Science.gov

Sample records for 2-d unstructured mesh

  1. Differencing the diffusion equation on unstructured meshes in 2-D

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.S.

    1994-10-24

    During the last few years, there has been an increased effort to devise robust transport differencings for unstructured meshes, specifically arbitrarily connected grids of polygons. Adams has investigated unstructured mesh discretization techniques for the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation, and for the more traditional first-order form. Conversely, development of unstructured mesh diffusion methods has been lacking. While Morel, Kershaw, Shestakov and others have done a great deal of work on diffusion schemes for logically-rectangular grids, to the author`s knowledge there has been no work on discretizations of the diffusion equation on unstructured meshes of polygons. In this paper, the authors introduce a point-centered diffusion differencing for two-dimensional unstructured meshes. They have designed the method to have the following attractive properties: (1) the scheme is equivalent to the standard five-point point-centered scheme on an orthogonal mesh; (2) the method preserves the homogeneous linear solution; (3) the method gives second-order accuracy; (4) they have strict conservation within the control volume surrounding each point; and (5) the numerical solution converges to the exact result as the mesh is refined, regardless of the smoothness of the mesh. A potential disadvantage of the method is that the diffusion matrix is asymmetric, in general.

  2. MAST solution of irrotational flow problems in 2D domains with strongly unstructured triangular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucciarelli, T.

    2012-12-01

    A new methodology for the solution of irrotational 2D flow problems in domains with strongly unstructured meshes is presented. A fractional time step procedure is applied to the original governing equations, solving consecutively a convective prediction system and a diffusive corrective system. The non linear components of the problem are concentrated in the prediction step, while the correction step leads to the solution of a linear system, of the order of the number of computational cells. A MArching in Space and Time (MAST) approach is applied for the solution of the convective prediction step. The major advantages of the model, as well as its ability to maintain the solution monotonicity even in strongly irregular meshes, are briefly described. The algorithm is applied to the solution of diffusive shallow water equations in a simple domain.

  3. MAST-2D diffusive model for flood prediction on domains with triangular Delaunay unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, C.; Sinagra, M.; Begnudelli, L.; Tucciarelli, T.

    2011-11-01

    A new methodology for the solution of the 2D diffusive shallow water equations over Delaunay unstructured triangular meshes is presented. Before developing the new algorithm, the following question is addressed: it is worth developing and using a simplified shallow water model, when well established algorithms for the solution of the complete one do exist? The governing Partial Differential Equations are discretized using a procedure similar to the linear conforming Finite Element Galerkin scheme, with a different flux formulation and a special flux treatment that requires Delaunay triangulation but entire solution monotonicity. A simple mesh adjustment is suggested, that attains the Delaunay condition for all the triangle sides without changing the original nodes location and also maintains the internal boundaries. The original governing system is solved applying a fractional time step procedure, that solves consecutively a convective prediction system and a diffusive correction system. The non linear components of the problem are concentrated in the prediction step, while the correction step leads to the solution of a linear system of the order of the number of computational cells. A semi-analytical procedure is applied for the solution of the prediction step. The discretized formulation of the governing equations allows to handle also wetting and drying processes without any additional specific treatment. Local energy dissipations, mainly the effect of vertical walls and hydraulic jumps, can be easily included in the model. Several numerical experiments have been carried out in order to test (1) the stability of the proposed model with regard to the size of the Courant number and to the mesh irregularity, (2) its computational performance, (3) the convergence order by means of mesh refinement. The model results are also compared with the results obtained by a fully dynamic model. Finally, the application to a real field case with a Venturi channel is presented.

  4. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  5. Parallel FE Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.; Lorenz, J.

    1999-03-02

    A novel solution method has been developed to solve the coupled electron-photon transport problem on an unstructured triangular mesh. Instead of tackling the first-order form of the linear Boltzmann equation, this approach is based on the second-order form in conjunction with the conventional multi-group discrete-ordinates approximation. The highly forward-peaked electron scattering is modeled with a multigroup Legendre expansion derived from the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The finite element method is used to treat the spatial dependence. The solution method is unique in that the space-direction dependence is solved simultaneously, eliminating the need for the conventional inner iterations, a method that is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  6. Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement applied to radiation transport on 2D unstructured triangular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Jean C. Ragusa

    2011-02-01

    Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques are presented for the linear Boltzmann transport equation. A posteriori error estimates are employed to drive the AMR process and are based on angular-moment information rather than on directional information, leading to direction-independent adapted meshes. An error estimate based on a two-mesh approach and a jump-based error indicator are compared for various test problems. In addition to the standard AMR approach, where the global error in the solution is diminished, a goal-oriented AMR procedure is devised and aims at reducing the error in user-specified quantities of interest. The quantities of interest are functionals of the solution and may include, for instance, point-wise flux values or average reaction rates in a subdomain. A high-order (up to order 4) Discontinuous Galerkin technique with standard upwinding is employed for the spatial discretization; the discrete ordinates method is used to treat the angular variable.

  7. Unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity techniques is given. Basic building blocks taken from the field of computational geometry are first described. Various practical mesh generation techniques based on these algorithms are then constructed and illustrated with examples. Issues of adaptive meshing and stretched mesh generation for anisotropic problems are treated in subsequent sections. The presentation is organized in an education manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  8. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Longcope, D.W.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  9. An admissibility and asymptotic-preserving scheme for systems of conservation laws with source term on 2D unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachère, F.; Turpault, R.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to design explicit finite volumes schemes for specific systems of conservations laws with stiff source terms, which degenerate into diffusion equations. We propose a general framework to design an asymptotic preserving scheme, that is stable and consistent under a classical hyperbolic CFL condition in both hyperbolic and diffusive regime, for any two-dimensional unstructured mesh. Moreover, the scheme developed also preserves the set of admissible states, which is mandatory to keep physical solutions in stiff configurations. This construction is achieved by using a non-linear scheme as a target scheme for the diffusive equation, which gives the form of the global scheme for the complete system of conservation laws. Numerical results are provided to validate the scheme in both regimes.

  10. Multigrid techniques for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current multigrid techniques for unstructured meshes is given. The basic principles of the multigrid approach are first outlined. Application of these principles to unstructured mesh problems is then described, illustrating various different approaches, and giving examples of practical applications. Advanced multigrid topics, such as the use of algebraic multigrid methods, and the combination of multigrid techniques with adaptive meshing strategies are dealt with in subsequent sections. These represent current areas of research, and the unresolved issues are discussed. The presentation is organized in an educational manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  11. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  12. Mesh2d

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  13. Toward An Unstructured Mesh Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Mahdiraji, Alireza; Baumann, Peter Peter

    2014-05-01

    Unstructured meshes are used in several application domains such as earth sciences (e.g., seismology), medicine, oceanography, cli- mate modeling, GIS as approximate representations of physical objects. Meshes subdivide a domain into smaller geometric elements (called cells) which are glued together by incidence relationships. The subdivision of a domain allows computational manipulation of complicated physical structures. For instance, seismologists model earthquakes using elastic wave propagation solvers on hexahedral meshes. The hexahedral con- tains several hundred millions of grid points and millions of hexahedral cells. Each vertex node in the hexahedrals stores a multitude of data fields. To run simulation on such meshes, one needs to iterate over all the cells, iterate over incident cells to a given cell, retrieve coordinates of cells, assign data values to cells, etc. Although meshes are used in many application domains, to the best of our knowledge there is no database vendor that support unstructured mesh features. Currently, the main tool for querying and manipulating unstructured meshes are mesh libraries, e.g., CGAL and GRAL. Mesh li- braries are dedicated libraries which includes mesh algorithms and can be run on mesh representations. The libraries do not scale with dataset size, do not have declarative query language, and need deep C++ knowledge for query implementations. Furthermore, due to high coupling between the implementations and input file structure, the implementations are less reusable and costly to maintain. A dedicated mesh database offers the following advantages: 1) declarative querying, 2) ease of maintenance, 3) hiding mesh storage structure from applications, and 4) transparent query optimization. To design a mesh database, the first challenge is to define a suitable generic data model for unstructured meshes. We proposed ImG-Complexes data model as a generic topological mesh data model which extends incidence graph model to multi

  14. Reduced order modelling of an unstructured mesh air pollution model and application in 2D/3D urban street canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Zhang, T.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C. C.; Buchan, A. G.; Navon, I. M.

    2014-10-01

    A novel reduced order model (ROM) based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) has been developed for a finite-element (FE) adaptive mesh air pollution model. A quadratic expansion of the non-linear terms is employed to ensure the method remained efficient. This is the first time such an approach has been applied to air pollution LES turbulent simulation through three dimensional landscapes. The novelty of this work also includes POD's application within a FE-LES turbulence model that uses adaptive resolution. The accuracy of the reduced order model is assessed and validated for a range of 2D and 3D urban street canyon flow problems. By comparing the POD solutions against the fine detail solutions obtained from the full FE model it is shown that the accuracy is maintained, where fine details of the air flows are captured, whilst the computational requirements are reduced. In the examples presented below the size of the reduced order models is reduced by factors up to 2400 in comparison to the full FE model while the CPU time is reduced by up to 98% of that required by the full model.

  15. Adaptive and Unstructured Mesh Cleaving

    PubMed Central

    Bronson, Jonathan R.; Sastry, Shankar P.; Levine, Joshua A.; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new strategy for boundary conforming meshing that decouples the problem of building tetrahedra of proper size and shape from the problem of conforming to complex, non-manifold boundaries. This approach is motivated by the observation that while several methods exist for adaptive tetrahedral meshing, they typically have difficulty at geometric boundaries. The proposed strategy avoids this conflict by extracting the boundary conforming constraint into a secondary step. We first build a background mesh having a desired set of tetrahedral properties, and then use a generalized stenciling method to divide, or “cleave”, these elements to get a set of conforming tetrahedra, while limiting the impacts cleaving has on element quality. In developing this new framework, we make several technical contributions including a new method for building graded tetrahedral meshes as well as a generalization of the isosurface stuffing and lattice cleaving algorithms to unstructured background meshes. PMID:26137171

  16. Conservation properties of unstructured staggered mesh schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Perot, B.

    2000-03-20

    Classic Cartesian staggered mesh schemes have a number of attractive properties. They do not display spurious pressure modes and they have been shown to locally conserve, mass, momentum, kinetic energy, and circulation to machine precision. Recently, a number of generalizations of the staggered mesh approach have been proposed for unstructured (triangular or tetrahedral) meshes. These unstructured staggered mesh methods have been created to retain the attractive pressure aspects and mass conservation properties of the classic Cartesian mesh method. This work addresses the momentum, kinetic energy, and circulation conservation properties of unstructured staggered mesh methods. It is shown that with certain choices of the velocity interpolation, unstructured staggered mesh discretization of the divergence form of the Navier-Stokes equations can conserve kinetic energy and momentum both locally and globally. In addition, it is shown that unstructured staggered mesh discretization of the rotational form of the Navier-Stokes equations can conserve kinetic energy and circulation both locally and globally. The analysis includes viscous terms and a generalization of the concept of conservation in the presence of viscosity to include a negative definite dissipation term in the kinetic energy equation. These novel conserving unstructured staggered mesh schemes have not been previously analyzed. It is shown that they are first-order accurate on nonuniform two-dimensional unstructured meshes and second-order accurate on uniform unstructured meshes. Numerical confirmation of the conservation properties and the order of accuracy of these unstructured staggered mesh methods is presented.

  17. Implicit solvers for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1991-01-01

    Implicit methods were developed and tested for unstructured mesh computations. The approximate system which arises from the Newton linearization of the nonlinear evolution operator is solved by using the preconditioned GMRES (Generalized Minimum Residual) technique. Three different preconditioners were studied, namely, the incomplete LU factorization (ILU), block diagonal factorization, and the symmetric successive over relaxation (SSOR). The preconditioners were optimized to have good vectorization properties. SSOR and ILU were also studied as iterative schemes. The various methods are compared over a wide range of problems. Ordering of the unknowns, which affects the convergence of these sparse matrix iterative methods, is also studied. Results are presented for inviscid and turbulent viscous calculations on single and multielement airfoil configurations using globally and adaptively generated meshes.

  18. Unstructured mesh algorithms for aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of unstructured mesh techniques for solving complex aerodynamic flows is discussed. The principle advantages of unstructured mesh strategies, as they relate to complex geometries, adaptive meshing capabilities, and parallel processing are emphasized. The various aspects required for the efficient and accurate solution of aerodynamic flows are addressed. These include mesh generation, mesh adaptivity, solution algorithms, convergence acceleration, and turbulence modeling. Computations of viscous turbulent two-dimensional flows and inviscid three-dimensional flows about complex configurations are demonstrated. Remaining obstacles and directions for future research are also outlined.

  19. Adaption of unstructured meshes using node movement

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.G.; McRae, V.D.S.

    1996-12-31

    The adaption algorithm of Benson and McRae is modified for application to unstructured grids. The weight function generation was modified for application to unstructured grids and movement was limited to prevent cross over. A NACA 0012 airfoil is used as a test case to evaluate the modified algorithm when applied to unstructured grids and compared to results obtained by Warren. An adaptive mesh solution for the Sudhoo and Hall four element airfoil is included as a demonstration case.

  20. Computational results for parallel unstructured mesh computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.T.; Plassmann, P.E.

    1994-12-31

    The majority of finite element models in structural engineering are composed of unstructured meshes. These unstructured meshes are often very large and require significant computational resources; hence they are excellent candidates for massively parallel computation. Parallel solution of the sparse matrices that arise from such meshes has been studied heavily, and many good algorithms have been developed. Unfortunately, many of the other aspects of parallel unstructured mesh computation have gone largely ignored. The authors present a set of algorithms that allow the entire unstructured mesh computation process to execute in parallel -- including adaptive mesh refinement, equation reordering, mesh partitioning, and sparse linear system solution. They briefly describe these algorithms and state results regarding their running-time and performance. They then give results from the 512-processor Intel DELTA for a large-scale structural analysis problem. These results demonstrate that the new algorithms are scalable and efficient. The algorithms are able to achieve up to 2.2 gigaflops for this unstructured mesh problem.

  1. Parallel automated adaptive procedures for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Flaherty, J. E.; Decougny, H. L.; Ozturan, C.; Bottasso, C. L.; Beall, M. W.

    1995-01-01

    Consideration is given to the techniques required to support adaptive analysis of automatically generated unstructured meshes on distributed memory MIMD parallel computers. The key areas of new development are focused on the support of effective parallel computations when the structure of the numerical discretization, the mesh, is evolving, and in fact constructed, during the computation. All the procedures presented operate in parallel on already distributed mesh information. Starting from a mesh definition in terms of a topological hierarchy, techniques to support the distribution, redistribution and communication among the mesh entities over the processors is given, and algorithms to dynamically balance processor workload based on the migration of mesh entities are given. A procedure to automatically generate meshes in parallel, starting from CAD geometric models, is given. Parallel procedures to enrich the mesh through local mesh modifications are also given. Finally, the combination of these techniques to produce a parallel automated finite element analysis procedure for rotorcraft aerodynamics calculations is discussed and demonstrated.

  2. Unstructured Polyhedral Mesh Thermal Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.S.; Zika, M.R.; Madsen, N.K.

    2000-07-27

    Unstructured mesh particle transport and diffusion methods are gaining wider acceptance as mesh generation, scientific visualization and linear solvers improve. This paper describes an algorithm that is currently being used in the KULL code at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to solve the radiative transfer equations. The algorithm employs a point-centered diffusion discretization on arbitrary polyhedral meshes in 3D. We present the results of a few test problems to illustrate the capabilities of the radiation diffusion module.

  3. Conformal refinement of unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Garmella, Rao

    2009-01-01

    We present a multilevel adaptive refinement technique for unstructured quadrilateral meshes in which the mesh is kept conformal at all times. This means that the refined mesh, like the original, is formed of only quadrilateral elements that intersect strictly along edges or at vertices, i.e., vertices of one quadrilateral element do not lie in an edge of another quadrilateral. Elements are refined using templates based on 1:3 refinement of edges. We demonstrate that by careful design of the refinement and coarsening strategy, we can maintain high quality elements in the refined mesh. We demonstrate the method on a number of examples with dynamically changing refinement regions.

  4. Unstructured mesh methods for CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraire, J.; Morgan, K.; Peiro, J.

    Mesh generation methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are outlined. Geometric modeling is discussed. An advancing front method is described. Flow past a two engine Falcon aeroplane is studied. An algorithm and associated data structure called the alternating digital tree, which efficiently solves the geometric searching problem is described. The computation of an initial approximation to the steady state solution of a given poblem is described. Mesh generation for transient flows is described.

  5. Unstructured mesh methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, J.; Morgan, K.; Peiro, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mesh generation methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are outlined. Geometric modeling is discussed. An advancing front method is described. Flow past a two engine Falcon aeroplane is studied. An algorithm and associated data structure called the alternating digital tree, which efficiently solves the geometric searching problem is described. The computation of an initial approximation to the steady state solution of a given poblem is described. Mesh generation for transient flows is described.

  6. Numerical simulation of H2/air detonation using unstructured mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togashi, Fumiya; Löhner, Rainald; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki

    2009-06-01

    To explore the capability of unstructured mesh to simulate detonation wave propagation phenomena, numerical simulation of H2/air detonation using unstructured mesh was conducted. The unstructured mesh has several adv- antages such as easy mesh adaptation and flexibility to the complicated configurations. To examine the resolution dependency of the unstructured mesh, several simulations varying the mesh size were conducted and compared with a computed result using a structured mesh. The results show that the unstructured mesh solution captures the detailed structure of detonation wave, as well as the structured mesh solution. To capture the detailed detonation cell structure, the unstructured mesh simulations required at least twice, ideally 5times the resolution of structured mesh solution.

  7. On Convergence Acceleration Techniques for Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1998-01-01

    A discussion of convergence acceleration techniques as they relate to computational fluid dynamics problems on unstructured meshes is given. Rather than providing a detailed description of particular methods, the various different building blocks of current solution techniques are discussed and examples of solution strategies using one or several of these ideas are given. Issues relating to unstructured grid CFD problems are given additional consideration, including suitability of algorithms to current hardware trends, memory and cpu tradeoffs, treatment of non-linearities, and the development of efficient strategies for handling anisotropy-induced stiffness. The outlook for future potential improvements is also discussed.

  8. Improvements to the Unstructured Mesh Generator MESH3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Scott D.; Baker, Timothy J.; Cliff, Susan E.

    1999-01-01

    The AIRPLANE process starts with an aircraft geometry stored in a CAD system. The surface is modeled with a mesh of triangles and then the flow solver produces pressures at surface points which may be integrated to find forces and moments. The biggest advantage is that the grid generation bottleneck of the CFD process is eliminated when an unstructured tetrahedral mesh is used. MESH3D is the key to turning around the first analysis of a CAD geometry in days instead of weeks. The flow solver part of AIRPLANE has proven to be robust and accurate over a decade of use at NASA. It has been extensively validated with experimental data and compares well with other Euler flow solvers. AIRPLANE has been applied to all the HSR geometries treated at Ames over the course of the HSR program in order to verify the accuracy of other flow solvers. The unstructured approach makes handling complete and complex geometries very simple because only the surface of the aircraft needs to be discretized, i.e. covered with triangles. The volume mesh is created automatically by MESH3D. AIRPLANE runs well on multiple platforms. Vectorization on the Cray Y-MP is reasonable for a code that uses indirect addressing. Massively parallel computers such as the IBM SP2, SGI Origin 2000, and the Cray T3E have been used with an MPI version of the flow solver and the code scales very well on these systems. AIRPLANE can run on a desktop computer as well. AIRPLANE has a future. The unstructured technologies developed as part of the HSR program are now targeting high Reynolds number viscous flow simulation. The pacing item in this effort is Navier-Stokes mesh generation.

  9. The Tera Multithreaded Architecture and Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1998-01-01

    The Tera Multithreaded Architecture (MTA) is a new parallel supercomputer currently being installed at San Diego Supercomputing Center (SDSC). This machine has an architecture quite different from contemporary parallel machines. The computational processor is a custom design and the machine uses hardware to support very fine grained multithreading. The main memory is shared, hardware randomized and flat. These features make the machine highly suited to the execution of unstructured mesh problems, which are difficult to parallelize on other architectures. We report the results of a study carried out during July-August 1998 to evaluate the execution of EUL3D, a code that solves the Euler equations on an unstructured mesh, on the 2 processor Tera MTA at SDSC. Our investigation shows that parallelization of an unstructured code is extremely easy on the Tera. We were able to get an existing parallel code (designed for a shared memory machine), running on the Tera by changing only the compiler directives. Furthermore, a serial version of this code was compiled to run in parallel on the Tera by judicious use of directives to invoke the "full/empty" tag bits of the machine to obtain synchronization. This version achieves 212 and 406 Mflop/s on one and two processors respectively, and requires no attention to partitioning or placement of data issues that would be of paramount importance in other parallel architectures.

  10. Kull ALE: II. Grid Motion on Unstructured Arbitrary Polyhedral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P

    2002-02-11

    Several classes of mesh motion algorithms are presented for the remap phase of unstructured mesh ALE codes. The methods range from local shape optimization procedures to more complex variational minimization methods applied to arbitrary unstructured polyhedral meshes necessary for the Kull code.

  11. Hypersonic Flow Computations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, K. L.; Riley, C. J.; Peraire, J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for computing inviscid hypersonic flow over complex configurations using unstructured meshes is presented. The unstructured grid solver uses an edge{based finite{volume formulation. Fluxes are computed using a flux vector splitting scheme that is capable of representing constant enthalpy solutions. Second{order accuracy in smooth flow regions is obtained by linearly reconstructing the solution, and stability near discontinuities is maintained by locally forcing the scheme to reduce to first-order accuracy. The implementation of the algorithm to parallel computers is described. Computations using the proposed method are presented for a sphere-cone configuration at Mach numbers of 5.25 and 10.6, and a complex hypersonic re-entry vehicle at Mach numbers of 4.5 and 9.8. Results are compared to experimental data and computations made with established structured grid methods. The use of the solver as a screening tool for rapid aerodynamic assessment of proposed vehicles is described.

  12. Algebraic turbulence modeling for unstructured and adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1990-01-01

    An algebraic turbulence model based on the Baldwin-Lomax model, has been implemented for use on unstructured grids. The implementation is based on the use of local background structured turbulence meshes. At each time-step, flow variables are interpolated from the unstructured mesh onto the background structured meshes, the turbulence model is executed on these meshes, and the resulting eddy viscosity values are interpolated back to the unstructured mesh. Modifications to the algebraic model were required to enable the treatment of more complicated flows, such as confluent boundary layers and wakes. The model is used in conjuction with an efficient unstructured multigrid finite-element Navier-Stokes solver in order to compute compressible turbulent flows on fully unstructured meshes. Solutions about single and multiple element airfoils are obtained and compared with experimental data.

  13. The design and application of upwind schemes on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Jespersen, Dennis C.

    1989-01-01

    Solution and mesh generation algorithms for solving the Euler equations on unstructured meshes consisting of triangle and quadrilateral control volumes are presented. Cell-centered and mesh-vertex upwind finite-volume schemes are developed which utilize multi-dimensional monotone linear reconstruction procedures. These algorithms differ from existing algorithms (even on structured meshes). Numerical results in two dimensions are presented.

  14. Turbulent flow calculations using unstructured and adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1990-01-01

    A method of efficiently computing turbulent compressible flow over complex two dimensional configurations is presented. The method makes use of fully unstructured meshes throughout the entire flow-field, thus enabling the treatment of arbitrarily complex geometries and the use of adaptive meshing techniques throughout both viscous and inviscid regions of flow-field. Mesh generation is based on a locally mapped Delaunay technique in order to generate unstructured meshes with highly-stretched elements in the viscous regions. The flow equations are discretized using a finite element Navier-Stokes solver, and rapid convergence to steady-state is achieved using an unstructured multigrid algorithm. Turbulence modeling is performed using an inexpensive algebraic model, implemented for use on unstructured and adaptive meshes. Compressible turbulent flow solutions about multiple-element airfoil geometries are computed and compared with experimental data.

  15. Parallel performance optimizations on unstructured mesh-based simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarje, Abhinav; Song, Sukhyun; Jacobsen, Douglas; Huck, Kevin; Hollingsworth, Jeffrey; Malony, Allen; Williams, Samuel; Oliker, Leonid

    2015-06-01

    This paper addresses two key parallelization challenges the unstructured mesh-based ocean modeling code, MPAS-Ocean, which uses a mesh based on Voronoi tessellations: (1) load imbalance across processes, and (2) unstructured data access patterns, that inhibit intra- and inter-node performance. Our work analyzes the load imbalance due to naive partitioning of the mesh, and develops methods to generate mesh partitioning with better load balance and reduced communication. Furthermore, we present methods that minimize both inter- and intranode data movement and maximize data reuse. Our techniques include predictive ordering of data elements for higher cache efficiency, as well as communication reduction approaches. We present detailed performance data when running on thousands of cores using the Cray XC30 supercomputer and show that our optimization strategies can exceed the original performance by over 2×. Additionally, many of these solutions can be broadly applied to a wide variety of unstructured grid-based computations.

  16. Soundproof simulations of stratospheric gravity waves on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolarkiewicz, P.; Szmelter, J.

    2012-04-01

    An edge-based unstructured-mesh semi-implicit model is presented that integrates nonhydrostatic soundproof equations, inclusive of anelastic and pseudo-incompressible systems of partial differential equations. The model numerics employ nonoscillatory forward-in-time MPDATA methods [Smolarkiewicz, 2006, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fl., 50, 1123-1144] using finite-volume spatial discretization and unstructured meshes with arbitrarily shaped cells. Implicit treatment of gravity waves benefits both accuracy and stability of the model. The unstructured-mesh solutions are compared to equivalent structured-grid results for intricate, multiscale internal-wave phenomenon of a non-Boussinesq amplification and breaking of deep stratospheric gravity waves. The departures of the anelastic and pseudo-incompressible results are quantified in reference to a recent asymptotic theory [Achatz et al., 2010, J. Fluid Mech., 663, 120-147].

  17. AN ALGORITHM FOR PARALLEL SN SWEEPS ON UNSTRUCTURED MESHES

    SciTech Connect

    S. D. PAUTZ

    2000-12-01

    We develop a new algorithm for performing parallel S{sub n} sweeps on unstructured meshes. The algorithm uses a low-complexity list ordering heuristic to determine a sweep ordering on any partitioned mesh. For typical problems and with ''normal'' mesh partitionings we have observed nearly linear speedups on up to 126 processors. This is an important and desirable result, since although analyses of structured meshes indicate that parallel sweeps will not scale with normal partitioning approaches, we do not observe any severe asymptotic degradation in the parallel efficiency with modest ({le}100) levels of parallelism. This work is a fundamental step in the development of parallel S{sub n} methods.

  18. Multigrid solution of internal flows using unstructured solution adaptive meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Wayne A.; Blake, Kenneth R.

    1992-11-01

    This is the final report of the NASA Lewis SBIR Phase 2 Contract Number NAS3-25785, Multigrid Solution of Internal Flows Using Unstructured Solution Adaptive Meshes. The objective of this project, as described in the Statement of Work, is to develop and deliver to NASA a general three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code using unstructured solution-adaptive meshes for accuracy and multigrid techniques for convergence acceleration. The code will primarily be applied, but not necessarily limited, to high speed internal flows in turbomachinery.

  19. 3-D UNSTRUCTURED HEXAHEDRAL-MESH Sn TRANSPORT METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    J. MOREL; J. MCGHEE; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have developed a method for solving the neutral-particle transport equation on 3-D unstructured hexahedral meshes using a S{sub n} discretization in angle in conjunction with a discontinuous finite-element discretization in space and a multigroup discretization in energy. Previous methods for solving this equation in 3-D have been limited to rectangular meshes. The unstructured-mesh method that we have developed is far more efficient for solving problems with complex 3-D geometric features than rectangular-mesh methods. In spite of having to make several compromises in our spatial discretization technique and our iterative solution technique, our method has been found to be both accurate and efficient for a broad class of problems.

  20. TVD differencing on three-dimensional unstructured meshes with monotonicity-preserving correction of mesh skewness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend G. M.

    2015-10-01

    Total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes are a widely applied group of monotonicity-preserving advection differencing schemes for partial differential equations in numerical heat transfer and computational fluid dynamics. These schemes are typically designed for one-dimensional problems or multidimensional problems on structured equidistant quadrilateral meshes. Practical applications, however, often involve complex geometries that cannot be represented by Cartesian meshes and, therefore, necessitate the application of unstructured meshes, which require a more sophisticated discretisation to account for their additional topological complexity. In principle, TVD schemes are applicable to unstructured meshes, however, not all the data required for TVD differencing is readily available on unstructured meshes, and the solution suffers from considerable numerical diffusion as a result of mesh skewness. In this article we analyse TVD differencing on unstructured three-dimensional meshes, focusing on the non-linearity of TVD differencing and the extrapolation of the virtual upwind node. Furthermore, we propose a novel monotonicity-preserving correction method for TVD schemes that significantly reduces numerical diffusion caused by mesh skewness. The presented numerical experiments demonstrate the importance of accounting for the non-linearity introduced by TVD differencing and of imposing carefully chosen limits on the extrapolated virtual upwind node, as well as the efficacy of the proposed method to correct mesh skewness.

  1. Unstructured Adaptive Meshes: Bad for Your Memory?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Feng, Hui-Yu; VanderWijngaart, Rob

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation explores the need for a NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) parallel benchmark for problems with irregular dynamical memory access. This benchmark is important and necessary because: 1) Problems with localized error source benefit from adaptive nonuniform meshes; 2) Certain machines perform poorly on such problems; 3) Parallel implementation may provide further performance improvement but is difficult. Some examples of problems which use irregular dynamical memory access include: 1) Heat transfer problem; 2) Heat source term; 3) Spectral element method; 4) Base functions; 5) Elemental discrete equations; 6) Global discrete equations. Nonconforming Mesh and Mortar Element Method are covered in greater detail in this presentation.

  2. Zonal multigrid solution of compressible flow problems on unstructured and adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1989-01-01

    The simultaneous use of adaptive meshing techniques with a multigrid strategy for solving the 2-D Euler equations in the context of unstructured meshes is studied. To obtain optimal efficiency, methods capable of computing locally improved solutions without recourse to global recalculations are pursued. A method for locally refining an existing unstructured mesh, without regenerating a new global mesh is employed, and the domain is automatically partitioned into refined and unrefined regions. Two multigrid strategies are developed. In the first, time-stepping is performed on a global fine mesh covering the entire domain, and convergence acceleration is achieved through the use of zonal coarse grid accelerator meshes, which lie under the adaptively refined regions of the global fine mesh. Both schemes are shown to produce similar convergence rates to each other, and also with respect to a previously developed global multigrid algorithm, which performs time-stepping throughout the entire domain, on each mesh level. However, the present schemes exhibit higher computational efficiency due to the smaller number of operations on each level.

  3. Progress in integrated analysis with adaptive unstructured meshing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1992-01-01

    Design of lightweight structures and thermal protection systems for hypersonic vehicles depend on accurate prediction of aerothermal loads, structural temperatures and their gradients, and structural deformations and stresses. Concentration is on an alternative meshing technique which generates an entirely new adaptive unstructured mesh based on the solution obtained from the earlier mesh. The technique combined with the finite element method has been shown to significantly improve the efficiency and accuracy of the fluid, thermal, and structural analyses. Current capability of the adaptive unstructured meshing technique for the integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis is described first. The technique was extended to transient thermal analysis of structures with time-dependent adaptive meshing to capture the detailed temperature response with a minimum number of unknowns and computational cost. Both linear and higher-order finite elements are implemented to demonstrate the generality of the technique and to investigate their solution accuracy. Currently, the adaptive meshing technique is being developed for plane structures that can be modeled with membrane elements and built-up structures modeled with membrane and bending elements. The capability of the technique to these different disciplinary problems is demonstrated by several examples.

  4. Parallel performance optimizations on unstructured mesh-based simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sarje, Abhinav; Song, Sukhyun; Jacobsen, Douglas; Huck, Kevin; Hollingsworth, Jeffrey; Malony, Allen; Williams, Samuel; Oliker, Leonid

    2015-06-01

    This paper addresses two key parallelization challenges the unstructured mesh-based ocean modeling code, MPAS-Ocean, which uses a mesh based on Voronoi tessellations: (1) load imbalance across processes, and (2) unstructured data access patterns, that inhibit intra- and inter-node performance. Our work analyzes the load imbalance due to naive partitioning of the mesh, and develops methods to generate mesh partitioning with better load balance and reduced communication. Furthermore, we present methods that minimize both inter- and intranode data movement and maximize data reuse. Our techniques include predictive ordering of data elements for higher cache efficiency, as well as communication reduction approaches.more » We present detailed performance data when running on thousands of cores using the Cray XC30 supercomputer and show that our optimization strategies can exceed the original performance by over 2×. Additionally, many of these solutions can be broadly applied to a wide variety of unstructured grid-based computations.« less

  5. Reactor physics verification of the MCNP6 unstructured mesh capability

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, T. P.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martz, R. L.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    The Monte Carlo software package MCNP6 has the ability to transport particles on unstructured meshes generated from the Computed-Aided Engineering software Abaqus. Verification is performed using benchmarks with features relevant to reactor physics - Big Ten and the C5G7 computational benchmark. Various meshing strategies are tested and results are compared to reference solutions. Computational performance results are also given. The conclusions show MCNP6 is capable of producing accurate calculations for reactor physics geometries and the computational requirements for small lattice benchmarks are reasonable on modern computing platforms. (authors)

  6. Out-of-Core Streamline Visualization on Large Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueng, Shyh-Kuang; Sikorski, K.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1997-01-01

    It's advantageous for computational scientists to have the capability to perform interactive visualization on their desktop workstations. For data on large unstructured meshes, this capability is not generally available. In particular, particle tracing on unstructured grids can result in a high percentage of non-contiguous memory accesses and therefore may perform very poorly with virtual memory paging schemes. The alternative of visualizing a lower resolution of the data degrades the original high-resolution calculations. This paper presents an out-of-core approach for interactive streamline construction on large unstructured tetrahedral meshes containing millions of elements. The out-of-core algorithm uses an octree to partition and restructure the raw data into subsets stored into disk files for fast data retrieval. A memory management policy tailored to the streamline calculations is used such that during the streamline construction only a very small amount of data are brought into the main memory on demand. By carefully scheduling computation and data fetching, the overhead of reading data from the disk is significantly reduced and good memory performance results. This out-of-core algorithm makes possible interactive streamline visualization of large unstructured-grid data sets on a single mid-range workstation with relatively low main-memory capacity: 5-20 megabytes. Our test results also show that this approach is much more efficient than relying on virtual memory and operating system's paging algorithms.

  7. Robust and efficient overset grid assembly for partitioned unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Roget, Beatrice Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a method to perform efficient and automated Overset Grid Assembly (OGA) on a system of overlapping unstructured meshes in a parallel computing environment where all meshes are partitioned into multiple mesh-blocks and processed on multiple cores. The main task of the overset grid assembler is to identify, in parallel, among all points in the overlapping mesh system, at which points the flow solution should be computed (field points), interpolated (receptor points), or ignored (hole points). Point containment search or donor search, an algorithm to efficiently determine the cell that contains a given point, is the core procedure necessary for accomplishing this task. Donor search is particularly challenging for partitioned unstructured meshes because of the complex irregular boundaries that are often created during partitioning. Another challenge arises because of the large variation in the type of mesh-block overlap and the resulting large load imbalance on multiple processors. Desirable traits for the grid assembly method are efficiency (requiring only a small fraction of the solver time), robustness (correct identification of all point types), and full automation (no user input required other than the mesh system). Additionally, the method should be scalable, which is an important challenge due to the inherent load imbalance. This paper describes a fully-automated grid assembly method, which can use two different donor search algorithms. One is based on the use of auxiliary grids and Exact Inverse Maps (EIM), and the other is based on the use of Alternating Digital Trees (ADT). The EIM method is demonstrated to be more efficient than the ADT method, while retaining robustness. An adaptive load re-balance algorithm is also designed and implemented, which considerably improves the scalability of the method.

  8. PLUM: Parallel Load Balancing for Unstructured Adaptive Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing large-scale problems that require grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. Unfortunately, an efficient parallel implementation is difficult to achieve, primarily due to the load imbalance created by the dynamically-changing nonuniform grid. To address this problem, we have developed PLUM, an automatic portable framework for performing adaptive large-scale numerical computations in a message-passing environment. First, we present an efficient parallel implementation of a tetrahedral mesh adaption scheme. Extremely promising parallel performance is achieved for various refinement and coarsening strategies on a realistic-sized domain. Next we describe PLUM, a novel method for dynamically balancing the processor workloads in adaptive grid computations. This research includes interfacing the parallel mesh adaption procedure based on actual flow solutions to a data remapping module, and incorporating an efficient parallel mesh repartitioner. A significant runtime improvement is achieved by observing that data movement for a refinement step should be performed after the edge-marking phase but before the actual subdivision. We also present optimal and heuristic remapping cost metrics that can accurately predict the total overhead for data redistribution. Several experiments are performed to verify the effectiveness of PLUM on sequences of dynamically adapted unstructured grids. Portability is demonstrated by presenting results on the two vastly different architectures of the SP2 and the Origin2OOO. Additionally, we evaluate the performance of five state-of-the-art partitioning algorithms that can be used within PLUM. It is shown that for certain classes of unsteady adaption, globally repartitioning the computational mesh produces higher quality results than diffusive repartitioning schemes. We also demonstrate that a coarse starting mesh produces high quality load balancing, at

  9. Multiphase Flow of Immiscible Fluids on Unstructured Moving Meshes.

    PubMed

    Misztal, Marek K; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam; Fursund, Jens; Christensen, Brian Bunch; Bærentzen, J Andreas; Bridson, Robert

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted by a majority of fluid simulation techniques that use tetrahedral meshes. We characterize fluid simulation as an optimization problem allowing for full coupling of the pressure and velocity fields and the incorporation of a second-order surface energy. We introduce a preconditioner based on the diagonal Schur complement and solve our optimization on the GPU. We provide the results of parameter studies as well as a performance analysis of our method, together with suggestions for performance optimization. PMID:23836703

  10. Multiphase flow of immiscible fluids on unstructured moving meshes.

    PubMed

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam; Fursund, Jens; Christensen, Brian Bunch; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Bridson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted by a majority of fluid simulation techniques that use tetrahedral meshes. We characterize fluid simulation as an optimization problem allowing for full coupling of the pressure and velocity fields and the incorporation of a second-order surface energy. We introduce a preconditioner based on the diagonal Schur complement and solve our optimization on the GPU. We provide the results of parameter studies as well as a performance analysis of our method, together with suggestions for performance optimization. PMID:24201322

  11. LES on unstructured deforming meshes: Towards reciprocating IC engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, D. C.; Jansen, K.

    1996-01-01

    A variable explicit/implicit characteristics-based advection scheme that is second-order accurate in space and time has been developed recently for unstructured deforming meshes (O'Rourke & Sahota 1996a). To explore the suitability of this methodology for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES), three subgrid-scale turbulence models have been implemented in the CHAD CFD code (O'Rourke & Sahota 1996b): a constant-coefficient Smagorinsky model, a dynamic Smagorinsky model for flows having one or more directions of statistical homogeneity, and a Lagrangian dynamic Smagorinsky model for flows having no spatial or temporal homogeneity (Meneveau et al. 1996). Computations have been made for three canonical flows, progressing towards the intended application of in-cylinder flow in a reciprocating engine. Grid sizes were selected to be comparable to the coarsest meshes used in earlier spectral LES studies. Quantitative results are reported for decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and for a planar channel flow. Computations are compared to experimental measurements, to Direct-Numerical Simulation (DNS) data, and to Rapid-Distortion Theory (RDT) where appropriate. Generally satisfactory evolution of first and second moments is found on these coarse meshes; deviations are attributed to insufficient mesh resolution. Issues include mesh resolution and computational requirements for a specified level of accuracy, analytic characterization of the filtering implied by the numerical method, wall treatment, and inflow boundary conditions. To resolve these issues, finer-mesh simulations and computations of a simplified axisymmetric reciprocating piston-cylinder assembly are in progress.

  12. Radiation transport on unstructured mesh with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.C.; Drumm, C.R.

    2000-07-01

    This paper summarizes the developmental work on a deterministic transport code that provides multidimensional radiation transport capabilities on an unstructured mesh. The second-order form of the Boltzmann transport equation is solved utilizing the discrete ordinates angular differencing and the Galerkin finite element spatial differencing. The discretized system, which couples the spatial-angular dependence, is solved simultaneously using a parallel conjugate-gradient (CG) iterative solver. This approach eliminates the need for the conventional inner iterations over the discrete directions and is well-suited for massively parallel computers.

  13. Recent Improvements in Aerodynamic Design Optimization on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    2000-01-01

    Recent improvements in an unstructured-grid method for large-scale aerodynamic design are presented. Previous work had shown such computations to be prohibitively long in a sequential processing environment. Also, robust adjoint solutions and mesh movement procedures were difficult to realize, particularly for viscous flows. To overcome these limiting factors, a set of design codes based on a discrete adjoint method is extended to a multiprocessor environment using a shared memory approach. A nearly linear speedup is demonstrated, and the consistency of the linearizations is shown to remain valid. The full linearization of the residual is used to precondition the adjoint system, and a significantly improved convergence rate is obtained. A new mesh movement algorithm is implemented and several advantages over an existing technique are presented. Several design cases are shown for turbulent flows in two and three dimensions.

  14. PLUM: Parallel Load Balancing for Adaptive Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Mesh adaption is a powerful tool for efficient unstructured-grid computations but causes load imbalance among processors on a parallel machine. We present a novel method called PLUM to dynamically balance the processor workloads with a global view. This paper presents the implementation and integration of all major components within our dynamic load balancing strategy for adaptive grid calculations. Mesh adaption, repartitioning, processor assignment, and remapping are critical components of the framework that must be accomplished rapidly and efficiently so as not to cause a significant overhead to the numerical simulation. A data redistribution model is also presented that predicts the remapping cost on the SP2. This model is required to determine whether the gain from a balanced workload distribution offsets the cost of data movement. Results presented in this paper demonstrate that PLUM is an effective dynamic load balancing strategy which remains viable on a large number of processors.

  15. 3D unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.

    1997-12-31

    Three unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes are currently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first code is ATTILA, which uses an unstructured tetrahedral mesh in conjunction with standard Sn (discrete-ordinates) angular discretization, standard multigroup energy discretization, and linear-discontinuous spatial differencing. ATTILA solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation using source iteration in conjunction with diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. DANTE is designed to run primarily on workstations. The second code is DANTE, which uses a hybrid finite-element mesh consisting of arbitrary combinations of hexahedra, wedges, pyramids, and tetrahedra. DANTE solves several second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation including the even-parity equation, the odd-parity equation, and a new equation called the self-adjoint angular flux equation. DANTE also offers three angular discretization options: $S{_}n$ (discrete-ordinates), $P{_}n$ (spherical harmonics), and $SP{_}n$ (simplified spherical harmonics). DANTE is designed to run primarily on massively parallel message-passing machines, such as the ASCI-Blue machines at LANL and LLNL. The third code is PERICLES, which uses the same hybrid finite-element mesh as DANTE, but solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation rather than a second-order self-adjoint form. DANTE uses a standard $S{_}n$ discretization in angle in conjunction with trilinear-discontinuous spatial differencing, and diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. PERICLES was initially designed to run on workstations, but a version for massively parallel message-passing machines will be built. The three codes will be described in detail and computational results will be presented.

  16. Dynamic Rupture Modeling in Three Dimensions on Unstructured Meshes Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelties, C.; Käser, M.

    2010-12-01

    We will present recent developments concerning the extensions of the ADER-DG method to solve three dimensional dynamic rupture problems on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. The simulation of earthquake rupture dynamics and seismic wave propagation using a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method in 2D was recently presented by J. de la Puente et al. (2009). A considerable feature of this study regarding spontaneous rupture problems was the combination of the DG scheme and a time integration method using Arbitrarily high-order DERivatives (ADER) to provide high accuracy in space and time with the discretization on unstructured meshes. In the resulting discrete velocity-stress formulation of the elastic wave equations variables are naturally discontinuous at the interfaces between elements. The so-called Riemann problem can then be solved to obtain well defined values of the variables at the discontinuity itself. This is in particular valid for the fault at which a certain friction law has to be evaluated. Hence, the fault’s geometry is honored by the computational mesh. This way, complex fault planes can be modeled adequately with small elements while fast mesh coarsening is possible with increasing distance from the fault. Due to the strict locality of the scheme using only direct neighbor communication, excellent parallel behavior can be observed. A further advantage of the scheme is that it avoids spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require artificial Kelvin-Voigt damping or filtering of synthetic seismograms. In order to test the accuracy of the ADER-DG method the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) benchmark for spontaneous rupture simulations was employed. Reference: J. de la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, and M. Käser (2009), Dynamic rupture modeling on unstructured meshes using a discontinuous Galerkin method, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 114, B10302, doi:10.1029/2008JB006271

  17. Generating unstructured nuclear reactor core meshes in parallel

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev; Tautges, Timothy J.

    2014-10-24

    Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor core examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a ¼ pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.

  18. Generating unstructured nuclear reactor core meshes in parallel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jain, Rajeev; Tautges, Timothy J.

    2014-10-24

    Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor coremore » examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a ¼ pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.« less

  19. Multigrid Strategies for Viscous Flow Solvers on Anisotropic Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Movriplis, Dimitri J.

    1998-01-01

    Unstructured multigrid techniques for relieving the stiffness associated with high-Reynolds number viscous flow simulations on extremely stretched grids are investigated. One approach consists of employing a semi-coarsening or directional-coarsening technique, based on the directions of strong coupling within the mesh, in order to construct more optimal coarse grid levels. An alternate approach is developed which employs directional implicit smoothing with regular fully coarsened multigrid levels. The directional implicit smoothing is obtained by constructing implicit lines in the unstructured mesh based on the directions of strong coupling. Both approaches yield large increases in convergence rates over the traditional explicit full-coarsening multigrid algorithm. However, maximum benefits are achieved by combining the two approaches in a coupled manner into a single algorithm. An order of magnitude increase in convergence rate over the traditional explicit full-coarsening algorithm is demonstrated, and convergence rates for high-Reynolds number viscous flows which are independent of the grid aspect ratio are obtained. Further acceleration is provided by incorporating low-Mach-number preconditioning techniques, and a Newton-GMRES strategy which employs the multigrid scheme as a preconditioner. The compounding effects of these various techniques on speed of convergence is documented through several example test cases.

  20. Numerical simulation of immiscible viscous fingering using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Salinas, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Muggeridge, A. H.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Displacement of one fluid by another in porous media occurs in various settings including hydrocarbon recovery, CO2 storage and water purification. When the invading fluid is of lower viscosity than the resident fluid, the displacement front is subject to a Saffman-Taylor instability and is unstable to transverse perturbations. These instabilities can grow, leading to fingering of the invading fluid. Numerical simulation of viscous fingering is challenging. The physics is controlled by a complex interplay of viscous and diffusive forces and it is necessary to ensure physical diffusion dominates numerical diffusion to obtain converged solutions. This typically requires the use of high mesh resolution and high order numerical methods. This is computationally expensive. We demonstrate here the use of a novel control volume - finite element (CVFE) method along with dynamic unstructured mesh adaptivity to simulate viscous fingering with higher accuracy and lower computational cost than conventional methods. Our CVFE method employs a discontinuous representation for both pressure and velocity, allowing the use of smaller control volumes (CVs). This yields higher resolution of the saturation field which is represented CV-wise. Moreover, dynamic mesh adaptivity allows high mesh resolution to be employed where it is required to resolve the fingers and lower resolution elsewhere. We use our results to re-examine the existing criteria that have been proposed to govern the onset of instability.Mesh adaptivity requires the mapping of data from one mesh to another. Conventional methods such as consistent interpolation do not readily generalise to discontinuous fields and are non-conservative. We further contribute a general framework for interpolation of CV fields by Galerkin projection. The method is conservative, higher order and yields improved results, particularly with higher order or discontinuous elements where existing approaches are often excessively diffusive.

  1. Unstructured Mesh Methods for the Simulation of Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime; Bibb, K. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the research work undertaken at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The aim of this research is to identify effective algorithms and methodologies for the efficient and routine solution of hypersonic viscous flows about re-entry vehicles. For over ten years we have received support from NASA to develop unstructured mesh methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics. As a result of this effort a methodology based on the use, of unstructured adapted meshes of tetrahedra and finite volume flow solvers has been developed. A number of gridding algorithms flow solvers, and adaptive strategies have been proposed. The most successful algorithms developed from the basis of the unstructured mesh system FELISA. The FELISA system has been extensively for the analysis of transonic and hypersonic flows about complete vehicle configurations. The system is highly automatic and allows for the routine aerodynamic analysis of complex configurations starting from CAD data. The code has been parallelized and utilizes efficient solution algorithms. For hypersonic flows, a version of the, code which incorporates real gas effects, has been produced. One of the latest developments before the start of this grant was to extend the system to include viscous effects. This required the development of viscous generators, capable of generating the anisotropic grids required to represent boundary layers, and viscous flow solvers. In figures I and 2, we show some sample hypersonic viscous computations using the developed viscous generators and solvers. Although these initial results were encouraging, it became apparent that in order to develop a fully functional capability for viscous flows, several advances in gridding, solution accuracy, robustness and efficiency were required. As part of this research we have developed: 1) automatic meshing techniques and the corresponding computer codes have been delivered to NASA and implemented into the GridEx system, 2) a finite

  2. A flexible unstructured mesh generation algorithm suitable for block partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Karamete, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the logic of a dynamic algorithm for an arbitrarily prescribed geometry. The generated meshes show Delaunay property both in 2D and 3D. The algorithm requires minimal surface information in 3D. The surface triangles appear as the direct consequence of interior tetrahedration. The adopted successive refinement scheme results in such a node distribution that it is not needed to check boundary conformity. Further computational saving is provided by using a special binary tree (ADT). The generating front can not be determined a-priori as opposed to the moving front techniques. This feature can effectively be used to partition the geometry into equal element sized blocks while generating the mesh for parallel computing purposes. The algorithm shows flexibility to split the geometry into blocks at mesh generation time.

  3. Gradient Calculation Methods on Arbitrary Polyhedral Unstructured Meshes for Cell-Centered CFD Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sozer, Emre; Brehm, Christoph; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2014-01-01

    A survey of gradient reconstruction methods for cell-centered data on unstructured meshes is conducted within the scope of accuracy assessment. Formal order of accuracy, as well as error magnitudes for each of the studied methods, are evaluated on a complex mesh of various cell types through consecutive local scaling of an analytical test function. The tests highlighted several gradient operator choices that can consistently achieve 1st order accuracy regardless of cell type and shape. The tests further offered error comparisons for given cell types, leading to the observation that the "ideal" gradient operator choice is not universal. Practical implications of the results are explored via CFD solutions of a 2D inviscid standing vortex, portraying the discretization error properties. A relatively naive, yet largely unexplored, approach of local curvilinear stencil transformation exhibited surprisingly favorable properties

  4. Pressure boundary conditions for incompressible flow using unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, S.R.; Murthy, J.Y.

    1997-10-01

    A large variety of industrial problems require the specification of pressure boundary conditions. In many industrial pipe flows, for example, the mass flow rate is not known a priori; the flow is driven by a specified pressure difference between inlet and outlet. This article presents a numerical method for computing incompressible flows with given pressure boundary conditions. Unstructured meshes composed of arbitrary polyhedra are considered in a cell-centered, co-located pressure-velocity formulation. The SIMPLE algorithm of Patankar and Spalding is extended to develop correction equations for boundary static pressure and boundary mass flux through an added-dissipation scheme. The procedure is validated against published benchmarks and shown to perform satisfactorily.

  5. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  6. Euler Flow Computations on Non-Matching Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumaste, Udayan

    1999-01-01

    Advanced fluid solvers to predict aerodynamic performance-coupled treatment of multiple fields are described. The interaction between the fluid and structural components in the bladed regions of the engine is investigated with respect to known blade failures caused by either flutter or forced vibrations. Methods are developed to describe aeroelastic phenomena for internal flows in turbomachinery by accounting for the increased geometric complexity, mutual interaction between adjacent structural components and presence of thermal and geometric loading. The computer code developed solves the full three dimensional aeroelastic problem of-stage. The results obtained show that flow computations can be performed on non-matching finite-volume unstructured meshes with second order spatial accuracy.

  7. Mesh quality effects on the accuracy of CFD solutions on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Aaron; Sankaran, Venkateswaran

    2011-08-01

    The order of accuracy and error magnitude of node- and cell-centered schemes are examined on representative unstructured meshes and flowfield solutions for computational fluid dynamics. Specifically, we investigate the properties of inviscid and viscous flux discretizations for isotropic and highly stretched meshes using the Method of Manufactured Solutions. Grid quality effects are studied by randomly perturbing the base meshes and cataloguing the error convergence as a function of grid size. For isotropic grids, node-centered approaches produce less error than cell-centered approaches. Moreover, a corrected node-centered scheme is shown to maintain third order accuracy for the inviscid terms on arbitrary triangular meshes. In contrast, for stretched meshes, cell-centered schemes are favored, with cell-centered prismatic approaches in particular showing the lowest levels of error. In three dimensions, simple flux integrations on non-planar control volume faces lead to first-order solution errors, while second-order accuracy is recovered by triangulation of the non-planar faces.

  8. An efficient approach to unstructured mesh hydrodynamics on the cell broadband engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    Unstructured mesh physics for the Cell Broadband Engine (CBE) has received little or no attention to date, largely because the CBE architecture poses particular challenges for unstructured mesh algorithms. The most common SPU memory management strategies cannot be applied to the irregular memory access patterns of unstructured meshes, and the SPU vector instruction set does not support the indirect addressing needed by connectivity arrays. This paper presents an approach to unstructured mesh physics that addresses these challenges, by creating a new mesh data structure and reorganizing code to give efficient CBE performance. The approach is demonstrated on the FLAG production hydrodynamics code using standard test problems, and results show an average speedup of more than 5x over the original code.

  9. An efficient approach to unstructured mesh hydrodynamics on the cell broadband engine (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, Charles R

    2010-12-14

    Unstructured mesh physics for the Cell Broadband Engine (CBE) has received little or no attention to date, largely because the CBE architecture poses particular challenges for unstructured mesh algorithms. SPU memory management strategies such as data preloading cannot be applied to the irregular memory storage patterns of unstructured meshes; and the SPU vector instruction set does not support the indirect addressing needed by connectivity arrays. This paper presents an approach to unstructured mesh physics that addresses these challenges, by creating a new mesh data structure and reorganizing code to give efficient CBE performance. The approach is demonstrated on the FLAG production hydrodynamics code using standard test problems, and results show an average speedup of more than 5x over the original code.

  10. Accurate, finite-volume methods for 3D MHD on unstructured Lagrangian meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.C.; Rousculp, C.L.

    1998-10-01

    Previous 2D methods for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) have contributed both to development of core code capability and to physics applications relevant to AGEX pulsed-power experiments. This strategy is being extended to 3D by development of a modular extension of an ASCI code. Extension to 3D not only increases complexity by problem size, but also introduces new physics, such as magnetic helicity transport. The authors have developed a method which incorporates all known conservation properties into the difference scheme on a Lagrangian unstructured mesh. Because the method does not depend on the mesh structure, mesh refinement is possible during a calculation to prevent the well known problem of mesh tangling. Arbitrary polyhedral cells are decomposed into tetrahedrons. The action of the magnetic vector potential, A {center_dot} {delta}l, is centered on the edges of this extended mesh. For ideal flow, this maintains {del} {center_dot} B = 0 to round-off error. Vertex forces are derived by the variation of magnetic energy with respect to vertex positions, F = {minus}{partial_derivative}W{sub B}/{partial_derivative}r. This assures symmetry as well as magnetic flux, momentum, and energy conservation. The method is local so that parallelization by domain decomposition is natural for large meshes. In addition, a simple, ideal-gas, finite pressure term has been included. The resistive diffusion part is calculated using the support operator method, to obtain an energy conservative, symmetric method on an arbitrary mesh. Implicit time difference equations are solved by preconditioned, conjugate gradient methods. Results of convergence tests are presented. Initial results of an annular Z-pinch implosion problem illustrate the application of these methods to multi-material problems.

  11. Euler and Navier-Stokes computations for two-dimensional geometries using unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    A general purpose unstructured mesh solver for steady-state two-dimensional inviscid and viscous flows is described. The efficiency and accuracy of the method are enhanced by the simultaneous use of adaptive meshing and an unstructured multigrid technique. A method for generating highly stretched triangulations in regions of viscous flow is outlined, and a procedure for implementing an algebraic turbulence model on unstructured meshes is described. Results are shown for external and internal inviscid flows and for turbulent viscous flow over a multi-element airfoil configuration.

  12. An unstructured-mesh atmospheric model for nonhydrostatic dynamics: Towards optimal mesh resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmelter, Joanna; Zhang, Zhao; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2015-08-01

    The paper advances the limited-area anelastic model (Smolarkiewicz et al. (2013) [45]) for investigation of nonhydrostatic dynamics in mesoscale atmospheric flows. New developments include the extension to a tetrahedral-based median-dual option for unstructured meshes and a static mesh adaptivity technique using an error indicator based on inherent properties of the Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA). The model employs semi-implicit nonoscillatory forward-in-time integrators for soundproof PDEs, built on MPDATA and a robust non-symmetric Krylov-subspace elliptic solver. Finite-volume spatial discretisation adopts an edge-based data structure. Simulations of stratified orographic flows and the associated gravity-wave phenomena in media with uniform and variable dispersive properties verify the advancement and demonstrate the potential of heterogeneous anisotropic discretisation with large variation in spatial resolution for study of complex stratified flows that can be computationally unattainable with regular grids.

  13. Numerical study of Taylor bubbles with adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar; Hasan, Abbas; Azzopardi, Barry

    2014-11-01

    The Taylor bubble is a single long bubble which nearly fills the entire cross section of a liquid-filled circular tube. This type of bubble flow regime often occurs in gas-liquid slug flows in many industrial applications, including oil-and-gas production, chemical and nuclear reactors, and heat exchangers. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of Taylor bubbles rising in a vertical pipe filled with oils of extremely high viscosity (mimicking the ``heavy oils'' found in the oil-and-gas industry). A modelling and simulation framework is presented here which can modify and adapt anisotropic unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of bubble rise and reduce the computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control-volume and finite-element formulation, a ``volume of fluid''-type method for the interface capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Numerical examples of some benchmark tests and the dynamics of Taylor bubbles are presented to show the capability of this method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  14. Achieving high sustained performance in an unstructured mesh CFD application

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E; Anderson, W K; Gropp, W D; Kaushik, D K; Smith, B F

    1999-12-10

    This paper highlights a three-year project by an interdisciplinary team on a legacy F77 computational fluid dynamics code, with the aim of demonstrating that implicit unstructured grid simulations can execute at rates not far from those of explicit structured grid codes, provided attention is paid to data motion complexity and the reuse of data positioned at the levels of the memory hierarchy closest to the processor, in addition to traditional operation count complexity. The demonstration code is from NASA and the enabling parallel hardware and (freely available) software toolkit are from DOE, but the resulting methodology should be broadly applicable, and the hardware limitations exposed should allow programmers and vendors of parallel platforms to focus with greater encouragement on sparse codes with indirect addressing. This snapshot of ongoing work shows a performance of 15 microseconds per degree of freedom to steady-state convergence of Euler flow on a mesh with 2.8 million vertices using 3072 dual-processor nodes of ASCI Red, corresponding to a sustained floating-point rate of 0.227 Tflop/s.

  15. On essentially non-oscillatory schemes on unstructured meshes: Analysis and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abgrall, R.

    1992-01-01

    A few years ago, the class of Essentially Non-Oscillatory Schemes for the numerical simulation of hyperbolic equations and systems was constructed. Since then, some extensions have been made to multidimensional simulations of compressible flows, mainly in the context of very regular structured meshes. In this paper, we first recall and improve the results of an earlier paper about non-oscillatory reconstruction on unstructured meshes, emphasizing the effective calculation of the reconstruction. Then we describe a class of numerical schemes on unstructured meshes and give some applications for its third order version. This demonstrates that a higher order of accuracy is indeed obtained, even on very irregular meshes.

  16. MESH2D GRID GENERATOR DESIGN AND USE

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.; Smith, F.

    2012-01-20

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j{sub 0}) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations. The overall mesh is constructed from grid zones that are typically then subdivided into a collection of smaller grid cells. The grid zones usually correspond to distinct materials or larger-scale geometric shapes. The structured grid zones are identified through uppercase indices (I,J). Subdivision of zonal regions into grid cells can be done uniformly, or nonuniformly using either a polynomial or geometric skewing algorithm. Grid cells may be concentrated backward, forward, or toward both ends. Figure 1 illustrates the above concepts in the context of a simple four zone grid.

  17. High-order ENO schemes for unstructured meshes based on least-squares reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Ollivier-Gooch, C.F.

    1997-03-01

    High-order accurate schemes for conservation laws for unstructured meshes are not nearly so well advanced as such schemes for structured meshes. Consequently, little or nothing is known about the possible practical advantages of high-order discretization on unstructured meshes. This article is part of an ongoing effort to develop high-order schemes for unstructured meshes to the point where meaningful information can be obtained about the trade-offs involved in using spatial discretizations of higher than second-order accuracy on unstructured meshes. This article describes a high-order accurate ENO reconstruction scheme, called DD-L{sub 2}-ENO, for use with vertex-centered upwind flow solution algorithms on unstructured meshes. The solution of conservation equations in this context can be broken naturally into three phases: (1) solution reconstruction, in which a polynomial approximation of the solution is obtained in each control volume. (2) Flux integration around each control volume, using an appropriate flux function and a quadrature rule with accuracy commensurate with that of the reconstruction. (3) Time evolution, which may be implicit, explicit, multigrid, or some hybrid.

  18. Application of a finite element algorithm for high speed viscous flows using structured and unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vemaganti, Gururaja R.; Wieting, Allan R.

    1990-01-01

    A higher-order streamline upwinding Petrov-Galerkin finite element method is employed for high speed viscous flow analysis using structured and unstructured meshes. For a Mach 8.03 shock interference problem, successive mesh adaptation was performed using an adaptive remeshing method. Results from the finite element algorithm compare well with both experimental data and results from an upwind cell-centered method. Finite element results for a Mach 14.1 flow over a 24 degree compression corner compare well with experimental data and two other numerical algorithms for both structured and unstructured meshes.

  19. A New Approach to Parallel Dynamic Partitioning for Adaptive Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Gao, Guang R.

    1999-01-01

    Classical mesh partitioning algorithms were designed for rather static situations, and their straightforward application in a dynamical framework may lead to unsatisfactory results, e.g., excessive data migration among processors. Furthermore, special attention should be paid to their amenability to parallelization. In this paper, a novel parallel method for the dynamic partitioning of adaptive unstructured meshes is described. It is based on a linear representation of the mesh using self-avoiding walks.

  20. An Interpreted Language and System for the Visualization of Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    We present an interpreted language and system supporting the visualization of unstructured meshes and the manipulation of shapes defined in terms of mesh subsets. The language features primitives inspired by geometric modeling, mathematical morphology and algebraic topology. The adaptation of the topology ideas to an interpreted environment, along with support for programming constructs such, as user function definition, provide a flexible system for analyzing a mesh and for calculating with shapes defined in terms of the mesh. We present results demonstrating some of the capabilities of the language, based on an implementation called the Shape Calculator, for tetrahedral meshes in R^3.

  1. Verification of Unstructured Mesh Capabilities in MCNP6 for Reactor Physics Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Timothy P.; Martz, Roger L.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Martin, William R.

    2012-08-22

    New unstructured mesh capabilities in MCNP6 (developmental version during summer 2012) show potential for conducting multi-physics analyses by coupling MCNP to a finite element solver such as Abaqus/CAE[2]. Before these new capabilities can be utilized, the ability of MCNP to accurately estimate eigenvalues and pin powers using an unstructured mesh must first be verified. Previous work to verify the unstructured mesh capabilities in MCNP was accomplished using the Godiva sphere [1], and this work attempts to build on that. To accomplish this, a criticality benchmark and a fuel assembly benchmark were used for calculations in MCNP using both the Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) native to MCNP and the unstructured mesh geometry generated using Abaqus/CAE. The Big Ten criticality benchmark [3] was modeled due to its geometry being similar to that of a reactor fuel pin. The C5G7 3-D Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Assembly Benchmark [4] was modeled to test the unstructured mesh capabilities on a reactor-type problem.

  2. A Robust and Scalable Software Library for Parallel Adaptive Refinement on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, John Z.; Norton, Charles D.; Cwik, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    The design and implementation of Pyramid, a software library for performing parallel adaptive mesh refinement (PAMR) on unstructured meshes, is described. This software library can be easily used in a variety of unstructured parallel computational applications, including parallel finite element, parallel finite volume, and parallel visualization applications using triangular or tetrahedral meshes. The library contains a suite of well-designed and efficiently implemented modules that perform operations in a typical PAMR process. Among these are mesh quality control during successive parallel adaptive refinement (typically guided by a local-error estimator), parallel load-balancing, and parallel mesh partitioning using the ParMeTiS partitioner. The Pyramid library is implemented in Fortran 90 with an interface to the Message-Passing Interface (MPI) library, supporting code efficiency, modularity, and portability. An EM waveguide filter application, adaptively refined using the Pyramid library, is illustrated.

  3. WLS-ENO: Weighted-least-squares based essentially non-oscillatory schemes for finite volume methods on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxu; Jiao, Xiangmin

    2016-06-01

    ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) and WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) schemes are widely used high-order schemes for solving partial differential equations (PDEs), especially hyperbolic conservation laws with piecewise smooth solutions. For structured meshes, these techniques can achieve high order accuracy for smooth functions while being non-oscillatory near discontinuities. For unstructured meshes, which are needed for complex geometries, similar schemes are required but they are much more challenging. We propose a new family of non-oscillatory schemes, called WLS-ENO, in the context of solving hyperbolic conservation laws using finite-volume methods over unstructured meshes. WLS-ENO is derived based on Taylor series expansion and solved using a weighted least squares formulation. Unlike other non-oscillatory schemes, the WLS-ENO does not require constructing sub-stencils, and hence it provides a more flexible framework and is less sensitive to mesh quality. We present rigorous analysis of the accuracy and stability of WLS-ENO, and present numerical results in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D for a number of benchmark problems, and also report some comparisons against WENO.

  4. A comparison of gradient estimation methods for volume rendering on unstructured meshes.

    PubMed

    Correa, Carlos D; Hero, Robert; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a study of gradient estimation methods for rendering unstructured-mesh volume data. Gradient estimation is necessary for rendering shaded isosurfaces and specular highlights, which provide important cues for shape and depth. Gradient estimation has been widely studied and deployed for regular-grid volume data to achieve local illumination effects, but has been, otherwise, for unstructured-mesh data. As a result, most of the unstructured-mesh volume visualizations made so far were unlit. In this paper, we present a comprehensive study of gradient estimation methods for unstructured meshes with respect to their cost and performance. Through a number of benchmarks, we discuss the effects of mesh quality and scalar function complexity in the accuracy of the reconstruction, and their impact in lighting-enabled volume rendering. Based on our study, we also propose two heuristic improvements to the gradient reconstruction process. The first heuristic improves the rendering quality with a hybrid algorithm that combines the results of the multiple reconstruction methods, based on the properties of a given mesh. The second heuristic improves the efficiency of its GPU implementation, by restricting the computation of the gradient on a fixed-size local neighborhood. PMID:21233515

  5. Large-Scale Parallel Unstructured Mesh Computations for 3D High-Lift Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Pirzadeh, S.

    1999-01-01

    A complete "geometry to drag-polar" analysis capability for three-dimensional high-lift configurations is described. The approach is based on the use of unstructured meshes in order to enable rapid turnaround for complicated geometries which arise in high-lift configurations. Special attention is devoted to creating a capability for enabling analyses on highly resolved grids. Unstructured meshes of several million vertices are initially generated on a work-station, and subsequently refined on a supercomputer. The flow is solved on these refined meshes on large parallel computers using an unstructured agglomeration multigrid algorithm. Good prediction of lift and drag throughout the range of incidences is demonstrated on a transport take-off configuration using up to 24.7 million grid points. The feasibility of using this approach in a production environment on existing parallel machines is demonstrated, as well as the scalability of the solver on machines using up to 1450 processors.

  6. Large-scale Parallel Unstructured Mesh Computations for 3D High-lift Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Pirzadeh, S.

    1999-01-01

    A complete "geometry to drag-polar" analysis capability for the three-dimensional high-lift configurations is described. The approach is based on the use of unstructured meshes in order to enable rapid turnaround for complicated geometries that arise in high-lift configurations. Special attention is devoted to creating a capability for enabling analyses on highly resolved grids. Unstructured meshes of several million vertices are initially generated on a work-station, and subsequently refined on a supercomputer. The flow is solved on these refined meshes on large parallel computers using an unstructured agglomeration multigrid algorithm. Good prediction of lift and drag throughout the range of incidences is demonstrated on a transport take-off configuration using up to 24.7 million grid points. The feasibility of using this approach in a production environment on existing parallel machines is demonstrated, as well as the scalability of the solver on machines using up to 1450 processors.

  7. Large-Scale Parallel Unstructured Mesh Computations for 3D High-Lift Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Pirzadeh, S.

    1999-01-01

    A complete "geometry to drag-polar" analysis capability for three-dimensional high-lift configurations is described. The approach is based on the use of unstructured meshes in order to enable rapid turnaround for complicated geometries which arise in high-lift con gurations. Special attention is devoted to creating a capability for enabling analyses on highly resolved grids. Unstructured meshes of several million vertices are initially generated on a work-station, and subsequently refined on a supercomputer. The flow is solved on these refined meshes on large parallel computers using an unstructured agglomeration multigrid algorithm. Good prediction of lift and drag throughout the range of incidences is demonstrated on a transport take-off configuration using up to 24.7 million grid points. The feasibility of using this approach in a production environment on existing parallel machines is demonstrated, as well as the scalability of the solver on machines using up to 1450 processors.

  8. Adaptive unstructured meshing for thermal stress analysis of built-up structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive unstructured meshing technique for mechanical and thermal stress analysis of built-up structures has been developed. A triangular membrane finite element and a new plate bending element are evaluated on a panel with a circular cutout and a frame stiffened panel. The adaptive unstructured meshing technique, without a priori knowledge of the solution to the problem, generates clustered elements only where needed. An improved solution accuracy is obtained at a reduced problem size and analysis computational time as compared to the results produced by the standard finite element procedure.

  9. The solution of the two-dimensional incompressible flow equations on unstructured triangular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Morgan

    1993-05-01

    A numerical method for calculating two-dimensional turbulent incompressible flow on unstructured triangular meshes is developed. A primitive variable formulation is used. The Helmholtz pressure equation algorithm is used to enforce the velocity continuity relation for incompressible flow. A careful treatment of the pressure dissipation model is presented. A standard k-epsilon turbulence model with wall functions is used to provide closure for the governing equations. A backward-facing step turbulent flow is calculated using an unstructured triangular mesh, and the results are compared to experimental and computational data.

  10. Unstructured mesh generation and landcover-based resistance for hydrodynamic modeling of urban flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Jochen E.; Sanders, Brett F.; Smith, Martin J.; Wright, Nigel G.

    2008-12-01

    Urban flood inundation modeling with a hydrodynamic flow solver is addressed in this paper, focusing on strategies to effectively integrate geospatial data for unstructured mesh generation, building representation and flow resistance parameterization. Data considered include Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) terrain height surveys, aerial imagery and vector datasets such as building footprint polygons. First, a unstructured mesh-generation technique we term the building-hole method (BH) is developed whereby building footprint data define interior domain boundaries or mesh holes. A wall boundary condition depicts the impact of buildings on flood hydrodynamics. BH provides an alternative to the more commonly used method of raising terrain heights where buildings coincide with the mesh. We term this the building-block method (BB). Application of BH and BB to a flooding site in Glasgow, Scotland identifies a number of tradeoffs to consider at resolutions ranging from 1 to 5 m. At fine resolution, BH is shown to be similarly accurate but execute faster than BB. And at coarse resolution, BH is shown to preserve the geometry of buildings and maintain better accuracy than BB, but requires a longer run time. Meshes that ignore buildings completely ( no-building method or NB) also support surprisingly good flood inundation predictions at coarse resolution compared to BH and BB. NB also supports faster execution times than BH at coarse resolution because the latter uses localized refinements that mandate a greater number of computational cells. However, with mesh refinement, NB converges to a different (and presumably less-accurate) solution compared to BH and BB. Using the same test conditions, Hunter et al. [Hunter NM, Bates PD, Neelz S, Pender G, Villanueva I, Wright NG, Liang D, et al. Benchmarking 2D hydraulic models for urban flood simulations. ICE J Water Manage 2008;161(1):13-30] compared the performance of dynamic-wave and diffusive-wave models and reported that

  11. Parallel adaptive mesh-refining scheme on a three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral mesh and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Y.-Y.; Hsu, K.-H.; Shao, Y.-L.; Lee, Y.-M.; Jeng, Y.-W.; Wu, J.-S.

    2006-12-01

    The development of a parallel three-dimensional (3-D) adaptive mesh refinement (PAMR) scheme for an unstructured tetrahedral mesh using dynamic domain decomposition on a memory-distributed machine is presented in detail. A memory-saving cell-based data structure is designed such that the resulting mesh information can be readily utilized in both node- or cell-based numerical methods. The general procedures include isotropic refinement from one parent cell into eight child cells and then followed by anisotropic refinement which effectively removes hanging nodes. A simple but effective mesh-quality control mechanism is employed to preserve the mesh quality. The resulting parallel performance of this PAMR is found to scale approximately as N for N⩽32. Two test cases, including a particle method (parallel DSMC solver for rarefied gas dynamics) and an equation-based method (parallel Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver for electrostatic field), are used to demonstrate the generality of the PAMR module. It is argued that this PAMR scheme can be applied in any numerical method if the unstructured tetrahedral mesh is adopted.

  12. Unstructured and adaptive mesh generation for high Reynolds number viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for generating and adaptively refining a highly stretched unstructured mesh suitable for the computation of high-Reynolds-number viscous flows about arbitrary two-dimensional geometries was developed. The method is based on the Delaunay triangulation of a predetermined set of points and employs a local mapping in order to achieve the high stretching rates required in the boundary-layer and wake regions. The initial mesh-point distribution is determined in a geometry-adaptive manner which clusters points in regions of high curvature and sharp corners. Adaptive mesh refinement is achieved by adding new points in regions of large flow gradients, and locally retriangulating; thus, obviating the need for global mesh regeneration. Initial and adapted meshes about complex multi-element airfoil geometries are shown and compressible flow solutions are computed on these meshes.

  13. The adaptive GRP scheme for compressible fluid flows over unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiequan; Zhang, Yongjin

    2013-06-01

    Unstructured mesh methods have attracted much attention in CFD community due to the flexibility for dealing with complex geometries and the ability to easily incorporate adaptive (moving) mesh strategies. When the finite volume framework is applied, a reliable solver is crucial for the construction of numerical fluxes, for which the generalized Riemann problem (GRP) scheme undertakes such a task in the sense of second order accuracy. Combining these techniques yields a second order accurate adaptive generalized Riemann problem (AGRP) scheme for two dimensional compressible fluid flows over unstructured triangular meshes. Besides the generation of meshes, the main process of this combination consists of two ingredients: Fluid dynamical evolution and mesh redistribution. The fluid dynamical evolution ingredient serves to evolve the compressible fluid flows on a fixed nonuniform triangular mesh with the direct Eulerian GRP solver. The role of the mesh redistribution is to redistribute mesh points on which a conservative interpolation formula is adopted to calculate the cell-averages for the conservative variables, and the gradients of primitive variables are reconstructed using the least squares method. Several examples are taken from various contexts to demonstrate the performance of such a program.

  14. Selective refinement queries for volume visualization of unstructured tetrahedral meshes.

    PubMed

    Cignoni, Paolo; De Floriani, Leila; Magillo, Paola; Puppo, Enrico; Scopigno, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of the efficient visualization of large irregular volume data sets by exploiting a multiresolution model based on tetrahedral meshes. Multiresolution models, also called Level-Of-Detail (LOD) models, allow encoding the whole data set at a virtually continuous range of different resolutions. We have identified a set of queries for extracting meshes at variable resolution from a multiresolution model, based on field values, domain location, or opacity of the transfer function. Such queries allow trading off between resolution and speed in visualization. We define a new compact data structure for encoding a multiresolution tetrahedral mesh built through edge collapses to support selective refinement efficiently and show that such a structure has a storage cost from 3 to 5.5 times lower than standard data structures used for tetrahedral meshes. The data structures and variable resolution queries have been implemented together with state-of-the art visualization techniques in a system for the interactive visualization of three-dimensional scalar fields defined on tetrahedral meshes. Experimental results show that selective refinement queries can support interactive visualization of large data sets. PMID:15382696

  15. High-order boundary layer analysis using B-splines on hybrid unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Alvin; Sahni, Onkar

    2015-11-01

    Boundary layer flows are present in many engineering applications. In such flows, boundary layers span only a fraction of the characteristic length of the problem near the walls and possess large velocity gradients in the wall normal direction. This mandates use of a layered and graded mesh with a dense anisotropic h-resolution near the walls in order to accurately resolve the boundary layer. To account for complex geometries, a hybrid unstructured mesh approach is adopted. In this approach, the mesh is decomposed into wall normal and wall parallel directions. An alternative to an anisotropic h-resolution is to use a similar setting for both h- and p-resolution possibly with greater smoothness. For this purpose a mixed B-spline basis becomes attractive, where B-splines are used in the wall-normal direction and a C0 basis in the wall-parallel directions as well as the fully unstructured region of the mesh. A mixed B-spline basis offers several advantages over the traditional C0 basis utilized in finite element methods, which include greater accuracy per degree-of-freedom, ease of p-refinement as well as potential for k-refinement. In this study we demonstrate that the mixed B-spline basis, defined for the hybrid unstructured mesh, accurately models the boundary layer behavior.

  16. Accurate interface normal and curvature estimates on three-dimensional unstructured non-convex polyhedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivey, Christopher B.; Moin, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a framework for extending the height-function technique for the calculation of interface normals and curvatures to unstructured non-convex polyhedral meshes with application to the piecewise-linear interface calculation volume-of-fluid method. The methodology is developed with reference to a collocated node-based finite-volume two-phase flow solver that utilizes the median-dual mesh, requiring a set of data structures and algorithms for non-convex polyhedral operations: truncation of a polyhedron by a plane, intersection of two polyhedra, joining of two convex polyhedra, volume enforcement of a polyhedron by a plane, and volume fraction initialization by a signed-distance function. By leveraging these geometric tools, a geometric interpolation strategy for embedding structured height-function stencils in unstructured meshes is developed. The embedded height-function technique is tested on surfaces with known interface normals and curvatures, namely cylinder, sphere, and ellipsoid. Tests are performed on the median duals of a uniform cartesian mesh, a wedge mesh, and a tetrahedral mesh, and comparisons are made with conventional methods. Across the tests, the embedded height-function technique outperforms contemporary methods and its accuracy approaches the accuracy that the traditional height-function technique exemplifies on uniform cartesian meshes.

  17. Implicit adaptive mesh refinement for 2D reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby; Chacón, Luis; Pernice, Michael

    2008-10-01

    An implicit structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) solver for 2D reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is described. The time-implicit discretization is able to step over fast normal modes, while the spatial adaptivity resolves thin, dynamically evolving features. A Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method is used for the nonlinear solver engine. For preconditioning, we have extended the optimal "physics-based" approach developed in [L. Chacón, D.A. Knoll, J.M. Finn, An implicit, nonlinear reduced resistive MHD solver, J. Comput. Phys. 178 (2002) 15-36] (which employed multigrid solver technology in the preconditioner for scalability) to SAMR grids using the well-known Fast Adaptive Composite grid (FAC) method [S. McCormick, Multilevel Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations, SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 1989]. A grid convergence study demonstrates that the solver performance is independent of the number of grid levels and only depends on the finest resolution considered, and that it scales well with grid refinement. The study of error generation and propagation in our SAMR implementation demonstrates that high-order (cubic) interpolation during regridding, combined with a robustly damping second-order temporal scheme such as BDF2, is required to minimize impact of grid errors at coarse-fine interfaces on the overall error of the computation for this MHD application. We also demonstrate that our implementation features the desired property that the overall numerical error is dependent only on the finest resolution level considered, and not on the base-grid resolution or on the number of refinement levels present during the simulation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool on several challenging problems.

  18. Revisiting the Least-squares Procedure for Gradient Reconstruction on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Thomas, James L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of the least-squares technique for gradient reconstruction on unstructured meshes is examined. While least-squares techniques produce accurate results on arbitrary isotropic unstructured meshes, serious difficulties exist for highly stretched meshes in the presence of surface curvature. In these situations, gradients are typically under-estimated by up to an order of magnitude. For vertex-based discretizations on triangular and quadrilateral meshes, and cell-centered discretizations on quadrilateral meshes, accuracy can be recovered using an inverse distance weighting in the least-squares construction. For cell-centered discretizations on triangles, both the unweighted and weighted least-squares constructions fail to provide suitable gradient estimates for highly stretched curved meshes. Good overall flow solution accuracy can be retained in spite of poor gradient estimates, due to the presence of flow alignment in exactly the same regions where the poor gradient accuracy is observed. However, the use of entropy fixes has the potential for generating large but subtle discretization errors.

  19. Forward and adjoint simulations of seismic wave propagation on fully unstructured hexahedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Daniel; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Luo, Yang; Martin, Roland; Le Goff, Nicolas; Casarotti, Emanuele; Le Loher, Pieyre; Magnoni, Federica; Liu, Qinya; Blitz, Céline; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Basini, Piero; Tromp, Jeroen

    2011-08-01

    We present forward and adjoint spectral-element simulations of coupled acoustic and (an)elastic seismic wave propagation on fully unstructured hexahedral meshes. Simulations benefit from recent advances in hexahedral meshing, load balancing and software optimization. Meshing may be accomplished using a mesh generation tool kit such as CUBIT, and load balancing is facilitated by graph partitioning based on the SCOTCH library. Coupling between fluid and solid regions is incorporated in a straightforward fashion using domain decomposition. Topography, bathymetry and Moho undulations may be readily included in the mesh, and physical dispersion and attenuation associated with anelasticity are accounted for using a series of standard linear solids. Finite-frequency Fréchet derivatives are calculated using adjoint methods in both fluid and solid domains. The software is benchmarked for a layercake model. We present various examples of fully unstructured meshes, snapshots of wavefields and finite-frequency kernels generated by Version 2.0 'Sesame' of our widely used open source spectral-element package SPECFEM3D.

  20. Topographic accuracy assessment of bare earth lidar-derived unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilskie, Matthew V.; Hagen, Scott C.

    2013-02-01

    This study is focused on the integration of bare earth lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) data into unstructured (triangular) finite element meshes and the implications on simulating storm surge inundation using a shallow water equations model. A methodology is developed to compute root mean square error (RMSE) and the 95th percentile of vertical elevation errors using four different interpolation methods (linear, inverse distance weighted, natural neighbor, and cell averaging) to resample bare earth lidar and lidar-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) onto unstructured meshes at different resolutions. The results are consolidated into a table of optimal interpolation methods that minimize the vertical elevation error of an unstructured mesh for a given mesh node density. The cell area averaging method performed most accurate when DEM grid cells within 0.25 times the ratio of local element size and DEM cell size were averaged. The methodology is applied to simulate inundation extent and maximum water levels in southern Mississippi due to Hurricane Katrina, which illustrates that local changes in topography such as adjusting element size and interpolation method drastically alter simulated storm surge locally and non-locally. The methods and results presented have utility and implications to any modeling application that uses bare earth lidar.

  1. Towards a new multiscale air quality transport model using the fully unstructured anisotropic adaptive mesh technology of Fluidity (version 4.1.9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Zhu, J.; Wang, Z.; Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Xiang, J.

    2015-10-01

    An integrated method of advanced anisotropic hr-adaptive mesh and discretization numerical techniques has been, for first time, applied to modelling of multiscale advection-diffusion problems, which is based on a discontinuous Galerkin/control volume discretization on unstructured meshes. Over existing air quality models typically based on static-structured grids using a locally nesting technique, the advantage of the anisotropic hr-adaptive model has the ability to adapt the mesh according to the evolving pollutant distribution and flow features. That is, the mesh resolution can be adjusted dynamically to simulate the pollutant transport process accurately and effectively. To illustrate the capability of the anisotropic adaptive unstructured mesh model, three benchmark numerical experiments have been set up for two-dimensional (2-D) advection phenomena. Comparisons have been made between the results obtained using uniform resolution meshes and anisotropic adaptive resolution meshes. Performance achieved in 3-D simulation of power plant plumes indicates that this new adaptive multiscale model has the potential to provide accurate air quality modelling solutions effectively.

  2. Numerical experiments on unstructured PIC stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Day, David Minot

    2011-04-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) is a method for plasmas simulation. Particles are pushed with Verlet time integration. Fields are modeled using finite differences on a tensor product mesh (cells). The Unstructured PIC methods studied here use instead finite element discretizations on unstructured (simplicial) meshes. PIC is constrained by stability limits (upper bounds) on mesh and time step sizes. Numerical evidence (2D) and analysis will be presented showing that similar bounds constrain unstructured PIC.

  3. A parallel, volume-tracking algorithm for unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Mosso, S.J.; Swartz, B.K.; Kothe, D.B.; Ferrell, R.C.

    1996-10-01

    Many diverse areas of industry benefit from the use of volume of fluid methods to predict the movement of materials. Casting is a common method of part fabrication. The accurate prediction of the casting process is pivotal to industry. Mold design and casting is currently considered an art by industry. It typically involves many trial mold designs, and the rejection of defective parts is costly. Failure of cast parts, because residual stresses reduce the part`s strength, can be catastrophic. Cast parts should have precise geometric details that reduce or eliminate the need for machining after casting. Volume of fluid codes will help designers predict how the molten metal fills a mold and where ay trapped voids remain. Prediction of defects due to thermal contraction or expansion will eliminate defective, trial mold designs and speed the parts to market with fewer rejections. Increasing the predictability and therefore the accuracy of the casting process will reduce the art that is involved in mold design and parts casting. Here, recent enhancements to multidimensional volume-tracking algorithms are presented. Illustrations in two dimensions are given. The improvements include new, local algorithms for interface normal constructions and a new full remapping algorithm for time integration. These methods are used on structured and unstructured grids.

  4. 2-D transmitral flows simulation by means of the immersed boundary method on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denaro, F. M.; Sarghini, F.

    2002-04-01

    Interaction between computational fluid dynamics and clinical researches recently allowed a deeper understanding of the physiology of complex phenomena involving cardio-vascular mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to develop a simplified numerical model based on the Immersed Boundary Method and to perform numerical simulations in order to study the cardiac diastolic phase during which the left ventricle is filled with blood flowing from the atrium throughout the mitral valve. As one of the diagnostic problems to be faced by clinicians is the lack of a univocal definition of the diastolic performance from the velocity measurements obtained by Eco-Doppler techniques, numerical simulations are supposed to provide an insight both into the physics of the diastole and into the interpretation of experimental data. An innovative application of the Immersed Boundary Method on unstructured grids is presented, fulfilling accuracy requirements related to the development of a thin boundary layer along the moving immersed boundary. It appears that this coupling between unstructured meshes and the Immersed Boundary Method is a promising technique when a wide range of spatial scales is involved together with a moving boundary. Numerical simulations are performed in a range of physiological parameters and a qualitative comparison with experimental data is presented, in order to demonstrate that, despite the simplified model, the main physiological characteristics of the diastole are well represented. Copyright

  5. Vortex-dominated conical-flow computations using unstructured adaptively-refined meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1989-01-01

    A conical Euler/Navier-Stokes algorithm is presented for the computation of vortex-dominated flows. The flow solver involves a multistage Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme which uses a finite-volume spatial discretization on an unstructured grid made up of triangles. The algorithm also employs an adaptive mesh refinement procedure which enriches the mesh locally to more accurately resolve the vortical flow features. Results are presented for several highly-swept delta wing and circular cone cases at high angles of attack and at supersonic freestream flow conditions. Accurate solutions were obtained more efficiently when adaptive mesh refinement was used in contrast with refining the grid globally. The paper presents descriptions of the conical Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver and adaptive mesh refinement procedures along with results which demonstrate the capability.

  6. Rotor Airloads Prediction Using Unstructured Meshes and Loose CFD/CSD Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    The FUN3D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids has been modified to allow prediction of trimmed rotorcraft airloads. The trim of the rotorcraft and the aeroelastic deformation of the rotor blades are accounted for via loose coupling with the CAMRAD II rotorcraft computational structural dynamics code. The set of codes is used to analyze the HART-II Baseline, Minimum Noise and Minimum Vibration test conditions. The loose coupling approach is found to be stable and convergent for the cases considered. Comparison of the resulting airloads and structural deformations with experimentally measured data is presented. The effect of grid resolution and temporal accuracy is examined. Rotorcraft airloads prediction presents a very substantial challenge for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Not only must the unsteady nature of the flow be accurately modeled, but since most rotorcraft blades are not structurally stiff, an accurate simulation must account for the blade structural dynamics. In addition, trim of the rotorcraft to desired thrust and moment targets depends on both aerodynamic loads and structural deformation, and vice versa. Further, interaction of the fuselage with the rotor flow field can be important, so that relative motion between the blades and the fuselage must be accommodated. Thus a complete simulation requires coupled aerodynamics, structures and trim, with the ability to model geometrically complex configurations. NASA has recently initiated a Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) Project under the overall Fundamental Aeronautics Program. Within the context of SRW are efforts aimed at furthering the state of the art of high-fidelity rotorcraft flow simulations, using both structured and unstructured meshes. Structured-mesh solvers have an advantage in computation speed, but even though remarkably complex configurations may be accommodated using the overset grid approach, generation of complex structured-mesh systems can require

  7. PLUM: Parallel Load Balancing for Unstructured Adaptive Meshes. Degree awarded by Colorado Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing large-scale problems that require grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. By locally refining and coarsening the mesh to capture physical phenomena of interest, such procedures make standard computational methods more cost effective. Unfortunately, an efficient parallel implementation of these adaptive methods is rather difficult to achieve, primarily due to the load imbalance created by the dynamically-changing nonuniform grid. This requires significant communication at runtime, leading to idle processors and adversely affecting the total execution time. Nonetheless, it is generally thought that unstructured adaptive- grid techniques will constitute a significant fraction of future high-performance supercomputing. Various dynamic load balancing methods have been reported to date; however, most of them either lack a global view of loads across processors or do not apply their techniques to realistic large-scale applications.

  8. Efficient unstructured mesh generation by means of Delaunay triangulation and Bowyer-Watson algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rebay, S. )

    1993-05-01

    This work is devoted to the description of an efficient unstructured mesh generation method entirely based on the Delaunay triangulation. The distinctive characteristic of the proposed method is that point positions and connections are computed simultaneously. This result is achieved by taking advantage of the sequential way in which the Bowyer-Watson algorithm computes the Delaunay triangulation. Two methods are proposed which have great geometrical flexibility, in that they allow us to treat domains of arbitrary shape and topology and to generate arbitrarily nonuniform meshes. The methods are computationally efficient and are applicable both in two and three dimensions. 11 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fast methods for the Eikonal and related Hamilton- Jacobi equations on unstructured meshes.

    PubMed

    Sethian, J A; Vladimirsky, A

    2000-05-23

    The Fast Marching Method is a numerical algorithm for solving the Eikonal equation on a rectangular orthogonal mesh in O(M log M) steps, where M is the total number of grid points. The scheme relies on an upwind finite difference approximation to the gradient and a resulting causality relationship that lends itself to a Dijkstra-like programming approach. In this paper, we discuss several extensions to this technique, including higher order versions on unstructured meshes in Rn and on manifolds and connections to more general static Hamilton-Jacobi equations. PMID:10811874

  10. A first collision source method for ATTILA, an unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code

    SciTech Connect

    Wareing, T.A.; Morel, J.E.; Parsons, D.K.

    1998-12-01

    A semi-analytic first collision source method is developed for the transport code, ATTILA, a three-dimensional, unstructured tetrahedral mesh, discrete-ordinates code. This first collision source method is intended to mitigate ray effects due to point sources. The method is third-order accurate, which is the same order of accuracy as the linear-discontinuous spatial differencing scheme used in ATTILA. Numerical results are provided to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the first collision source method.

  11. A Reactor Pressure Vessel Dosimetry Calculation Using ATTILA, An Unstructured Tetrahedral Mesh Discrete-Ordinates Code

    SciTech Connect

    Wareing, T.A.; Parsons, D.K.; Pautz, S.

    1997-12-31

    Recently, a new state-of-the-art discrete-ordinates code, ATTILA, was developed. ATTILA provides the capabilities to solve geometrically complex 3-D transport problems by using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh. In this paper we describe the application of ATTILA to a 3-D reactor pressure vessel dosimetry problem. We provide numerical results from ATTILA and the Monte Carlo code, MCNP. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of ATTILA for such calculations.

  12. TRIM: A finite-volume MHD algorithm for an unstructured adaptive mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, D.D.; Lottati, I.; Mikic, Z.

    1995-07-01

    The authors describe TRIM, a MHD code which uses finite volume discretization of the MHD equations on an unstructured adaptive grid of triangles in the poloidal plane. They apply it to problems related to modeling tokamak toroidal plasmas. The toroidal direction is treated by a pseudospectral method. Care was taken to center variables appropriately on the mesh and to construct a self adjoint diffusion operator for cell centered variables.

  13. Unstructured 3D Delaunay mesh generation applied to planes, trains and automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Kenneth R.; Spragle, Gregory S.

    1993-01-01

    Technical issues associated with domain-tessellation production, including initial boundary node triangulation and volume mesh refinement, are presented for the 'TGrid' 3D Delaunay unstructured grid generation program. The approach employed is noted to be capable of preserving predefined triangular surface facets in the final tessellation. The capabilities of the approach are demonstrated by generating grids about an entire fighter aircraft configuration, a train, and a wind tunnel model of an automobile.

  14. Adaptive Meshing Techniques for Viscous Flow Calculations on Mixed Element Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    An adaptive refinement strategy based on hierarchical element subdivision is formulated and implemented for meshes containing arbitrary mixtures of tetrahendra, hexahendra, prisms and pyramids. Special attention is given to keeping memory overheads as low as possible. This procedure is coupled with an algebraic multigrid flow solver which operates on mixed-element meshes. Inviscid flows as well as viscous flows are computed an adaptively refined tetrahedral, hexahedral, and hybrid meshes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by generating an adapted hexahedral mesh containing 3 million vertices on a relatively inexpensive workstation.

  15. An anisotropic scale-invariant unstructured mesh generator suitable for volumetric imaging data.

    PubMed

    Kuprat, Andrew P; Einstein, Daniel R

    2009-02-20

    We present a boundary-fitted, scale-invariant unstructured tetrahedral mesh generation algorithm that enables registration of element size to local feature size. Given an input triangulated surface mesh, a feature size field is determined by casting rays normal to the surface and into the geometry and then performing gradient-limiting operations to enforce continuity of the resulting field. Surface mesh density is adjusted to be proportional to the feature size field and then a layered anisotropic volume mesh is generated. This mesh is "scale-invariant" in that roughly the same number of layers of mesh exist in mesh cross-sections, between a minimum scale size L(min) and a maximum scale size L(max). We illustrate how this field can be used to produce quality grids for computational fluid dynamics based simulations of challenging, topologically complex biological surfaces derived from magnetic resonance images. The algorithm is implemented in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) version of the Los Alamos grid toolbox LaGriT[14]. Research funded by the National Heart and Blood Institute Award 1RO1HL073598-01A1. PMID:19784397

  16. An anisotropic scale-invariant unstructured mesh generator suitable for volumetric imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Kuprat, Andrew P.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a boundary-fitted, scale-invariant unstructured tetrahedral mesh generation algorithm that enables registration of element size to local feature size. Given an input triangulated surface mesh, a feature size field is determined by casting rays normal to the surface and into the geometry and then performing gradient-limiting operations to enforce continuity of the resulting field. Surface mesh density is adjusted to be proportional to the feature size field and then a layered anisotropic volume mesh is generated. This mesh is “scale-invariant” in that roughly the same number of layers of mesh exist in mesh cross-sections, between a minimum scale size Lmin and a maximum scale size Lmax. We illustrate how this field can be used to produce quality grids for computational fluid dynamics based simulations of challenging, topologically complex biological surfaces derived from magnetic resonance images. The algorithm is implemented in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) version of the Los Alamos grid toolbox LaGriT[14]. Research funded by the National Heart and Blood Institute Award 1RO1HL073598-01A1. PMID:19784397

  17. Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin method using a new type of WENO limiters on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhong, Xinghui; Shu, Chi-Wang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we generalize a new type of limiters based on the weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) finite volume methodology for the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) methods solving nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws, which were recently developed in [32] for structured meshes, to two-dimensional unstructured triangular meshes. The key idea of such limiters is to use the entire polynomials of the DG solutions from the troubled cell and its immediate neighboring cells, and then apply the classical WENO procedure to form a convex combination of these polynomials based on smoothness indicators and nonlinear weights, with suitable adjustments to guarantee conservation. The main advantage of this new limiter is its simplicity in implementation, especially for the unstructured meshes considered in this paper, as only information from immediate neighbors is needed and the usage of complicated geometric information of the meshes is largely avoided. Numerical results for both scalar equations and Euler systems of compressible gas dynamics are provided to illustrate the good performance of this procedure.

  18. Computation of Flow over a Rotating Body on Unstructured Chimera Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; He, G. W.; Ni, S. Z.

    Flow around moving boundary is ubiquitous in engineering applications. To increse the efficienly of the algorithm to handle moving boundaries is still a major challenge in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The Chimera grid method is one type of method to handle moving boundaries. A concept of domain de-composition has been proposed in this paper. In this method, sub-domains are meshed independently and governing equations are also solved separately on them. The Chimera grid method was originally used only on structured (curvilinear) meshes. However, in a problem which involves both moving boundary and complex geometry, the number of sub-domains required in a traditional (structured) Chimera method becomes fairly large. Thus the time required in the interior boundary locating, link-building and data exchanging also increases. The use of unstructured Chimera grid can reduce the time consumption significantly by the reduction of domain (block) number. Generally speaking, unstructured Chimera grid method has not been developed. In this paper, a well-known pressure correction scheme—SIMPLEC is modified and implemented on unstructured Chimera mesh. A new interpolation scheme regarding the pressure correction is proposed to prevent the possible decoupling of pressure. A moving-mesh finite volume approach is implemented in an inertial reference frame. This approach is then used to compute incompressible flow around a rotating circular and elliptic cylinder. These numerical examples demonstrate the capability of the proposed scheme in handling moving boundaries. The numerical results are in good agreement with other experimental and computational data in literature. The method proposed in this paper can be efficiently applied to more challenge cases such as free-falling objects or heavy particles in fluid.

  19. Boundary treatments for 2D elliptic mesh generation in complex geometries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a boundary treatment method for 2D elliptic mesh generation in complex geometries. Corresponding to Neumann- Dirichlet boundary conditions (sliding boundary conditions), the proposed method aims at achieving orthogonal and smooth nodal distribution along irregular boundaries. In ...

  20. An unstructured mesh arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian unsteady incompressible flow solver and its application to insect flight aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaohui; Cao, Yuanwei; Zhao, Yong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an unstructured mesh Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) incompressible flow solver is developed to investigate the aerodynamics of insect hovering flight. The proposed finite-volume ALE Navier-Stokes solver is based on the artificial compressibility method (ACM) with a high-resolution method of characteristics-based scheme on unstructured grids. The present ALE model is validated and assessed through flow passing over an oscillating cylinder. Good agreements with experimental results and other numerical solutions are obtained, which demonstrates the accuracy and the capability of the present model. The lift generation mechanisms of 2D wing in hovering motion, including wake capture, delayed stall, rapid pitch, as well as clap and fling are then studied and illustrated using the current ALE model. Moreover, the optimized angular amplitude in symmetry model, 45°, is firstly reported in details using averaged lift and the energy power method. Besides, the lift generation of complete cyclic clap and fling motion, which is simulated by few researchers using the ALE method due to large deformation, is studied and clarified for the first time. The present ALE model is found to be a useful tool to investigate lift force generation mechanism for insect wing flight.

  1. Terrain-driven unstructured mesh development through semi-automatic vertical feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilskie, Matthew V.; Coggin, David; Hagen, Scott C.; Medeiros, Stephen C.

    2015-12-01

    A semi-automated vertical feature terrain extraction algorithm is described and applied to a two-dimensional, depth-integrated, shallow water equation inundation model. The extracted features describe what are commonly sub-mesh scale elevation details (ridge and valleys), which may be ignored in standard practice because adequate mesh resolution cannot be afforded. The extraction algorithm is semi-automated, requires minimal human intervention, and is reproducible. A lidar-derived digital elevation model (DEM) of coastal Mississippi and Alabama serves as the source data for the vertical feature extraction. Unstructured mesh nodes and element edges are aligned to the vertical features and an interpolation algorithm aimed at minimizing topographic elevation error assigns elevations to mesh nodes via the DEM. The end result is a mesh that accurately represents the bare earth surface as derived from lidar with element resolution in the floodplain ranging from 15 m to 200 m. To examine the influence of the inclusion of vertical features on overland flooding, two additional meshes were developed, one without crest elevations of the features and another with vertical features withheld. All three meshes were incorporated into a SWAN+ADCIRC model simulation of Hurricane Katrina. Each of the three models resulted in similar validation statistics when compared to observed time-series water levels at gages and post-storm collected high water marks. Simulated water level peaks yielded an R2 of 0.97 and upper and lower 95% confidence interval of ∼ ± 0.60 m. From the validation at the gages and HWM locations, it was not clear which of the three model experiments performed best in terms of accuracy. Examination of inundation extent among the three model results were compared to debris lines derived from NOAA post-event aerial imagery, and the mesh including vertical features showed higher accuracy. The comparison of model results to debris lines demonstrates that additional

  2. Development of an Unstructured Mesh Code for Flows About Complete Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime; Gupta, K. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the research work undertaken at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, under NASA Research Grant NAG4-157. The aim of this research is to identify effective algorithms and methodologies for the efficient and routine solution of flow simulations about complete vehicle configurations. For over ten years we have received support from NASA to develop unstructured mesh methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics. As a result of this effort a methodology based on the use of unstructured adapted meshes of tetrahedra and finite volume flow solvers has been developed. A number of gridding algorithms, flow solvers, and adaptive strategies have been proposed. The most successful algorithms developed from the basis of the unstructured mesh system FELISA. The FELISA system has been extensively for the analysis of transonic and hypersonic flows about complete vehicle configurations. The system is highly automatic and allows for the routine aerodynamic analysis of complex configurations starting from CAD data. The code has been parallelized and utilizes efficient solution algorithms. For hypersonic flows, a version of the code which incorporates real gas effects, has been produced. The FELISA system is also a component of the STARS aeroservoelastic system developed at NASA Dryden. One of the latest developments before the start of this grant was to extend the system to include viscous effects. This required the development of viscous generators, capable of generating the anisotropic grids required to represent boundary layers, and viscous flow solvers. We show some sample hypersonic viscous computations using the developed viscous generators and solvers. Although this initial results were encouraging it became apparent that in order to develop a fully functional capability for viscous flows, several advances in solution accuracy, robustness and efficiency were required. In this grant we set out to investigate some novel methodologies that could lead to the

  3. Spatial invasion dynamics on random and unstructured meshes: implications for heterogeneous tumor populations.

    PubMed

    Manem, V S K; Kohandel, M; Komarova, N L; Sivaloganathan, S

    2014-05-21

    In this work we discuss a spatial evolutionary model for a heterogeneous cancer cell population. We consider the gain-of-function mutations that not only change the fitness potential of the mutant phenotypes against normal background cells but may also increase the relative motility of the mutant cells. The spatial modeling is implemented as a stochastic evolutionary system on a structured grid (a lattice, with random neighborhoods, which is not necessarily bi-directional) or on a two-dimensional unstructured mesh, i.e. a bi-directional graph with random numbers of neighbors. We present a computational approach to investigate the fixation probability of mutants in these spatial models. Additionally, we examine the effect of the migration potential on the spatial dynamics of mutants on unstructured meshes. Our results suggest that the probability of fixation is negatively correlated with the width of the distribution of the neighborhood size. Also, the fixation probability increases given a migration potential for mutants. We find that the fixation probability (of advantaged, disadvantaged and neutral mutants) on unstructured meshes is relatively smaller than the corresponding results on regular grids. More importantly, in the case of neutral mutants the introduction of a migration potential has a critical effect on the fixation probability and increases this by orders of magnitude. Further, we examine the effect of boundaries and as intuitively expected, the fixation probability is smaller on the boundary of regular grids when compared to its value in the bulk. Based on these computational results, we speculate on possible better therapeutic strategies that may delay tumor progression to some extent. PMID:24462897

  4. Numerical modeling of landslide-generated tsunami using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Cian; Collins, Gareth; Desousa Costa, Patrick; Piggott, Matthew

    2010-05-01

    Landslides impacting into or occurring under water generate waves, which can have devastating environmental consequences. Depending on the characteristics of the landslide the waves can have significant amplitude and potentially propagate over large distances. Linear models of classical earthquake-generated tsunamis cannot reproduce the highly nonlinear generation mechanisms required to accurately predict the consequences of landslide-generated tsunamis. Also, laboratory-scale experimental investigation is limited to simple geometries and short time-scales before wave reflections contaminate the data. Computational fluid dynamics models based on the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations can simulate landslide-tsunami generation at realistic scales. However, traditional chessboard-like structured meshes introduce superfluous resolution and hence the computing power required for such a simulation can be prohibitively high, especially in three dimensions. Unstructured meshes allow the grid spacing to vary rapidly from high resolution in the vicinity of small scale features to much coarser, lower resolution in other areas. Combining this variable resolution with dynamic mesh adaptivity allows such high resolution zones to follow features like the interface between the landslide and the water whilst minimising the computational costs. Unstructured meshes are also better suited to representing complex geometries and bathymetries allowing more realistic domains to be simulated. Modelling multiple materials, like water, air and a landslide, on an unstructured adaptive mesh poses significant numerical challenges. Novel methods of interface preservation must be considered and coupled to a flow model in such a way that ensures conservation of the different materials. Furthermore this conservation property must be maintained during successive stages of mesh optimisation and interpolation. In this paper we validate a new multi-material adaptive unstructured fluid dynamics model

  5. Second order finite volume scheme for Maxwell's equations with discontinuous electromagnetic properties on unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Ismagilov, Timur Z.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a second order finite volume scheme for numerical solution of Maxwell's equations with discontinuous dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability on unstructured meshes. The scheme is based on Godunov scheme and employs approaches of Van Leer and Lax–Wendroff to increase the order of approximation. To keep the second order of approximation near dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability discontinuities a novel technique for gradient calculation and limitation is applied near discontinuities. Results of test computations for problems with linear and curvilinear discontinuities confirm second order of approximation. The scheme was applied to modelling propagation of electromagnetic waves inside photonic crystal waveguides with a bend.

  6. A force-based large increment method for 2D continuum solids and the mesh convergence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Danbing; Guo, Zaoyang; Liu, Xila; Natarajan, Sundararajan; Bordas, Stéphane

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a triangular plane stress element is implemented based on the large increment method (LIM) to solve 2D continuum mechanics problems. In the LIM, after the governing equations are established using the generalized elemental force variables as primary unknowns, an iteration procedure is employed to obtain an optimised approximate solution of the problem. Two numerical examples are investigated to study the mesh convergence of the proposed triangular LIM element. Structured meshes as well as unstructured meshes with different element densities are generated to illustrate the convergence of the total strain energy in both examples. The numerical results obtained from the LIM (including the total strain energy, the displacement and the stress) are compared with the analytical solutions as well as the results from the commercial FEM software ABAQUS. All the results show that the performance of the LIM is as good as the FEM in linear elastic problems. A simple elastoplastic example suggests that the LIM may obtain better result than the FEM.

  7. Finite volume scheme with quadratic reconstruction on unstructured adaptive meshes applied to turbomachinery flows

    SciTech Connect

    Delanaye, M.; Essers, J.A.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents a new finite volume cell-centered scheme for solving the two-dimensional Euler equations. The technique for computing the advective derivatives is based on a high-order Gauss quadrature and an original quadratic reconstruction of the conservative variables for each control volume. A very sensitive detector identifying discontinuity regions switches the scheme to a TVD scheme, and ensures the monotonicity of the solution. The code uses unstructured meshes whose cells are polygons with any number of edges. A mesh adaptation based on cell division is performed in order to increase the resolution of shocks. The accuracy, insensitivity to grid distortions, and shock capturing properties of the scheme are demonstrated for different cascade flow computations.

  8. Implementation of Implicit Adaptive Mesh Refinement in an Unstructured Finite-Volume Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan M.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the implementation of adaptive mesh refinement in an unstructured, finite-volume solver. Unsteady and steady problems are considered. The effect on the recovery of high-order numerics is explored and the results are favorable. Important to this work is the ability to provide a path for efficient, implicit time advancement. A method using a simple refinement sensor based on undivided differences is discussed and applied to a practical problem: a shock-shock interaction on a hypersonic, inviscid double-wedge. Cases are compared to uniform grids without the use of adapted meshes in order to assess error and computational expense. Discussion of difficulties, advances, and future work prepare this method for additional research. The potential for this method in more complicated flows is described.

  9. Parallel performance investigations of an unstructured mesh Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2000-01-01

    A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver based on unstructured mesh techniques for analysis of high-lift configurations is described. The method makes use of an agglomeration multigrid solver for convergence acceleration. Implicit line-smoothing is employed to relieve the stiffness associated with highly stretched meshes. A GMRES technique is also implemented to speed convergence at the expense of additional memory usage. The solver is cache efficient and fully vectorizable, and is parallelized using a two-level hybrid MPI-OpenMP implementation suitable for shared and/or distributed memory architectures, as well as clusters of shared memory machines. Convergence and scalability results are illustrated for various high-lift cases.

  10. 3D-2D Deformable Image Registration Using Feature-Based Nonuniform Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaohu; Cai, Yiqi; Yang, Yin; Wang, Jing; Jia, Xun

    2016-01-01

    By using prior information of planning CT images and feature-based nonuniform meshes, this paper demonstrates that volumetric images can be efficiently registered with a very small portion of 2D projection images of a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scan. After a density field is computed based on the extracted feature edges from planning CT images, nonuniform tetrahedral meshes will be automatically generated to better characterize the image features according to the density field; that is, finer meshes are generated for features. The displacement vector fields (DVFs) are specified at the mesh vertices to drive the deformation of original CT images. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the deformed anatomy are generated and compared with corresponding 2D projections. DVFs are optimized to minimize the objective function including differences between DRRs and projections and the regularity. To further accelerate the above 3D-2D registration, a procedure to obtain good initial deformations by deforming the volume surface to match 2D body boundary on projections has been developed. This complete method is evaluated quantitatively by using several digital phantoms and data from head and neck cancer patients. The feature-based nonuniform meshing method leads to better results than either uniform orthogonal grid or uniform tetrahedral meshes. PMID:27019849

  11. An Anisotropic Scale-Invariant Unstructured Mesh Generator Auitable for Volumetric Imaging Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, Andrew P.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2009-02-20

    Mesh generation algorithms must consider the computational physics schemes to be adopted insomuch as tessellation should attempt to minimize discretization error metrics a priori, while placing elements judiciously yet economically. Basing local element size and shape on local geometric feature size is a promising approach, as the underlying physics may either be scale-invariant or may vary with scale in a predictable way. We present a boundary-fitted scale-invariant unstructured tetrahedral mesh generation algorithm that enables registration of element size to local geometric scale, given a triangulated mesh surface. The resulting tetrahedra are well-shaped and nearly orthogonal to the boundary. Unlike previous feature-based approaches, our algorithm does not require a background mesh, nor does it rely on the medial-axis. In contrast, as a first step, our algorithm produces a gradientlimited feature-size field over the input surface based on efficient ray casting. We illustrate how this field can be used to produce quality grids for computational fluid dynamics based simulations of challenging, topologically complex surfaces derived from magnetic resonance images. The algorithm is implemented in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) version of the Los Alamos grid toolbox LaGriT[6].

  12. A constrained transport scheme for MHD on unstructured static and moving meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocz, Philip; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in many astrophysical systems and a detailed understanding of their impact on the gas dynamics requires robust numerical simulations. Here we present a new method to evolve the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations on unstructured static and moving meshes that preserves the magnetic field divergence-free constraint to machine precision. The method overcomes the major problems of using a cleaning scheme on the magnetic fields instead, which is non-conservative, not fully Galilean invariant, does not eliminate divergence errors completely, and may produce incorrect jumps across shocks. Our new method is a generalization of the constrained transport (CT) algorithm used to enforce the ∇ · B = 0 condition on fixed Cartesian grids. Preserving ∇ · B = 0 at the discretized level is necessary to maintain the orthogonality between the Lorentz force and B. The possibility of performing CT on a moving mesh provides several advantages over static mesh methods due to the quasi-Lagrangian nature of the former (i.e. the mesh generating points move with the flow), such as making the simulation automatically adaptive and significantly reducing advection errors. Our method preserves magnetic fields and fluid quantities in pure advection exactly.

  13. ATTILA: A three-dimensional, unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Wareing, T.A.; McGhee, J.M.; Morel, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Many applications of radiation transport require the accurate modeling of complex three-dimensional geometries. Historically, Monte Carlo codes have been used for such applications. Existing deterministic transport codes were not applied to such problems because of the difficulties of modeling complex three-dimensional geometries with rectangular meshes. The authors have developed a three-dimensional discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) code, ATTILA, which uses linear-discontinuous finite element spatial differencing in conjunction with diffusion-synthetic acceleration (DSA) on an unstructured tetrahedral mesh. This tetrahedral mesh capability enables the authors to efficiently model complex three-dimensional geometries. One interesting and challenging application of neutron and/or gamma-ray transport is nuclear well-logging applications. Nuclear well-logging problems usually involve a complex geometry with fixed sources and one or more detectors. Detector responses must generally be accurate to within {approx}1%. The combination of complex three-dimensional geometries and high accuracy requirements makes it difficult to perform logging problems with traditional S{sub n} differencing schemes and rectangular meshes. Hence, it is not surprising that deterministic S{sub n} codes have seen limited use in nuclear well-logging applications. The geometric modeling capabilities and the advanced spatial differencing of ATTILA give it a significant advantage, relative to traditional S{sub n} codes, for performing nuclear well-logging calculations.

  14. Parallel CFD Algorithms for Aerodynamical Flow Solvers on Unstructured Meshes. Parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) has requested my participation in the lecture series entitled Parallel Computing in Computational Fluid Dynamics to be held at the von Karman Institute in Brussels, Belgium on May 15-19, 1995. In addition, a request has been made from the US Coordinator for AGARD at the Pentagon for NASA Ames to hold a repetition of the lecture series on October 16-20, 1995. I have been asked to be a local coordinator for the Ames event. All AGARD lecture series events have attendance limited to NATO allied countries. A brief of the lecture series is provided in the attached enclosure. Specifically, I have been asked to give two lectures of approximately 75 minutes each on the subject of parallel solution techniques for the fluid flow equations on unstructured meshes. The title of my lectures is "Parallel CFD Algorithms for Aerodynamical Flow Solvers on Unstructured Meshes" (Parts I-II). The contents of these lectures will be largely review in nature and will draw upon previously published work in this area. Topics of my lectures will include: (1) Mesh partitioning algorithms. Recursive techniques based on coordinate bisection, Cuthill-McKee level structures, and spectral bisection. (2) Newton's method for large scale CFD problems. Size and complexity estimates for Newton's method, modifications for insuring global convergence. (3) Techniques for constructing the Jacobian matrix. Analytic and numerical techniques for Jacobian matrix-vector products, constructing the transposed matrix, extensions to optimization and homotopy theories. (4) Iterative solution algorithms. Practical experience with GIVIRES and BICG-STAB matrix solvers. (5) Parallel matrix preconditioning. Incomplete Lower-Upper (ILU) factorization, domain-decomposed ILU, approximate Schur complement strategies.

  15. Failure of Anisotropic Unstructured Mesh Adaption Based on Multidimensional Residual Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.

    2003-01-01

    An automated anisotropic unstructured mesh adaptation strategy is proposed, implemented, and assessed for the discretization of viscous flows. The adaption criteria is based upon the minimization of the residual fluctuations of a multidimensional upwind viscous flow solver. For scalar advection, this adaption strategy has been shown to use fewer grid points than gradient based adaption, naturally aligning mesh edges with discontinuities and characteristic lines. The adaption utilizes a compact stencil and is local in scope, with four fundamental operations: point insertion, point deletion, edge swapping, and nodal displacement. Evaluation of the solution-adaptive strategy is performed for a two-dimensional blunt body laminar wind tunnel case at Mach 10. The results demonstrate that the strategy suffers from a lack of robustness, particularly with regard to alignment of the bow shock in the vicinity of the stagnation streamline. In general, constraining the adaption to such a degree as to maintain robustness results in negligible improvement to the solution. Because the present method fails to consistently or significantly improve the flow solution, it is rejected in favor of simple uniform mesh refinement.

  16. Multigrid solution of compressible turbulent flow on unstructured meshes using a two-equation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Martinelli, L.

    1991-01-01

    The system of equations consisting of the full Navier-Stokes equations and two turbulence equations was solved for in the steady state using a multigrid strategy on unstructured meshes. The flow equations and turbulence equations are solved in a loosely coupled manner. The flow equations are advanced in time using a multistage Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme with a stability bound local time step, while the turbulence equations are advanced in a point-implicit scheme with a time step which guarantees stability and positively. Low Reynolds number modifications to the original two equation model are incorporated in a manner which results in well behaved equations for arbitrarily small wall distances. A variety of aerodynamic flows are solved for, initializing all quantities with uniform freestream values, and resulting in rapid and uniform convergence rates for the flow and turbulence equations.

  17. A high resolution finite volume method for efficient parallel simulation of casting processes on unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, D.B.; Turner, J.A.; Mosso, S.J.; Ferrell, R.C.

    1997-03-01

    We discuss selected aspects of a new parallel three-dimensional (3-D) computational tool for the unstructured mesh simulation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) casting processes. This tool, known as {bold Telluride}, draws upon on robust, high resolution finite volume solutions of metal alloy mass, momentum, and enthalpy conservation equations to model the filling, cooling, and solidification of LANL castings. We briefly describe the current {bold Telluride} physical models and solution methods, then detail our parallelization strategy as implemented with Fortran 90 (F90). This strategy has yielded straightforward and efficient parallelization on distributed and shared memory architectures, aided in large part by new parallel libraries {bold JTpack9O} for Krylov-subspace iterative solution methods and {bold PGSLib} for efficient gather/scatter operations. We illustrate our methodology and current capabilities with source code examples and parallel efficiency results for a LANL casting simulation.

  18. Multigrid approaches to non-linear diffusion problems on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency of three multigrid methods for solving highly non-linear diffusion problems on two-dimensional unstructured meshes is examined. The three multigrid methods differ mainly in the manner in which the nonlinearities of the governing equations are handled. These comprise a non-linear full approximation storage (FAS) multigrid method which is used to solve the non-linear equations directly, a linear multigrid method which is used to solve the linear system arising from a Newton linearization of the non-linear system, and a hybrid scheme which is based on a non-linear FAS multigrid scheme, but employs a linear solver on each level as a smoother. Results indicate that all methods are equally effective at converging the non-linear residual in a given number of grid sweeps, but that the linear solver is more efficient in cpu time due to the lower cost of linear versus non-linear grid sweeps.

  19. A three dimensional multigrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes solver is described. Turbulence is simulated using a single field-equation model. Computational overheads are minimized through the use of a single edge-based data-structure, and efficient multigrid solution technique, and the use of multi-tasking on shared memory multi-processors. The accuracy and efficiency of the code are evaluated by computing two-dimensional flows in three dimensions and comparing with results from a previously validated two-dimensional code which employs the same solution algorithm. The feasibility of computing three-dimensional flows on grids of several million points in less than two hours of wall clock time is demonstrated.

  20. Development and validation of a three-dimensional, wave-current coupled model on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, JinHua; Shen, YongMing

    2011-01-01

    Using unstructured meshes provides great flexibility for modeling the flow in complex geomorphology of tidal creeks, barriers and islands, with refined grid resolution in regions of interest and not elsewhere. In this paper, an unstructured three-dimensional fully coupled wave-current model is developed. Firstly, a parallel, unstructured wave module is developed. Variations in wave properties are governed by a wave energy equation that includes wave-current interactions and dissipation representative of wave breaking. Then, the existing Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) is modified to couple with the wave module. The couple procedure includes depth dependent wave radiation stress terms, Stokes drift, vertical transfer of wave-generated pressure transfer to the mean momentum equation, wave dissipation as a source term in the turbulence kinetic energy equation, and mean current advection and refraction of wave energy. Several applications are presented to evaluate the developed model. In particular the wind and wave-induced storm surge generated by Hurricane Katrina is investigated. The obtained results have been compared to the in situ measurements with respect to the wave heights and water level elevations revealing good accuracy of the model in reproduction of the investigated events. In a comparison to water level measurements at Dauphin Island, inclusion of the wave induced water level setup reduced the normalized root mean square error from 0.301 to 0.257 m and increased the correlation coefficient from 0.860 to 0.929. Several runs were carried out to analyze the effects of waves. The experiments show that among the processes that represent wave effects, radiation stress and wave-induced surface stress are more important than wave-induced bottom stress in affecting the water level. The Hurricane Katrina simulations showed the importance of the inclusion of the wave effects for the hindcast of the water levels during the storm surge.

  1. Implicit flux-split Euler schemes for unsteady aerodynamic analysis involving unstructured dynamic meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Improved algorithms for the solution of the time-dependent Euler equations are presented for unsteady aerodynamic analysis involving unstructured dynamic meshes. The improvements have been developed recently to the spatial and temporal discretizations used by unstructured grid flow solvers. The spatial discretization involves a flux-split approach which is naturally dissipative and captures shock waves sharply with at most one grid point within the shock structure. The temporal discretization involves an implicit time-integration shceme using a Gauss-Seidel relaxation procedure which is computationally efficient for either steady or unsteady flow problems. For example, very large time steps may be used for rapid convergence to steady state, and the step size for unsteady cases may be selected for temporal accuracy rather than for numerical stability. Steady and unsteady flow results are presented for the NACA 0012 airfoil to demonstrate applications of the new Euler solvers. The unsteady results were obtained for the airfoil pitching harmonically about the quarter chord. The resulting instantaneous pressure distributions and lift and moment coefficients during a cycle of motion compare well with experimental data. The paper presents a description of the Euler solvers along with results and comparisons which assess the capability.

  2. Implicit flux-split Euler schemes for unsteady aerodynamic analysis involving unstructured dynamic meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Improved algorithm for the solution of the time-dependent Euler equations are presented for unsteady aerodynamic analysis involving unstructured dynamic meshes. The improvements were developed recently to the spatial and temporal discretizations used by unstructured grid flow solvers. The spatial discretization involves a flux-split approach which is naturally dissipative and captures shock waves sharply with at most one grid point within the shock structure. The temporal discretization involves an implicit time-integration scheme using a Gauss-Seidel relaxation procedure which is computationally efficient for either steady or unsteady flow problems. For example, very large time steps may be used for rapid convergence to steady state, and the step size for unsteady cases may be selected for temporal accuracy rather than for numerical stability. Steady and unsteady flow results are presented for the NACA 0012 airfoil to demonstrate applications of the new Euler solvers. The unsteady results were obtained for the airfoil pitching harmonically about the quarter chord. The resulting instantaneous pressure distributions and lift and moment coefficients during a cycle of motion compare well with experimental data. A description of the Euler solvers is presented along with results and comparisons which assess the capability.

  3. Higher Order Time Integration Schemes for the Unsteady Navier-Stokes Equations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jothiprasad, Giridhar; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Caughey, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The rapid increase in available computational power over the last decade has enabled higher resolution flow simulations and more widespread use of unstructured grid methods for complex geometries. While much of this effort has been focused on steady-state calculations in the aerodynamics community, the need to accurately predict off-design conditions, which may involve substantial amounts of flow separation, points to the need to efficiently simulate unsteady flow fields. Accurate unsteady flow simulations can easily require several orders of magnitude more computational effort than a corresponding steady-state simulation. For this reason, techniques for improving the efficiency of unsteady flow simulations are required in order to make such calculations feasible in the foreseeable future. The purpose of this work is to investigate possible reductions in computer time due to the choice of an efficient time-integration scheme from a series of schemes differing in the order of time-accuracy, and by the use of more efficient techniques to solve the nonlinear equations which arise while using implicit time-integration schemes. This investigation is carried out in the context of a two-dimensional unstructured mesh laminar Navier-Stokes solver.

  4. Three-dimensional flux-split Euler schemes involving unstructured dynamic meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Improved algorithms for the solution of the three-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations are presented for aerodynamic analysis involving unstructured dynamic meshes. The improvements have been developed recently to the spatial and temporal discretizations used by unstructured grid flow solvers. The spatial discretization involves a flux-split approach which is naturally dissipative and captures shock waves sharply with at most one grid point within the shock structure. The temporal discretization involves either an explicit time-integration scheme using a multi-stage Runge-Kutta procedure or an implicit time-integration scheme using a Gauss-Seidel relaxation procedure which is computationally efficient for either steady or unsteady flow problems. With the implicit Gauss-Seidel procedure, very large time steps may be used for rapid convergence to steady state, and the step size for unsteady cases may be selected for temporal accuracy rather than for numerical stability. Steady flow results are presented for both the NACA 0012 airfoil and the ONERA M6 wing to demonstrate applications of the new Euler solvers. The paper presents a description of the Euler solvers along with results and comparisons which assess the capability.

  5. Three-dimensional flux-split Euler schemes involving unstructured dynamic meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Improved algorithms for the solution of the 3-D time dependent Euler equations are presented for aerodynamic analysis involving unstructured dynamic meshes. The improvements were developed recently to the spatial and temporal discretizations used by unstructured grid flow solvers. The spatial discretization involves a flux split approach which is naturally dissipative and captures shock waves sharply with at most one grid point within the shock structure. The temporal discretization involves either an explicit time integration scheme using a multistage Runge-Kutta procedure or an implicit time integration scheme using a Gauss-Seidel relaxation procedure which is computationally efficient for either steady or unsteady flow problems. With the implicit Gauss-Seidel procedure, very large time steps may be used for rapid convergence to steady state, and the step size for unsteady cases may be selected for temporal accuracy rather than for numerical stability. Steady flow results are presented for both the NACA 0012 airfoil and the ONERA M6 wing to demonstrate applications of the new Euler solvers. A description of the Euler solvers is presented along with results and comparisons which assess the capability.

  6. Implications of mountain shading on calculating energy for snowmelt using unstructured triangular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, C.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Spiteri, R.

    2012-12-01

    In many parts of the world, the snowmelt energy balance is dominated by net solar shortwave radiation. This is the case in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, where clear skies dominate the winter and spring. In mountainous regions, irradiance at the snow surface is not only affected by solar angles, atmospheric transmittance, and the slope and aspect of immediate topography, but also by horizon-shadows, i.e., shadows from surrounding terrain. Many hydrological models do not consider such horizon-shadows and the accumulation of errors in estimating solar irradiance by neglecting horizon-shadows may lead to significant errors in calculating the timing and rate of snowmelt due to the seasonal storage of internal energy in the snowpack. An unstructured triangular-mesh-based horizon-shading model is compared to standard self-shading algorithms in the Marmot Creek Research Basin (MCRB), Alberta, Canada. A systematic basin-wide over-prediction (basin mean expressed as phase change mass (assumed constant albedo of 0.8): 14 mm, maximum: 200 mm) in net shortwave radiation is observed when only self-shading is considered. The horizon-shadow model is run at a point scale at three sites throughout the MCRB to investigate the effects of topographic scale on the model results. In addition, the model results are compared to measurements of mountain shadows via orthorectified timelapse digital photographs and measured surface irradiance. The horizon-model irradiance data are used to drive a point-scale energy balance model, SNOBAL, via The Cold Regions Hydrological Model, an HRU-based hydrologic model. Melt timing is shown to differ by up to four days by neglecting horizon-shadows. It is further hypothesized that the errors might be much larger in basins with more rugged topography. Finally, a consideration of the intersection of unstructured-mesh and HRU landscape representations is discussed.

  7. Mesh type tradeoffs in 2D hydrodynamic modeling of flooding with a Godunov-based flow solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byunghyun; Sanders, Brett F.; Schubert, Jochen E.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2014-06-01

    The effect of mesh type on the accuracy and computational demands of a two-dimensional Godunov-type flood inundation model is critically examined. Cartesian grids, constrained and unconstrained triangular grids, constrained quadrilateral grids, and mixed meshes are considered, with and without local time stepping (LTS), to determine the approach that maximizes computational efficiency defined as accuracy relative to computational effort. A mixed-mesh numerical scheme is introduced so all grids are processed by the same solver. Analysis focuses on a wide range of dam-break type test cases, where Godunov-type flood models have proven very successful. Results show that different mesh types excel under different circumstances. Cartesian grids are 2-3 times more efficient with relatively simple terrain features such as rectilinear channels that call for a uniform grid resolution, while unstructured grids are about twice as efficient in complex domains with irregular terrain features that call for localized refinements. The superior efficiency of locally refined, unstructured grids in complex terrain is attributable to LTS; the locally refined unstructured grid becomes less efficient using global time stepping. These results point to mesh-type tradeoffs that should be considered in flood modeling applications. A mixed mesh model formulation with LTS is recommended as a general purpose solver because the mesh type can be adapted to maximize computational efficiency.

  8. A New Poisson Solver PIC Simulations on Arbitrary Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkin, Sergey; Gatsonis, Nikolaos

    2015-11-01

    A new node-based algorithm is developed for the solution of Poisson's equation in PIC simulations on arbitrary unstructured tetrahedral meshes. The algorithm is derived by applying the integral form of the Gauss law to the indirect dual mesh constructed by connecting the centroids of edges to the centroids of faces and centroids of faces with the centroids of tetrahedral cells for each tetrahedron. The potential variation is assumed linear inside every cell and allows to estimate the potential gradient in each cell from the nodal values. The obtained sparse linear system is solved with the GMRES solver combined with the ILU(0) preconditioner. The new algorithm is verified with the simulation of the current collection by cylindrical Langmuire probes in the collisionless regime for a wide range of probe to Debye length ratios. The computed electron and ion number density variations as well as electric potential and collected currents compare well with the simulation results of Laframboise. AFOSR-FA9550-14-1-0366 Computational Mathematics Program.

  9. Least-squares finite-element scheme for the lattice Boltzmann method on an unstructured mesh.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusong; LeBoeuf, Eugene J; Basu, P K

    2005-10-01

    A numerical model of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) utilizing least-squares finite-element method in space and the Crank-Nicolson method in time is developed. This method is able to solve fluid flow in domains that contain complex or irregular geometric boundaries by using the flexibility and numerical stability of a finite-element method, while employing accurate least-squares optimization. Fourth-order accuracy in space and second-order accuracy in time are derived for a pure advection equation on a uniform mesh; while high stability is implied from a von Neumann linearized stability analysis. Implemented on unstructured mesh through an innovative element-by-element approach, the proposed method requires fewer grid points and less memory compared to traditional LBM. Accurate numerical results are presented through two-dimensional incompressible Poiseuille flow, Couette flow, and flow past a circular cylinder. Finally, the proposed method is applied to estimate the permeability of a randomly generated porous media, which further demonstrates its inherent geometric flexibility. PMID:16383571

  10. Discretization and Preconditioning Algorithms for the Euler and Navier-Stokes Equations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Several stabilized demoralization procedures for conservation law equations on triangulated domains will be considered. Specifically, numerical schemes based on upwind finite volume, fluctuation splitting, Galerkin least-squares, and space discontinuous Galerkin demoralization will be considered in detail. A standard energy analysis for several of these methods will be given via entropy symmetrization. Next, we will present some relatively new theoretical results concerning congruence relationships for left or right symmetrized equations. These results suggest new variants of existing FV, DG, GLS, and FS methods which are computationally more efficient while retaining the pleasant theoretical properties achieved by entropy symmetrization. In addition, the task of Jacobean linearization of these schemes for use in Newton's method is greatly simplified owing to exploitation of exact symmetries which exist in the system. The FV, FS and DG schemes also permit discrete maximum principle analysis and enforcement which greatly adds to the robustness of the methods. Discrete maximum principle theory will be presented for general finite volume approximations on unstructured meshes. Next, we consider embedding these nonlinear space discretizations into exact and inexact Newton solvers which are preconditioned using a nonoverlapping (Schur complement) domain decomposition technique. Elements of nonoverlapping domain decomposition for elliptic problems will be reviewed followed by the present extension to hyperbolic and elliptic-hyperbolic problems. Other issues of practical relevance such the meshing of geometries, code implementation, turbulence modeling, global convergence, etc, will. be addressed as needed.

  11. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of falling films using an adaptive unstructured mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Chris; Xie, Zhihua; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Falling liquid films have rich wave dynamics, often occurring in many industrial applications, such as condensers, evaporators and chemical reactors. A number of numerical studies featuring falling liquid films are available in the literature; the majority of them, however, have focused on two-dimensional falling films. Far fewer studies have considered three-dimensional falling films, and those that have only studied the flow in a periodic domain. The objective of this study is to investigate flow dynamics of developing three-dimensional falling films using the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with interface capturing approach over extended domains. An adaptive, unstructured mesh modelling framework is employed here to study this problem, which can modify and adapt three-dimensional meshes to better represent the underlying physics of multiphase problems and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. Numerical examples of three-dimensional falling films in a long domain are presented and discussed. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  12. Time integration algorithms for the two-dimensional Euler equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, David C.; Whitaker, D. L.; Walters, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    Explicit and implicit time integration algorithms for the two-dimensional Euler equations on unstructured grids are presented. Both cell-centered and cell-vertex finite volume upwind schemes utilizing Roe's approximate Riemann solver are developed. For the cell-vertex scheme, a four-stage Runge-Kutta time integration, a fourstage Runge-Kutta time integration with implicit residual averaging, a point Jacobi method, a symmetric point Gauss-Seidel method and two methods utilizing preconditioned sparse matrix solvers are presented. For the cell-centered scheme, a Runge-Kutta scheme, an implicit tridiagonal relaxation scheme modeled after line Gauss-Seidel, a fully implicit lower-upper (LU) decomposition, and a hybrid scheme utilizing both Runge-Kutta and LU methods are presented. A reverse Cuthill-McKee renumbering scheme is employed for the direct solver to decrease CPU time by reducing the fill of the Jacobian matrix. A comparison of the various time integration schemes is made for both first-order and higher order accurate solutions using several mesh sizes, higher order accuracy is achieved by using multidimensional monotone linear reconstruction procedures. The results obtained for a transonic flow over a circular arc suggest that the preconditioned sparse matrix solvers perform better than the other methods as the number of elements in the mesh increases.

  13. Recent Development in the CESE Method for the Solution of the Navier-Stokes Equations Using Unstructured Triangular or Tetrahedral Meshes With High Aspect Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Yen, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    In the multidimensional CESE development, triangles and tetrahedra turn out to be the most natural building blocks for 2D and 3D spatial meshes. As such the CESE method is compatible with the simplest unstructured meshes and thus can be easily applied to solve problems with complex geometries. However, because the method uses space-time staggered stencils, solution decoupling may become a real nuisance in applications involving unstructured meshes. In this paper we will describe a simple and general remedy which, according to numerical experiments, has removed any possibility of solution decoupling. Moreover, in a real-world viscous flow simulation near a solid wall, one often encounters a case where a boundary with high curvature or sharp corner is surrounded by triangular/tetrahedral meshes of extremely high aspect ratio (up to 106). For such an extreme case, the spatial projection of a space-time compounded conservation element constructed using the original CESE design may become highly concave and thus its centroid (referred to as a spatial solution point) may lie far outside of the spatial projection. It could even be embedded beyond a solid wall boundary and causes serious numerical difficulties. In this paper we will also present a new procedure for constructing conservation elements and solution elements which effectively overcomes the difficulties associated with the original design. Another difficulty issue which was addressed more recently is the wellknown fact that accuracy of gradient computations involving triangular/tetrahedral grids deteriorates rapidly as the aspect ratio of grid cells increases. The root cause of this difficulty was clearly identified and several remedies to overcome it were found through a rigorous mathematical analysis. However, because of the length of the current paper and the complexity of mathematics involved, this new work will be presented in another paper.

  14. Divergence-free MHD on unstructured meshes using high order finite volume schemes based on multidimensional Riemann solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Several advances have been reported in the recent literature on divergence-free finite volume schemes for Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Almost all of these advances are restricted to structured meshes. To retain full geometric versatility, however, it is also very important to make analogous advances in divergence-free schemes for MHD on unstructured meshes. Such schemes utilize a staggered Yee-type mesh, where all hydrodynamic quantities (mass, momentum and energy density) are cell-centered, while the magnetic fields are face-centered and the electric fields, which are so useful for the time update of the magnetic field, are centered at the edges. Three important advances are brought together in this paper in order to make it possible to have high order accurate finite volume schemes for the MHD equations on unstructured meshes. First, it is shown that a divergence-free WENO reconstruction of the magnetic field can be developed for unstructured meshes in two and three space dimensions using a classical cell-centered WENO algorithm, without the need to do a WENO reconstruction for the magnetic field on the faces. This is achieved via a novel constrained L2-projection operator that is used in each time step as a postprocessor of the cell-centered WENO reconstruction so that the magnetic field becomes locally and globally divergence free. Second, it is shown that recently-developed genuinely multidimensional Riemann solvers (called MuSIC Riemann solvers) can be used on unstructured meshes to obtain a multidimensionally upwinded representation of the electric field at each edge. Third, the above two innovations work well together with a high order accurate one-step ADER time stepping strategy, which requires the divergence-free nonlinear WENO reconstruction procedure to be carried out only once per time step. The resulting divergence-free ADER-WENO schemes with MuSIC Riemann solvers give us an efficient and easily-implemented strategy for divergence-free MHD on

  15. Temporal-adaptive Euler/Navier-Stokes algorithm for unsteady aerodynamic analysis of airfoils using unstructured dynamic meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Williams, Marc H.; Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    A temporal adaptive algorithm for the time-integration of the two-dimensional Euler or Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The flow solver involves an upwind flux-split spatial discretization for the convective terms and central differencing for the shear-stress and heat flux terms on an unstructured mesh of triangles. The temporal adaptive algorithm is a time-accurate integration procedure which allows flows with high spatial and temporal gradients to be computed efficiently by advancing each grid cell near its maximum allowable time step. Results indicate that an appreciable computational savings can be achieved for both inviscid and viscous unsteady airfoil problems using unstructured meshes without degrading spatial or temporal accuracy.

  16. Efficient 3D geometric and Zernike moments computation from unstructured surface meshes.

    PubMed

    Pozo, José María; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2011-03-01

    This paper introduces and evaluates a fast exact algorithm and a series of faster approximate algorithms for the computation of 3D geometric moments from an unstructured surface mesh of triangles. Being based on the object surface reduces the computational complexity of these algorithms with respect to volumetric grid-based algorithms. In contrast, it can only be applied for the computation of geometric moments of homogeneous objects. This advantage and restriction is shared with other proposed algorithms based on the object boundary. The proposed exact algorithm reduces the computational complexity for computing geometric moments up to order N with respect to previously proposed exact algorithms, from N(9) to N(6). The approximate series algorithm appears as a power series on the rate between triangle size and object size, which can be truncated at any desired degree. The higher the number and quality of the triangles, the better the approximation. This approximate algorithm reduces the computational complexity to N(3). In addition, the paper introduces a fast algorithm for the computation of 3D Zernike moments from the computed geometric moments, with a computational complexity N(4), while the previously proposed algorithm is of order N(6). The error introduced by the proposed approximate algorithms is evaluated in different shapes and the cost-benefit ratio in terms of error, and computational time is analyzed for different moment orders. PMID:20714011

  17. Ordering Unstructured Meshes for Sparse Matrix Computations on Leading Parallel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Li, Xiaoye; Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak

    2000-01-01

    The ability of computers to solve hitherto intractable problems and simulate complex processes using mathematical models makes them an indispensable part of modern science and engineering. Computer simulations of large-scale realistic applications usually require solving a set of non-linear partial differential equations (PDES) over a finite region. For example, one thrust area in the DOE Grand Challenge projects is to design future accelerators such as the SpaHation Neutron Source (SNS). Our colleagues at SLAC need to model complex RFQ cavities with large aspect ratios. Unstructured grids are currently used to resolve the small features in a large computational domain; dynamic mesh adaptation will be added in the future for additional efficiency. The PDEs for electromagnetics are discretized by the FEM method, which leads to a generalized eigenvalue problem Kx = AMx, where K and M are the stiffness and mass matrices, and are very sparse. In a typical cavity model, the number of degrees of freedom is about one million. For such large eigenproblems, direct solution techniques quickly reach the memory limits. Instead, the most widely-used methods are Krylov subspace methods, such as Lanczos or Jacobi-Davidson. In all the Krylov-based algorithms, sparse matrix-vector multiplication (SPMV) must be performed repeatedly. Therefore, the efficiency of SPMV usually determines the eigensolver speed. SPMV is also one of the most heavily used kernels in large-scale numerical simulations.

  18. Three-dimensional unstructured-mesh eutrophication model and its application to the Xiangxi River, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Danxun; Wang, Xingkui

    2012-01-01

    The Xiangxi River is one of the main tributaries in the Three Gorges reservoir, with the shortest distance to the Three Gorges Project Dam. Severe and frequent algal bloom events have occurred frequently in the Xiangxi River in recent years. Therefore, the current study develops a three-dimensional unstructured-mesh model to investigate the dynamic process of algal bloom. The developed model comprises three modules, namely, hydrodynamics, nutrient cycles, and phytoplankton ecological dynamics. A number of factors, including hydrodynamic condition, nutrient concentration, temperature, and light illumination, that would affect the evolution of phytoplankton were considered. Moreover, the wave equation was used to solve the free surface fluctuations and vertical Z-coordinates with adjustable layered thicknesses. These values, in turn, are suitable for solving the algal bloom problems that occurred in the river style reservoir that has a complex boundary and dramatically changing hydrodynamic conditions. The comparisons between the modeling results and field data of years 2007 and 2008 indicate that the developed model is capable of simulating the algal bloom process in the Xiangxi River with reasonable accuracy. However, hydrodynamic force and external pollution loads affect the concentrations of nutrients, which, along with the underwater light intensity, could consequently affect phytoplankton evolution. Thus, flow velocity cannot be ignored in the analysis of river algal bloom. Based on the modeling results, building an impounding reservoir and increasing the releasing discharge at appropriate times are effective ways for controlling algal bloom. PMID:23520863

  19. Unstructured-mesh modeling of the Congo river-to-sea continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bars, Yoann Le; Vallaeys, Valentin; Deleersnijder, Éric; Hanert, Emmanuel; Carrere, Loren; Channelière, Claire

    2016-04-01

    With the second largest outflow in the world and one of the widest hydrological basins, the Congo River is of a major importance both locally and globally. However, relatively few studies have been conducted on its hydrology, as compared to other great rivers such as the Amazon, Nile, Yangtze, or Mississippi. The goal of this study is therefore to help fill this gap and provide the first high-resolution simulation of the Congo river-estuary-coastal sea continuum. To this end, we are using a discontinuous-Galerkin finite element marine model that solves the two-dimensional depth-averaged shallow water equations on an unstructured mesh. To ensure a smooth transition from river to coastal sea, we have considered a model that encompasses both hydrological and coastal ocean processes. An important difficulty in setting up this model was to find data to parameterize and validate it, as it is a rather remote and understudied area. Therefore, an important effort in this study has been to establish a methodology to take advantage of all the data sources available including nautical charts that had to be digitalized. The model surface elevation has then been validated with respect to an altimetric database. Model results suggest the existence of gyres in the vicinity of the river mouth that have never been documented before. The effect of those gyres on the Congo River dynamics has been further investigated by simulating the transport of Lagrangian particles and computing the water age.

  20. A third-order compact gas-kinetic scheme on unstructured meshes for compressible Navier-Stokes solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liang; Xu, Kun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, for the first time a third-order compact gas-kinetic scheme is proposed on unstructured meshes for the compressible viscous flow computations. The possibility to design such a third-order compact scheme is due to the high-order gas evolution model, where a time-dependent gas distribution function at cell interface not only provides the fluxes across a cell interface, but also presents a time accurate solution for flow variables at cell interface. As a result, both cell averaged and cell interface flow variables can be used for the initial data reconstruction at the beginning of next time step. A weighted least-square procedure has been used for the initial reconstruction. Therefore, a compact third-order gas-kinetic scheme with the involvement of neighboring cells only can be developed on unstructured meshes. In comparison with other conventional high-order schemes, the current method avoids the Gaussian point integration for numerical fluxes along a cell interface and the multi-stage Runge-Kutta method for temporal accuracy. The third-order compact scheme is numerically stable under CFL condition CFL ≈ 0.5. Due to its multidimensional gas-kinetic formulation and the coupling of inviscid and viscous terms, even with unstructured meshes, the boundary layer solution and vortex structure can be accurately captured by the current scheme. At the same time, the compact scheme can capture strong shocks as well.

  1. Multiphase flow modelling of explosive volcanic eruptions using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christian T.; Collins, Gareth S.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Kramer, Stephan C.

    2014-05-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions generate highly energetic plumes of hot gas and ash particles that produce diagnostic deposits and pose an extreme environmental hazard. The formation, dispersion and collapse of these volcanic plumes are complex multiscale processes that are extremely challenging to simulate numerically. Accurate description of particle and droplet aggregation, movement and settling requires a model capable of capturing the dynamics on a range of scales (from cm to km) and a model that can correctly describe the important multiphase interactions that take place. However, even the most advanced models of eruption dynamics to date are restricted by the fixed mesh-based approaches that they employ. The research presented herein describes the development of a compressible multiphase flow model within Fluidity, a combined finite element / control volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. Fluidity adopts a state-of-the-art adaptive unstructured mesh-based approach to discretise the domain and focus numerical resolution only in areas important to the dynamics, while decreasing resolution where it is not needed as a simulation progresses. This allows the accurate but economical representation of the flow dynamics throughout time, and potentially allows large multi-scale problems to become tractable in complex 3D domains. The multiphase flow model is verified with the method of manufactured solutions, and validated by simulating published gas-solid shock tube experiments and comparing the numerical results against pressure gauge data. The application of the model considers an idealised 7 km by 7 km domain in which the violent eruption of hot gas and volcanic ash high into the atmosphere is simulated. Although the simulations do not correspond to a particular eruption case study, the key flow features observed in a typical explosive eruption event are successfully captured. These include a shock wave resulting

  2. The application of ICOM, a non-hydrostatic, fully unstructured mesh model in large scale ocean domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Stephan C.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Cotter, Colin J.; Pain, Chris C.; Nelson, Rhodri B.

    2010-05-01

    There are many apparent advantages of the application of unstructured meshes in ocean modelling: a much better representation of the coastal boundaries, the ability to focus resolution in areas of interest, or areas of intensified flow, such as boundary currents, etc. In particular with adaptive mesh technology, where the mesh is adapted during the simulation as the flow evolves, one is able to resolve much smaller features in the often turbulent ocean flow, than would be possible with fixed, structured mesh models. The Imperial College Ocean Model[1], is a non-hydrostatic ocean model that employs fully unstructured adaptive meshes, that allow focussing of resolution not only in the horizontal but also in the vertical. This enables the modelling of physical processes, such as open ocean deep convection, density driven flows on a steep bottom topography, etc. that are very important for the global ocean circulation. The Imperial College Ocean Model has been applied succesfully in the modelling of many of these processes. On the other hand hydrostatic, layered ocean models have a significant advantage in large areas of the oceans where the hydrostatic assumption is valid. The fact that with fully unstructured meshes it is no longer straightforward to separate horizontal, baroptropic modes and vertical, baroclinic dynamics, has consequences for both numerical accuracy and the efficiency of the linear solvers. It has therefore been a challenge for ICOM to remain competitive in these areas with layered mesh models. These problems have been overcome by, amongst others, the development of a new mesh adaptation technique that maintains a columnar structure of the mesh in such areas. The application of multigrid techniques has improved the effiency of the non-hydrostatic pressure solve[2] in such a way that convergence is now independent of aspect ratio, which makes the pressure solve competitive with that of a hydrostatic model. In this contribution an overview will be

  3. A new spectral finite volume method for elastic wave modelling on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan; Chung, Eric T.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we consider a new spectral finite volume method for the elastic wave equations. Our new finite volume method is based on a piecewise constant approximation on a fine mesh and a high-order polynomial reconstruction on a coarser mesh. Our new method is constructed based on two existing techniques, the high-order finite volume method and the spectral finite volume method. In fact, we will construct a new method to take advantage of both methods. More precisely, our method has two distinctive features. The first one is that the local polynomial reconstructions are performed on the coarse triangles, and the reconstruction matrices for all the coarse triangles are the same. This fact enhances the parallelization of our algorithm. We will present a parallel implementation of our method and show excellent efficiency results. The second one is that, by using a suitable number of finer triangles with a coarse triangle, we obtain an over-determined reconstruction system, which can enhance the robustness of the reconstruction process. To derive our scheme, standard finite volume technique is applied to each fine triangle, and the high-order reconstructed polynomials, computed on coarse triangles, are used to compute numerical fluxes. We will present numerical results to show the performance of our method. Our method is presented for 2D problems, but the same methodology can be applied to 3D.

  4. A new spectral finite volume method for elastic wave modelling on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan; Chung, Eric T.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a new spectral finite volume method (FVM) for the elastic wave equations. Our new FVM is based on a piecewise constant approximation on a fine mesh and a high-order polynomial reconstruction on a coarser mesh. Our new method is constructed based on two existing techniques, the high-order FVM and the spectral FVM. In fact, we will construct a new method to take advantage of both methods. More precisely, our method has two distinctive features. The first one is that the local polynomial reconstructions are performed on the coarse triangles and the reconstruction matrices for all the coarse triangles are the same. This fact enhances the parallelization of our algorithm. We will present a parallel implementation of our method and show excellent efficiency results. The second one is that, by using a suitable number of finer triangles with a coarse triangle, we obtain an overdetermined reconstruction system, which can enhance the robustness of the reconstruction process. To derive our scheme, standard finite volume technique is applied to each fine triangle, and the high-order reconstructed polynomials, computed on coarse triangles, are used to compute numerical fluxes. We will present numerical results to show the performance of our method. Our method is presented for 2-D problems, but the same methodology can be applied to 3-D.

  5. An implementation of a chemical and thermal nonequilibrium flow solver on unstructured meshes and application to blunt bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a nonequilibrium flow solver, implementation of the algorithm on unstructured meshes, and application to hypersonic flow past blunt bodies. Air is modeled as a mixture of five chemical species, namely O2, N2, O, NO, and N, having two temperatures namely translational and vibrational. The solution algorithm is a cell centered, point implicit upwind scheme that employs Roe's flux difference splitting technique. Implementation of this algorithm on unstructured meshes is described. The computer code is applied to solve Mach 15 flow with and without a Type IV shock interference on a cylindrical body of 2.5mm radius representing a cowl lip. Adaptively generated meshes are employed, and the meshes are refined several times until the solution exhibits detailed flow features and surface pressure and heat flux distributions. Effects of a catalytic wall on surface heat flux distribution are studied. For the Mach 15 Type IV shock interference flow, present results showed a peak heat flux of 544 MW/m2 for a fully catalytic wall and 431 MW/m(exp 2) for a noncatalytic wall. Some of the results are compared with available computational data.

  6. EM modelling of arbitrary shaped anisotropic dielectric objects using an efficient 3D leapfrog scheme on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gansen, A.; Hachemi, M. El; Belouettar, S.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.

    2016-09-01

    The standard Yee algorithm is widely used in computational electromagnetics because of its simplicity and divergence free nature. A generalization of the classical Yee scheme to 3D unstructured meshes is adopted, based on the use of a Delaunay primal mesh and its high quality Voronoi dual. This allows the problem of accuracy losses, which are normally associated with the use of the standard Yee scheme and a staircased representation of curved material interfaces, to be circumvented. The 3D dual mesh leapfrog-scheme which is presented has the ability to model both electric and magnetic anisotropic lossy materials. This approach enables the modelling of problems, of current practical interest, involving structured composites and metamaterials.

  7. Adaptive unstructured triangular mesh generation and flow solvers for the Navier-Stokes equations at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashford, Gregory A.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A method for generating high quality unstructured triangular grids for high Reynolds number Navier-Stokes calculations about complex geometries is described. Careful attention is paid in the mesh generation process to resolving efficiently the disparate length scales which arise in these flows. First the surface mesh is constructed in a way which ensures that the geometry is faithfully represented. The volume mesh generation then proceeds in two phases thus allowing the viscous and inviscid regions of the flow to be meshed optimally. A solution-adaptive remeshing procedure which allows the mesh to adapt itself to flow features is also described. The procedure for tracking wakes and refinement criteria appropriate for shock detection are described. Although at present it has only been implemented in two dimensions, the grid generation process has been designed with the extension to three dimensions in mind. An implicit, higher-order, upwind method is also presented for computing compressible turbulent flows on these meshes. Two recently developed one-equation turbulence models have been implemented to simulate the effects of the fluid turbulence. Results for flow about a RAE 2822 airfoil and a Douglas three-element airfoil are presented which clearly show the improved resolution obtainable.

  8. Adaptive unstructured triangular mesh generation and flow solvers for the Navier-Stokes equations at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashford, Gregory A.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-10-01

    A method for generating high quality unstructured triangular grids for high Reynolds number Navier-Stokes calculations about complex geometries is described. Careful attention is paid in the mesh generation process to resolving efficiently the disparate length scales which arise in these flows. First the surface mesh is constructed in a way which ensures that the geometry is faithfully represented. The volume mesh generation then proceeds in two phases thus allowing the viscous and inviscid regions of the flow to be meshed optimally. A solution-adaptive remeshing procedure which allows the mesh to adapt itself to flow features is also described. The procedure for tracking wakes and refinement criteria appropriate for shock detection are described. Although at present it has only been implemented in two dimensions, the grid generation process has been designed with the extension to three dimensions in mind. An implicit, higher-order, upwind method is also presented for computing compressible turbulent flows on these meshes. Two recently developed one-equation turbulence models have been implemented to simulate the effects of the fluid turbulence. Results for flow about a RAE 2822 airfoil and a Douglas three-element airfoil are presented which clearly show the improved resolution obtainable.

  9. An effective 3D leapfrog scheme for electromagnetic modelling of arbitrary shaped dielectric objects using unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gansen, A.; El Hachemi, M.; Belouettar, S.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.

    2015-12-01

    In computational electromagnetics, the advantages of the standard Yee algorithm are its simplicity and its low computational costs. However, because of the accuracy losses resulting from the staircased representation of curved interfaces, it is normally not the method of choice for modelling electromagnetic interactions with objects of arbitrary shape. For these problems, an unstructured mesh finite volume time domain method is often employed, although the scheme does not satisfy the divergence free condition at the discrete level. In this paper, we generalize the standard Yee algorithm for use on unstructured meshes and solve the problem concerning the loss of accuracy linked to staircasing, while preserving the divergence free nature of the algorithm. The scheme is implemented on high quality primal Delaunay and dual Voronoi meshes. The performance of the approach was validated in previous work by simulating the scattering of electromagnetic waves by spherical 3D PEC objects in free space. In this paper we demonstrate the performance of this scheme for penetration problems in lossy dielectrics using a new averaging technique for Delaunay and Voronoi edges at the interface. A detailed explanation of the implementation of the method, and a demonstration of the quality of the results obtained for transmittance and scattering simulations by 3D objects of arbitrary shapes, are presented.

  10. High-Order Discontinuous Galerkin Level Set Method for Interface Tracking and Re-Distancing on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Patrick; Nourgaliev, Robert; Schofield, Sam

    2015-11-01

    A new sharp high-order interface tracking method for multi-material flow problems on unstructured meshes is presented. The method combines the marker-tracking algorithm with a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) level set method to implicitly track interfaces. DG projection is used to provide a mapping from the Lagrangian marker field to the Eulerian level set field. For the level set re-distancing, we developed a novel marching method that takes advantage of the unique features of the DG representation of the level set. The method efficiently marches outward from the zero level set with values in the new cells being computed solely from cell neighbors. Results are presented for a number of different interface geometries including ones with sharp corners and multiple hierarchical level sets. The method can robustly handle the level set discontinuities without explicit utilization of solution limiters. Results show that the expected high order (3rd and higher) of convergence for the DG representation of the level set is obtained for smooth solutions on unstructured meshes. High-order re-distancing on irregular meshes is a must for applications were the interfacial curvature is important for underlying physics, such as surface tension, wetting and detonation shock dynamics. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Information management release number LLNL-ABS-675636.

  11. Seamless atmospheric modeling across the hydrostatic-nonhydrostatic scales - preliminary results using an unstructured-Voronoi mesh for weather prediction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skamarock, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    One of the major problems in atmospheric model applications is the representation of deep convection within the models; explicit simulation of deep convection on fine meshes performs much better than sub-grid parameterized deep convection on coarse meshes. Unfortunately, the high cost of explicit convective simulation has meant it has only been used to down-scale global simulations in weather prediction and regional climate applications, typically using traditional one-way interactive nesting technology. We have been performing real-time weather forecast tests using a global non-hydrostatic atmospheric model (the Model for Prediction Across Scales, MPAS) that employs a variable-resolution unstructured Voronoi horizontal mesh (nominally hexagons) to span hydrostatic to nonhydrostatic scales. The smoothly varying Voronoi mesh eliminates many downscaling problems encountered using traditional one- or two-way grid nesting. Our test weather forecasts cover two periods - the 2015 Spring Forecast Experiment conducted at the NOAA Storm Prediction Center during the month of May in which we used a 50-3 km mesh, and the PECAN field program examining nocturnal convection over the US during the months of June and July in which we used a 15-3 km mesh. An important aspect of this modeling system is that the model physics be scale-aware, particularly the deep convection parameterization. These MPAS simulations employ the Grell-Freitas scale-aware convection scheme. Our test forecasts show that the scheme produces a gradual transition in the deep convection, from the deep unstable convection being handled entirely by the convection scheme on the coarse mesh regions (dx > 15 km), to the deep convection being almost entirely explicit on the 3 km NA region of the meshes. We will present results illustrating the performance of critical aspects of the MPAS model in these tests.

  12. 3D Mesh optimization methods for unstructured polyhedra: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.S.; Burton, D.E.

    1994-11-22

    A mesh optimization scheme allows a Lagrangian code to run problems with extreme mesh distortion by reconfiguring node and zone connectivity as the problem evolves. We have developed some 3D mesh optimization operations and criteria for applying them. These are demonstrated in a 3D Free Lagrange code being developed at LLNL. In the simplest case of a mesh or mesh subregion composed purely of tetrahedra we can maintain a Delaunay tetrahedralization. For more interesting meshes, made up of general polyhedra, a suite of optimization operations and their respective application criteria have been developed.

  13. A computational study of the effect of unstructured mesh quality on solution efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Batdorf, M.; Freitag, L.A.; Ollivier-Gooch, C.

    1997-09-01

    It is well known that mesh quality affects both efficiency and accuracy of CFD solutions. Meshes with distorted elements make solutions both more difficult to compute and less accurate. We review a recently proposed technique for improving mesh quality as measured by element angle (dihedral angle in three dimensions) using a combination of optimization-based smoothing techniques and local reconnection schemes. Typical results that quantify mesh improvement for a number of application meshes are presented. We then examine effects of mesh quality as measured by the maximum angle in the mesh on the convergence rates of two commonly used CFD solution techniques. Numerical experiments are performed that quantify the cost and benefit of using mesh optimization schemes for incompressible flow over a cylinder and weakly compressible flow over a cylinder.

  14. Recent improvements to an unstructured mesh 3D Navier-Stokes solver aimed at extending the range of geometric capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, W. N.

    This paper describes some recent improvements made to an unstructed mesh, solution-adaptive three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver aimed at extending the range of geometric complexity which can be handled in the general context of turbomachinery. The methodology involves generation of a topologically cuboidal mesh, and then the detetion of cells which are not required to allow the formation of relatively complex geometries. This comparatively simple approach permits much of the benefits of an unstructured solution environment to be achieved with minimal complication. Solutions are presented for the highly three-dimensional flows associated with a truncated cylinder in a cross flow, a periodic array of coolant ejection holes, and the overtip leakage flow in an annular cascade of turbine blades.

  15. Challenges performing multi-scale, three-dimensional simulations of landslide generated tsunamis on adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. R.; Kramer, S. C.; Collins, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    Linear wave models cannot reproduce the highly nonlinear generation mechanisms required to accurately predict the consequences of landslide-generated tsunamis. Models based on the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations can simulate complex landslide-water interactions at realistic scales; however, the computing power required for such a simulation can be prohibitively high for large domains with realistic bathymetries. The variable resolution available with the use of unstructured adaptive meshes allows larger domains to be modeled at the same resolution for a lower computational cost than on structured meshes; they are also better at representing complex geometries and bathymetries. However, unstructured meshes introduce extra numerical challenges requiring the use of novel interface preservation techniques coupled with velocity-pressure discretisations that ensure the conservation and boundedness of all materials in the simulation. In this study we describe some of the challenges encountered extending the finite element, finite volume multiple-material fluid dynamics model Fluidity to large-scale landslide-generated tsunami simulations. In particular, we focus on the ability of the model to preserve the balance between the buoyancy and pressure gradient forces. Failure to discretely satisfy this relationship is shown to result in spurious waves that contaminate any physical tsunami signal. However, ensuring that balance is preserved in a computationally efficient manner imposes extra constraints on the dynamic mesh optimisation process. Incorporating these restrictions allows us to validate our model against multi-scale experimental simulations of landslide generated tsunami (see figure). Experimental (top, taken from Di Risio et. al. 2009, doi:10.1029/2008JC004858) and equivalent numerical simulation (bottom) of a subaerial landslide impacting into water. In the experiment the 80cm long landslide produces waves of amplitude 1-2cm around a 9m diameter island in a 50x

  16. Two-dimensional implicit time dependent calculations on adaptive unstructured meshes with time evolving boundaries.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Paul Tinphone; Jameson, Antony, 1934-; Baker, Timothy J.; Martinelli, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    An implicit multigrid-driven algorithm for two-dimensional incompressible laminar viscous flows has been coupled with a solution adaptation method and a mesh movement method for boundary movement. Time-dependent calculations are performed implicitly by regarding each time step as a steady-state problem in pseudo-time. The method of artificial compressibility is used to solve the flow equations. The solution mesh adaptation method performs local mesh refinement using an incremental Delaunay algorithm and mesh coarsening by means of edge collapse. Mesh movement is achieved by modeling the computational domain as an elastic solid and solving the equilibrium equations for the stress field. The solution adaptation method has been validated by comparison with experimental results and other computational results for low Reynolds number flow over a shedding circular cylinder. Preliminary validation of the mesh movement method has been demonstrated by a comparison with experimental results of an oscillating airfoil and with computational results for an oscillating cylinder.

  17. Efficient quadrature-free high-order spectral volume method on unstructured grids: Theory and 2D implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.; Wang, Z.; Liu, Y.

    2007-11-19

    An efficient implementation of the high-order spectral volume (SV) method is presented for multi-dimensional conservation laws on unstructured grids. In the SV method, each simplex cell is called a spectral volume (SV), and the SV is further subdivided into polygonal (2D), or polyhedral (3D) control volumes (CVs) to support high-order data reconstructions. In the traditional implementation, Gauss quadrature formulas are used to approximate the flux integrals on all faces. In the new approach, a nodal set is selected and used to reconstruct a high-order polynomial approximation for the flux vector, and then the flux integrals on the internal faces are computed analytically, without the need for Gauss quadrature formulas. This gives a significant advantage over the traditional SV method in efficiency and ease of implementation. For SV interfaces, a quadrature-free approach is compared with the Gauss quadrature approach to further evaluate the accuracy and efficiency. A simplified treatment of curved boundaries is also presented that avoids the need to store a separate reconstruction for each boundary cell. Fundamental properties of the new SV implementation are studied and high-order accuracy is demonstrated for linear and non-linear advection equations, and the Euler equations. Several well known inviscid flow test cases are utilized to show the effectiveness of the simplified curved boundary representation.

  18. Efficient quadrature-free high-order spectral volume method on unstructured grids: Theory and 2D implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Rob; Wang, Z. J.; Liu, Yen

    2008-01-01

    An efficient implementation of the high-order spectral volume (SV) method is presented for multi-dimensional conservation laws on unstructured grids. In the SV method, each simplex cell is called a spectral volume (SV), and the SV is further subdivided into polygonal (2D), or polyhedral (3D) control volumes (CVs) to support high-order data reconstructions. In the traditional implementation, Gauss quadrature formulas are used to approximate the flux integrals on all faces. In the new approach, a nodal set is selected and used to reconstruct a high-order polynomial approximation for the flux vector, and then the flux integrals on the internal faces are computed analytically, without the need for Gauss quadrature formulas. This gives a significant advantage over the traditional SV method in efficiency and ease of implementation. For SV interfaces, a quadrature-free approach is compared with the Gauss quadrature approach to further evaluate the accuracy and efficiency. A simplified treatment of curved boundaries is also presented that avoids the need to store a separate reconstruction for each boundary cell. Fundamental properties of the new SV implementation are studied and high-order accuracy is demonstrated for linear and non-linear advection equations, and the Euler equations. Several well known inviscid flow test cases are utilized to show the effectiveness of the simplified curved boundary representation.

  19. Extreme Wave Simulation due to Typhoon Bolaven based on locally Enhanced Fine-Mesh Unstructured Grid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyeong Ok; Choi, Byung Ho; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2016-04-01

    The performance of an integrally coupled wave-tide-surge model using the unstructured mesh system has been tested for the typhoon Bolaven which is regarded as the most powerful storm to strike the Korean Peninsula in nearly a decade with wind gusts measured up to 50 m/s, causing serious damages with 19 victims. Use of the unstructured mesh in coastal sea regions of marginal scale allows all energy from deep to shallow waters to be seamlessly followed; the physics of wave-circulation interactions can be then correctly resolved. The model covers the whole Yellow and East China Seas with locally refined meshes near the regions of Gageo Island (offshore southwestern corner of the Korean Peninsula) and south of Jeju Island (Gangjeong and Seogwipo ports). The wind and pressure fields during the passage of typhoon Bolaven are generated by the blending method. Generally the numerical atmospheric model cannot satisfactorily reproduce the strength of typhoons due to dynamic and resolution restrictions. In this study we could achieve an improved conservation of the typhoon strength by blending the Holland typhoon model result by the empirical formula onto the ambient meteorological fields of NCEP dataset. The model results are compared with the observations and the model performance is then evaluated. The computed wave spectrums for one and two dimensions are compared with the observation in Ieodo station. Results show that the wind wave significantly enhances the current intensity and surge elevation, addressing that to incorporate the wave-current interaction effect in the wave-tide-surge coupled model is important for the accurate prediction of current and sea surface elevation as well as extreme waves in shallow coastal sea regions. The resulting modeling system can be used for hindcasting and forecasting the wave-tide-surges in marine environments with complex coastlines, shallow water depth and fine sediment.

  20. A two-dimensional fourth-order unstructured-meshed Euler solver based on the CESE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyeu, David L.; Yu, S.-T. John; Chen, Yung-Yu; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, Chang's one-dimensional high-order CESE method [1] is extended to a two-dimensional, unstructured-triangular-meshed Euler solver. This fourth-order CESE method retains all favorable attributes of the original second-order CESE method, including: (i) flux conservation in space and time without using an approximated Riemann solver, (ii) genuine multi-dimensional algorithm without dimensional splitting, (iii) the CFL constraint for stable calculation remains to be ⩽1, (iv) the use of the most compact mesh stencil, involving only the immediate neighboring cells surrounding the cell where the solution at a new time step is sought, and (v) an explicit, unified space-time integration procedure without using a quadrature integration procedure. To demonstrate the new algorithm, three numerical examples are presented: (i) a moving vortex, (ii) acoustic wave interaction, and (iii) supersonic flow over a blunt body. Case 1 shows fourth-order convergence through mesh refinement. In Case 2, the nonlinear Euler solver is applied to simulate linear waves. In Case 3, superb shock capturing capabilities of the new fourth-order method without the carbuncle effect is demonstrated.

  1. A Parallel Implementation of Multilevel Recursive Spectral Bisection for Application to Adaptive Unstructured Meshes. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Stephen T.; Simon, Horst; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The design of a parallel implementation of multilevel recursive spectral bisection is described. The goal is to implement a code that is fast enough to enable dynamic repartitioning of adaptive meshes.

  2. Computation of UH-60A Airloads Using CFD/CSD Coupling on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids is used to compute the rotor airloads on the UH-60A helicopter at high-speed and high thrust conditions. The flow solver is coupled to a rotorcraft comprehensive code in order to account for trim and aeroelastic deflections. Simulations are performed both with and without the fuselage, and the effects of grid resolution, temporal resolution and turbulence model are examined. Computed airloads are compared to flight data.

  3. Solution algorithms for the two-dimensional Euler equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, D. L.; Slack, David C.; Walters, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze implicit techniques employed in structured grid algorithms for solving two-dimensional Euler equations and extend them to unstructured solvers in order to accelerate convergence rates. A comparison is made between nine different algorithms for both first-order and second-order accurate solutions. Higher-order accuracy is achieved by using multidimensional monotone linear reconstruction procedures. The discussion is illustrated by results for flow over a transonic circular arc.

  4. Development of a discrete ordinates code system for unstructured meshes of tetrahedral cells, with serial and parallel implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1998-11-01

    A numerically stable, accurate, and robust form of the exponential characteristic (EC) method, used to solve the time-independent linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation, is derived using direct affine coordinate transformations on unstructured meshes of tetrahedra. This quadrature, as well as the linear characteristic (LC) spatial quadrature, is implemented in the transport code, called TETRAN. This code solves multi-group neutral particle transport problems with anisotropic scattering and was parallelized using High Performance Fortran and angular domain decomposition. A new, parallel algorithm for updating the scattering source is introduced. The EC source and inflow flux coefficients are efficiently evaluated using Broyden`s rootsolver, started with special approximations developed here. TETRAN showed robustness, stability and accuracy on a variety of challenging test problems. Parallel speed-up was observed as the number of processors was increased using an IBM SP computer system.

  5. Parallelization of Unsteady Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan M.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the implementation of the MPI parallelization in a Navier-Stokes solver using adaptive mesh re nement. Viscous and inviscid test problems are considered for the purpose of benchmarking, as are implicit and explicit time advancement methods. The main test problem for comparison includes e ects from boundary layers and other viscous features and requires a large number of grid points for accurate computation. Ex- perimental validation against double cone experiments in hypersonic ow are shown. The adaptive mesh re nement shows promise for a staple test problem in the hypersonic com- munity. Extension to more advanced techniques for more complicated ows is described.

  6. Aerodynamic Design Optimization on Unstructured Meshes Using the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    1998-01-01

    A discrete adjoint method is developed and demonstrated for aerodynamic design optimization on unstructured grids. The governing equations are the three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a one-equation turbulence model. A discussion of the numerical implementation of the flow and adjoint equations is presented. Both compressible and incompressible solvers are differentiated and the accuracy of the sensitivity derivatives is verified by comparing with gradients obtained using finite differences. Several simplifying approximations to the complete linearization of the residual are also presented, and the resulting accuracy of the derivatives is examined. Demonstration optimizations for both compressible and incompressible flows are given.

  7. An arbitrary high-order Discontinuous Galerkin method for elastic waves on unstructured meshes - III. Viscoelastic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käser, Martin; Dumbser, Michael; de la Puente, Josep; Igel, Heiner

    2007-01-01

    We present a new numerical method to solve the heterogeneous anelastic, seismic wave equations with arbitrary high order accuracy in space and time on 3-D unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Using the velocity-stress formulation provides a linear hyperbolic system of equations with source terms that is completed by additional equations for the anelastic functions including the strain history of the material. These additional equations result from the rheological model of the generalized Maxwell body and permit the incorporation of realistic attenuation properties of viscoelastic material accounting for the behaviour of elastic solids and viscous fluids. The proposed method combines the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element (FE) method with the ADER approach using Arbitrary high order DERivatives for flux calculations. The DG approach, in contrast to classical FE methods, uses a piecewise polynomial approximation of the numerical solution which allows for discontinuities at element interfaces. Therefore, the well-established theory of numerical fluxes across element interfaces obtained by the solution of Riemann problems can be applied as in the finite volume framework. The main idea of the ADER time integration approach is a Taylor expansion in time in which all time derivatives are replaced by space derivatives using the so-called Cauchy-Kovalewski procedure which makes extensive use of the governing PDE. Due to the ADER time integration technique the same approximation order in space and time is achieved automatically and the method is a one-step scheme advancing the solution for one time step without intermediate stages. To this end, we introduce a new unrolled recursive algorithm for efficiently computing the Cauchy-Kovalewski procedure by making use of the sparsity of the system matrices. The numerical convergence analysis demonstrates that the new schemes provide very high order accuracy even on unstructured tetrahedral meshes while computational cost and

  8. 2D nearly orthogonal mesh generation with controls on distortion functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method to control the distortion function of the Ryskin and Leal (RL) orthogonal mesh generation system is presented. The proposed method considers the effects from not only the local orthogonal condition but also the local smoothness condition (the geometry and the mesh size) on the distortion fu...

  9. Adaptation of an unstructured-mesh, finite-element ocean model to the simulation of ocean circulation beneath ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Satoshi; Candy, Adam S.; Holland, Paul R.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Jenkins, Adrian

    2013-07-01

    Several different classes of ocean model are capable of representing floating glacial ice shelves. We describe the incorporation of ice shelves into Fluidity-ICOM, a nonhydrostatic finite-element ocean model with the capacity to utilize meshes that are unstructured and adaptive in three dimensions. This geometric flexibility offers several advantages over previous approaches. The model represents melting and freezing on all ice-shelf surfaces including vertical faces, treats the ice shelf topography as continuous rather than stepped, and does not require any smoothing of the ice topography or any of the additional parameterisations of the ocean mixed layer used in isopycnal or z-coordinate models. The model can also represent a water column that decreases to zero thickness at the 'grounding line', where the floating ice shelf is joined to its tributary ice streams. The model is applied to idealised ice-shelf geometries in order to demonstrate these capabilities. In these simple experiments, arbitrarily coarsening the mesh outside the ice-shelf cavity has little effect on the ice-shelf melt rate, while the mesh resolution within the cavity is found to be highly influential. Smoothing the vertical ice front results in faster flow along the smoothed ice front, allowing greater exchange with the ocean than in simulations with a realistic ice front. A vanishing water-column thickness at the grounding line has little effect in the simulations studied. We also investigate the response of ice shelf basal melting to variations in deep water temperature in the presence of salt stratification.

  10. A higher-order conservation element solution element method for solving hyperbolic differential equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyeu, David

    This dissertation presents an extension of the Conservation Element Solution Element (CESE) method from second- to higher-order accuracy. The new method retains the favorable characteristics of the original second-order CESE scheme, including (i) the use of the space-time integral equation for conservation laws, (ii) a compact mesh stencil, (iii) the scheme will remain stable up to a CFL number of unity, (iv) a fully explicit, time-marching integration scheme, (v) true multidimensionality without using directional splitting, and (vi) the ability to handle two- and three-dimensional geometries by using unstructured meshes. This algorithm has been thoroughly tested in one, two and three spatial dimensions and has been shown to obtain the desired order of accuracy for solving both linear and non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equations. The scheme has also shown its ability to accurately resolve discontinuities in the solutions. Higher order unstructured methods such as the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method and the Spectral Volume (SV) methods have been developed for one-, two- and three-dimensional application. Although these schemes have seen extensive development and use, certain drawbacks of these methods have been well documented. For example, the explicit versions of these two methods have very stringent stability criteria. This stability criteria requires that the time step be reduced as the order of the solver increases, for a given simulation on a given mesh. The research presented in this dissertation builds upon the work of Chang, who developed a fourth-order CESE scheme to solve a scalar one-dimensional hyperbolic partial differential equation. The completed research has resulted in two key deliverables. The first is a detailed derivation of a high-order CESE methods on unstructured meshes for solving the conservation laws in two- and three-dimensional spaces. The second is the code implementation of these numerical methods in a computer code. For

  11. Tissue specific simulations of interstitial cells of cajal networks using unstructured meshes.

    PubMed

    Sathar, Shameer; Trew, Mark L; Cheng, Leo K

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal motility is facilitated by specialized pacemaker cells called Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICC). ICC play a critical role in coordinating normal motility and its degradation in the gastrointestinal tract is associated with many functional motility disorders. Nonetheless, the degree of degradation and associated clinical impact remains unclear. Continuum modeling frameworks offers a virtual mean to simulate the electrical activity, and analyze the ICC activity in both normal and diseased states. Confocal images of the ICC networks were obtained from the intestine of normal mice. In this study, a new approach is presented where meshes of ICC networks were generated using a Delaunay triangulation and used to solve finite-element based reaction-diffusion equations describing gastrointestinal electrophysiology. The electrical activity was simulated on the ICC network and solutions were compared to those of a regular mesh based on individual pixel locations. The simulation results showed the proposed approach to be approximately 80% more efficient than a pixel-based mesh. The difference in activation time for the entire network between the different methods was observed to be around 4% (about 20 ms). The proposed approach will enable efficient examination of the ICC slow wave activity in larger networks and for longer temporal duration that has been previously impossible. This will provide valuable insights relating ICC degradation to gastrointestinal motility disorders. PMID:26738164

  12. A simple adaptive mesh generator for 2-D finite element calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, F.A.; Yong, Y.C.; Ettinger, R.D. )

    1993-03-01

    A strategy for adaptive mesh generation is proposed. The method consists of the use of a suitably defined density function', which can either be defined by the user or be calculated from a previous approximate solution, to guide the generation of a new mesh. This new mesh is built starting from a minimal number of triangular elements which are then in several sweeps, repeatedly refined according to the density function. The Delaunay algorithm is used in each stage to keep the shape of the triangles as equilateral as possible.

  13. Multidimensional Riemann problem with self-similar internal structure. Part II - Application to hyperbolic conservation laws on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Multidimensional Riemann solvers that have internal sub-structure in the strongly-interacting state have been formulated recently (D.S. Balsara (2012, 2014) [5,16]). Any multidimensional Riemann solver operates at the grid vertices and takes as its input all the states from its surrounding elements. It yields as its output an approximation of the strongly interacting state, as well as the numerical fluxes. The multidimensional Riemann problem produces a self-similar strongly-interacting state which is the result of several one-dimensional Riemann problems interacting with each other. To compute this strongly interacting state and its higher order moments we propose the use of a Galerkin-type formulation to compute the strongly interacting state and its higher order moments in terms of similarity variables. The use of substructure in the Riemann problem reduces numerical dissipation and, therefore, allows a better preservation of flow structures, like contact and shear waves. In this second part of a series of papers we describe how this technique is extended to unstructured triangular meshes. All necessary details for a practical computer code implementation are discussed. In particular, we explicitly present all the issues related to computational geometry. Because these Riemann solvers are Multidimensional and have Self-similar strongly-Interacting states that are obtained by Consistency with the conservation law, we call them MuSIC Riemann solvers. (A video introduction to multidimensional Riemann solvers is available on http://www.elsevier.com/xml/linking-roles/text/html". The MuSIC framework is sufficiently general to handle general nonlinear systems of hyperbolic conservation laws in multiple space dimensions. It can also accommodate all self-similar one-dimensional Riemann solvers and subsequently produces a multidimensional version of the same. In this paper we focus on unstructured triangular meshes. As examples of different systems of conservation laws we

  14. MOCUM: A two-dimensional method of characteristics code based on unstructured meshing for general geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Satvat, N.

    2012-07-01

    A transport theory code MOCUM based on the Method of Characteristics (MOC) as the flux solver with an advanced general geometry processor is developed for two-dimensional lattice and full core neutronics modeling. The core structure is represented by Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) that uses Boolean operations to build complex geometries from simple polygons. Arbitrary-precision arithmetic is also used in the process of building CSG objects to eliminate the round-off error from the commonly used double precision numbers. Then, the constructed core frame will be decomposed and refined into a conforming Delaunay triangulation to ensure the quality of the meshes. The MOC solver kernel is fully paralleled using OpenMP and the developed numerical code is validated by several benchmarks representing various core geometries. For the cases modeled, the maximum percentage error for multiplication factor and the pin power compared to reference values are 0.1% and 0.7% respectively. (authors)

  15. Parallel load balancing strategy for Volume-of-Fluid methods on 3-D unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre, Lluís; Borrell, Ricard; Lehmkuhl, Oriol; Oliva, Assensi

    2015-02-01

    Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) is one of the methods of choice to reproduce the interface motion in the simulation of multi-fluid flows. One of its main strengths is its accuracy in capturing sharp interface geometries, although requiring for it a number of geometric calculations. Under these circumstances, achieving parallel performance on current supercomputers is a must. The main obstacle for the parallelization is that the computing costs are concentrated only in the discrete elements that lie on the interface between fluids. Consequently, if the interface is not homogeneously distributed throughout the domain, standard domain decomposition (DD) strategies lead to imbalanced workload distributions. In this paper, we present a new parallelization strategy for general unstructured VOF solvers, based on a dynamic load balancing process complementary to the underlying DD. Its parallel efficiency has been analyzed and compared to the DD one using up to 1024 CPU-cores on an Intel SandyBridge based supercomputer. The results obtained on the solution of several artificially generated test cases show a speedup of up to ∼12× with respect to the standard DD, depending on the interface size, the initial distribution and the number of parallel processes engaged. Moreover, the new parallelization strategy presented is of general purpose, therefore, it could be used to parallelize any VOF solver without requiring changes on the coupled flow solver. Finally, note that although designed for the VOF method, our approach could be easily adapted to other interface-capturing methods, such as the Level-Set, which may present similar workload imbalances.

  16. Using Multi-threading for the Automatic Load Balancing of 2D Adaptive Finite Element Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Thulasiraman, Parimala; Gao, Guang R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-threaded approach for the automatic load balancing of adaptive finite element (FE) meshes The platform of our choice is the EARTH multi-threaded system which offers sufficient capabilities to tackle this problem. We implement the adaption phase of FE applications oil triangular meshes and exploit the EARTH token mechanism to automatically balance the resulting irregular and highly nonuniform workload. We discuss the results of our experiments oil EARTH-SP2, on implementation of EARTH on the IBM SP2 with different load balancing strategies that are built into the runtime system.

  17. Using Multithreading for the Automatic Load Balancing of 2D Adaptive Finite Element Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Thulasiraman, Parimala; Gao, Guang R.; Bailey, David H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-threaded approach for the automatic load balancing of adaptive finite element (FE) meshes. The platform of our choice is the EARTH multi-threaded system which offers sufficient capabilities to tackle this problem. We implement the question phase of FE applications on triangular meshes, and exploit the EARTH token mechanism to automatically balance the resulting irregular and highly nonuniform workload. We discuss the results of our experiments on EARTH-SP2, an implementation of EARTH on the IBM SP2, with different load balancing strategies that are built into the runtime system.

  18. A fully-implicit finite-volume method for multi-fluid reactive and collisional magnetized plasmas on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Laguna, A.; Lani, A.; Deconinck, H.; Mansour, N. N.; Poedts, S.

    2016-08-01

    We present a Finite Volume scheme for solving Maxwell's equations coupled to magnetized multi-fluid plasma equations for reactive and collisional partially ionized flows on unstructured meshes. The inclusion of the displacement current allows for studying electromagnetic wave propagation in a plasma as well as charge separation effects beyond the standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) description, however, it leads to a very stiff system with characteristic velocities ranging from the speed of sound of the fluids up to the speed of light. In order to control the fulfillment of the elliptical constraints of the Maxwell's equations, we use the hyperbolic divergence cleaning method. In this paper, we extend the latter method applying the CIR scheme with scaled numerical diffusion in order to balance those terms with the Maxwell flux vectors. For the fluids, we generalize the AUSM+-up to multiple fluids of different species within the plasma. The fully implicit second-order method is first verified on the Hartmann flow (including comparison with its analytical solution), two ideal MHD cases with strong shocks, namely, Orszag-Tang and the MHD rotor, then validated on a much more challenging case, representing a two-fluid magnetic reconnection under solar chromospheric conditions. For the latter case, a comparison with pioneering results available in literature is provided.

  19. Discretization and Preconditioning Algorithms for the Euler and Navier-Stokes Equations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Several stabilized discretization procedures for conservation law equations on triangulated domains will be considered. Specifically, numerical schemes based on upwind finite volume, fluctuation splitting, Galerkin least-squares, and space discontinuous Galerkin discretization will be considered in detail. A standard energy analysis for several of these methods will be given via entropy symmetrization. Next, we will present some relatively new theoretical results concerning congruence relationships for left or right symmetrized equations. These results suggest new variants of existing FV, DG, GLS and FS methods which are computationally more efficient while retaining the pleasant theoretical properties achieved by entropy symmetrization. In addition, the task of Jacobian linearization of these schemes for use in Newton's method is greatly simplified owing to exploitation of exact symmetries which exist in the system. These variants have been implemented in the "ELF" library for which example calculations will be shown. The FV, FS and DG schemes also permit discrete maximum principle analysis and enforcement which greatly adds to the robustness of the methods. Some prevalent limiting strategies will be reviewed. Next, we consider embedding these nonlinear space discretizations into exact and inexact Newton solvers which are preconditioned using a nonoverlapping (Schur complement) domain decomposition technique. Elements of nonoverlapping domain decomposition for elliptic problems will be reviewed followed by the present extension to hyperbolic and elliptic-hyperbolic problems. Other issues of practical relevance such the meshing of geometries, code implementation, turbulence modeling, global convergence, etc. will be addressed as needed.

  20. Generalized Framework and Algorithms for Illustrative Visualization of Time-Varying Data on Unstructured Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander S. Rattner; Donna Post Guillen; Alark Joshi

    2012-12-01

    Photo- and physically-realistic techniques are often insufficient for visualization of simulation results, especially for 3D and time-varying datasets. Substantial research efforts have been dedicated to the development of non-photorealistic and illustration-inspired visualization techniques for compact and intuitive presentation of such complex datasets. While these efforts have yielded valuable visualization results, a great deal of work has been reproduced in studies as individual research groups often develop purpose-built platforms. Additionally, interoperability between illustrative visualization software is limited due to specialized processing and rendering architectures employed in different studies. In this investigation, a generalized framework for illustrative visualization is proposed, and implemented in marmotViz, a ParaView plugin, enabling its use on variety of computing platforms with various data file formats and mesh geometries. Detailed descriptions of the region-of-interest identification and feature-tracking algorithms incorporated into this tool are provided. Additionally, implementations of multiple illustrative effect algorithms are presented to demonstrate the use and flexibility of this framework. By providing a framework and useful underlying functionality, the marmotViz tool can act as a springboard for future research in the field of illustrative visualization.

  1. Framework and algorithms for illustrative visualizations of time-varying flows on unstructured meshes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rattner, Alexander S.; Guillen, Donna Post; Joshi, Alark; Garimella, Srinivas

    2016-03-17

    Photo- and physically realistic techniques are often insufficient for visualization of fluid flow simulations, especially for 3D and time-varying studies. Substantial research effort has been dedicated to the development of non-photorealistic and illustration-inspired visualization techniques for compact and intuitive presentation of such complex datasets. However, a great deal of work has been reproduced in this field, as many research groups have developed specialized visualization software. Additionally, interoperability between illustrative visualization software is limited due to diverse processing and rendering architectures employed in different studies. In this investigation, a framework for illustrative visualization is proposed, and implemented in MarmotViz, a ParaViewmore » plug-in, enabling its use on a variety of computing platforms with various data file formats and mesh geometries. Region-of-interest identification and feature-tracking algorithms incorporated into this tool are described. Implementations of multiple illustrative effect algorithms are also presented to demonstrate the use and flexibility of this framework. Here, by providing an integrated framework for illustrative visualization of CFD data, MarmotViz can serve as a valuable asset for the interpretation of simulations of ever-growing scale.« less

  2. An effective integration of methods for second-order three-dimensional multi-material ALE method on unstructured hexahedral meshes using MOF interface reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zupeng; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Shudao

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an effective second-order three-dimensional unstructured multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (MMALE) method for compressible fluid dynamics. This is an integration work. The MMALE method utilizes Moment of Fluid (MOF) capability with interface reconstruction for multi-material modeling of immiscible fluids. It is of the explicit time-marching Lagrange plus remap type. In the Lagrangian phase, the staggered compatible discretization for Lagrangian gas dynamics is used also with Tipton's pressure relaxation model for the closure of mixed cells. For the remapping phase, an improved second-order cell-intersection-based method for three-dimensional unstructured mesh is presented. It is conservative for remapping cell-centered variables such as density and internal energy. It is suitable for remapping between two meshes with different topology. By using this remapping method, the new material centroid position in the rezoned cells can be geometrically computed. This enables it to be combined with the MOF algorithm for constructing a second-order MMALE method. The MMALE method can be implemented on three-dimensional unstructured hexahedral meshes. Numerical results have proved the accuracy and robustness of the MMALE method.

  3. Effects of mesh resolution and topographic representation in 2D finite volume models of shallow water fluvial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horritt, M. S.; Bates, P. D.; Mattinson, M. J.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryThe effects of mesh resolution and topographic data quality on the predictions of a 2D finite volume model of channel flow are investigated. 25 cm resolution side scan sonar swath bathymetry of a 7 km reach of the river Thames, UK, provides topography for a series of finite volume models with resolutions ranging from 2.5 to 50 m. Results from the coarser meshes are compared with the 2.5 m simulation which is used as a benchmark. The model shows greater sensitivity to mesh resolution than topographic sampling. Sensitivity to mesh resolution is attributed to two effects of roughly equal magnitude. Small elements are able to represent hydraulic features such as recirculation zones, and a more accurate representation of the domain boundary helps to drive these flow features. In practical terms, a models at a resolution of 20 and 50 m require 50 m cross-sections, whereas the 10 m model predictions are improved by using all the bathymetry data.

  4. High Order Approximations for Compressible Fluid Dynamics on Unstructured and Cartesian Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy (Editor); Deconinck, Herman (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The development of high-order accurate numerical discretization techniques for irregular domains and meshes is often cited as one of the remaining challenges facing the field of computational fluid dynamics. In structural mechanics, the advantages of high-order finite element approximation are widely recognized. This is especially true when high-order element approximation is combined with element refinement (h-p refinement). In computational fluid dynamics, high-order discretization methods are infrequently used in the computation of compressible fluid flow. The hyperbolic nature of the governing equations and the presence of solution discontinuities makes high-order accuracy difficult to achieve. Consequently, second-order accurate methods are still predominately used in industrial applications even though evidence suggests that high-order methods may offer a way to significantly improve the resolution and accuracy for these calculations. To address this important topic, a special course was jointly organized by the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel of NATO's Research and Technology Organization (RTO), the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, and the Numerical Aerospace Simulation Division at the NASA Ames Research Center. The NATO RTO sponsored course entitled "Higher Order Discretization Methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics" was held September 14-18, 1998 at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics in Belgium and September 21-25, 1998 at the NASA Ames Research Center in the United States. During this special course, lecturers from Europe and the United States gave a series of comprehensive lectures on advanced topics related to the high-order numerical discretization of partial differential equations with primary emphasis given to computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Additional consideration was given to topics in computational physics such as the high-order discretization of the Hamilton-Jacobi, Helmholtz, and elasticity equations. This volume consists

  5. ZONE - a finite element mesh generator. [2-D, for CDC 7600

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, M.J.

    1980-03-12

    The ZONE computer program is a finite element mesh generator that produces the nodes and element description of any two-dimensional geometry. The geometry is subdivided into a mesh of quadrilateral and triangular zones arranged sequentially in an ordered march through the geometry. The order of march can be chosen so that the minimum bandwidth is obtained. The node points are defined in terms of the x and y coordinates in a global rectangular coordinate system. The zones generated are quadrilaterals or triangles defined by four node points in a counterclockwise sequence. Node points defining the outside boundary are generated for slide lines and to describe pressure boundary conditions. The mesh that is generated can be used as input to any two dimensional as well as any axisymmetrical structure program. The following points are taken up: program concept and characteristics; regions; layers; meridians (offset, circular arc, ellipse); rays; common characterstics - rays and meridians, ZONE input description; output files; examples; and program availability. Also generated is the input to the program PLOT. 15 figures. (RWR)

  6. Three-dimensional modeling of a thermal dendrite using the phase field method with automatic anisotropic and unstructured adaptive finite element meshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkis, C.; Silva, L.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Plapp, M.

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic growth is computed with automatic adaptation of an anisotropic and unstructured finite element mesh. The energy conservation equation is formulated for solid and liquid phases considering an interface balance that includes the Gibbs-Thomson effect. An equation for a diffuse interface is also developed by considering a phase field function with constant negative value in the liquid and constant positive value in the solid. Unknowns are the phase field function and a dimensionless temperature, as proposed by [1]. Linear finite element interpolation is used for both variables, and discretization stabilization techniques ensure convergence towards a correct non-oscillating solution. In order to perform quantitative computations of dendritic growth on a large domain, two additional numerical ingredients are necessary: automatic anisotropic unstructured adaptive meshing [2,[3] and parallel implementations [4], both made available with the numerical platform used (CimLib) based on C++ developments. Mesh adaptation is found to greatly reduce the number of degrees of freedom. Results of phase field simulations for dendritic solidification of a pure material in two and three dimensions are shown and compared with reference work [1]. Discussion on algorithm details and the CPU time will be outlined.

  7. A simple robust and accurate a posteriori sub-cell finite volume limiter for the discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbser, Michael; Loubère, Raphaël

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we propose a simple, robust and accurate nonlinear a posteriori stabilization of the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method for the solution of nonlinear hyperbolic PDE systems on unstructured triangular and tetrahedral meshes in two and three space dimensions. This novel a posteriori limiter, which has been recently proposed for the simple Cartesian grid case in [62], is able to resolve discontinuities at a sub-grid scale and is substantially extended here to general unstructured simplex meshes in 2D and 3D. It can be summarized as follows: At the beginning of each time step, an approximation of the local minimum and maximum of the discrete solution is computed for each cell, taking into account also the vertex neighbors of an element. Then, an unlimited discontinuous Galerkin scheme of approximation degree N is run for one time step to produce a so-called candidate solution. Subsequently, an a posteriori detection step checks the unlimited candidate solution at time t n + 1 for positivity, absence of floating point errors and whether the discrete solution has remained within or at least very close to the bounds given by the local minimum and maximum computed in the first step. Elements that do not satisfy all the previously mentioned detection criteria are flagged as troubled cells. For these troubled cells, the candidate solution is discarded as inappropriate and consequently needs to be recomputed. Within these troubled cells the old discrete solution at the previous time tn is scattered onto small sub-cells (Ns = 2 N + 1 sub-cells per element edge), in order to obtain a set of sub-cell averages at time tn. Then, a more robust second order TVD finite volume scheme is applied to update the sub-cell averages within the troubled DG cells from time tn to time t n + 1. The new sub-grid data at time t n + 1 are finally gathered back into a valid cell-centered DG polynomial of degree N by using a classical conservative and higher order

  8. Discontinuous diffusion synthetic acceleration for S{sub n} transport on 2D arbitrary polygonal meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Turcksin, Bruno Ragusa, Jean C.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) technique applied to the S{sub n} radiation transport equation is developed using Piece-Wise Linear Discontinuous (PWLD) finite elements on arbitrary polygonal grids. The discretization of the DSA equations employs an Interior Penalty technique, as is classically done for the stabilization of the diffusion equation using discontinuous finite element approximations. The penalty method yields a system of linear equations that is Symmetric Positive Definite (SPD). Thus, solution techniques such as Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) can be effectively employed. Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) and Symmetric Gauss–Seidel (SGS) are employed as conjugate gradient preconditioners for the DSA system. AMG is shown to be significantly more efficient than SGS. Fourier analyses are carried out and we show that this discontinuous finite element DSA scheme is always stable and effective at reducing the spectral radius for iterative transport solves, even for grids with high-aspect ratio cells. Numerical results are presented for different grid types: quadrilateral, hexagonal, and polygonal grids as well as grids with local mesh adaptivity.

  9. Numerical aspects and implementation of a two-layer zonal wall model for LES of compressible turbulent flows on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Moin, Parviz

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on numerical and practical aspects associated with a parallel implementation of a two-layer zonal wall model for large-eddy simulation (LES) of compressible wall-bounded turbulent flows on unstructured meshes. A zonal wall model based on the solution of unsteady three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations on a separate near-wall grid is implemented in an unstructured, cell-centered finite-volume LES solver. The main challenge in its implementation is to couple two parallel, unstructured flow solvers for efficient boundary data communication and simultaneous time integrations. A coupling strategy with good load balancing and low processors underutilization is identified. Face mapping and interpolation procedures at the coupling interface are explained in detail. The method of manufactured solution is used for verifying the correct implementation of solver coupling, and parallel performance of the combined wall-modeled LES (WMLES) solver is investigated. The method has successfully been applied to several attached and separated flows, including a transitional flow over a flat plate and a separated flow over an airfoil at an angle of attack.

  10. Applying State-of-the-art, Unstructured mesh Models on Estuary Management in the Danish Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundgaard, K.; Lumborg, U.; Vested, H. J.; Edelvang, K.

    2006-12-01

    projects in the area will be used to show the general behavior of hydrodynamics and fine-grained sediment in the area. This will be demonstrated using measurements, aerial photos and model results. Based on this, a newly developed unstructured flexible mesh model of the area will be demonstrated. It will be shown that the model can depict the physics of the hydrodynamics and the fine-grained sediment, and that a good calibration can be established with regard to the hydrodynamics and suspended sediment. The demonstration will also include the models' capabilities as tools for estuary management. It will be shown how the calibrated model can be used for optimizing dredging procedures and determining their effect on long term sedimentation. A newly developed sediment transport model describing mixtures of cohesive and non-cohesive sediments will be demonstrated. The advantage of this type of model is that it is able to calculate both cohesive and non- cohesive sediment transport simultaneously. This allows a description of effects such as sorting, armoring and changing of erodibility. The model uses a multifraction approach, which allows fractions to be treated differently. This means that the model is capable of calculating the advection dominated transport of fine- grained sediments at the same time as the bed load dominated transport of sand. This makes it a very powerful tool for calculating sediment transport in estuaries with very varying sediment types for example estuaries with mudflats and sandy tidal channels.

  11. A staggered space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured tetrahedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavelli, Maurizio; Dumbser, Michael

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we propose a novel arbitrary high order accurate semi-implicit space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the solution of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on staggered unstructured curved tetrahedral meshes. As is typical for space-time DG schemes, the discrete solution is represented in terms of space-time basis functions. This allows to achieve very high order of accuracy also in time, which is not easy to obtain for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Similarly to staggered finite difference schemes, in our approach the discrete pressure is defined on the primary tetrahedral grid, while the discrete velocity is defined on a face-based staggered dual grid. While staggered meshes are state of the art in classical finite difference schemes for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, their use in high order DG schemes is still quite rare. A very simple and efficient Picard iteration is used in order to derive a space-time pressure correction algorithm that achieves also high order of accuracy in time and that avoids the direct solution of global nonlinear systems. Formal substitution of the discrete momentum equation on the dual grid into the discrete continuity equation on the primary grid yields a very sparse five-point block system for the scalar pressure, which is conveniently solved with a matrix-free GMRES algorithm. From numerical experiments we find that the linear system seems to be reasonably well conditioned, since all simulations shown in this paper could be run without the use of any preconditioner, even up to very high polynomial degrees. For a piecewise constant polynomial approximation in time and if pressure boundary conditions are specified at least in one point, the resulting system is, in addition, symmetric and positive definite. This allows us to use even faster iterative solvers, like the conjugate gradient method. The flexibility and accuracy of high order space-time DG methods on curved

  12. Time-Accurate Local Time Stepping and High-Order Time CESE Methods for Multi-Dimensional Flows Using Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary

    2013-01-01

    With the wide availability of affordable multiple-core parallel supercomputers, next generation numerical simulations of flow physics are being focused on unsteady computations for problems involving multiple time scales and multiple physics. These simulations require higher solution accuracy than most algorithms and computational fluid dynamics codes currently available. This paper focuses on the developmental effort for high-fidelity multi-dimensional, unstructured-mesh flow solvers using the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) framework. Two approaches have been investigated in this research in order to provide high-accuracy, cross-cutting numerical simulations for a variety of flow regimes: 1) time-accurate local time stepping and 2) highorder CESE method. The first approach utilizes consistent numerical formulations in the space-time flux integration to preserve temporal conservation across the cells with different marching time steps. Such approach relieves the stringent time step constraint associated with the smallest time step in the computational domain while preserving temporal accuracy for all the cells. For flows involving multiple scales, both numerical accuracy and efficiency can be significantly enhanced. The second approach extends the current CESE solver to higher-order accuracy. Unlike other existing explicit high-order methods for unstructured meshes, the CESE framework maintains a CFL condition of one for arbitrarily high-order formulations while retaining the same compact stencil as its second-order counterpart. For large-scale unsteady computations, this feature substantially enhances numerical efficiency. Numerical formulations and validations using benchmark problems are discussed in this paper along with realistic examples.

  13. A 3D agglomeration multigrid solver for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid strategy is developed and implemented for the solution of three-dimensional steady viscous flows. The method enables convergence acceleration with minimal additional memory overheads, and is completely automated, in that it can deal with grids of arbitrary construction. The multigrid technique is validated by comparing the delivered convergence rates with those obtained by a previously developed overset-mesh multigrid approach, and by demonstrating grid independent convergence rates for aerodynamic problems on very large grids. Prospects for further increases in multigrid efficiency for high-Reynolds number viscous flows on highly stretched meshes are discussed.

  14. Minimising the error in eigenvalue calculations involving the Boltzmann transport equation using goal-based adaptivity on unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Goffin, Mark A.; Baker, Christopher M.J.; Buchan, Andrew G.; Pain, Christopher C.; Eaton, Matthew D.; Smith, Paul N.

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a method for goal-based anisotropic adaptive methods for the finite element method applied to the Boltzmann transport equation. The neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, is used as the goal of the adaptive procedure. The anisotropic adaptive algorithm requires error measures for k{sub eff} with directional dependence. General error estimators are derived for any given functional of the flux and applied to k{sub eff} to acquire the driving force for the adaptive procedure. The error estimators require the solution of an appropriately formed dual equation. Forward and dual error indicators are calculated by weighting the Hessian of each solution with the dual and forward residual respectively. The Hessian is used as an approximation of the interpolation error in the solution which gives rise to the directional dependence. The two indicators are combined to form a single error metric that is used to adapt the finite element mesh. The residual is approximated using a novel technique arising from the sub-grid scale finite element discretisation. Two adaptive routes are demonstrated: (i) a single mesh is used to solve all energy groups, and (ii) a different mesh is used to solve each energy group. The second method aims to capture the benefit from representing the flux from each energy group on a specifically optimised mesh. The k{sub eff} goal-based adaptive method was applied to three examples which illustrate the superior accuracy in criticality problems that can be obtained.

  15. A cell-local finite difference discretization of the low-order quasidiffusion equations for neutral particle transport on unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Wieselquist, William A.; Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.; Morel, Jim E.

    2014-09-15

    We present a quasidiffusion (QD) method for solving neutral particle transport problems in Cartesian XY geometry on unstructured quadrilateral meshes, including local refinement capability. Neutral particle transport problems are central to many applications including nuclear reactor design, radiation safety, astrophysics, medical imaging, radiotherapy, nuclear fuel transport/storage, shielding design, and oil well-logging. The primary development is a new discretization of the low-order QD (LOQD) equations based on cell-local finite differences. The accuracy of the LOQD equations depends on proper calculation of special non-linear QD (Eddington) factors from a transport solution. In order to completely define the new QD method, a proper discretization of the transport problem is also presented. The transport equation is discretized by a conservative method of short characteristics with a novel linear approximation of the scattering source term and monotonic, parabolic representation of the angular flux on incoming faces. Analytic and numerical tests are used to test the accuracy and spatial convergence of the non-linear method. All tests exhibit O(h{sup 2}) convergence of the scalar flux on orthogonal, random, and multi-level meshes.

  16. Application of unstructured grid methods to steady and unsteady aerodynamic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to describe the development of unstructured grid methods which have several advantages when compared to methods which make use of structured grids. Unstructured grids, for example, easily allow the treatment of complex geometries, allow for general mesh movement for realistic motions and structural deformations of complete aircraft configurations which is important for aeroelastic analysis, and enable adaptive mesh refinement to more accurately resolve the physics of the flow. Steady Euler calculations for a supersonic fighter configuration to demonstrate the complex geometry capability; unsteady Euler calculations for the supersonic fighter undergoing harmonic oscillations in a complete-vehicle bending mode to demonstrate the general mesh movement capability; and vortex-dominated conical-flow calculations for highly-swept delta wings to demonstrate the adaptive mesh refinement capability are discussed. The basic solution algorithm is a multi-stage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme with a finite-volume spatial discretization based on an unstructured grid of triangles in 2D or tetrahedra in 3D. The moving mesh capability is a general procedure which models each edge of each triangle (2D) or tetrahedra (3D) with a spring. The resulting static equilibrium equations which result from a summation of forces are then used to move the mesh to allow it to continuously conform to the instantaneous position or shape of the aircraft. The adaptive mesh refinement procedure enriches the unstructured mesh locally to more accurately resolve the vortical flow features. These capabilities are described in detail along with representative results which demonstrate several advantages of unstructured grid methods. The applicability of the unstructured grid methodology to steady and unsteady aerodynamic problems and directions for future work are discussed.

  17. Users manual for AUTOMESH-2D: A program of automatic mesh generation for two-dimensional scattering analysis by the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Chongyu; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    AUTOMESH-2D is a computer program specifically designed as a preprocessor for the scattering analysis of two dimensional bodies by the finite element method. This program was developed due to a need for reproducing the effort required to define and check the geometry data, element topology, and material properties. There are six modules in the program: (1) Parameter Specification; (2) Data Input; (3) Node Generation; (4) Element Generation; (5) Mesh Smoothing; and (5) Data File Generation.

  18. The Feasibility of Adaptive Unstructured Computations On Petaflops Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid; Heber, Gerd; Gao, Guang; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the advantages of mesh adaptation, unstructured grids, and dynamic load balancing. It illustrates parallel adaptive communications, and explains PLUM (Parallel dynamic load balancing for adaptive unstructured meshes), and PSAW (Proper Self Avoiding Walks).

  19. Prospects and expectations for unstructured methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a vigorous and sustained research effort on unstructured methods for computational fluid dynamics. Unstructured mesh generators and flow solvers have evolved to the point where they are now in use for design purposes throughout the aerospace industry. In this paper we survey the various mesh types, structured as well as unstructured, and examine their relative strengths and weaknesses. We argue that unstructured methodology does offer the best prospect for the next generation of computational fluid dynamics algorithms.

  20. A direct Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian ADER-WENO finite volume scheme on unstructured tetrahedral meshes for conservative and non-conservative hyperbolic systems in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscheri, Walter; Dumbser, Michael

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a new family of high order accurate Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) one-step ADER-WENO finite volume schemes for the solution of nonlinear systems of conservative and non-conservative hyperbolic partial differential equations with stiff source terms on moving tetrahedral meshes in three space dimensions. A WENO reconstruction technique is used to achieve high order of accuracy in space, while an element-local space-time Discontinuous Galerkin finite element predictor on moving curved meshes is used to obtain a high order accurate one-step time discretization. Within the space-time predictor the physical element is mapped onto a reference element using a high order isoparametric approach, where the space-time basis and test functions are given by the Lagrange interpolation polynomials passing through a predefined set of space-time nodes. Since our algorithm is cell-centered, the final mesh motion is computed by using a suitable node solver algorithm. A rezoning step as well as a flattener strategy are used in some of the test problems to avoid mesh tangling or excessive element deformations that may occur when the computation involves strong shocks or shear waves. The ALE algorithm presented in this article belongs to the so-called direct ALE methods because the final Lagrangian finite volume scheme is based directly on a space-time conservation formulation of the governing PDE system, with the rezoned geometry taken already into account during the computation of the fluxes. We apply our new high order unstructured ALE schemes to the 3D Euler equations of compressible gas dynamics, for which a set of classical numerical test problems has been solved and for which convergence rates up to sixth order of accuracy in space and time have been obtained. We furthermore consider the equations of classical ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) as well as the non-conservative seven-equation Baer-Nunziato model of compressible multi-phase flows with

  1. Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration for High-Order Discontinuous Finite Element SN Transport Schemes and Application to Locally Refined Unstructured Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Jean C. Ragusa

    2011-10-01

    Diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) schemes compatible with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) grids are derived for the SN transport equations discretized using high-order discontinuous finite elements. These schemes are directly obtained from the discretized transport equations by assuming a linear dependence in angle of the angular flux along with an exact Fick's law and, therefore, are categorized as partially consistent. These schemes are akin to the symmetric interior penalty technique applied to elliptic problems and are all based on a second-order discontinuous finite element discretization of a diffusion equation (as opposed to a mixed or P1 formulation). Therefore, they only have the scalar flux as unknowns. A Fourier analysis has been carried out to determine the convergence properties of the three proposed DSA schemes for various cell optical thicknesses and aspect ratios. Out of the three DSA schemes derived, the modified interior penalty (MIP) scheme is stable and effective for realistic problems, even with distorted elements, but loses effectiveness for some highly heterogeneous configurations. The MIP scheme is also symmetric positive definite and can be solved efficiently with a preconditioned conjugate gradient method. Its implementation in an AMR SN transport code has been performed for both source iteration and GMRes-based transport solves, with polynomial orders up to 4. Numerical results are provided and show good agreement with the Fourier analysis results. Results on AMR grids demonstrate that the cost of DSA can be kept low on locally refined meshes.

  2. The DANTE Boltzmann transport solver: An unstructured mesh, 3-D, spherical harmonics algorithm compatible with parallel computer architectures

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, J.M.; Roberts, R.M.; Morel, J.E.

    1997-06-01

    A spherical harmonics research code (DANTE) has been developed which is compatible with parallel computer architectures. DANTE provides 3-D, multi-material, deterministic, transport capabilities using an arbitrary finite element mesh. The linearized Boltzmann transport equation is solved in a second order self-adjoint form utilizing a Galerkin finite element spatial differencing scheme. The core solver utilizes a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. Other distinguishing features of the code include options for discrete-ordinates and simplified spherical harmonics angular differencing, an exact Marshak boundary treatment for arbitrarily oriented boundary faces, in-line matrix construction techniques to minimize memory consumption, and an effective diffusion based preconditioner for scattering dominated problems. Algorithm efficiency is demonstrated for a massively parallel SIMD architecture (CM-5), and compatibility with MPP multiprocessor platforms or workstation clusters is anticipated.

  3. Pollutant transport by shallow water equations on unstructured meshes: Hyperbolization of the model and numerical solution via a novel flux splitting scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzo, Davide; Siviglia, Annunziato; Toro, Eleuterio F.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, using the Cattaneo's relaxation approach, we reformulate the system of governing equations for the pollutant transport by shallow water flows over non-flat topography and anisotropic diffusion as hyperbolic balance laws with stiff source terms. The proposed relaxation system circumvents the infinite wave speed paradox which is inherent in standard advection-diffusion models. This turns out to give a larger stability range for the choice of the time step. Second, following a flux splitting approach, we derive a novel numerical method to discretise the resulting problem. In particular, we propose a new flux splitting and study the associated two systems of differential equations, called the "hydrodynamic" and the "relaxed diffusive" system, respectively. For the presented splitting we analyse the resulting two systems of differential equations and propose two discretisation schemes of the Godunov-type. These schemes are simple to implement, robust, accurate and fast when compared with existing methods. The resulting method is implemented on unstructured meshes and is systematically assessed for accuracy, robustness and efficiency on a carefully selected suite of test problems including non-flat topography and wetting and drying problems. Formal second order accuracy is assessed through convergence rates studies.

  4. Unstructured hexahedral mesh generation of complex vascular trees using a multi-block grid-based approach.

    PubMed

    Bols, Joris; Taelman, L; De Santis, G; Degroote, J; Verhegghe, B; Segers, P; Vierendeels, J

    2016-01-01

    The trend towards realistic numerical models of (pathologic) patient-specific vascular structures brings along larger computational domains and more complex geometries, increasing both the computation time and the operator time. Hexahedral grids effectively lower the computational run time and the required computational infrastructure, but at high cost in terms of operator time and minimal cell quality, especially when the computational analyses are targeting complex geometries such as aneurysm necks, severe stenoses and bifurcations. Moreover, such grids generally do not allow local refinements. As an attempt to overcome these limitations, a novel approach to hexahedral meshing is proposed in this paper, which combines the automated generation of multi-block structures with a grid-based method. The robustness of the novel approach is tested on common complex geometries, such as tree-like structures (including trifurcations), stenoses, and aneurysms. Additionally, the performance of the generated grid is assessed using two numerical examples. In the first example, a grid sensitivity analysis is performed for blood flow simulated in an abdominal mouse aorta and compared to tetrahedral grids with a prismatic boundary layer. In the second example, the fluid-structure interaction in a model of an aorta with aortic coarctation is simulated and the effect of local grid refinement is analyzed. PMID:26208183

  5. Finite-volume goal-oriented mesh adaptation for aerodynamics using functional derivative with respect to nodal coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todarello, Giovanni; Vonck, Floris; Bourasseau, Sébastien; Peter, Jacques; Désidéri, Jean-Antoine

    2016-05-01

    A new goal-oriented mesh adaptation method for finite volume/finite difference schemes is extended from the structured mesh framework to a more suitable setting for adaptation of unstructured meshes. The method is based on the total derivative of the goal with respect to volume mesh nodes that is computable after the solution of the goal discrete adjoint equation. The asymptotic behaviour of this derivative is assessed on regularly refined unstructured meshes. A local refinement criterion is derived from the requirement of limiting the first order change in the goal that an admissible node displacement may cause. Mesh adaptations are then carried out for classical test cases of 2D Euler flows. Efficiency and local density of the adapted meshes are presented. They are compared with those obtained with a more classical mesh adaptation method in the framework of finite volume/finite difference schemes [46]. Results are very close although the present method only makes usage of the current grid.

  6. A Well-Balanced Central-Upwind Scheme for the 2D Shallow Water Equations on Triangular Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron

    2004-01-01

    We are interested in approximating solutions of the two-dimensional shallow water equations with a bottom topography on triangular meshes. We show that there is a certain flexibility in choosing the numerical fluxes in the design of semi-discrete Godunov-type central schemes. We take advantage of this fact to generate a new second-order, central-upwind method for the two-dimensional shallow water equations that is well-balanced. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method as well as its balance properties in a variety of examples.

  7. Unstructured meshing and parameter estimation for urban dam-break flood modeling: building treatments and implications for accuracy and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, J. E.; Sanders, B. F.

    2011-12-01

    Urban landscapes are at the forefront of current research efforts in the field of flood inundation modeling for two major reasons. First, urban areas hold relatively large economic and social importance and as such it is imperative to avoid or minimize future damages. Secondly, urban flooding is becoming more frequent as a consequence of continued development of impervious surfaces, population growth in cities, climate change magnifying rainfall intensity, sea level rise threatening coastal communities, and decaying flood defense infrastructure. In reality urban landscapes are particularly challenging to model because they include a multitude of geometrically complex features. Advances in remote sensing technologies and geographical information systems (GIS) have promulgated fine resolution data layers that offer a site characterization suitable for urban inundation modeling including a description of preferential flow paths, drainage networks and surface dependent resistances to overland flow. Recent research has focused on two-dimensional modeling of overland flow including within-curb flows and over-curb flows across developed parcels. Studies have focused on mesh design and parameterization, and sub-grid models that promise improved performance relative to accuracy and/or computational efficiency. This presentation addresses how fine-resolution data, available in Los Angeles County, are used to parameterize, initialize and execute flood inundation models for the 1963 Baldwin Hills dam break. Several commonly used model parameterization strategies including building-resistance, building-block and building hole are compared with a novel sub-grid strategy based on building-porosity. Performance of the models is assessed based on the accuracy of depth and velocity predictions, execution time, and the time and expertise required for model set-up. The objective of this study is to assess field-scale applicability, and to obtain a better understanding of advantages

  8. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  9. Low-dispersion meshes for scattering problems

    SciTech Connect

    Hakula, H.

    1996-12-31

    For scattering problems, e.g. the Helmholtz equation, the ideal mesh in 2D is a structured mesh of equilateral triangles, since the numerical dispersion and internal reflections caused by the mesh are then minimal. However, if the scattering body does not conform to the mesh, one has to add unstructured elements to the mesh. In this paper we describe a simple modification to the Rebay`s method which leads to meshes of high quality in the context of the application. Even though the Rebay`s method is a variant of Delaunay algorithms, it does include the concept of a front. By controlling the generation of fronts in the mesh we can always choose the outer boundary of the computational domain so that the mesh will be structured far from the scattering body and the only anisotropic elements are close to the body. As a result of this, one can use the same generator both for electromagnetic and flow simulations in 2D. In multi-body configurations the meshes are intimately dependent on the relative distances between the bodies.

  10. Significant acceleration of 2D-3D registration-based fusion of ultrasound and x-ray images by mesh-based DRR rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Markus; John, Matthias; Borsdorf, Anja; Mountney, Peter; Ionasec, Razvan; Nöttling, Alois; Kiefer, Philipp; Seeburger, Jörg; Neumuth, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    For transcatheter-based minimally invasive procedures in structural heart disease ultrasound and X-ray are the two enabling imaging modalities. A live fusion of both real-time modalities can potentially improve the workflow and the catheter navigation by combining the excellent instrument imaging of X-ray with the high-quality soft tissue imaging of ultrasound. A recently published approach to fuse X-ray fluoroscopy with trans-esophageal echo (TEE) registers the ultrasound probe to X-ray images by a 2D-3D registration method which inherently provides a registration of ultrasound images to X-ray images. In this paper, we significantly accelerate the 2D-3D registration method in this context. The main novelty is to generate the projection images (DRR) of the 3D object not via volume ray-casting but instead via a fast rendering of triangular meshes. This is possible, because in the setting for TEE/X-ray fusion the 3D geometry of the ultrasound probe is known in advance and their main components can be described by triangular meshes. We show that the new approach can achieve a speedup factor up to 65 and does not affect the registration accuracy when used in conjunction with the gradient correlation similarity measure. The improvement is independent of the underlying registration optimizer. Based on the results, a TEE/X-ray fusion could be performed with a higher frame rate and a shorter time lag towards real-time registration performance. The approach could potentially accelerate other applications of 2D-3D registrations, e.g. the registration of implant models with X-ray images.

  11. Electrochemical incineration of indigo. A comparative study between 2D (plate) and 3D (mesh) BDD anodes fitted into a filter-press reactor.

    PubMed

    Nava, José L; Sirés, Ignasi; Brillas, Enric

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the performance of 2D (plate) and 3D (mesh) boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes, fitted into a filter-press reactor, during the electrochemical incineration of indigo textile dye as a model organic compound in chloride medium. The electrolyses were carried out in the FM01-LC reactor at mean fluid velocities between 0.9 ≤ u ≤ 10.4 and 1.2 ≤ u ≤ 13.9 cm s(-1) for the 2D BDD and the 3D BDD electrodes, respectively, at current densities of 5.63 and 15 mA cm(-2). The oxidation of the organic matter was promoted, on the one hand, via the physisorbed hydroxyl radicals (BDD(·OH)) formed from water oxidation at the BDD surface and, on the other hand, via active chlorine formed from the oxidation of chloride ions on BDD. The performance of 2D BDD and 3D BDD electrodes in terms of current efficiency, energy consumption, and charge passage during the treatments is discussed. PMID:24737017

  12. Application of Quaternions for Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2002-01-01

    A new three dimensional mesh deformation algorithm, based on quaternion algebra, is introduced. A brief overview of quaternion algebra is provided, along with some preliminary results for two-dimensional structured and unstructured viscous mesh deformation.

  13. The UGRID Reader - A ParaView Plugin for the Visualization of Unstructured Climate Model Data in NetCDF Format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisc, Felicia; Vater, Stefan; Behrens, Joern

    2016-04-01

    We present the UGRID Reader, a visualization software component that implements the UGRID Conventions into Paraview. It currently supports the reading and visualization of 2D unstructured triangular, quadrilateral and mixed triangle/quadrilateral meshes, while the data can be defined per cell or per vertex. The Climate and Forecast Metadata Conventions (CF Conventions) have been set for many years as the standard framework for climate data written in NetCDF format. While they allow storing unstructured data simply as data defined at a series of points, they do not currently address the topology of the underlying unstructured mesh. However, it is often necessary to have additional mesh topology information, i.e. is it a one dimensional network, a 2D triangular mesh or a flexible mixed triangle/quadrilateral mesh, a 2D mesh with vertical layers, or a fully unstructured 3D mesh. The UGRID Conventions proposed by the UGRID Interoperability group are attempting to fill in this void by extending the CF Conventions with topology specifications. As the UGRID Conventions are increasingly popular with an important subset of the CF community, they warrant the development of a customized tool for the visualization and exploration of UGRID-conforming data. The implementation of the UGRID Reader has been designed corresponding to the ParaView plugin architecture. This approach allowed us to tap into the powerful reading and rendering capabilities of ParaView, while the reader is easy to install. We aim at parallelism to be able to process large data sets. Furthermore, our current application of the reader is the visualization of higher order simulation output which demands for a special representation of the data within a cell.

  14. phdMesh

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-01

    Parallel Heterogeneous Dynamic unstructured Mesh (phdMesh) data structure library and integration testing code that performs dynamic load balancing of the data structure and parallel geometric proximity search on a contrived test problem. The phdMesh library is intended to be module within a finite element or finite volume library or code. The integration testing code is intended to provide a compact and highly portable performance evaluation code for parallel computing systems.

  15. Application of Quaternions for Mesh Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2002-01-01

    A new three-dimensional mesh deformation algorithm, based on quaternion algebra, is introduced. A brief overview of quaternion algebra is provided, along with some preliminary results for two-dimensional structured and unstructured viscous mesh deformation.

  16. Hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  17. Hybrid Mesh for Nasal Airflow Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  18. ELRIS2D: A MATLAB Package for the 2D Inversion of DC Resistivity/IP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, Irfan

    2016-04-01

    ELRIS2D is an open source code written in MATLAB for the two-dimensional inversion of direct current resistivity (DCR) and time domain induced polarization (IP) data. The user interface of the program is designed for functionality and ease of use. All available settings of the program can be reached from the main window. The subsurface is discretized using a hybrid mesh generated by the combination of structured and unstructured meshes, which reduces the computational cost of the whole inversion procedure. The inversion routine is based on the smoothness constrained least squares method. In order to verify the program, responses of two test models and field data sets were inverted. The models inverted from the synthetic data sets are consistent with the original test models in both DC resistivity and IP cases. A field data set acquired in an archaeological site is also used for the verification of outcomes of the program in comparison with the excavation results.

  19. On unstructured grids and solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals and the state-of-the-art technology for unstructured grids and solvers are highlighted. Algorithms and techniques pertinent to mesh generation are discussed. It is shown that grid generation and grid manipulation schemes rely on fast multidimensional searching. Flow solution techniques for the Euler equations, which can be derived from the integral form of the equations are discussed. Sample calculations are also provided.

  20. A paradigm for parallel unstructured grid generation

    SciTech Connect

    Gaither, A.; Marcum, D.; Reese, D.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, a sequential 2D unstructured grid generator based on iterative point insertion and local reconnection is coupled with a Delauney tessellation domain decomposition scheme to create a scalable parallel unstructured grid generator. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is used for distributed communication in the parallel grid generator. This work attempts to provide a generic framework to enable the parallelization of fast sequential unstructured grid generators in order to compute grand-challenge scale grids for Computational Field Simulation (CFS). Motivation for moving from sequential to scalable parallel grid generation is presented. Delaunay tessellation and iterative point insertion and local reconnection (advancing front method only) unstructured grid generation techniques are discussed with emphasis on how these techniques can be utilized for parallel unstructured grid generation. Domain decomposition techniques are discussed for both Delauney and advancing front unstructured grid generation with emphasis placed on the differences needed for both grid quality and algorithmic efficiency.

  1. Reactive transport simulation via combination of a multiphase-capable transport code for unstructured meshes with a Gibbs energy minimization solver of geochemical equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, S. J.; Driesner, T.; Hingerl, F. F.; Kulik, D. A.; Wagner, T.

    2011-12-01

    We apply a new, C++-based computational model for hydrothermal fluid-rock interaction and scale formation in geothermal reservoirs. The model couples the Complex System Modelling Platform (CSMP++) code for fluid flow in porous and fractured media (Matthai et al., 2007) with the Gibbs energy minimization numerical kernel GEMS3K of the GEM-Selektor (GEMS3) geochemical modelling package (Kulik et al., 2010) in a modular fashion. CSMP++ includes interfaces to commercial file formats, accommodating complex geometry construction using CAD (Rhinoceros) and meshing (ANSYS) software. The CSMP++ approach employs finite element-finite volume spatial discretization, implicit or explicit time discretization, and operator splitting. GEMS3K can calculate complex fluid-mineral equilibria based on a variety of equation of state and activity models. A selection of multi-electrolyte aqueous solution models, such as extended Debye-Huckel, Pitzer (Harvie et al., 1984), EUNIQUAC (Thomsen et al., 1996), and the new ELVIS model (Hingerl et al., this conference), makes it well-suited for application to a wide range of geothermal conditions. An advantage of the GEMS3K solver is simultaneous consideration of complex solid solutions (e.g., clay minerals), gases, fluids, and aqueous solutions. Each coupled simulation results in a thermodynamically-based description of the geochemical and physical state of a hydrothermal system evolving along a complex P-T-X path. The code design allows efficient, flexible incorporation of numerical and thermodynamic database improvements. We demonstrate the coupled code workflow and applicability to compositionally and physically complex natural systems relevant to enhanced geothermal systems, where temporally and spatially varying chemical interactions may take place within diverse lithologies of varying geometry. Engesgaard, P. & Kipp, K. L. (1992). Water Res. Res. 28: 2829-2843. Harvie, C. E.; Møller, N. & Weare, J. H. (1984). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 48

  2. Unstructured grid methods for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.; Peiro, J.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of the finite element method on unstructured triangular grids is described and the development of centered finite element schemes for the solution of the compressible Euler equation on general triangular and tetrahedral grids is discussed. Explicit and implicit Lax-Wendroff type methods and a method based upon the use of explicit multistep timestepping are considered. In the latter case, the convergence behavior of the method is accelerated by the incorporation of a fully unstructured multigrid procedure. The advancing front method for generating unstructured grids of triangles and tetrahedra is described and the application of adaptive mesh techniques to both steady and transient flow analysis is illustrated.

  3. Simulation of fatigue crack closure behavior under variable-amplitude loading by a 2D finite element analysis based on the most appropriate mesh size concept

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.J.; Song, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    A two-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis is performed for plane stress conditions with 4-node isoparametric elements to investigate the closure behavior under various variable-amplitude loading, i.e., single overloading, Hi-Lo block loading, and narrow- and wide-band random loading. The closure behavior under single overloading and Hi-Lo block loading can be well simulated by applying the concept of the most appropriate mesh size that will provide numerical results consistent with experimental data under constant-amplitude loading. It is found that the crack opening load under random loading may be predicted approximately by replacing the complicated random load history with the appropriate equivalent, simplified variable load history.

  4. Unstructured multigrid through agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Berger, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    In this work the compressible Euler equations are solved using finite volume techniques on unstructured grids. The spatial discretization employs a central difference approximation augmented by dissipative terms. Temporal discretization is done using a multistage Runge-Kutta scheme. A multigrid technique is used to accelerate convergence to steady state. The coarse grids are derived directly from the given fine grid through agglomeration of the control volumes. This agglomeration is accomplished by using a greedy-type algorithm and is done in such a way that the load, which is proportional to the number of edges, goes down by nearly a factor of 4 when moving from a fine to a coarse grid. The agglomeration algorithm has been implemented and the grids have been tested in a multigrid code. An area-weighted restriction is applied when moving from fine to coarse grids while a trivial injection is used for prolongation. Across a range of geometries and flows, it is shown that the agglomeration multigrid scheme compares very favorably with an unstructured multigrid algorithm that makes use of independent coarse meshes, both in terms of convergence and elapsed times.

  5. A statistical model of fracture for a 2D hexagonal mesh: The Cell Network Model of Fracture for the bamboo Guadua angustifolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Gabriel; Linero, Dorian L.; Muñoz, José D.

    2011-01-01

    A 2D, hexagonal in geometry, statistical model of fracture is proposed. The model is based on the drying fracture process of the bamboo Guadua angustifolia. A network of flexible cells are joined by brittle junctures of fixed Young moduli that break at a certain thresholds in tensile force. The system is solved by means of the Finite Element Method (FEM). The distribution of avalanche breakings exhibits a power law with exponent -2.93(9), in agreement with the random fuse model (Bhattacharyya and Chakrabarti, 2006) [1].

  6. toolkit computational mesh conceptual model.

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, David G.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Cochran, William K.; Williams, Alan B.; Sjaardema, Gregory D.

    2010-03-01

    The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh is a software library intended to support massively parallel multi-physics computations on dynamically changing unstructured meshes. This domain of intended use is inherently complex due to distributed memory parallelism, parallel scalability, heterogeneity of physics, heterogeneous discretization of an unstructured mesh, and runtime adaptation of the mesh. Management of this inherent complexity begins with a conceptual analysis and modeling of this domain of intended use; i.e., development of a domain model. The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh software library is designed and implemented based upon this domain model. Software developers using, maintaining, or extending the Sierra Toolkit computational mesh library must be familiar with the concepts/domain model presented in this report.

  7. Preconditioning Operators on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nepomnyaschikh, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    We consider systems of mesh equations that approximate elliptic boundary value problems on arbitrary (unstructured) quasi-uniform triangulations and propose a method for constructing optimal preconditioning operators. The method is based upon two approaches: (1) the fictitious space method, i.e., the reduction of the original problem to a problem in an auxiliary (fictitious) space, and (2) the multilevel decomposition method, i.e., the construction of preconditioners by decomposing functions on hierarchical meshes. The convergence rate of the corresponding iterative process with the preconditioner obtained is independent of the mesh step. The preconditioner has an optimal computational cost: the number of arithmetic operations required for its implementation is proportional to the number of unknowns in the problem. The construction of the preconditioning operators for three dimensional problems can be done in the same way.

  8. Pre- and postprocessing techniques for determining goodness of computational meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Westermann, T.; Bass, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Research in error estimation, mesh conditioning, and solution enhancement for finite element, finite difference, and finite volume methods has been incorporated into AUDITOR, a modern, user-friendly code, which operates on 2D and 3D unstructured neutral files to improve the accuracy and reliability of computational results. Residual error estimation capabilities provide local and global estimates of solution error in the energy norm. Higher order results for derived quantities may be extracted from initial solutions. Within the X-MOTIF graphical user interface, extensive visualization capabilities support critical evaluation of results in linear elasticity, steady state heat transfer, and both compressible and incompressible fluid dynamics.

  9. Performance Portability for Unstructured Mesh Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, J A

    2012-03-23

    ASC legacy software must be ported to emerging hardware architectures. This paper notes that many programming models used by DOE applications are similar, and suggests that constructing a common terminology across these models could reveal a performance portable programming model. The paper then highlights how the LULESH mini-app is used to explore new programming models with outside solution providers. Finally, we suggest better tools to identify parallelism in software, and give suggestions for enhancing the co-design process with vendors.

  10. Curved mesh generation and mesh refinement using Lagrangian solid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, P.-O.; Peraire, J.

    2008-12-31

    We propose a method for generating well-shaped curved unstructured meshes using a nonlinear elasticity analogy. The geometry of the domain to be meshed is represented as an elastic solid. The undeformed geometry is the initial mesh of linear triangular or tetrahedral elements. The external loading results from prescribing a boundary displacement to be that of the curved geometry, and the final configuration is determined by solving for the equilibrium configuration. The deformations are represented using piecewise polynomials within each element of the original mesh. When the mesh is sufficiently fine to resolve the solid deformation, this method guarantees non-intersecting elements even for highly distorted or anisotropic initial meshes. We describe the method and the solution procedures, and we show a number of examples of two and three dimensional simplex meshes with curved boundaries. We also demonstrate how to use the technique for local refinement of non-curved meshes in the presence of curved boundaries.