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Sample records for 2-d time-dependent creep

  1. Semi-analytical solution of time-dependent thermomechanical creep behavior of FGM hollow spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Fesharaki, J.; Loghman, A.; Yazdipoor, M.; Golabi, S.

    2014-02-01

    By using a method of successive elastic solution, the time-dependent creep behavior of a functionally graded hollow sphere under thermomechanical loads has been investigated. Based on volume percentage, the mechanical and thermal properties of material, except for the Poisson's ratio, are assumed to be radially dependent. Total strains are assumed to be the sum of elastic, thermal and creep strains. Creep strains are temperature-, stress- and time-dependent. Using the Prandtl-Reuss relations and Sherby's law, histories of stresses and strains are presented from their initial elastic values at zero time up to 30 years after loading. The results show that the creep stresses and strains change with time and material inhomogeneity has influence on thermomechanical creep behavior. The aim of this work was to understand the effect of creep behavior on a functionally graded hollow sphere subjected to thermomechanical load.

  2. Incremental constitutive formulation for time dependent materials: creep integral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazal, Claude; Moutou Pitti, Rostand

    2011-08-01

    This paper deals with the development of a mathematical approach for the solution of linear, non-ageing viscoelastic materials undergoing mechanical deformation. The formulation is derived from integral approach based on a discrete spectrum representation for the creep tensor. Finite difference integration is used to discretize the integral operators. The resulting constitutive model contains an internal state variable which represents the influence of the whole past history of stress and strain. Thus the difficulty of retaining the strain history in computer solutions is avoided. A complete general formulation of linear viscoelastic stress-strain analysis is developed in terms of increments of stresses and strains. Numerical simulations are included in order to validate the incremental constitutive equations.

  3. Time-Dependent Behaviors of Granite: Loading-Rate Dependence, Creep, and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, K.; Fukui, K.

    2016-07-01

    To assess the long-term stability of underground structures, it is important to understand the time-dependent behaviors of rocks, such as their loading-rate dependence, creep, and relaxation. However, there have been fewer studies on crystalline rocks than on tuff, mudstone, and rock salt, because the high strength of crystalline rocks makes the detection of their time-dependent behaviors much more difficult. Moreover, studies on the relaxation, temporal change of stress and strain (TCSS) conditions, and relations between various time-dependent behaviors are scarce for not only granites, but also other rocks. In this study, previous reports on the time-dependent behaviors of granites were reviewed and various laboratory tests were conducted using Toki granite. These tests included an alternating-loading-rate test, creep test, relaxation test, and TCSS test. The results showed that the degree of time dependence of Toki granite is similar to other granites, and that the TCSS resembles the stress-relaxation curve and creep-strain curve. A viscoelastic constitutive model, proposed in a previous study, was modified to investigate the relations between the time-dependent behaviors in the pre- and post-peak regions. The modified model reproduced the stress-strain curve, creep, relaxation, and the results of the TCSS test. Based on a comparison of the results of the laboratory tests and numerical simulations, close relations between the time-dependent behaviors were revealed quantitatively.

  4. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-21

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors.The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation fields

  5. Visual Analysis of time-dependent 2D Uncertainties in Decadal Climate Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttinger, Michael; Röber, Niklas; Meier-Fleischer, Karin; Pohlmann, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Climate prediction systems used today for investigating the climate predictability on a decadal time scale are based on coupled global climate models. First, ensembles of hindcast experiments are carried out in order to derive the predictive skill of the prediction system. Then, in a second step, the prediction system is initialized with observations and actual future predictions are computed. The ensemble simulation techniques applied enable issuing of probabilistic information along with the quantities predicted. Different aspects of the uncertainty can be derived: The ensemble standard deviation (or ensemble spread) is a measure for the internal variability of the simulation, while the predictive skill is an inverse measure for the uncertainty in the prediction. In this work, we focus on the concurrent visualization of three related time-dependent 2D fields: the forecast variable itself, here the 2m temperature anomaly, along with the corresponding predictive skill and the ensemble spread which is given through the ensemble standard deviation. On the basis of temporally filtered data, animations are used to visualize the mean spatio-temporal development of the three quantities. Furthermore, seasonal analyses are similarly visualized in order to identify seasonal patterns. We show exemplary solutions produced with three different visualization systems: NCL, Avizo Green and ParaView. As example data set, we have used a decadal climate prediction carried out within the German research project "MiKlip - Decadal Predictions" using the MPI-M Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) from the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg.

  6. CREEP-2: Long-term time-dependent rock deformation in a deep-sea observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Steve; Meredith, Philip; Heap, Michael; Berenzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Earthquake rupture and volcanic eruptions are the most spectacular manifestations of dynamic failure of a critically stressed crust. But these are actually rather rare events, and most of the crust spends most of its time in a highly-stressed but sub-critical state. Below a few hundred metres, the crust is saturated, and water-rock chemical reactions lead to time-dependent deformation that allows rocks to fail over extended periods of time at stresses far below their short-term strength by the mechanism of stress corrosion crack growth. This process is highly non-linear and a change in applied stress of around 5% can lead to a change in the time-to-failure of more than an order of magnitude. Theoretical calculations based on reaction rate theory suggest that such cracking may occur down to stresses as low as 20% of the rock strength, implying that time-dependent cracking will be an important deformation mechanism over geological time and at typical tectonic strain rates. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to explain this behaviour. However, it is currently not possible to discriminate between these competing models due to the relatively narrow bandwidth of strain rates that are practicably achievable in conventional laboratory experiments. Ultra-long-term experiments at very low strain rates are clearly essential to address this problem. We have therefore used the stability of the deep-sea environment to conduct ultra-long-term experiments. At depth, the temperature remains constant throughout the year and water pressure also remains essentially constant, especially in the Ionian Sea where the tidal range is minimal. We have successfully conducted a pilot experiment (CREEP-1) in which we used the constant sea-water pressure at depth to provide both a constant confining pressure and a constant deforming stress for our rock samples. Building on that success, we are now building a multi-sample deformation observatory (CREEP-2) to be deployed at

  7. 2-D Time-Dependent Fuel Element, Thermal Analysis Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-09-24

    Version 00 WREM-TOODEE2 is a two dimensional, time-dependent, fuel-element thermal analysis program. Its primary purpose is to evaluate fuel-element thermal response during post-LOCA refill and reflood in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). TOODEE2 calculations are carried out in a two-dimensional mesh region defined in slab or cylindrical geometry by orthogonal grid lines. Coordinates which form order pairs are labeled x-y in slab geometry, and those in cylindrical geometry are labeled r-z for the axisymmetric casemore » and r-theta for the polar case. Conduction and radiation are the only heat transfer mechanisms assumed within the boundaries of the mesh region. Convective and boiling heat transfer mechanisms are assumed at the boundaries. The program numerically solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, heat conduction equation within the mesh region. KEYWORDS: FUEL MANAGEMENT; HEAT TRANSFER; LOCA; PWR« less

  8. Dynamic Creep Buckling: Analysis of Shell Structures Subjected to Time-dependent Mechanical and Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Carlson, R. L.; Riff, R.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing the structural response of thin, metallic shell structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses associated with these loads and conditions are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and ratcheting. Thus geometric and material nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in developing the mathematical model. A complete, true ab-initio rate theory of kinematics and kinetics for continuum and curved thin structures, without any restriction on the magnitude of the strains or the deformations, was formulated. The time dependence and large strain behavior are incorporated through the introduction of the time rates of metric and curvature in two coordinate systems: fixed (spatial) and convected (material). The relations between the time derivative and the covariant derivative (gradient) were developed for curved space and motion, so the velocity components supply the connection between the equations of motion and the time rates of change of the metric and curvature tensors.

  9. 2D simulations based on general time-dependent reciprocal relation for LFEIT.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Mursel; Gencer, Nevzat Guneri

    2015-08-01

    Lorentz field electrical impedance tomography (LFEIT) is a newly proposed technique for imaging the conductivity of the tissues by measuring the electromagnetic induction under the ultrasound pressure field. In this paper, the theory and numerical simulations of the LFEIT are reported based on the general time dependent formulation. In LFEIT, a phased array ultrasound probe is used to introduce a current distribution inside a conductive body. The velocity current occurs, due to the movement of the conductive particles under a static magnetic field. In order to sense this current, a receiver coil configuration that surrounds the volume conductor is utilized. Finite Element Method (FEM) is used to carry out the simulations of LFEIT. It is shown that, LFEIT can be used to reconstruct the conductivity even up to 50% perturbation in the initial conductivity distribution. PMID:26736569

  10. Time dependent inflow-outflow boundary conditions for 2D acoustic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Myers, Michael K.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of the number and form of the required inflow-outflow boundary conditions for the full two-dimensional time-dependent nonlinear acoustic system in subsonic mean flow is performed. The explicit predictor-corrector method of MacCormack (1969) is used. The methodology is tested on both uniform and sheared mean flows with plane and nonplanar sources. Results show that the acoustic system requires three physical boundary conditions on the inflow and one on the outflow boundary. The most natural choice for the inflow boundary conditions is judged to be a specification of the vorticity, the normal acoustic impedance, and a pressure gradient-density gradient relationship normal to the boundary. Specification of the acoustic pressure at the outflow boundary along with these inflow boundary conditions is found to give consistent reliable results. A set of boundary conditions developed earlier, which were intended to be nonreflecting is tested using the current method and is shown to yield unstable results for nonplanar acoustic waves.

  11. Time dependence of mesoscopic strain distribution for triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured by digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, Jun; Nagayama, Hideo; Yoneyama, Satoru; Aoki, Takahira

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain of a triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured using digital image correlation (DIC). Two types of DIC techniques were employed for the measurement: conventional subset DIC and mesh DIC. Static tensile and creep tests were carried out, and the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain distribution was investigated by applying these techniques. The ultimate failure of this material is dominated by inter-bundle decohesion caused by relative rigid rotation and relating shear stress. Therefore, these were focused on in the present study. During the creep tests, the fiber directional strain, shear strain, and rotation were monitored using the DIC, and the mechanism for the increase in the specimen's macro-strain over time was investigated based on the results obtained by the DIC measurement.

  12. Time dependence of mesoscopic strain distribution for triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured by digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, Jun; Nagayama, Hideo; Yoneyama, Satoru; Aoki, Takahira

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain of a triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured using digital image correlation (DIC). Two types of DIC techniques were employed for the measurement: conventional subset DIC and mesh DIC. Static tensile and creep tests were carried out, and the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain distribution was investigated by applying these techniques. The ultimate failure of this material is dominated by inter-bundle decohesion caused by relative rigid rotation and relating shear stress. Therefore, these were focused on in the present study. During the creep tests, the fiber directional strain, shear strain, and rotation were monitored using the DIC, and the mechanism for the increase in the specimen's macro-strain over time was investigated based on the results obtained by the DIC measurement.

  13. 2-D discrete element modeling of the fault zone considering the time-dependent increase of contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igami, M.; Shibazaki, B.; Nakama, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Particle based simulations such as the lattice solid modeling (Mora and Place, 1994; Abe et al., 2002) and the modeling using the discrete element method (Morgan and Boettcher, 1999) are very useful for investigating frictional behavior of the fault zone. We investigate the fault behavior using the discrete element method considering the effect of the time-dependent increase of contact area between particles. In our model the tangential force due to the frictional contact is assumed to be SA, where S is the shear stress within microcontacts and A is the contact area. For stationary contact, the contact area is assumed to increase with time following the equation A(t)=A0}(1+k{BT/E ln (1+t/t0)) (Brechet and Estrin, 1994), where t0 is an increasing function of temperature T. On the other hand, when sliding velocity V is not equal to 0, t is replaced with D c/V. Based on the elastic contact theory, A0 is assumed to be in proportion to Fn3/2, where Fn is the normal force that acts on each grain. As a test, we perform velocity step experiments. We consider the particle size distribution of r max/r min=2, where r max and r min represent maximum and minimum particle size, respectively. We found that stability of the fault zone is controlled by T. For small T or t0, velocity weakening behavior was observed. When T or t0 is large, however, no velocity weakening was observed. Our model is able to include the increase of contact area due to solution-transfer proposed by Hickman and Evans (1992). We also report the results of numerical simulation using the functional form of contact area when the solution-transfer is at work within microcontacts.

  14. A model for time-independent and time-dependent damage evolution and their influence on creep of multidirectional polymer composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Amir

    Application of polymer matrix composites in engineering structures has been steadily increasing over the past five decades. Multidirectional polymer composites are one class of continuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites used in aerospace structures, where the desired mechanical performance outweighs the cost. Their modulus and strength degrade with time (known as creep and creep rupture) during the service, owing to the viscos-elasticity of the polymer matrix. Additional contribution to this degradation comes from various damage modes developed in the plies of the composite with time and identified in this thesis as TDD (Time Dependent Damage). These damage modes may also develop due to process-induced residual stresses, and during loading to the service load, identified as TID (Time Independent Damage). TID influences the TDD, the creep and the creep rupture. The objective of this thesis is to develop a model to predict the evolution of TID and TDD in multiple plies of a laminate and their influence on creep. The predominant damage mode, transverse cracking, is modeled in this study. The model consists of four modules, PIS, QSL, SL, and VA. The PIS, QSL, and SL moduli predict changes in ply stresses for incremental change in temperature, stress, and time respectively, using lamination theory and assuming linear elastic behavior of the plies during an incremental step. In parallel, each module predicts the stored elastic energy in each ply after each incremental step and compares it with a critical stored elastic energy criterion to determine if a ply would crack. If fracture is predicted, the VA module based on variational analysis, is invoked to determine the crack density and the perturbation in ply stresses due to cracking. The perturbation stresses are used by the module that invoked the VA module to determine the ply stresses after cracking during the current incremental step. The model predictions for a [+/-45/90]s laminate, at two test

  15. Creep: Long-term Time-Dependent Rock Deformation in a Deep-sea Laboratory in the Ionian sea: a Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Boon, S.; Vinciguerra, S.; Bowles, J.; NEMO Group,.

    2003-12-01

    Time-dependent brittle rock deformation is of first-order importance for understanding the long-term behavior of water saturated rocks in the Earth's upper crust. Interpretation of results from traditional laboratory brittle creep experiments have generally been in terms of three individual creep phases; primary (decelerating), secondary (constant strain rate or quasi-steady-state) and tertiary (accelerating or unstable). The deformation may be distributed during the first two, but localizes onto a fault plane during phase three. More recently, models have been proposed that explain the trimodal shape of creep curves in terms of the competition between a weakening mechanism and a strengthening mechanism, with the weakening mechanism eventually dominating and leading to localized failure. However, a major problem is that it is difficult to distinguish between these competing mechanisms and models given the lower limit of strain rates achievable in laboratory experiments over practicable time scales. This study aims to address that problem directly by extending significantly the range of achievable strain rates through much longer-term experiments conducted in a deep-sea laboratory in the Ionian sea. The project takes advantage of a collaboration with the NEMO Group-INFN, a consortium that is developing a large volume (1 km3) deep-sea detector for high-energy (>1019 eV) cosmic neutrinos. A suitable test site has been identified, some 20km north-east of Catania in Sicily, at a depth of 2100m. Within the CREEP deformation apparatus, confining pressure is provided by the ambient water pressure (>22MPa), and the constant axial stress is provided by an actuator that amplifies this pressure. Measurement transducers and a data acquisition system are sealed internally, with power provided for up to 6 months by an internal battery pack. The great advantage of operating in the deep sea in this way is that the system is essentially passive, has few moving parts, and requires no

  16. Creep: long-term time-dependent rock deformation in a deep-sea laboratory in the ionian sea: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P.; Boon, S.; Vinciguerra, S.; Bowles, J.; Hughes, N.; Migneco, E.; Musumeci, M.; Piattelli, P.; Riccobene, G.; Vinciguerra, D.

    2003-04-01

    Time-dependent brittle rock deformation is of first-order importance for understanding the long-term behaviour of water saturated rocks in the Earth's upper crust. The traditional way of investigating this has been to carry out laboratory "brittle creep" experiments. Results have been interpreted involving three individual creep phases; primary (decelerating), secondary (constant strain rate or steady state) and tertiary (accelerating or unstable). The deformation may be distributed during the first two, but localizes onto a fault plane during phase three. However, it is difficult to distinguish between competing mechanisms and models given the lower limit of strain rates practicably achievable in the laboratory. The study reported here aims to address this problem directly by extending significantly the range of achievable strain rates through much longer-term experiments conducted in a deep-sea laboratory in the Ionian sea. The project takes advantage of a collaboration with the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) of the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), that is developing a deep-sea laboratory for a very large volume (1 km3) deep-sea detector of high-energy (>1019 eV) cosmic neutrinos (NEMO). A suitable deep-sea site has been identified, some 20km south-west of Catania in Sicily, with flat bathymetry at a depth of 2100m. The CREEP deformation apparatus is driven by an actuator that amplifies the ambient water pressure, while the confining pressure around the rock sample is provided by the ambient water pressure (>20MPa). Measurement transducers and a low-energy data acquisition system are sealed internally, with power provided for up to 6 months by an internal battery pack. The great advantage of operating in the deep sea in this way is that the system is simple; it is "passive", has few moving parts, and requires no maintenance. The apparatus is fixed approximately 10m above the seabed; held in place by a disposable concrete anchor and

  17. A quantum time-dependent wave-packet study of intersystem crossing effects in the O(3P0, 1, 2) + D2(v = 0, j = 0) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan

    2013-04-01

    We investigated spin-orbit-induced intersystem crossing effects in the title reaction by the time-dependent wave-packet method combined with an extended split operator scheme. We performed non-adiabatic calculations of the fine-structure-resolved cross section and adiabatic calculations of integral cross section. The calculations are based on the potential energy surfaces of 3A' and the two degenerate 3A'' states [S. Rogers, D. Wang, A. Kuppermann, and S. Walch, J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 2308 (2000)], 10.1021/jp992985g, together with the spin-orbit coupling matrix [B. Maiti and G. C. Schatz, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 12360 (2003)], 10.1063/1.1623481 and singlet 1A' potential energy surface [J. Dobbyn and P. J. Knowles, Faraday Discuss. 110, 247 (1998)]. The results of the O(3P) + D2 are similar to those of the O(3P) + H2 reaction. The product spin state-resolved reaction cross section and the total reaction cross section both show that the adiabatic channel is dominant in all cases, and the non-adiabatic channels have cross sections of several orders of magnitude smaller than the adiabatic channels at high collision energy. Although the cross sections caused by the intersystem crossing effects in the O(3P) + D2 reaction are larger than those in the O(3P) + H2 reaction, the differences in non-adiabaticity between these two reaction systems are quite modest. Based on the results of the O(3P) + H2 reaction, we can predict that the influence of spin-orbit on the total reaction cross sections of the O(3P) + D2 reaction is also insignificant. However, these non-adiabatic effects can be reflected in the presence of some forward-scattering in the angular distribution for the OD product.

  18. Time Dependent Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the flow characteristics of thixotropic and negative thixotropic fluids; various theories underlying the thixotropic behavior; and thixotropic phenomena exhibited in drilling muds, commercial paints, pastes, and greases. Inconsistencies in the terminology used to label time dependent effects are revealed. (CC)

  19. Spatial fluctuations in transient creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurson, Lasse; Rosti, Jari; Koivisto, Juha; Miksic, Amandine; Alava, Mikko J.

    2011-07-01

    We study the spatial fluctuations of transient creep deformation of materials as a function of time, both by digital image correlation (DIC) measurements of paper samples and by numerical simulations of a crystal plasticity or discrete dislocation dynamics model. This model has a jamming or yielding phase transition, around which power law or Andrade creep is found. During primary creep, the relative strength of the strain rate fluctuations increases with time in both cases—the spatially averaged creep rate obeys the Andrade law epsilont ~ t - 0.7, while the time dependence of the spatial fluctuations of the local creep rates is given by Δepsilont ~ t - 0.5. A similar scaling for the fluctuations is found in the logarithmic creep regime that is typically observed for lower applied stresses. We review briefly some classical theories of Andrade creep from the point of view of such spatial fluctuations. We consider these phenomenological, time-dependent creep laws in terms of a description based on a non-equilibrium phase transition separating evolving and frozen states of the system when the externally applied load is varied. Such an interpretation is discussed further by the data collapse of the local deformations in the spirit of absorbing state/depinning phase transitions, as well as deformation-deformation correlations and the width of the cumulative strain distributions. The results are also compared with the order parameter fluctuations observed close to the depinning transition of the 2d linear interface model or the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson equation.

  20. Time dependent holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Diptarka

    One of the most important results emerging from string theory is the gauge gravity duality (AdS/CFT correspondence) which tells us that certain problems in particular gravitational backgrounds can be exactly mapped to a particular dual gauge theory a quantum theory very similar to the one explaining the interactions between fundamental subatomic particles. The chief merit of the duality is that a difficult problem in one theory can be mapped to a simpler and solvable problem in the other theory. The duality can be used both ways. Most of the current theoretical framework is suited to study equilibrium systems, or systems where time dependence is at most adiabatic. However in the real world, systems are almost always out of equilibrium. Generically these scenarios are described by quenches, where a parameter of the theory is made time dependent. In this dissertation I describe some of the work done in the context of studying quantum quench using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We recover certain universal scaling type of behavior as the quenching is done through a quantum critical point. Another question that has been explored in the dissertation is time dependence of the gravity theory. Present cosmological observations indicate that our universe is accelerating and is described by a spacetime called de-Sitter(dS). In 2011 there had been a speculation over a possible duality between de-Sitter gravity and a particular field theory (Euclidean SP(N) CFT). However a concrete realization of this proposition was still lacking. Here we explicitly derive the dS/CFT duality using well known methods in field theory. We discovered that the time dimension emerges naturally in the derivation. We also describe further applications and extensions of dS/CFT. KEYWORDS: Holography, AdS/CFT correspondence, Quantum Quench, dS/CFT correspondence, Chaos.

  1. Time dependent seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidoro, B.; Iervolino, I.; Chioccarelli, E.; Giorgio, M.

    2012-04-01

    Probabilistic seismic hazard is usually computed trough a homogeneous Poisson process that even though it is a time-independent process it is widely used for its very convenient properties. However, when a single fault is of concern and/or the time scale is different from that of the long term, time-dependent processes are required. In this paper, different time-dependent models are reviewed with working examples. In fact, the Paganica fault (in central Italy) has been considered to compute both the probability of occurrence of at least one event in the lifespan of the structure, as well as the seismic hazard expressed in terms of probability of exceedance of an intensity value in a given time frame causing the collapse of the structure. Several models, well known or novel application to engineering hazard have been considered, limitation and issues in their applications are also discussed. The Brownian Passage Time (BPT) model is based on a stochastic modification of the deterministic stick-slip oscillator model for characteristic earthquakes; i.e., based on the addition of random perturbations (a Gaussian white noise) to the deterministic load path predicted by elastic rebound theory. This model assumes that the load state is at some ground level immediately after an event, increases steadly over time, reaches a failure threshold and relaxes instantaneously back to the ground level. For this model also a variable threshold has been considered to take into account the uncertainty of the threshold value. For the slip-predictable model it is assumed that the stress accumulates at a constant rate starting from some initial stress level. Stress is assumed to accumulate for a random period of time until an earthquake occurs. The size of the earthquake is governed by the stress release and it is a function of the elapsed time since the last event. In the time-predictable model stress buildup occurs at a constant rate until the accumulated stress reaches a threshold

  2. Time-Dependent Erosion of Ion Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E.; Anderson, John R.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.

    2008-01-01

    The accurate prediction of thruster life requires time-dependent erosion estimates for the ion optics assembly. Such information is critical to end-of-life mechanisms such as electron backstreaming. CEX2D was recently modified to handle time-dependent erosion, double ions, and multiple throttle conditions in a single run. The modified code is called "CEX2D-t". Comparisons of CEX2D-t results with LDT and ELT post-tests results show good agreement for both screen and accel grid erosion including important erosion features such as chamfering of the downstream end of the accel grid and reduced rate of accel grid aperture enlargement with time.

  3. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Time Dependent Allowables

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Julie Knibloe

    2015-06-01

    Time dependent allowable stresses are required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for design of components in the temperature range where time dependent deformation (i.e., creep) is expected to become significant. There are time dependent allowable stresses in Section IID of the Code for use in the non-nuclear construction codes, however, there are additional criteria that must be considered in developing time dependent allowables for nuclear components. These criteria are specified in Section III NH. St is defined as the lesser of three quantities: 100% of the average stress required to obtain a total (elastic, plastic, primary and secondary creep) strain of 1%; 67% of the minimum stress to cause rupture; and 80% of the minimum stress to cause the initiation of tertiary creep. The values are reported for a range of temperatures and for time increments up to 100,000 hours. These values are determined from uniaxial creep tests, which involve the elevated temperature application of a constant load which is relatively small, resulting in deformation over a long time period prior to rupture. The stress which is the minimum resulting from these criteria is the time dependent allowable stress St. In this report data from a large number of creep and creep-rupture tests on Alloy 617 are analyzed using the ASME Section III NH criteria. Data which are used in the analysis are from the ongoing DOE sponsored high temperature materials program, form Korea Atomic Energy Institute through the Generation IV VHTR Materials Program and historical data from previous HTR research and vendor data generated in developing the alloy. It is found that the tertiary creep criterion determines St at highest temperatures, while the stress to cause 1% total strain controls at low temperatures. The ASME Section III Working Group on Allowable Stress Criteria has recommended that the uncertainties associated with determining the onset of tertiary creep and the lack of significant

  4. Nonlinear fracture mechanics. Volume 1. Time-dependent fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Landes, J.D.; Bassani, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on time-dependent fracture in nonlinear fracture mechanics are presented. Individual subjects considered include: numerical study of non-steady-state creep at stationary crack tips, crack growth in small-scale creep, growth of macroscopic cracks by void coalescence under extensive creeping conditions, creep embrittlement susceptibility and creep crack growth behavior in low-alloy steels, and experimental determination of the high-temperature crack growth behavior of Incoloy 800H. Also discussed are: three-dimensional transient analysis of a dynamically loaded three-point-bend ductile fracture specimen, experimental study of the validity of a Delta J criterion for fatigue crack growth, combined-mode low-cycle fatigue crack growth under torsional loading, fatigue crack-tip mechanics in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy from high-sensitivity displacement field measurements, and nonlinear fracture of concrete and ceramics.

  5. Further Developments in Modeling Creep Effects Within Structural SiC/SiC Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Jerry; DiCarlo, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Anticipating the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC composites into turbine section components of future aero-propulsion engines, the primary objective of this on-going study is to develop physics-based analytical and finite-element modeling tools to predict the effects of constituent creep on SiC/SiC component service life. A second objective is to understand how to possibly manipulate constituent materials and processes in order to minimize these effects. Focusing on SiC/SiC components experiencing through-thickness stress gradients (e.g., airfoil leading edge), prior NASA creep modeling studies showed that detrimental residual stress effects can develop globally within the component walls which can increase the risk of matrix cracking. These studies assumed that the SiC/SiC composites behaved as isotropic viscoelastic continuum materials with creep behavior that was linear and symmetric with stress and that the creep parameters could be obtained from creep data as experimentally measured in-plane in the fiber direction of advanced thin-walled 2D SiC/SiC panels. The present study expands on those prior efforts by including constituent behavior with non-linear stress dependencies in order to predict such key creep-related SiC/SiC properties as time-dependent matrix stress, constituent creep and content effects on composite creep rates and rupture times, and stresses on fiber and matrix during and after creep.

  6. Time-dependent drift Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1983-03-01

    The lowest-order drift equations are given in a canonical magnetic coordinate form for time-dependent magnetic and electric fields. The advantages of the canonical Hamiltonian form are also discussed.

  7. Time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Kuśmierczyk, Piotr; Liu, Changqing; Yang, Guang; Sevostianov, Igor; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel. Due to its ideal biocompatibility, BC hydrogel could be employed in biomedical applications. Considering the complexity of loading conditions in human body environment, time-dependent behaviour under relevant conditions should be understood. BC specimens are produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 at static-culture conditions. Time-dependent behaviour of specimens at several stress levels is experimentally determined by uniaxial tensile creep tests. We use fraction-exponential operators to model the rheological behaviour. Such a representation allows combination of good accuracy in analytical description of viscoelastic behaviour of real materials and simplicity in solving boundary value problems. The obtained material parameters allow us to identify time-dependent behaviour of BC hydrogel at high stress level with sufficient accuracy. PMID:26478298

  8. Time-dependent Brittle Deformation in Darley Dale Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2008-12-01

    The characterization of time-dependent brittle rock deformation is fundamental to understanding the long- term evolution and dynamics of the Earth's upper crust. The chemical influence of water promotes time- dependent deformation through stress corrosion cracking that allows rocks to deform at stresses far below their short-term failure strength. Here we report results from a study of time-dependent brittle creep in water- saturated samples of Darley Dale sandstone (initial porosity of 13%). Conventional creep experiments (or 'static fatigue' tests) show that time to failure decreases dramatically with the imposed deviatoric stress. They also suggest the existence of a critical level of damage beyond which localized failure develops. Sample variability results however in significant scattering in the experimental data and numerous tests are needed to clearly define a relation between the strain rate and the applied stress. We show here that stress-stepping experiments provide a means to overcome this problem and that it is possible this way to obtain the strain rate dependence on applied stress with a single test. This allows to study in details the impact of various thermodynamical conditions on brittle creep. The influence of effective stress was investigated in stress-stepping experiments with effective confining pressures of 10, 30 and 50 MPa (whilst maintaining a constant pore fluid pressure of 20 MPa). In addition to the expected purely mechanical influence of an elevated effective stress our results also demonstrate that stress corrosion appears to be inhibited at higher effective stresses. The influence of doubling the pore fluid pressure however, whilst maintaining a constant effective stress, is shown to have no effect on the rate of stress corrosion. We then discuss the results in light of acoustic emission hypocentre location data and optical microscope analysis and use our experimental data to validate proposed macroscopic creep laws. Finally, using

  9. Time dependent view factor methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-03-01

    View factors have been used for treating radiation transport between opaque surfaces bounding a transparent medium for several decades. However, in recent years they have been applied to problems involving intense bursts of radiation in enclosed volumes such as in the laser fusion hohlraums. In these problems, several aspects require treatment of time dependence.

  10. Analytic Time Depending Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, F.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Considerando las hip6tesis de Chandrasekhar para el estudjo de la GalActicaq se han desarrollado varios modelos analiticos integrables con simetria axial y dependientes del . . By considering Chandrasekhar hypotheses +or the study o+ Galactic Dynamics, several integrable analytic axisymmetric time-depending galactic models have been developed. Ke ords; GALAXY-DYNAMICS - GALAXY-STRUCTURE

  11. A Unified Constitutive Relationship for the Time-dependent Behavior of Fast Breeder Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    Constitutive equations based on classical concepts of creep and plasticity generally rest on the assumption that the inelastic strain can be decomposed into two distinct and additive contributions, one time dependent (creep) and the other time dependent (plastic). It is suggested that an approach is to adopt a unified representation in which creep and plasticity are characterized as occurring simultaneously and interactively and time is an essential ingredient throughout. Examples of the inherent time dependency exhibited by some fast breeder alloys at elevated temperature are rate dependency under monotonic and cyclic straining, thermal recovery and strong creep-elasticity interaction. The stron influence of the recent history of plastic straining on stress relaxation is shown.

  12. Time-dependent interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    Some current problems in interstellar chemistry are considered in the context of time-dependent calculations. The limitations of steady-state models of interstellar gas-phase chemistry are discussed, and attempts to chemically date interstellar clouds are reviewed. The importance of studying the physical and chemical properties of interstellar dust is emphasized. Finally, the results of a series of studies of collapsing clouds are described.

  13. Time-Dependent Reliability Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-10-27

    FRANTIC-3 was developed to evaluate system unreliability using time-dependent techniques. The code provides two major options: to evaluate standby system unavailability or, in addition to the unavailability to calculate the total system failure probability by including both the unavailability of the system on demand as well as the probability that it will operate for an arbitrary time period following the demand. The FRANTIC-3 time dependent reliability models provide a large selection of repair and testingmore » policies applicable to standby or continously operating systems consisting of periodically tested, monitored, and non-repairable (non-testable) components. Time-dependent and test frequency dependent failures, as well as demand stress related failure, test-caused degradation and wear-out, test associated human errors, test deficiencies, test override, unscheduled and scheduled maintenance, component renewal and replacement policies, and test strategies can be prescribed. The conditional system unavailabilities associated with the downtimes of the user specified failed component are also evaluated. Optionally, the code can perform a sensitivity study for system unavailability or total failure probability to the failure characteristics of the standby components.« less

  14. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from creep and creep-rupture tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-rupture included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Time-Dependent Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Natta, Antonella

    1995-01-01

    We present theoretical models of the time-dependent thermal and chemical structure of molecular gas suddenly exposed to far-ultraviolet (FUV) (6 eV less than hv less than 13.6 eV) radiation fields and the consequent time- dependent infrared emission of the gas. We focus on the response of molecular hydrogen for cloud densities ranging from n = 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 6)/cu cm and FUV fluxes G(sub 0) = 10(exp 3)-10(exp 6) times the local FUV interstellar flux. For G(sub 0)/n greater than 10(exp -2) cu cm, the emergent H(sub 2) vibrational line intensities are initially larger than the final equilibrium values. The H(sub 2) lines are excited by FUV fluorescence and by collisional excitation in warm gas. Most of the H(sub 2) intensity is generated at a characteristic hydrogen column density of N approximately 10(exp 21)/sq cm, which corresponds to an FUV optical depth of unity caused by dust opacity. The time dependence of the H(sub 2) intensities arises because the initial abundances of H(sub 2) at these depths is much higher than the equilibrium values, so that H(sub 2) initially competes more effectively with dust in absorbing FUV photons. Considerable column densities of warm (T approximately 1000) K H(sub 2) gas can be produced by the FUV pumping of H(sub 2) vibrational levels followed by collisional de-excitation, which transfers the energy to heat. In dense (n greater than or approximately 10(exp 5)/cu cm) gas exposed to high (G(sub 0) greater than or approximately 10(exp 4)) fluxes, this warm gas produces a 2-1 S(1)/1-0 S(l) H(sub 2) line ratio of approximately 0.1, which mimics the ratio found in shocked gas. In lower density regions, the FUV pumping produces a pure-fluorescent ratio of approximately 0.5. We also present calculations of the time dependence of the atomic hydrogen column densities and of the intensities of 0 I 6300 A, S II 6730 A, Fe II 1.64 microns, and rotational OH and H20 emission. Potential applications include star-forming regions, clouds

  16. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  17. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-08-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  18. Modeling Creep Effects within SiC/SiC Turbine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, J. A.; Lang, J.

    2008-01-01

    Anticipating the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composites into the hot section components of future gas turbine engines, the primary objective of this on-going study is to develop physics-based analytical and finite-element modeling tools to predict the effects of constituent creep on SiC/SiC component service life. A second objective is to understand how to possibly select and manipulate constituent materials, processes, and geometries in order to minimize these effects. In initial studies aimed at SiC/SiC components experiencing through-thickness stress gradients, creep models were developed that allowed an understanding of detrimental residual stress effects that can develop globally within the component walls. It was assumed that the SiC/SiC composites behaved as isotropic visco-elastic materials with temperature-dependent creep behavior as experimentally measured in-plane in the fiber direction of advanced thin-walled 2D SiC/SiC panels. The creep models and their key results are discussed assuming state-of-the-art SiC/SiC materials within a simple cylindrical thin-walled tubular structure, which is currently being employed to model creep-related effects for turbine airfoil leading edges subjected to through-thickness thermal stress gradients. Improvements in the creep models are also presented which focus on constituent behavior with more realistic non-linear stress dependencies in order to predict such key creep-related SiC/SiC properties as time-dependent matrix stress, constituent creep and content effects on composite creep rates and rupture times, and stresses on fiber and matrix during and after creep.

  19. Network-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Delattre, Vincent; Keller, Daniel; Perich, Matthew; Markram, Henry; Muller, Eilif B

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD), with STDP-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding. PMID:26106298

  20. Network-timing-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Delattre, Vincent; Keller, Daniel; Perich, Matthew; Markram, Henry; Muller, Eilif B.

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD), with STDP-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding. PMID:26106298

  1. Creep-Fatigue Interaction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue fives in metals are nominally time independent below 0.5 T(sub Melt). At higher temperatures, fatigue lives are altered due to time-dependent, thermally activated creep. Conversely, creep rates are altered by super. imposed fatigue loading. Creep and fatigue generally interact synergistically to reduce material lifetime. Their interaction, therefore, is of importance to structural durability of high-temperature structures such as nuclear reactors, reusable rocket engines, gas turbine engines, terrestrial steam turbines, pressure vessel and piping components, casting dies, molds for plastics, and pollution control devices. Safety and lifecycle costs force designers to quantify these interactions. Analytical and experimental approaches to creep-fatigue began in the era following World War II. In this article experimental and life prediction approaches are reviewed for assessing creep-fatigue interactions of metallic materials. Mechanistic models are also discussed briefly.

  2. The time-dependence of compaction localization in a porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Meredith, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Compaction bands in sandstone are laterally-extensive planar deformation features that are characterized by lower porosity and permeability than the surrounding host rock. As a result, this form of localization has important implications for both strain partitioning and fluid flow in the Earth's upper crust. To better understand the time-dependency of compaction band growth, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (initial porosity = 0.24) under constant stress (creep) conditions in the compactant regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the compactant regime, manifest as compaction bands. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterized by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain rate to shear failure, compaction creep is characterized by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain rate. The global decrease in the rates of axial strain, acoustic emission energy, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated at intervals by higher rate excursions, interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased. However, the inelastic strain associated with the growth of a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude (from 10-8 to 10-5 s-1). We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate (from both creep and constant strain rate experiments), the characteristics (geometry, thickness) of the compaction bands remain essentially the same. Several lines of evidence, notably the similarity between the differential stress dependence of creep strain rate in the dilatant and compactant regimes, suggest that, as for dilatant creep, subcritical stress corrosion cracking is the mechanism responsible for

  3. Infrared Blobs : Time-dependent Flags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, P. R.; Mack, J.; Dulude, M.; Hilbert, B.

    2014-10-01

    We describe the creation of time-dependent flags for pixels associated with "blobs" on the WFC3 IR detector. We detect the blobs on flat fields obtained by repeated observations of the night side of the Earth. We provide the most complete census of IR blobs' positions, radii, and times of first appearance. In aggregate, a set of 46 blobs, 27 "strong" and 19 "medium" in their effective scattering cross section, affect slightly less than 1% of the pixels of the detector. A second set of 81 "weak" (and typically smaller) blobs affect another 1% of the pixels. In the past, the "blob" flag, bit 9 (i.e. value = 512) in the data quality (DQ) array described in Table 2.5 of the WFC3 Data Handbook (Rajan et al. 2010) has been a static 2-D array; henceforth a set of such arrays, each associated with a "use after" date corresponding to the appearance of one or more new blobs, can be used. We prepared such DQ arrays using the 46 "strong" and "medium" blobs and discuss why we did not include the fainter blobs therein. As an added data product, we create and test a blob flat field that corrects the effects of blobs on extended emission; however, it should not be applied if stellar photometry is the goal.

  4. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-06-30

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C-S-H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C-S-H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate ( approximately 1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  5. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C–S–H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C–S–H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate (≈1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  6. Characterization of Time-Dependent Behavior of Ramming Paste Used in an Aluminum Electrolysis Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orangi, Sakineh; Picard, Donald; Alamdari, Houshang; Ziegler, Donald; Fafard, Mario

    2015-12-01

    A new methodology was proposed for the characterization of time-dependent behavior of materials in order to develop a constitutive model. The material used for the characterization was ramming paste, a porous material used in an aluminum electrolysis cell, which is baked in place under varying loads induced by the thermal expansion of other components of the cell. In order to develop a constitutive model representing the paste mechanical behavior, it was necessary to get some insight into its behavior using samples which had been baked at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 1000 °C. Creep stages, effect of testing temperature on the creep, creep-recovery, as well as nonlinear creep were observed for designing a constitutive law. Uniaxial creep-recovery tests were carried out at two temperatures on the baked paste: ambient and higher. Results showed that the shape of creep curves was similar to a typical creep; recovery happened and the creep was shown to be nonlinear. Those experimental observations and the identification of nonlinear parameters of developed constitutive model demonstrated that the baked paste experiences nonlinear viscoelastic-viscoplastic behavior at different temperatures.

  7. Creep behavior of uranium carbide-based alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wright, T. R.; Moak, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work gives the results of experiments on the influence of zirconium carbide and tungsten on the creep properties of uranium carbide. The creep behavior of high-density UC samples follows the classical time-dependence pattern of (1) an instantaneous deformation, (2) a primary creep region, and (3) a period of steady-state creep. Creep rates for unalloyed UC-1.01 and UC-1.05 are several orders of magnitude greater than those measured for carbide alloys containing a Zr-C and/or W dispersoid. The difference in creep strength between alloyed and unalloyed materials varies with temperature and applied stress.

  8. Time-dependent damage in predictions of fatigue behaviour of normal and healing ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Gail M.; Bailey, Soraya J.; Schwab, Timothy D.

    2015-08-01

    Ligaments are dense fibrous tissues that connect bones across a joint and are exposed daily to creep and fatigue loading. Ligaments are tensile load-bearing tissues; therefore, fatigue loading will have a component of time-dependent damage from the non-zero mean stress and cycle-dependent damage from the oscillating stress. If time-dependent damage is not sufficient to completely predict the fatigue response, then cycle-dependent damage could be an important contributor. Using data from normal ligaments (current study and Thornton et al., Clin. Biomech. 22:932-940, 2007a) and healing ligaments (Thornton and Bailey, J. Biomech. Eng. 135:091004-1-091004-6, 2013), creep data was used to predict the fatigue response considering time-dependent damage. Relationships between creep lifetime and test stress or initial strain were modelled using exponential or power-law regression. In order to predict fatigue lifetimes, constant rates of damage were assumed and time-varying stresses were introduced into the expressions for time-dependent damage from creep. Then, the predictions of fatigue lifetime were compared with curvefits to the fatigue data where exponential or power-law regressions were used to determine the relationship between fatigue lifetime and test stress or initial strain. The fatigue prediction based on time-dependent damage alone greatly overestimated fatigue lifetime suggesting that time-dependent damage alone cannot account for all of the damage accumulated during fatigue and that cycle-dependent damage has an important role. At lower stress and strain, time-dependent damage was a greater relative contributor for normal ligaments than healing ligaments; however, cycle-dependent damage was a greater relative contributor with incremental increases in stress or strain for normal ligaments than healing ligaments.

  9. Spectral methods for time dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1990-01-01

    Spectral approximations are reviewed for time dependent problems. Some basic ingredients from the spectral Fourier and Chebyshev approximations theory are discussed. A brief survey was made of hyperbolic and parabolic time dependent problems which are dealt with by both the energy method and the related Fourier analysis. The ideas presented above are combined in the study of accuracy stability and convergence of the spectral Fourier approximation to time dependent problems.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Time-dependent Spring-back Behavior for Aluminum Alloy 6022-T4 Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taejoon; Chung, Kwansoo; Ryou, Hansun; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Wagoner, R. H.

    2010-06-01

    In order to analyze the time-dependent spring-back behavior of the aluminum alloy 6022-T4 sheet, the viscoelastic/plastic constitutive law was applied by utilizing a linear viscoelastic/plastic model previously developed. As for the plastic deformation, the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening law was used to represent the Bauschinger behavior and transient hardening, while a non-quadratic anisotropic yield function, Yld2000-2d, was applied to account for anisotropic yield behavior. The numerical formulation was developed based on the incremental deformation viscoelastic/plasticity theory and then, the constitutive law was implemented into the ABAQUS/Standard commercial finite element program using the user-defined material subroutine, UMAT. The viscoelastic behavior was characterized by the creep test above the initial yield stress level, while anisotropic yielding and hardening parameters were obtained by the uniaxial tensile test. The constitutive law and the formulation were successfully validated for time-dependent springback in the draw-bend test.

  11. A theory of time-dependent compaction by fracturing and pressure solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Porous rocks under compressional stress conditions are subject to compaction creep. A previous micromechanical model, dealing with (partially) water-filled carbonates was able to predict strain rates of the compaction at macroscopic level by combining microscopic fracturing and pressure solution at microscopic level and using a statistical upscaling. Building on this model we investigated the time-dependence of the pressure solution and the overall compaction and created a new theory of compaction by developing a statistical theory of time-dependence of pressure solution. Long-term creep experiments on carbonate samples were used to test the model which was able to predict the rate of compaction and its time-dependence in largely different effective stress, temperature and fluid chemistry conditions.

  12. Time-Dependent Neutral Particle Transport Benchmarks in Two and Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Barry D. Ganapol

    2007-10-12

    The main objective of NEER grant was to generate highly accurate 2D and 3D time-dependent neutral particle intensity maps from 3D pulsed wire sources through integration of the analytical representation of a time-dependent point source.

  13. Time dependency of strainrange partitioning life relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, S.; Manson, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of exposure time (or creep rate) on the CP life relationship is established by conducting isothermal CP tests at varying exposure times on 316 Ss at 1300 and 1500 F. A reduction in the CP cycle life is observed with an increase in the exposure time of the CP test at a given inelastic strain-range. This phenomenon is characterized by modifying the Manson-Coffin type of CP relationship. Two new life relationships: (1) the Steady State Creep Rate (SSRC) Modified CP life relationship, and (2) the Failure Time (FT) Modified CP life relationship, are developed in this report. They account for the effect of creep rate and exposure time within the CP type of waveform. The reduction in CP cyclic life in the long exposure time tests is attributed to oxidation and the precipitation of carbides along the grain boundaries.

  14. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  15. Time-dependent behavior of flax/starch composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varna, J.; Spārniņš, E.; Joffe, R.; Nättinen, K.; Lampinen, J.

    2012-02-01

    The time-dependent mechanical response of flax fiber-reinforced thermoplastic starch matrix composite and neat starch is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the response is highly sensitive to the relative humidity (with specific saturation moisture content in the composite) and special effort has to be made to keep it constant. It was found that the accumulation of micro-damage and the resulting reduction of the elastic modulus in this type of composite is limited. The highly nonlinear behavior of composites is related to the nonlinear viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity. These phenomena are accounted for by simple material models, as suggested in this study. The stress-dependent nonlinearity descriptors in these models are determined in creep and strain recovery tests at low as well as by high stresses.

  16. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  17. Time-Dependent Behavior of High-Strength Kevlar and Vectran Webbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.

    2014-01-01

    High-strength Kevlar and Vectran webbings are currently being used by both NASA and industry as the primary load-bearing structure in inflatable space habitation modules. The time-dependent behavior of high-strength webbing architectures is a vital area of research that is providing critical material data to guide a more robust design process for this class of structures. This paper details the results of a series of time-dependent tests on 1-inch wide webbing including an initial set of comparative tests between specimens that underwent realtime and accelerated creep at 65 and 70% of their ultimate tensile strength. Variability in the ultimate tensile strength of the webbings is investigated and compared with variability in the creep life response. Additional testing studied the effects of load and displacement rate, specimen length and the time-dependent effects of preconditioning the webbings. The creep test facilities, instrumentation and test procedures are also detailed. The accelerated creep tests display consistently longer times to failure than their real-time counterparts; however, several factors were identified that may contribute to the observed disparity. Test setup and instrumentation, grip type, loading scheme, thermal environment and accelerated test postprocessing along with material variability are among these factors. Their effects are discussed and future work is detailed for the exploration and elimination of some of these factors in order to achieve a higher fidelity comparison.

  18. Birefringence in time-dependent moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shirong; Zhang, Ruoyang; Zhai, Yanwang; Wei, Jianye; Zhao, Qing

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic wave propagation in one- and two-dimensional time-dependent moving media is investigated in this paper. We identify another origin of linear birefringence caused by the component of the flow perpendicular to the wave vector. Previously, birefringence is induced by applying external electric and magnetic fields to non-crystalline material. Here it is shown that the time-varying velocity field also contributes to such a phenomenon. Our results indicate that the parallel component, time-dependent or not, will not yield birefringence. Furthermore, the time-dependent flow also results in a frequency shift. One-dimensional simulation is conducted to demonstrate these effects.

  19. Adjoint-Based Methodology for Time-Dependent Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a discrete adjoint method for a broad class of time-dependent optimization problems. The time-dependent adjoint equations are derived in terms of the discrete residual of an arbitrary finite volume scheme which approximates unsteady conservation law equations. Although only the 2-D unsteady Euler equations are considered in the present analysis, this time-dependent adjoint method is applicable to the 3-D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with minor modifications. The discrete adjoint operators involving the derivatives of the discrete residual and the cost functional with respect to the flow variables are computed using a complex-variable approach, which provides discrete consistency and drastically reduces the implementation and debugging cycle. The implementation of the time-dependent adjoint method is validated by comparing the sensitivity derivative with that obtained by forward mode differentiation. Our numerical results show that O(10) optimization iterations of the steepest descent method are needed to reduce the objective functional by 3-6 orders of magnitude for test problems considered.

  20. Topic 5: Time-Dependent Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Tanabe, Tada-aki

    1991-12-31

    This chapter is a report of the material presented at the International Workshop on Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete, Session 4 -- Time Dependent Behavior, held at Columbia University, New York on June 3--6, 1991. Dr. P.A. Pfeiffer presented recent developments in time-dependent behavior of concrete and Professor T. Tanabe presented a review of research in Japan on time-dependent behavior of concrete. The chapter discusses the recent research of time-dependent behavior of concrete in the past few years in both the USA-European and Japanese communities. The author appreciates the valuable information provided by Zdenek P. Bazant in preparing the USA-European Research section.

  1. Time dependent breakdown in silicon dioxide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svensson, C.; Shumka, A.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted regarding the possible existence of a time-dependent breakdown mechanism in thermal oxides of the type used as gate oxide in MOS circuits. Questions of device fabrication are discussed along with details concerning breakdown measurements and the determination of C-V characteristics. A relatively large prebreakdown current observed in one of the cases is related to the time-dependent breakdown.

  2. Deterministic methods for time-dependent stochastic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Randal S

    2009-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving the time-dependent survival probability equation in general (lD/2D/3D) geometries using the multi group SNmethod. Although this equation was first formulated by Bell in the early 1960's, it has only been applied to stationary systems (for other than idealized point models) until recently, and detailed descriptions of numerical solution techniques are lacking in the literature. This paper presents such a description and applies it to a dynamic system representative of a figurative criticality accident scenario.

  3. Time-Dependent 2D Modeling of Magnetron Plasma Torch in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lincun; Xia, Weidong

    2008-06-01

    A theoretical model is presented to describe the electromagnetic, heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena within a magnetron plasma torch and in the resultant plume, by using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Specific calculations are presented for a pure argon system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an argon environment), operated in a turbulent mode. An important finding of this work is that the external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of arc plasma and thus affects the resulting plume. The AMF impels the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. As a result, the plasma intensity distribution on the cross section of torch seems to be more uniform. Numerical results also show that with AMF, the highest plasma temperature decreases and the anode arc root moves upstream significantly, while the current density distribution at the anode is more concentrated with a higher peak value. In addition, the use of AMF then induces a strong backflow at the torch spout and its magnitude increases with the AMF strength but decreases with the inlet gas velocity.

  4. Impression Creep Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, M. D.; Naveena; Vijayanand, D.

    2013-02-01

    Impression creep tests have been carried out at 923 K on 316LN SS containing 0.07, 0.14, and 0.22 wt.% nitrogen, under different applied stress levels. It was observed that the impression creep depth versus time curves were similar to the creep curves obtained from conventional uniaxial creep tests. The impression creep curves were characterized by a loading strain and primary and secondary creep stages similar to uniaxial creep curves. The tertiary stage observed in uniaxial creep curves was absent. The steady-state impression velocity was found to increase with increasing applied stress. The equivalent steady-state creep rates calculated from impression velocities were found to be in good agreement with the steady-state creep rates obtained from conventional uniaxial creep tests. Equivalence between applied stress and steady-state impression velocity with uniaxial creep stress and steady-state creep rate, respectively, has been established based on the laws of mechanics for time-dependent plasticity. It was found that impression velocity was sensitive to the variation in nitrogen content in the steel; impression velocity decreased with increasing nitrogen content, and the results obtained in this study were in agreement with those obtained from uniaxial creep tests.

  5. Homogenized Creep Behavior of CFRP Laminates at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Kawai, M.

    In this study, creep behavior of a CFRP laminate subjected to a constant stress is analyzed based on the time-dependent homogenization theory developed by the present authors. The laminate is a unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy laminate T800H/#3631 manufactured by Toray Industries, Inc. Two kinds of creep analyses are performed. First, 45° off-axis creep deformation of the laminate at high temperature (100°C) is analyzed with three kinds of creep stress levels, respectively. It is shown that the present theory accurately predicts macroscopic creep behavior of the unidirectional CFRP laminate observed in experiments. Then, high temperature creep deformations at a constant creep stress are simulated with seven kinds of off-axis angles, i.e., θ = 0°, 10°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°. It is shown that the laminate has marked in-plane anisotropy with respect to the creep behavior.

  6. Time-dependent Deformation in Porous Rocks Driven by Chemo-mechanical Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.

    2015-12-01

    We report results from triaxial deformation of porous sandstone and limestone conducted to determine the time-dependency of deformation. Experiments were run on water-saturated samples under constant differential stress (creep) conditions. In sandstone, the deformation is entirely brittle for all levels of stress and for all resulting strain rates. The strain rate during creep is very stress sensitive, with a change of only 20 MPa in differential stress producing three orders of magnitude change in strain rate. Failure occurs by localized shear faulting after an extended period of dilatant microcracking, as evidenced by the output of acoustic emissions. By contrast, the behaviour of limestone is more complex. At low effective pressure, the creep behavior is brittle and characterised by the same features as observed for sandstone; a decelerating phase of creep, followed by an inflection and then an accelerating creep phase leading to macroscopic failure. Similarly, only a small amount of inelastic strain is accommodated before failure, and P wave speeds measured throughout deformation decrease continuously, indicating a continuous increase in dilatant crack damage. At higher effective pressure, brittle creep still occurs, but the details of the time-dependent deformation behavior are quite different. First, the total amount of accumulated creep strain increases dramatically with decreasing strain rate, and no localized failure occurs even at these higher strains. Second, the rate of decrease in P wave speeds during deformation decreases with decreasing strain rate; indicating that less damage is accumulated per unit strain when the strain rate is lower. Third, complementary strain rate stepping experiments indicate that the deformation becomes more compactant at lower strain rates. Taken together, these observations suggest that rate-dependent compactive deformation mechanisms compete with dilatant subcritical crack growth during creep in limestone under low

  7. Time-Dependent Behavior of a Graphite/Thermoplastic Composite and the Effects of Stress and Physical Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1995-01-01

    Experimental studies were performed to determine the effects of stress and physical aging on the matrix dominated time dependent properties of IM7/8320 composite. Isothermal tensile creep/aging test techniques developed for polymers were adapted for testing of the composite material. Time dependent transverse and shear compliance's for an orthotropic plate were found from short term creep compliance measurements at constant, sub-T(8) temperatures. These compliance terms were shown to be affected by physical aging. Aging time shift factors and shift rates were found to be a function of temperature and applied stress.

  8. Time-dependent corona models - Scaling laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korevaar, P.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1989-01-01

    Scaling laws are derived for the one-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations that describe the evolution of a spherically symmetric stellar atmosphere. With these scaling laws the results of the time-dependent calculations by Korevaar (1989) obtained for one star are applicable over the whole Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and even to elliptic galaxies. The scaling is exact for stars with the same M/R-ratio and a good approximation for stars with a different M/R-ratio. The global relaxation oscillation found by Korevaar (1989) is scaled to main sequence stars, a solar coronal hole, cool giants and elliptic galaxies.

  9. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  10. Time-Dependent Molecular Reaction Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Oehrn, Yngve

    2007-11-29

    This paper is a brief review of a time-dependent, direct, nonadiabatic theory of molecular processes called Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END). This approach to the study of molecular reaction dynamics is a hierarchical theory that can be applied at various levels of approximation. The simplest level of END uses classical nuclei and represents all electrons by a single, complex, determinantal wave function. The wave function parameters such as average nuclear positions and momenta, and molecular orbital coefcients carry the time dependence and serve as dynamical variables. Examples of application are given of the simplest level of END to ion-atom and ion-molecule reactions.

  11. A multilayer model of time dependent deformation following an earthquake on a strike-slip fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    A multilayer model of the Earth to calculate finite element of time dependent deformation and stress following an earthquake on a strike slip fault is discussed. The model involves shear properties of an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard viscoelastic linear solid lower lithosphere, a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere and an elastic mesosphere. Systematic variations of fault and layer depths and comparisons with simpler elastic lithosphere over viscoelastic asthenosphere calculations are analyzed. Both the creep of the lower lithosphere and astenosphere contribute to the postseismic deformation. The magnitude of the deformation is enhanced by a short distance between the bottom of the fault (slip zone) and the top of the creep region but is less sensitive to the thickness of the creeping layer. Postseismic restressing is increased as the lower lithosphere becomes more viscoelastic, but the tendency for the width of the restressed zone to growth with time is retarded.

  12. Time-dependent behaviour of high performance concrete: influence of coarse aggregate characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makani, A.; Vidal, T.; Pons, G.; Escadeillas, G.

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the influence of coarse aggregate characteristics on the time-dependent deformations of High Performances Concretes (HPC). Four concretes made using the same cement paste but incorporating different types of aggregate (rolled siliceous gravel, crushed granite, crushed limestone and crushed siliceous gravels) were studied in order to investigate the effect of aggregate properties on the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, shrinkage and creep. The results indicate that the aggregate type has a significant effect on creep and shrinkage deformations of HPC. An influence of the shape of aggregate on time-dependent deformations has also been observed. On the basis of these results, long-term behaviour seems to be correlated to the characteristics of the Interfacial Transition Zone (ITZ) strongly depending on the mineralogical nature and properties of aggregates. The experimental results are compared with the values calculated using the current Eurocode 2 model in order to assess the accuracy of the predictions.

  13. Deformation characteristics and time-dependent notch sensitivity of Udimet 700 at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Time dependent notch sensitivity was observed in Udimet 700 sheet, bar, and investment castings between 1000 and 1400 F (538 -760 C), but not at 1600 F (871 C). As was the case for modified Waspaloy, Waspaloy and Inconel 718, it occurred in notched specimens loaded below the yield strength when the creep deformation was localized. For each alloy and notched specimen geometry, a stress-average particle size zone can be defined that characterizes the notch sensitive behavior.

  14. NUBOW-2D Inelastic

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-01-31

    This program solves the two-dimensional mechanical equilbrium configuration of a core restraint system, which is subjected to radial temperature and flux gradients, on a time increment basis. At each time increment, the code calculates the irradiation creep and swelling strains for each duct from user-specified creep and swelling correlations. Using the calculated thermal bowing, inelastic bowing and the duct dilation, the corresponding equilibrium forces, beam deflections, total beam displacements, and structural reactivity changes are calculated.

  15. Computer program for predicting creep behavior of bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R.; Greenbaum, G.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program, CRAB, uses finite-element method to calculate creep behavior and predict steady-state stresses in an arbitrary body of revolution subjected to a time-dependent axisymmetric load. Creep strains follow a time hardening law and a Prandtl-Reuss stress-strain relationship.

  16. Wave function for time-dependent harmonically confined electrons in a time-dependent electric field.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Qi; Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht

    2013-09-21

    The many-body wave function of a system of interacting particles confined by a time-dependent harmonic potential and perturbed by a time-dependent spatially homogeneous electric field is derived via the Feynman path-integral method. The wave function is comprised of a phase factor times the solution to the unperturbed time-dependent Schrödinger equation with the latter being translated by a time-dependent value that satisfies the classical driven equation of motion. The wave function reduces to that of the Harmonic Potential Theorem wave function for the case of the time-independent harmonic confining potential. PMID:24070284

  17. Structural instabilities involving time dependent materials : theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minahen, Timothy M.

    The creep buckling of viscoelastic structures is studied analytically and experimentally to investigate structural stability in the presence of time dependent materials. The theory of linear viscoelasticity is used to model polymeric column specimens subjected to constant compressive end loads. A strength of materials approach (Euler-Bernoulli beam theory) is employed to model the moment-curvature relation for the column. The growth of initial imperfections is calculated using the hereditary integral formulation. Solution techniques are developed for small displacements and then generalized to include the effects of large displacements and rotations. A failure criterion based on maximum deformation allows the column life to be estimated directly from the material relaxation modulus. A discussion generalizing the results to include plates and shells is presented.Rectangular cross-section polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) specimens with hinged boundary conditions are used to study viscoelastic buckling experimentally. Constant compressive end loads are applied using a servo-controlled load frame while the specimens are kept in a temperature cabinet at elevated temperatures (accelerating the creep behavior). Specimen shortening and out-of-plane deflections are monitored during the tests. The relaxation modulus of PMMA is approximated by a Prony-Dirichlet series and the model is used to simulate the laboratory experiments. Model and experimental results show good agreement during the "glassy" and slow growth phases of the column response. As the growth rate increases some deviations between theory and experiment are seen. It is shown that the deviations are not a result of geometric nonlinearities, but may, in part, be explained by material nonlinearities not accounted for in the model.

  18. Time-dependent mechanical-electrical coupled behavior in single crystal ZnO nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Jae; Yun, Tae Gwang; Choi, In-Chul; Kim, Sungwoong; Park, Won Il; Han, Seung Min; Jang, Jae-il

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale time-dependent mechanical-electrical coupled behavior of single crystal ZnO nanorods was systematically explored, which is essential for accessing the long-term reliability of the ZnO nanorod-based flexible devices. A series of compression creep tests combined with in-situ electrical measurement was performed on vertically-grown single crystal ZnO nanorods. Continuous measurement of the current (I)-voltage (V) curves before, during, after the creep tests revealed that I is non-negligibly increased as a result of the time-dependent deformation. Analysis of the I-V curves based on the thermionic emission-diffusion theory allowed extraction of nanorod resistance, which was shown to decrease as time-dependent deformation. Finally, based on the observations in this study, a simple analytical model for predicting the reduction in nanorod resistance as a function of creep strain that is induced from diffusional mechanisms is proposed, and this model was demonstrated to be in an excellent agreement with the experimental results. PMID:25982962

  19. Time-dependent mechanical-electrical coupled behavior in single crystal ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Jae; Yun, Tae Gwang; Choi, In-Chul; Kim, Sungwoong; Park, Won Il; Han, Seung Min; Jang, Jae-il

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale time-dependent mechanical-electrical coupled behavior of single crystal ZnO nanorods was systematically explored, which is essential for accessing the long-term reliability of the ZnO nanorod-based flexible devices. A series of compression creep tests combined with in-situ electrical measurement was performed on vertically-grown single crystal ZnO nanorods. Continuous measurement of the current (I)-voltage (V) curves before, during, after the creep tests revealed that I is non-negligibly increased as a result of the time-dependent deformation. Analysis of the I-V curves based on the thermionic emission-diffusion theory allowed extraction of nanorod resistance, which was shown to decrease as time-dependent deformation. Finally, based on the observations in this study, a simple analytical model for predicting the reduction in nanorod resistance as a function of creep strain that is induced from diffusional mechanisms is proposed, and this model was demonstrated to be in an excellent agreement with the experimental results. PMID:25982962

  20. Creep-rupture of polymer-matrix composites. [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An accelerated characterization method for resin matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep rupture analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer matrix composites. Comparisons between creep rupture experiments and analytical models are presented. The time dependent creep rupture process in graphite epoxy laminates is examined as a function of temperature and stress level.

  1. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  2. Time-dependent projected Hartree-Fock

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-03-28

    Projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) has recently emerged as an alternative approach to describing degenerate systems where static correlation is abundant, when the spin-symmetry is projected. Here, we derive a set of linearized time-dependent equations for PHF in order to be able to access excited states. The close connection of such linear-response time-dependent PHF (TDPHF) to the stability condition of a PHF wave function is discussed. Expanding this analysis also makes it possible to give analytical expressions for the projected coupling terms of Hamiltonian and overlaps between excited Slater determinants. TDPHF with spin-projection (TDSUHF) and its Tamm-Dancoff approximation are benchmarked for several electronically degenerate molecules including the dissociating H{sub 2}, F{sub 2} and O{sub 3} at equilibrium, and the distorted ethylene. It is shown that they give consistently better descriptions of excited states than does time-dependent HF (TDHF). Furthermore, we demonstrate that they offer not only singly but also doubly excited states, which naturally arise upon spin-projection. We also address the thermodynamic limit of TDSUHF, using non-interacting He gas. While TDPHF singly excited states tend to converge to those of HF with the size of the system due to the lack of size-extensivity of PHF, doubly excited states remain reasonable even at the thermodynamic limit. We find that the overall performance of our method is systematically better than the regular TDHF in many cases at the same computational scaling.

  3. Time Dependent Behavior in the Weissenberg Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degen, Michael M.; Andereck, C. David

    1997-03-01

    The Weissenberg effect is the climb of a non-Newtonian fluid up a rotating rod. We have found novel transitional effects in the behavior of a particular climbing fluid, STP(STP Oil Treatment distributed by First Brands Corporation.). The first state is a time-independent axisymmetric concave climb. As the rotation rate of the rod is increased, the first transition is to an axisymmetric climb with an ``onion dome'' shape. At higher rotation rates, the flow undergoes a symmetry breaking bifurcation to a time-dependent state. This time-dependent state exhibits an oscillation with a single frequency. Upon further increase of the rod rotation rate, the oscillation becomes modulated by a second frequency. The nature of each transition will be characterized, including the measurement of oscillation amplitudes and the frequency (or frequencies) of the time dependent states. These results will be compared with previous work.(G.S. Beavers, D.D. Joseph, J. Fluid Mech. 69), 475 (1975).(D.D. Joseph, R.L. Fosdick, Arch. Rational Mech. 49), 321 (1973).

  4. Time-dependent projected Hartree-Fock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) has recently emerged as an alternative approach to describing degenerate systems where static correlation is abundant, when the spin-symmetry is projected. Here, we derive a set of linearized time-dependent equations for PHF in order to be able to access excited states. The close connection of such linear-response time-dependent PHF (TDPHF) to the stability condition of a PHF wave function is discussed. Expanding this analysis also makes it possible to give analytical expressions for the projected coupling terms of Hamiltonian and overlaps between excited Slater determinants. TDPHF with spin-projection (TDSUHF) and its Tamm-Dancoff approximation are benchmarked for several electronically degenerate molecules including the dissociating H2, F2 and O3 at equilibrium, and the distorted ethylene. It is shown that they give consistently better descriptions of excited states than does time-dependent HF (TDHF). Furthermore, we demonstrate that they offer not only singly but also doubly excited states, which naturally arise upon spin-projection. We also address the thermodynamic limit of TDSUHF, using non-interacting He gas. While TDPHF singly excited states tend to converge to those of HF with the size of the system due to the lack of size-extensivity of PHF, doubly excited states remain reasonable even at the thermodynamic limit. We find that the overall performance of our method is systematically better than the regular TDHF in many cases at the same computational scaling.

  5. Singular boundary method using time-dependent fundamental solution for scalar wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Li, Junpu; Fu, Zhuojia

    2016-07-01

    This study makes the first attempt to extend the meshless boundary-discretization singular boundary method (SBM) with time-dependent fundamental solution to two-dimensional and three-dimensional scalar wave equation upon Dirichlet boundary condition. The two empirical formulas are also proposed to determine the source intensity factors. In 2D problems, the fundamental solution integrating along with time is applied. In 3D problems, a time-successive evaluation approach without complicated mathematical transform is proposed. Numerical investigations show that the present SBM methodology produces the accurate results for 2D and 3D time-dependent wave problems with varied velocities c and wave numbers k.

  6. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  7. Time-dependent Dyson orbital theory.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2016-08-21

    Although time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the tool of choice for real-time propagation of the electron density ρ(N)(t) of N-electron systems, it also encounters problems in this application. The first problem is the neglect of memory effects stemming from the, in TDDFT virtually unavoidable, adiabatic approximation, the second problem is the reliable evaluation of the probabilities P(n)(t) of multiple photoinduced ionization, while the third problem (which TDDFT shares with other approaches) is the reliable description of continuum states of the electrons ejected in the process of ionization. In this paper time-dependent Dyson orbital theory (TDDOT) is proposed. Exact TDDOT equations of motion (EOMs) for time-dependent Dyson orbitals are derived, which are linear differential equations with just static, feasible potentials of the electron-electron interaction. No adiabatic approximation is used, which formally resolves the first TDDFT problem. TDDOT offers formally exact expressions for the complete evolution in time of the wavefunction of the outgoing electron. This leads to the correlated probability of single ionization P(1)(t) as well as the probabilities of no ionization (P(0)(t)) and multiple ionization of n electrons, P(n)(t), which formally solves the second problem of TDDFT. For two-electron systems a proper description of the required continuum states appears to be rather straightforward, and both P(1)(t) and P(2)(t) can be calculated. Because of the exact formulation, TDDOT is expected to reproduce a notorious memory effect, the "knee structure" of the non-sequential double ionization of the He atom. PMID:26987972

  8. Pulsar Electrodynamics: a Time-dependent View

    SciTech Connect

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    Pulsar spindown forms a reliable yet enigmatic prototype for the energy loss processes in many astrophysical objects including accretion disks and back holes. In this paper we review the physics of pulsar magnetospheres, concentrating on recent developments in force-free modeling of the magnetospheric structure. In particular, we discuss a new method for solving the equations of time-dependent force-free relativistic MHD in application to pulsars. This method allows to dynamically study the formation of the magnetosphere and its response to perturbations, opening a qualitatively new window on pulsar phenomena. Applications of the method to other magnetized rotators, such as magnetars and accretion disks, are also discussed.

  9. Topologically nontrivial time-dependent chiral condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.

    1996-11-01

    Topologically nontrivial time-dependent solutions of the classical nonlinear {sigma} model are studied as candidates of the disoriented chiral condensate (DCC) in 3+1 dimensions. Unlike the analytic solutions so far discussed, these solutions cannot be transformed into isospin-uniform ones by chiral rotations. If they are produced as DCC{close_quote}s, they can be detected by a distinct pattern in the angle-rapidity distribution of the neutral-to-charged pion ratio. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. A computational study of the time dependent crack growth process

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W.; Krishnaswamy, P.

    1992-01-01

    Universal studies of creep crack growth for (1) constant load and (2) variable load cases are presented. Results of the constant load cases is compared to experiment. The behavior of displacements and integral creep for fracture parameters are discussed for both load cases. The need for using a constitutive law which can handle cyclic creep is discussed.

  11. Postseismic relaxation and transient creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Yu, S.-B.

    2005-01-01

    Postseismic deformation has been observed in the epicentral area following the 1992 Landers (M = 7.3), 1999 Chi-Chi (M = 7.6), 1999 Hector Mine (M = 7.1), 2002 Denali (M = 7.9), 2003 San Simeon (M = 6.5), and 2004 Parkfield (M = 6.0) earthquakes. The observations consist of repeated GPS measurements of the position of one monument relative to another (separation ???100 km). The early observations (t < 0.1 year) are well fit by the function a' + c'log(t), where t is the time after the earthquake and a' and c' are constants chosen to fit the data. Because a log(t) time dependence is characteristic of transient (primary) creep, the early postseismic response may be governed by transient creep as Benioff proposed in 1951. That inference is provisional as the stress conditions prevailing in postseismic relaxation are not identical to the constant stress condition in creep experiments. The observed logarithmic time dependence includes no characteristic time that might aid in identifying the micromechanical cause.

  12. The time-dependent Gutzwiller approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, Michele

    2015-03-01

    The time-dependent Gutzwiller Approximation (t-GA) is shown to be capable of tracking the off-equilibrium evolution both of coherent quasiparticles and of incoherent Hubbard bands. The method is used to demonstrate that the sharp dynamical crossover observed by time-dependent DMFT in the quench-dynamics of a half-filled Hubbard model can be identified within the t-GA as a genuine dynamical transition separating two distinct physical phases. This result, strictly variational for lattices of infinite coordination number, is intriguing as it actually questions the occurrence of thermalization. Next, we shall present how t-GA works in a multi-band model for V2O3 that displays a first-order Mott transition. We shall show that a physically accessible excitation pathway is able to collapse the Mott gap down and drive off-equilibrium the insulator into a metastable metal phase. Work supported by the European Union, Seventh Framework Programme, under the project GO FAST, Grant Agreement No. 280555.

  13. Time-dependent diffusion in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, G.; Stift, M. J.; Dorfi, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical peculiarities of Ap stars are due to abundance stratifications produced by atomic diffusion in their outer layers. Theoretical models can predict such stratifications, but so far only provide equilibrium solutions which correspond to the maximum depth-dependent abundances for each element that can be supported by the radiation field. However, these stratifications are actually built up through a non-linear, time-dependent process which has never been modelled for realistic stellar atmospheres. Here, we present the first numerical simulations of time-dependent diffusion. We solve the continuity equation after having computed, as accurately as possible, atomic diffusion velocities (with and without a magnetic field) for a simplified fictitious - but still realistic - chemical element: cloudium. The direct comparison with existing observations is not the immediate aim of this work but rather a general understanding of how the stratification build-up proceeds in time and space. Our results raise serious questions as to the relevance of equilibrium solutions and reinforce the suspicion that certain accumulations of chemical elements might prove unstable.

  14. Micromechanics effects in creep of metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. C.; Allison, J. E.

    1995-12-01

    The creep of metal-matrix composites is analyzed by finite element techniques. An axisymmetric unit-cell model with spherical reinforcing particles is used. Parameters appropriate to TiC particles in a precipitation-hardened (2219) Al matrix are chosen. The effects of matrix plasticity and residual stresses on the creep of the composite are calculated. We confirm (1) that the steady-state rate is independent of the particle elastic moduli and the matrix elastic and plastic properties, (2) that the ratio of composite to matrix steady-state rates depends only on the volume fraction and geometry of the reinforcing phase, and (3) that this ratio can be determined from a calculation of the stress-strain relation for the geometrically identical composite (same phase volume and geometry) with rigid particles in the appropriate power-law hardening matrix. The values of steady-state creep are compared to experimental ones (Krajewski et al.). Continuum mechanics predictions give a larger reduction of the composite creep relative to the unreinforced material than measured, suggesting that the effective creep rate of the matrix is larger than in unreinforced precipitation-hardened Al due to changes in microstructure, dislocation density, or creep mechanism. Changes in matrix creep properties are also suggested by the comparison of calculated and measured creep strain rates in the primary creep regime, where significantly different time dependencies are found. It is found that creep calculations performed for a timeindependent matrix creep law can be transformed to obtain the creep for a time-dependent creep law.

  15. Time-dependent model of aseismic slip on the central San Andreas Fault from InSAR time series and repeating earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshmanesh, M.; Shirzaei, M.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2015-09-01

    The Central segment of San Andreas Fault (CSAF) is characterized by a nearly continuous right-lateral aseismic slip. However, observations of the creep rate obtained using small characteristically repeating earthquakes (CREs) show pulses of creep along the CSAF, which may indicate spatially and temporally variable seismic hazard along the CSAF. Therefore, the goal of this study is to obtain a high-resolution time-dependent model of creep along the CSAF to examine this hypothesis. To this end, we apply a time-dependent creep modeling approach, which combines interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) surface deformation time series and observations of fault creep obtained from CREs. The SAR data set includes C band scenes acquired by the ERS-2 and Envisat satellites between 2003 and 2011. The resulting creep rate distribution implies a peak rate up to 32 mm/yr along the central part of the CSAF. Afterslip due to the 2004 Parkfield earthquake on the southeastern segment of the CSAF is also manifest in the model, and there is clear evidence of creep pulsing along strike and depth of the CSAF. Estimated annual rate of slip deficit accumulation is equivalent to a magnitude 5.6-5.7 earthquake. Taking advantage of the time-dependence of our model, we also refine the scaling relationship, which associates the released seismic moment due to a CRE event with the amount of creep on the fault, surrounding the CRE patches. This study provides the first kinematic model of creep pulsing, constrained using geodetic and seismic data, which can enhance time-dependent seismic hazard maps and improve earthquake operational forecast models.

  16. Pseudospectral time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Chaehyuk; Malick, David K.; Braden, Dale A.; Friesner, Richard A.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2008-03-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is implemented within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) using a pseudospectral approach to evaluate two-electron repulsion integrals. The pseudospectral approximation uses a split representation with both spectral basis functions and a physical space grid to achieve a reduction in the scaling behavior of electronic structure methods. We demonstrate here that exceptionally sparse grids may be used in the excitation energy calculation, following earlier work employing the pseudospectral approximation for determining correlation energies in wavefunction-based methods with similar conclusions. The pseudospectral TDA-TDDFT method is shown to be up to ten times faster than a conventional algorithm for hybrid functionals without sacrificing chemical accuracy.

  17. A Contribution to Time-Dependent Damage Modeling of Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treasurer, Paul; Poirette, Yann; Perreux, Dominique; Thiebaud, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents a new damage model for predicting stiffness loss due to creep loading and cyclic fatigue. The model, developed within a continuum damage mechanics framework, is based on the idea of a time-dependent damage spectrum, some elements of which occur rapidly and others slowly. The use of this spectrum allows a single damage kinematic to model creep and fatigue damage and to take into account the effect of stress amplitude, R ratio, and frequency. The evolution equations are based on similar equation than the one describing the viscoelasticity model and are relatively easy to implement. The new model is compared to the experimental results on carbon fiber/epoxy tubes. Quasi-static, creep and fatigue tests are performed on filament-wound tubular specimens to characterize the elastic, viscoelastic and plastic behavior of the composite material. Varying amounts of damage are observed and discussed depending on stress level and R ratio. The experimental work aims to develop and validate the damage model for predicting stiffness loss due to creep loading and cyclic fatigue.

  18. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  19. Time-dependent treatment of scattering - Integral equation approaches using the time-dependent amplitude density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David K.; Sharafeddin, Omar; Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent form of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation is used as the basis of several new wave packet propagation schemes. These can be formulated in terms of either the time-dependent wave function or a time-dependent amplitude density. The latter is nonzero only in the region of configuratiaon space for which the potential is nonzero, thereby in principle obviating the necessity of large grids or the use of complex absorbing potentials when resonances cause long collision times (leading, consequently, to long propagation times). Transition amplitudes are obtained in terms of Fourier transforms of the amplitude density from the time to the energy domain. The approach is illustrated by an application to a standard potential scattering model problem where, as in previous studies, the action of the kinetic energy operator is evaluated by fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques.

  20. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  1. Material properties of femoral cancellous bone in axial loading. Part II: Time dependent properties.

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Rohlmann, A; Bergmann, G; Kölbel, R

    1980-01-01

    In part I of this communication we reported on some time independent material properties of cancellous bone specimens from different regions of human femora. In part II we will report on our investigations of the time dependent behaviour, i.e. stress relaxation and creep. Cylindrical specimens were obtained from the head and condyles of pairs of cadaveric femora and subjected to axial loading. The data were evaluated statistically. The medianL values for relaxation of cancellous bone were greater in the femoral head than in the condyles, greater proximally than distally and greater medially than laterally in the condyles. The distribution of creep was found to be the reverse. The correlation analysis showed that a linear correlation between compressive strength, apparent density and the time dependent properties cannot be assumed. The time dependent properties reported here would appear to demonstrate the visco-elastic behaviour of cancellous bone. An experimental foundation and explanation is presented for the clinical practice of re-tightening cancellous bone screws one time only. PMID:7458609

  2. Time dependent friction in a free gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Cristiano; Sisti, Francesco; Stagno, Gabriele V.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a body moving in a perfect gas, described by the mean-field approximation and interacting elastically with the body, we study the friction exerted by the gas on the body fixed at constant velocities. The time evolution of the body in this setting was studied in Caprino et al. [Math. Phys. 264, 167-189 (2006)], Caprino et al. [Math. Models Methods Appl. Sci. 17, 1369-1403 (2007)], and Cavallaro [Rend. Mat. Appl. 27, 123-145 (2007)] for object with simple shape; the first study where a simple kind of concavity was considered was in Sisti and Ricciuti [SIAM J. Math. Anal. 46, 3759-3611 (2014)], showing new features in the dynamic but not in the friction term. The case of more general shape of the body was left out for further difficulties, and we believe indeed that there are actually non-trivial issues to be faced for these more general cases. To show this and in the spirit of getting a more realistic perspective in the study of friction problems, in this paper, we focused our attention on the friction term itself, studying its behavior on a body with a more general kind of concavity and fixed at constant velocities. We derive the expression of the friction term for constant velocities, we show how it is time dependent, and we give its exact estimate in time. Finally, we use this result to show the absence of a constant velocity in the actual dynamic of such a body.

  3. Alternative time-dependent optimized effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    The OEP is known as a single-particle potential minimizing the expectation value of a many-body Hamiltonian on the set of eigen-functions of a single-particle Hamiltonian. The time-dependent (TD) OEP can be constructed with the TD quantum stationary-action principle. Very useful conceptually in DFT and TDDFT, both OEPs are not practicable due to the complexity of their implementations. Here we report a TDOEP by minimizing the difference of LHS and RHS of the TD Schrödinger equation. If the orbitals are varied, then the TD Hartree-Fock equations are reproduced. Similarly, we now find the OEP. New OMP does not involve the inversion of the density-response function χs, which greatly facilitates implementations. Accordingly, the exchange-correlation kernel fxc involves of χs- 1 only, not its quadratic counterpart. To show the power of this method, we work out the fxch (q , ω) of the homogeneous electron gas to be used with the nearly-free electrons theory, where fxch is the main input. Partial support from National Science Council, Taiwan, Grant No. 100-2112-M-001-025-MY3 is acknowledged.

  4. Time-dependent nanomechanics of cartilage.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Frank, Eliot H; Greene, Jacqueline J; Lee, Hsu-Yi; Hung, Han-Hwa K; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-04-01

    In this study, atomic force microscopy-based dynamic oscillatory and force-relaxation indentation was employed to quantify the time-dependent nanomechanics of native (untreated) and proteoglycan (PG)-depleted cartilage disks, including indentation modulus E(ind), force-relaxation time constant τ, magnitude of dynamic complex modulus |E(∗)|, phase angle δ between force and indentation depth, storage modulus E', and loss modulus E″. At ∼2 nm dynamic deformation amplitude, |E(∗)| increased significantly with frequency from 0.22 ± 0.02 MPa (1 Hz) to 0.77 ± 0.10 MPa (316 Hz), accompanied by an increase in δ (energy dissipation). At this length scale, the energy dissipation mechanisms were deconvoluted: the dynamic frequency dependence was primarily governed by the fluid-flow-induced poroelasticity, whereas the long-time force relaxation reflected flow-independent viscoelasticity. After PG depletion, the change in the frequency response of |E(∗)| and δ was consistent with an increase in cartilage local hydraulic permeability. Although untreated disks showed only slight dynamic amplitude-dependent behavior, PG-depleted disks showed great amplitude-enhanced energy dissipation, possibly due to additional viscoelastic mechanisms. Hence, in addition to functioning as a primary determinant of cartilage compressive stiffness and hydraulic permeability, the presence of aggrecan minimized the amplitude dependence of |E(∗)| at nanometer-scale deformation. PMID:21463599

  5. Dosing time-dependent actions of psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-01

    The concept of the dosing time-dependent (DTD) actions of drugs has been used to describe the effects of diurnal rhythms on pharmacological responsiveness. Notwithstanding the importance of diurnal variability in drug pharmacokinetics and bioavailability, it appears that in the central nervous system (CNS), the DTD actions of psychotropic drugs involve diurnal changes in the CNS-specific expression of genes encoding for psychotropic drug targets and transcription factors known as clock genes. In this review, we focused our discussion on the DTD effects of the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines. Both cocaine and amphetamines produce differential lasting behavioral alterations, that is, locomotor sensitization, depending on the time of the day they are administered. This exemplifies a DTD action of these drugs. The DTD effects of these psychostimulants correlate with diurnal changes in the system of transcription factors termed clock genes, for example, Period 1, and with changes in the availability of certain subtypes of dopamine receptors, for example, D2 and D3. Diurnal synthesis and release of the pineal hormone melatonin influence the DTD behavioral actions of cocaine and amphetamines. The molecular mechanism of melatonin's effects on the responsiveness of CNS to psychostimulants appears to involve melatonin receptors and clock genes. It is proposed that the DTD characteristics of psychostimulant action and the contributions of the melatonergic system may have clinical implications that include treatments for the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and possibly neurotoxicity/neuroprotection. PMID:19897073

  6. Heating liquid dielectrics by time dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalife, A.; Pathak, U.; Richert, R.

    2011-10-01

    Steady state and time-resolved dielectric relaxation experiments are performed at high fields on viscous glycerol and the effects of energy absorption from the electric field are studied. Time resolution is obtained by a sinusoidal field whose amplitude is switched from a low to a high level and by recording voltage and current traces with an oscilloscope during this transition. Based on their distinct time and frequency dependences, three sources of modifying the dynamics and dielectric loss via an increase in the effective temperature can be distinguished: electrode temperature, real sample temperature, and configurational temperatures of the modes that absorbed the energy. Isothermal conditions that are desired for focusing on the configurational temperature changes (as in dielectric hole burning and related techniques) are maintained only for very thin samples and for moderate power levels. For high frequencies, say ν > 1 MHz, changes of the real temperature will exceed the effects of configurational temperatures in the case of macroscopic samples. Regarding microwave chemistry, heating via cell phone use, and related situations in which materials are subject to fields involving frequencies beyond the MHz regime, we conclude that changes in the configurational (or fictive) temperatures remain negligible compared with the increase of the real temperature. This simplifies the assessment of how time dependent electric fields modify the properties of materials.

  7. Time-Dependent Nanomechanics of Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin; Frank, Eliot H.; Greene, Jacqueline J.; Lee, Hsu-Yi; Hung, Han-Hwa K.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-01-01

    In this study, atomic force microscopy-based dynamic oscillatory and force-relaxation indentation was employed to quantify the time-dependent nanomechanics of native (untreated) and proteoglycan (PG)-depleted cartilage disks, including indentation modulus Eind, force-relaxation time constant τ, magnitude of dynamic complex modulus |E∗|, phase angle δ between force and indentation depth, storage modulus E′, and loss modulus E″. At ∼2 nm dynamic deformation amplitude, |E∗| increased significantly with frequency from 0.22 ± 0.02 MPa (1 Hz) to 0.77 ± 0.10 MPa (316 Hz), accompanied by an increase in δ (energy dissipation). At this length scale, the energy dissipation mechanisms were deconvoluted: the dynamic frequency dependence was primarily governed by the fluid-flow-induced poroelasticity, whereas the long-time force relaxation reflected flow-independent viscoelasticity. After PG depletion, the change in the frequency response of |E∗| and δ was consistent with an increase in cartilage local hydraulic permeability. Although untreated disks showed only slight dynamic amplitude-dependent behavior, PG-depleted disks showed great amplitude-enhanced energy dissipation, possibly due to additional viscoelastic mechanisms. Hence, in addition to functioning as a primary determinant of cartilage compressive stiffness and hydraulic permeability, the presence of aggrecan minimized the amplitude dependence of |E∗| at nanometer-scale deformation. PMID:21463599

  8. Tunable Time-Dependent Colloidal Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Andrew M.; Rogers, W. Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles can be driven by changes in temperature, density, or the concentration of solutes, and it is even possible to program the thermal response and equilibrium phase transitions of such systems. It is still difficult, however, to tune how the self-assembly process varies in time. We demonstrate control over the time-dependence of colloidal interactions, using DNA-functionalized colloidal particles with binding energies that are set by the concentration of a free linker strand in solution. We control the rate at which this free strand is consumed using a catalytic DNA reaction, whose rate is governed by the concentration of a catalyst strand. Varying the concentration of the linker, its competitor, and the catalyst at a fixed temperature, we can tune the rate and degree of the formation of colloidal aggregates and their following disassembly. Close to the colloidal melting point, the timescales of these out-of-equilibrium assembly and disassembly processes are determined by the rate of the catalytic reaction. Far below the colloidal melting point, however, the effects from varying our linker and competitor concentrations dominate.

  9. In-situ Creep Testing Capability Development for Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

    2010-08-01

    Creep is the slow, time-dependent strain that occurs in a material under a constant strees (or load) at high temperature. High temperature is a relative term, dependent on the materials being evaluated. A typical creep curve is shown in Figure 1-1. In a creep test, a constant load is applied to a tensile specimen maintained at a constant temperature. Strain is then measured over a period of time. The slope of the curve, identified in the figure below, is the strain rate of the test during Stage II or the creep rate of the material. Primary creep, Stage I, is a period of decreasing creep rate due to work hardening of the material. Primary creep is a period of primarily transient creep. During this period, deformation takes place and the resistance to creep increases until Stage II, Secondary creep. Stage II creep is a period with a roughly constant creep rate. Stage II is referred to as steady-state creep because a balance is achieved between the work hardening and annealing (thermal softening) processes. Tertiary creep, Stage III, occurs when there is a reduction in cross sectional area due to necking or effective reduction in area due to internal void formation; that is, the creep rate increases due to necking of the specimen and the associated increase in local stress.

  10. Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Don N.

    2013-09-01

    If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4πM02, or about 7.509M02 ≈ 6.268 × 1076(M0/Msolar)2, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M02 ≈ 1.254 × 1077(M0/Msolar)2, and then decreases back down to 4πM02 = 1.049 × 1077(M0/Msolar)2.

  11. Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Don N.

    2013-09-01

    If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4πM{sub 0}{sup 2}, or about 7.509M{sub 0}{sup 2} ≈ 6.268 × 10{sup 76}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M{sub 0}{sup 2} ≈ 1.254 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, and then decreases back down to 4πM{sub 0}{sup 2} = 1.049 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}.

  12. Time-dependence in mixture toxicity prediction

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Douglas A.; Allen, Erin M.G.; Allen, Joshua L.; Baumann, Hannah J.; Bensinger, Heather M.; Genco, Nicole; Guinn, Daphne; Hull, Michael W.; Il'Giovine, Zachary J.; Kaminski, Chelsea M.; Peyton, Jennifer R.; Schultz, T. Wayne; Pöch, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    The value of time-dependent toxicity (TDT) data in predicting mixture toxicity was examined. Single chemical (A and B) and mixture (A + B) toxicity tests using Microtox® were conducted with inhibition of bioluminescence (Vibrio fischeri) being quantified after 15, 30 and 45-min of exposure. Single chemical and mixture tests for 25 sham (A1:A2) and 125 true (A:B) combinations had a minimum of seven duplicated concentrations with a duplicated control treatment for each test. Concentration/response (x/y) data were fitted to sigmoid curves using the five-parameter logistic minus one parameter (5PL-1P) function, from which slope, EC25, EC50, EC75, asymmetry, maximum effect, and r2 values were obtained for each chemical and mixture at each exposure duration. Toxicity data were used to calculate percentage-based TDT values for each individual chemical and mixture of each combination. Predicted TDT values for each mixture were calculated by averaging the TDT values of the individual components and regressed against the observed TDT values obtained in testing, resulting in strong correlations for both sham (r2 = 0.989, n = 25) and true mixtures (r2 = 0.944, n = 125). Additionally, regression analyses confirmed that observed mixture TDT values calculated for the 50% effect level were somewhat better correlated with predicted mixture TDT values than at the 25 and 75% effect levels. Single chemical and mixture TDT values were classified into five levels in order to discern trends. The results suggested that the ability to predict mixture TDT by averaging the TDT of the single agents was modestly reduced when one agent of the combination had a positive TDT value and the other had a minimal or negative TDT value. PMID:25446331

  13. Deformation characteristics and time-dependent notch sensitivity of Udimet 700 at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Time-dependent notch sensitivity of Udimet 700 sheet, bar, and investment castings was observed between 1000 and 1400 F (538-760 C) but not at 1600 F (871 C). As was the case for Modified Waspaloy, Waspaloy, Rene 41, Inconel 718, and TD-NiCr, it occurred when notched specimens were loaded below the yield strength and when creep deformation was localized. For each gamma-prime strengthened alloy and notched specimen geometry, a stress-average particle size zone can be defined to characterize the notch-sensitive behavior.

  14. Creep of plain weave polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Abhishek

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in various industrial sectors to reduce structural weight and improve performance. Woven (also known as textile) composites are one class of polymer matrix composites with increasing market share mostly due to their lightweight, their flexibility to form into desired shape, their mechanical properties and toughness. Due to the viscoelasticity of the polymer matrix, time-dependent degradation in modulus (creep) and strength (creep rupture) are two of the major mechanical properties required by engineers to design a structure reliably when using these materials. Unfortunately, creep and creep rupture of woven composites have received little attention by the research community and thus, there is a dire need to generate additional knowledge and prediction models, given the increasing market share of woven composites in load bearing structural applications. Currently, available creep models are limited in scope and have not been validated for any loading orientation and time period beyond the experimental time window. In this thesis, an analytical creep model, namely the Modified Equivalent Laminate Model (MELM), was developed to predict tensile creep of plain weave composites for any orientation of the load with respect to the orientation of the fill and warp fibers, using creep of unidirectional composites. The ability of the model to predict creep for any orientation of the load is a "first" in this area. The model was validated using an extensive experimental involving the tensile creep of plain weave composites under varying loading orientation and service conditions. Plain weave epoxy (F263)/ carbon fiber (T300) composite, currently used in aerospace applications, was procured as fabrics from Hexcel Corporation. Creep tests were conducted under two loading conditions: on-axis loading (0°) and off-axis loading (45°). Constant load creep, in the temperature range of 80-240°C and stress range of 1-70% UTS of the

  15. Time-Dependent, Parallel Neutral Particle Transport Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-09-10

    Version 00 PARTISN (PARallel, TIme-Dependent SN) is the evolutionary successor to CCC-547/DANTSYS. The PARTISN code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent or dependent multigroup discrete ordinates form of the Boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, the Solver Module, and themore » Edit Module, respectively. PARTISN is the evolutionary successor to the DANTSYSTM code system package. The Input and Edit Modules in PARTISN are very similar to those in DANTSYS. However, unlike DANTSYS, the Solver Module in PARTISN contains one, two, and three-dimensional solvers in a single module. In addition to the diamond-differencing method, the Solver Module also has Adaptive Weighted Diamond-Differencing (AWDD), Linear Discontinuous (LD), and Exponential Discontinuous (ED) spatial differencing methods. The spatial mesh may consist of either a standard orthogonal mesh or a block adaptive orthogonal mesh. The Solver Module may be run in parallel for two and three dimensional problems. One can now run 1-D problems in parallel using Energy Domain Decomposition (triggered by Block 5 input keyword npeg>0). EDD can also be used in 2-D/3-D with or without our standard Spatial Domain Decomposition. Both the static (fixed source or eigenvalue) and time-dependent forms of the transport equation are solved in forward or adjoint mode. In addition, PARTISN now has a probabilistic mode for Probability of Initiation (static) and Probability of Survival (dynamic) calculations. Vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, or inhomogeneous boundary conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering and inhomogeneous sources are permitted. PARTISN solves the transport equation on orthogonal (single level or block-structured AMR) grids in 1-D

  16. Time-Dependent Rate Phenomenon in Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Aiewsakun, Pakorn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Among the most fundamental questions in viral evolutionary biology are how fast viruses evolve and how evolutionary rates differ among viruses and fluctuate through time. Traditionally, viruses are loosely classed into two groups: slow-evolving DNA viruses and fast-evolving RNA viruses. As viral evolutionary rate estimates become more available, it appears that the rates are negatively correlated with the measurement timescales and that the boundary between the rates of DNA and RNA viruses might not be as clear as previously thought. In this study, we collected 396 viral evolutionary rate estimates across almost all viral genome types and replication strategies, and we examined their rate dynamics. We showed that the time-dependent rate phenomenon exists across multiple levels of viral taxonomy, from the Baltimore classification viral groups to genera. We also showed that, by taking the rate decay dynamics into account, a clear division between the rates of DNA and RNA viruses as well as reverse-transcribing viruses could be recovered. Surprisingly, despite large differences in their biology, our analyses suggested that the rate decay speed is independent of viral types and thus might be useful for better estimation of the evolutionary time scale of any virus. To illustrate this, we used our model to reestimate the evolutionary timescales of extant lentiviruses, which were previously suggested to be very young by standard phylogenetic analyses. Our analyses suggested that these viruses are millions of years old, in agreement with paleovirological evidence, and therefore, for the first time, reconciled molecular analyses of ancient and extant viruses. IMPORTANCE This work provides direct evidence that viral evolutionary rate estimates decay with their measurement timescales and that the rate decay speeds do not differ significantly among viruses despite the vast differences in their molecular features. After adjustment for the rate decay dynamics, the

  17. Time dependence of the paramagnetic Meissner effect: Comparison between model calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Magnusson, J.; Andersson, J.; Bjoernander, M.; Nordblad, P.; Svedlindh, P.

    1995-05-01

    Experimental results of the temperature, field, and time dependence of the magnetization in high-temperature superconductors displaying the paramagnetic Meissner effect are compared with numerical results from model calculations. In experiments the relaxation rate of the zero-field-cooled magnetization exhibits novel field-dependent properties and the field-cooled magnetization is found to increase with time. A model based on an ensemble of superconducting loops, each loop containing an ordinary Josephson junction or a {pi} junction, is shown to be able to account for most of the experimental results. The time-dependent magnetization is explained by thermally activated flipping of spontaneous orbital magnetic moments, a dynamical process which is fundamentally different from the flux-creep phenomenon usually observed in type-II superconductors.

  18. Time-dependent friction and the mechanics of stick-slip

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Time-dependent increase of static friction is characteristic of rock friction undera variety of experimental circumstances. Data presented here show an analogous velocity-dependent effect. A theor of friction is proposed that establishes a common basis for static and sliding friction. Creep at points of contact causes increases in friction that are proportional to the logarithm of the time that the population of points of contact exist. For static friction that time is the time of stationary contact. For sliding friction the time of contact is determined by the critical displacement required to change the population of contacts and the slip velocity. An analysis of a one-dimensional spring and slider system shows that experimental observations establishing the transition from stable sliding to stick-slip to be a function of normal stress, stiffness and surface finish are a consequence of time-dependent friction. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  19. Time dependent reliability model incorporating continuum damage mechanics for high-temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Presently there are many opportunities for the application of ceramic materials at elevated temperatures. In the near future ceramic materials are expected to supplant high temperature metal alloys in a number of applications. It thus becomes essential to develop a capability to predict the time-dependent response of these materials. The creep rupture phenomenon is discussed, and a time-dependent reliability model is outlined that integrates continuum damage mechanics principles and Weibull analysis. Several features of the model are presented in a qualitative fashion, including predictions of both reliability and hazard rate. In addition, a comparison of the continuum and the microstructural kinetic equations highlights a strong resemblance in the two approaches.

  20. Time-Dependent Electronic Populations in Fragment-Based Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Martín A; Wasserman, Adam

    2015-08-11

    Conceiving a molecule as being composed of smaller molecular fragments, or subunits, is one of the pillars of the chemical and physical sciences and leads to productive methods in quantum chemistry. Using a fragmentation scheme, efficient algorithms can be proposed to address problems in the description of chemical bond formation and breaking. We present a formally exact time-dependent density functional theory for the electronic dynamics of molecular fragments with a variable number of electrons. This new formalism is an extension of previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 023001 (2013)]. We also introduce a stable density-inversion method that is applicable to time-dependent and ground-state density functional theories and their extensions, including those discussed in this work. PMID:26574438

  1. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C[sub t] or C[sup *]. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C[sub t]. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C[sub t] is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C[sub t]. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C[sub t])[sub avg] was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  2. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  3. Relationship of mechanical characteristics and microstructural features to the time-dependent edge notch sensitivity of inconel 718 sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    Time-dependent notch sensitivity of Inconel 718 sheet was observed at 900 F to 1200 F (482 - 649 C). It occurred when edge-notched specimens were loaded below the yield strength and smooth specimen tests showed that small amounts of creep consumed large rupture life fractions. The severity of the notch sensitivity was reduced by decreasing the solution temperature, increasing the time and/or temperature of aging and increasing the test temperature to 1400 F (760 C). Elimination of time-dependent notch sensitivity correlated with a change in dislocation motion mechanism from shearing to by-passing precipitate particles.

  4. Methodology for determining time-dependent mechanical properties of tuff subjected to near-field repository conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Blacic, J.D.; Andersen, R.

    1983-01-01

    We have established a methodology to determine the time dependence of strength and transport properties of tuff under conditions appropriate to a nuclear waste repository. Exploratory tests to determine the approximate magnitudes of thermomechanical property changes are nearly complete. In this report we describe the capabilities of an apparatus designed to precisely measure the time-dependent deformation and permeability of tuff at simulated repository conditions. Preliminary tests with this new apparatus indicate that microclastic creep failure of tuff occurs over a narrow strain range with little precursory Tertiary creep behavior. In one test, deformation under conditions of slowly decreasing effective pressure resulted in failure, whereas some strain indicators showed a decreasing rate of strain.

  5. Time-dependent behavior of RC beams strengthened with externally bonded FRP plates: interfacial stresses analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyoucef, S.; Tounsi, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Adda Bedia, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    External bonding of fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites has becomes a popular technique for strengthening concrete structures all over the world. An important failure mode of such strengthened members is the debonding of the FRP plate from the concrete due to high interfacial stresses near the plate ends. For correctly installed FRP plate, failure will occur within the concrete. Accurate predictions of the interfacial stresses are prerequisite for designing against debonding failures. In particular, the interfacial stresses between a beam and soffit plate within the linear elastic range have been addressed by numerous analytical investigations. In this study, the time-dependent behavior of RC beams bonded with thin composite plate was investigated theoretically by including the effect of the adherend shear deformations. The time effects considered here are those that arise from shrinkage and creep deformations of the concrete. This paper presents an analytical model for the interfacial stresses between RC beam and a thin FRP plate bonded to its soffit. The influence of creep and shrinkage effect relative to the time of the casting and the time of the loading of the beams is taken into account. Numerical results from the present analysis are presented to illustrate the significance of time-dependent of adhesive stresses.

  6. Differences in time-dependent mechanical properties between extruded and molded hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ersumo, N; Witherel, C E; Spiller, K L

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of hydrogels used in biomaterials and tissue engineering applications are critical determinants of their functionality. Despite the recent rise of additive manufacturing, and specifically extrusion-based bioprinting, as a prominent biofabrication method, comprehensive studies investigating the mechanical behavior of extruded constructs remain lacking. To address this gap in knowledge, we compared the mechanical properties and swelling properties of crosslinked gelatin-based hydrogels prepared by conventional molding techniques or by 3D bioprinting using a BioBots Beta pneumatic extruder. A preliminary characterization of the impact of bioprinting parameters on construct properties revealed that both Young's modulus and optimal extruding pressure increased with polymer content, and that printing resolution increased with both printing speed and nozzle gauge. High viability (>95%) of encapsulated NIH 3T3 fibroblasts confirmed the cytocompatibility of the construct preparation process. Interestingly, the Young's moduli of extruded and molded constructs were not different, but extruded constructs did show increases in both the rate and extent of time-dependent mechanical behavior observed in creep. Despite similar polymer densities, extruded hydrogels showed greater swelling over time compared to molded hydrogels, suggesting that differences in creep behavior derived from differences in microstructure and fluid flow. Because of the crucial roles of time-dependent mechanical properties, fluid flow, and swelling properties on tissue and cell behavior, these findings highlight the need for greater consideration of the effects of the extrusion process on hydrogel properties. PMID:27550945

  7. On-wafer time-dependent high reproducibility nano-force tensile testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergers, L. I. J. C.; Hoefnagels, J. P. M.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Time-dependent mechanical investigations of on-wafer specimens are of interest for improving the reliability of thin metal film microdevices. This paper presents a novel methodology, addressing key challenges in creep and anelasticity investigations through on-wafer tensile tests, achieving highly reproducible force and specimen deformation measurements and loading states. The methodology consists of a novel approach for precise loading using a pin-in-hole gripper and a high-precision specimen alignment system based on three-dimensional image tracking and optical profilometry resulting in angular alignment of <0.1 mrad and near-perfect co-linearity. A compact test system enables in situ tensile tests of on-wafer specimens under light and electron microscopy. Precision force measurement over a range of 0.07 µN to 250 mN is realized based on a simple drift-compensated elastically-hinged load cell with high-precision deflection measurement. The specimen deformation measurement, compensated for drift through image tracking, yields displacement reproducibility of <6 nm. Proof of principle tensile experiments are performed on 5 µm-thick aluminum-alloy thin film specimens, demonstrating reproducible Young’s modulus measurement of 72.6 ± 3.7 GPa. Room temperature creep experiments show excellent stability of the force measurement and underline the methodology’s high reproducibility and suitability for time-dependent nano-force tensile testing of on-wafer specimens.

  8. Solid-phase creep during the expression of palm-oil filter cakes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamst, G.F.; Bruinsma, O.S.L.; Graauw, J. de

    1997-03-01

    For an adequate model of the processes of compressible cake filtration and mechanical expression, permeability and compressibility data are required. Experimental and modeling results of the creep behavior of palm-oil filter cakes at constant and time-dependent pressures are presented. Creep curves of palm-oil cakes at constant pressures cannot be modeled with linear viscoelastic models. Modeling with a modified form of the empirical equation of Nutting gives satisfactory results. This modification does not lead to unrealistic values of the porosity at extreme conditions, contrary to the original form of the equation of Nutting. Creep curves at time-dependent pressures were modeled with two nonlinear viscoelastic models, which describe the time-dependent creep behavior as a function of the pressure history and creep curves at constant pressures. Modeling with the strain-hardening model provides the best porosity predictions.

  9. The Mitral Valve Prolapsus: Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, F.; Coisne, D.; Sanchez, L.; Perrault, R.

    2001-10-01

    Color Doppler is routinely used for visualisation of intra cardiac flows and quantification of valvular heart disease, Nevertheless the 2D visualization of a complex 3D phenomenon is the major limitation of this technique, In particular, in clinical setting, the flow rate calculation upstream a regurgitant orifice (i,e, mitral valve insufficiency), assumes that the velocity field in the convergent region have hemispheric shapes and introduce miscalculation specially in case of prolaps regurgitant orifices, The main objective of this study was to characterize the dynamic 3D velocity field of the convergent region upstream a prolaps model of regurgitant orifice based on 2D time dependent PIV reconstruction.

  10. Aniso2D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  11. Elevated time-dependent strengthening rates observed in San Andreas Fault drilling samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Vogt, Christoph; Kopf, Achim J.

    2016-09-01

    The central San Andreas Fault in California is known as a creeping fault, however recent studies have shown that it may be accumulating a slip deficit and thus its seismogenic potential should be seriously considered. We conducted laboratory friction experiments measuring time-dependent frictional strengthening (healing) on fault zone and wall rock samples recovered during drilling at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), located near the southern edge of the creeping section and in the direct vicinity of three repeating microearthquake clusters. We find that for hold times of up to 3000 s, frictional healing follows a log-linear dependence on hold time and that the healing rate is very low for a sample of the actively shearing fault core, consistent with previous results. However, considering longer hold times up to ∼350,000 s, the healing rate accelerates such that the data for all samples are better described by a power law relation. In general, samples having a higher content of phyllosilicate minerals exhibit low log-linear healing rates, and the notably clay-rich fault zone sample also exhibits strong power-law healing when longer hold times are included. Our data suggest that weak faults, such as the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault, can accumulate interseismic shear stress more rapidly than expected from previous friction data. Using the power-law dependence of frictional healing on hold time, calculations of recurrence interval and stress drop based on our data accurately match observations of discrete creep events and repeating Mw = 2 earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault.

  12. Time-dependent deformation at elevated temperatures in basalt from El Hierro, Stromboli and Teide volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, P. M.; Fahrner, D.; Harnett, C. E.; Fazio, M.

    2014-12-01

    Time dependent deformation describes the process whereby brittle materials deform at a stress level below their short-term material strength (Ss), but over an extended time frame. Although generally well understood in engineering (where it is known as static fatigue or "creep"), knowledge of how rocks creep and fail has wide ramifications in areas as diverse as mine tunnel supports and the long term stability of critically loaded rock slopes. A particular hazard relates to the instability of volcano flanks. A large number of flank collapses are known such as Stromboli (Aeolian islands), Teide, and El Hierro (Canary Islands). Collapses on volcanic islands are especially complex as they necessarily involve the combination of active tectonics, heat, and fluids. Not only does the volcanic system generate stresses that reach close to the failure strength of the rocks involved, but when combined with active pore fluid the process of stress corrosion allows the rock mass to deform and creep at stresses far lower than Ss. Despite the obvious geological hazard that edifice failure poses, the phenomenon of creep in volcanic rocks at elevated temperatures has yet to be thoroughly investigated in a well controlled laboratory setting. We present new data using rocks taken from Stromboli, El Heirro and Teide volcanoes in order to better understand the interplay between the fundamental rock mechanics of these basalts and the effects of elevated temperature fluids (activating stress corrosion mechanisms). Experiments were conducted over short (30-60 minute) and long (8-10 hour) time scales. For this, we use the method of Heap et al., (2011) to impose a constant stress (creep) domain deformation monitored via non-contact axial displacement transducers. This is achieved via a conventional triaxial cell to impose shallow conditions of pressure (<25 MPa) and temperature (<200 °C), and equipped with a 3D laboratory seismicity array (known as acoustic emission, AE) to monitor the micro

  13. An experimental study of uniaxial creep, cyclic creep and relaxation of aisi type 304 stainless steel at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawski, D.; Kallianpur, V.; Krempl, E.

    1980-04-01

    FOLLOWING previous work ( KREMPL, 1979), a servocontrolled testing machine and strain measurement at the gage length were used to study the uniaxial rate(time)-dependent behavior of AISI Type 304 stainless steel at room temperature. The test results show that the creep strain accumulated in a given period of time depends strongly on the stress-rate preceding the creep test. In constant stress-rate zero-to-tension loading the creep strain accumulated in a fixed time-period at a given stress level is always higher during loading than during unloading. Continued cycling causes an exhaustion of creep ratchetting which depends on the stress-rate. Periods of creep and relaxation introduced during completely reversed plastic cycling show that the curved portions of the hysteresis loop exhibit most of the inelasticity. In the straight portions, creep and relaxation are small and there exists a region commencing after unloading where the behavior is similar to that at the origin for virgin materials. This region does not extend to zero stress. The results are at variance with creep theory and with viscoplasticity theories which assume that the yield surface expands with the stress. They support the theory of viscoplasticity based on total strain and overstress.

  14. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  15. Mesh2d

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  16. Unified creep-plasticity model for halite

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, R. D.

    1980-11-01

    There are two national energy programs which are considering caverns in geological salt (NaCl) as a storage repository. One is the disposal of nuclear wastes and the other is the storage of oil. Both short-time and long-time structural deformations and stresses must be predictable for these applications. At 300K, the nominal initial temperature for both applications, the salt is at 0.28 of the melting temperature and exhibits a significant time dependent behavior. A constitutive model has been developed which describes the behavior observed in an extensive set of triaxial creep tests. Analysis of these tests showed that a single deformation mechanism seems to be operative over the stress and temperature range of interest so that the secondary creep data can be represented by a power of the stress over the entire test range. This simple behavior allowed a new unified creep-plasticity model to be applied with some confidence. The resulting model recognizes no inherent difference between plastic and creep strains yet models the total inelastic strain reasonably well including primary and secondary creep and reverse loadings. A multiaxial formulation is applied with a back stress. A Bauschinger effect is exhibited as a consequence and is present regardless of the time scale over which the loading is applied. The model would be interpreted as kinematic hardening in the sense of classical plasticity. Comparisons are made between test data and model behavior.

  17. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  18. Endochronic theory of transient creep and creep recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.; Chen, L.

    1979-01-01

    Short time creep and creep recovery were investigated by means of the endochronic theory of viscoplasticity. It is shown that the constitutive equations for constant-strain-rate stress-strain behavior, creep, creep recovery, and stress relaxation can all ber derived from the general constitutive equation by imposing appropriate constraints. In this unified approach, the effect of strain-hardening is naturally accounted for when describing creep and creep recovery. The theory predicts with reasonable accuracy the creep and creep recovery behaviors for Aluminum 1100-0 at 150 C. It was found that the strain-rate history at prestraining stage affects the subsequent creep. A critical stress was also established for creep recovery. The theory predicts a forward creep for creep recovery stress greater than the critical stress. For creep recovery stress less than the critical stress, the theory then predicts a normal strain recovery.

  19. Mechanical behavior of low porosity carbonate rock: from brittle creep to ductile creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this experimental study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a low porosity (9%) white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite) at P-Q conditions beyond the elastic domain. It has been shown that in sandstones composed of quartz, cracks are developing under these conditions. However, in carbonates, calcite minerals can meanwhile also exhibit microplasticity. The samples were deformed in the triaxial cell of the Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris at effective confining pressures ranging from 35 MPa to 85 MPa and room temperature. Experiments were carried on dry and water saturated samples to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Time dependency was investigated by a creep steps methodology: at each step, differential stress was increased rapidly and kept constant for at least 24h. During these steps elastic wave velocities (P and S) and permeability were measured continuously. Our results show two different creep behaviors: (1) brittle creep is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile creep is observed at higher confining pressures. These two creep behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes. Indeed, in the brittle domain, the primary creep is associated with a decrease of elastic wave velocities and an increase of permeability, and no secondary creep is observed. In the ductile domain, the primary creep

  20. Accelerated characterization for long-term creep behavior of polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rongguo; Chen, Chaozhong; Li, Qifu; Luo, Xiyan

    2008-11-01

    Based on the observation that high stress results in increasing creep rate of polymeric material, which is analogous to the time-temperature equivalence, where high temperature accelerates the process of creep or relaxation of polymer, the time-stress equivalence is investigated. The changes of intrinsic time in polymer induced by temperature and stress are studied using the free volume theory, and a clock model based on the time-temperature and time-stress equivalence is constructed to predict the long-term creep behavior of polymer. Polypropylene is used for this work. The specimens with shape of dumbbell are formed via injection molding. The short-term creep tests under various stress levels are carried out at ambient temperature. The creep strains of specimens are modeled according to the concept of time-stress equivalence, and the corresponding stress shift factors are calculated. A master creep curve is built by the clock model. The result indicates that the time-stress superposition principle provides an accelerated characterization method in the laboratory. Finally, the time-dependent axial elongations at sustained stress levels, whose values are close to the tensile strength of polypropylene, are measured. The three phases of creep, i.e., the transient, steady state and accelerated creep phases, are studied, and the application and limitation of the time-stress superposition principle are discussed.

  1. Analysis of available creep and creep-rupture data for commercially heat-treated alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1980-03-01

    The Ni-Cr-Fe-Nb alloy 718 is a widely used material in elevated- temperature applications. Currently, it is approved by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code only as a bolting material for elevated-temperature nuclear service. This report presents analyses of available creep and creep-rupture data for commercially heat-treated alloy 718 toward the development of allowable stress levels for this material in general elevated-temperature nuclear service. Available data came from 14 heats of bar, plate, and forging material over the temperature range from 538 to 704{degrees}C. The longest rupture time encompassed by the data was almost 87,000 h. Generalized regression analyses were performed to yield an analytical expression for rupture life as a function of stress and temperature. Heat-to-heat variations were accounted for by lot-centering'' the data. Effects of different solution heat treatment temperatures (T{sub s}) were accounted for by normalizing the creep stresses to the data for T{sub s} = 954{degrees}C. Thus, the results are strictly applicable only for material with this solution treatment. Time and strain to tertiary creep were predicted as functions of rupture life. Creep strain-time data were represented by normalization to the time and strain to tertiary creep and development of master creep curves.'' The results allow estimation of time-dependent allowable stress per American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code Class N-47, and the creep strain-time relationships can be used to develop isochronous stress-strain curves. 29 refs., 44 figs., 14 tabs.

  2. Time-dependent deformation of gas shales - role of rock framework versus reservoir fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, Sander; Zoback, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operations are generally performed to achieve a fast, drastic increase of permeability and production rates. Although modeling of the underlying short-term mechanical response has proven successful via conventional geomechanical approaches, predicting long-term behavior is still challenging as the formation interacts physically and chemically with the fluids present in-situ. Recent experimental work has shown that shale samples subjected to a change in effective stress deform in a time-dependent manner ("creep"). Although the magnitude and nature of this behavior is strongly related to the composition and texture of the sample, also the choice of fluid used in the experiments affects the total strain response - strongly adsorbing fluids result in more, recoverable creep. The processes underlying time-dependent deformation of shales under in-situ stresses, and the long-term impact on reservoir performance, are at present poorly understood. In this contribution, we report triaxial mechanical tests, and theoretical/thermodynamic modeling work with the aim to identify and describe the main mechanisms that control time-dependent deformation of gas shales. In particular, we focus on the role of the shale solid framework versus the type and pressure of the present pore fluid. Our experiments were mainly performed on Eagle Ford Shale samples. The samples were subjected to cycles of loading and unloading, first in the dry state, and then again after equilibrating them with (adsorbing) CO2 and (non-adsorbing) He at fluid pressures of 4 MPa. Stresses were chosen close to those persisting under in-situ conditions. The results of our tests demonstrate that likely two main types of deformation mechanisms operate that relate to a) the presence of microfractures as a dominating feature in the solid framework of the shale, and b) the adsorbing potential of fluids present in the nanoscale voids of the shale. To explain the role of adsorption in the observed

  3. Solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using time-dependent basis functions.

    PubMed

    Varga, Kálmán

    2012-01-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved by using an explicitly time-dependent basis. This approach allows efficient reflection-free time propagation of the wave function. The applicability of the method is illustrated by solving various time-dependent problems including the calculation of the above threshold ionization of a model atom and the optical absorption spectrum of a sodium dimer. PMID:22400699

  4. Dirac equation with some time-dependent electromagnetic terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi, K.; Zarrinkamar, S.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-07-01

    We study the motion of relativistic fermions in a time-dependent electromagnetic field within the framework of Dirac equation. We consider the time-dependent scalar potential of the exponential form and the vector potential of linear form. We obtain the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues.

  5. Creep and creep rupture of laminated graphite/epoxy composites. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 1 Oct. 1979 - 30 Sep. 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, D. A.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    An incremental numerical procedure based on lamination theory is developed to predict creep and creep rupture of general laminates. Existing unidirectional creep compliance and delayed failure data is used to develop analytical models for lamina response. The compliance model is based on a procedure proposed by Findley which incorporates the power law for creep into a nonlinear constitutive relationship. The matrix octahedral shear stress is assumed to control the stress interaction effect. A modified superposition principle is used to account for the varying stress level effect on the creep strain. The lamina failure model is based on a modification of the Tsai-Hill theory which includes the time dependent creep rupture strength. A linear cumulative damage law is used to monitor the remaining lifetime in each ply.

  6. Microstructural indicators of transition mechanisms in time-dependent fatigue crack growth in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, Ann E.

    Gas turbine engines are an important part of power generation in modern society, especially in the field of aerospace. Aerospace engines are design to last approximately 30 years and the engine components must be designed to survive for the life of the engine or to be replaced at regular intervals to ensure consumer safety. Fatigue crack growth analysis is a vital component of design for an aerospace component. Crack growth modeling and design methods date back to an origin around 1950 with a high rate of accuracy. The new generation of aerospace engines is designed to be efficient as possible and require higher operating temperatures than ever seen before in previous generations. These higher temperatures place more stringent requirements on the material crack growth performance under creep and time dependent conditions. Typically the types of components which are subject to these requirements are rotating disk components which are made from advanced materials such as nickel base superalloys. Traditionally crack growth models have looked at high temperature crack growth purely as a function of temperature and assumed that all crack growth was either controlled by a cycle dependent or time dependent mechanism. This new analysis is trying to evaluate the transition between cycle-dependent and time-dependent mechanism and the microstructural markers that characterize this transitional behavior. The physical indications include both the fracture surface morphology as well as the shape of the crack front. The research will evaluate whether crack tunneling occurs and whether it consistently predicts a transition from cycle-dependent crack growth to time-dependent crack growth. The study is part of a larger research program trying to include the effects of geometry, mission profile and environmental effects, in addition to temperature effects, as a part of the overall crack growth system. The outcome will provide evidence for various transition types and correlate those

  7. Studies of time dependence of fields in TEVATRON superconducting dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hanft, R.W.; Brown, B.C.; Herrup, D.A.; Lamm, M.J.; McInturff, A.D.; Syphers, M.J.

    1988-08-22

    The time variation in the magnetic field of a model Tevatron dipole magnet at constant excitation current has been studied. Variations in symmetry allowed harmonic components over long time ranges show a log t behavior indicative of ''flux creep.'' Both short time range and long time range behavior depend in a detailed way on the excitation history. Similar effects are seen in the remnant fields present in full-scale Tevatron dipoles following current ramping. Both magnitudes and time dependences are observed to depend on details for the ramps, such as ramp rate, flattop duration, and number of ramps. In a few magnets, variations are also seen in symmetry unallowed harmonics. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  8. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Adam J.; Lee, John C.

    2016-02-01

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  9. Application Of Elastic Perfectly Plastic Cyclic Analysis To Assessment Of Creep Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Peter; Jetter, Robert I; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A cyclic elastic-perfectly plastic analysis method is proposed which provides a conservative estimate to cyclic creep strain accumulation within the ratchet boundary. The method is to check for ratcheting based on an elastic-perfectly material with a temperature-dependent pseudo yield stress defined by temperature, time and stress to give 1% creep strain. It does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. This simplified method could be used as a rapid screening calculation, with full time-dependent creep analysis used if necessary.

  10. Vectran Fiber Time-Dependent Behavior and Additional Static Loading Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fette, Russell B.; Sovinski, Marjorie F.

    2004-01-01

    Vectran HS appears from literature and testing to date to be an ideal upgrade from Kevlar braided cords for many long-term, static-loading applications such as tie-downs on solar arrays. Vectran is a liquid crystalline polymer and exhibits excellent tensile properties. The material has been touted as a zero creep product. Testing discussed in this report does not support this statement, though the creep is on the order of four times slower than with similar Kevlar 49 products. Previous work with Kevlar and new analysis of Vectran testing has led to a simple predictive model for Vectran at ambient conditions. The mean coefficient of thermal expansion (negative in this case) is similar to Kevlar 49, but is not linear. A positive transition in the curve occurs near 100 C. Out-gassing tests show that the material performs well within parameters for most space flight applications. Vectran also offers increased abrasion resistance, minimal moisture regain, and similar UV degradation. The effects of material construction appear to have a dramatic effect in stress relaxation for braided Vectran. To achieve the improved relaxation rate, upgrades must also examine alternate construction or preconditioning methods. This report recommends Vectran HS as a greatly improved replacement material for applications where time-dependent relaxation is a major factor.

  11. Swelling and Time-Dependent Crack Growth in SiC/SiC Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.

    2007-08-01

    SiC continuous-fiber composites are considered for nuclear applications but concern has centered on the differential materials response of the fiber, fiber/matrix interphase (fiber coating), and matrix. In our study, a continuous-fiber composite is simulated by four concentric cylinders to explore the magnitude of radial stresses when irradiation swelling of the various components is incorporated. The outputs of this model were input into a time-dependent crack-bridging model to predict crack growth rates in an environment where thermal and irradiation creep of SiC-based fibers is considered. Under assumed Coulomb friction the fiber-matrix sliding stress decreases with increasing dose and then increases once the pyrocarbon swelling reaches “turn around.” This causes an initial increase in crack growth rate and higher stresses in crack bridging fibers at higher doses. An assumed irradiation creep law for fine-grained SiC fibers is shown to dominate the radiation response.

  12. Time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen; Libisch, Florian; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-03-28

    We introduce a time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory (TD-PFET), in which atoms are grouped into subsystems. In TD-PFET, subsystems can be propagated by different suitable time-dependent quantum mechanical methods and their interactions can be treated in a seamless, first-principles manner. TD-PFET is formulated based on the time-dependent quantum mechanics variational principle. The action of the total quantum system is written as a functional of the time-dependent embedding potential, i.e., a potential-functional formulation. By exploiting the Runge-Gross theorem, we prove the uniqueness of the time-dependent embedding potential under the constraint that all subsystems share a common embedding potential. We derive the integral equation that such an embedding potential needs to satisfy. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate TD-PFET for a Na{sub 4} cluster, in which each Na atom is treated as one subsystem and propagated by time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TDDFT) using the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Our results agree well with a direct TDDFT calculation on the whole Na{sub 4} cluster using ALDA. We envision that TD-PFET will ultimately be useful for studying ultrafast quantum dynamics in condensed matter, where key regions are solved by highly accurate time-dependent quantum mechanics methods, and unimportant regions are solved by faster, less accurate methods.

  13. Synchronization of rigid microrotors by time-dependent hydrodynamic interactions.

    PubMed

    Theers, Mario; Winkler, Roland G

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the emergent dynamical behavior of hydrodynamically coupled microrotors. The two rotors are confined in a plane and move along circles driven by active forces. The three-dimensional fluid is described by the linearized, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations instead of the usually adopted Stokes equations. We demonstrate that time-dependent hydrodynamic interactions lead to synchronization of the rotational motion. The time dependence of the phase difference between the rotors is determined and synchronization times are extracted for various external torques and rotor separations by solving the underlaying integrodifferential equations numerically. In addition, an analytical expression is provided for the synchronization time. PMID:24032929

  14. Time-dependent behavior of positrons in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Wadehra, J.M. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Drallos, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium behaviors of positrons in several noble gases are reviewed. Our novel procedure for obtaining the time-dependent behavior of various swarm parameters -- such as the positron drift velocity, average positron energy, positron annihilation rate (or equivalently Z{sub eff}) etc. -- for positrons in pure ambient gases subjected to external electrostatic fields is described. Summaries of time-dependent as well as electric field-dependent results for positron swarms in various noble gases are presented. New time-dependent results for positron swarms in neon are also described in detail. 36 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Time-dependent manipulation of ultracold ion bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijnders, M. P.; Debernardi, N.; van der Geer, S. B.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.; Luiten, O. J.

    2011-02-01

    The combination of an ultracold ion source based on photoionization of a laser-cooled gas and time-dependent acceleration fields enables precise manipulation of ion beams. We demonstrate reduction in the longitudinal energy spread and transverse (de)focusing of the beam by applying time-dependent acceleration voltages. In addition, we show how time-dependent acceleration fields can be used to control both the sign and strength of the spherical aberrations. The experimental results are in close agreement with detailed charged particle tracking simulations and can be explained in terms of a simple analytical model.

  16. Review of time-dependent fatigue behavior and life prediction for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Majumdar, S.

    1982-01-01

    Available data on creep-fatigue life and fracture behavior of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel are reviewed. Whereas creep-fatigue interaction is important for Type 304 stainless steel, oxidation effects appear to dominate the time-dependent fatigue behavior of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Four of the currently available predictive methods - the Linear Damage Rule, Frequency Separation Equation, Strain Range Partitioning Equation, and Damage Rate Equation - are evaluated for their predictive capability. Variations in the parameters for the various predictive methods with temperature, heat of material, heat treatment, and environment are investigated. Relative trends in the lives predicted by the various methods as functions of test duration, waveshape, etc., are discussed. The predictive methods will need modification in order to account for oxidation and aging effects in the 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Future tests that will emphasize the difference between the various predictive methods are proposed.

  17. Creep and Stress-strain Behavior After Creep from Sic Fiber Reinforced, Melt-infiltrated Sic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (Hi-Nicalon Type S, Nippon Carbon) reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites containing melt-infiltrated Si were subjected to creep at 1315 C for a number of different stress conditions, This study is aimed at understanding the time-dependent creep behavior of CMCs for desired use-conditions, and also more importantly, how the stress-strain response changes as a result of the time-temperature-stress history of the crept material. For the specimens that did not rupture, fast fracture experiments were performed at 1315 C or at room temperature immediately following tensile creep. In many cases, the stress-strain response and the resulting matrix cracking stress of the composite change due to stress-redistribution between composite constituents during tensile creep. The paper will discuss these results and its implications on applications of these materials for turbine engine components.

  18. Creep crack growth behavior of aluminum alloy 2519. Part 1: Experimental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, B.C.; Saxena, A.; McDowell, D.L.; Hall, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The discipline of time-dependent fracture mechanics has traditionally focused on the creep crack growth behavior of high-temperature materials that display creep-ductile behavior, such as stainless steels and chromium-molybdenum steels. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys, however, have been developed that exhibit creep-brittle behavior; in this case, the creep crack growth rate correlates with the stress intensity factor, K. The fracture characteristics of aluminum alloy 2519-T87 were studied at 135 C, and the creep and creep crack growth behavior were characterized utilizing experimental and numerical methods. The strain to failure for creep deformation specimens was limited to only 1.2 to 2.0%. Creep crack growth tests revealed a unique correlation between the creep crack growth rate and K, a result consistent with creep-brittle behavior. No experimental correlation was found between the creep crack growth rate and the C{sub t} parameter. Microscopy of fracture surfaces revealed distinct regions of intergranular and transgranular fracture, and the transition between the fracture regions was found to occur at a critical K-level. Experimental results also appeared to show that initiation of crack growth (incubation) is controlled by the accumulation of a critical amount of damage ahead of the crack tip and that a correlation exists between the incubation time and K. Total time to failure is viewed as a summation of the incubation period and the crack growth period, and the design importance of incubation time is discussed.

  19. Functional differentiability in time-dependent quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Penz, Markus Ruggenthaler, Michael

    2015-03-28

    In this work, we investigate the functional differentiability of the time-dependent many-body wave function and of derived quantities with respect to time-dependent potentials. For properly chosen Banach spaces of potentials and wave functions, Fréchet differentiability is proven. From this follows an estimate for the difference of two solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation that evolve under the influence of different potentials. Such results can be applied directly to the one-particle density and to bounded operators, and present a rigorous formulation of non-equilibrium linear-response theory where the usual Lehmann representation of the linear-response kernel is not valid. Further, the Fréchet differentiability of the wave function provides a new route towards proving basic properties of time-dependent density-functional theory.

  20. Time-dependent edge notch sensitivity of Inconel 718 sheet in the temperature range 900 to 1400 F (482 to 760 C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Time-dependent notch sensitivity of Inconel 718 sheet occurred at 900 to 1200 F when notched specimens were loaded below the yield strength, and tests on smooth specimens showed that small amounts of creep consumed large fractions of creep-rupture life. The severity of the notch sensitivity decreased with decreasing solution treatment temperature and increasing time and/or temperature of the aging treatment. Elimination of the notch sensitivity was correlated with a change in the dislocation mechanism from shearing to by-passing precipitate particles.

  1. Cosmological evolution of cosmic strings with time-dependent tension

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2005-08-15

    We discuss the cosmological evolution of cosmic strings with time-dependent tension. We show that, in the case that the tension changes as a power of time, the cosmic string network obeys the scaling solution: the characteristic scale of the string network grows with the time. But due to the time dependence of the tension, the ratio of the energy density of infinite strings to that of the background universe is not necessarily constant.

  2. Time-dependent {P} {T}-symmetric quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiangbin; Wang, Qing-hai

    2013-12-01

    The parity-time-reversal ( {P} {T})-symmetric quantum mechanics (QM) (PTQM) has developed into a noteworthy area of research. However, to date, most known studies of PTQM focused on the spectral properties of non-Hermitian Hamiltonian operators. In this work, we propose an axiom in PTQM in order to study general time-dependent problems in PTQM, e.g., those with a time-dependent {P} {T}-symmetric Hamiltonian and with a time-dependent metric. We illuminate our proposal by examining a proper mapping from a time-dependent Schrödinger-like equation of motion for PTQM to the familiar time-dependent Schrödinger equation in conventional QM. The rich structure of the proper mapping hints that time-dependent PTQM can be a fruitful extension of conventional QM. Under our proposed framework, we further study in detail the Berry-phase generation in a class of {P} {T}-symmetric two-level systems. It is found that a closed path in the parameter space of PTQM is often associated with an open path in a properly mapped problem in conventional QM. In one interesting case, we further interpret the Berry phase as the flux of a continuously tunable fictitious magnetic monopole, thus highlighting the difference between PTQM and conventional QM despite the existence of a proper mapping between them.

  3. Modeling creep behavior in a directionally solidified nickel base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, Alejandro R.

    deformation over a wide range of stress, time and temperature conditions. The Monkman-Grant relationship, the Larson-Miller parameter and the theta projection model have been successfully used to predict the time to rupture for different orientation-temperature-stress conditions. The time dependent fracture mechanics approach is used to model creep crack growth behavior. The creep crack grows faster at higher temperatures and in the LT orientation, but the crack advance rate is uniquely characterized by Ct independent of the orientation and temperature.

  4. Numerical solution of the two-dimensional time-dependent incompressible Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitfield, David L.; Taylor, Lafayette K.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving the artificial compressibility form of the 2D time-dependent incompressible Euler equations. The approach is based on using an approximate Riemann solver for the cell face numerical flux of a finite volume discretization. Characteristic variable boundary conditions are developed and presented for all boundaries and in-flow out-flow situations. The system of algebraic equations is solved using the discretized Newton-relaxation (DNR) implicit method. Numerical results are presented for both steady and unsteady flow.

  5. A two-dimensional, time-dependent, near-earth magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, Elden; Puetter, Richard; Rosenberg, Marlene

    1991-01-01

    A kinetic approach is presented for obtaining slowly time-dependent, self-consistent plasma, and magnetic field configurations for this region, using anisotropic particle distributions. At present, a 2D configuration is used. The time variation of the plasma/field configuration is assumed to be driven by a slowly varying, externally imposed electric field (representing, for example, a change in solar wind conditions). The numerical approach involves solving a 2D nonlinear Poisson equation for the magnetic vector potential at each time step. The local current density is calculated from particle velocity distributions under the assumption of adiabatic particle motion. The obtained equations of state are compared with those of double-adiabatic theory. Numerical examples of self-consistent responses of the near-earth plasma and field to an externally imposed electric field pulse are presented.

  6. Modeling the time-dependent flexural response of wood-plastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Scott E.

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs) are moisture sensitive bimodal anisotropic nonlinear viscoelastic materials, with time and temperature having the greatest effect on mechanical behavior. As WPC producers seek to manufacture structural bending members, such as beams and joists, it is important that the material's time and temperature-dependent mechanical behavior be understood and characterized. The complicated time-dependent behavior means that WPC bending deflections cannot be adequately predicted for even practical design purposes using simple linear-elastic models. Instead, mechanics-based models that incorporate the observed time-dependent and nonlinear responses are necessary. This dissertation presents an experimental and modeling program used to test and characterize the axial and shear behaviors of seven different WPC products (primarily polyethylene and polypropylene) subjected to both quasi-static and creep loading at multiple temperatures. These data were used to develop a mechanics based model that can predict bending deflections of complex sections at any time or temperature. Additionally, a practical design method and standardized test procedures were created for use in typical long-term bending situations. A mechanical model for WPCs must combine time-dependent material characterization with a tool that can simulate mode dependence, temperature dependence, changing neutral axis location, and nonlinear axial stress distributions that vary over the length of a member and evolve with time. Finite-element (FE) modeling was chosen as the most practical way to satisfy these requirements. The model developed in this study uses an FE model with a custom-designed material model. Bending deflection predictions from the model were compared to experimental testing and the model showed some success despite the difficulties created by the material variability. The practical method created for designing WPC structural bending members utilizes four material constants

  7. Time-dependent evolution of rock slopes by a multi-modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzano, F.; Della Seta, M.; Martino, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a multi-modelling approach that incorporates contributions from morpho-evolutionary modelling, detailed engineering-geological modelling and time-dependent stress-strain numerical modelling to analyse the rheological evolution of a river valley slope over approximately 102 kyr. The slope is located in a transient, tectonically active landscape in southwestern Tyrrhenian Calabria (Italy), where gravitational processes drive failures in rock slopes. Constraints on the valley profile development were provided by a morpho-evolutionary model based on the correlation of marine and river strath terraces. Rock mass classes were identified through geomechanical parameters that were derived from engineering-geological surveys and outputs of a multi-sensor slope monitoring system. The rock mass classes were associated to lithotechnical units to obtain a high-resolution engineering-geological model along a cross section of the valley. Time-dependent stress-strain numerical modelling reproduced the main morpho-evolutionary stages of the valley slopes. The findings demonstrate that a complex combination of eustatism, uplift and Mass Rock Creep (MRC) deformations can lead to first-time failures of rock slopes when unstable conditions are encountered up to the generation of stress-controlled shear zones. The multi-modelling approach enabled us to determine that such complex combinations may have been sufficient for the first-time failure of the S. Giovanni slope at approximately 140 ka (MIS 7), even without invoking any trigger. Conversely, further reactivations of the landslide must be related to triggers such as earthquakes, rainfall and anthropogenic activities. This failure involved a portion of the slope where a plasticity zone resulted from mass rock creep that evolved with a maximum strain rate of 40% per thousand years, after the formation of a river strath terrace. This study demonstrates that the multi-modelling approach presented herein is a useful

  8. Time-dependent Model of Aseismic slip on the Central San Andreas Fault from InSAR Time Series and Repeating Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshmanesh, M.; Shirzaei, M.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Central segment of the San Andreas Fault (CSAF) is characterized by a nearly continuous right-lateral aseismic slip. Geodetic observations of surface deformation along CSAF indicate interseismic strain accumulation with a rate of about 10 mm/yr. The creep rates obtained using Characteristic Repeating Earthquakes (CRE) show pulses of creep affecting most of the CSAF, suggesting spatiotemporal variability of seismic hazard. Therefore, a high resolution time-dependent model of creep on the CSAF can greatly enhance the knowledge of aseismic and seismic faulting processes as well as the seismic hazard estimates. We used InSAR surface deformation time series in conjunction with observations of fault creep obtained from CRE. The SAR data set includes C-band scenes acquired by the ERS-2 and Envisat during period 2003-2011, comprising 46 images, resulted in about 150 interferograms. Within the same observation period, the CRE data set includes more than 630 repeating sequences. Understanding the spatiotemporal distribution of creep, we implement a time-dependent modeling scheme, allowing us to jointly invert the surface deformation time series and CRE estimates of the fault creep.The distribution of obtained creep rate on the CSAF includes features similar to that reported in earlier works. The map of long-term slip rate reveals that fastest creep rate occurs at the central part of CSAF with an average rate of 27 mm/yr, which is less than the long-term shearing rate. Moving northwestward, the slip rate gradually drops to less than half of its long-term rate. The spatiotemporal map of the creep includes unique features such as afterslip due to the 2004 Parkfield earthquake affecting the southeastern part of the CSAF and the clear evidence of creep pulsing along strike and depth of the CSAF with a period of 1.5 to 2 years. Considering 34.5 mm/yr as the long-term shearing rate, the zone of afterslip is characterized by relaxation time of about 16.35 years. The moment

  9. Viscous flow within an embedded serpentine channel as a mechanism to create time-dependent deformation patterns of elastic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matia, Yoav; Gat, Amir

    2014-11-01

    We analyze the time dependent interaction between the flow-field and the elastic deformation-field of a viscous liquid within a long serpentine channel, embedded in an elastic beam. The channel is positioned asymmetrically with regard to the midplane of the elastic beam. We focus on creeping flows and small deformations of the elastic beam and obtain, in leading order, a diffusion equation governing the pressure-field within the serpentine channel. The deformation of the beam is then related to the propagation of pressure within the channel. We thus obtain a viscous-elastic equation governing the deformation of the beam due to the viscous flow within the serpentine channel. This equation enables to design complex time-dependent deformation patterns of beams with embedded channel networks, relevant to soft-robotic applications. Our theoretical results were illustrated and verified using numerical computations. Israel Science Foundation 818/13.

  10. Numerical modeling of shallow fault creep triggered by nearby earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapha Mw 7.2 earthquake is the largest earthquake that strikes southern California in the last 18 years. It has triggered shallow fault creep on many faults in Salton Trough, Southern California, making it at least the 8th time in the last 42 years that a local or regional earthquake has done so. However, the triggering mechanism of fault creep and its implications to seismic hazard and fault mechanics is still poorly understood. For example, what determines the relative importance of static triggering and dynamic triggering of fault creep? What can we learn about the local frictional properties and normal stress from the triggering of fault creep? To understand the triggering mechanism and constrain fault frictional properties, we simulate the triggered fault creep on the Superstition Hills Fault (SHF), Salton Trough, Southern California. We use realistic static and dynamic shaking due to nearby earthquakes as stress perturbations to a 2D (in a 3D medium) planar fault model with rate-and-state frictional property variations both in depth and along strike. Unlike many previous studies, we focus on the simulation of triggered shallow fault creep instead of earthquakes. Our fault model can reproduce the triggering process, by static, dynamic , and combined stress perturbation. Preliminary results show that the magnitude of perturbation relative to the original stress level is an important parameter. In the static case, perturbation of 1% of normal stress trigger delayed fault creep whereas 10% of normal stress generate instantaneous creep. In the dynamic case, a change of two times in magnitude of perturbation can result in difference of triggered creep in several orders of magnitude. We explore combined triggering with different ratio of static and dynamic perturbation. The timing of triggering in a earthquake cycle is also important. With measurements on triggered creep on the SHF, we constrain local stress level and frictional parameters, which

  11. Information theories for time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Daeyeoul; Maamache, Mustapha; Menouar, Salah; Nahm, In Hyun

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Information theories for the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator based on invariant operator method. > Time dependence of entropies and entropic uncertainty relation. > Characteristics of Shannon information and Fisher information. > Application of information theories to particular systems that have time-dependent behavior. - Abstract: Information theories for the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator are described on the basis of invariant operator method. We obtained entropic uncertainty relation of the system and discussed whether it is always larger than or equal to the physically allowed minimum value. Shannon information and Fisher information are derived by means of density operator that satisfies Liouville-von Neumann equation and their characteristics are investigated. Shannon information is independent of time, but Fisher information is explicitly dependent on time as the time functions of the Hamiltonian vary. We can regard that the Fisher information is a local measure since its time behavior is largely affected by local arrangements of the density, whilst the Shannon information plays the role of a global measure of the spreading of density. To promote the understanding, our theory is applied to special systems, the so-called quantum oscillator with time-dependent frequency and strongly pulsating mass system.

  12. Irradiation Induced Creep of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Murty, Prof K.L.; Eapen, Dr. Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The current status of graphite irradiation induced creep strain prediction is reviewed and the major creep models are described. The ability of the models to quantitatively predict the irradiation induced creep strain of graphite is reported. Potential mechanisms of in-crystal creep are reviewed as are mechanisms of pore generation under stress. The case for further experimental work is made and the need for improved creep models across multi-scales is highlighted.

  13. The computational foundations of time dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, James

    2014-03-01

    The mathematical foundations of TDDFT are established through the formal existence of a fictitious non-interacting system (known as the Kohn-Sham system), which can reproduce the one-electron reduced probability density of the actual system. We build upon these works and show that on the interior of the domain of existence, the Kohn-Sham system can be efficiently obtained given the time-dependent density. Since a quantum computer can efficiently produce such time-dependent densities, we present a polynomial time quantum algorithm to generate the time-dependent Kohn-Sham potential with controllable error bounds. Further, we find that systems do not immediately become non-representable but rather become ill-representable as one approaches this boundary. A representability parameter is defined in our work which quantifies the distance to the boundary of representability and the computational difficulty of finding the Kohn-Sham system.

  14. Computational complexity of time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, J. D.; Yung, M.-H.; Tempel, D. G.; Boixo, S.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.

    2014-08-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is rapidly emerging as a premier method for solving dynamical many-body problems in physics and chemistry. The mathematical foundations of TDDFT are established through the formal existence of a fictitious non-interacting system (known as the Kohn-Sham system), which can reproduce the one-electron reduced probability density of the actual system. We build upon these works and show that on the interior of the domain of existence, the Kohn-Sham system can be efficiently obtained given the time-dependent density. We introduce a V-representability parameter which diverges at the boundary of the existence domain and serves to quantify the numerical difficulty of constructing the Kohn-Sham potential. For bounded values of V-representability, we present a polynomial time quantum algorithm to generate the time-dependent Kohn-Sham potential with controllable error bounds.

  15. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  16. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  17. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  18. Handling Time-dependent Variables: Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Frencken, Jos F; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-06-15

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods, antibiotics constitute time-dependent exposures. Cox regression models are suited for determining such associations. After explaining the concepts of hazard, hazard ratio, and proportional hazards, the effects of treating antibiotic exposure as fixed or time-dependent variables are illustrated and discussed. Wider acceptance of these techniques will improve quantification of the effects of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance development and provide better evidence for guideline recommendations. PMID:27025824

  19. Time Dependence of Joint Entropy of Oscillating Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Özgür; Aktürk, Ethem; Sever, Ramazan

    2008-12-01

    The time dependent entropy (or Leipnik’s entropy) of harmonic and damped harmonic oscillator systems is studied by using time dependent wave function obtained by the Feynman path integral method. The Leipnik entropy and its envelope change as a function of time, angular frequency and damping factor. Our results for simple harmonic oscillator are in agreement with the literature. However, the joint entropy of damped harmonic oscillator shows remarkable discontinuity with time for certain values of damping factor. The envelope of the joint entropy curve increases with time monotonically. These results show the general properties of the envelope of the joint entropy curve for quantum systems.

  20. Choice of Variables and Preconditioning for Time Dependent Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, Eli; Vatsa, Verr N.

    2003-01-01

    We consider the use of low speed preconditioning for time dependent problems. These are solved using a dual time step approach. We consider the effect of this dual time step on the parameter of the low speed preconditioning. In addition, we compare the use of two sets of variables, conservation and primitive variables, to solve the system. We show the effect of these choices on both the convergence to a steady state and the accuracy of the numerical solutions for low Mach number steady state and time dependent flows.

  1. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-15

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  2. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-26

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. The stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  3. Features of the low-temperature creep of a Nb-Ti alloy after large plastic deformations at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. K.; Volchok, O. I.; Karaseva, E. V.; Starodubov, Ya. D.

    2004-04-01

    The low-temperature (77 K) creep and the corresponding changes in the resistivity of a niobium-titanium alloy subjected to plastic deformation by drawing at 77 K are investigated. It is shown that after large plastic deformations (ɛ>99%) one observes anomalies of the low-temperature creep which do not appear in tests of samples subjected to low and medium deformations. The creep rate in the transient stage is significantly higher than would follow from the classical ideas about the mechanisms of low-temperature creep (logarithmic law), and the time dependence of the creep deformations is described by a power law, which corresponds to recovery creep. In the creep process oscillations appear on the resistivity curves; these are especially pronounced after drawing in liquid nitrogen. Possible causes of the observed effects are discussed.

  4. Primary creep of Ni{sub 3}(Al, Ta) single crystals at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Uchic, M.D.; Nix, W.D.

    1997-12-31

    This study examines the time-dependent deformation of Ni{sub 3}(Al, Ta) at room temperature. Tension creep experiments have been performed on single crystals with one [111]<101> slip system active at the start of the test, where the applied stress ranged from 66.4 MPa (the measured 0.01% flow stress) to 143 MPa (which produced approximately 9% plastic strain). All creep curves displayed primary creep leading to eventual exhaustion, where the measured creep strain declined at a rate faster than predicted for logarithmic creep. However, no correlation between the applied stress and the form of the declining creep rate can be made at this time. Many creep curves can be obtained from one sample, as the creep curves from both virgin samples and samples with prior deformation history (at the same test stress) were indistinguishable. At the beginning of an incremental creep test, where the stress is increased by a small amount to reinitiate plastic flow in an exhausted sample, a significant retardation of the plastic response of the sample occurred when the stress increment was below 4 MPa. Preliminary TEM studies of a sample strained to 6% suggest that room temperature creep tests may not be ideal for examining the flow of Anti-Phase-Boundary (APB) dissociated dislocations.

  5. Time-dependent bridging and life prediction of SiC/SiC in a hypothetical fusion environment

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, C.H. Jr.; Lewinsohn, C.A.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1996-10-01

    Growth of subcritical cracks in SiC/SiC composites of CG-Nicalon fibers with a {approximately}1 {mu}m C-interphase has been measured on a related Basic Energy Sciences program using environments of purified argon and mixtures of argon and oxygen at 1073K to 1373K. Companion thermo-gravimetric (TGA) testing measured mass loss in identical environments. The TGA mass loss was from C-interphase oxidation to CO and CO{sub 2}, which was undetectable in argon and linear with oxygen concentration in argon-oxygen mixtures, and was converted into an interphase linear recession rate. Crack growth in pure argon indicated that fiber creep was causing time-dependent crack bridging to occur, while crack growth in argon-oxygen mixtures indicated that time-dependent C-interphase recession was also causing time-dependent bridging with different kinetics. A model of time-dependent bridging was used to compute crack growth rates in argon and in argon-oxygen mixtures and gave an estimate of useable life of about 230 days at 1073K in a He + 1.01 Pa O{sub 2} (10 ppm) environment.

  6. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  7. Student Understanding of Time Dependence in Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emigh, Paul J.; Passante, Gina; Shaffer, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The time evolution of quantum states is arguably one of the more difficult ideas in quantum mechanics. In this article, we report on results from an investigation of student understanding of this topic after lecture instruction. We demonstrate specific problems that students have in applying time dependence to quantum systems and in recognizing…

  8. Time dependent solution for acceleration of tau-leaping

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Jin; Wu, Sheng; Petzold, Linda R.

    2013-02-15

    The tau-leaping method is often effective for speeding up discrete stochastic simulation of chemically reacting systems. However, when fast reactions are involved, the speed-up for this method can be quite limited. One way to address this is to apply a stochastic quasi-steady state assumption. However we must be careful when using this assumption. If the fast subsystem cannot reach a steady distribution fast enough, the quasi-steady-state assumption will propagate error into the simulation. To avoid these errors, we propose to use the time dependent solution rather than the quasi-steady-state. Generally speaking, the time dependent solution is not easy to derive for an arbitrary network. However, for some common motifs we do have time dependent solutions. We derive the time dependent solutions for these motifs, and then show how they can be used with tau-leaping to achieve substantial speed-ups, including for a realistic model of blood coagulation. Although the method is complicated, we have automated it.

  9. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  10. Pedagogical Aspects of Time-Dependent Rotation Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leubner, C.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the reformulation of a classical magnetic moment interacting with various magnetic field configurations in terms of coordinate-free, time-dependent rotation operators. This approach provides useful exercises for the manipulation of three-dimensional rotation operators and provides examples for a number of quantum-mechanics related…

  11. Spike-timing-dependent BDNF secretion and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Park, Hyungju; Poo, Mu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In acute hippocampal slices, we found that the presence of extracellular brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for the induction of spike-timing-dependent long-term potentiation (tLTP). To determine whether BDNF could be secreted from postsynaptic dendrites in a spike-timing-dependent manner, we used a reduced system of dissociated hippocampal neurons in culture. Repetitive pairing of iontophoretically applied glutamate pulses at the dendrite with neuronal spikes could induce persistent alterations of glutamate-induced responses at the same dendritic site in a manner that mimics spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP)-the glutamate-induced responses were potentiated and depressed when the glutamate pulses were applied 20 ms before and after neuronal spiking, respectively. By monitoring changes in the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence at the dendrite of hippocampal neurons expressing GFP-tagged BDNF, we found that pairing of iontophoretic glutamate pulses with neuronal spiking resulted in BDNF secretion from the dendrite at the iontophoretic site only when the glutamate pulses were applied within a time window of approximately 40 ms prior to neuronal spiking, consistent with the timing requirement of synaptic potentiation via STDP. Thus, BDNF is required for tLTP and BDNF secretion could be triggered in a spike-timing-dependent manner from the postsynaptic dendrite. PMID:24298135

  12. Dynamic structure evolution of time-dependent network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhou, Yadong; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dai; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we research the long-voided problem of formulating the time-dependent network structure evolution scheme, it focus not only on finding new emerging vertices in evolving communities and new emerging communities over the specified time range but also formulating the complex network structure evolution schematic. Previous approaches basically applied to community detection on time static networks and thus failed to consider the potentially crucial and useful information latently embedded in the dynamic structure evolution process of time-dependent network. To address these problems and to tackle the network non-scalability dilemma, we propose the dynamic hierarchical method for detecting and revealing structure evolution schematic of the time-dependent network. In practice and specificity, we propose an explicit hierarchical network evolution uncovering algorithm framework originated from and widely expanded from time-dependent and dynamic spectral optimization theory. Our method yields preferable results compared with previous approaches on a vast variety of test network data, including both real on-line networks and computer generated complex networks.

  13. Acceleration in a nonplanar time-dependent billiard.

    PubMed

    Raeisi, Sedighe; Eslami, Parvin

    2016-08-01

    We study the dynamical properties of a particle in a nonplanar square billiard. The plane of the billiard has a sinusoidal shape. We consider both the static and time-dependent plane. We study the affect of different parameters that control the geometry of the billiard in this model. We consider variations of different parameters of the model and describe how the particle trajectory is affected by these parameters. We also investigate the dynamical behavior of the system in the static condition using its reduced phase plot and show that the dynamics of the particle inside the billiard may be regular, mixed, or chaotic. Finally, the problem of the particle energy growth is studied in the billiard with the time-dependent plane. We show that when in the static case, the billiard is chaotic, then the particle energy in the time-dependent billiard grows for a small number of collisions, and then it starts to saturate. But when the dynamics of the static case is regular, then the particle average energy in the time-dependent situation stays constant. PMID:27627308

  14. Radiation and temperature effects on the time-dependent response of T300/934 graphite/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, Robert N.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1988-01-01

    A time-dependent characterization study was performed on T300/934 graphite/epoxy in a simulated space environment. Creep tests on irradiated and nonirradiated graphite/epoxy and bulk resin specimens were carried out at temperatures of 72 and 250 F. Irradiated specimens were exposed to dosages of penetrating electron radiation equal to 30 years exposure at GEO-synchronous orbit. Radiation was shown to have little effect on the creep response of both the composite and bulk resin specimens at 72 F while radiation had a significant effect at 250 F. A healing process was shown to be present in the irradiated specimens where broken bonds in the epoxy due to radiation recombined over time to form cross-links in the 934 resin structure. An analytical micromechanical model was also developed to predict the viscoelastic response of fiber reinforced composite materials. The model was shown to correlate well with experimental results for linearly viscoelastic materials with relatively small creep strains.

  15. Time dependent behavior of a graphite/thermoplastic composite and the effects of stress and physical aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Two complimentary studies were performed to determine the effects of stress and physical aging on the matrix dominated time dependent properties of IM7/8320 composite. The first of these studies, experimental in nature, used isothermal tensile creep/aging test techniques developed for polymers and adapted them for testing of the composite material. From these tests, the time dependent transverse (S22) and shear (S66) compliance's for an orthotropic plate were found from short term creep compliance measurements at constant, sub-T(sub g) temperatures. These compliance terms were shown to be affected by physical aging. Aging time shift factors and shift rates were found to be a function of temperature and applied stress. The second part of the study relied upon isothermal uniaxial tension tests of IM7/8320 to determine the effects of physical aging on the nonlinear material behavior at elevated temperature. An elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model was used to quantify the effects of aging on the rate-independent plastic and rate-dependent viscoplastic response. Sensitivity of the material constants required by the model to aging time were determined for aging times up to 65 hours. Verification of the analytical model indicated that the effects of prior aging on the nonlinear stress/strain/time data of matrix dominated laminates can be predicted.

  16. Numerical implementation of inelastic time dependent and time independent, finite strain constitutive equtions in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Key, S.W.; Krieg, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A number of complex issues are addressed which will allow the incorporation of finite strain, inelastic material behavior into the piecewise numerical construction of solutions in solid mechanics. Without recourse to extensive continuum mechanics preliminaries, an elementary time independent plasticity model, an elementary time dependent creep model, and a viscoelastic model are introduced as examples of constitutive equations which are routinely used in engineering calculations. The constitutive equations are all suitable for problems involving large deformations and finite strains. The plasticity and creep models are in rate form and use the symmetric part of the velocity gradient or the stretching to compute the co-rotational time derivative of the Cauchy stress. The viscoelastic model computes the current value of the Cauchy stress from a hereditary integral of a materially invariant form of the stretching history. The current configuration is selected for evaluation of equilibrium as opposed to either the reference configuration or the last established equilibrium configuration. The process of strain incrementation is examined in some depth and the stretching evaluated at the midinterval multiplied by the time step is identified as the appropriate finite strain increment to use with the selected form of the constitutive equations. Discussed is the conversion of rotation rates based on the spin into incremental orthogonal rotations which are then used to update stresses and state variables due to rigid body rotation during the load increment. Comments and references to the literature are directed at numerical integration of the constitutive equations with an emphasis on doing this accurately, if not exactly, for any time step and stretching. This material taken collectively provides an approach to numerical implementation which is marked by its simplicity.

  17. Rate and time dependent failure of structural adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Renieri, M. P.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Studies on two adhesives (Metlbond 1113 and 1113-2) identified as having important applications in the bonding of composite materials are presented. A testing program to ascertain stress-strain, strain-rate, time, yield, and/or failure behavior of these materials in bulk form using uniaxial tensile constant strain-rate, creep, and relaxation tests is described. The stress-strain behavior of each material is shown to be significantly rate dependent. A rate dependent stress whitening (crazing) phenomenon occurs prior to either yield or fracture. A region of linear elasticity, a region of viscoelasticity, and the onset of yielding are identified in the stress-strain behavior. The linear elastic limit and the yield point are shown to be rate dependent and agree well with an empirical equation proposed by Ludwik. A creep to failure phenomenon is shown to exist and is correlated with a delayed yield equation proposed by Crochet. Analytical predictions based on a modified Bingham model are shown to agree well with experimental stress-strain strain-rate data. Analytical predictions based on a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation are also shown for comparison purposes.

  18. Time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Lyon, J. G.; Lario, D.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results from a simulation study exploring heliospheric consequences of time-dependent changes at the Sun. We selected a 2 month period in the beginning of year 2008 that was characterized by very low solar activity. The heliosphere in the equatorial region was dominated by two coronal holes whose changing structure created temporal variations distorting the classical steady state picture of the heliosphere. We used the Air Force Data Assimilate Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model to obtain daily updated photospheric magnetograms and drive the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model of the corona. This leads to a formulation of a time-dependent boundary condition for our three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, LFM-helio, which is the heliospheric adaptation of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry MHD simulation code. The time-dependent coronal conditions were propagated throughout the inner heliosphere, and the simulation results were compared with the spacecraft located near 1 astronomical unit (AU) heliocentric distance: Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO-A and STEREO-B), and the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft that was in cruise phase measuring the heliospheric magnetic field between 0.35 and 0.6 AU. In addition, during the selected interval MESSENGER and ACE aligned radially allowing minimization of the effects of temporal variation at the Sun versus radial evolution of structures. Our simulations show that time-dependent simulationsreproduce the gross-scale structure of the heliosphere with higher fidelity, while on smaller spatial and faster time scales (e.g., 1 day) they provide important insights for interpretation of the data. The simulations suggest that moving boundaries of slow-fast wind transitions at 0.1 AU may result in the formation of inverted magnetic fields near pseudostreamers which is an intrinsically time-dependent process

  19. Boosting thermoelectric efficiency using time-dependent control

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hangbo; Thingna, Juzar; Hänggi, Peter; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric efficiency is defined as the ratio of power delivered to the load of a device to the rate of heat flow from the source. Till date, it has been studied in presence of thermodynamic constraints set by the Onsager reciprocal relation and the second law of thermodynamics that severely bottleneck the thermoelectric efficiency. In this study, we propose a pathway to bypass these constraints using a time-dependent control and present a theoretical framework to study dynamic thermoelectric transport in the far from equilibrium regime. The presence of a control yields the sought after substantial efficiency enhancement and importantly a significant amount of power supplied by the control is utilised to convert the wasted-heat energy into useful-electric energy. Our findings are robust against nonlinear interactions and suggest that external time-dependent forcing, which can be incorporated with existing devices, provides a beneficial scheme to boost thermoelectric efficiency. PMID:26464021

  20. The Time-Dependent Structure of the Electron Reconnection Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Kuznetsova, Masha; Klimas, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection is often associated with time-dependent behavior. Specifically, current layers in the diffusion region can become unstable to tearing-type instabilities on one hand, or to instabilities with current-aligned wave vectors on the other. In the former case, the growth of tearing instabilities typically leads to the production of magnetic islands, which potentially provide feedback on the reconnection process itself, as well as on the rate of reconnection. The second class of instabilities tend to modulate the current layer along the direction of the current flow, for instance generating kink-type perturbations, or smaller-scale turbulence with the potential to broaden the current layer. All of these processes contribute to rendering magnetic reconnection time-dependent. In this presentation, we will provide a summary of these effects, and a discussion of how much they contribute to the overall magnetic reconnection rate.

  1. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve.

  2. Time-dependent nonlinear cosmic ray shocks confirming abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfi, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical studies of time dependent cosmic ray shock structures in planar geometry are interesting because analytical time-independent solutions are available which include the non-linear reactions on the plasma flow. A feature of these time asymptotic solutions is that for higher Mach numbers (M approximately 5) and for a low cosmic ray upstream pressure the solution is not uniquely determined by the usual conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy. These numerical solutions clearly indicate that much work needs to be done before we understand shock acceleration as a time dependent process. The slowness of the process is possibly due to the fact that there is a diffusive flux into the downstream region in addition to the usual advective losses. Analytic investigations of thie phenomenon are required.

  3. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntz, M. Heidelberg Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  4. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  5. Polymer dynamics in time-dependent periodic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauttonen, Janne; Merikoski, Juha; Pulkkinen, Otto

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of a discrete polymer in time-dependent external potentials is studied with the master equation approach. We consider both stochastic and deterministic switching mechanisms for the potential states and give the essential equations for computing the stationary-state properties of molecules with internal structure in time-dependent periodic potentials on a lattice. As an example, we consider standard and modified Rubinstein-Duke polymers and calculate their mean drift and effective diffusion coefficient in the two-state nonsymmetric flashing potential and symmetric traveling potential. Rich nonlinear behavior of these observables is found. By varying the polymer length, we find current inversions caused by the rebound effect that is only present for molecules with internal structure. These results depend strongly on the polymer type. We also notice increased transport coherence for longer polymers.

  6. Boosting thermoelectric efficiency using time-dependent control.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hangbo; Thingna, Juzar; Hänggi, Peter; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric efficiency is defined as the ratio of power delivered to the load of a device to the rate of heat flow from the source. Till date, it has been studied in presence of thermodynamic constraints set by the Onsager reciprocal relation and the second law of thermodynamics that severely bottleneck the thermoelectric efficiency. In this study, we propose a pathway to bypass these constraints using a time-dependent control and present a theoretical framework to study dynamic thermoelectric transport in the far from equilibrium regime. The presence of a control yields the sought after substantial efficiency enhancement and importantly a significant amount of power supplied by the control is utilised to convert the wasted-heat energy into useful-electric energy. Our findings are robust against nonlinear interactions and suggest that external time-dependent forcing, which can be incorporated with existing devices, provides a beneficial scheme to boost thermoelectric efficiency. PMID:26464021

  7. A semianalytical satellite theory for weak time-dependent perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cefola, P.; Mcclain, W.; Early, L.; Green, A.

    1980-01-01

    The modifications of the semianalytical satellite theory required to include these 'weak' time dependent perturbations are described. The new formulation results in additional terms in the short periodic variations but does not change the averaged equations of motion. Thus the m monthly terms are still included in the averaged equations of motion. This contrasts with the usual approach for the strongly time dependent perturbations in which the m monthly (or m daily, if tesseral harmonics are being considered) terms would be eliminated from the averaged equations of motion and included in the short periodics computation. Numerical test results for the GPS case obtained with a numerical averaging implementation of the new theory demonstrate the accuracy improvement.

  8. Statistical time-dependent model for the interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerola, H.; Kafatos, M.; Mccray, R.

    1974-01-01

    We present models for temperature and ionization structure of low, uniform-density (approximately 0.3 per cu cm) interstellar gas in a galactic disk which is exposed to soft X rays from supernova outbursts occurring randomly in space and time. The structure was calculated by computing the time record of temperature and ionization at a given point by Monte Carlo simulation. The calculation yields probability distribution functions for ionized fraction, temperature, and their various observable moments. These time-dependent models predict a bimodal temperature distribution of the gas that agrees with various observations. Cold regions in the low-density gas may have the appearance of clouds in 21-cm absorption. The time-dependent model, in contrast to the steady-state model, predicts large fluctuations in ionization rate and the existence of cold (approximately 30 K), ionized (ionized fraction equal to about 0.1) regions.

  9. A time dependent theory of crazing behavior in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, S. S.; Hsiao, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    The development of crazing is not only a function of stress, but also a function of time. Under a simple state of tension, a craze opening displacement is closely associated with the viscoelastic behavior of the original bulk polymer medium in which individual crazes initiate and develop. Within each craze region, molecular orientation takes place when conditions permit, and a new phase of rearranged molecules governs its local behavior. Based upon a time-dependent viscoelastic two-dimensional model, using a computer program the craze opening displacement field has been calculated, time-dependent craze length was also computed by taking into consideration the molecular orientation mechanism and large deformations in the craze region. Examples are given for simple viscoelastic media with simplified stress distributions. It is interesting to find out that the occurrence of crazing may be interpreted in terms of the stability or instability of the constitutive behavior of the bulk polymer.

  10. Sublinear scaling for time-dependent stochastic density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2015-01-21

    A stochastic approach to time-dependent density functional theory is developed for computing the absorption cross section and the random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energy. The core idea of the approach involves time-propagation of a small set of stochastic orbitals which are first projected on the occupied space and then propagated in time according to the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. The evolving electron density is exactly represented when the number of random orbitals is infinite, but even a small number (≈16) of such orbitals is enough to obtain meaningful results for absorption spectrum and the RPA correlation energy per electron. We implement the approach for silicon nanocrystals using real-space grids and find that the overall scaling of the algorithm is sublinear with computational time and memory.

  11. Time-dependent buoyant puff model for explosive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kansa, E.J.

    1997-01-01

    Several models exist to predict the time dependent behavior of bouyant puffs that result from explosions. This paper presents a new model that is derived from the strong conservative form of the conservation partial differential equations that are integrated over space to yield a coupled system of time dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations. This model permits the cloud to evolve from an intial spherical shape not an ellipsoidal shape. It ignores the Boussinesq approximation, and treats the turbulence that is generated by the puff itself and the ambient atmospheric tubulence as separate mechanisms in determining the puff history. The puff cloud rise history was found to depend no only on the mass and initial temperature of the explosion, but also upon the stability conditions of the ambient atmosphere. This model was calibrated by comparison with the Roller Coaster experiments.

  12. Student understanding of time dependence in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emigh, Paul J.; Passante, Gina; Shaffer, Peter S.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] The time evolution of quantum states is arguably one of the more difficult ideas in quantum mechanics. In this article, we report on results from an investigation of student understanding of this topic after lecture instruction. We demonstrate specific problems that students have in applying time dependence to quantum systems and in recognizing the key role of the energy eigenbasis in determining the time dependence of wave functions. Through analysis of student responses to a set of four interrelated tasks, we categorize some of the difficulties that underlie common errors. The conceptual and reasoning difficulties that have been identified are illustrated through student responses to four sets of questions administered at different points in a junior-level course on quantum mechanics. Evidence is also given that the problems persist throughout undergraduate instruction and into the graduate level.

  13. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures from Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    Daren R. Norman; James L. Jones; Brandon W. Blackburn; Kevin J. Haskell; James T. Johnson; Scott M. Watson; Alan W. Hunt; Randy Spaulding; Frank Harmon

    2007-08-01

    Pulsed photonuclear interrogation environments generated by 8–24 MeV electron linac are rich with time-dependent, material-specific, radiation signatures. Nitrogen-based explosives and nuclear materials can be detected by exploiting these signatures in different delayed-time regions. Numerical and experimental results presented in this paper show the unique time and energy dependence of these signatures. It is shown that appropriate delayed-time windows are essential to acquire material-specific signatures in pulsed photonuclear assessment environments. These developments demonstrate that pulsed, high-energy, photon-inspection environments can be exploited for time-dependent, material-specific signatures through the proper operation of specialized detectors and detection methods.

  14. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures from Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    Daren R. Norman; James L. Jones; Brandon W. Blackburn; Kevin J. Haskell; James T. Johnson; Scott M. Watson; Alan W. Hunt; Randy Spaulding; Frank Harmon

    2007-08-01

    Pulsed photonuclear interrogation environments generated by 8–24 MeV electron linac are rich with time-dependent, material-specific, radiation signatures. Nitrogen-based explosives and nuclear materials can be detected by exploiting these signatures in different delayed-time regions. Numerical and experimental results presented in this paper show the unique time and energy dependence of these signatures. It is shown that appropriate delayed-time windows are essential to acquire material-specific signatures in the pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) environments. These developments demonstrate that pulsed, high-energy, photon- inspection environments can be exploited for time-dependent, material-specific signatures through the proper operation of specialized detectors and detection methods.

  15. Time-Dependent Coupled Harmonic Oscillators: Classical and Quantum Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, Diego Ximenes; Guedes, Ilde

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present the classical and quantum solutions for an arbitrary system of time-dependent coupled harmonic oscillators, where the masses (m), frequencies (ω) and coupling parameter (k) are functions of time. To obtain the classical solutions we use a coordinate and momentum transformations along with a canonical transformation to write the original Hamiltonian as the sum of two Hamiltonians of uncoupled harmonic oscillators with modified time-dependent frequencies and unitary masses. To obtain the exact quantum solutions we use a unitary transformation and the Lewis and Riesenfeld invariant method. The exact wave functions are obtained by solving the respective Milne-Pinney equation for each system. We obtain the solutions for the system with m1 = m2 = m0eγt, ω1 = ω01e-γt/2, ω2 = ω02e-γt/2 and k = k0.

  16. Time-dependent coupled harmonic oscillators: Classical and quantum solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, D. X.; Guedes, I.

    2014-08-01

    In this work we present the classical and quantum solutions for an arbitrary system of time-dependent coupled harmonic oscillators, where the masses (m), frequencies (ω) and coupling parameter (k) are functions of time. To obtain the classical solutions, we use a coordinate and momentum transformations along with a canonical transformation to write the original Hamiltonian as the sum of two Hamiltonians of uncoupled harmonic oscillators with modified time-dependent frequencies and unitary masses. To obtain the exact quantum solutions we use a unitary transformation and the Lewis and Riesenfeld (LR) invariant method. The exact wave functions are obtained by solving the respective Milne-Pinney (MP) equation for each system. We obtain the solutions for the system with m1 = m2 = m0eγt, ω1 = ω01e-γt/2, ω2 = ω02e-γt/2 and k = k0.

  17. Time-dependent response of filamentary composite spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel is modeled as a pseudoisotropic (or transversely isotropic) composite shell, with the effects of the liner and fill tubes omitted. Equations of elasticity, macromechanical and micromechanical formulations, and laminate properties are derived for the application of an internally pressured spherical composite vessel. Viscoelastic properties for the composite matrix are used to characterize time-dependent behavior. Using the maximum strain theory of failure, burst pressure and critical strain equations are formulated, solved in the Laplace domain with an associated elastic solution, and inverted back into the time domain using the method of collocation. Viscoelastic properties of HBFR-55 resin are experimentally determined and a Kevlar/HBFR-55 system is evaluated with a FORTRAN program. The computed reduction in burst pressure with respect to time indicates that the analysis employed may be used to predict the time-dependent response of a filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel.

  18. Quick Time-dependent Ionization Calculations Depending on MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengcai; Raymond, John C.; Murphy, Nicholas Arnold

    2014-06-01

    Time-dependent ionization is important in astrophysical environments where the thermodynamic time scale is shorter than ionization time scale. In this work, we report a FORTRAN program that performs fast non-equilibrium ionization calculations based on parallel computing. Using MHD simulation results, we trace the movements of plasma in a Lagrangian framework, and obtain evolutionary history of temperature and electron density. Then the time-dependent ionization equations are solved using the eigenvalue method. For any complex temperature and density histories, we introduce a advanced time-step strategy to improve the computational efficiency. Our tests show that this program has advantages of high numerical stability and high accuracy. In addition, it is also easy to integrate this solver with the other MHD routines.

  19. Time-dependent ion transport in heterogeneous permselective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Yoav; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-06-01

    The current study extends previous analytical and numerical solutions of chronopotentiometric response of one-dimensional systems consisting of three layers to the more realistic two-dimensional (2D) heterogeneous ion-permselective medium. An analytical solution for the transient concentration-polarization problem, under the local electroneutrality approximation and assumption of ideal permselectivity, was obtained using the Laplace transform and separation of variables technique. Then the 2D electric potential was obtained numerically and was compared to the full Poisson-Nernst-Planck solution. It was then shown that the resultant voltage drop across the system varies between the initial Ohmic response and that of the steady state accounting for concentration polarization. Also, the field-focusing effect in a 2D system is shown to result in a faster depletion of ions at the permselective interface.

  20. Time-dependent first-principles approaches to PV materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2013-12-10

    Computational scheme for designing photovoltaic (PV) materials is presented. First-principles electron dynamics of photo-excitation and subsequent electron-hole splitting is performed based on the time-dependent density functional theory. Photo-induced enhancement of dipole moment was observed in a polar crystal and a donor-acceptor molecular pair. These experiences will pave a way to design PV material from first-principles simulations.

  1. Shoulder pain and time dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion variability.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Chandrasekaran; Moon, Yaejin; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-07-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion places considerable repetitive mechanical strain on the upper limbs leading to shoulder injury and pain. While recent research indicates that the amount of variability in wheelchair propulsion and shoulder pain may be related. There has been minimal inquiry into the fluctuation over time (i.e. time-dependent structure) in wheelchair propulsion variability. Consequently the purpose of this investigation was to examine if the time-dependent structure in the wheelchair propulsion parameters are related to shoulder pain. 27 experienced wheelchair users manually propelled their own wheelchair fitted with a SMARTWheel on a roller at 1.1m/s for 3min. Time-dependent structure of cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in contact angle and inter push time interval was quantified using sample entropy (SampEn) and compared between the groups with/without shoulder pain using non-parametric statistics. Overall findings were, (1) variability observed in contact angle fluctuations during manual wheelchair propulsion is structured (Z=3.15;p<0.05), (2) individuals with shoulder pain exhibited higher SampEn magnitude for contact angle during wheelchair propulsion than those without pain (χ(2)(1)=6.12;p<0.05); and (3) SampEn of contact angle correlated significantly with self-reported shoulder pain (rs (WUSPI) =0.41;rs (VAS)=0.56;p<0.05). It was concluded that the time-dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion may provide novel information for tracking and monitoring shoulder pain. PMID:27134151

  2. Time-dependent global modeling of the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Lyon, J.; Arge, C. N.; Lario, D.; Linker, J.; Lionello, R.

    2015-12-01

    We present results of time-dependent modeling of the inner heliosphere using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). Two types of simulations are performed: one concentrates on the background solar wind specification, while the other deals with the propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). For simulations of the first type we coupled the LFM-helio code with the ADAPT-driven WSA model. We present some details of the coupling machinery and then simulate selected periods characterized by very low solar activity with no significant energetic particle events or CMEs. The results of the model are compared with MESSENGER, ACE, STEREO A and B spacecraft to probe both radial and temporal evolution of solar wind structure. The results indicate, in particular, the importance of time-dependent modeling for more accurate prediction of high-speed streams and heliospheric current sheet structure when the spacecraft skim its surface. We will comment on the formation of magnetic field reversals in pseudostreamer regions, which is an intrinsically time-dependent phenomenon, and on the current sheet corrugation caused by solar wind momentum shears. For the second type of time-dependent inner heliosphere simulations we have coupled LFM-helio with the MAS MHD model of the corona. We first present results of idealized coupled MAS/LFM-helio simulations with symmetric solar wind background and no rotation intended to test the interface for seamless propagation of transients from the corona into the inner heliosphere domain. We then simulate an event with a CME propagating through a realistic heliosphere background including corotating interaction regions. We show details of propagation of flux-rope CMEs through the boundary between MAS and LFM-helio and compare the results between the two codes in the heliospheric domain. The results indicate that the coupling works well, although some differences in the solutions are observed probably due to differences in numerical

  3. Gamma time-dependency in Blaxter's compartmental model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matis, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A new two-compartment model for the passage of particles through the gastro-intestinal tract of ruminants is proposed. In this model, a gamma distribution of lifetimes is introduced in the first compartment; thereby, passage from that compartment becomes time-dependent. This modification is strongly suggested by the physical alteration which certain substances, e.g. hay particles, undergo in the digestive process. The proposed model is applied to experimental data.

  4. Stochastic protein production and time-dependent current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorissen, Mieke; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2011-03-01

    Translation is the cellular process in which ribosomes make proteins from information encoded on messenger RNA. We model this process using driven lattice gases and take into account the finite lifetime of mRNA. The stochastic properties of the translation process can then be determined from the time-dependent current fluctuations of the lattice gas model. We illustrate our ideas with a totally asymmetric exclusion process with extended objects.

  5. Time-dependent induced potentials in convoy electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuña, G. P.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2006-11-01

    We study the time-dependent induced potentials at the convoy electron position due to the self-interaction with a metal surface and to the shock wave created by the positive hole (vacancy) left. The time evolution of these potentials are calculated using the linear response theory. Results obtained are fitted with simple functions. We find that those two potentials nearly cancel each other in the first ten atomic units of time.

  6. Autoionization in time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, V.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the exact exchange-correlation potential of the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for the correlated process of autoionization. The potential develops barriers which regulate the autoionization rate. TDDFT employing known and practicable exchange-correlation potentials does not capture any autoionization dynamics. Approximate exchange-correlation potentials capturing such dynamics would necessarily require memory effects and are unlikely to be developed, as will be illustrated.

  7. Designing for time-dependent material response in spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Oleksuk, Lynda L. S.; Bowles, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    To study the influence on overall deformations of the time-dependent constitutive properties of fiber-reinforced polymeric matrix composite materials being considered for use in orbiting precision segmented reflectors, simple sandwich beam models are developed. The beam models include layers representing the face sheets, the core, and the adhesive bonding of the face sheets to the core. A three-layer model lumps the adhesive layers with the face sheets or core, while a five-layer model considers the adhesive layers explicitly. The deformation response of the three-layer and five-layer sandwich beam models to a midspan point load is studied. This elementary loading leads to a simple analysis, and it is easy to create this loading in the laboratory. Using the correspondence principle of viscoelasticity, the models representing the elastic behavior of the two beams are transformed into time-dependent models. Representative cases of time-dependent material behavior for the facesheet material, the core material, and the adhesive are used to evaluate the influence of these constituents being time-dependent on the deformations of the beam. As an example of the results presented, if it assumed that, as a worst case, the polymer-dominated shear properties of the core behave as a Maxwell fluid such that under constant shear stress the shear strain increases by a factor of 10 in 20 years, then it is shown that the beam deflection increases by a factor of 1.4 during that time. In addition to quantitative conclusions, several assumptions are discussed which simplify the analyses for use with more complicated material models. Finally, it is shown that the simpler three-layer model suffices in many situations.

  8. Time Dependent Models of Grain Formation Around Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, M. P.; Shipman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are sites of dust formation and undergo mass loss at rates ranging from 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr. The state-of-the-art in modeling these processes is time-dependent models which simultaneously solve the grain formation and gas dynamics problem. We present results from such a model, which also includes an exact solution of the radiative transfer within the system.

  9. Time-dependent MOS breakdown. [of Na contaminated capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. P.; Bates, E. T.; Maserjian, J.

    1976-01-01

    A general model for time-dependent breakdown in metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) structures is developed and related to experimental measurements on samples deliberately contaminated with Na. A statistical method is used for measuring the breakdown probability as a function of log time and applied field. It is shown that three time regions of breakdown can be explained respectively in terms of silicon surface defects, ion emission from the metal interface, and lateral ion diffusion at the silicon interface.

  10. Quasinormal modes in a time-dependent black hole background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Cheng-Gang; Wang, Bin; Abdalla, Elcio; Su, Ru-Keng

    2005-02-01

    We have studied the evolution of the massless scalar field propagating in a time-dependent charged Vaidya black hole background. A generalized tortoise coordinate transformation was used to study the evolution of the massless scalar field. It is shown that, for the slowest damped quasinormal modes, the approximate formulas in the stationary Reissner-Nordström black hole turn out to be a reasonable prescription, showing that results from quasinormal mode analysis are rather robust.

  11. Quasinormal modes in a time-dependent black hole background

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Chenggang; Wang Bin; Abdalla, Elcio; Su Rukeng

    2005-02-15

    We have studied the evolution of the massless scalar field propagating in a time-dependent charged Vaidya black hole background. A generalized tortoise coordinate transformation was used to study the evolution of the massless scalar field. It is shown that, for the slowest damped quasinormal modes, the approximate formulas in the stationary Reissner-Nordstroem black hole turn out to be a reasonable prescription, showing that results from quasinormal mode analysis are rather robust.

  12. On the solution of time-dependent problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, M. A.

    2005-10-01

    The time-dependent radiative transfer problems involving non-equilibrium coupling to the material temperature to differential equation and ballistic-diffusive equation have been solved by means of two different techniques, namely, flux-limited approach and maximum entropy method. The behaviour of the radiative intensity is shown graphically. Knowing the radiative intensity allows us to calculate directly some physical parameters such as the reflection function and heat flux that are numerically computed.

  13. Relating Time-Dependent Acceleration and Height Using an Elevator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinser, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment in relating a time-dependent linear acceleration function to height is explored through the use of a smartphone and an elevator. Given acceleration as a function of time, a(t), the velocity function and position functions are determined through integration as in v(t)=? a(t) dt (1) and x(t)=? v(t) dt. Mobile devices such as…

  14. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-28

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example.

  15. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures From Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Norman; J. L. Jones; B. W. Blackburn; S. M. Watson; K. J. Haskell

    2006-08-01

    A pulsed photonuclear interrogation environment is rich with time-dependent, material specific, radiation signatures. Exploitation of these signatures in the delayed time regime (>1us after the photon flash) has been explored through various detection schemes to identify both shielded nuclear material and nitrogen-based explosives. Prompt emission may also be invaluable for these detection methods. Numerical and experimental results, which utilize specially modified neutron and HpGe detectors, are presented which illustrate the efficacy of utilizing these time-dependent signatures. Optimal selection of the appropriate delayed time window is essential to these pulsed inspection systems. For explosive (ANFO surrogate) detection, both numerical models and experimental results illustrate that nearly all 14N(n,y) reactions have occurred within l00 us after the flash. In contrast, however, gamma-ray and neutron signals for nuclear material detection require a delay of several milliseconds after the photon pulse. In this case, any data collected too close to the photon flash results in a spectrum dominated by high energy signals which make it difficult to discern signatures from nuclear material. Specifically, two short-lived, high-energy fission fragments (97Ag(T1/2=5.1 s) and 94Sr(T1/2=75.2 s)) were measured and identified as indicators of the presence of fissionable material. These developments demonstrate that a photon inspection environment can be exploited for time-dependent, material specific signatures through the proper operation of specially modified detectors.

  16. Analytic controllability of time-dependent quantum control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chunhua; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Chi, Quo-Shin; Clark, John W.

    2005-05-01

    The question of controllability is investigated for a quantum control system in which the Hamiltonian operator components carry explicit time dependence which is not under the control of an external agent. We consider the general situation in which the state moves in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space, a drift term is present, and the operators driving the state evolution may be unbounded. However, considerations are restricted by the assumption that there exists an analytic domain, dense in the state space, on which solutions of the controlled Schrödinger equation may be expressed globally in exponential form. The issue of controllability then naturally focuses on the ability to steer the quantum state on a finite-dimensional submanifold of the unit sphere in Hilbert space—and thus on analytic controllability. A relatively straightforward strategy allows the extension of Lie-algebraic conditions for strong analytic controllability derived earlier for the simpler, time-independent system in which the drift Hamiltonian and the interaction Hamiltonian have no intrinsic time dependence. Enlarging the state space by one dimension corresponding to the time variable, we construct an augmented control system that can be treated as time independent. Methods developed by Kunita can then be implemented to establish controllability conditions for the one-dimension-reduced system defined by the original time-dependent Schrödinger control problem. The applicability of the resulting theorem is illustrated with selected examples.

  17. Time-dependent dynamic behavior of light diffraction in ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Min-Feng; Chou, S. E.; Fu, Chao-Ming

    2012-04-01

    The time-dependent dynamic behavior of diffraction patterns induced by external magnetic field in a suspension of nano-sized magnetic particles (Fe3O4) in a water-based magnetic fluid was investigated. It was observed that the diffraction pattern changed with time as the magnetic field was applied. In the absence of applied magnetic field, there was no diffraction pattern in the screen. When the magnetic field was applied, the transmitted light was perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the diffraction pattern was unstable. There were many small lines and points moving with time. After one minute, the diffraction pattern turned stable, and the small lines became longer. This time-dependent behavior helps us to understand the evolution of the forming chains of magnetic nanoparticles. Moreover, we have measured the other diffraction pattern, the transmitted light propagating parallel to the applied field. These time-dependent diffraction patterns give a new point to understand the dynamic three-dimensional structure of magnetic fluid under a dc magnetic field.

  18. Time dependent turbulence modeling and analytical theories of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R.

    1993-01-01

    By simplifying the direct interaction approximation (DIA) for turbulent shear flow, time dependent formulas are derived for the Reynolds stresses which can be included in two equation models. The Green's function is treated phenomenologically, however, following Smith and Yakhot, we insist on the short and long time limits required by DIA. For small strain rates, perturbative evaluation of the correlation function yields a time dependent theory which includes normal stress effects in simple shear flows. From this standpoint, the phenomenological Launder-Reece-Rodi model is obtained by replacing the Green's function by its long time limit. Eddy damping corrections to short time behavior initiate too quickly in this model; in contrast, the present theory exhibits strong suppression of eddy damping at short times. A time dependent theory for large strain rates is proposed in which large scales are governed by rapid distortion theory while small scales are governed by Kolmogorov inertial range dynamics. At short times and large strain rates, the theory closely matches rapid distortion theory, but at long times it relaxes to an eddy damping model.

  19. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited.

    PubMed

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-28

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example. PMID:26133412

  20. Particle creation in a time-dependent electric field revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Gaurang

    2009-02-15

    We adopt the general formalism for analyzing evolution of gaussian states of quantized fields in time-dependent backgrounds in the Schrodinger picture (presented in detail in Mahajan and Padmanabhan [G. Mahajan, T. Padmanabhan, Gen. Rel. Grav. 40 (2008) 661]) to study the example of a spatially uniform electric field background (in a time-dependent gauge) which is kept turned on for a finite duration of time. In particular, we study the time-dependent particle content, defined in terms of the concept of instantaneous eigenstates, and describe how it captures the time evolution of the quantized field modes. The actual particle creation process occurs over a relatively short interval in time, and the particle content saturates rather quickly. We also compare the power spectrum of the field modes, computed in the asymptotic limit, with the corresponding situation in a cosmological de Sitter background. Particle creation under the influence of a spiked electric field localized in time, as a particular limiting case of the above general model, is also considered.

  1. Particle creation in a time-dependent electric field revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Gaurang

    2009-02-01

    We adopt the general formalism for analyzing evolution of gaussian states of quantized fields in time-dependent backgrounds in the Schrodinger picture (presented in detail in Mahajan and Padmanabhan [G. Mahajan, T. Padmanabhan, Gen. Rel. Grav. 40 (2008) 661]) to study the example of a spatially uniform electric field background (in a time-dependent gauge) which is kept turned on for a finite duration of time. In particular, we study the time-dependent particle content, defined in terms of the concept of instantaneous eigenstates, and describe how it captures the time evolution of the quantized field modes. The actual particle creation process occurs over a relatively short interval in time, and the particle content saturates rather quickly. We also compare the power spectrum of the field modes, computed in the asymptotic limit, with the corresponding situation in a cosmological de Sitter background. Particle creation under the influence of a spiked electric field localized in time, as a particular limiting case of the above general model, is also considered.

  2. Fuzzy parameters analysis of time-dependent fracture of concrete dam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barpi, Fabrizio; Valente, Silvio

    2002-08-01

    In order to apply the mechanical properties (measured on material specimens or laboratory-sized models) to large structures (such as concrete dams), a non-linear theory able to predict the size-scale effect has to be used. One of these theories was first proposed by Hillerborg and co-workers (fictitious crack model) and is based on the earlier works by Barenblatt and Dugdale for metals (cohesive crack model). It is based on the existence of a fracture process zone (FPZ), where the material undergoes strain softening. The behaviour of the material outside the FPZ is linear elastic.A large number of short-time laboratory tests were executed, by varying the load, under crack mouth opening displacement control. Since concrete exhibits a time-dependent behaviour, an interaction between creep and micro-crack growth occurs in the FPZ. Therefore, different testing conditions can be applied: rupture can be achieved by keeping the load constant before peak value (pre-peak tests), or after peak value and after an unloading and reloading procedure (post-peak tests). The crack propagation rate is shown to be small enough to neglect inertial forces and large enough to keep the time-dependent behaviour of the process zone as dominant compared to the behaviour of the undamaged and viscoelastic zone.Due to the variability in material microstructure from one specimen to another, experimental data show large ranges of scatter. Well established methods in probability theory require sufficient experimental data in order to assume a probability density distribution. The objective of this study is to investigate the ranges of variation of the time response under constant load in simple structural elements associated with pre-selected variation (fuzziness) in the main material parameters. For situations where the values of the material parameters are of a non-stochastic nature, the fuzzy set approach to modelling variability has been proposed as a better and more natural approach.

  3. Deterministic Multiaxial Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancements for CARES/Creep Integrated Design Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep rupture criterion. However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of sum, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of Ns methodology and the

  4. AnisWave 2D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  5. Creep avalanches on the Central San Andreas Fault: Clues and Causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshmanesh, M.; Shirzaei, M.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Central segment of San Andreas Fault (CSAF) is characterized by a nearly continuous right-lateral aseismic slip. However, observations of the creep rate obtained using Characteristically Repeating Earthquakes (CREs) show a quasi-periodic temporal variation, which is recently confirmed using both InSAR surface deformation time series and geodetic-based time-dependent kinematic model of creep along the CSAF. Here, we show that the statistical analysis of creep fronts along the CSAF indicates a sporadic behavior, signature of a burst-like creep dynamics. Moreover, the probability of creep velocities follows a Gumbel distribution characterized by longer tail toward the extreme positive rates. Fourier analysis of the time series of surface creep rate indicates a self-affine regime with Hurst exponent altering between 0.6 and 0.9 during the observation period of 2003-2011. The variable Hurst component is an indicator for temporal variation in the roughness of the fault zone. To explain the causes of creep avalanches, two possible mechanisms are considered, including temporal variation in: 1) fault geometry, and 2) Ambient normal stress. We find that the overall statistical dependence between the pattern of surface creep rate and the fault geometry is insignificant. To investigate the effect of ambient normal stress, primarily due to variation in pore pressure, we implement a rate and state friction law to link the time-dependent kinematic creep model to the spatiotemporal variations of the normal stress on the velocity-strengthening fault zones. These observations and models help to understand the driving mechanisms that govern the creep rate variations at short spatial length and low velocities. Under these circumstances, the other mechanisms such as thermal pressurization are not feasible.

  6. Characterizing time-dependent mechanics in metallic MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergers, L. I. J. C.; Delhey, N. K. R.; Hoefnagels, J. P. M.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2010-06-01

    Experiments for characterization of time-dependent material properties in free-standing metallic microelectromechanical system (MEMS) pose challenges: e.g. fabrication and handling (sub)-μm sized specimens, control and measurement of sub-μN loads and sub-μm displacements over long periods and various temperatures [1]. A variety of experimental setups have been reported each having their pros and cons. One example is a micro-tensile tester with an ingenious electro-static specimen gripping system [2] aiding simple specimen design giving good results at μN and sub-μm levels, but without in-situ full-field observations. Other progressive examples assimilate the specimen, MEMS actuators and load cells on a single chip [3,4] yielding significant results at nN and nm levels with in-situ TEM/SEM observability, though not without complications: complex load actuator/sensor calibration per chip, measures to reduce fabrication failure and unfeasible cofabrication on wafers with commercial metallic MEMS. This work aims to overcome these drawbacks by developing experimental methods with high sensitivity, precision and in-situ full-field observation capabilities. Moreover, these should be applicable to simple free-standing metallic MEMS that can be co-fabricated with commercial devices. These methods will then serve in systematic studies into size-effects in time-dependent material properties. First a numeric-experimental method is developed. It characterizes bending deformation of onwafer μm-sized aluminum cantilevers. A specially designed micro-clamp is used to mechanically apply a constant precise deflection of the beam (zres <50 nm) for a prolonged period, see fig. 1. After this period, the deflection by the micro-clamp is removed. Full-field height maps with the ensuing deformation are measured over time with confocal optical profilometry (COP). This yields the tip deflection as function of time with ~3 nm precision, see fig.2. To extract material parameters

  7. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  8. Brownian motion of electrons in time-dependent magnetic fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, G. J.; Williams, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    The behavior of a weakly ionized plasma in slowly varying time-dependent magnetic fields is studied through an extension of Williamson's stochastic theory. In particular, attention is focused on the properties of electron diffusion in the plane perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field, when the field strength is large. It is shown that, in the strong field limit, the classical 1/B-squared dependence of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient is obtained for two models in which the field B(t) is monotonic in t and for two models in which B(t) possesses at least one turning point.

  9. Time-dependent coupled-cluster method for atomic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pigg, David A; Hagen, Gaute; Nam, Hai Ah; Papenbrock, Thomas F

    2012-01-01

    We study time-dependent coupled-cluster theory in the framework of nuclear physics. Based on Kvaal's bi-variational formulation of this method [S. Kvaal, arXiv:1201.5548], we explicitly demonstrate that observables that commute with the Hamiltonian are conserved under time evolution. We explore the role of the energy and of the similarity-transformed Hamiltonian under real and imaginary time evolution and relate the latter to similarity renormalization group transformations. Proof-of-principle computations of He-4 and O-16 in small model spaces, and computations of the Lipkin model illustrate the capabilities of the method

  10. Time-Dependent Approach to Two-Proton Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Hagino, Kouichi; Sagawa, Hiroyuki

    We apply a time-dependent quantum three-body model to the two-proton emission of 6Be nucleus in order to discuss the role of pairing correlation between the emitted two protons during the tunneling process. With this method, we calculate the time-evolution of the two protons, which provides an intuitive way to understand this phenomenon. The calculated decay width is in a good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, we also show that the pairing correlation significantly enhances the probabilities of the diproton-like cluster emission, reflecting the "diproton correlation" in proton-rich nuclei.