component. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant (approximately 85 percent by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  1. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1996-07-20

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevectors aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of mid-inertial range magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between reduced magnetic power spectra in the two different directions perpendicular to the mean field. Such a difference is expected for 2D geometry but not for slab geometry. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant ({approx}85% by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  2. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  3. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  4. Simultaneous 2D Strain Sensing Using Polymer Planar Bragg Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Manuel; Eisenbeil, Waltraud; Schmauss, Bernhard; Hellmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of polymer planar Bragg gratings for multi-axial strain sensing and particularly highlight simultaneous 2D strain measurement. A polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG) fabricated with a single writing step in bulk polymethylmethacrylate is used for measuring both tensile and compressive strain at various angles. It is shown that the sensitivity of the PPBG strongly depends on the angle between the optical waveguide into which the grating is inscribed and the direction along which the mechanical load is applied. Additionally, a 2D PPBG fabricated by writing two Bragg gratings angularly displaced from each other into a single polymer platelet is bonded to a stainless steel plate. The two reflected wavelengths exhibit different sensitivities while tested toward tensile and compressive strain. These characteristics make 2D PPBG suitable for measuring multi-axial tensile and compressive strain. PMID:25686313

  5. Simultaneous 2D strain sensing using polymer planar Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Manuel; Eisenbeil, Waltraud; Schmauss, Bernhard; Hellmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of polymer planar Bragg gratings for multi-axial strain sensing and particularly highlight simultaneous 2D strain measurement. A polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG) fabricated with a single writing step in bulk polymethylmethacrylate is used for measuring both tensile and compressive strain at various angles. It is shown that the sensitivity of the PPBG strongly depends on the angle between the optical waveguide into which the grating is inscribed and the direction along which the mechanical load is applied. Additionally, a 2D PPBG fabricated by writing two Bragg gratings angularly displaced from each other into a single polymer platelet is bonded to a stainless steel plate. The two reflected wavelengths exhibit different sensitivities while tested toward tensile and compressive strain. These characteristics make 2D PPBG suitable for measuring multi-axial tensile and compressive strain. PMID:25686313

  6. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  7. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  8. Observing the Great Plains Low-Level Jet Using the Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS): A Comparison with Boundary Layer Profiler Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, P. S.; Basu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Wind resources derived from the nocturnal low-level jet of the Great Plains of the United States are a driving factor in the proliferation of wind energy facilities across the region. Accurate diagnosis and forecasting of the low-level jet is important to not only assess the wind resource but to estimate the potential for shear-induced stress generation on turbine rotors. This study will examine the utility of Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS) observations in diagnosing low-level jet events across the Texas Panhandle. ACARS observations from Lubbock International Airport (KLBB) will be compared to observations from a 915 MHZ Doppler radar vertical boundary-layer profiler with 60m vertical resolution located at the field experiment site of Texas Tech University. The ability of ACARS data to adequately observe low-level jet events during the spring and summer of 2009 will be assessed and presented.

  9. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  10. 2D Radiative Processes Near Cloud Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, T.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the importance and complexity of dynamical, microphysical, and radiative processes taking place near cloud edges, the transition zone between clouds and cloud free air has been the subject of intense research both in the ASR program and in the wider community. One challenge in this research is that the one-dimensional (1D) radiative models widely used in both remote sensing and dynamical simulations become less accurate near cloud edges: The large horizontal gradients in particle concentrations imply that accurate radiative calculations need to consider multi-dimensional radiative interactions among areas that have widely different optical properties. This study examines the way the importance of multidimensional shortwave radiative interactions changes as we approach cloud edges. For this, the study relies on radiative simulations performed for a multiyear dataset of clouds observed over the NSA, SGP, and TWP sites. This dataset is based on Microbase cloud profiles as well as wind measurements and ARM cloud classification products. The study analyzes the way the difference between 1D and 2D simulation results increases near cloud edges. It considers both monochromatic radiances and broadband radiative heating, and it also examines the influence of factors such as cloud type and height, and solar elevation. The results provide insights into the workings of radiative processes and may help better interpret radiance measurements and better estimate the radiative impacts of this critical region.

  11. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  12. Light field morphing using 2D features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Lin, Stephen; Lee, Seungyong; Guo, Baining; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2005-01-01

    We present a 2D feature-based technique for morphing 3D objects represented by light fields. Existing light field morphing methods require the user to specify corresponding 3D feature elements to guide morph computation. Since slight errors in 3D specification can lead to significant morphing artifacts, we propose a scheme based on 2D feature elements that is less sensitive to imprecise marking of features. First, 2D features are specified by the user in a number of key views in the source and target light fields. Then the two light fields are warped view by view as guided by the corresponding 2D features. Finally, the two warped light fields are blended together to yield the desired light field morph. Two key issues in light field morphing are feature specification and warping of light field rays. For feature specification, we introduce a user interface for delineating 2D features in key views of a light field, which are automatically interpolated to other views. For ray warping, we describe a 2D technique that accounts for visibility changes and present a comparison to the ideal morphing of light fields. Light field morphing based on 2D features makes it simple to incorporate previous image morphing techniques such as nonuniform blending, as well as to morph between an image and a light field. PMID:15631126

  13. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  14. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  15. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  16. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  17. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  18. Extended 2D generalized dilaton gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, R. O.

    2008-09-01

    We show that an anomaly-free description of matter in (1+1) dimensions requires a deformation of the 2D relativity principle, which introduces a non-trivial centre in the 2D Poincaré algebra. Then we work out the reduced phase space of the anomaly-free 2D relativistic particle, in order to show that it lives in a noncommutative 2D Minkowski space. Moreover, we build a Gaussian wave packet to show that a Planck length is well defined in two dimensions. In order to provide a gravitational interpretation for this noncommutativity, we propose to extend the usual 2D generalized dilaton gravity models by a specific Maxwell component, which guages the extra symmetry associated with the centre of the 2D Poincaré algebra. In addition, we show that this extension is a high energy correction to the unextended dilaton theories that can affect the topology of spacetime. Further, we couple a test particle to the general extended dilaton models with the purpose of showing that they predict a noncommutativity in curved spacetime, which is locally described by a Moyal star product in the low energy limit. We also conjecture a probable generalization of this result, which provides strong evidence that the noncommutativity is described by a certain star product which is not of the Moyal type at high energies. Finally, we prove that the extended dilaton theories can be formulated as Poisson Sigma models based on a nonlinear deformation of the extended Poincaré algebra.

  19. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    T. Munsat; E. Mazzucato; H. Park; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-07-08

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented.

  20. 2d-LCA - an alternative to x-wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2014-11-01

    The 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA) is an innovative sensor for two-dimensional velocity measurements in fluids. It uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon and SU-8 as a sensing element and is capable of performing mesurements with extremly high temporal resolutions up to 150 kHz. The size of the cantilever defines its spatial resolution, which is in the order of 150 μm only. Another big feature is a large angular range of 180° in total. The 2d-LCA has been developed as an alternative measurement method to x-wires with the motivation to create a sensor that can operate in areas where the use of hot-wire anemometry is difficult. These areas include measurements in liquids and in near-wall or particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high speed flows. Comparative measurements with the 2d-LCA and hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the new anemometer. The data of both measurement techniques were analyzed using the same stochastic methods including a spectral analysis as well as an inspection of increment statistics and structure functions. Furthermore, key parameters, such as mean values of both velocity components, angles of attack and the characteristic length scales were determined from both data sets. The analysis reveals a great agreement between both anemometers and thus confirms the new approach.

  1. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  2. Phosphorene: A New High-Mobility 2D Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Neal, Adam; Zhu, Zhen; Tomanek, David; Ye, Peide

    2014-03-01

    The rise of 2D crystals has opened various possibilities for future electrical and optical applications. MoS2 n-type transistors are showing great potential in ultra-scaled and low-power electronics. Here, we introduce phosphorene, a name we coined for 2D few-layer black phosphorus, a new 2D material with layered structure. We perform ab initio band structure calculations and show that the fundamental band gap depends sensitively on the number of layers. We observe transport behavior, which shows a mobility variation in the 2D plane. High on-current of 194 mA/mm, high hole mobility up to 286 cm2/V .s and on/off ratio up to 104 was achieved with phosphorene transistors at room temperature. Schottky barrier height at the metal/phosphorene interface was also measured as a function of temperature. We demonstrate a CMOS inverter with combination to MoS2 NMOS transistors, which shows great potential for semiconducting 2D crystals in future electronic, optoelectronic and flexible electronic devices.

  3. In situ spazialisation of flow laws in a fractured media with multi-parametric measurements (pressure, deformation, water conductivity) and 2d coupled hydro-mechanical (h.m) modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmoille, A.; Cappa, F.; Guglielmie, Y.

    2003-04-01

    decreasing. The simultaneous record of deformations in the drain and joint show us that joint deformation is effective after the drain opening. It is necessarily to have a sufficient water pressure in the drain to open the joint, thus the joint deformation is strongly dependent of the water pressure in the drain. When the pressure decreases in the drain, the stress stopped on the joint, and it happens a reduction of the joint aperture which induces a pressure fall less fast than the pressure fall in the drain. In the very low permeable area of the joint, it only happens a lightly decrease of pressure. In this investigation area, the joint opening is less important than in the low permeable area. During the pressure decrease in the drain, the joint closed, and the new affected permeability only permits water to slowly flow out of the joint. Then, we induce the second pressure increase when the pressure decrease in this area doesn’t finish. The reopening of the joint with the arrivals of water induces a new pressure increase which adds to the residual pressure, thus, it happens an accumulation of pressure in the joint. This observation shows us that the flow in the fractured media isn’t governed by the same parameters in a low permeable discontinuity or in a very permeable discontinuity. The conductivity measurements in the joint and in drain clearly highlight the channelling of a fracture plan. In this stratigraphic joint studied, the conductivity variations show the complexity of a joint surface. These variations of conductivity resulted of the water flow from one channel to another one induced by the pressure variations in the drain. The last stage of this research work consists of to analyse the hydro-mechanical (H.M) behaviour of the two studied discontinuities with the UDEC 2D numerical code. The procedures of modelling examine the coupled H.M effects of a jointed rock mass affected, in a first test, by an identical joint aperture in the network, and, in a second

  4. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  5. 2D-Crystal-Based Functional Inks.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bartolotta, Antonino; Coleman, Jonathan N; Backes, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    The possibility to produce and process graphene, related 2D crystals, and heterostructures in the liquid phase makes them promising materials for an ever-growing class of applications as composite materials, sensors, in flexible optoelectronics, and energy storage and conversion. In particular, the ability to formulate functional inks with on-demand rheological and morphological properties, i.e., lateral size and thickness of the dispersed 2D crystals, is a step forward toward the development of industrial-scale, reliable, inexpensive printing/coating processes, a boost for the full exploitation of such nanomaterials. Here, the exfoliation strategies of graphite and other layered crystals are reviewed, along with the advances in the sorting of lateral size and thickness of the exfoliated sheets together with the formulation of functional inks and the current development of printing/coating processes of interest for the realization of 2D-crystal-based devices. PMID:27273554

  6. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  7. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W.; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Tobias, B. J.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  8. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  9. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  10. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247