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Sample records for 2-d cellular networks

  1. Sigma-delta cellular neural network for 2D modulation.

    PubMed

    Aomori, Hisashi; Otake, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2008-01-01

    Although sigma-delta modulation is widely used for analog-to-digital (A/D) converters, sigma-delta concepts are only for 1D signals. Signal processing in the digital domain is extremely useful for 2D signals such as used in image processing, medical imaging, ultrasound imaging, and so on. The intricate task that provides true 2D sigma-delta modulation is feasible in the spatial domain sigma-delta modulation using the discrete-time cellular neural network (DT-CNN) with a C-template. In the proposed architecture, the A-template is used for a digital-to-analog converter (DAC), the C-template works as an integrator, and the nonlinear output function is used for the bilevel output. In addition, due to the cellular neural network (CNN) characteristics, each pixel of an image corresponds to a cell of a CNN, and each cell is connected spatially by the A-template. Therefore, the proposed system can be thought of as a very large-scale and super-parallel sigma-delta modulator. Moreover, the spatio-temporal dynamics is designed to obtain an optimal reconstruction signal. The experimental results show the excellent reconstruction performance and capabilities of the CNN as a sigma-delta modulator. PMID:18215502

  2. 2D-CELL: image processing software for extraction and analysis of 2-dimensional cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, F.; Telley, H.; Leibling, Th. M.; Mocellin, A.

    1992-01-01

    2D-CELL is a software package for the processing and analyzing of photographic images of cellular structures in a largely interactive way. Starting from a binary digitized image, the programs extract the line network (skeleton) of the structure and determine the graph representation that best models it. Provision is made for manually correcting defects such as incorrect node positions or dangling bonds. Then a suitable algorithm retrieves polygonal contours which define individual cells — local boundary curvatures are neglected for simplicity. Using elementary analytical geometry relations, a range of metric and topological parameters describing the population are then computed, organized into statistical distributions and graphically displayed.

  3. Dynamics of HIV infection on 2D cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyoussef, A.; HafidAllah, N. El; ElKenz, A.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Loulidi, M.

    2003-05-01

    We use a cellular automata approach to describe the interactions of the immune system with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We study the evolution of HIV infection, particularly in the clinical latency period. The results we have obtained show the existence of four different behaviours in the plane of death rate of virus-death rate of infected T cell. These regions meet at a critical point, where the virus density and the infected T cell density remain invariant during the evolution of disease. We have introduced two kinds of treatments, the protease inhibitors and the RT inhibitors, in order to study their effects on the evolution of HIV infection. These treatments are powerful in decreasing the density of the virus in the blood and the delay of the AIDS onset.

  4. Renormalisation of 2D Cellular Automata with an Absorbing State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Iain S.; Prügel-Bennett, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We describe a real-space renormalisation scheme for non-equilibrium probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) models, and apply it to a two-dimensional binary PCA. An exact renormalisation scheme is rare, and therefore we provide a method for computing the stationary probability distribution of states for such models with which to weight the renormalisation, effectively minimising the error in the scale transformation. While a mean-field approximation is trivial, we use the principle of maximum entropy to incorporate nearest-neighbour spin-correlations in the steady-state probability distribution. In doing so we find the fixed point of the renormalisation is modified by the steady-state approximation order.

  5. The role of the cytoskeleton in cellular force generation in 2D and 3D environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Carey, Shawn P.; Califano, Joseph P.; Smith, Brooke N.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2011-02-01

    To adhere and migrate, cells generate forces through the cytoskeleton that are transmitted to the surrounding matrix. While cellular force generation has been studied on 2D substrates, less is known about cytoskeletal-mediated traction forces of cells embedded in more in vivo-like 3D matrices. Recent studies have revealed important differences between the cytoskeletal structure, adhesion, and migration of cells in 2D and 3D. Because the cytoskeleton mediates force, we sought to directly compare the role of the cytoskeleton in modulating cell force in 2D and 3D. MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with agents that perturbed actin, microtubules, or myosin, and analyzed for changes in cytoskeletal organization and force generation in both 2D and 3D. To quantify traction stresses in 2D, traction force microscopy was used; in 3D, force was assessed based on single cell-mediated collagen fibril reorganization imaged using confocal reflectance microscopy. Interestingly, even though previous studies have observed differences in cell behaviors like migration in 2D and 3D, our data indicate that forces generated on 2D substrates correlate with forces within 3D matrices. Disruption of actin, myosin or microtubules in either 2D or 3D microenvironments disrupts cell-generated force. These data suggest that despite differences in cytoskeletal organization in 2D and 3D, actin, microtubules and myosin contribute to contractility and matrix reorganization similarly in both microenvironments.

  6. Regional and cellular expression of CYP2D6 in human brain: higher levels in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Miksys, Sharon; Rao, Yushu; Hoffmann, Ewa; Mash, Deborah C; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2002-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 is expressed in liver, brain and other extrahepatic tissues where it metabolizes a range of centrally acting drugs and toxins. As ethanol can induce CYP2D in rat brain, we hypothesized that CYP2D6 expression is higher in brains of human alcoholics. We examined regional and cellular expression of CYP2D6 mRNA and protein by RT-PCR, Southern blotting, slot blotting, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. A significant correlation was found between mean mRNA and CYP2D6 protein levels across 13 brain regions. Higher expression was detected in 13 brain regions of alcoholics (n = 8) compared to nonalcoholics (n = 5) (anovap < 0.0001). In hippocampus this was localized in CA1-3 pyramidal cells and dentate gyrus granular neurons. In cerebellum this was localized in Purkinje cells and their dendrites. Both of these brain regions, and these same cell-types, are known to be susceptible to alcohol damage. For one case, a poor metabolizer (CYP2D6*4/*4), there was no detectable CYP2D6 protein, confirming the specificity of the antibody used. These data suggest that in alcoholics elevated brain CYP2D6 expression may contribute to altered sensitivity to centrally acting drugs and to the mediation of neurotoxic and behavioral effects of alcohol. PMID:12354285

  7. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  8. A new micromechanical approach of micropolar continuum modeling for 2-D periodic cellular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Bin; Yan, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new united approach to formulate the equivalent micropolar constitutive relation of two-dimensional (2-D) periodic cellular material to capture its non-local properties and to explain the size effects in its structural analysis. The new united approach takes both the displacement compatibility and the equilibrium of forces and moments into consideration, where Taylor series expansion of the displacement and rotation fields and the extended averaging procedure with an explicit enforcement of equilibrium are adopted in the micromechanical analysis of a unit cell. In numerical examples, the effective micropolar constants obtained in this paper and others derived in the literature are used for the equivalent micropolar continuum simulation of cellular solids. The solutions from the equivalent analysis are compared with the discrete simulation solutions of the cellular solids. It is found that the micropolar constants developed in this paper give satisfying results of equivalent analysis for the periodic cellular material.

  9. Duality Between Spin Networks and the 2D Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Costantino, Francesco; Livine, Etera R.

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to exhibit a deep relation between the partition function of the Ising model on a planar trivalent graph and the generating series of the spin network evaluations on the same graph. We provide respectively a fermionic and a bosonic Gaussian integral formulation for each of these functions and we show that they are the inverse of each other (up to some explicit constants) by exhibiting a supersymmetry relating the two formulations. We investigate three aspects and applications of this duality. First, we propose higher order supersymmetric theories that couple the geometry of the spin networks to the Ising model and for which supersymmetric localization still holds. Secondly, after interpreting the generating function of spin network evaluations as the projection of a coherent state of loop quantum gravity onto the flat connection state, we find the probability distribution induced by that coherent state on the edge spins and study its stationary phase approximation. It is found that the stationary points correspond to the critical values of the couplings of the 2D Ising model, at least for isoradial graphs. Third, we analyze the mapping of the correlations of the Ising model to spin network observables, and describe the phase transition on those observables on the hexagonal lattice. This opens the door to many new possibilities, especially for the study of the coarse-graining and continuum limit of spin networks in the context of quantum gravity.

  10. Predicting and Analyzing Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mona

    High-throughput experimental technologies, along with computational predictions, have resulted in large-scale biological networks for numerous organisms. Global analyses of biological networks provide new opportunities for revealing protein functions and pathways, and for uncovering cellular organization principles. In my talk, I will discuss a number of approaches we have developed over the years for the complementary problems of predicting interactions and analyzing interaction networks. First, I will describe a genomic approach for uncovering high-confidence regulatory interactions, and show how it can be effectively combined with a framework for predicting regulatory interactions for proteins with known structural domains but unknown binding specificity. Next, I will describe algorithms for analyzing protein interaction networks in order to uncover protein function and functional modules, and demonstrate the importance of considering the topological structure of interaction networks in order to make high quality predictions. Finally, I will present a framework for explicitly incorporating known attributes of individual proteins into the analysis of biological networks, and utilize it to discover recurring network patterns underlying a range of biological processes.

  11. Micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Cibula, Matthew; Feng, Jingchen; Krnacik, Emma A.; McIntyre, David H.; Levine, Herbert; Sun, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Collagen gels are widely used in experiments on cell mechanics because they mimic the extracellular matrix in physiological conditions. Collagen gels are often characterized by their bulk rheology; however, variations in the collagen fiber microstructure and cell adhesion forces cause the mechanical properties to be inhomogeneous at the cellular scale. We study the mechanics of type I collagen on the scale of tens to hundreds of microns by using holographic optical tweezers to apply pN forces to microparticles embedded in the collagen fiber network. We find that in response to optical forces, particle displacements are inhomogeneous, anisotropic, and asymmetric. Gels prepared at 21 °C and 37 °C show qualitative difference in their micromechanical characteristics. We also demonstrate that contracting cells remodel the micromechanics of their surrounding extracellular matrix in a strain- and distance-dependent manner. To further understand the micromechanics of cellularized extracellular matrix, we have constructed a computational model which reproduces the main experiment findings. PMID:26324923

  12. 2D photonic crystal complete band gap search using a cyclic cellular automaton refination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, R.; Castañón, G.; Hernández-Figueroa, H. E.

    2014-11-01

    We present a refination method based on a cyclic cellular automaton (CCA) that simulates a crystallization-like process, aided with a heuristic evolutionary method called differential evolution (DE) used to perform an ordered search of full photonic band gaps (FPBGs) in a 2D photonic crystal (PC). The solution is proposed as a combinatorial optimization of the elements in a binary array. These elements represent the existence or absence of a dielectric material surrounded by air, thus representing a general geometry whose search space is defined by the number of elements in such array. A block-iterative frequency-domain method was used to compute the FPBGs on a PC, when present. DE has proved to be useful in combinatorial problems and we also present an implementation feature that takes advantage of the periodic nature of PCs to enhance the convergence of this algorithm. Finally, we used this methodology to find a PC structure with a 19% bandgap-to-midgap ratio without requiring previous information of suboptimal configurations and we made a statistical study of how it is affected by disorder in the borders of the structure compared with a previous work that uses a genetic algorithm.

  13. 2D Carbon Nanotube Network: A New material for Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, George

    2006-03-01

    This talk will focus on the electronic properties of two dimensional carbon nanotube networks, and on their application potential. Percolation issues, together with the frequency, and temperature dependent activity will be discussed. The network can be tuned from having semiconducting to metallic like behavior, and doping with electron withdrawing and donating species leads to networks with tailor-made electronic properties. The network is also highly transparent in the visible spectral range, this attribute -- together with simple room temperature fab processes -- opens up application opportunities in the area of electronics, opto-electronics, photovoltaics and sensors. Recent results on solar cells, OLEDs and smart windows will be reviewed. Field effect transistors that incorporate nanotube network conducting channels, together with complex functional devices that incorporate networks and functional molecules will also be discussed. Finally a comparison will be made with conventional and emerging materials that compete area of disposable, flexible and printable electronics.

  14. 2D pattern evolution constrained by complex network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Rocha, L. E. C.; Costa, L. da F.

    2007-03-01

    Complex networks have established themselves in recent years as being particularly suitable and flexible for representing and modelling several complex natural and artificial systems. In the same time in which the structural intricacies of such networks are being revealed and understood, efforts have also been directed at investigating how such connectivity properties define and constrain the dynamics of systems unfolding on such structures. However, less attention has been focused on hybrid systems, i.e. involving more than one type of network and/or dynamics. Several real systems present such an organization, e.g. the dynamics of a disease coexisting with the dynamics of the immune system. The current paper investigates a specific system involving diffusive (linear and nonlinear) dynamics taking place in a regular network while interacting with a complex network of defensive agents following Erdös Rényi (ER) and Barabási Albert (BA) graph models with moveable nodes. More specifically, the complex network is expected to control, and if possible, to extinguish the diffusion of some given unwanted process (e.g. fire, oil spilling, pest dissemination, and virus or bacteria reproduction during an infection). Two types of pattern evolution are considered: Fick and Gray Scott. The nodes of the defensive network then interact with the diffusing patterns and communicate between themselves in order to control the diffusion. The main findings include the identification of higher efficiency for the BA control networks and the presence of relapses in the case of the ER model.

  15. Aging cellular networks: chaperones as major participants.

    PubMed

    Soti, C; Csermely, P

    2007-01-01

    We increasingly rely on the network approach to understand the complexity of cellular functions. Chaperones (heat shock proteins) are key "networkers", which sequester and repair damaged proteins. In order to link the network approach and chaperones with the aging process, we first summarize the properties of aging networks suggesting a "weak link theory of aging". This theory suggests that age-related random damage primarily affects the overwhelming majority of the low affinity, transient interactions (weak links) in cellular networks leading to increased noise, destabilization and diversity. These processes may be further amplified by age-specific network remodelling and by the sequestration of weakly linked cellular proteins to protein aggregates of aging cells. Chaperones are weakly linked hubs (i.e., network elements with a large number of connections) and inter-modular bridge elements of protein-protein interaction, signalling and mitochondrial networks. As aging proceeds, the increased overload of damaged proteins is an especially important element contributing to cellular disintegration and destabilization. Additionally, chaperone overload may contribute to the increase of "noise" in aging cells, which leads to an increased stochastic resonance resulting in a deficient discrimination between signals and noise. Chaperone- and other multi-target therapies, which restore the missing weak links in aging cellular networks, may emerge as important anti-aging interventions. PMID:16814508

  16. Ring Correlations in Two-Dimensional (2D) Random Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Mahdi; Thorpe, M. F.

    Amorphous materials can be characterized by their ring structure. Recently, two experimental groups imaged bilayers of vitreous silica at atomic resolution which provides a direct access to the ring structure of a 2D glass. It has been shown that experimental samples have various ring statistics, obey Aboav-Weaire law and have a distinct area law. In this work, we study correlations between rings as a function of their size and topological separation. We show that correlation is medium-range and vanishes when the separation is about three rings apart. We also present a generalization of the Aboav-Weaire law.

  17. Structure of a randomly grown 2-d network.

    PubMed

    Ajazi, Fioralba; Napolitano, George M; Turova, Tatyana; Zaurbek, Izbassar

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a growing random network on a plane as a model of a growing neuronal network. The properties of the structure of the induced graph are derived. We compare our results with available data. In particular, it is shown that depending on the parameters of the model the system undergoes in time different phases of the structure. We conclude with a possible explanation of some empirical data on the connections between neurons. PMID:26375356

  18. Magnetic anisotropy of metal functionalized phthalocyanine 2D networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guojun; Zhang, Yun; Xiao, Huaping; Cao, Juexian

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic anisotropy of metal including Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, W, Re, Os, Ir atoms functionalized phthalocyanine networks have been investigated with first-principles calculations. The magnetic moments can be expressed as 8-n μB with n the electronic number of outmost d shell in the transition metals. The huge magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) is obtained by torque method. Especially, the MAE of Re functionalized phthalocyanine network is about 20 meV with an easy axis perpendicular to the plane of phthalocyanine network. The MAE is further manipulated by applying the external biaxial strain. It is found that the MAE is linear increasing with the external strain in the range of -2% to 2%. Our results indicate an effective approach to modulate the MAE for practical application.

  19. Active transport and cluster formation on 2D networks.

    PubMed

    Greulich, P; Santen, L

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a model for active transport on inhomogeneous networks embedded in a diffusive environment which is motivated by vesicular transport on actin filaments. In the presence of a hard-core interaction, particle clusters are observed that exhibit an algebraically decaying distribution in a large parameter regime, indicating the existence of clusters on all scales. The scale-free behavior can be understood by a mechanism promoting preferential attachment of particles to large clusters. The results are compared with a diffusion-limited aggregation model and active transport on a regular network. For both models we observe aggregation of particles to clusters which are characterized by a finite size scale if the relevant time scales and particle densities are considered. PMID:20556462

  20. Stability of Stochastic Neutral Cellular Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ling; Zhao, Hongyong

    In this paper, we study a class of stochastic neutral cellular neural networks. By constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional and employing the nonnegative semi-martingale convergence theorem we give some sufficient conditions ensuring the almost sure exponential stability of the networks. The results obtained are helpful to design stability of networks when stochastic noise is taken into consideration. Finally, two examples are provided to show the correctness of our analysis.

  1. 2D MIMO Network Coding with Inter-Route Interference Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Gia Khanh; Sakaguchi, Kei; Ono, Fumie; Araki, Kiyomichi

    Infrastructure wireless mesh network has been attracting much attention due to the wide range of its application such as public wireless access, sensor network, etc. In recent years, researchers have shown that significant network throughput gain can be achieved by employing network coding in a wireless environment. For further improvement of network throughput in one dimensional (1D) topology, Ono et al. proposed to use multiple antenna technique combined with network coding. In this paper, being inspired by MIMO network coding in 1D topology, the authors establish a novel MIMO network coding algorithm for a 2D topology consisting of two crossing routes. In this algorithm, multiple network coded flows are spatially multiplexed. Owing to the efficient usage of radio resource of network coding and co-channel interference cancellation ability of MIMO, the proposed algorithm shows an 8-fold gain in network capacity compared to conventional methods in the best-case scenario.

  2. Inferring cellular networks – a review

    PubMed Central

    Markowetz, Florian; Spang, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    In this review we give an overview of computational and statistical methods to reconstruct cellular networks. Although this area of research is vast and fast developing, we show that most currently used methods can be organized by a few key concepts. The first part of the review deals with conditional independence models including Gaussian graphical models and Bayesian networks. The second part discusses probabilistic and graph-based methods for data from experimental interventions and perturbations. PMID:17903286

  3. Optimal design of 2D digital filters based on neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-hua; He, Yi-gang; Zheng, Zhe-zhao; Zhang, Xu-hong

    2005-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) digital filters are widely useful in image processing and other 2-D digital signal processing fields,but designing 2-D filters is much more difficult than designing one-dimensional (1-D) ones.In this paper, a new design approach for designing linear-phase 2-D digital filters is described,which is based on a new neural networks algorithm (NNA).By using the symmetry of the given 2-D magnitude specification,a compact express for the magnitude response of a linear-phase 2-D finite impulse response (FIR) filter is derived.Consequently,the optimal problem of designing linear-phase 2-D FIR digital filters is turned to approximate the desired 2-D magnitude response by using the compact express.To solve the problem,a new NNA is presented based on minimizing the mean-squared error,and the convergence theorem is presented and proved to ensure the designed 2-D filter stable.Three design examples are also given to illustrate the effectiveness of the NNA-based design approach.

  4. 2D spatially controlled polymer micro patterning for cellular behavior studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, V.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Paraico, I.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A.; Dinescu, M.

    2011-04-01

    A simple and effective method to functionalize glass surfaces that enable polymer micropatterning and subsequent spatially controlled adhesion of cells is reported in this paper. The method involves the application of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) to achieve polymer patterning in a single step onto cell repellent substrates (i.e. polyethyleneglycol (PEG)). This approach was used to produce micron-size polyethyleneimine (PEI)-patterns alternating with cell-repellent areas. The focus of this work is the ability of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells to orient, migrate, and produce organized cellular arrangements on laser generated PEI patterns.

  5. Intracellular ROS mediates gas plasma-facilitated cellular transfection in 2D and 3D cultures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dehui; Wang, Biqing; Xu, Yujing; Chen, Zeyu; Cui, Qinjie; Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as a versatile tool for delivering oligonucleotides into mammalian cells. Compared to lipofection and electroporation methods, plasma transfection showed a better uptake efficiency and less cell death in the transfection of oligonucleotides. We demonstrated that the level of extracellular aqueous reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gas plasma is correlated with the uptake efficiency and that this is achieved through an increase of intracellular ROS levels and the resulting increase in cell membrane permeability. This finding was supported by the use of ROS scavengers, which reduced CAP-based uptake efficiency. In addition, we found that cold atmospheric plasma could transfer oligonucleotides such as siRNA and miRNA into cells even in 3D cultures, thus suggesting the potential for unique applications of CAP beyond those provided by standard transfection techniques. Together, our results suggest that cold plasma might provide an efficient technique for the delivery of siRNA and miRNA in 2D and 3D culture models. PMID:27296089

  6. Intracellular ROS mediates gas plasma-facilitated cellular transfection in 2D and 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Wang, Biqing; Xu, Yujing; Chen, Zeyu; Cui, Qinjie; Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as a versatile tool for delivering oligonucleotides into mammalian cells. Compared to lipofection and electroporation methods, plasma transfection showed a better uptake efficiency and less cell death in the transfection of oligonucleotides. We demonstrated that the level of extracellular aqueous reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gas plasma is correlated with the uptake efficiency and that this is achieved through an increase of intracellular ROS levels and the resulting increase in cell membrane permeability. This finding was supported by the use of ROS scavengers, which reduced CAP-based uptake efficiency. In addition, we found that cold atmospheric plasma could transfer oligonucleotides such as siRNA and miRNA into cells even in 3D cultures, thus suggesting the potential for unique applications of CAP beyond those provided by standard transfection techniques. Together, our results suggest that cold plasma might provide an efficient technique for the delivery of siRNA and miRNA in 2D and 3D culture models. PMID:27296089

  7. Automatic angle measurement of a 2D object using optical correlator-neural networks hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, N.; Neil, M. A. A.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper a novel method is proposed and demonstrated for automatic rotation angle measurement of a 2D object using a hybrid architecture, consisting of a 4f optical correlator with a binary phase only multiplexed matched filter and a single layer neural network. The hybrid set-up can be considered as a two-layer perceptron-like neural network; an optical correlator is the first layer and the standard single layer neural network is the second layer. The training scheme used to train the hybrid architecture is a combination of a Direct Binary Search algorithm, to train the optical correlator, and an Error Back Propagation algorithm, to train the neural network. The aim is to perform the major information processing by the optical correlator with a small additional processing by the neural network stage. This allows the system to be used for real-time applications as optics has the inherent ability to process information in a parallel manner at high speed. The neural network stage gives an extra dimension of freedom so that complicated tasks like automatic rotation angle measurement can be achieved. Results of both computer simulation and experimental set-up are presented for rotation angle measurement of an English alphabetic character as a 2D object. The experimental set-up consists of a real optical correlator using two spatial light modulators for both input and frequency plane representations and a PC based model of a single layer network.

  8. Heterogeneous Force Chains in Cellularized Biopolymer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    Biopolymer Networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the mechanical response of a model biopolymer network due to the active contraction of embedded cells. Specifically, a graph (bond-node) model derived from confocal microscopy data is used to represent the network microstructure, and cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes, representing the focal adhesion sites. A force-based stochastic relaxation method is employed to obtain force-balanced network under cell contraction. We find that the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emerged from the contracting cells. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to the reorientation induced by cell contraction. Large fluctuations of the forces along different force chains are observed. Importantly, the decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure could support long-range mechanical signaling between cells.

  9. Cellular automata modelling of biomolecular networks dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bonchev, D; Thomas, S; Apte, A; Kier, L B

    2010-01-01

    The modelling of biological systems dynamics is traditionally performed by ordinary differential equations (ODEs). When dealing with intracellular networks of genes, proteins and metabolites, however, this approach is hindered by network complexity and the lack of experimental kinetic parameters. This opened the field for other modelling techniques, such as cellular automata (CA) and agent-based modelling (ABM). This article reviews this emerging field of studies on network dynamics in molecular biology. The basics of the CA technique are discussed along with an extensive list of related software and websites. The application of CA to networks of biochemical reactions is exemplified in detail by the case studies of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, the FAS-ligand (FASL)-induced and Bcl-2-related apoptosis. The potential of the CA method to model basic pathways patterns, to identify ways to control pathway dynamics and to help in generating strategies to fight with cancer is demonstrated. The different line of CA applications presented includes the search for the best-performing network motifs, an analysis of importance for effective intracellular signalling and pathway cross-talk. PMID:20373215

  10. Application of quantitative artificial neural network analysis to 2D NMR spectra of hydrocarbon mixtures.

    PubMed

    Väänänen, Taito; Koskela, Harri; Hiltunen, Yrjö; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2002-01-01

    Understanding relationships between the structure and composition of molecular mixtures and their chemical properties is a main industrial aim. One central field of research is oil chemistry where the key question is how the molecular characteristics of composite hydrocarbon mixtures can be associated with the macroscopic properties of the oil products. Apparently these relationships are complex and often nonlinear and therefore call for advanced spectroscopic techniques. An informative and an increasingly used approach is two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. In the case of composite hydrocarbons the application of 2D NMR methodologies in a quantitative manner pose many technical difficulties, and, in any case, the resulting spectra contain many overlapping resonances that challenge the analytical work. Here, we present a general methodology, based on quantitative artificial neural network (ANN) analysis, to resolve overlapping information in 2D NMR spectra and to simultaneously assess the relative importance of multiple spectral variables on the sample properties. The results in a set of 2D NMR spectra of oil samples illustrate, first, that use of ANN analysis for quantitative purposes is feasible also in 2D and, second, that this methodology offers an intrinsic opportunity to assess the complex and nonlinear relationships between the molecular composition and sample properties. The presented ANN methodology is not limited to the analysis of NMR spectra but can also be applied in a manner similar to other (multidimensional) spectroscopic data. PMID:12444730

  11. Vehicular motion in 2D city traffic network with signals controlled by phase shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komada, Kazuhito; Kojima, Kengo; Nagatani, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    We study the dynamic behavior of vehicular traffic through the series of traffic lights controlled by phase shift in two-dimensional (2D) city traffic network. The nonlinear-map model is presented for the vehicular traffic. The city traffic network is made of one-way perpendicular streets arranged in a square lattice with traffic signals where vertical streets are oriented upwards and horizontal streets are oriented rightwards. There are two traffic lights for the movement to north or that to east at each crossing. The traffic lights are controlled by the cycle time, split, and phase shift. The vehicle moves through the series of signals on a path selected by the driver. The city traffic with a heterogeneous density distribution is also studied. The dependence of the arrival time on cycle time, split, phase shift, selected path, and density is clarified for 2D city traffic. It is shown that the vehicular traffic is efficiently controlled by the phase shift.

  12. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  13. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2007-06-01

    The availability of whole-cell-level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate the metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30 000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations has relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reactions are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  14. A Wireless Communications Laboratory on Cellular Network Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawy, Z.; Husseini, A.; Yaacoub, E.; Al-Kanj, L.

    2010-01-01

    The field of radio network planning and optimization (RNPO) is central for wireless cellular network design, deployment, and enhancement. Wireless cellular operators invest huge sums of capital on deploying, launching, and maintaining their networks in order to ensure competitive performance and high user satisfaction. This work presents a lab…

  15. From 2D to 3D: novel nanostructured scaffolds to investigate signalling in reconstructed neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Susanna; Rauti, Rossana; Laishram, Jummi; Turco, Antonio; Lonardoni, Davide; Nieus, Thierry; Prato, Maurizio; Scaini, Denis; Ballerini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    To recreate in vitro 3D neuronal circuits will ultimately increase the relevance of results from cultured to whole-brain networks and will promote enabling technologies for neuro-engineering applications. Here we fabricate novel elastomeric scaffolds able to instruct 3D growth of living primary neurons. Such systems allow investigating the emerging activity, in terms of calcium signals, of small clusters of neurons as a function of the interplay between the 2D or 3D architectures and network dynamics. We report the ability of 3D geometry to improve functional organization and synchronization in small neuronal assemblies. We propose a mathematical modelling of network dynamics that supports such a result. Entrapping carbon nanotubes in the scaffolds remarkably boosted synaptic activity, thus allowing for the first time to exploit nanomaterial/cell interfacing in 3D growth support. Our 3D system represents a simple and reliable construct, able to improve the complexity of current tissue culture models. PMID:25910072

  16. 2D and 3D Histioid Disclination Networks in Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Miao; Guo, Yubing; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Wei, Qi-Huo

    Topological defects and disclination lines are of both fundamental interest and practical importance. In this paper, we will show that periodic/non-periodic 2D/3D networks of disclination lines can be created in nematic liquid crystal cells by setting well-designed alignment patterns at the top and bottom substrate surfaces. The desired complex patterns of liquid crystal molecular alignments at the substrates are obtained using a projection photoalignment technique based on plasmonic metamasks. The designs of alignment patterns and their resulting disclination line networks will be presented. These designable topological networks represent a new kind of artificial materials which could be of useful for directing colloidal and molecular assembly. National Science Foundation CMMI-1436565.

  17. Developing an effective 2-D urban flood inundation model for city emergency management based on cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Liu, Y.; Wang, X.; Yu, D.; Liu, K.; Huang, H.; Hu, G.

    2014-09-01

    Flash floods have occurred frequently and severely in the urban areas of South China. An effective process-oriented urban flood inundation model becomes an urgent demand for urban storm water and emergency management. This study develops an effective and flexible cellular automaton (CA) model to simulate storm water runoff and the flood inundation process during extreme storm events. The process of infiltration, inlets discharge and flow dynamic can be simulated only with little pre-processing on commonly available basic urban geographic data. In this model, a set of gravitational diverging rules are implemented in a cellular automation (CA) model to govern the water flow in a 3 x 3 cell template of a raster layer. The model is calibrated by one storm event and validated by another in a small urban catchment in Guangzhou of Southern China. The depth of accumulated water at the catchment outlet is interpreted from street monitoring sensors and verified by on-site survey. A good level of agreement between the simulated process and the reality is reached for both storm events. The model reproduces the changing extent and depth of flooded areas at the catchment outlet with an accuracy of 4 cm in water depth. Comparisons with a physically-based 2-D model (FloodMap) results show that the model have the capability of simulating flow dynamics. The high computational efficiency of CA model can satisfy the demand of city emergency management. The encouraging results of the simulations demonstrate that the CA-based approach is capable of effectively representing the key processes associated with a storm event and reproducing the process of water accumulation at the catchment outlet for making process-considered city emergency management decisions.

  18. Simulation and analysis of solute transport in 2D fracture/pipe networks: The SOLFRAC program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Jacques; Porel, Gilles; Delay, Fred; Ubertosi, Fabrice; Bernard, Stéphane; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2007-01-01

    The Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) method has been recently developed by Delay and Bodin [Delay, F. and Bodin, J., 2001. Time domain random walk method to simulate transport by advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion in fracture networks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(21): 4051-4054.] and Bodin et al. [Bodin, J., Porel, G. and Delay, F., 2003c. Simulation of solute transport in discrete fracture networks using the time domain random walk method. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 6566: 1-8.] for simulating solute transport in discrete fracture networks. It is assumed that the fracture network can reasonably be represented by a network of interconnected one-dimensional pipes (i.e. flow channels). Processes accounted for are: (1) advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the channels, (2) matrix diffusion, (3) diffusion into stagnant zones within the fracture planes, (4) sorption reactions onto the fracture walls and in the matrix, (5) linear decay, and (6) mass sharing at fracture intersections. The TDRW method is handy and very efficient in terms of computation costs since it allows for the one-step calculation of the particle residence time in each bond of the network. This method has been programmed in C++, and efforts have been made to develop an efficient and user-friendly software, called SOLFRAC. This program is freely downloadable at the URL http://labo.univ-poitiers.fr/hydrasa/intranet/telechargement.htm. It calculates solute transport into 2D pipe networks, while considering different types of injections and different concepts of local dispersion within each flow channel. Post-simulation analyses are also available, such as the mean velocity or the macroscopic dispersion at the scale of the entire network. The program may be used to evaluate how a given transport mechanism influences the macroscopic transport behaviour of fracture networks. It may also be used, as is the case, e.g., with analytical solutions, to interpret laboratory or field tracer test experiments

  19. A 2D Polychloride Network Held Together by Halogen-Halogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Robin; Haller, Heike; Steinhauer, Simon; Müller, Carsten; Riedel, Sebastian

    2015-12-14

    In a eutectic mixture of two ionic liquids, we have synthesized and crystallized the new polychloride compound [Et4 N]2 [(Cl3 )2 ⋅Cl2 ] that exhibits a periodic 2D polychloride network acting as an anionic layer. Based on its low melting point and vapor pressure, this compound can be described as a room-temperature ionic liquid. The compound was fully characterized by IR and Raman spectroscopy as well as single-crystal X-ray structure determination. The characterization was complemented by solid-state quantum-chemical calculations confirming the results of the experimental work. PMID:26545703

  20. Developing an effective 2-D urban flood inundation model for city emergency management based on cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Liu, Y.; Wang, X.; Yu, D.; Liu, K.; Huang, H.; Hu, G.

    2015-03-01

    Flash floods have occurred frequently in the urban areas of southern China. An effective process-oriented urban flood inundation model is urgently needed for urban storm-water and emergency management. This study develops an efficient and flexible cellular automaton (CA) model to simulate storm-water runoff and the flood inundation process during extreme storm events. The process of infiltration, inlets discharge and flow dynamics can be simulated with little preprocessing on commonly available basic urban geographic data. In this model, a set of gravitational diverging rules are implemented to govern the water flow in a rectangular template of three cells by three cells of a raster layer. The model is calibrated by one storm event and validated by another in a small urban catchment in Guangzhou of southern China. The depth of accumulated water at the catchment outlet is interpreted from street-monitoring closed-circuit television (CCTV) videos and verified by on-site survey. A good level of agreement between the simulated process and the reality is reached for both storm events. The model reproduces the changing extent and depth of flooded areas at the catchment outlet with an accuracy of 4 cm in water depth. Comparisons with a physically based 2-D model (FloodMap) show that the model is capable of effectively simulating flow dynamics. The high computational efficiency of the CA model can meet the needs of city emergency management.

  1. Confinement properties of 2D porous molecular networks on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Müller, Kathrin; Enache, Mihaela; Stöhr, Meike

    2016-04-20

    Quantum effects that arise from confinement of electronic states have been extensively studied for the surface states of noble metals. Utilizing small artificial structures for confinement allows tailoring of the surface properties and offers unique opportunities for applications. So far, examples of surface state confinement include thin films, artificial nanoscale structures, vacancy and adatom islands, self-assembled 1D chains, vicinal surfaces, quantum dots and quantum corrals. In this review we summarize recent achievements in changing the electronic structure of surfaces by adsorption of nanoporous networks whose design principles are based on the concepts of supramolecular chemistry. Already in 1993, it was shown that quantum corrals made from Fe atoms on a Cu(1 1 1) surface using single atom manipulation with a scanning tunnelling microscope confine the Shockley surface state. However, since the atom manipulation technique for the construction of corral structures is a relatively time consuming process, the fabrication of periodic two-dimensional (2D) corral structures is practically impossible. On the other side, by using molecular self-assembly extended 2D porous structures can be achieved in a parallel process, i.e. all pores are formed at the same time. The molecular building blocks are usually held together by non-covalent interactions like hydrogen bonding, metal coordination or dipolar coupling. Due to the reversibility of the bond formation defect-free and long-range ordered networks can be achieved. However, recently also examples of porous networks formed by covalent coupling on the surface have been reported. By the choice of the molecular building blocks, the dimensions of the network (pore size and pore to pore distance) can be controlled. In this way, the confinement properties of the individual pores can be tuned. In addition, the effect of the confined state on the hosting properties of the pores will be discussed in this review article

  2. Confinement properties of 2D porous molecular networks on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kathrin; Enache, Mihaela; Stöhr, Meike

    2016-04-01

    Quantum effects that arise from confinement of electronic states have been extensively studied for the surface states of noble metals. Utilizing small artificial structures for confinement allows tailoring of the surface properties and offers unique opportunities for applications. So far, examples of surface state confinement include thin films, artificial nanoscale structures, vacancy and adatom islands, self-assembled 1D chains, vicinal surfaces, quantum dots and quantum corrals. In this review we summarize recent achievements in changing the electronic structure of surfaces by adsorption of nanoporous networks whose design principles are based on the concepts of supramolecular chemistry. Already in 1993, it was shown that quantum corrals made from Fe atoms on a Cu(1 1 1) surface using single atom manipulation with a scanning tunnelling microscope confine the Shockley surface state. However, since the atom manipulation technique for the construction of corral structures is a relatively time consuming process, the fabrication of periodic two-dimensional (2D) corral structures is practically impossible. On the other side, by using molecular self-assembly extended 2D porous structures can be achieved in a parallel process, i.e. all pores are formed at the same time. The molecular building blocks are usually held together by non-covalent interactions like hydrogen bonding, metal coordination or dipolar coupling. Due to the reversibility of the bond formation defect-free and long-range ordered networks can be achieved. However, recently also examples of porous networks formed by covalent coupling on the surface have been reported. By the choice of the molecular building blocks, the dimensions of the network (pore size and pore to pore distance) can be controlled. In this way, the confinement properties of the individual pores can be tuned. In addition, the effect of the confined state on the hosting properties of the pores will be discussed in this review article.

  3. Insight into the crystallization of amorphous imine-linked polymer networks to 2D covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Overholts, Anna C; Hwang, Nicky; Dichtel, William R

    2016-03-01

    We explore the crystallization of a high surface area imine-linked two-dimensional covalent organic framework (2D COF). The growth process reveals rapid initial formation of an amorphous network that subsequently crystallizes into the layered 2D network. The metastable amorphous polymer may be isolated and resubjected to growth conditions to form the COF. These experiments provide the first mechanistic insight into the mechanism of imine-linked 2D COF formation, which is distinct from that of boronate-ester linked COFs. PMID:26857035

  4. 2D image classification for 3D anatomy localization: employing deep convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bob D.; Wolterink, Jelmer M.; de Jong, Pim A.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Localization of anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) is a preprocessing step in many medical image analysis tasks. While trivial for humans, it is complex for automatic methods. Classic machine learning approaches require the challenge of hand crafting features to describe differences between ROIs and background. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) alleviate this by automatically finding hierarchical feature representations from raw images. We employ this trait to detect anatomical ROIs in 2D image slices in order to localize them in 3D. In 100 low-dose non-contrast enhanced non-ECG synchronized screening chest CT scans, a reference standard was defined by manually delineating rectangular bounding boxes around three anatomical ROIs -- heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Every anatomical ROI was automatically identified using a combination of three CNNs, each analyzing one orthogonal image plane. While single CNNs predicted presence or absence of a specific ROI in the given plane, the combination of their results provided a 3D bounding box around it. Classification performance of each CNN, expressed in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was >=0.988. Additionally, the performance of ROI localization was evaluated. Median Dice scores for automatically determined bounding boxes around the heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta were 0.89, 0.70, and 0.85 respectively. The results demonstrate that accurate automatic 3D localization of anatomical structures by CNN-based 2D image classification is feasible.

  5. Some tensor-network diagnostics for a class of 2D SPT states with internal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Abhishodh; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    We demonstrate some diagnostic techniques to characterize certain 2D tensor network states with internal symmetries that are classified by the third group cohomology of the symmetry group. We use the discussions of Else et al. [Phys. Rev. B 90, 235137 (2014)] to extract data that determines the phase of matter from the tensors that make up a specific class of wave functions. This is possible because the symmetry transformation at the `physical' level, which is of product form, translates to a symmetry in the `virtual' level which may no longer be of product form. An appropriate analysis of the virtual-space symmetry helps us obtain the topological information (the 3-cocycle twist) that places the wave function in the classification scheme. This reproduces the results of Chen et al. [Phys. Rev. B 87,155114 (2013)] without using projection operators in merging two 'Matrix Product Operators' of the symmetry representation of two group actions.

  6. Surface-Supported Robust 2D Lanthanide-Carboxylate Coordination Networks.

    PubMed

    Urgel, José I; Cirera, Borja; Wang, Yang; Auwärter, Willi; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M; Alcamí, Manuel; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Martín, Fernando; Miranda, Rodolfo; Ecija, David; Barth, Johannes V

    2015-12-16

    Lanthanide-based metal-organic compounds and architectures are promising systems for sensing, heterogeneous catalysis, photoluminescence, and magnetism. Herein, the fabrication of interfacial 2D lanthanide-carboxylate networks is introduced. This study combines low- and variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) experiments, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations addressing their design and electronic properties. The bonding of ditopic linear linkers to Gd centers on a Cu(111) surface gives rise to extended nanoporous grids, comprising mononuclear nodes featuring eightfold lateral coordination. XPS and DFT elucidate the nature of the bond, indicating ionic characteristics, which is also manifest in appreciable thermal stability. This study introduces a new generation of robust low-dimensional metallosupramolecular systems incorporating the functionalities of the f-block elements. PMID:26524215

  7. Optimizing Cellular Networks Enabled with Renewal Energy via Strategic Learning.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Insoo; Liu, Huaping; Ansari, Nirwan

    2015-01-01

    An important issue in the cellular industry is the rising energy cost and carbon footprint due to the rapid expansion of the cellular infrastructure. Greening cellular networks has thus attracted attention. Among the promising green cellular network techniques, the renewable energy-powered cellular network has drawn increasing attention as a critical element towards reducing carbon emissions due to massive energy consumption in the base stations deployed in cellular networks. Game theory is a branch of mathematics that is used to evaluate and optimize systems with multiple players with conflicting objectives and has been successfully used to solve various problems in cellular networks. In this paper, we model the green energy utilization and power consumption optimization problem of a green cellular network as a pilot power selection strategic game and propose a novel distributed algorithm based on a strategic learning method. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm achieves correlated equilibrium of the pilot power selection game, resulting in optimum green energy utilization and power consumption reduction. PMID:26167934

  8. Optimizing Cellular Networks Enabled with Renewal Energy via Strategic Learning

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Insoo; Liu, Huaping; Ansari, Nirwan

    2015-01-01

    An important issue in the cellular industry is the rising energy cost and carbon footprint due to the rapid expansion of the cellular infrastructure. Greening cellular networks has thus attracted attention. Among the promising green cellular network techniques, the renewable energy-powered cellular network has drawn increasing attention as a critical element towards reducing carbon emissions due to massive energy consumption in the base stations deployed in cellular networks. Game theory is a branch of mathematics that is used to evaluate and optimize systems with multiple players with conflicting objectives and has been successfully used to solve various problems in cellular networks. In this paper, we model the green energy utilization and power consumption optimization problem of a green cellular network as a pilot power selection strategic game and propose a novel distributed algorithm based on a strategic learning method. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm achieves correlated equilibrium of the pilot power selection game, resulting in optimum green energy utilization and power consumption reduction. PMID:26167934

  9. Toward IMRT 2D dose modeling using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantzis, Georgios; Vasquez-Quino, Luis A.; Zalman, Travis; Pratx, Guillem; Lei, Yu

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of artificial neural networks (ANN) to reconstruct dose maps for intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields compared with those of the treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: An artificial feed forward neural network and the back-propagation learning algorithm have been used to replicate dose calculations of IMRT fields obtained from PINNACLE{sup 3} v9.0. The ANN was trained with fluence and dose maps of IMRT fields for 6 MV x-rays, which were obtained from the amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device of Novalis TX. Those fluence distributions were imported to the TPS and the dose maps were calculated on the horizontal midpoint plane of a water equivalent homogeneous cylindrical virtual phantom. Each exported 2D dose distribution from the TPS was classified into two clusters of high and low dose regions, respectively, based on the K-means algorithm and the Euclidian metric in the fluence-dose domain. The data of each cluster were divided into two sets for the training and validation phase of the ANN, respectively. After the completion of the ANN training phase, 2D dose maps were reconstructed by the ANN and isodose distributions were created. The dose maps reconstructed by ANN were evaluated and compared with the TPS, where the mean absolute deviation of the dose and the {gamma}-index were used. Results: A good agreement between the doses calculated from the TPS and the trained ANN was achieved. In particular, an average relative dosimetric difference of 4.6% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 93% were obtained for low dose regions, and a dosimetric difference of 2.3% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 97% for high dose region. Conclusions: An artificial neural network has been developed to convert fluence maps to corresponding dose maps. The feasibility and potential of an artificial neural network to replicate complex convolution kernels in the TPS for IMRT dose calculations

  10. Environmental Monitoring using Measurements from Cellular Network Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, N.; Gao, O. H.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate measurements of atmospheric parameters at ground level are fundamentally essential for hazard warning, meteorological forecasting and for various applications in agriculture, hydrology, transportation and more. The accuracy of existing instruments, however, is often limited as a result of technical and practical constraints. Existing technologies such as satellite systems cover large areas but may experience lack of precision at near surface level. On the other hand, ground based in-situ sensors often suffer from low spatial representativity. In addition, these conventional monitoring instruments are costly to implement and maintain. At frequencies of tens of GHz, various atmospheric hydrometeors affect microwave beams, causing perturbations to radio signals. Consequently, commercial wireless links that constitute the infrastructure for data transport between cellular base stations can be considered as a built in environmental monitoring facility (Messer et al., Science, 2006). These microwave links are widely deployed worldwide at surface level altitudes and can provide measurements of various atmospheric phenomena. The implementation costs are minimal since the infrastructure is already situated in the field. This technique has been shown to be applicable for 2D rainfall monitoring (e.g. Overeem et al., PNAS, 2013; Liberman et al., AMT, 2014) and potentially for water vapor observations (David et al., ACP, 2009; Chwala et al., Atmos. Res., 2013). Moreover, it has been recently shown that the technology has strong potential for detection of fog and estimation of its intensity (David et al., JGR-Atmos., 2013; David et al., BAMS, 2014). The research conducted to this point forms the basis for the initiation of a research project in this newly emerging field at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering of Cornell University. The presentation will provide insights into key capabilities of the novel approach. The potential to monitor various

  11. Quantitative nanoscale visualization of heterogeneous electron transfer rates in 2D carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Güell, Aleix G; Ebejer, Neil; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-07-17

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable interest for electrochemical, electrocatalytic, and sensing applications, yet there remains uncertainty concerning the intrinsic electrochemical (EC) activity. In this study, we use scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) to determine local heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) kinetics in a random 2D network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on an Si/SiO(2) substrate. The high spatial resolution of SECCM, which employs a mobile nanoscale EC cell as a probe for imaging, enables us to sample the responses of individual portions of a wide range of SWNTs within this complex arrangement. Using two redox processes, the oxidation of ferrocenylmethyl trimethylammonium and the reduction of ruthenium (III) hexaamine, we have obtained conclusive evidence for the high intrinsic EC activity of the sidewalls of the large majority of SWNTs in networks. Moreover, we show that the ends of SWNTs and the points where two SWNTs cross do not show appreciably different HET kinetics relative to the sidewall. Using finite element method modeling, we deduce standard rate constants for the two redox couples and demonstrate that HET based solely on characteristic defects in the SWNT side wall is highly unlikely. This is further confirmed by the analysis of individual line profiles taken as the SECCM probe scans over an SWNT. More generally, the studies herein demonstrate SECCM to be a powerful and versatile method for activity mapping of complex electrode materials under conditions of high mass transport, where kinetic assignments can be made with confidence. PMID:22635266

  12. Facial Sketch Synthesis Using 2D Direct Combined Model-Based Face-Specific Markov Network.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ching-Ting; Chan, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Chung

    2016-08-01

    A facial sketch synthesis system is proposed, featuring a 2D direct combined model (2DDCM)-based face-specific Markov network. In contrast to the existing facial sketch synthesis systems, the proposed scheme aims to synthesize sketches, which reproduce the unique drawing style of a particular artist, where this drawing style is learned from a data set consisting of a large number of image/sketch pairwise training samples. The synthesis system comprises three modules, namely, a global module, a local module, and an enhancement module. The global module applies a 2DDCM approach to synthesize the global facial geometry and texture of the input image. The detailed texture is then added to the synthesized sketch in a local patch-based manner using a parametric 2DDCM model and a non-parametric Markov random field (MRF) network. Notably, the MRF approach gives the synthesized results an appearance more consistent with the drawing style of the training samples, while the 2DDCM approach enables the synthesis of outcomes with a more derivative style. As a result, the similarity between the synthesized sketches and the input images is greatly improved. Finally, a post-processing operation is performed to enhance the shadowed regions of the synthesized image by adding strong lines or curves to emphasize the lighting conditions. The experimental results confirm that the synthesized facial images are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the input images as well as the ground-truth sketches provided by the same artist. The representing power of the proposed framework is demonstrated by synthesizing facial sketches from input images with a wide variety of facial poses, lighting conditions, and races even when such images are not included in the training data set. Moreover, the practical applicability of the proposed framework is demonstrated by means of automatic facial recognition tests. PMID:27244737

  13. Energy efficiency analysis of relay-assisted cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huan; Li, Yunzhou; Kountouris, Marios; Xu, Xibin; Wang, Jing

    2014-12-01

    To meet the demand for higher throughput, improved coverage and enhanced reliability, future wireless cellular networks face significant technical challenges. One promising solution is to place relay stations between transmitters and receivers in the cellular network. Meanwhile, as energy consumption reduction has been an important concern for the wireless industry, energy-efficient communications is of prime interest for future networks. In this paper, we study whether and how relays can improve the energy efficiency of cellular networks. Specifically, the energy efficiency of relay-assisted cellular networks is analyzed using tools of stochastic geometry. We first derive the coverage probability for the macro base station (MBS) to user (UE), the MBS to relay station (RS), and the RS to UE links, and then we model the power consumption at the MBS and RS. Based on the analytical model and expressions, the energy efficiency of relay-assisted cellular networks is then evaluated and is shown to be strictly quasi-concave on the transmit power for MBS to UE link or the RS to UE link. Numerical results show that the energy efficiency first improves while it hits a ceiling as the MBS density increases.

  14. Extracting insight from noisy cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Landry, Christian R; Levy, Emmanuel D; Abd Rabbo, Diala; Tarassov, Kirill; Michnick, Stephen W

    2013-11-21

    Network biologists attempt to extract meaningful relationships among genes or their products from very noisy data. We argue that what we categorize as noisy data may sometimes reflect noisy biology and therefore may shield a hidden meaning about how networks evolve and how matter is organized in the cell. We present practical solutions, based on existing evolutionary and biophysical concepts, through which our understanding of cell biology can be enormously enriched. PMID:24267884

  15. A new small-world network created by Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yuhong; Li, Anwei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we generate small-world networks by the Cellular Automaton based on starting with one-dimensional regular networks. Besides the common properties of small-world networks with small average shortest path length and large clustering coefficient, the small-world networks generated in this way have other properties: (i) The edges which are cut in the regular network can be controlled that whether the edges are reconnected or not, and (ii) the number of the edges of the small-world network model equals the number of the edges of the original regular network. In other words, the average degree of the small-world network model equals to the average degree of the original regular network.

  16. Optimal Prediction by Cellular Signaling Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Nils B.; Mugler, Andrew; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2015-12-01

    Living cells can enhance their fitness by anticipating environmental change. We study how accurately linear signaling networks in cells can predict future signals. We find that maximal predictive power results from a combination of input-noise suppression, linear extrapolation, and selective readout of correlated past signal values. Single-layer networks generate exponential response kernels, which suffice to predict Markovian signals optimally. Multilayer networks allow oscillatory kernels that can optimally predict non-Markovian signals. At low noise, these kernels exploit the signal derivative for extrapolation, while at high noise, they capitalize on signal values in the past that are strongly correlated with the future signal. We show how the common motifs of negative feedback and incoherent feed-forward can implement these optimal response functions. Simulations reveal that E. coli can reliably predict concentration changes for chemotaxis, and that the integration time of its response kernel arises from a trade-off between rapid response and noise suppression.

  17. Stochastic cellular automata model of neural networks.

    PubMed

    Goltsev, A V; de Abreu, F V; Dorogovtsev, S N; Mendes, J F F

    2010-06-01

    We propose a stochastic dynamical model of noisy neural networks with complex architectures and discuss activation of neural networks by a stimulus, pacemakers, and spontaneous activity. This model has a complex phase diagram with self-organized active neural states, hybrid phase transitions, and a rich array of behaviors. We show that if spontaneous activity (noise) reaches a threshold level then global neural oscillations emerge. Stochastic resonance is a precursor of this dynamical phase transition. These oscillations are an intrinsic property of even small groups of 50 neurons. PMID:20866454

  18. Formats and Network Protocols for Browser Access to 2D Raster Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesea, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tiled web maps in browsers are a major success story, forming the foundation of many current web applications. Enabling tiled data access is the next logical step, and is likely to meet with similar success. Many ad-hoc approaches have already started to appear, and something similar is explored within the Open Geospatial Consortium. One of the main obstacles in making browser data access a reality is the lack of a well-known data format. This obstacle also represents an opportunity to analyze the requirements and possible candidates, applying lessons learned from web tiled image services and protocols. Similar to the image counterpart, a web tile raster data format needs to have good intrinsic compression and be able to handle high byte count data types including floating point. An overview of a possible solution to the format problem, a 2D data raster compression algorithm called Limited Error Raster Compression (LERC) will be presented. In addition to the format, best practices for high request rate HTTP services also need to be followed. In particular, content delivery network (CDN) caching suitability needs to be part of any design, not an after-thought. Last but not least, HTML 5 browsers will certainly be part of any solution since they provide improved access to binary data, as well as more powerful ways to view and interact with the data in the browser. In a simple but relevant application, digital elevation model (DEM) raster data is served as LERC compressed data tiles which are used to generate terrain by a HTML5 scene viewer.

  19. Personal communication in traditional cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuer, Ellwood I.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the flow of calls through the mobile network as it applies to the operation of Basic and Enhanced Services. Included in the discussion is the overall network layout, the physical connections between the network entities, and the signaling protocols which allow the entities to be integrated. The specific functionality of the applications and services are not detailed as the specific implementation varies from vendor to vendor and from service provider to service provider. The Enhanced Services Platform is installed in a service providers network in order to offer mobile subscribers services and applications which would otherwise not be available. The service providers' objective is to increase revenue/subscriber, increase subscriber loyalty/decrease churn, and build competitive advantages through differentiation. The services provided on the Enhanced Services platform can be viewed as either Basic or Enhanced. For the purpose of this paper, Basic Services refers to Numeric Paging, Call Answering, and Voice Messaging while Enhanced Services refers to FAX Messaging, One Number Service, Voice Dialing and other Voice Recognition applications, Information Services including FAX on Demand, and Automated Call Routing.

  20. Fc-optimized NKG2D-Fc constructs induce NK cell antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells independently of HER2/neu expression status.

    PubMed

    Raab, Stefanie; Steinbacher, Julia; Schmiedel, Benjamin J; Kousis, Philaretos C; Steinle, Alexander; Jung, Gundram; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Salih, Helmut R

    2014-10-15

    The ability of NK cells to mediate Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) largely contributes to the clinical success of antitumor Abs, including trastuzumab, which is approved for the treatment of breast cancer with HER2/neu overexpression. Notably, only ∼25% of breast cancer patients overexpress HER2/neu. Moreover, HER2/neu is expressed on healthy cells, and trastuzumab application is associated with side effects. In contrast, the ligands of the activating immunoreceptor NKG2D (NKG2DL) are selectively expressed on malignant cells. In this study, we took advantage of the tumor-associated expression of NKG2DL by using them as target Ags for NKG2D-IgG1 fusion proteins optimized by amino acid exchange S239D/I332E in their Fc part. Compared to constructs with wild-type Fc parts, fusion proteins carrying the S239D/I332E modification (NKG2D-Fc-ADCC) mediated highly enhanced degranulation, ADCC, and IFN-γ production of NK cells in response to breast cancer cells. NKG2D-Fc-ADCC substantially enhanced NK reactivity also against HER2/neu-low targets that were unaffected by trastuzumab, as both compounds mediated their immunostimulatory effects in strict dependence of target Ag expression levels. Thus, in line with the hierarchically organized potential of the various activating receptors governing NK reactivity and due to its highly increased affinity to CD16, NKG2D-Fc-ADCC potently enhances NK cell reactivity despite the inevitable reduction of activating signals upon binding to NKG2DL. Due to the tumor-restricted expression of NKG2DL, NKG2D-Fc-ADCC may constitute an attractive means for immunotherapy especially of HER2/neu-low or -negative breast cancer. PMID:25217158

  1. Increasing cellular coverage within integrated terrestrial/satellite mobile networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Jonathan P.

    1995-01-01

    When applying the hierarchical cellular concept, the satellite acts as giant umbrella cell covering a region with some terrestrial cells. If a mobile terminal traversing the region arrives to the border-line or limits of a regular cellular ground service, network transition occurs and the satellite system continues the mobile coverage. To adequately assess the boundaries of service of a mobile satellite system an a cellular network within an integrated environment, this paper provides an optimized scheme to predict when a network transition may be necessary. Under the assumption of a classified propagation phenomenon and Lognormal shadowing, the study applies an analytical approach to estimate the location of a mobile terminal based on a reception of the signal strength emitted by a base station.

  2. Optimising base station location for UMTS cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalata, G.; Pozniak-Koszalka, I.; Koszalka, L.; Kasprzak, A.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid development of universal mobile telecommunication systems put demands on tools for assisting planning of cellular network infrastructure. The tools need to focus on critical issues in modern cellular networks and techniques used for previous generation system no longer serve useful. In this paper, an algorithm based on Branch & Bound approach is proposed for solving base station location problem, covering interference levels, traffic demands and power control mechanism. The efficiency of the algorithm is evaluated with respect to existing approaches for solving this problem - using the designed and implemented experimentation system.

  3. Estimation of 3-D pore network coordination number of rocks from watershed segmentation of a single 2-D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, Arash; Ayatollahi, Shahab; Kharrat, Riyaz; Dashti, Nader

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we have utilized 3-D micro-tomography images of real and synthetic rocks to introduce two mathematical correlations which estimate the distribution parameters of 3-D coordination number using a single 2-D cross-sectional image. By applying a watershed segmentation algorithm, it is found that the distribution of 3-D coordination number is acceptably predictable by statistical analysis of the network extracted from 2-D images. In this study, we have utilized 25 volumetric images of rocks in order to propose two mathematical formulas. These formulas aim to approximate the average and standard deviation of coordination number in 3-D pore networks. Then, the formulas are applied for five independent test samples to evaluate the reliability. Finally, pore network flow modeling is used to find the error of absolute permeability prediction using estimated and measured coordination numbers. Results show that the 2-D images are considerably informative about the 3-D network of the rocks and can be utilized to approximate the 3-D connectivity of the porous spaces with determination coefficient of about 0.85 that seems to be acceptable considering the variety of the studied samples.

  4. Myosin-II inhibition and soft 2D matrix maximize multinucleation and cellular projections typical of platelet-producing megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae-Won; Swift, Joe; Spinler, Kyle R; Discher, Dennis E

    2011-07-12

    Cell division, membrane rigidity, and strong adhesion to a rigid matrix are all promoted by myosin-II, and so multinucleated cells with distended membranes--typical of megakaryocytes (MKs)--seem predictable for low myosin activity in cells on soft matrices. Paradoxically, myosin mutations lead to defects in MKs and platelets. Here, reversible inhibition of myosin-II is sustained over several cell cycles to produce 3- to 10-fold increases in polyploid MK and a number of other cell types. Even brief inhibition generates highly distensible, proplatelet-like projections that fragment readily under shear, as seen in platelet generation from MKs in vivo. The effects are maximized with collagenous matrices that are soft and 2D, like the perivascular niches in marrow rather than 3D or rigid, like bone. Although multinucleation of other primary hematopoietic lineages helps to generalize a failure-to-fission mechanism, lineage-specific signaling with increased polyploidy proves possible and novel with phospho-regulation of myosin-II heavy chain. Label-free mass spectrometry quantitation of the MK proteome uses a unique proportional peak fingerprint (ProPF) analysis to also show upregulation of the cytoskeletal and adhesion machinery critical to platelet function. Myosin-inhibited MKs generate more platelets in vitro and also in vivo from the marrows of xenografted mice, while agonist stimulation activates platelet spreading and integrin αIIbβ3. Myosin-II thus seems a central, matrix-regulated node for MK-poiesis and platelet generation. PMID:21709232

  5. Millimeter-Wave Evolution for 5G Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Kei; Tran, Gia Khanh; Shimodaira, Hidekazu; Nanba, Shinobu; Sakurai, Toshiaki; Takinami, Koji; Siaud, Isabelle; Strinati, Emilio Calvanese; Capone, Antonio; Karls, Ingolf; Arefi, Reza; Haustein, Thomas

    Triggered by the explosion of mobile traffic, 5G (5th Generation) cellular network requires evolution to increase the system rate 1000 times higher than the current systems in 10 years. Motivated by this common problem, there are several studies to integrate mm-wave access into current cellular networks as multi-band heterogeneous networks to exploit the ultra-wideband aspect of the mm-wave band. The authors of this paper have proposed comprehensive architecture of cellular networks with mm-wave access, where mm-wave small cell basestations and a conventional macro basestation are connected to Centralized-RAN (C-RAN) to effectively operate the system by enabling power efficient seamless handover as well as centralized resource control including dynamic cell structuring to match the limited coverage of mm-wave access with high traffic user locations via user-plane/control-plane splitting. In this paper, to prove the effectiveness of the proposed 5G cellular networks with mm-wave access, system level simulation is conducted by introducing an expected future traffic model, a measurement based mm-wave propagation model, and a centralized cell association algorithm by exploiting the C-RAN architecture. The numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed network to realize 1000 times higher system rate than the current network in 10 years which is not achieved by the small cells using commonly considered 3.5 GHz band. Furthermore, the paper also gives latest status of mm-wave devices and regulations to show the feasibility of using mm-wave in the 5G systems.

  6. 2D warp-and-woof interwoven networks constructed by helical chains with different chirality.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuhua; Guo, Yang; OuYang, Yan; Liu, Zhanquan; Liao, Daizheng; Cheng, Peng; Yan, Shiping; Jiang, Zonghui

    2007-09-21

    Two unprecedented 2D entangled layers of warp-and-woof threads interwoven by left- and right-handed helical chains, {[Mn(salen)Au(CN)2]4(H2O)}n (salen = N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylideneaminato)) and {Mn(acacen)Ag(CN)2}n (acacen = N,N'-ethylenebis(acetylacetonylideneiminate)) 2, have been synthesized and characterized. PMID:17728880

  7. Observation of kinetic networks of hydrogen-bond exchange using 2D IR echo spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yung Sam; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    The ultrafast H-bond motion in acetonitrile/methanol and of methanol and water around a dicarbonyl (piperidone) dominates the mechanism of vibrational coherence transfer in linear and 2D IR echo spectra. Multiple state coherence transfer and energy transfer are seen at and between the two carbonyl groups of the piperidone in both water and methanol.

  8. Application of GA in optimization of pore network models generated by multi-cellular growth algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, Saeid; Boozarjomehry, Ramin Bozorgmehry; Pishvaie, Mahmoud Reza

    2009-10-01

    In pore network modeling, the void space of a rock sample is represented at the microscopic scale by a network of pores connected by throats. Construction of a reasonable representation of the geometry and topology of the pore space will lead to a reliable prediction of the properties of porous media. Recently, the theory of multi-cellular growth (or L-systems) has been used as a flexible tool for generation of pore network models which do not require any special information such as 2D SEM or 3D pore space images. In general, the networks generated by this method are irregular pore network models which are inherently closer to the complicated nature of the porous media rather than regular lattice networks. In this approach, the construction process is controlled only by the production rules that govern the development process of the network. In this study, genetic algorithm has been used to obtain the optimum values of the uncertain parameters of these production rules to build an appropriate irregular lattice network capable of the prediction of both static and hydraulic information of the target porous medium.

  9. Cellular neural networks for welding arc thermograms segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamrozik, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Machine vision systems are used in many areas for monitoring of technological processes. Among this processes welding takes important place, where often infrared cameras are used. Besides reliable hardware, successful application of vision systems requires suitable software based on proper algorithms. One of most important group of image processing algorithms is connected to image segmentation. Obtainment of exact boundary of an object that changes shape in time, such as the welding arc, represented on a thermogram is not a trivial task. In the paper a segmentation method using supervised approach based on a cellular neural networks is presented. Simulated annealing and genetic algorithm were used for training of the network (template optimization). Comparison of proposed method to a well elaborated segmentation method based on region growing approach was made. Obtained results prove that the cellular neural network can be a valuable tool for infrared welding pool images segmentation.

  10. The role of actin networks in cellular mechanosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azatov, Mikheil

    Physical processes play an important role in many biological phenomena, such as wound healing, organ development, and tumor metastasis. During these processes, cells constantly interact with and adapt to their environment by exerting forces to mechanically probe the features of their surroundings and generating appropriate biochemical responses. The mechanisms underlying how cells sense the physical properties of their environment are not well understood. In this thesis, I present my studies to investigate cellular responses to the stiffness and topography of the environment. In order to sense the physical properties of their environment, cells dynamically reorganize the structure of their actin cytoskeleton, a dynamic network of biopolymers, altering the shape and spatial distribution of protein assemblies. Several observations suggest that proteins that crosslink actin filaments may play an important role in cellular mechanosensitivity. Palladin is an actin-crosslinking protein that is found in the lamellar actin network, stress fibers and focal adhesions, cellular structures that are critical for mechanosensing of the physical environment. By virtue of its close interactions with these structures in the cell, palladin may play an important role in cell mechanics. However, the role of actin crosslinkers in general, and palladin in particular, in cellular force generation and mechanosensing is not well known. I have investigated the role of palladin in regulating the plasticity of the actin cytoskeleton and cellular force generation in response to alterations in substrate stiffness. I have shown that the expression levels of palladin modulate the forces exerted by cells and their ability to sense substrate stiffness. Perturbation experiments also suggest that palladin levels in cells altered myosin motor activity. These results suggest that the actin crosslinkers, such as palladin, and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant

  11. Analysing Dynamical Behavior of Cellular Networks via Stochastic Bifurcations

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Anna; Kurths, Jürgen; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Koseska, Aneta

    2011-01-01

    The dynamical structure of genetic networks determines the occurrence of various biological mechanisms, such as cellular differentiation. However, the question of how cellular diversity evolves in relation to the inherent stochasticity and intercellular communication remains still to be understood. Here, we define a concept of stochastic bifurcations suitable to investigate the dynamical structure of genetic networks, and show that under stochastic influence, the expression of given proteins of interest is defined via the probability distribution of the phase variable, representing one of the genes constituting the system. Moreover, we show that under changing stochastic conditions, the probabilities of expressing certain concentration values are different, leading to different functionality of the cells, and thus to differentiation of the cells in the various types. PMID:21647432

  12. Using Cellular Communication Networks To Detect Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    David, Noam; Gao, H Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Accurate real time monitoring of atmospheric conditions at ground level is vital for hazard warning, meteorological forecasting, and various environmental applications required for public health and safety. However, conventional monitoring facilities are costly and often insufficient, for example, since they are not representative of the larger space and are not deployed densely enough in the field. There have been numerous scientific works showing the ability of commercial microwave links that comprise the data transmission infrastructure in cellular communication networks to monitor hydrometeors as a potential complementary solution. However, despite the large volume of research carried out in this emerging field during the past decade, no study has shown the ability of the system to provide critical information regarding air quality. Here we reveal the potential for identifying atmospheric conditions prone to air pollution by detecting temperature inversions that trap pollutants at ground level. The technique is based on utilizing standard signal measurements from an existing cellular network during routine operation. PMID:27490182

  13. Performance evaluation of cellular phone network based portable ECG device.

    PubMed

    Hong, Joo-Hyun; Cha, Eun-Jong; Lee, Tae-Soo

    2008-01-01

    In this study, cellular phone network based portable ECG device was developed and three experiments were performed to evaluate the accuracy, reliability and operability, applicability during daily life of the developed device. First, ECG signals were measured using the developed device and Biopac device (reference device) during sitting and marking time and compared to verify the accuracy of R-R intervals. Second, the reliable data transmission to remote server was verified on two types of simulated emergency event using patient simulator. Third, during daily life with five types of motion, accuracy of data transmission to remote server was verified on two types of event occurring. By acquiring and comparing subject's biomedical signal and motion signal, the accuracy, reliability and operability, applicability during daily life of the developed device were verified. Therefore, cellular phone network based portable ECG device can monitor patient with inobtrusive manner. PMID:19162767

  14. Cellular Automata with network incubation in information technology diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseo, Renato; Guidolin, Mariangela

    2010-06-01

    Innovation diffusion of network goods determines direct network externalities that depress sales for long periods and delay full benefits. We model this effect through a multiplicative dynamic market potential driven by a latent individual threshold embedded in a special Cellular Automata representation. The corresponding mean field approximation of its aggregate version is a Riccati equation with a closed form solution. This allows the detection of a change-point time separating an incubation period from a subsequent take-off due to a collective threshold (critical mass). Weighted nonlinear least squares are the main inferential methodology. An application is analysed with reference to USA fax machine diffusion.

  15. Ion beam analysis based on cellular nonlinear networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, V.; Tetzlaff, R.; Reichau, H.; Ratzinger, U.

    2011-07-01

    The development of a non- destructive measurement method for ion beam parameters has been treated in various projects. Although results are promising, the high complexity of beam dynamics has made it impossible to implement a real time process control up to now. In this paper we will propose analysing methods based on the dynamics of Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNN) that can be implemented on pixel parallel CNN based architectures and yield satisfying results even at low resolutions.

  16. Network Medicine: From Cellular Networks to the Human Diseasome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    Given the functional interdependencies between the molecular components in a human cell, a disease is rarely a consequence of an abnormality in a single gene, but reflects the perturbations of the complex intracellular network. The tools of network science offer a platform to explore systematically not only the molecular complexity of a particular disease, leading to the identification of disease modules and pathways, but also the molecular relationships between apparently distinct (patho)phenotypes. Advances in this direction not only enrich our understanding of complex systems, but are also essential to identify new disease genes, to uncover the biological significance of disease-associated mutations identified by genome-wide association studies and full genome sequencing, and to identify drug targets and biomarkers for complex diseases.

  17. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  18. Hybrid Spectral Efficient Cellular Network Deployment to Reduce RF Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Sumit; K. Jain, R.; K. Agrawal, N.

    2012-09-01

    As the mobile telecommunication systems are growing tremendously all over the world, the numbers of handheld and base stations are also rapidly growing and it became very popular to see these base stations distributed everywhere in the neighborhood and on roof tops which has caused a considerable amount of panic to the public in Palestine concerning wither the radiated electromagnetic fields from these base stations may cause any health effect or hazard. Recently UP High Court in India ordered for removal of BTS towers from residential area, it has created panic among cellular communication network designers too. Green cellular networks could be a solution for the above problem. This paper deals with green cellular networks with the help of multi-layer overlaid hierarchical structure (macro / micro / pico / femto cells). Macrocell for area coverage, micro for pedestrian and a slow moving traffic while pico for indoor use and femto for individual high capacity users. This could be the answer of the problem of energy conservation and enhancement of spectral density also.

  19. ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Oehler, Hannah; Voigt, Andrea; Dalic, Denis; Freiwald, Anja; Serve, Hubert; Beli, Petra

    2016-02-01

    The slowing down or stalling of replication forks is commonly known as replication stress and arises from multiple causes such as DNA lesions, nucleotide depletion, RNA-DNA hybrids, and oncogene activation. The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) plays an essential role in the cellular response to replication stress and inhibition of ATR has emerged as therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers that exhibit high levels of replication stress. However, the cellular signaling induced by replication stress and the substrate spectrum of ATR has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we employed quantitative MS-based proteomics to define the cellular signaling after nucleotide depletion-induced replication stress and replication fork collapse following ATR inhibition. We demonstrate that replication stress results in increased phosphorylation of a subset of proteins, many of which are involved in RNA splicing and transcription and have previously not been associated with the cellular replication stress response. Furthermore, our data reveal the ATR-dependent phosphorylation following replication stress and discover novel putative ATR target sites on MCM6, TOPBP1, RAD51AP1, and PSMD4. We establish that ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress and leads to the activation of the ATM-driven double-strand break repair signaling. PMID:26572502

  20. Tuning the resonance properties of 2D carbon nanotube networks towards a mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Guiyong; Zhang, Baocheng; Bell, John M.; Gu, Yuantong

    2015-08-01

    The capabilities of the mechanical resonator-based nanosensors in detecting ultra-small mass or force shifts have driven a continuing exploration of the palette of nanomaterials for such application purposes. Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we have assessed the applicability of a new class of carbon nanomaterials for nanoresonator usage, i.e. the single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) network. It is found that SWNT networks inherit excellent mechanical properties from the constituent SWNTs, possessing a high natural frequency. However, although a high quality factor is suggested from the simulation results, it is hard to obtain an unambiguous Q-factor due to the existence of vibration modes in addition to the dominant mode. The nonlinearities resulting from these extra vibration modes are found to exist uniformly under various testing conditions including different initial actuations and temperatures. Further testing shows that these modes can be effectively suppressed through the introduction of axial strain, leading to an extremely high quality factor in the order of 109 estimated from the SWNT network with 2% tensile strain. Additional studies indicate that the carbon rings connecting the SWNTs can also be used to alter the vibrational properties of the resulting network. This study suggests that the SWNT network can be a good candidate for applications as nanoresonators.

  1. Tuning the resonance properties of 2D carbon nanotube networks towards a mechanical resonator.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Guiyong; Zhang, Baocheng; Bell, John M; Gu, Yuantong

    2015-08-01

    The capabilities of the mechanical resonator-based nanosensors in detecting ultra-small mass or force shifts have driven a continuing exploration of the palette of nanomaterials for such application purposes. Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we have assessed the applicability of a new class of carbon nanomaterials for nanoresonator usage, i.e. the single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) network. It is found that SWNT networks inherit excellent mechanical properties from the constituent SWNTs, possessing a high natural frequency. However, although a high quality factor is suggested from the simulation results, it is hard to obtain an unambiguous Q-factor due to the existence of vibration modes in addition to the dominant mode. The nonlinearities resulting from these extra vibration modes are found to exist uniformly under various testing conditions including different initial actuations and temperatures. Further testing shows that these modes can be effectively suppressed through the introduction of axial strain, leading to an extremely high quality factor in the order of 10(9) estimated from the SWNT network with 2% tensile strain. Additional studies indicate that the carbon rings connecting the SWNTs can also be used to alter the vibrational properties of the resulting network. This study suggests that the SWNT network can be a good candidate for applications as nanoresonators. PMID:26184034

  2. A Novel Crosstalk Suppression Method of the 2-D Networked Resistive Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianfeng; Wang, Lei; Li, Jianqing; Song, Aiguo

    2014-01-01

    The 2-D resistive sensor array in the row–column fashion suffered from the crosstalk problem for parasitic parallel paths. Firstly, we proposed an Improved Isolated Drive Feedback Circuit with Compensation (IIDFCC) based on the voltage feedback method to suppress the crosstalk. In this method, a compensated resistor was specially used to reduce the crosstalk caused by the column multiplexer resistors and the adjacent row elements. Then, a mathematical equivalent resistance expression of the element being tested (EBT) of this circuit was analytically derived and verified by the circuit simulations. The simulation results show that the measurement method can greatly reduce the influence on the EBT caused by parasitic parallel paths for the multiplexers' channel resistor and the adjacent elements. PMID:25046011

  3. A 2D zinc-organic network being easily exfoliated into isolated sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guihong; Li, Ruiqing; Leng, Zhihua; Gan, Shucai

    2016-08-01

    A metal-organic aggregate, namely {Zn2Cl2(BBC)}n (BBC = 4,4‧,4‧‧-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(benzene-4,1-diyl))tribenzoate) was obtained by solvothermal synthesis. Its structure is featured with the Zn2(COO)3 paddle-wheels with two chloride anions on axial positions and hexagonal pores in the layers. The exclusion of water in the precursor and the solvent plays a crucial role in the formation of target compound. This compound can be easily dissolved in alkaline solution and exfoliated into isolated sheets, which shows a novel way for the preparation of 2D materials.

  4. Distinctive Behaviors of Druggable Proteins in Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Paul; Al-Lazikani, Bissan

    2015-01-01

    The interaction environment of a protein in a cellular network is important in defining the role that the protein plays in the system as a whole, and thus its potential suitability as a drug target. Despite the importance of the network environment, it is neglected during target selection for drug discovery. Here, we present the first systematic, comprehensive computational analysis of topological, community and graphical network parameters of the human interactome and identify discriminatory network patterns that strongly distinguish drug targets from the interactome as a whole. Importantly, we identify striking differences in the network behavior of targets of cancer drugs versus targets from other therapeutic areas and explore how they may relate to successful drug combinations to overcome acquired resistance to cancer drugs. We develop, computationally validate and provide the first public domain predictive algorithm for identifying druggable neighborhoods based on network parameters. We also make available full predictions for 13,345 proteins to aid target selection for drug discovery. All target predictions are available through canSAR.icr.ac.uk. Underlying data and tools are available at https://cansar.icr.ac.uk/cansar/publications/druggable_network_neighbourhoods/. PMID:26699810

  5. Network Coordinated Opportunistic Beamforming in Downlink Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Won-Yong; Jung, Bang Chul

    We propose a network coordinated opportunistic beamforming (NC-OBF) protocol for downlink K-cell networks with M-antenna base stations (BSs). In the NC-OBF scheme, based on pseudo-randomly generated BF vectors, a user scheduling strategy is introduced, where each BS opportunistically selects a set of mobile stations (MSs) whose desired signals generate the minimum interference to the other MSs. Its performance is then analyzed in terms of degrees-of-freedom (DoFs). As our achievability result, it is shown that KM DoFs are achievable if the number N of MSs in a cell scales at least as SNRKM-1, where SNR denotes the received signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, by deriving the corresponding upper bound on the DoFs, it is shown that the NC-OBF scheme is DoF-optimal. Note that the proposed scheme does not require the global channel state information and dimension expansion, thereby resulting in easier implementation.

  6. Ferrimagnetism in 2D networks of porphyrin-X and -XO (X=Sc,...,Zn) with acetylene bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbowska, Małgorzata; Sobolewski, Andrzej L.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetism in 2D networks of the acetylene-bridged transition metal porphyrins M(P)-2(C-C)-2 (denoted P-TM), and oxo-TM-porphyrins OM(P)-2(C-C)-2 (denoted P-TMO), is studied with the density functional theory (DFT) and the self-interaction corrected pseudopotential scheme (pSIC). Addition of oxygen lowers magnetism of P-TMO with respect to the corresponding P-TM for most of the first-half 3d-row TMs. In contrast, binding O with the second-half 3d-row TMs or Sc increases the magnetic moments. Ferrimagnetism is found for the porphyrin networks with the TMs from V to Co and also for these cases with oxygen. This is a long-range effect of the delocalized spin-polarization, extended even to the acetylene bridges.

  7. Dynamic force measurement of rearrangements in a 2D network of droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkley, Solomon; Backholm, Matilda; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between two liquid droplets in an immiscible liquid is well understood. However, the emulsions relevant to biological and industrial processes involve high concentrations of these droplets, and multi-body effects cannot be ignored. As droplets rearrange in response to a disturbance, the importance of individual pair-wise interactions between droplets changes with the geometry of neighbours. Here we report on an experimental setup consisting of a two- dimensional network of monodisperse droplets stabilized with a surfactant. The system is studied with micropipette deflection, which permits direct measurement of forces along with simultaneous imaging of the droplet network. One micropipette is used to apply a tensile or compressive force to the droplet cluster, while a second pipette acts as a force-transducing cantilever, deflecting in response to rearrangements of the droplets.

  8. Power Versus Spectrum 2-D Sensing in Energy Harvesting Cognitive Radio Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Han, Weijia; Li, Di; Zhang, Ping; Cui, Shuguang

    2015-12-01

    Energy harvester based cognitive radio is a promising solution to address the shortage of both spectrum and energy. Since the spectrum access and power consumption patterns are interdependent, and the power value harvested from certain environmental sources are spatially correlated, the new power dimension could provide additional information to enhance the spectrum sensing accuracy. In this paper, the Markovian behavior of the primary users is considered, based on which we adopt a hidden input Markov model to specify the primary vs. secondary dynamics in the system. Accordingly, we propose a 2-D spectrum and power (harvested) sensing scheme to improve the primary user detection performance, which is also capable of estimating the primary transmit power level. Theoretical and simulated results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, in term of the performance gain achieved by considering the new power dimension. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to jointly consider the spectrum and power dimensions for the cognitive primary user detection problem.

  9. Contact transfer length investigation of a 2D nanoparticle network by scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Vargas, Carlos S; Reissner, Patrick A; Wagner, Tino; Wyss, Roman M; Park, Hyung Gyu; Stemmer, Andreas

    2015-09-11

    Nanoparticle network devices find growing application in sensing and electronics. One recurring challenge in the design and fabrication of this class of devices is ensuring a stable interface via robust yet unobstructive electrodes. A figure of merit which dictates the minimum electrode overlap required for optimal charge injection into the network is the contact transfer length. However, we find that traditional contact characterization using the transmission line model, an indirect method which requires extrapolation, is insufficient for network devices. Instead, we apply Kelvin probe force microscopy to characterize the contact resistance by imaging the surface potential with nanometer resolution. We then use scanning probe lithography to directly investigate the contact transfer length. We have determined the transfer length in graphene contacted devices to be 200-400 nm, thus apt for further device reduction which is often necessary for on-site sensing applications. Simulations from a two-dimensional resistor model support our observations and are expected to be an important tool for further optimizing the design of nanoparticle-based devices. PMID:26291069

  10. Mechanics of composite actin networks: in vitro and cellular perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2014-03-01

    Actin filaments and associated actin binding proteins play an essential role in governing the mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells. Even though cells have multiple actin binding proteins (ABPs) that exist simultaneously to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of the cellular cytoskeleton, how these proteins work together to determine the properties of actin networks is not well understood. The ABP, palladin, is essential for the integrity of cell morphology and movement during development. Palladin coexists with alpha-actinin in stress fibers and focal adhesions and binds to both actin and alpha-actinin. To obtain insight into how mutually interacting actin crosslinking proteins modulate the properties of actin networks, we have characterized the micro-structure and mechanics of actin networks crosslinked with palladin and alpha-actinin. Our studies on composite networks of alpha-actinin/palladin/actin show that palladin and alpha-actinin synergistically determine network viscoelasticity. We have further examined the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing. Traction force microscopy revealed that TAFs are sensitive to substrate stiffness as they generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells, and also inhibited the ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in the actin organization and adhesion dynamics of palladin knock down cells. Perturbation experiments also suggest altered myosin activity in palladin KD cells. Our results suggest that the actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis.

  11. Study and Simulation of Traffic Behavior in Cellular Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhup, D. K.; Shrestha, C. L.; Sharma, R. K.

    2007-07-01

    Cellular radio systems accommodate a large number of users with a limited radio spectrum. The concept of trunking allows a large number of users to share the relatively small number of channels in a cell by providing access to each user, on demand, from a pool of available channels. Traffic engineering deals with provisioning of communication circuits in a given area for a number of subscribers with a required grade of service. Traffic in any cell depends upon the number of users, the average request rate and average call duration. Certain number of channels is required for the required GOS. To design an optimum capacity cellular system, traffic behavior on that system is important. The number of channel required can be estimated by using Erlang formula and Erlang table. Erlang table is not always useful to calculate the probability of blocking in various complex scenarios such as channel borrowing strategies. When the total number of channel available in a given cell are divided to serve partly for newly generated calls and partly for handover calls, and if they use dynamic channel assignment strategies like channel borrowing, then the probability of blocking can't be calculated from Erlang table. Simulation model of the behavior help us to determine the blocking and the channel utilization while using various channel assignment strategies. The title "Study and Simulation of Traffic Behavior in Cellular Network" entail the study of the blocking probability of traffic in cellular network for static channel assignment strategies and dynamic channel borrowing strategies through MATLAB programming language and graphic user interface (GUI). The result shows that the dynamic scheme can perform better than static maximizing the overall utilization of the circuits and minimizing the overall blocking.

  12. Fracture network evaluation program (FraNEP): A software for analyzing 2D fracture trace-line maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeb, Conny; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Virgo, Simon; Blum, Philipp

    2013-10-01

    Fractures, such as joints, faults and veins, strongly influence the transport of fluids through rocks by either enhancing or inhibiting flow. Techniques used for the automatic detection of lineaments from satellite images and aerial photographs, LIDAR technologies and borehole televiewers significantly enhanced data acquisition. The analysis of such data is often performed manually or with different analysis software. Here we present a novel program for the analysis of 2D fracture networks called FraNEP (Fracture Network Evaluation Program). The program was developed using Visual Basic for Applications in Microsoft Excel™ and combines features from different existing software and characterization techniques. The main novelty of FraNEP is the possibility to analyse trace-line maps of fracture networks applying the (1) scanline sampling, (2) window sampling or (3) circular scanline and window method, without the need of switching programs. Additionally, binning problems are avoided by using cumulative distributions, rather than probability density functions. FraNEP is a time-efficient tool for the characterisation of fracture network parameters, such as density, intensity and mean length. Furthermore, fracture strikes can be visualized using rose diagrams and a fitting routine evaluates the distribution of fracture lengths. As an example of its application, we use FraNEP to analyse a case study of lineament data from a satellite image of the Oman Mountains.

  13. Country-wide rainfall maps from cellular communication networks

    PubMed Central

    Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Accurate and timely surface precipitation measurements are crucial for water resources management, agriculture, weather prediction, climate research, as well as ground validation of satellite-based precipitation estimates. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks such data, and in many parts of the world the density of surface precipitation gauging networks is even rapidly declining. This development can potentially be counteracted by using received signal level data from the enormous number of microwave links used worldwide in commercial cellular communication networks. Along such links, radio signals propagate from a transmitting antenna at one base station to a receiving antenna at another base station. Rain-induced attenuation and, subsequently, path-averaged rainfall intensity can be retrieved from the signal’s attenuation between transmitter and receiver. Here, we show how one such a network can be used to retrieve the space–time dynamics of rainfall for an entire country (The Netherlands, ∼35,500 km2), based on an unprecedented number of links (∼2,400) and a rainfall retrieval algorithm that can be applied in real time. This demonstrates the potential of such networks for real-time rainfall monitoring, in particular in those parts of the world where networks of dedicated ground-based rainfall sensors are often virtually absent. PMID:23382210

  14. Country-wide rainfall maps from cellular communication networks.

    PubMed

    Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2013-02-19

    Accurate and timely surface precipitation measurements are crucial for water resources management, agriculture, weather prediction, climate research, as well as ground validation of satellite-based precipitation estimates. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks such data, and in many parts of the world the density of surface precipitation gauging networks is even rapidly declining. This development can potentially be counteracted by using received signal level data from the enormous number of microwave links used worldwide in commercial cellular communication networks. Along such links, radio signals propagate from a transmitting antenna at one base station to a receiving antenna at another base station. Rain-induced attenuation and, subsequently, path-averaged rainfall intensity can be retrieved from the signal's attenuation between transmitter and receiver. Here, we show how one such a network can be used to retrieve the space-time dynamics of rainfall for an entire country (The Netherlands, ∼35,500 km(2)), based on an unprecedented number of links (∼2,400) and a rainfall retrieval algorithm that can be applied in real time. This demonstrates the potential of such networks for real-time rainfall monitoring, in particular in those parts of the world where networks of dedicated ground-based rainfall sensors are often virtually absent. PMID:23382210

  15. Cutting the Wires: Modularization of Cellular Networks for Experimental Design

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Moritz; Summers, Sean; Stelling, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Understanding naturally evolved cellular networks requires the consecutive identification and revision of the interactions between relevant molecular species. In this process, initially often simplified and incomplete networks are extended by integrating new reactions or whole subnetworks to increase consistency between model predictions and new measurement data. However, increased consistency with experimental data alone is not sufficient to show the existence of biomolecular interactions, because the interplay of different potential extensions might lead to overall similar dynamics. Here, we present a graph-based modularization approach to facilitate the design of experiments targeted at independently validating the existence of several potential network extensions. Our method is based on selecting the outputs to measure during an experiment, such that each potential network extension becomes virtually insulated from all others during data analysis. Each output defines a module that only depends on one hypothetical network extension, and all other outputs act as virtual inputs to achieve insulation. Given appropriate experimental time-series measurements of the outputs, our modules can be analyzed, simulated, and compared to the experimental data separately. Our approach exemplifies the close relationship between structural systems identification and modularization, an interplay that promises development of related approaches in the future. PMID:24411264

  16. Emulating fire propagation by using cellular nonlinear networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, A.; Fortuna, L.; Frasca, M.; Xibilia, M. G.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper a new approach based on Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) for modeling the diffusion of forest fires is presented. Based on a model relying on an hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equation, the proposed approach exploits the peculiarity of CNNs allowing the investigation of different types of forest fires, also considering specific morphological characteristics of the terrain and the presence of external perturbations like wind flows. Results show the emergence of particular phenomena really observed in wildfires, allowing to assess the validity of the approach.

  17. Application-Aware Dynamic Retransmission Control in Mobile Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halima, Nadhir Ben; Kliazovich, Dzmitry; Granelli, Fabrizio

    This paper proposes an application-aware cross-layer approach between application/transport layers on the mobile terminal and link layer at the wireless base station to enable dynamic control on the strength of per-packet error protection for multimedia and data transfers. Specifically, in the context of cellular networks, the proposed scheme allows to control the desired level of Hybrid ARQ (HARQ) protection by using an in-band control feedback channel. Such protection is dynamically adapted on a per-packet basis and depends on the perceptual importance of different packets as well as on the reception history of the flow.

  18. Detecting 2D symmetry-protected topological phases with the tensor-network method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ching-Yu; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    Symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases exhibit nontrivial order if symmetry is respected but are adiabatically connected to the trivial product phase if symmetry is not respected. However, unlike the symmetry breaking phase, there is no local order parameter for SPT phases. Here we employ a tensor-network method to compute the topological invariants characterized by the simulated modular S and T matrices proposed by Hung and Wen to study a transition in a one-parameter family of wavefunctions which are Z2 symmetric. The studied wavefunctions are in some sense the SPT analog of Z2 topological states under a string tension. The numerically obtained S and T matrices are able to characterize the two different phases and identify the transition point.

  19. Sources of Uncertainty in Rainfall Maps from Cellular Communication Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe; Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    and quantify the sources of uncertainty in such rainfall maps, but also to test the actual and optimal performance of one commercial microwave network from one of the cellular providers in The Netherlands.

  20. GPM ground validation via commercial cellular networks: an exploratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe; Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Brasjen, Noud; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-04-01

    The suitability of commercial microwave link networks for ground validation of GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement) data is evaluated here. Two state-of-the-art rainfall products are compared over the land surface of the Netherlands for a period of 7 months, i.e., rainfall maps from commercial cellular communication networks and Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG). Commercial microwave link networks are nowadays the core component in telecommunications worldwide. Rainfall rates can be retrieved from measurements of attenuation between transmitting and receiving antennas. If adequately set up, these networks enable rainfall monitoring tens of meters above the ground at high spatiotemporal resolutions (temporal sampling of seconds to tens of minutes, and spatial sampling of hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers). The GPM mission is the successor of TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission). For two years now, IMERG offers rainfall estimates across the globe (180°W - 180°E and 60°N - 60°S) at spatiotemporal resolutions of 0.1° x 0.1° every 30 min. These two data sets are compared against a Dutch gauge-adjusted radar data set, considered to be the ground truth given its accuracy, spatiotemporal resolution and availability. The suitability of microwave link networks in satellite rainfall evaluation is of special interest, given the independent character of this technique, its high spatiotemporal resolutions and availability. These are valuable assets for water management and modeling of floods, landslides, and weather extremes; especially in places where rain gauge networks are scarce or poorly maintained, or where weather radar networks are too expensive to acquire and/or maintain.

  1. Cellular telephone-based wide-area radiation detection network

    DOEpatents

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2009-06-09

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  2. Nanophotonic Filters and Integrated Networks in Flexible 2D Polymer Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xuetao; Clevenson, Hannah; Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Li, Luozhou; Englund, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Polymers have appealing optical, biochemical, and mechanical qualities, including broadband transparency, ease of functionalization, and biocompatibility. However, their low refractive indices have precluded wavelength-scale optical confinement and nanophotonic applications in polymers. Here, we introduce a suspended polymer photonic crystal (SPPC) architecture that enables the implementation of nanophotonic structures typically limited to high-index materials. Using the SPPC platform, we demonstrate nanophotonic band-edge filters, waveguides, and nanocavities featuring quality (Q) factors exceeding 2, 300 and mode volumes (Vmode) below 1.7(λ/n)3. The unprecedentedly high Q/Vmode ratio results in a spectrally selective enhancement of radiative transitions of embedded emitters via the cavity Purcell effect with an enhancement factor exceeding 100. Moreover, the SPPC architecture allows straightforward integration of nanophotonic networks, shown here by a waveguide-coupled cavity drop filter with sub-nanometer spectral resolution. The nanoscale optical confinement in polymer promises new applications ranging from optical communications to organic opto-electronics, and nanophotonic polymer sensors. PMID:23828320

  3. Nanotribology Results Show that DNA Forms a Mechanically Resistant 2D Network in Metaphase Chromatin Plates

    PubMed Central

    Gállego, Isaac; Oncins, Gerard; Sisquella, Xavier; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Daban, Joan-Ramon

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that metaphase chromosomes are formed by thin plates, and here we have applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) and friction force measurements at the nanoscale (nanotribology) to analyze the properties of these planar structures in aqueous media at room temperature. Our results show that high concentrations of NaCl and EDTA and extensive digestion with protease and nuclease enzymes cause plate denaturation. Nanotribology studies show that native plates under structuring conditions (5 mM Mg2+) have a relatively high friction coefficient (μ ≈ 0.3), which is markedly reduced when high concentrations of NaCl or EDTA are added (μ ≈ 0.1). This lubricant effect can be interpreted considering the electrostatic repulsion between DNA phosphate groups and the AFM tip. Protease digestion increases the friction coefficient (μ ≈ 0.5), but the highest friction is observed when DNA is cleaved by micrococcal nuclease (μ ≈ 0.9), indicating that DNA is the main structural element of plates. Whereas nuclease-digested plates are irreversibly damaged after the friction measurement, native plates can absorb kinetic energy from the AFM tip without suffering any damage. These results suggest that plates are formed by a flexible and mechanically resistant two-dimensional network which allows the safe storage of DNA during mitosis. PMID:21156137

  4. Assessing the weather monitoring capabilities of cellular microwave link networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fencl, Martin; Vrzba, Miroslav; Rieckermann, Jörg; Bareš, Vojtěch

    2016-04-01

    Using of microwave links for rainfall monitoring was suggested already by (Atlas and Ulbrich, 1977). However, this technique attracted broader attention of scientific community only in the recent decade, with the extensive growth of cellular microwave link (CML) networks, which form the backbone of today's cellular telecommunication infrastructure. Several studies have already shown that CMLs can be conveniently used as weather sensors and have potential to provide near-ground path-integrated observations of rainfall but also humidity or fog. However, although research is still focusing on algorithms to improve the weather sensing capabilities (Fencl et al., 2015), it is not clear how to convince cellular operators to provide the power levels of their network. One step in this direction is to show in which regions or municipalities the networks are sufficiently dense to provide/develop good services. In this contribution we suggest a standardized approach to evaluate CML networks in terms of rainfall observation and to identify suitable regions for CML rainfall monitoring. We estimate precision of single CML based on its sensitivity to rainfall, i.e. as a function of frequency, polarization and path length. Capability of a network to capture rainfall spatial patterns is estimated from the CML coverage and path lengths considering that single CML provides path-integrated rain rates. We also search for suitable predictors for regions where no network topologies are available. We test our approach on several European networks and discuss the results. Our results show that CMLs are very dense in urban areas (> 1 CML/km2), but less in rural areas (< 0.02 CML/km2). We found a strong correlation between a population and CML network density (e.g. R2 = 0.97 in Czech Republic), thus population could be a simple proxy to identify suitable regions for CML weather monitoring. To enable a simple and efficient assessment of the CML monitoring potential for any region worldwide

  5. Mesoscale assembly of chemically modified graphene into complex cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barg, Suelen; Perez, Felipe Macul; Ni, Na; Do Vale Pereira, Paula; Maher, Robert C.; Garcia-Tuñon, Esther; Eslava, Salvador; Agnoli, Stefano; Mattevi, Cecilia; Saiz, Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    The widespread technological introduction of graphene beyond electronics rests on our ability to assemble this two-dimensional building block into three-dimensional structures for practical devices. To achieve this goal we need fabrication approaches that are able to provide an accurate control of chemistry and architecture from nano to macroscopic levels. Here, we describe a versatile technique to build ultralight (density ≥1 mg cm-3) cellular networks based on the use of soft templates and the controlled segregation of chemically modified graphene to liquid interfaces. These novel structures can be tuned for excellent conductivity; versatile mechanical response (elastic-brittle to elastomeric, reversible deformation, high energy absorption) and organic absorption capabilities (above 600 g per gram of material). The approach can be used to uncover the basic principles that will guide the design of practical devices that by combining unique mechanical and functional performance will generate new technological opportunities.

  6. Automatic generation of multipath algorithms in the cellular nonlinear network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preciado, Victor M.; Guinea, Domingo; Montufar-Chaveznava, Rodrigo

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this work is to generate a learning machine capable of find solutions for complex image processing task by Cellular Neural Network (CNN's). First a general machine for automatic analog algorithm design independent of the problem to solve is created, this is accomplished through an evolutionary strategy that is an extension of genetic programming. Second, this work introduces a suite of sub- mechanisms that increase the power of genetic programming and contribute to reduce the enormous space search for producing a plentiful search. Some concepts in this section are related with AI theory, in such a way that in this work we are in the intersection field of AI and Image Processing by CNN.

  7. A 'bioproduction breadboard': programming, assembling, and actuating cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Zargar, Amin; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2015-12-01

    With advances in synthetic biology and biofabrication, cellular networks can be functionalized and connected with unprecedented sophistication. We describe a platform for the creation of a 'bioproduction breadboard'. This would consist of physically isolated product-producing cell populations, product capture devices, and other unit operations that function as programmed in place, using unique, orthogonal inputs. For product synthesis, customized cell populations would be connected through standardized, generic inputs allowing 'plug and play' functionality and primary, user-mediated regulation. In addition, through autonomous pathway redirection and balancing, the cells themselves would provide secondary, self-directed regulation to optimize bioproduction. By leveraging specialization and division of labor, we envision diverse cell populations linked to create new pathway designs. PMID:26342587

  8. Edge detection of noisy images based on cellular neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huaqing; Liao, Xiaofeng; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Hongyu; Li, Chaojie

    2011-09-01

    This paper studies a technique employing both cellular neural networks (CNNs) and linear matrix inequality (LMI) for edge detection of noisy images. Our main work focuses on training templates of noise reduction and edge detection CNNs. Based on the Lyapunov stability theorem, we derive a criterion for global asymptotical stability of a unique equilibrium of the noise reduction CNN. Then we design an approach to train edge detection templates, and this approach can detect the edge precisely and efficiently, i.e., by only one iteration. Finally, we illustrate performance of the proposed methodology from the aspect of peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) through computer simulations. Moreover, some comparisons are also given to prove that our method outperforms classical operators in gray image edge detection.

  9. Mesoscale assembly of chemically modified graphene into complex cellular networks

    PubMed Central

    Barg, Suelen; Perez, Felipe Macul; Ni, Na; do Vale Pereira, Paula; Maher, Robert C.; Garcia-Tuñon, Esther; Eslava, Salvador; Agnoli, Stefano; Mattevi, Cecilia; Saiz, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The widespread technological introduction of graphene beyond electronics rests on our ability to assemble this two-dimensional building block into three-dimensional structures for practical devices. To achieve this goal we need fabrication approaches that are able to provide an accurate control of chemistry and architecture from nano to macroscopic levels. Here, we describe a versatile technique to build ultralight (density ≥1 mg cm−3) cellular networks based on the use of soft templates and the controlled segregation of chemically modified graphene to liquid interfaces. These novel structures can be tuned for excellent conductivity; versatile mechanical response (elastic-brittle to elastomeric, reversible deformation, high energy absorption) and organic absorption capabilities (above 600 g per gram of material). The approach can be used to uncover the basic principles that will guide the design of practical devices that by combining unique mechanical and functional performance will generate new technological opportunities. PMID:24999766

  10. Country-wide rainfall maps from cellular communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leijnse, Hidde; Overeem, Aart; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2013-04-01

    Accurate rainfall observations with high spatial and temporal resolutions are needed for hydrological applications, agriculture, meteorology, and climate monitoring. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks accurate rainfall information and the number of rain gauges is even severely declining in Europe, South-America, and Africa. This calls for alternative sources of rainfall information. Various studies have shown that microwave links from operational cellular telecommunication networks may be employed for rainfall monitoring. Such networks cover 20% of the land surface of the earth and have a high density, especially in urban areas. The basic principle of rainfall monitoring using microwave links is as follows. Rainfall attenuates the electromagnetic signals transmitted from one telephone tower to another. By measuring the received power at one end of a microwave link as a function of time, the path-integrated attenuation due to rainfall can be calculated. Previous studies have shown that average rainfall intensities over the length of a link can be derived from the path-integrated attenuation. Here we show how one cellular telecommunication network can be used to retrieve the space-time dynamics of rainfall for an entire country. A dataset from a commercial microwave link network over the Netherlands is analyzed, containing data from an unprecedented number of links (2400) covering the land surface of the Netherlands (35500 km2). This dataset consists of 24 days with substantial rainfall in June - September 2011. A rainfall retrieval algorithm is presented to derive rainfall intensities from the microwave link data, which have a temporal resolution of 15 min. Rainfall maps (1 km spatial resolution) are generated from these rainfall intensities using Kriging. This algorithm is suited for real-time application, and is calibrated on a subset (12 days) of the dataset. The other 12 days in the dataset are used to validate the algorithm. Both

  11. Simulating Quantitative Cellular Responses Using Asynchronous Threshold Boolean Network Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With increasing knowledge about the potential mechanisms underlying cellular functions, it is becoming feasible to predict the response of biological systems to genetic and environmental perturbations. Due to the lack of homogeneity in living tissues it is difficult to estimate the physiological effect of chemicals, including potential toxicity. Here we investigate a biologically motivated model for estimating tissue level responses by aggregating the behavior of a cell population. We assume that the molecular state of individual cells is independently governed by discrete non-deterministic signaling mechanisms. This results in noisy but highly reproducible aggregate level responses that are consistent with experimental data. Results We developed an asynchronous threshold Boolean network simulation algorithm to model signal transduction in a single cell, and then used an ensemble of these models to estimate the aggregate response across a cell population. Using published data, we derived a putative crosstalk network involving growth factors and cytokines - i.e., Epidermal Growth Factor, Insulin, Insulin like Growth Factor Type 1, and Tumor Necrosis Factor α - to describe early signaling events in cell proliferation signal transduction. Reproducibility of the modeling technique across ensembles of Boolean networks representing cell populations is investigated. Furthermore, we compare our simulation results to experimental observations of hepatocytes reported in the literature. Conclusion A systematic analysis of the results following differential stimulation of this model by growth factors and cytokines suggests that: (a) using Boolean network ensembles with asynchronous updating provides biologically plausible noisy individual cellular responses with reproducible mean behavior for large cell populations, and (b) with sufficient data our model can estimate the response to different concentrations of extracellular ligands. Our results suggest that this

  12. Cellular computational networks--a scalable architecture for learning the dynamics of large networked systems.

    PubMed

    Luitel, Bipul; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Neural networks for implementing large networked systems such as smart electric power grids consist of multiple inputs and outputs. Many outputs lead to a greater number of parameters to be adapted. Each additional variable increases the dimensionality of the problem and hence learning becomes a challenge. Cellular computational networks (CCNs) are a class of sparsely connected dynamic recurrent networks (DRNs). By proper selection of a set of input elements for each output variable in a given application, a DRN can be modified into a CCN which significantly reduces the complexity of the neural network and allows use of simple training methods for independent learning in each cell thus making it scalable. This article demonstrates this concept of developing a CCN using dimensionality reduction in a DRN for scalability and better performance. The concept has been analytically explained and empirically verified through application. PMID:24300549

  13. Sources of uncertainty in rainfall maps from cellular communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, M. F.; Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2015-03-01

    ground truth). Thus, we were able to not only identify and quantify the sources of uncertainty in such rainfall maps, but also to test the actual and optimal performance of one commercial microwave network from one of the cellular providers in the Netherlands.

  14. Cellular and network mechanisms of genetically-determined absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Pinault, Didier; O'Brien, Terence J

    2005-01-01

    The absence epilepsies are characterized by recurrent episodes of loss of consciousness associated with generalized spike-and-wave discharges, with an abrupt onset and offset, in the thalamocortical system. In the absence of detailed neurophysiological studies in humans, many of the concepts regarding the pathophysiological basis of absence seizures are based on studies in animal models. Each of these models has its particular strengths and limitations, and the validity of findings from these models for the human condition cannot be assumed. Consequently, studies in different models have produced some conflicting findings and conclusions. A long-standing concept, based primarily from studies in vivo in cats and in vitro brain slices, is that these paroxysmal electrical events develop suddenly from sleep-related spindle oscillations. More specifically, it is proposed that the initial mechanisms that underlie absence-related spike-and-wave discharges are located in the thalamus, involving especially the thalamic reticular nucleus. By contrast, more recent studies in well-established, genetic models of absence epilepsy in rats demonstrate that spike-and-wave discharges originate in a cortical focus and develop from a wake-related natural corticothalamic sensorimotor rhythm. In this review we integrate recent findings showing that, in both the thalamus and the neocortex, genetically-determined, absence-related spike-and-wave discharges are the manifestation of hypersynchronized, cellular, rhythmic excitations and inhibitions that result from a combination of complex, intrinsic, synaptic mechanisms. Arguments are put forward supporting the hypothesis that layer VI corticothalamic neurons act as 'drivers' in the generation of spike-and-wave discharges in the somatosensory thalamocortical system that result in corticothalamic resonances particularly initially involving the thalamic reticular nucleus. However an important unresolved question is: what are the cellular and

  15. Cellular nonlinear networks for strike-point localization at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, P.; Fortuna, L.; Bruno, M.; Vagliasindi, G.; Murari, A.; Andrew, P.; Mazzitelli, G.

    2005-11-01

    At JET, the potential of fast image processing for real-time purposes is thoroughly investigated. Particular attention is devoted to smart sensors based on system on chip technology. The data of the infrared cameras were processed with a chip implementing a cellular nonlinear network (CNN) structure so as to support and complement the magnetic diagnostics in the real-time localization of the strike-point position in the divertor. The circuit consists of two layers of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor components, the first being the sensor and the second implementing the actual CNN. This innovative hardware has made it possible to determine the position of the maximum thermal load with a time resolution of the order of 30 ms. Good congruency has been found with the measurement from the thermocouples in the divertor, proving the potential of the infrared data in locating the region of the maximum thermal load. The results are also confirmed by JET magnetic codes, both those used for the equilibrium reconstructions and those devoted to the identification of the plasma boundary.

  16. Radio Resource Allocation on Complex 4G Wireless Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psannis, Kostas E.

    2015-09-01

    In this article we consider the heuristic algorithm which improves step by step wireless data delivery over LTE cellular networks by using the total transmit power with the constraint on users’ data rates, and the total throughput with the constraints on the total transmit power as well as users’ data rates, which are jointly integrated into a hybrid-layer design framework to perform radio resource allocation for multiple users, and to effectively decide the optimal system parameter such as modulation and coding scheme (MCS) in order to adapt to the varying channel quality. We propose new heuristic algorithm which balances the accessible data rate, the initial data rates of each user allocated by LTE scheduler, the priority indicator which signals delay- throughput- packet loss awareness of the user, and the buffer fullness by achieving maximization of radio resource allocation for multiple users. It is noted that the overall performance is improved with the increase in the number of users, due to multiuser diversity. Experimental results illustrate and validate the accuracy of the proposed methodology.

  17. Network signatures of cellular immortalization in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Sung-Mi; Jung, So-Young; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Mee-Hee; Kim, Jun-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jeon, Jae-Pil

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We identified network signatures of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles. •More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCLs. •MicroRNA target genes in LCLs are involved in apoptosis and immune-related functions. •This approach is useful to find functional miRNA targets in specific cell conditions. -- Abstract: Human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) has been used as an in vitro cell model in genetic and pharmacogenomic studies, as well as a good model for studying gene expression regulatory machinery using integrated genomic analyses. In this study, we aimed to identify biological networks of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles of microRNAs and their target genes in LCLs. We first selected differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and microRNAs (DEmiRs) between early passage LCLs (eLCLs) and terminally differentiated late passage LCLs (tLCLs). The in silico and correlation analysis of these DEGs and DEmiRs revealed that 1098 DEG–DEmiR pairs were found to be positively (n = 591 pairs) or negatively (n = 507 pairs) correlated with each other. More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCL immortalizations. The target DEGs of DEmiRs were enriched for cellular functions associated with apoptosis, immune response, cell death, JAK–STAT cascade and lymphocyte activation while non-miRNA target DEGs were over-represented for basic cell metabolisms. The target DEGs correlated negatively with miR-548a-3p and miR-219-5p were significantly associated with protein kinase cascade, and the lymphocyte proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. In addition, the miR-106a and miR-424 clusters located in the X chromosome were enriched in DEmiR–mRNA pairs for LCL immortalization. In this study, the integrated transcriptomic analysis of LCLs could identify functional networks of biologically active microRNAs and their target genes involved in LCL immortalization.

  18. When are two multi-layer cellular neural networks the same?

    PubMed

    Ban, Jung-Chao; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2016-07-01

    This paper aims to characterize whether a multi-layer cellular neural network is of deep architecture; namely, when can an n-layer cellular neural network be replaced by an m-layer cellular neural network for mnetwork is revealed. PMID:27085113

  19. Predict drug-protein interaction in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved with many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are the most frequent targets for drug development: over 50% of all prescription drugs currently on the market are actually acting by targeting GPCRs directly or indirectly. Found in every living thing and nearly all cells, ion channels play crucial roles for many vital functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction, and central nervous system response. Their dysfunction may have significant impact to human health, and hence ion channels are deemed as "the next GPCRs". To develop GPCR-targeting or ion-channel-targeting drugs, the first important step is to identify the interactions between potential drug compounds with the two kinds of protein receptors in the cellular networking. In this minireview, we are to introduce two predictors. One is called iGPCR-Drug accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/; the other called iCDI-PseFpt at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt. The former is for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs; while the latter for that with ion channels. In both predictors, the drug compound was formulated by the two-dimensional molecular fingerprint, and the protein receptor by the pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, while the operation engine was the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. For the convenience of most experimental pharmaceutical and medical scientists, a step-bystep guide is provided on how to use each of the two web-servers to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics involved originally for their establishment. PMID:23889048

  20. Design mobile satellite system architecture as an integral part of the cellular access digital network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, E. S. K.; Marinho, J. A.; Russell, J. E., Sr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cellular Access Digital Network (CADN) is the access vehicle through which cellular technology is brought into the mainstream of the evolving integrated telecommunications network. Beyond the integrated end-to-end digital access and per call network services provisioning of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the CADN engenders the added capability of mobility freedom via wireless access. One key element of the CADN network architecture is the standard user to network interface that is independent of RF transmission technology. Since the Mobile Satellite System (MSS) is envisioned to not only complement but also enhance the capabilities of the terrestrial cellular telecommunications network, compatibility and interoperability between terrestrial cellular and mobile satellite systems are vitally important to provide an integrated moving telecommunications network of the future. From a network standpoint, there exist very strong commonalities between the terrestrial cellular system and the mobile satellite system. Therefore, the MSS architecture should be designed as an integral part of the CADN. This paper describes the concept of the CADN, the functional architecture of the MSS, and the user-network interface signaling protocols.

  1. Analysis of Blocking Rate and Bandwidth Usage of Mobile IPTV Services in Wireless Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingfu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks become more and more popular, owing to the significant growth in access bandwidth of wireless cellular networks such as 3G/4G and WiMAX. However, the spectrum resources of wireless cellular networks is rare. How to enhance the spectral efficiency of mobile networks becomes an important issue. Unicast, broadcast, and multicast are the most important transport schemes for offering mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks. Therefore, bandwidth usages and blocking rates of unicast, broadcast, and multicast IPTV services were analyzed and compared in this paper. Simulations were also conducted to validate the analytical results. Numerical results demonstrate that the presented analysis is correct, and multicast scheme achieves the best bandwidth usage and blocking rate performance, relative to the other two schemes. PMID:25379521

  2. Analysis of blocking rate and bandwidth usage of mobile IPTV services in wireless cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingfu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks become more and more popular, owing to the significant growth in access bandwidth of wireless cellular networks such as 3G/4G and WiMAX. However, the spectrum resources of wireless cellular networks is rare. How to enhance the spectral efficiency of mobile networks becomes an important issue. Unicast, broadcast, and multicast are the most important transport schemes for offering mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks. Therefore, bandwidth usages and blocking rates of unicast, broadcast, and multicast IPTV services were analyzed and compared in this paper. Simulations were also conducted to validate the analytical results. Numerical results demonstrate that the presented analysis is correct, and multicast scheme achieves the best bandwidth usage and blocking rate performance, relative to the other two schemes. PMID:25379521

  3. Discrete hexamer water clusters and 2D water layer trapped in three luminescent Ag/tetramethylpyrazine/benzene-dicarboxylate hosts: 1D chain, 2D layer and 3D network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Hong-Xin; Zhang, Ting; Huang, Hua-Qi; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2016-03-01

    Three mix-ligand Ag(I) coordination compounds, namely, {[Ag10(tpyz) 5(L1) 5(H2 O)2].(H2 O)4}n (1, tpyz = 2,3,4,5-tetramethylpyrazine, H2 L1 = phthalic acid), [Ag4(tpyz) 2(L2) 2(H2 O)].(H2 O)5}n (2, H2 L2 = isophthalic acid) {[Ag2(tpyz) 2(L3) (H2 O)4].(H2 O)8}n (3, H2 L3 = terephthalic acid), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, PXRD and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. 1 exhibits a 2D layer which can be simplified as a (4,4) net. 2 is a 3D network which can be simplified as a (3,3)-connected 2-nodal net with a point symbol of {102.12}{102}. 3 consists of linear [Ag(tpyz) (H2 O)2]n chain. Of particular interest, discrete hexamer water clusters were observed in 1 and 2, while a 2D L10(6) water layer exists in 3. The results suggest that the benzene dicarboxylates play pivotal roles in the formation of the different host architectures as well as different water aggregations. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and emissive behaviors of these compounds were investigated.

  4. Traffic Driven Analysis of Cellular and WiFi Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Utpal Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Since the days Internet traffic proliferated, measurement, monitoring and analysis of network traffic have been critical to not only the basic understanding of large networks, but also to seek improvements in resource management, traffic engineering and security. At the current times traffic in wireless local and wide area networks are facing…

  5. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation-Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks.

    PubMed

    White, Forest M; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-12

    Protein phosphorylation-mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks. PMID:27049636

  6. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation–Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Forest M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation–mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks.

  7. Effects of cellular homeostatic intrinsic plasticity on dynamical and computational properties of biological recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Naudé, Jérémie; Cessac, Bruno; Berry, Hugues; Delord, Bruno

    2013-09-18

    Homeostatic intrinsic plasticity (HIP) is a ubiquitous cellular mechanism regulating neuronal activity, cardinal for the proper functioning of nervous systems. In invertebrates, HIP is critical for orchestrating stereotyped activity patterns. The functional impact of HIP remains more obscure in vertebrate networks, where higher order cognitive processes rely on complex neural dynamics. The hypothesis has emerged that HIP might control the complexity of activity dynamics in recurrent networks, with important computational consequences. However, conflicting results about the causal relationships between cellular HIP, network dynamics, and computational performance have arisen from machine-learning studies. Here, we assess how cellular HIP effects translate into collective dynamics and computational properties in biological recurrent networks. We develop a realistic multiscale model including a generic HIP rule regulating the neuronal threshold with actual molecular signaling pathways kinetics, Dale's principle, sparse connectivity, synaptic balance, and Hebbian synaptic plasticity (SP). Dynamic mean-field analysis and simulations unravel that HIP sets a working point at which inputs are transduced by large derivative ranges of the transfer function. This cellular mechanism ensures increased network dynamics complexity, robust balance with SP at the edge of chaos, and improved input separability. Although critically dependent upon balanced excitatory and inhibitory drives, these effects display striking robustness to changes in network architecture, learning rates, and input features. Thus, the mechanism we unveil might represent a ubiquitous cellular basis for complex dynamics in neural networks. Understanding this robustness is an important challenge to unraveling principles underlying self-organization around criticality in biological recurrent neural networks. PMID:24048833

  8. Cues for cellular assembly of vascular elastin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.

    Elastin, a structural protein distributed in the extracellular matrix of vascular tissues is critical to the maintenance of vascular mechanics, besides regulation of cell-signaling pathways involved in injury response and morphogenesis. Thus, congenital absence or disease-mediated degradation of vascular elastin and its malformation within native vessels due to innately poor elastin synthesis by adult vascular cells compromise vascular homeostasis. Current elastin regenerative strategies using tissue engineering principles are limited by the progressive destabilization of tropoelastin mRNA expression in adult vascular cells and the unavailability of scaffolds that can provide cellular cues necessary to up-regulate elastin synthesis and regenerate faithful mimics of native elastin. Since our earlier studies demonstrated the elastogenic utility of hyaluronan (HA)-based cues, we have currently sought to identify a unique set of culture conditions based on HA fragments (0.756-2000 kDa), growth factors (TGF-beta1, IGF-1) and other biomolecules (Cu2+ ions, LOX), which will together enhance synthesis, crosslinking, maturation and fibrous elastin matrix formation by adult SMCs, under both healthy and inflammatory conditions. It was observed that TGF-beta1 (1 ng/mL) together with HA oligomers (0.2 microg/mL) synergistically suppressed SMC proliferation, enhanced tropoelastin (8-fold) and matrix elastin synthesis (5.5-fold), besides improving matrix yield (4.5-fold), possibly by increasing production and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX). Though addition of IGF-1 alone did not offer any advantage, HA fragments (20-200 kDa) in the presence of IGF-1 stimulated tropoelastin and soluble elastin synthesis more than 2.2-fold, with HMW HA contributing for ˜5-fold increase in crosslinked matrix elastin synthesis. Similarly, 0.1 M of Cu2+ ions, alone or together with HA fragments stimulated synthesis of tropoelastin (4-fold) and crosslinked matrix elastin (4.5-fold), via increases in

  9. Cellular Uptake and Movement in 2D and 3D Multicellular Breast Cancer Models of Fructose-Based Cylindrical Micelles That Is Dependent on the Rod Length.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiacheng; Lu, Hongxu; Xiao, Pu; Stenzel, Martina H

    2016-07-01

    While the shape effect of nanoparticles on cellular uptake has been frequently studied, no consistent conclusions are available currently. The controversy mainly focuses on the cellular uptake of elongated (i.e., filaments or rod-like micelles) as compared to spherical (i.e., micelles and vesicles) nanoparticles. So far, there is no clear trend that proposes the superiority of spherical or nonspherical nanoparticles with conflicting reports available in the literature. One of the reasons is that these few reports available deal with nanoparticles of different shapes, surface chemistries, stabilities, and aspects ratios. Here, we investigated the effect of the aspect ratio of cylindrical micelles on the cellular uptake by breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Cylindrical micelles, also coined rod-like micelles, of various length were prepared using fructose-based block copolymers poly(1-O-methacryloyl-β-d-fructopyranose)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate). The critical water content, temperature, and stirring rate that trigger the morphological transition from spheres to rods of various aspect ratios were identified, allowing the generation of different kinetically trapping morphologies. High shear force as they are found with high stirring rates was observed to inhibit the formation of long rods. Rod-like micelles with length of 500-2000 nm were subsequently investigated toward their ability to translocate in breast cancer cells and penetrate into MCF-7 multicellular spheroid models. It was found that shorter rods were taken up at a higher rate than longer rods. PMID:27286273

  10. Participatory sensing as an enabler for self-organisation in future cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, Muhammad Ali; Imran, Ali; Onireti, Oluwakayode

    2013-12-01

    In this short review paper we summarise the emerging challenges in the field of participatory sensing for the self-organisation of the next generation of wireless cellular networks. We identify the potential of participatory sensing in enabling the self-organisation, deployment optimisation and radio resource management of wireless cellular networks. We also highlight how this approach can meet the future goals for the next generation of cellular system in terms of infrastructure sharing, management of multiple radio access techniques, flexible usage of spectrum and efficient management of very small data cells.

  11. Performance evaluation of power control algorithms in wireless cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temaneh-Nyah, C.; Iita, V.

    2014-10-01

    Power control in a mobile communication network intents to control the transmission power levels in such a way that the required quality of service (QoS) for the users is guaranteed with lowest possible transmission powers. Most of the studies of power control algorithms in the literature are based on some kind of simplified assumptions which leads to compromise in the validity of the results when applied in a real environment. In this paper, a CDMA network was simulated. The real environment was accounted for by defining the analysis area and the network base stations and mobile stations are defined by their geographical coordinates, the mobility of the mobile stations is accounted for. The simulation also allowed for a number of network parameters including the network traffic, and the wireless channel models to be modified. Finally, we present the simulation results of a convergence speed based comparative analysis of three uplink power control algorithms.

  12. Simulating Quantitative Cellular Responses Using Asynchronous Threshold Boolean Network Ensembles

    EPA Science Inventory

    With increasing knowledge about the potential mechanisms underlying cellular functions, it is becoming feasible to predict the response of biological systems to genetic and environmental perturbations. Due to the lack of homogeneity in living tissues it is difficult to estimate t...

  13. Tools and Models for Integrating Multiple Cellular Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstein, Mark

    2015-11-06

    In this grant, we have systematically investigated the integrated networks, which are responsible for the coordination of activity between metabolic pathways in prokaryotes. We have developed several computational tools to analyze the topology of the integrated networks consisting of metabolic, regulatory, and physical interaction networks. The tools are all open-source, and they are available to download from Github, and can be incorporated in the Knowledgebase. Here, we summarize our work as follow. Understanding the topology of the integrated networks is the first step toward understanding its dynamics and evolution. For Aim 1 of this grant, we have developed a novel algorithm to determine and measure the hierarchical structure of transcriptional regulatory networks [1]. The hierarchy captures the direction of information flow in the network. The algorithm is generally applicable to regulatory networks in prokaryotes, yeast and higher organisms. Integrated datasets are extremely beneficial in understanding the biology of a system in a compact manner due to the conflation of multiple layers of information. Therefore for Aim 2 of this grant, we have developed several tools and carried out analysis for integrating system-wide genomic information. To make use of the structural data, we have developed DynaSIN for protein-protein interactions networks with various dynamical interfaces [2]. We then examined the association between network topology with phenotypic effects such as gene essentiality. In particular, we have organized E. coli and S. cerevisiae transcriptional regulatory networks into hierarchies. We then correlated gene phenotypic effects by tinkering with different layers to elucidate which layers were more tolerant to perturbations [3]. In the context of evolution, we also developed a workflow to guide the comparison between different types of biological networks across various species using the concept of rewiring [4], and Furthermore, we have developed

  14. C. elegans Metabolic Gene Regulatory Networks Govern the Cellular Economy

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Emma; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Diet greatly impacts metabolism in health and disease. In response to the presence or absence of specific nutrients, metabolic gene regulatory networks sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate metabolic flux accordingly, for instance by the transcriptional control of metabolic enzymes. Here we discuss recent insights regarding metazoan metabolic regulatory networks using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, including the modular organization of metabolic gene regulatory networks, the prominent impact of diet on the transcriptome and metabolome, specialized roles of nuclear hormone receptors in responding to dietary conditions, regulation of metabolic genes and metabolic regulators by microRNAs, and feedback between metabolic genes and their regulators. PMID:24731597

  15. Detection of silent cells, synchronization and modulatory activity in developing cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Johannes J J; Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Pires, Johny; Dassen, Valerie J; Berkhout, Janna A; Emperador Melero, Javier; Nadadhur, Aish G; Alevra, Mihai; Toonen, Ruud F; Heine, Vivi M; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Meredith, Rhiannon M

    2016-04-01

    Developing networks in the immature nervous system and in cellular cultures are characterized by waves of synchronous activity in restricted clusters of cells. Synchronized activity in immature networks is proposed to regulate many different developmental processes, from neuron growth and cell migration, to the refinement of synapses, topographic maps, and the mature composition of ion channels. These emergent activity patterns are not present in all cells simultaneously within the network and more immature "silent" cells, potentially correlated with the presence of silent synapses, are prominent in different networks during early developmental periods. Many current network analyses for detection of synchronous cellular activity utilize activity-based pixel correlations to identify cellular-based regions of interest (ROIs) and coincident cell activity. However, using activity-based correlations, these methods first underestimate or ignore the inactive silent cells within the developing network and second, are difficult to apply within cell-dense regions commonly found in developing brain networks. In addition, previous methods may ignore ROIs within a network that shows transient activity patterns comprising both inactive and active periods. We developed analysis software to semi-automatically detect cells within developing neuronal networks that were imaged using calcium-sensitive reporter dyes. Using an iterative threshold, modulation of activity was tracked within individual cells across the network. The distribution pattern of both inactive and active, including synchronous cells, could be determined based on distance measures to neighboring cells and according to different anatomical layers. PMID:26097169

  16. Retrieval algorithm for rainfall mapping from microwave links in a cellular communication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Leijnse, Hidde

    2016-04-01

    Microwave links in commercial cellular communication networks hold a promise for areal rainfall monitoring and could complement rainfall estimates from ground-based weather radars, rain gauges, and satellites. It has been shown that country-wide rainfall maps can be derived from the signal attenuations of microwave links in such a network. We present a rainfall retrieval algorithm, which is employed to obtain rainfall maps from microwave links in a cellular communication network. We compare these rainfall maps to gauge-adjusted radar rainfall maps. The microwave link data set, as well as the developed code, a package in the open source scripting language "R", are freely available at GitHub (https://github.com/overeem11/RAINLINK). The purpose of this presentation is to promote rainfall mapping utilizing microwave links from cellular communication networks as an alternative or complementary means for continental-scale rainfall monitoring.

  17. Automatic classification of pulmonary peri-fissural nodules in computed tomography using an ensemble of 2D views and a convolutional neural network out-of-the-box.

    PubMed

    Ciompi, Francesco; de Hoop, Bartjan; van Riel, Sarah J; Chung, Kaman; Scholten, Ernst Th; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Jong, Pim A; Prokop, Mathias; van Ginneken, Bram

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we tackle the problem of automatic classification of pulmonary peri-fissural nodules (PFNs). The classification problem is formulated as a machine learning approach, where detected nodule candidates are classified as PFNs or non-PFNs. Supervised learning is used, where a classifier is trained to label the detected nodule. The classification of the nodule in 3D is formulated as an ensemble of classifiers trained to recognize PFNs based on 2D views of the nodule. In order to describe nodule morphology in 2D views, we use the output of a pre-trained convolutional neural network known as OverFeat. We compare our approach with a recently presented descriptor of pulmonary nodule morphology, namely Bag of Frequencies, and illustrate the advantages offered by the two strategies, achieving performance of AUC = 0.868, which is close to the one of human experts. PMID:26458112

  18. Quantifying Uncertainties in Rainfall Maps from Cellular Communication Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uijlenhoet, R.; Rios Gaona, M. F.; Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.

    2014-12-01

    The core idea behind rainfall retrievals from commercial microwave link networks is to measure the decrease in power due to attenuation of the electromagnetic signal by raindrops along the link path. Accurate rainfall measurements are of vital importance in hydrological applications, for instance, flash-flood early-warning systems, agriculture, and climate modeling. Hence, such an alternative technique fulfills the need for measurements with higher resolution in time and space, especially in places where standard rain gauge-networks are scarce or poorly maintained. Rainfall estimation via commercial microwave link networks, at country-wide scales, has recently been demonstrated. Despite their potential applicability in rainfall estimation at higher spatiotemporal resolutions, the uncertainties present in link-based rainfall maps are not yet fully comprehended. Now we attempt to quantify the inherent sources of uncertainty present in interpolated maps computed from commercial microwave link rainfall retrievals. In order to disentangle these sources of uncertainty we identified four main sources of error: 1) microwave link measurements, 2) availability of microwave link measurements, 3) spatial distribution of the network, and 4) interpolation methodology. We computed more than 1000 rainfall fields, for The Netherlands, from real and simulated microwave link data. These rainfall fields were compared to quality-controlled gauge-adjusted radar rainfall maps considered as ground-truth. Thus we were able to quantify the contribution of errors in microwave link measurements to the overall uncertainty. The actual performance of the commercial microwave link network is affected by the intermittent availability of the links, not only in time but also in space. We simulated a fully-operational network in time and space, and thus we quantified the role of the availability of microwave link measurements to the overall uncertainty. This research showed that the largest source of

  19. Resource Management in QoS-Aware Wireless Cellular Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhi

    2011-01-01

    Emerging broadband wireless networks that support high speed packet data with heterogeneous quality of service (QoS) requirements demand more flexible and efficient use of the scarce spectral resource. Opportunistic scheduling exploits the time-varying, location-dependent channel conditions to achieve multiuser diversity. In this work, we study…

  20. Application of Cellular Automata to Detection of Malicious Network Packets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    A problem in computer security is identification of attack signatures in network packets. An attack signature is a pattern of bits that characterizes a particular attack. Because there are many kinds of attacks, there are potentially many attack signatures. Furthermore, attackers may seek to avoid detection by altering the attack mechanism so that…

  1. Reverse engineering cellular decisions for hybrid reconfigurable network modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Howard A.; Saranak, Jureepan; Foster, Kenneth W.

    2011-06-01

    Cells as microorganisms and within multicellular organisms make robust decisions. Knowing how these complex cells make decisions is essential to explain, predict or mimic their behavior. The discovery of multi-layer multiple feedback loops in the signaling pathways of these modular hybrid systems suggests their decision making is sophisticated. Hybrid systems coordinate and integrate signals of various kinds: discrete on/off signals, continuous sensory signals, and stochastic and continuous fluctuations to regulate chemical concentrations. Such signaling networks can form reconfigurable networks of attractors and repellors giving them an extra level of organization that has resilient decision making built in. Work on generic attractor and repellor networks and on the already identified feedback networks and dynamic reconfigurable regulatory topologies in biological cells suggests that biological systems probably exploit such dynamic capabilities. We present a simple behavior of the swimming unicellular alga Chlamydomonas that involves interdependent discrete and continuous signals in feedback loops. We show how to rigorously verify a hybrid dynamical model of a biological system with respect to a declarative description of a cell's behavior. The hybrid dynamical systems we use are based on a unification of discrete structures and continuous topologies developed in prior work on convergence spaces. They involve variables of discrete and continuous types, in the sense of type theory in mathematical logic. A unification such as afforded by convergence spaces is necessary if one wants to take account of the affect of the structural relationships within each type on the dynamics of the system.

  2. Frequency-dependent micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris; Kim, Jihan; McIntyre, David; Sun, Bo

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence many cellular behaviors such as growth, differentiation, and migration. These are dynamic processes in which the cells actively remodel the ECM. Reconstituted collagen gel is a common model ECM for studying cell-ECM interactions in vitro because collagen is the most abundant component of mammalian ECM and gives the ECM its material stiffness. We embed micron-sized particles in collagen and use holographic optical tweezers to apply forces to the particles in multiple directions and over a range of frequencies up to 10 Hz. We calculate the local compliance and show that it is dependent on both the direction and frequency of the applied force. Performing the same measurement on many particles allows us to characterize the spatial inhomogeneity of the mechanical properties and shows that the compliance decreases at higher frequencies. Performing these measurements on cell-populated collagen gels shows that cellular remodeling of the ECM changes the mechanical properties of the collagen and we investigate whether this change is dependent on the local strain and distance from nearby cells.

  3. A 2-D Pore-Network Model of the Drying of Single-Component Liquids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Yanic C.; Yiotis, A.G.; Stubos, A.K.; Boundovis, A.G.

    2000-01-20

    The drying of liquid-saturated porous media is typically approaching using macroscopic continuum models involving phenomenological coefficients. Insight on these coefficients can be obtained by a more fundamental study at the pore- and pore-network levels. In this report, a model based on pore-network representation of porous media that accounts for various process at the pore-scale is presented. These include mass transfer by advection and diffusion in the gas phase, viscous flow in liquid and gas phases and capillary effects at the gas-liquid menisci in the pore throats.

  4. A statistical model of fracture for a 2D hexagonal mesh: The Cell Network Model of Fracture for the bamboo Guadua angustifolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Gabriel; Linero, Dorian L.; Muñoz, José D.

    2011-01-01

    A 2D, hexagonal in geometry, statistical model of fracture is proposed. The model is based on the drying fracture process of the bamboo Guadua angustifolia. A network of flexible cells are joined by brittle junctures of fixed Young moduli that break at a certain thresholds in tensile force. The system is solved by means of the Finite Element Method (FEM). The distribution of avalanche breakings exhibits a power law with exponent -2.93(9), in agreement with the random fuse model (Bhattacharyya and Chakrabarti, 2006) [1].

  5. Stackelberg Game Based Power Allocation for Physical Layer Security of Device-to-device Communication Underlaying Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Junyue; Cai, Yueming; Wu, Dan; Chen, Hualiang

    2014-05-01

    The problem of power allocation for device-to-device (D2D) underlay communication to improve physical layer security is addressed. Specifically, to improve the secure communication of the cellular users, we introduce a Stackelberg game for allocating the power of the D2D link under a total power constraint and a rate constraint at the D2D pair. In the introduced Stackelberg game the D2D pair works as a seller and the cellular UEs work as buyers. Firstly, because the interference signals from D2D pair are unknown to both the legitimate receiver and the illegitimate eavesdropper, it is possible that a cellular UE decline to participate in the introduced Stackelberg game. So the condition under which a legitimate user will participate in the introduced Stackelberg game is discussed. Then, based on the Stackelberg game, we propose a semi-distributed power allocation algorithm, which is proved to conclude after finite-time iterations. In the end, some simulations are presented to verify the performance improvement in the physical layer security of cellular UEs using the proposed power allocation algorithm. We can determine that with the proposed algorithm, while the D2D pair's communication demand is met, the physical layer security of cellular UEs can be improved.

  6. Cellular network entropy as the energy potential in Waddington's differentiation landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Severini, Simone; Widschwendter, Martin; Enver, Tariq; Zhou, Joseph X.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.

    2013-10-01

    Differentiation is a key cellular process in normal tissue development that is significantly altered in cancer. Although molecular signatures characterising pluripotency and multipotency exist, there is, as yet, no single quantitative mark of a cellular sample's position in the global differentiation hierarchy. Here we adopt a systems view and consider the sample's network entropy, a measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, computable from a sample's genome-wide expression profile. We demonstrate that network entropy provides a quantitative, in-silico, readout of the average undifferentiated state of the profiled cells, recapitulating the known hierarchy of pluripotent, multipotent and differentiated cell types. Network entropy further exhibits dynamic changes in time course differentiation data, and in line with a sample's differentiation stage. In disease, network entropy predicts a higher level of cellular plasticity in cancer stem cell populations compared to ordinary cancer cells. Importantly, network entropy also allows identification of key differentiation pathways. Our results are consistent with the view that pluripotency is a statistical property defined at the cellular population level, correlating with intra-sample heterogeneity, and driven by the degree of signaling promiscuity in cells. In summary, network entropy provides a quantitative measure of a cell's undifferentiated state, defining its elevation in Waddington's landscape.

  7. Logical Modeling and Dynamical Analysis of Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Jaoudé, Wassim; Traynard, Pauline; Monteiro, Pedro T.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Helikar, Tomáš; Thieffry, Denis; Chaouiya, Claudine

    2016-01-01

    The logical (or logic) formalism is increasingly used to model regulatory and signaling networks. Complementing these applications, several groups contributed various methods and tools to support the definition and analysis of logical models. After an introduction to the logical modeling framework and to several of its variants, we review here a number of recent methodological advances to ease the analysis of large and intricate networks. In particular, we survey approaches to determine model attractors and their reachability properties, to assess the dynamical impact of variations of external signals, and to consistently reduce large models. To illustrate these developments, we further consider several published logical models for two important biological processes, namely the differentiation of T helper cells and the control of mammalian cell cycle. PMID:27303434

  8. Dynamical modeling and analysis of large cellular regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérenguier, D.; Chaouiya, C.; Monteiro, P. T.; Naldi, A.; Remy, E.; Thieffry, D.; Tichit, L.

    2013-06-01

    The dynamical analysis of large biological regulatory networks requires the development of scalable methods for mathematical modeling. Following the approach initially introduced by Thomas, we formalize the interactions between the components of a network in terms of discrete variables, functions, and parameters. Model simulations result in directed graphs, called state transition graphs. We are particularly interested in reachability properties and asymptotic behaviors, which correspond to terminal strongly connected components (or "attractors") in the state transition graph. A well-known problem is the exponential increase of the size of state transition graphs with the number of network components, in particular when using the biologically realistic asynchronous updating assumption. To address this problem, we have developed several complementary methods enabling the analysis of the behavior of large and complex logical models: (i) the definition of transition priority classes to simplify the dynamics; (ii) a model reduction method preserving essential dynamical properties, (iii) a novel algorithm to compact state transition graphs and directly generate compressed representations, emphasizing relevant transient and asymptotic dynamical properties. The power of an approach combining these different methods is demonstrated by applying them to a recent multilevel logical model for the network controlling CD4+ T helper cell response to antigen presentation and to a dozen cytokines. This model accounts for the differentiation of canonical Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes, as well as of inflammatory Th17 and regulatory T cells, along with many hybrid subtypes. All these methods have been implemented into the software GINsim, which enables the definition, the analysis, and the simulation of logical regulatory graphs.

  9. Cellular metabolic network analysis: discovering important reactions in Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueying; Zhao, Min; Qu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    T. pallidum, the syphilis-causing pathogen, performs very differently in metabolism compared with other bacterial pathogens. The desire for safe and effective vaccine of syphilis requests identification of important steps in T. pallidum's metabolism. Here, we apply Flux Balance Analysis to represent the reactions quantitatively. Thus, it is possible to cluster all reactions in T. pallidum. By calculating minimal cut sets and analyzing topological structure for the metabolic network of T. pallidum, critical reactions are identified. As a comparison, we also apply the analytical approaches to the metabolic network of H. pylori to find coregulated drug targets and unique drug targets for different microorganisms. Based on the clustering results, all reactions are further classified into various roles. Therefore, the general picture of their metabolic network is obtained and two types of reactions, both of which are involved in nucleic acid metabolism, are found to be essential for T. pallidum. It is also discovered that both hubs of reactions and the isolated reactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolisms play important roles in T. pallidum. These reactions could be potential drug targets for treating syphilis. PMID:26495292

  10. Cellular Metabolic Network Analysis: Discovering Important Reactions in Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueying; Zhao, Min; Qu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    T. pallidum, the syphilis-causing pathogen, performs very differently in metabolism compared with other bacterial pathogens. The desire for safe and effective vaccine of syphilis requests identification of important steps in T. pallidum's metabolism. Here, we apply Flux Balance Analysis to represent the reactions quantitatively. Thus, it is possible to cluster all reactions in T. pallidum. By calculating minimal cut sets and analyzing topological structure for the metabolic network of T. pallidum, critical reactions are identified. As a comparison, we also apply the analytical approaches to the metabolic network of H. pylori to find coregulated drug targets and unique drug targets for different microorganisms. Based on the clustering results, all reactions are further classified into various roles. Therefore, the general picture of their metabolic network is obtained and two types of reactions, both of which are involved in nucleic acid metabolism, are found to be essential for T. pallidum. It is also discovered that both hubs of reactions and the isolated reactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolisms play important roles in T. pallidum. These reactions could be potential drug targets for treating syphilis. PMID:26495292

  11. Multiperiod cellular network design via price-influenced simulated annealing (PISA).

    PubMed

    Menon, Syam; Amiri, Ali

    2006-06-01

    Cellular telecommunications systems tend to be more flexible than traditional ones. As a result, traditional approaches to telecommunications network design are often inappropriate for the design of cellular networks, and approaches that explicitly incorporate the increased flexibility into the design process need to be developed. This paper presents one such multiperiod cellular network design problem and solves it via a hybrid heuristic that incorporates ideas from linear programming (LP) and simulated annealing (SA). Extensive computational results comparing the performance of the heuristic with the lower bound obtained from the LP relaxation are presented. These results indicate that this price-influenced simulated annealing (PISA) procedure is extremely efficient, consistently providing solutions with average gaps of 0.30% or less in fewer than 30 s. PMID:16761813

  12. Protease-associated cellular networks in malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria continues to be one of the most severe global infectious diseases, responsible for 1-2 million deaths yearly. The rapid evolution and spread of drug resistance in parasites has led to an urgent need for the development of novel antimalarial targets. Proteases are a group of enzymes that play essential roles in parasite growth and invasion. The possibility of designing specific inhibitors for proteases makes them promising drug targets. Previously, combining a comparative genomics approach and a machine learning approach, we identified the complement of proteases (degradome) in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its sibling species [1-3], providing a catalog of targets for functional characterization and rational inhibitor design. Network analysis represents another route to revealing the role of proteins in the biology of parasites and we use this approach here to expand our understanding of the systems involving the proteases of P. falciparum. Results We investigated the roles of proteases in the parasite life cycle by constructing a network using protein-protein association data from the STRING database [4], and analyzing these data, in conjunction with the data from protein-protein interaction assays using the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) system [5], blood stage microarray experiments [6-8], proteomics [9-12], literature text mining, and sequence homology analysis. Seventy-seven (77) out of 124 predicted proteases were associated with at least one other protein, constituting 2,431 protein-protein interactions (PPIs). These proteases appear to play diverse roles in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, invasion and infection. Their degrees of connectivity (i.e., connections to other proteins), range from one to 143. The largest protease-associated sub-network is the ubiquitin-proteasome system which is crucial for protein recycling and stress response. Proteases are also implicated in heat shock response, signal peptide processing, cell cycle

  13. [Construction and structural analysis of integrated cellular network of Corynebacterium glutamicum].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinguo; Song, Lifu; Zheng, Ping; Jia, Shiru; Sun, Jibin

    2012-05-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is one of the most important traditional industrial microorganisms and receiving more and more attention towards a novel cellular factory due to the recently rapid development in genomics and genetic operation toolboxes for Corynebacterium. However, compared to other model organisms such as Escherichia coli, there were few studies on its metabolic regulation, especially a genome-scale integrated cellular network model currently missing for Corynebacterium, which hindered the systematic study of Corynebacterium glutamicum and large-scale rational design and optimization for strains. Here, by gathering relevant information from a number of public databases, we successfully constructed an integrated cellular network, which was composed of 1384 reactions, 1276 metabolites, 88 transcriptional factors and 999 pairs of transcriptional regulatory relationships. The transcriptional regulatory sub-network could be arranged into five layers and the metabolic sub-network presented a clear bow-tie structure. We proposed a new method to extract complex metabolic and regulatory sub-network for product-orientated study taking lysine biosynthesis as an example. The metabolic and regulatory sub-network extracted by our method was more close to the real functional network than the simplex biochemical pathways. The results would be greatly helpful for understanding the high-yielding biomechanism for amino acids and the re-design of the industrial strains. PMID:22916496

  14. A malignant cellular network in gliomas: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Osswald, Matthias; Solecki, Gergely; Wick, Wolfgang; Winkler, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of distinct, ultra-long, and highly functional membrane protrusions in gliomas, particularly in astrocytomas, extends our understanding of how these tumors progress in the brain and how they resist therapies. In this article, we will focus on ideas on how to target these membrane protrusions, for which we have suggested the term "tumor microtubes" (TMs), and the malignant multicellular network they form. First, we discuss TM-specific features and their differential biological functions known so far. Second, the connection between 1p/19q codeletion and the inability to form functional TMs via certain neurodevelopmental pathways is presented; this could provide an explanation for the distinct clinical features of oligodendrogliomas. Third, the role of TMs for primary and potentially also adaptive resistance to cytotoxic therapies is highlighted. Fourth, avenues for therapeutic approaches to inhibit TM formation and/or function are discussed, with a focus on disruption (or exploitation) of network functionality. Finally, we propose ideas on how to use TMs as a biomarker in glioma patients. An increasing understanding of TMs in clinical and preclinical settings will show us whether they really are a long-sought-after Achilles' heel of treatment-resistant gliomas. PMID:26995789

  15. Cellular Origins of Type IV Collagen Networks in Developing Glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamson, Dale R.; Hudson, Billy G.; Stroganova, Larysa; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; St. John, Patricia L.

    2009-01-01

    Laminin and type IV collagen composition of the glomerular basement membrane changes during glomerular development and maturation. Although it is known that both glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes produce different laminin isoforms at the appropriate stages of development, the cellular origins for the different type IV collagen heterotrimers that appear during development are unknown. Here, immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that endothelial cells, mesangial cells, and podocytes of immature glomeruli synthesize collagen α1α2α1(IV). However, intracellular labeling revealed that podocytes, but not endothelial or mesangial cells, contain collagen α3α4α5(IV). To evaluate the origins of collagen IV further, we transplanted embryonic kidneys from Col4a3-null mutants (Alport mice) into kidneys of newborn, wildtype mice. Hybrid glomeruli within grafts containing numerous host-derived, wildtype endothelial cells never expressed collagen α3α4α5(IV). Finally, confocal microscopy of glomeruli from infant Alport mice that had been dually labeled with anti-collagen α5(IV) and the podocyte marker anti-GLEPP1 showed immunolabeling exclusively within podocytes. Together, these results indicate that collagen α3α4α5(IV) originates solely from podocytes; therefore, glomerular Alport disease is a genetic defect that manifests specifically within this cell type. PMID:19423686

  16. Cellular origins of type IV collagen networks in developing glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Dale R; Hudson, Billy G; Stroganova, Larysa; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; St John, Patricia L

    2009-07-01

    Laminin and type IV collagen composition of the glomerular basement membrane changes during glomerular development and maturation. Although it is known that both glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes produce different laminin isoforms at the appropriate stages of development, the cellular origins for the different type IV collagen heterotrimers that appear during development are unknown. Here, immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that endothelial cells, mesangial cells, and podocytes of immature glomeruli synthesize collagen alpha 1 alpha 2 alpha1(IV). However, intracellular labeling revealed that podocytes, but not endothelial or mesangial cells, contain collagen alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV). To evaluate the origins of collagen IV further, we transplanted embryonic kidneys from Col4a3-null mutants (Alport mice) into kidneys of newborn, wildtype mice. Hybrid glomeruli within grafts containing numerous host-derived, wildtype endothelial cells never expressed collagen alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV). Finally, confocal microscopy of glomeruli from infant Alport mice that had been dually labeled with anti-collagen alpha 5(IV) and the podocyte marker anti-GLEPP1 showed immunolabeling exclusively within podocytes. Together, these results indicate that collagen alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) originates solely from podocytes; therefore, glomerular Alport disease is a genetic defect that manifests specifically within this cell type. PMID:19423686

  17. Rainfall measurements from cellular networks microwave links : an alternative ground reference for satellite validation and hydrology in Africa .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, Marielle; cazenave, frederic; Zougmore, françois; Doumounia, Ali; kacou, Modeste

    2015-04-01

    In many part of the Tropics the ground based gauge networks are sparse, often degrading and accessing this data for monitoring rainfall or for validating satellite products is sometime difficult. Here, an alternative rainfall measuring technique is proposed and tested in West Africa. It is based on using commercial microwave links from cellular telephone networks to detect and quantify rainfall. Rainfall monitoring based on commercial terrestrial microwave links has been tested for the first time in Burkina Faso, in Sahel. The rainfall regime is characterized by intense rainfall intensities brought by mesoscale Convective systems (MCS), generated by deep organized convection. The region is subjected to drought as well as dramatic floods associated with the intense rainfall provided by a few MCSs. The hydrometeorological risk is increasing and need to be monitored. In collaboration with the national cellular phone operator, Telecel Faso, the attenuation on 29 km long microwave links operating at 7 GHz was monitored at 1s time rate for the monsoon season 2012. The time series of attenuation is transformed into rain rates and compared with rain gauge data. The method is successful in quantifying rainfall: 95% of the rainy days are detected. The correlation with the daily raingauge series is 0.8 and the season bias is 5%. The correlation at the 5 min time step within each event is also high. We will present the quantitative results, discuss the uncertainties and compare the time series and the 2D maps with those derived from a polarimetric radar. The results demonstrate the potential interest of exploiting national and regional wireless telecommunication networks to provide rainfall maps for various applications : urban hydrology, agro-hydrological risk monitoring, satellite validation and development of combined rainfall products. We will also present the outcome of the first international Rain Cell Africa workshop held in Ouagadougou early 2015.

  18. The role of topological features of intercellular communication networks by the synchronization of cellular oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovič, R.; Gosak, M.; Marhl, M.

    2012-08-01

    Because of the complexity of processes that govern the regulatory mechanisms which control the cellular functions and dynamic behavior, mathematical models and numerical simulations are needed to fully grasp the mechanisms and functions of biological rhythms. In the last decade the theory of complex networks is frequently applied to address those issues. In the present paper we investigate theoretically the role of the intercellular communication network structure by synchronization of cellular oscillators. Motivated by the fact that in biological systems the interplay between the network structure and the dynamics taking place on it is closely interrelated, we develop a spatial network representation of an ensemble of cells in which we can tune the network organization between a scale-free network with dominating long-range connections and a homogeneous network with mostly adjacent neurons connected. Our results reveal that for noise-induced oscillations in excitable cells and for chaotic bursting oscillations the most synchronized response is obtained for the intermediate regime where long-as well as short-range connections constitute the intercellular network. On the other hand, for periodic oscillations it is found than the scale-free network topology ensures the greatest collective response. We argue that those findings are related to flexibility properties of individual cells.

  19. A Mathematical Model to study the Dynamics of Epithelial Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Alessandro; Vincent, Stéphane; Dobbe, Roel; Silletti, Alberto; Master, Neal; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Tomlin, Claire J.

    2013-01-01

    Epithelia are sheets of connected cells that are essential across the animal kingdom. Experimental observations suggest that the dynamical behavior of many single-layered epithelial tissues has strong analogies with that of specific mechanical systems, namely large networks consisting of point masses connected through spring-damper elements and undergoing the influence of active and dissipating forces. Based on this analogy, this work develops a modeling framework to enable the study of the mechanical properties and of the dynamic behavior of large epithelial cellular networks. The model is built first by creating a network topology that is extracted from the actual cellular geometry as obtained from experiments, then by associating a mechanical structure and dynamics to the network via spring-damper elements. This scalable approach enables running simulations of large network dynamics: the derived modeling framework in particular is predisposed to be tailored to study general dynamics (for example, morphogenesis) of various classes of single-layered epithelial cellular networks. In this contribution we test the model on a case study of the dorsal epithelium of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo during early dorsal closure (and, less conspicuously, germband retraction). PMID:23221083

  20. Structural Variations in the Uranyl/4,4'-Biphenyldicarboxylate System. Rare Examples of 2D → 3D Polycatenated Uranyl-Organic Networks.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2015-08-17

    4,4'-Biphenyldicarboxylic acid (H2L) was reacted with uranyl ions under solvo-hydrothermal conditions with variations in the experimental procedure (organic cosolvent, presence of additional 3d-block metal cations, and N-donor species), thus giving six complexes of the fully deprotonated acid that were characterized by their crystal structure and, in most cases, their emission spectrum. The three complexes [UO2(L)(DMA)] (1), [UO2(L)(NMP)] (2), and [UO2(L)(NMP)] (3) include the cosolvent as a coligand, and they crystallize as two-dimensional (2D) assemblies, with different combinations of the chelating and bridging-bidentate carboxylate coordination modes, resulting in two different topologies. Complex 4, [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)2(L)2(C2O4)]·H2O, includes oxalate coligands generated in situ and contains an anionic planar two-dimensional (2D) assembly with a {6(3)} honeycomb topology. The same hexagonal geometry is found in the homoleptic complexes [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)2(L)3]·6H2O (5) and [Ni(phen)3][(UO2)2(L)3]·4H2O (6), but the large size of the hexagonal rings in these cases (∼27 Å in the longest dimension) allows 2D → three-dimensional (3D) inclined polycatenation to occur, with the two families of networks either orthogonal in tetragonal complex 5 or at an angle of 73.4° in orthorhombic complex 6. The parallel networks are arranged in closely spaced groups of two, with possible π···π stacking interactions, and as many as four rods from four parallel nets pass through each ring of the inclined family of nets, an unusually high degree of catenation. These are the second cases only of 2D → 3D inclined polycatenation in uranyl-organic species. Emission spectra measured in the solid state show the usual vibronic fine structure, with variations in intensity and positions of maxima that are not simply connected with the number of equatorial donors and the presence of additional metal cations. PMID:26241368

  1. Identification of driving network of cellular differentiation from single sample time course gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Ilker, Tunc; Gao, Shouguo; Wang, Xujing

    Methods developed based on bifurcation theory have demonstrated their potential in driving network identification for complex human diseases, including the work by Chen, et al. Recently bifurcation theory has been successfully applied to model cellular differentiation. However, there one often faces a technical challenge in driving network prediction: time course cellular differentiation study often only contains one sample at each time point, while driving network prediction typically require multiple samples at each time point to infer the variation and interaction structures of candidate genes for the driving network. In this study, we investigate several methods to identify both the critical time point and the driving network through examination of how each time point affects the autocorrelation and phase locking. We apply these methods to a high-throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset of 42 subsets of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells at multiple time points during their differentiation (GSE48138 from GEO). We compare the predicted driving genes with known transcription regulators of cellular differentiation. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of our proposed methods, as well as potential further improvements of our methods.

  2. The Electrophysiological MEMS Device with Micro Channel Array for Cellular Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonomura, Wataru; Kurashima, Toshiaki; Takayama, Yuzo; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Konishi, Satoshi

    This paper describes a new type of MCA (Micro Channel Array) for simultaneous multipoint measurement of cellular network. Presented MCA employing the measurement principles of the patch-clamp technique is designed for advanced neural network analysis which has been studied by co-authors using 64ch MEA (Micro Electrode Arrays) system. First of all, sucking and clamping of cells through channels of developed MCA is expected to improve electrophysiological signal detections. Electrophysiological sensing electrodes integrated around individual channels of MCA by using MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) technologies are electrically isolated for simultaneous multipoint measurement. In this study, we tested the developed MCA using the non-cultured rat's cerebral cortical slice and the hippocampal neurons. We could measure the spontaneous action potential of the slice simultaneously at multiple points and culture the neurons on developed MCA. Herein, we describe the experimental results together with the design and fabrication of the electrophysiological MEMS device with MCA for cellular network analysis.

  3. Retrieval algorithm for rainfall mapping from microwave links in a cellular communication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2015-08-01

    Microwave links in commercial cellular communication networks hold a promise for areal rainfall monitoring and could complement rainfall estimates from ground-based weather radars, rain gauges, and satellites. It has been shown that country-wide rainfall maps can be derived from the signal attenuations of microwave links in such a network. Here we give a detailed description of the employed rainfall retrieval algorithm and provide the corresponding code. Moreover, the code (in the scripting language "R") is made available including a data set of commercial microwave links. The purpose of this paper is to promote rainfall monitoring utilizing microwave links from cellular communication networks as an alternative or complementary means for global, continental-scale rainfall monitoring.

  4. A self-learning call admission control scheme for CDMA cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Huaguang

    2005-09-01

    In the present paper, a call admission control scheme that can learn from the network environment and user behavior is developed for code division multiple access (CDMA) cellular networks that handle both voice and data services. The idea is built upon a novel learning control architecture with only a single module instead of two or three modules in adaptive critic designs (ACDs). The use of adaptive critic approach for call admission control in wireless cellular networks is new. The call admission controller can perform learning in real-time as well as in offline environments and the controller improves its performance as it gains more experience. Another important contribution in the present work is the choice of utility function for the present self-learning control approach which makes the present learning process much more efficient than existing learning control methods. The performance of our algorithm will be shown through computer simulation and compared with existing algorithms. PMID:16252828

  5. Retrieval algorithm for rainfall mapping from microwave links in a cellular communication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-06-01

    Microwave links in commercial cellular communication networks hold a promise for areal rainfall monitoring and could complement rainfall estimates from ground-based weather radars, rain gauges, and satellites. It has been shown that country-wide (≈ 35 500 km2) 15 min rainfall maps can be derived from the signal attenuations of approximately 2400 microwave links in such a network. Here we give a detailed description of the employed rainfall retrieval algorithm. Moreover, the documented, modular, and user-friendly code (a package in the scripting language "R") is made available, including a 2-day data set of approximately 2600 commercial microwave links from the Netherlands. The purpose of this paper is to promote rainfall mapping utilising microwave links from cellular communication networks as an alternative or complementary means for continental-scale rainfall monitoring.

  6. 2D and 3D soil moisture imaging using a sensor-based platform moving inside a subsurface network of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravalos, I.; Moshou, D.; Loutridis, S.; Gialamas, Th.; Kateris, D.; Bompolas, E.; Tsiropoulos, Z.; Xyradakis, P.; Fountas, S.

    2013-08-01

    In this study a prototype sensor-based platform moving inside a subsurface network of pipes with the task of monitoring the soil moisture content is presented. It comprises of a mobile platform, a modified commercial soil moisture sensor (Diviner 2000), a network of subsurface polyvinylchloride (PVC) access pipes, driving hardware and image processing software. The software allows the composition of two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) images with high accuracy and at a large scale. The 3D soil moisture images are created by using 2D slices for better illustration of the soil moisture variability. Three case studies of varying soil moisture content using an experimental soil tank were examined. In the first case study, the irrigation water was applied uniformly on the entire tank surface. In second and third case studies, the irrigation water was applied uniformly only on the surface of the intermediate and last part of the soil tank respectively. The processed images give a detailed description of the soil moisture distribution of a layer at 15 cm depth under the soil surface in the tank. In all case studies that have been investigated, the distribution of soil moisture was characterized by a significant variability (difference between poorly and well-drained regions) of the soil tank. A very poorly-drained region was located in the middle of the soil tank, while well-drained soil areas were located southwest and northeast. The knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture is a valuable tool for proper management of crop irrigation.

  7. Cellular automata with object-oriented features for parallel molecular network modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Wu, Yinghui; Huang, Sui; Sun, Yan; Dhar, Pawan

    2005-06-01

    Cellular automata are an important modeling paradigm for studying the dynamics of large, parallel systems composed of multiple, interacting components. However, to model biological systems, cellular automata need to be extended beyond the large-scale parallelism and intensive communication in order to capture two fundamental properties characteristic of complex biological systems: hierarchy and heterogeneity. This paper proposes extensions to a cellular automata language, Cellang, to meet this purpose. The extended language, with object-oriented features, can be used to describe the structure and activity of parallel molecular networks within cells. Capabilities of this new programming language include object structure to define molecular programs within a cell, floating-point data type and mathematical functions to perform quantitative computation, message passing capability to describe molecular interactions, as well as new operators, statements, and built-in functions. We discuss relevant programming issues of these features, including the object-oriented description of molecular interactions with molecule encapsulation, message passing, and the description of heterogeneity and anisotropy at the cell and molecule levels. By enabling the integration of modeling at the molecular level with system behavior at cell, tissue, organ, or even organism levels, the program will help improve our understanding of how complex and dynamic biological activities are generated and controlled by parallel functioning of molecular networks. Index Terms-Cellular automata, modeling, molecular network, object-oriented. PMID:16117022

  8. Interference Avoiding Radio Resource Allocation Scheme for Multi-hop OFDMA Cellular Networks with Random Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sunggook; Lee, Jaiyong

    Relaying technology is the one of the solutions to expand the coverage and enhance the throughput of a cellular network with low cost, therefore numerous smart relay stations (RSs) which are able to schedule its own transmission frame and manage radio resources allocated by its serving base station (BS) will be deployed within the cellular network. while more RSs are deployed, the network topology is turning to the random topology. In the random topology, however, conventional frequency reuse schemes based on the uniformly distributed RSs are not adoptable because of the randomness for locations of RSs. Another problem is severe increase of interference during the transmission period for an access link because more transmitters including BSs and RSs are existed within a cell. We suggest the random-topology frequency reuse (RFR) scheme supporting the frequency reuse in the cellular multi-hop network with random topology to reduce intra-cell interference. The simulation results show RFR is reducing the overall intra-cell interference compared to the full allocation scheme whose reuse factor is one. The throughput and average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) is still greater than the full allocation scheme although the spectral efficiency is lower than the compared scheme.

  9. Efficient training of convolutional deep belief networks in the frequency domain for application to high-resolution 2D and 3D images.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Tom; Tam, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Deep learning has traditionally been computationally expensive, and advances in training methods have been the prerequisite for improving its efficiency in order to expand its application to a variety of image classification problems. In this letter, we address the problem of efficient training of convolutional deep belief networks by learning the weights in the frequency domain, which eliminates the time-consuming calculation of convolutions. An essential consideration in the design of the algorithm is to minimize the number of transformations to and from frequency space. We have evaluated the running time improvements using two standard benchmark data sets, showing a speed-up of up to 8 times on 2D images and up to 200 times on 3D volumes. Our training algorithm makes training of convolutional deep belief networks on 3D medical images with a resolution of up to 128×128×128 voxels practical, which opens new directions for using deep learning for medical image analysis. PMID:25380341

  10. A methodology for linking 2D overland flow models with the sewer network model SWMM 5.1 based on dynamic link libraries.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Jorge; Martins, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Pluvial flooding in urban areas is characterized by a gradually varying inundation process caused by surcharge of the sewer manholes. Therefore urban flood models need to simulate the interaction between the sewer network and the overland flow in order to accurately predict the flood inundation extents. In this work we present a methodology for linking 2D overland flow models with the storm sewer model SWMM 5. SWMM 5 is a well-known free open-source code originally developed in 1971. The latest major release saw its structure re-written in C ++ allowing it to be compiled as a command line executable or through a series of calls made to function inside a dynamic link library (DLL). The methodology developed herein is written inside the same DLL in C + +, and is able to simulate the bi-directional interaction between both models during simulation. Validation is done in a real case study with an existing urban flood coupled model. The novelty herein is that the new methodology can be added to SWMM without the need for editing SWMM's original code. Furthermore, it is directly applicable to other coupled overland flow models aiming to use SWMM 5 as the sewer network model. PMID:27332848

  11. Relating the sequential dynamics of excitatory neural networks to synaptic cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Nekorkin, V I; Dmitrichev, A S; Kasatkin, D V; Afraimovich, V S

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a new approach for the description of sequential dynamics of excitatory neural networks. Our approach is based on the dynamics of synapses possessing the short-term plasticity property. We suggest a model of such synapses in the form of a second-order system of nonlinear ODEs. In the framework of the model two types of responses are realized-the fast and the slow ones. Under some relations between their timescales a cellular automaton (CA) on the graph of connections is constructed. Such a CA has only a finite number of attractors and all of them are periodic orbits. The attractors of the CA determine the regimes of sequential dynamics of the original neural network, i.e., itineraries along the network and the times of successive firing of neurons in the form of bunches of spikes. We illustrate our approach on the example of a Morris-Lecar neural network. PMID:22225361

  12. Two programmed replicative lifespans of Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed by the endogenous molecular-cellular network.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Zhu, Xiaomei; Wang, Xinan; Yuan, Ruoshi; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Minjuan; Ao, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Cellular replicative capacity is a therapeutic target for regenerative medicine as well as cancer treatment. The mechanism of replicative senescence and cell immortality is still unclear. We investigated the diauxic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and demonstrate that the replicative capacity revealed by the yeast growth curve can be understood by using the dynamical property of the molecular-cellular network regulating S. cerevisiae. The endogenous network we proposed has a limit cycle when pheromone signaling is disabled, consistent with the exponential growth phase with an infinite replicative capacity. In the post-diauxic phase, the cooperative effect of the pheromone activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway with the cell cycle leads to a fixed point attractor instead of the limit cycle. The cells stop dividing after several generations counting from the beginning of the post-diauxic growth. By tuning the MAPK pathway, S. cerevisiae therefore programs the number of offsprings it replicates. PMID:24447585

  13. A new cellular nonlinear network emulation on FPGA for EEG signal processing in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jens; Müller, Jan; Tetzlaff, Ronald

    2011-05-01

    For processing of EEG signals, we propose a new architecture for the hardware emulation of discrete-time Cellular Nonlinear Networks (DT-CNN). Our results show the importance of a high computational accuracy in EEG signal prediction that cannot be achieved with existing analogue VLSI circuits. The refined architecture of the processing elements and its resource schedule, the cellular network structure with local couplings, the FPGA-based embedded system containing the DT-CNN, and the data flow in the entire system will be discussed in detail. The proposed DT-CNN design has been implemented and tested on an Xilinx FPGA development platform. The embedded co-processor with a multi-threading kernel is utilised for control and pre-processing tasks and data exchange to the host via Ethernet. The performance of the implemented DT-CNN has been determined for a popular example and compared to that of a conventional computer.

  14. Application of neural networks to channel assignment for cellular CDMA networks with multiple services and mobile base stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    1996-03-01

    The use of artificial neural networks to the channel assignment problem for cellular code- division multiple access (CDMA) telecommunications systems is considered. CDMA takes advantage of voice activity and spatial isolation because its capacity is only interference limited, unlike time-division multiple access (TDMA) and frequency-division multiple access (FDMA) where capacities are bandwidth limited. Any reduction in interference in CDMA translates linearly into increased capacity. FDMA and TDMA use a frequency reuse pattern as a method to increase capacity, while CDMA reuses the same frequency for all cells and gains a reuse efficiency by means of orthogonal codes. The latter method can improve system capacity by factors of four to six over digital TDMA or FDMA. Cellular carriers are planning to provide multiple communication services using CDMA in the next generation cellular system infrastructure. The approach of this study is the use of neural network methods for automatic and local network control, based on traffic behavior in specific cell cites and demand history. The goal is to address certain problems associated with the management of mobile and personal communication services in a cellular radio communications environment. In planning a cellular radio network, the operator assigns channels to the radio cells so that the probability of the processed carrier-to-interference ratio, CII, exceeding a predefined value is sufficiently low. The RF propagation, determined from the topography and infrastructure in the operating area, is used in conjunction with the densities of expected communications traffic to formulate interference constraints. These constraints state which radio cells may use the same code (channel) or adjacent channels at a time. The traffic loading and the number of service grades can also be used to calculate the number of required channels (codes) for each cell. The general assignment problem is the task of assigning the required number

  15. Cellular Neural Network Models of Growth and Immune of Effector Cells Response to Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yongmei; Min, Lequan

    Four reaction-diffusion cellular neural network (R-D CNN) models are set up based on the differential equation models for the growths of effector cells and cancer cells, and the model of the immune response to cancer proposed by Allison et al. The CNN models have different reaction-diffusion coefficients and coupling parameters. The R-D CNN models may provide possible quantitative interpretations, and are good in agreement with the in vitro experiment data reported by Allison et al.

  16. Measuring information flow in cellular networks by the systems biology method through microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    In general, it is very difficult to measure the information flow in a cellular network directly. In this study, based on an information flow model and microarray data, we measured the information flow in cellular networks indirectly by using a systems biology method. First, we used a recursive least square parameter estimation algorithm to identify the system parameters of coupling signal transduction pathways and the cellular gene regulatory network (GRN). Then, based on the identified parameters and systems theory, we estimated the signal transductivities of the coupling signal transduction pathways from the extracellular signals to each downstream protein and the information transductivities of the GRN between transcription factors in response to environmental events. According to the proposed method, the information flow, which is characterized by signal transductivity in coupling signaling pathways and information transductivity in the GRN, can be estimated by microarray temporal data or microarray sample data. It can also be estimated by other high-throughput data such as next-generation sequencing or proteomic data. Finally, the information flows of the signal transduction pathways and the GRN in leukemia cancer cells and non-leukemia normal cells were also measured to analyze the systematic dysfunction in this cancer from microarray sample data. The results show that the signal transductivities of signal transduction pathways change substantially from normal cells to leukemia cancer cells. PMID:26082788

  17. A New Cellular Architecture for Information Retrieval from Sensor Networks through Embedded Service and Security Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Aamir; Landry, René; Lee, Malrey; Xiong, Naixue; Lee, Jongho; Lee, Changhoon

    2016-01-01

    Substantial changes have occurred in the Information Technology (IT) sectors and with these changes, the demand for remote access to field sensor information has increased. This allows visualization, monitoring, and control through various electronic devices, such as laptops, tablets, i-Pads, PCs, and cellular phones. The smart phone is considered as a more reliable, faster and efficient device to access and monitor industrial systems and their corresponding information interfaces anywhere and anytime. This study describes the deployment of a protocol whereby industrial system information can be securely accessed by cellular phones via a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) server. To achieve the study goals, proprietary protocol interconnectivity with non-proprietary protocols and the usage of interconnectivity services are considered in detail. They support the visualization of the SCADA system information, and the related operations through smart phones. The intelligent sensors are configured and designated to process real information via cellular phones by employing information exchange services between the proprietary protocol and non-proprietary protocols. SCADA cellular access raises the issue of security flaws. For these challenges, a cryptography-based security method is considered and deployed, and it could be considered as a part of a proprietary protocol. Subsequently, transmission flows from the smart phones through a cellular network. PMID:27314351

  18. A New Cellular Architecture for Information Retrieval from Sensor Networks through Embedded Service and Security Protocols.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Aamir; Landry, René; Lee, Malrey; Xiong, Naixue; Lee, Jongho; Lee, Changhoon

    2016-01-01

    Substantial changes have occurred in the Information Technology (IT) sectors and with these changes, the demand for remote access to field sensor information has increased. This allows visualization, monitoring, and control through various electronic devices, such as laptops, tablets, i-Pads, PCs, and cellular phones. The smart phone is considered as a more reliable, faster and efficient device to access and monitor industrial systems and their corresponding information interfaces anywhere and anytime. This study describes the deployment of a protocol whereby industrial system information can be securely accessed by cellular phones via a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) server. To achieve the study goals, proprietary protocol interconnectivity with non-proprietary protocols and the usage of interconnectivity services are considered in detail. They support the visualization of the SCADA system information, and the related operations through smart phones. The intelligent sensors are configured and designated to process real information via cellular phones by employing information exchange services between the proprietary protocol and non-proprietary protocols. SCADA cellular access raises the issue of security flaws. For these challenges, a cryptography-based security method is considered and deployed, and it could be considered as a part of a proprietary protocol. Subsequently, transmission flows from the smart phones through a cellular network. PMID:27314351

  19. An Asynchronous Recurrent Network of Cellular Automaton-Based Neurons and Its Reproduction of Spiking Neural Network Activities.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takashi; Torikai, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Modeling and implementation approaches for the reproduction of input-output relationships in biological nervous tissues contribute to the development of engineering and clinical applications. However, because of high nonlinearity, the traditional modeling and implementation approaches encounter difficulties in terms of generalization ability (i.e., performance when reproducing an unknown data set) and computational resources (i.e., computation time and circuit elements). To overcome these difficulties, asynchronous cellular automaton-based neuron (ACAN) models, which are described as special kinds of cellular automata that can be implemented as small asynchronous sequential logic circuits have been proposed. This paper presents a novel type of such ACAN and a theoretical analysis of its excitability. This paper also presents a novel network of such neurons, which can mimic input-output relationships of biological and nonlinear ordinary differential equation model neural networks. Numerical analyses confirm that the presented network has a higher generalization ability than other major modeling and implementation approaches. In addition, Field-Programmable Gate Array-implementations confirm that the presented network requires lower computational resources. PMID:25974951

  20. Phase transitions in pancreatic islet cellular networks and implications for type-1 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper, I. J.; Jackson, Elais; Wang, Xujing

    2014-01-01

    In many aspects the onset of a chronic disease resembles a phase transition in a complex dynamic system: Quantitative changes accumulate largely unnoticed until a critical threshold is reached, which causes abrupt qualitative changes of the system. In this study we examine a special case, the onset of type-1 diabetes (T1D), a disease that results from loss of the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β cells. Within each islet, the β cells are electrically coupled to each other via gap-junctional channels. This intercellular coupling enables the β cells to synchronize their insulin release, thereby generating the multiscale temporal rhythms in blood insulin that are critical to maintaining blood glucose homeostasis. Using percolation theory we show how normal islet function is intrinsically linked to network connectivity. In particular, the critical amount of β-cell death at which the islet cellular network loses site percolation is consistent with laboratory and clinical observations of the threshold loss of β cells that causes islet functional failure. In addition, numerical simulations confirm that the islet cellular network needs to be percolated for β cells to synchronize. Furthermore, the interplay between site percolation and bond strength predicts the existence of a transient phase of islet functional recovery after onset of T1D and introduction of treatment, potentially explaining the honeymoon phenomenon. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the onset of T1D may be the result of a phase transition of the islet β-cell network.

  1. Motion adaptive vertical handoff in cellular/WLAN heterogeneous wireless network.

    PubMed

    Li, Limin; Ma, Lin; Xu, Yubin; Fu, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    In heterogeneous wireless network, vertical handoff plays an important role for guaranteeing quality of service and overall performance of network. Conventional vertical handoff trigger schemes are mostly developed from horizontal handoff in homogeneous cellular network. Basically, they can be summarized as hysteresis-based and dwelling-timer-based algorithms, which are reliable on avoiding unnecessary handoff caused by the terminals dwelling at the edge of WLAN coverage. However, the coverage of WLAN is much smaller compared with cellular network, while the motion types of terminals can be various in a typical outdoor scenario. As a result, traditional algorithms are less effective in avoiding unnecessary handoff triggered by vehicle-borne terminals with various speeds. Besides that, hysteresis and dwelling-timer thresholds usually need to be modified to satisfy different channel environments. For solving this problem, a vertical handoff algorithm based on Q-learning is proposed in this paper. Q-learning can provide the decider with self-adaptive ability for handling the terminals' handoff requests with different motion types and channel conditions. Meanwhile, Neural Fuzzy Inference System (NFIS) is embedded to retain a continuous perception of the state space. Simulation results verify that the proposed algorithm can achieve lower unnecessary handoff probability compared with the other two conventional algorithms. PMID:24741347

  2. Motion Adaptive Vertical Handoff in Cellular/WLAN Heterogeneous Wireless Network

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Xu, Yubin; Fu, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    In heterogeneous wireless network, vertical handoff plays an important role for guaranteeing quality of service and overall performance of network. Conventional vertical handoff trigger schemes are mostly developed from horizontal handoff in homogeneous cellular network. Basically, they can be summarized as hysteresis-based and dwelling-timer-based algorithms, which are reliable on avoiding unnecessary handoff caused by the terminals dwelling at the edge of WLAN coverage. However, the coverage of WLAN is much smaller compared with cellular network, while the motion types of terminals can be various in a typical outdoor scenario. As a result, traditional algorithms are less effective in avoiding unnecessary handoff triggered by vehicle-borne terminals with various speeds. Besides that, hysteresis and dwelling-timer thresholds usually need to be modified to satisfy different channel environments. For solving this problem, a vertical handoff algorithm based on Q-learning is proposed in this paper. Q-learning can provide the decider with self-adaptive ability for handling the terminals' handoff requests with different motion types and channel conditions. Meanwhile, Neural Fuzzy Inference System (NFIS) is embedded to retain a continuous perception of the state space. Simulation results verify that the proposed algorithm can achieve lower unnecessary handoff probability compared with the other two conventional algorithms. PMID:24741347

  3. A computable cellular stress network model for non-diseased pulmonary and cardiovascular tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Humans and other organisms are equipped with a set of responses that can prevent damage from exposure to a multitude of endogenous and environmental stressors. If these stress responses are overwhelmed, this can result in pathogenesis of diseases, which is reflected by an increased development of, e.g., pulmonary and cardiac diseases in humans exposed to chronic levels of environmental stress, including inhaled cigarette smoke (CS). Systems biology data sets (e.g., transcriptomics, phosphoproteomics, metabolomics) could enable comprehensive investigation of the biological impact of these stressors. However, detailed mechanistic networks are needed to determine which specific pathways are activated in response to different stressors and to drive the qualitative and eventually quantitative assessment of these data. A current limiting step in this process is the availability of detailed mechanistic networks that can be used as an analytical substrate. Results We have built a detailed network model that captures the biology underlying the physiological cellular response to endogenous and exogenous stressors in non-diseased mammalian pulmonary and cardiovascular cells. The contents of the network model reflect several diverse areas of signaling, including oxidative stress, hypoxia, shear stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and xenobiotic stress, that are elicited in response to common pulmonary and cardiovascular stressors. We then tested the ability of the network model to identify the mechanisms that are activated in response to CS, a broad inducer of cellular stress. Using transcriptomic data from the lungs of mice exposed to CS, the network model identified a robust increase in the oxidative stress response, largely mediated by the anti-oxidant NRF2 pathways, consistent with previous reports on the impact of CS exposure in the mammalian lung. Conclusions The results presented here describe the construction of a cellular stress network model and its

  4. Metabolic flux and metabolic network analysis of Penicillium chrysogenum using 2D [13C, 1H] COSY NMR measurements and cumulative bondomer simulation.

    PubMed

    van Winden, Wouter A; van Gulik, Walter M; Schipper, Dick; Verheijen, Peter J T; Krabben, Preben; Vinke, Jacobus L; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2003-07-01

    At present two alternative methods are available for analyzing the fluxes in a metabolic network: (1) combining measurements of net conversion rates with a set of metabolite balances including the cofactor balances, or (2) leaving out the cofactor balances and fitting the resulting free fluxes to measured (13)C-labeling data. In this study these two approaches are applied to the fluxes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway of Penicillium chrysogenum growing on either ammonia or nitrate as the nitrogen source, which is expected to give different pentose phosphate pathway fluxes. The presented flux analyses are based on extensive sets of 2D [(13)C, (1)H] COSY data. A new concept is applied for simulation of this type of (13)C-labeling data: cumulative bondomer modeling. The outcomes of the (13)C-labeling based flux analysis substantially differ from those of the pure metabolite balancing approach. The fluxes that are determined using (13)C-labeling data are shown to be highly dependent on the chosen metabolic network. Extending the traditional nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway with additional transketolase and transaldolase reactions, extending the glycolysis with a fructose 6-phosphate aldolase/dihydroxyacetone kinase reaction sequence or adding a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase reaction to the model considerably improves the fit of the measured and the simulated NMR data. The results obtained using the extended version of the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway model show that the transketolase and transaldolase reactions need not be assumed reversible to get a good fit of the (13)C-labeling data. Strict statistical testing of the outcomes of (13)C-labeling based flux analysis using realistic measurement errors is demonstrated to be of prime importance for verifying the assumed metabolic model. PMID:12740935

  5. Increasing the coverage area through relay node deployment in long term evolution advanced cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldhaibani, Jaafar A.; Ahmad, R. B.; Yahya, A.; Azeez, Suzan A.

    2015-05-01

    Wireless multi-hop relay networks have become very important technologies in mobile communications. These networks ensure high throughput and coverage extension with a low cost. The poor capacity at cell edges is not enough to meet with growing demand of high capacity and throughput irrespective of user's placement in the cellular network. In this paper we propose optimal placement of relay node that provides maximum achievable rate at users and enhances the throughput and coverage at cell edge region. The proposed scheme is based on the outage probability at users and taken on account the interference between nodes. Numerical analyses along with simulation results indicated there are an improvement in capacity for users at the cell edge is 40% increment from all cell capacity.

  6. Optimal design of sewer networks using cellular automata-based hybrid methods: Discrete and continuous approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, M. H.; Rohani, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, cellular automata based hybrid methods are proposed for the optimal design of sewer networks and their performance is compared with some of the common heuristic search methods. The problem of optimal design of sewer networks is first decomposed into two sub-optimization problems which are solved iteratively in a two stage manner. In the first stage, the pipe diameters of the network are assumed fixed and the nodal cover depths of the network are determined by solving a nonlinear sub-optimization problem. A cellular automata (CA) method is used for the solution of the optimization problem with the network nodes considered as the cells and their cover depths as the cell states. In the second stage, the nodal cover depths calculated from the first stage are fixed and the pipe diameters are calculated by solving a second nonlinear sub-optimization problem. Once again a CA method is used to solve the optimization problem of the second stage with the pipes considered as the CA cells and their corresponding diameters as the cell states. Two different updating rules are derived and used for the CA of the second stage depending on the treatment of the pipe diameters. In the continuous approach, the pipe diameters are considered as continuous variables and the corresponding updating rule is derived mathematically from the original objective function of the problem. In the discrete approach, however, an adhoc updating rule is derived and used taking into account the discrete nature of the pipe diameters. The proposed methods are used to optimally solve two sewer network problems and the results are presented and compared with those obtained by other methods. The results show that the proposed CA based hybrid methods are more efficient and effective than the most powerful search methods considered in this work.

  7. Cellular neural network-based hybrid approach toward automatic image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, Pattathal VijayaKumar; Katiyar, Sunil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Image registration is a key component of various image processing operations that involve the analysis of different image data sets. Automatic image registration domains have witnessed the application of many intelligent methodologies over the past decade; however, inability to properly model object shape as well as contextual information has limited the attainable accuracy. A framework for accurate feature shape modeling and adaptive resampling using advanced techniques such as vector machines, cellular neural network (CNN), scale invariant feature transform (SIFT), coreset, and cellular automata is proposed. CNN has been found to be effective in improving feature matching as well as resampling stages of registration and complexity of the approach has been considerably reduced using coreset optimization. The salient features of this work are cellular neural network approach-based SIFT feature point optimization, adaptive resampling, and intelligent object modelling. Developed methodology has been compared with contemporary methods using different statistical measures. Investigations over various satellite images revealed that considerable success was achieved with the approach. This system has dynamically used spectral and spatial information for representing contextual knowledge using CNN-prolog approach. This methodology is also illustrated to be effective in providing intelligent interpretation and adaptive resampling.

  8. A multimedia session-aware QoS provisioning scheme for cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, Mona E.; Olariu, Stephan

    2005-03-01

    Multimedia applications often involve a set of cooperating streams that together form a multimedia session. We propose a novel local QoS provisioning scheme for cellular networks that is aware of the relationships between the streams that compose a session. As a rule, existing schemes either allow composite streams to compete with one another for resources or else provide QoS to the session as an atomic entity, leaving to the application the task of managing QoS for the individual streams. Our new MUltimedia SessIon-aware Cellular (MUSIC) QoS provisioning scheme manages the QoS of the individual streams in a session, and with the knowledge of their relationships, it prevents competition between the streams. Further, by allowing an application-specified prioritization between streams in a session, MUSIC scheme features a significant improvement in performance over session-unaware schemes.

  9. Segmentation algorithm via Cellular Neural/Nonlinear Network: implementation on Bio-inspired hardware platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabiber, Fethullah; Vecchio, Pietro; Grassi, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    The Bio-inspired (Bi-i) Cellular Vision System is a computing platform consisting of sensing, array sensing-processing, and digital signal processing. The platform is based on the Cellular Neural/Nonlinear Network (CNN) paradigm. This article presents the implementation of a novel CNN-based segmentation algorithm onto the Bi-i system. Each part of the algorithm, along with the corresponding implementation on the hardware platform, is carefully described through the article. The experimental results, carried out for Foreman and Car-phone video sequences, highlight the feasibility of the approach, which provides a frame rate of about 26 frames/s. Comparisons with existing CNN-based methods show that the conceived approach is more accurate, thus representing a good trade-off between real-time requirements and accuracy.

  10. Cellular Signaling Networks Function as Generalized Wiener-Kolmogorov Filters to Suppress Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2014-10-01

    Cellular signaling involves the transmission of environmental information through cascades of stochastic biochemical reactions, inevitably introducing noise that compromises signal fidelity. Each stage of the cascade often takes the form of a kinase-phosphatase push-pull network, a basic unit of signaling pathways whose malfunction is linked with a host of cancers. We show that this ubiquitous enzymatic network motif effectively behaves as a Wiener-Kolmogorov optimal noise filter. Using concepts from umbral calculus, we generalize the linear Wiener-Kolmogorov theory, originally introduced in the context of communication and control engineering, to take nonlinear signal transduction and discrete molecule populations into account. This allows us to derive rigorous constraints for efficient noise reduction in this biochemical system. Our mathematical formalism yields bounds on filter performance in cases important to cellular function—such as ultrasensitive response to stimuli. We highlight features of the system relevant for optimizing filter efficiency, encoded in a single, measurable, dimensionless parameter. Our theory, which describes noise control in a large class of signal transduction networks, is also useful both for the design of synthetic biochemical signaling pathways and the manipulation of pathways through experimental probes such as oscillatory input.

  11. Cellular network formation of hydrophobic alkanethiol capped gold nanoparticles on mica surface mediated by water islands.

    PubMed

    John, Neena S; Raina, Gargi; Sharma, Ashutosh; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2010-09-01

    Dendritic and cellular networks of nanoparticles are known to form commonly either by random diffusion-limited aggregation or by solvent evaporation dynamics. Using alkanethiol capped gold nanoparticles deposited on mica imaged under ambient and controlled water vapor conditions by atomic force microscope and in situ scanning electron microscope, respectively, we show a third mechanism in action. The cellular network consisting of open and closed polygons is formed by the nucleation and lateral growth of adsorbed water islands, the contact lines of which push the randomly distributed hydrophobic nanoparticles along the growth directions, eventually leading to the polygonal structure formation as the boundaries of the growing islands meet. Such nanoparticle displacement has been possible due to the weakly adhering nature of the hydrophilic substrate, mica. These results demonstrate an important but hitherto neglected effect of adsorbed water in the structure formation on hydrophilic substrates and provide a facile tool for the fabrication of nanoparticle networks without specific particle or substrate modifications and without a tight control on particle deposition conditions during the solvent evaporation. PMID:20831330

  12. Alzheimer's as a Systems-Level Disease Involving the Interplay of Multiple Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Castrillo, Juan I; Oliver, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), and many neurodegenerative disorders, are multifactorial in nature. They involve a combination of genomic, epigenomic, interactomic and environmental factors. Progress is being made, and these complex diseases are beginning to be understood as having their origin in altered states of biological networks at the cellular level. In the case of AD, genomic susceptibility and mechanisms leading to (or accompanying) the impairment of the central Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) processing and tau networks are widely accepted as major contributors to the diseased state. The derangement of these networks may result in both the gain and loss of functions, increased generation of toxic species (e.g., toxic soluble oligomers and aggregates) and imbalances, whose effects can propagate to supra-cellular levels. Although well sustained by empirical data and widely accepted, this global perspective often overlooks the essential roles played by the main counteracting homeostatic networks (e.g., protein quality control/proteostasis, unfolded protein response, protein folding chaperone networks, disaggregases, ER-associated degradation/ubiquitin proteasome system, endolysosomal network, autophagy, and other stress-protective and clearance networks), whose relevance to AD is just beginning to be fully realized. In this chapter, an integrative perspective is presented. Alzheimer's disease is characterized to be a result of: (a) intrinsic genomic/epigenomic susceptibility and, (b) a continued dynamic interplay between the deranged networks and the central homeostatic networks of nerve cells. This interplay of networks will underlie both the onset and rate of progression of the disease in each individual. Integrative Systems Biology approaches are required to effect its elucidation. Comprehensive Systems Biology experiments at different 'omics levels in simple model organisms, engineered to recapitulate the basic features of AD may illuminate the onset and

  13. Robust tracking by cellular automata and neural networks with nonlocal weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ososkov, Gennadii A.

    1995-04-01

    A modified rotor model of the Hopfield neural networks (HNN) is proposed for finding tracks in multiwire proportional chambers. That requires us to apply both raw data prefiltering by cellular automaton and HNN weights furnishing by a special robust multiplier. Then this model is developed to be applicable for a more general type of data and detectors. As an example, data processing of ionospheric measurements are considered. For handling tracks detected by high pressure drift chambers with their up-down ambiguity a modification of deformable templates method is proposed. A new concept of controlled HNN is proposed for solving the so-called track-match problem.

  14. Existence and stability of traveling wave solutions for multilayer cellular neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsiung; Lin, Jian-Jhong; Yang, Tzi-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the existence and stability of traveling wave solutions for one-dimensional multilayer cellular neural networks. We first establish the existence of traveling wave solutions using the truncated technique. Then we study the asymptotic behaviors of solutions for the Cauchy problem of the neural model. Applying two kinds of comparison principles and the weighed energy method, we show that all solutions of the Cauchy problem converge exponentially to the traveling wave solutions provided that the initial data belong to a suitable weighted space.

  15. A new design for reconfigurable XOR function based on cellular neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanyi; Liu, Wenbo

    2014-10-01

    We have described a new method to construct the reconfigurable XOR logic circuit by using the modification of the standard uncoupled cellular neural network (CNN) cells. The modification of the cell is easier to implement in engineering applications. The scheme proposed in this paper, using the modification of standard uncoupled CNN cells, allows less hardware consumption in comparison to the utilisation of chaos computing system or harnessing piecewise-linear systems. The template parameters of the modified cell have been discussed, and the physical circuit implementing the reconfigurable two-input and three-input XOR function has also been presented.

  16. Anisotropic optical flow algorithm based on self-adaptive cellular neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Congxuan; Chen, Zhen; Li, Ming; Sun, Kaiqiong

    2013-01-01

    An anisotropic optical flow estimation method based on self-adaptive cellular neural networks (CNN) is proposed. First, a novel optical flow energy function which contains a robust data term and an anisotropic smoothing term is projected. Next, the CNN model which has the self-adaptive feedback operator and threshold is presented according to the Euler-Lagrange partial differential equations of the proposed optical flow energy function. Finally, the elaborate evaluation experiments indicate the significant effects of the various proposed strategies for optical flow estimation, and the comparison results with the other methods show that the proposed algorithm has better performance in computing accuracy and efficiency.

  17. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, M. P.; Reukov, V. V.; Thompson, G. L.; Vertegel, A. A.; Guo, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Jesse, S.

    2009-10-01

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  18. Evolving Transport Networks With Cellular Automata Models Inspired by Slime Mould.

    PubMed

    Tsompanas, Michail-Antisthenis I; Sirakoulis, Georgios Ch; Adamatzky, Andrew I

    2015-09-01

    Man-made transport networks and their design are closely related to the shortest path problem and considered amongst the most debated problems of computational intelligence. Apart from using conventional or bio-inspired computer algorithms, many researchers tried to solve this kind of problem using biological computing substrates, gas-discharge solvers, prototypes of a mobile droplet, and hot ice computers. In this aspect, another example of biological computer is the plasmodium of acellular slime mould Physarum polycephalum (P. polycephalum), which is a large single cell visible by an unaided eye and has been proven as a reliable living substrate for implementing biological computing devices for computational geometry, graph-theoretical problems, and optimization and imitation of transport networks. Although P. polycephalum is easy to experiment with, computing devices built with the living slime mould are extremely slow; it takes slime mould days to execute a computation. Consequently, mapping key computing mechanisms of the slime mould onto silicon would allow us to produce efficient bio-inspired computing devices to tackle with hard to solve computational intelligence problems like the aforementioned. Toward this direction, a cellular automaton (CA)-based, Physarum-inspired, network designing model is proposed. This novel CA-based model is inspired by the propagating strategy, the formation of tubular networks, and the computing abilities of the plasmodium of P. polycephalum. The results delivered by the CA model demonstrate a good match with several previously published results of experimental laboratory studies on imitation of man-made transport networks with P. polycephalum. Consequently, the proposed CA model can be used as a virtual, easy-to-access, and biomimicking laboratory emulator that will economize large time periods needed for biological experiments while producing networks almost identical to the tubular networks of the real-slime mould. PMID

  19. Multilayer cellular neural network and fuzzy C-mean classifiers: comparison and performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo San-Martin, Maite; Hlebarov, Vejen; Sadki, Mustapha

    2004-11-01

    Neural Networks and Fuzzy systems are considered two of the most important artificial intelligent algorithms which provide classification capabilities obtained through different learning schemas which capture knowledge and process it according to particular rule-based algorithms. These methods are especially suited to exploit the tolerance for uncertainty and vagueness in cognitive reasoning. By applying these methods with some relevant knowledge-based rules extracted using different data analysis tools, it is possible to obtain a robust classification performance for a wide range of applications. This paper will focus on non-destructive testing quality control systems, in particular, the study of metallic structures classification according to the corrosion time using a novel cellular neural network architecture, which will be explained in detail. Additionally, we will compare these results with the ones obtained using the Fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm and analyse both classifiers according to its classification capabilities.

  20. Evaluating a Novel Cellular Automata-Based Distributed Power Management Approach for Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adabi, Sepideh; Adabi, Sahar; Rezaee, Ali

    According to the traditional definition of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), static sensors have limited the feasibility of WSNs in some kind of approaches, so the mobility was introduced in WSN. Mobile nodes in a WSN come equipped with battery and from the point of deployment, this battery reserve becomes a valuable resource since it cannot be replenished. Hence, maximizing the network lifetime by minimizing the energy is an important challenge in Mobile WSN. Energy conservation can be accomplished by different approaches. In this paper, we presented an energy conservation solution based on Cellular Automata. The main objective of this solution is based on dynamically adjusting the transmission range and switching between operational states of the sensor nodes.

  1. Cellular telephone-based radiation sensor and wide-area detection network

    DOEpatents

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2006-12-12

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  2. Using prior knowledge from cellular pathways and molecular networks for diagnostic specimen classification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For many complex diseases, an earlier and more reliable diagnosis is considered a key prerequisite for developing more effective therapies to prevent or delay disease progression. Classical statistical learning approaches for specimen classification using omics data, however, often cannot provide diagnostic models with sufficient accuracy and robustness for heterogeneous diseases like cancers or neurodegenerative disorders. In recent years, new approaches for building multivariate biomarker models on omics data have been proposed, which exploit prior biological knowledge from molecular networks and cellular pathways to address these limitations. This survey provides an overview of these recent developments and compares pathway- and network-based specimen classification approaches in terms of their utility for improving model robustness, accuracy and biological interpretability. Different routes to translate omics-based multifactorial biomarker models into clinical diagnostic tests are discussed, and a previous study is presented as example. PMID:26141830

  3. Mobility-Aware Caching and Computation Offloading in 5G Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Hao, Yixue; Qiu, Meikang; Song, Jeungeun; Wu, Di; Humar, Iztok

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends show that Internet traffic is increasingly dominated by content, which is accompanied by the exponential growth of traffic. To cope with this phenomena, network caching is introduced to utilize the storage capacity of diverse network devices. In this paper, we first summarize four basic caching placement strategies, i.e., local caching, Device-to-Device (D2D) caching, Small cell Base Station (SBS) caching and Macrocell Base Station (MBS) caching. However, studies show that so far, much of the research has ignored the impact of user mobility. Therefore, taking the effect of the user mobility into consideration, we proposes a joint mobility-aware caching and SBS density placement scheme (MS caching). In addition, differences and relationships between caching and computation offloading are discussed. We present a design of a hybrid computation offloading and support it with experimental results, which demonstrate improved performance in terms of energy cost. Finally, we discuss the design of an incentive mechanism by considering network dynamics, differentiated user’s quality of experience (QoE) and the heterogeneity of mobile terminals in terms of caching and computing capabilities. PMID:27347975

  4. Mobility-Aware Caching and Computation Offloading in 5G Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Hao, Yixue; Qiu, Meikang; Song, Jeungeun; Wu, Di; Humar, Iztok

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends show that Internet traffic is increasingly dominated by content, which is accompanied by the exponential growth of traffic. To cope with this phenomena, network caching is introduced to utilize the storage capacity of diverse network devices. In this paper, we first summarize four basic caching placement strategies, i.e., local caching, Device-to-Device (D2D) caching, Small cell Base Station (SBS) caching and Macrocell Base Station (MBS) caching. However, studies show that so far, much of the research has ignored the impact of user mobility. Therefore, taking the effect of the user mobility into consideration, we proposes a joint mobility-aware caching and SBS density placement scheme (MS caching). In addition, differences and relationships between caching and computation offloading are discussed. We present a design of a hybrid computation offloading and support it with experimental results, which demonstrate improved performance in terms of energy cost. Finally, we discuss the design of an incentive mechanism by considering network dynamics, differentiated user's quality of experience (QoE) and the heterogeneity of mobile terminals in terms of caching and computing capabilities. PMID:27347975

  5. Effect of crystals and fibrous network polymer additives on cellular morphology of microcellular foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ryoma; Utano, Tatsumi; Yasuhara, Shunya; Ishihara, Shota; Ohshima, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the core-back foam injection molding was used for preparing microcelluar polypropylene (PP) foam with either a 1,3:2,4 bis-O-(4-methylbenzylidene)-D-sorbitol gelling agent (Gel-all MD) or a fibros network polymer additive (Metablen 3000). Both agent and addiive could effectively control the celluar morphology in foams but somehow different ways. In course of cooling the polymer with Gel-all MD in the mold caity, the agent enhanced the crystal nucleation and resulted in the large number of small crystals. The crystals acted as effective bubble nucleation agent in foaming process. Thus, the agent reduced the cell size and increased the cell density, drastically. Furthermore, the small crystals provided an inhomogenuity to the expanding cell wall and produced the high open cell content with nano-scale fibril structure. Gell-all as well as Metablene 3000 formed a gel-like fibrous network in melt. The network increased the elongational viscosity and tended to prevent the cell wall from breaking up. The foaming temperature window was widened by the presence of the network. Especially, the temperature window where the macro-fibrous structure was formed was expanded to the higher temperature. The effects of crystal nucleating agent and PTFE on crystals' size and number, viscoelsticity, rheological propreties of PP and cellular morphology were compared and thorougly investigated.

  6. ComPPI: a cellular compartment-specific database for protein–protein interaction network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Veres, Daniel V.; Gyurkó, Dávid M.; Thaler, Benedek; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Fazekas, Dávid; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Here we present ComPPI, a cellular compartment-specific database of proteins and their interactions enabling an extensive, compartmentalized protein–protein interaction network analysis (URL: http://ComPPI.LinkGroup.hu). ComPPI enables the user to filter biologically unlikely interactions, where the two interacting proteins have no common subcellular localizations and to predict novel properties, such as compartment-specific biological functions. ComPPI is an integrated database covering four species (S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens). The compilation of nine protein–protein interaction and eight subcellular localization data sets had four curation steps including a manually built, comprehensive hierarchical structure of >1600 subcellular localizations. ComPPI provides confidence scores for protein subcellular localizations and protein–protein interactions. ComPPI has user-friendly search options for individual proteins giving their subcellular localization, their interactions and the likelihood of their interactions considering the subcellular localization of their interacting partners. Download options of search results, whole-proteomes, organelle-specific interactomes and subcellular localization data are available on its website. Due to its novel features, ComPPI is useful for the analysis of experimental results in biochemistry and molecular biology, as well as for proteome-wide studies in bioinformatics and network science helping cellular biology, medicine and drug design. PMID:25348397

  7. Uniqueness and stability of traveling waves for cellular neural networks with multiple delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhi-Xian; Mei, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of traveling waves to a class of lattice differential equations for cellular neural networks with multiple delays. Following the previous study [38] on the existence of the traveling waves, here we focus on the uniqueness and the stability of these traveling waves. First of all, by establishing the a priori asymptotic behavior of traveling waves and applying Ikehara's theorem, we prove the uniqueness (up to translation) of traveling waves ϕ (n - ct) with c ≤c* for the cellular neural networks with multiple delays, where c* < 0 is the critical wave speed. Then, by the weighted energy method together with the squeezing technique, we further show the global stability of all non-critical traveling waves for this model, that is, for all monotone waves with the speed c

  8. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-07-17

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of cofactors (cochaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these cochaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone-cochaperone-client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific cochaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein-protein interactions for cochaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family cochaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network and its regulation in development and disease and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug-target engagement. PMID:25036637

  9. Network, cellular, and molecular mechanisms underlying long-term memory formation.

    PubMed

    Carasatorre, Mariana; Ramírez-Amaya, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    The neural network stores information through activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that occurs in populations of neurons. Persistent forms of synaptic plasticity may account for long-term memory storage, and the most salient forms are the changes in the structure of synapses. The theory proposes that encoding should use a sparse code and evidence suggests that this can be achieved through offline reactivation or by sparse initial recruitment of the network units. This idea implies that in some cases the neurons that underwent structural synaptic plasticity might be a subpopulation of those originally recruited; However, it is not yet clear whether all the neurons recruited during acquisition are the ones that underwent persistent forms of synaptic plasticity and responsible for memory retrieval. To determine which neural units underlie long-term memory storage, we need to characterize which are the persistent forms of synaptic plasticity occurring in these neural ensembles and the best hints so far are the molecular signals underlying structural modifications of the synapses. Structural synaptic plasticity can be achieved by the activity of various signal transduction pathways, including the NMDA-CaMKII and ACh-MAPK. These pathways converge with the Rho family of GTPases and the consequent ERK 1/2 activation, which regulates multiple cellular functions such as protein translation, protein trafficking, and gene transcription. The most detailed explanation may come from models that allow us to determine the contribution of each piece of this fascinating puzzle that is the neuron and the neural network. PMID:22976275

  10. Proof-of-Concept of a Millimeter-Wave Integrated Heterogeneous Network for 5G Cellular.

    PubMed

    Okasaka, Shozo; Weiler, Richard J; Keusgen, Wilhelm; Pudeyev, Andrey; Maltsev, Alexander; Karls, Ingolf; Sakaguchi, Kei

    2016-01-01

    The fifth-generation mobile networks (5G) will not only enhance mobile broadband services, but also enable connectivity for a massive number of Internet-of-Things devices, such as wireless sensors, meters or actuators. Thus, 5G is expected to achieve a 1000-fold or more increase in capacity over 4G. The use of the millimeter-wave (mmWave) spectrum is a key enabler to allowing 5G to achieve such enhancement in capacity. To fully utilize the mmWave spectrum, 5G is expected to adopt a heterogeneous network (HetNet) architecture, wherein mmWave small cells are overlaid onto a conventional macro-cellular network. In the mmWave-integrated HetNet, splitting of the control plane (CP) and user plane (UP) will allow continuous connectivity and increase the capacity of the mmWave small cells. mmWave communication can be used not only for access linking, but also for wireless backhaul linking, which will facilitate the installation of mmWave small cells. In this study, a proof-of-concept (PoC) was conducted to demonstrate the practicality of a prototype mmWave-integrated HetNet, using mmWave technologies for both backhaul and access. PMID:27571074

  11. Firing patterns in a random network cellular automata model of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acedo, L.; Lamprianidou, E.; Moraño, J.-A.; Villanueva-Oller, J.; Villanueva, R.-J.

    2015-10-01

    One of the main challenges in the simulation of even reduced areas of the brain is the presence of a large number of neurons and a large number of connections among them. Even from a theoretical point of view, the behaviour of dynamical models of complex networks with high connectivity is unknown, precisely because the cost of computation is still unaffordable and it will likely be in the near future. In this paper we discuss the simulation of a cellular automata network model of the brain including up to one million sites with a maximum average of three hundred connections per neuron. This level of connectivity was achieved thanks to a distributed computing environment based on the BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing) platform. Moreover, in this work we consider the interplay among excitatory neurons (which induce the excitation of their neighbours) and inhibitory neurons (which prevent resting neurons from firing and induce firing neurons to pass to the refractory state). Our objective is to classify the normal (noisy but asymptotically constant patterns) and the abnormal (high oscillations with spindle-like behaviour) patterns of activity in the model brain and their stability and parameter ranges in order to determine the role of excitatory and inhibitory compensatory effects in healthy and diseased individuals.

  12. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  13. Global optimization of data quality checks on 2-D and 3-D networks of GPR cross-well tomographic data for automatic correction of unknown well deviations

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, D. S.; Peterson, J. E.

    2010-03-15

    .g. Bautu et al., 2006). In the technique of algebraic reconstruction tomography (ART), which is used herein for the travel time inversion (Peterson et al., 1985), a small relaxation parameter will smooth imaging artifacts caused by data errors at the expense of resolution and contrast (Figure 2). However, large data errors such as unaccounted well deviations cannot be adequately suppressed through inversion weighting schemes. Previously, problems with tomograms were treated manually. However, in large data sets and/or networks of data sets, trial and error changes to well geometries become increasingly difficult and ineffective. Mislocation of the transmitter and receiver stations of GPR cross-well tomography data sets can lead to serious imaging artifacts if not accounted for prior to inversion. Previously, problems with tomograms have been treated manually prior to inversion. In large data sets and/or networks of tomographic data sets, trial and error changes to well geometries become increasingly difficult and ineffective. Our approach is to use cross-well data quality checks and a simplified model of borehole deviation with particle swarm optimization (PSO) to automatically correct for source and receiver locations prior to tomographic inversion. We present a simple model of well deviation, which is designed to minimize potential corruption of actual data trends. We also provide quantitative quality control measures based on minimizing correlations between take-off angle and apparent velocity, and a quality check on the continuity of velocity between adjacent wells. This methodology is shown to be accurate and robust for simple 2-D synthetic test cases. Plus, we demonstrate the method on actual field data where it is compared to deviation logs. This study shows the promise for automatic correction of well deviations in GPR tomographic data. Analysis of synthetic data shows that very precise estimates of well deviation can be made for small deviations, even in the

  14. A novel method to assess human population exposure induced by a wireless cellular network.

    PubMed

    Varsier, Nadège; Plets, David; Corre, Yoann; Vermeeren, Günter; Joseph, Wout; Aerts, Sam; Martens, Luc; Wiart, Joe

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new metric to evaluate electromagnetic exposure induced by wireless cellular networks. This metric takes into account the exposure induced by base station antennas as well as exposure induced by wireless devices to evaluate average global exposure of the population in a specific geographical area. The paper first explains the concept and gives the formulation of the Exposure Index (EI). Then, the EI computation is illustrated through simple phone call scenarios (indoor office, in train) and a complete macro urban data long-term evolution scenario showing how, based on simulations, radio-planning predictions, realistic population statistics, user traffic data, and specific absorption rate calculations can be combined to assess the index. Bioelectromagnetics. 36:451-463, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26113174

  15. Multiscale Systems Analysis of Root Growth and Development: Modeling Beyond the Network and Cellular Scales

    PubMed Central

    Band, Leah R.; Fozard, John A.; Godin, Christophe; Jensen, Oliver E.; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm J.; King, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent decades, we have gained detailed knowledge of many processes involved in root growth and development. However, with this knowledge come increasing complexity and an increasing need for mechanistic modeling to understand how those individual processes interact. One major challenge is in relating genotypes to phenotypes, requiring us to move beyond the network and cellular scales, to use multiscale modeling to predict emergent dynamics at the tissue and organ levels. In this review, we highlight recent developments in multiscale modeling, illustrating how these are generating new mechanistic insights into the regulation of root growth and development. We consider how these models are motivating new biological data analysis and explore directions for future research. This modeling progress will be crucial as we move from a qualitative to an increasingly quantitative understanding of root biology, generating predictive tools that accelerate the development of improved crop varieties. PMID:23110897

  16. Modeling of trophospheric ozone concentrations using genetically trained multi-level cellular neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, H. Kurtulus; Bilgili, Erdem; Sahin, Ulku; Ucan, O. Nuri; Bayat, Cuma

    2007-09-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations, which are an important air pollutant, are modeled by the use of an artificial intelligence structure. Data obtained from air pollution measurement stations in the city of Istanbul are utilized in constituting the model. A supervised algorithm for the evaluation of ozone concentration using a genetically trained multi-level cellular neural network (ML-CNN) is introduced, developed, and applied to real data. A genetic algorithm is used in the optimization of CNN templates. The model results and the actual measurement results are compared and statistically evaluated. It is observed that seasonal changes in ozone concentrations are reflected effectively by the concentrations estimated by the multilevel-CNN model structure, with a correlation value of 0.57 ascertained between actual and model results. It is shown that the multilevel-CNN modeling technique is as satisfactory as other modeling techniques in associating the data in a complex medium in air pollution applications.

  17. Convergence and attractivity of memristor-based cellular neural networks with time delays.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sitian; Wang, Jun; Xue, Xiaoping

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents theoretical results on the convergence and attractivity of memristor-based cellular neural networks (MCNNs) with time delays. Based on a realistic memristor model, an MCNN is modeled using a differential inclusion. The essential boundedness of its global solutions is proven. The state of MCNNs is further proven to be convergent to a critical-point set located in saturated region of the activation function, when the initial state locates in a saturated region. It is shown that the state convergence time period is finite and can be quantitatively estimated using given parameters. Furthermore, the positive invariance and attractivity of state in non-saturated regions are also proven. The simulation results of several numerical examples are provided to substantiate the results. PMID:25562569

  18. Parallelism on the Intel 860 Hypercube:. Ising Magnets, Hydrodynamical Cellular Automata and Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohring, G. A.; Stauffer, D.

    Geometric parallelization was tested on the Intel Hypercube with 32 MIMD processors of 1860 type, each with 16 Mbytes of distributed memory. We applied it to Ising models in two and three dimensions as well as to neural networks and two-dimensional hydrodynamic cellular automata. For system sizes suited to this machine, up to 60960*60960 and 1410*1410*1408 Ising spins, we found nearly hundred percent parallel efficiency in spite of the needed inter-processor communications. For small systems, the observed deviations from full efficiency were compared with the scaling concepts of Heermann and Burkitt and of Jakobs and Gerling. For Ising models, we determined the Glauber kinetic exponent z≃2.18 in two dimensions and confirmed the stretched exponential relaxation of the magnetization towards the spontaneous magnetization below Tc. For three dimensions we found z≃2.09 and simple exponential relaxation.

  19. Global Detection of Live Virtual Machine Migration Based on Cellular Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kang; Yang, Yixian; Zhang, Ling; Jing, Maohua; Xin, Yang; Li, Zhongxian

    2014-01-01

    In order to meet the demands of operation monitoring of large scale, autoscaling, and heterogeneous virtual resources in the existing cloud computing, a new method of live virtual machine (VM) migration detection algorithm based on the cellular neural networks (CNNs), is presented. Through analyzing the detection process, the parameter relationship of CNN is mapped as an optimization problem, in which improved particle swarm optimization algorithm based on bubble sort is used to solve the problem. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can display the VM migration processing intuitively. Compared with the best fit heuristic algorithm, this approach reduces the processing time, and emerging evidence has indicated that this new approach is affordable to parallelism and analog very large scale integration (VLSI) implementation allowing the VM migration detection to be performed better. PMID:24959631

  20. Smart-Pixel Array Processors Based on Optimal Cellular Neural Networks for Space Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Sheu, Bing J.; Venus, Holger; Sandau, Rainer

    1997-01-01

    A smart-pixel cellular neural network (CNN) with hardware annealing capability, digitally programmable synaptic weights, and multisensor parallel interface has been under development for advanced space sensor applications. The smart-pixel CNN architecture is a programmable multi-dimensional array of optoelectronic neurons which are locally connected with their local neurons and associated active-pixel sensors. Integration of the neuroprocessor in each processor node of a scalable multiprocessor system offers orders-of-magnitude computing performance enhancements for on-board real-time intelligent multisensor processing and control tasks of advanced small satellites. The smart-pixel CNN operation theory, architecture, design and implementation, and system applications are investigated in detail. The VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) implementation feasibility was illustrated by a prototype smart-pixel 5x5 neuroprocessor array chip of active dimensions 1380 micron x 746 micron in a 2-micron CMOS technology.

  1. Global detection of live virtual machine migration based on cellular neural networks.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kang; Yang, Yixian; Zhang, Ling; Jing, Maohua; Xin, Yang; Li, Zhongxian

    2014-01-01

    In order to meet the demands of operation monitoring of large scale, autoscaling, and heterogeneous virtual resources in the existing cloud computing, a new method of live virtual machine (VM) migration detection algorithm based on the cellular neural networks (CNNs), is presented. Through analyzing the detection process, the parameter relationship of CNN is mapped as an optimization problem, in which improved particle swarm optimization algorithm based on bubble sort is used to solve the problem. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can display the VM migration processing intuitively. Compared with the best fit heuristic algorithm, this approach reduces the processing time, and emerging evidence has indicated that this new approach is affordable to parallelism and analog very large scale integration (VLSI) implementation allowing the VM migration detection to be performed better. PMID:24959631

  2. Co-evolutionary networks of genes and cellular processes across fungal species

    PubMed Central

    Tuller, Tamir; Kupiec, Martin; Ruppin, Eytan

    2009-01-01

    Background The introduction of measures such as evolutionary rate and propensity for gene loss have significantly advanced our knowledge of the evolutionary history and selection forces acting upon individual genes and cellular processes. Results We present two new measures, the 'relative evolutionary rate pattern' (rERP), which records the relative evolutionary rates of conserved genes across the different branches of a species' phylogenetic tree, and the 'copy number pattern' (CNP), which quantifies the rate of gene loss of less conserved genes. Together, these measures yield a high-resolution study of the co-evolution of genes in 9 fungal species, spanning 3,540 sets of orthologs. We find that the evolutionary tempo of conserved genes varies in different evolutionary periods. The co-evolution of genes' Gene Ontology categories exhibits a significant correlation with their functional distance in the Gene Ontology hierarchy, but not with their location on chromosomes, showing that cellular functions are a more important driving force in gene co-evolution than their chromosomal proximity. Two fundamental patterns of co-evolution of conserved genes, cooperative and reciprocal, are identified; only genes co-evolving cooperatively functionally back each other up. The co-evolution of conserved and less conserved genes exhibits both commonalities and differences; DNA metabolism is positively correlated with nuclear traffic, transcription processes and vacuolar biology in both analyses. Conclusions Overall, this study charts the first global network view of gene co-evolution in fungi. The future application of the approach presented here to other phylogenetic trees holds much promise in characterizing the forces that shape cellular co-evolution. PMID:19416514

  3. BioJazz: in silico evolution of cellular networks with unbounded complexity using rule-based modeling

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Song; Ollivier, Julien F.; Swain, Peter S.; Soyer, Orkun S.

    2015-01-01

    Systems biologists aim to decipher the structure and dynamics of signaling and regulatory networks underpinning cellular responses; synthetic biologists can use this insight to alter existing networks or engineer de novo ones. Both tasks will benefit from an understanding of which structural and dynamic features of networks can emerge from evolutionary processes, through which intermediary steps these arise, and whether they embody general design principles. As natural evolution at the level of network dynamics is difficult to study, in silico evolution of network models can provide important insights. However, current tools used for in silico evolution of network dynamics are limited to ad hoc computer simulations and models. Here we introduce BioJazz, an extendable, user-friendly tool for simulating the evolution of dynamic biochemical networks. Unlike previous tools for in silico evolution, BioJazz allows for the evolution of cellular networks with unbounded complexity by combining rule-based modeling with an encoding of networks that is akin to a genome. We show that BioJazz can be used to implement biologically realistic selective pressures and allows exploration of the space of network architectures and dynamics that implement prescribed physiological functions. BioJazz is provided as an open-source tool to facilitate its further development and use. Source code and user manuals are available at: http://oss-lab.github.io/biojazz and http://osslab.lifesci.warwick.ac.uk/BioJazz.aspx. PMID:26101250

  4. Intragranular cellular segregation network structure strengthening 316L stainless steel prepared by selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Leifeng; Wikman, Stefan; Cui, Daqing; Shen, Zhijian

    2016-03-01

    A feasibility study was performed to fabricate ITER In-Vessel components by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) supported by Fusion for Energy (F4E). Almost fully dense 316L stainless steel (SS316L) components were prepared from gas-atomized powder and with optimized SLM processing parameters. Tensile tests and Charpy-V tests were carried out at 22 °C and 250 °C and the results showed that SLM SS316L fulfill the RCC-MR code. Microstructure characterization reveals the presence of hierarchical macro-, micro- and nano-structures in as-built samples that were very different from SS316L microstructures prepared by other established methods. The formation of a characteristic intragranular cellular segregation network microstructure appears to contribute to the increase of yield strength without losing ductility. Silicon oxide nano-inclusions were formed during the SLM process that generated a micro-hardness fluctuation in the building direction. The combined influence of a cellular microstructure and the nano-inclusions constraints the size of ductile dimples to nano-scale. The crack propagation is hindered by a pinning effect that improves the defect-tolerance of the SLM SS316L. This work proves that it was possible to manufacture SS316L with properties suitable for ITER First Wall panels. Further studies on irradiation properties of SLM SS316L and manufacturing of larger real-size components are needed.

  5. Computerized detection of pulmonary nodules using cellular neural networks in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangwei; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sonka, Milan

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to detect small-sized (from 2mm to 10mm) non-pleural pulmonary nodules in high resolution helical CT scans. A new 3D automated scheme using cellular neural networks is presented. Different from most previous methods, this scheme employed the local shape property to perform voxel classification. The shape index feature successfully captured the local shape difference between nodules and non-nodules, especially vessels. A 3D discrete-time cellular neural network (DTCNN) was constructed to give a reliable voxel classification by collecting information in a neighborhood. To tailor it for lung nodule detection, this DTCNN was trained using genetic algorithms (GAs) to derive the shape index variation pattern of nodules. 19 clinical thoracic CT cases involving a total of 4838 sectional images were used in this work, with 2 scans forming the training set, and the remaining 17 cases being the testing set. The evaluation was composed of two stages. During the first stage, a pulmonologist and our CAD system independently detected nodules in the testing set. Then, the suspected nodule areas located by the computer were reviewed by the pulmonologist to confirm nodules missed by the human in the first review. There were 32 true nodules detected by the computer but missed by the pulmonologist in the first review, in which 30 non-juxtapleural nodules were found. Considering the nodules detected by the pulmonologist during the first and second reviews as the truth, 52 of 62 non-pleural nodules were detected by the CAD system (sensitivity being 83.9%), with the number of false positives being 3.47 per case.

  6. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown. PMID:26340633

  7. Cellular Nonlinear Networks for the emergence of perceptual states: application to robot navigation control.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; De Fiore, Sebastiano; Patané, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a new general purpose perceptual control architecture, based on nonlinear neural lattices, is presented and applied to solve robot navigation tasks. Insects show the ability to react to certain stimuli with simple reflexes, using direct sensory-motor pathways, which can be considered as basic behaviors, inherited and pre-wired. Relevant brain centres, known as Mushroom Bodies (MB) and Central Complex (CX) were recently identified in insects: though their functional details are not yet fully understood, it is known that they provide secondary pathways allowing the emergence of cognitive behaviors. These are gained through the coordination of the basic abilities to satisfy the insect's needs. Taking inspiration from this evidence, our architecture modulates, through a reinforcement learning, a set of competitive and concurrent basic behaviors in order to accomplish the task assigned through a reward function. The core of the architecture is constituted by the so-called Representation layer, used to create a concise picture of the current environment situation, fusing together different stimuli for the emergence of perceptual states. These perceptual states are steady state solutions of lattices of Reaction-Diffusion Cellular Nonlinear Networks (RD-CNN), designed to show Turing patterns. The exploitation of the dynamics of the multiple equilibria of the network is emphasized through the adaptive shaping of the basins of attraction for each emerged pattern. New experimental campaigns on standard robotic platforms are reported to demonstrate the potentiality and the effectiveness of the approach. PMID:19596552

  8. Measurement and interpolation uncertainties in rainfall maps from cellular communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, M. F.; Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2015-08-01

    compared against quality-controlled gauge-adjusted radar rainfall fields (assumed to be the ground truth). Thus, we were able to not only identify and quantify the sources of uncertainty in such rainfall maps, but also test the actual and optimal performance of one commercial microwave network from one of the cellular providers in the Netherlands. Errors in microwave link measurements were found to be the source that contributes most to the overall uncertainty.

  9. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases.

  10. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases. PMID:26608097

  11. Aniso2D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  12. Noise-robust realization of Turing-complete cellular automata by using neural networks with pattern representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oku, Makito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-11-01

    A modularly-structured neural network model is considered. Each module, which we call a ‘cell’, consists of two parts: a Hopfield neural network model and a multilayered perceptron. An array of such cells is used to simulate the Rule 110 cellular automaton with high accuracy even when all the units of neural networks are replaced by stochastic binary ones. We also find that noise not only degrades but also facilitates computation if the outputs of multilayered perceptrons are below the threshold required to update the states of the cells, which is a stochastic resonance in computation.

  13. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  14. Mesh2d

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  15. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  16. Astrocytic gap junctional networks suppress cellular damage in an in vitro model of ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shinotsuka, Takanori; Yasui, Masato; Nuriya, Mutsuo

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Astrocytes exhibit characteristic changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} under OGD. • Astrocytic [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase is synchronized with a neuronal anoxic depolarization. • Gap junctional couplings protect neurons as well as astrocytes during OGD. - Abstract: Astrocytes play pivotal roles in both the physiology and the pathophysiology of the brain. They communicate with each other via extracellular messengers as well as through gap junctions, which may exacerbate or protect against pathological processes in the brain. However, their roles during the acute phase of ischemia and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we imaged changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in astrocytes in mouse cortical slices under oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) condition using two-photon microscopy. Under OGD, astrocytes showed [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} oscillations followed by larger and sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases. While the pharmacological blockades of astrocytic receptors for glutamate and ATP had no effect, the inhibitions of gap junctional intercellular coupling between astrocytes significantly advanced the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase after OGD exposure. Interestingly, the simultaneous recording of the neuronal membrane potential revealed that the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes was synchronized with the appearance of neuronal anoxic depolarization. Furthermore, the blockade of gap junctional coupling resulted in a concurrent faster appearance of neuronal depolarizations, which remain synchronized with the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes. These results indicate that astrocytes delay the appearance of the pathological responses of astrocytes and neurons through their gap junction-mediated intercellular network under OGD. Thus, astrocytic gap junctional networks provide protection against tissue damage

  17. On-chip training for cellular neural networks using iterative annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiden, Dirk; Tetzlaff, Ronald

    2003-04-01

    Cellular Neural Network-Universal Machines (CNN-UM) are analog devices, which are excellently suited for image processing. A big challenge thereby is the determination of CNN templates for special image processing tasks. In many cases appropriate templates can only be found by a parameter optimization. The determination of templates for complex applications in the area of CNN is usually performed by using a CNN software simulator. Unfortunately, in many cases the determined templates cannot be used in hardware realizations of CNN caused by realization effects. In order to find robust templates, which are not only working on CNN simulators, but also on hardware implementations, we present in this contribution a new kind of on-chip-multi-template-training. Furthermore, as a possible application, we will also present a CNN-based solution of the problem of Pattern Matching, which is a processing step in many areas of image processing, like e.g. in Motion Estimation, Image- and Video-Compression.

  18. Residual Separation of Magnetic Fields Using a Cellular Neural Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albora, A. M.; Özmen, A.; Uçan, O. N.

    - In this paper, a Cellular Neural Network (CNN) has been applied to a magnetic regional/residual anomaly separation problem. CNN is an analog parallel computing paradigm defined in space and characterized by the locality of connections between processing neurons. The behavior of the CNN is defined by the template matrices A, B and the template vector I. We have optimized weight coefficients of these templates using Recurrent Perceptron Learning Algorithm (RPLA). The advantages of CNN as a real-time stochastic method are that it introduces little distortion to the shape of the original image and that it is not effected significantly by factors such as the overlap of power spectra of residual fields. The proposed method is tested using synthetic examples and the average depth of the buried objects has been estimated by power spectrum analysis. Next the CNN approach is applied to magnetic data over the Golalan chromite mine in Elazig which lies East of Turkey. This area is among the largest and richest chromite masses of the world. We compared the performance of CNN to classical derivative approaches.

  19. Data fusion and classification using a hybrid intrinsic cellular inference network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Robert; Walenz, Brett; Seiffertt, John; Robinette, Paul; Wunsch, Donald

    2010-04-01

    Hybrid Intrinsic Cellular Inference Network (HICIN) is designed for battlespace decision support applications. We developed an automatic method of generating hypotheses for an entity-attribute classifier. The capability and effectiveness of a domain specific ontology was used to generate automatic categories for data classification. Heterogeneous data is clustered using an Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) inference engine on a sample (unclassified) data set. The data set is the Lahman baseball database. The actual data is immaterial to the architecture, however, parallels in the data can be easily drawn (i.e., "Team" maps to organization, "Runs scored/allowed" to Measure of organization performance (positive/negative), "Payroll" to organization resources, etc.). Results show that HICIN classifiers create known inferences from the heterogonous data. These inferences are not explicitly stated in the ontological description of the domain and are strictly data driven. HICIN uses data uncertainty handling to reduce errors in the classification. The uncertainty handling is based on subjective logic. The belief mass allows evidence from multiple sources to be mathematically combined to increase or discount an assertion. In military operations the ability to reduce uncertainty will be vital in the data fusion operation.

  20. Memristor-based cellular nonlinear/neural network: design, analysis, and applications.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shukai; Hu, Xiaofang; Dong, Zhekang; Wang, Lidan; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2015-06-01

    Cellular nonlinear/neural network (CNN) has been recognized as a powerful massively parallel architecture capable of solving complex engineering problems by performing trillions of analog operations per second. The memristor was theoretically predicted in the late seventies, but it garnered nascent research interest due to the recent much-acclaimed discovery of nanocrossbar memories by engineers at the Hewlett-Packard Laboratory. The memristor is expected to be co-integrated with nanoscale CMOS technology to revolutionize conventional von Neumann as well as neuromorphic computing. In this paper, a compact CNN model based on memristors is presented along with its performance analysis and applications. In the new CNN design, the memristor bridge circuit acts as the synaptic circuit element and substitutes the complex multiplication circuit used in traditional CNN architectures. In addition, the negative differential resistance and nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of the memristor have been leveraged to replace the linear resistor in conventional CNNs. The proposed CNN design has several merits, for example, high density, nonvolatility, and programmability of synaptic weights. The proposed memristor-based CNN design operations for implementing several image processing functions are illustrated through simulation and contrasted with conventional CNNs. Monte-Carlo simulation has been used to demonstrate the behavior of the proposed CNN due to the variations in memristor synaptic weights. PMID:25069124

  1. Numerically evaluated functional equivalence between chaotic dynamics in neural networks and cellular automata under totalistic rules.

    PubMed

    Takada, Ryu; Munetaka, Daigo; Kobayashi, Shoji; Suemitsu, Yoshikazu; Nara, Shigetoshi

    2007-09-01

    Chaotic dynamics in a recurrent neural network model and in two-dimensional cellular automata, where both have finite but large degrees of freedom, are investigated from the viewpoint of harnessing chaos and are applied to motion control to indicate that both have potential capabilities for complex function control by simple rule(s). An important point is that chaotic dynamics generated in these two systems give us autonomous complex pattern dynamics itinerating through intermediate state points between embedded patterns (attractors) in high-dimensional state space. An application of these chaotic dynamics to complex controlling is proposed based on an idea that with the use of simple adaptive switching between a weakly chaotic regime and a strongly chaotic regime, complex problems can be solved. As an actual example, a two-dimensional maze, where it should be noted that the spatial structure of the maze is one of typical ill-posed problems, is solved with the use of chaos in both systems. Our computer simulations show that the success rate over 300 trials is much better, at least, than that of a random number generator. Our functional simulations indicate that both systems are almost equivalent from the viewpoint of functional aspects based on our idea, harnessing of chaos. PMID:19003512

  2. Synchronization schemes for coupled identical Yang-Yang type fuzzy cellular neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yonghui; Yang, Zijiang; Han, Maoan

    2009-09-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive procedure to the problem of synchronization for a class of coupled identical Yang-Yang type fuzzy cellular neural networks (YYFCNN) with time-varying delays. Based on the simple adaptive controller, a set of sufficient conditions are developed to guarantee the synchronization of the coupled YYFCNN with time-varying delays. The results are much different from previous ones. It is proved that two coupled identical YYFCNN with time-varying delays can achieve synchronization by enhancing the coupled strength dynamically. In addition, this kind of controller is simple to be implemented and it is fairly robust against the effect of weak noise in the given time series. The approaches are based on using the invariance principle of functional differential equations, constructing a general Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and employing a linear matrix inequality (LMI). An illustrative example and its simulations show the feasibility of our results. Finally, an application is given to show how to apply the presented synchronization scheme of YYFCNN to secure communication.

  3. The potential of cellular network infrastructures for sudden rainfall monitoring in dry climate regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, N.; Alpert, P.; Messer, H.

    2013-09-01

    Monitoring of precipitation and in particular sudden rain, in rural dry climate regions, is a subject of great significance in several weather related processes such as soil erosion, flash flooding, triggering epidemics and more. The rainfall monitoring facilities in these regions and as a result precipitation data are, however, commonly, severely lacking. As was recently shown, cellular networks infrastructures supply high resolution precipitation measurements at ground level while often being situated in dry areas, covering large parts of these climatic zones. The potential found in these systems to provide early monitoring and essential precipitation information, directly from arid regions, based on standard measurements of commercial microwave links, is exemplified here over the Negev and the Southern Judean desert, South Israel. We present the results of two different rainfall events occurred in these regions. It is shown that the microwave system measured precipitation between at least 50 min (in case 1) and at least 1 h and 40 min (in case 2) before each of the sparse rain gauges. During each case, the radar system, located relatively far from the arid sites, provided measurements from heights of at least 1500 m and 2000 m above surface, respectively. A third case study demonstrates a relative advantage of microwave links to measure precipitation intensity with respect to the radar system, over an area of complex topography located in northeastern Israel, which is relatively far (~ 150 km) from the radar.

  4. A universal concept based on cellular neural networks for ultrafast and flexible solving of differential equations.

    PubMed

    Chedjou, Jean Chamberlain; Kyamakya, Kyandoghere

    2015-04-01

    This paper develops and validates a comprehensive and universally applicable computational concept for solving nonlinear differential equations (NDEs) through a neurocomputing concept based on cellular neural networks (CNNs). High-precision, stability, convergence, and lowest-possible memory requirements are ensured by the CNN processor architecture. A significant challenge solved in this paper is that all these cited computing features are ensured in all system-states (regular or chaotic ones) and in all bifurcation conditions that may be experienced by NDEs.One particular quintessence of this paper is to develop and demonstrate a solver concept that shows and ensures that CNN processors (realized either in hardware or in software) are universal solvers of NDE models. The solving logic or algorithm of given NDEs (possible examples are: Duffing, Mathieu, Van der Pol, Jerk, Chua, Rössler, Lorenz, Burgers, and the transport equations) through a CNN processor system is provided by a set of templates that are computed by our comprehensive templates calculation technique that we call nonlinear adaptive optimization. This paper is therefore a significant contribution and represents a cutting-edge real-time computational engineering approach, especially while considering the various scientific and engineering applications of this ultrafast, energy-and-memory-efficient, and high-precise NDE solver concept. For illustration purposes, three NDE models are demonstratively solved, and related CNN templates are derived and used: the periodically excited Duffing equation, the Mathieu equation, and the transport equation. PMID:25794380

  5. Adiponectin fine-tuning of liver regeneration dynamics revealed through cellular network modelling.

    PubMed

    Correnti, Jason M; Cook, Daniel; Aksamitiene, Edita; Swarup, Aditi; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Hoek, Jan B

    2015-01-15

    Following partial hepatectomy, the liver initiates a regenerative programme involving hepatocyte priming and replication driven by the coordinated actions of cytokine and growth factors. We investigated the mechanisms underlying adiponectin's (Adn) regulation of liver regeneration through modulation of these mediators. Adn(-/-) mice showed delayed onset of hepatocyte replication, but accelerated cell cycle progression relative to wild-type mice, suggesting Adn has multiple effects fine-tuning the kinetics of liver regeneration. We developed a computational model describing the molecular and physiological kinetics of liver regeneration in Adn(-/-) mice. We employed this computational model to evaluate the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Our analysis predicted that Adn is required for an efficient early cytokine response to partial hepatectomy, but is inhibitory to later growth factor actions. Consistent with this prediction, Adn knockout reduced hepatocyte responses to interleukin-6 during the priming phase, but enhanced growth factor levels through peak hepatocyte replication. By contrast, supraphysiological concentrations of Adn resulting from rosiglitazone treatment suppressed regeneration by reducing growth factor levels during S phase, consistent with computational predictions. Together, these results revealed that Adn fine-tunes the progression of liver regeneration through dynamically modulating molecular mediator networks and cellular interactions within the liver. PMID:25630259

  6. Adiponectin fine-tuning of liver regeneration dynamics revealed through cellular network modelling

    PubMed Central

    Correnti, Jason M; Cook, Daniel; Aksamitiene, Edita; Swarup, Aditi; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Hoek, Jan B

    2015-01-01

    Following partial hepatectomy, the liver initiates a regenerative programme involving hepatocyte priming and replication driven by the coordinated actions of cytokine and growth factors. We investigated the mechanisms underlying adiponectin's (Adn) regulation of liver regeneration through modulation of these mediators. Adn–/– mice showed delayed onset of hepatocyte replication, but accelerated cell cycle progression relative to wild-type mice, suggesting Adn has multiple effects fine-tuning the kinetics of liver regeneration. We developed a computational model describing the molecular and physiological kinetics of liver regeneration in Adn–/– mice. We employed this computational model to evaluate the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Our analysis predicted that Adn is required for an efficient early cytokine response to partial hepatectomy, but is inhibitory to later growth factor actions. Consistent with this prediction, Adn knockout reduced hepatocyte responses to interleukin-6 during the priming phase, but enhanced growth factor levels through peak hepatocyte replication. By contrast, supraphysiological concentrations of Adn resulting from rosiglitazone treatment suppressed regeneration by reducing growth factor levels during S phase, consistent with computational predictions. Together, these results revealed that Adn fine-tunes the progression of liver regeneration through dynamically modulating molecular mediator networks and cellular interactions within the liver. PMID:25630259

  7. Ligand-controlled assembly of Cd(II) coordination polymers based on mixed ligands of naphthalene-dicarboxylate and dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline: From 0D+1D cocrystal, 2D rectangular network (4,4), to 3D PtS-type architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Guocheng; Chen Yongqiang; Wang Xiuli Chen Baokuan; Lin Hongyan

    2009-03-15

    Three novel Cd(II) coordination polymers, namely, [Cd(Dpq)(1,8-NDC)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][Cd(Dpq)(1,8-NDC)].2H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd(Dpq)(1,4-NDC)(H{sub 2}O)] (2), and [Cd(Dpq)(2,6-NDC)] (3) have been obtained from hydrothermal reactions of cadmium(II) nitrate with the mixed ligands dipyrido [3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (Dpq) and three structurally related naphthalene-dicarboxylate ligands [1,8-naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid (1,8-H{sub 2}NDC), 1,4-naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid (1,4-H{sub 2}NDC), and 2,6-naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H{sub 2}NDC)]. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the three polymers exhibit novel structures due to different naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid. Compound 1 is a novel cocrystal of left- and right-handed helical chains and binuclear complexes and ultimately packed into a 3D supramolecular structure through hydrogen bonds and {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions. Compound 2 shows a 2D rectangular network (4,4) bridged by 1,4-NDC with two kinds of coordination modes and ultimately packed into a 3D supramolecular structure through inter-layer {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions. Compound 3 is a new 3D coordination polymer with distorted PtS-type network. In addition, the title compounds exhibit blue/green emission in solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three novel Cd(II) compounds have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions exhibiting a systematic variation of architecture by the employment of three structurally related naphthalene-dicarboxylate ligands.

  8. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26733873

  9. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26733873

  10. Design and simulation of cellular nonlinear networks using single-electron tunneling transistor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerousis, Costa P.

    It is currently predicted that semiconductor device scaling will end at the 22-nm device feature size (7 nm physical channel length) according to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. The main challenge is then to develop innovative technologies that will extend the scaling beyond roadmap projection. Any new technology must be well matched with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology and scaleable beyond CMOS scaling projections and must provide low-power high-speed signal processing. Nanotechnology will become an appealing option for developing devices for integrated circuits with dimensions and performances well beyond roadmap predictions. Such devices, based on the controllable transfer of charge between dots or 'islands', can take advantage of the quantum mechanical effects, such as tunneling and energy quantization, which would normally occur at the nanometer scale. An outstanding challenge is in arranging such nanodevices in new architectures that can be integrated on a single chip. In particular, locally interconnected architectures are believed to be necessary to alleviate the problems associated with increasing interconnect length and complexity in ultra-dense circuits. The goal of this work is to investigate the use of nanoelectronic structures in cellular non-linear network (CNN) architectures for potential application in future high-density and low-power CMOS-nanodevice hybrid circuits. The operation of the single-electron tunneling (SET) transistor is first reviewed, followed by a discussion of simple CNN linear architectures using a SET inverter topology as the basis for the non-linear transfer characteristics for individual cells to be used in analog processing arrays for image-processing applications. The basic SET CNN cell acts as a summing node that is capacitively coupled to the inputs and outputs of nearest neighbor cells. Monte Carlo simulation results are used to show CNN-like behavior in attempting to