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Sample records for 2-mum doppler dial

  1. Correction of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering effects in H2O dial measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansmann, A.; Bosenberg, J.

    1986-01-01

    A general method of solutions for treating effects of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering in H2O Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements are described and discussed. Errors in vertical DIAL measuremtns caused by this laser line broadening effect can be very large and, therfore, this effect has to be accounted for accurately. To analyze and correct effects of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering in DIAL experiments, a generalized DIAL approximation was derived starting from a lidar equation, which includes Doppler broadening. To evaluate the accuracy of H2O DIAL measurements, computer simulations were performed. It was concluded that correction of Doppler broadened Rayleigh backscattering is possible with good accuracy in most cases of tropospheric H2O DIAL measurements, but great care has to be taken when layers with steep gradients of Mie backscattering like clouds or inversion layers are present.

  2. Influence of Rayleigh-Doppler broadening on the selection of H2O dial system parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, S.; Browell, E. V.

    1986-01-01

    Computer simulations have enabled the performance of a H2O Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system to be studied by spectrally analyzing the forward propagating and backscattered laser energy. The simulations were done for a high altitude (21 km) DIAL system operating in a nadir-viewing mode. The influence of Rayleigh Doppler broadening on DIAL measurement accuracies were evaluated and show that the Rayleigh broadening influence, which can be corrected to first order in regions free of large aerosol gradients, reduces the sensitivity of DIAL H2O measurement errors in the upper tropospheric region. The ability to correct the Rayleigh broadening and the selection of H2O DIAL parameters when all the systematic effects are combined, were discussed.

  3. Combined 2-micron Dial and Doppler Lidar: Application to the Atmosphere of Earth or Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Ismail, Syed; Kavaya, Michael; Yu, Jirong; Wood, Sidney A.; Emmitt, G. David

    2006-01-01

    A concept is explored for combining the Doppler and DIAL techniques into a single, multifunctional instrument. Wind, CO2 concentration, and aerosol density can all be measured. Technology to build this instrument is described, including the demonstration of a prototype lidar. Applications are described for use in the Earth science. The atmosphere of Mars can also be studied, and results from a recently-developed simulation model of performance in the Martian atmosphere are presented.

  4. Direct Detection 1.6?m DIAL / Doppler Lidar for Measurements of CO2 Concentration and Wind Profiles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of present carbon sources and sinks including their spatial distribution and their variation in time is one of the essential information for predicting future CO2 atmospheric concentration levels. Moreover, wind information is an important parameter for transport simulations and inverse estimation of surface CO2 flux. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and the Doppler wind lidar with the range resolution is expected to measure atmospheric CO2 profiles and wind profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer and lower troposphere from a ground platform. We have succeeded to develop a scanning 1.6 μm DIAL and incoherent Doppler lidar system for simultaneously measuring CO2 concentration and wind speed profiles. Our 1.6 μm DIAL system consists of the Optical Parametric Generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd: YAG laser with high repetition rate (500 Hz) and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube with high quantum efficiency operating at the photon counting mode, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filter to detect a Doppler shift, and a 25 cm telescope [1] [2]. We had developed an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) system for 1.6 μm CO2 DIAL[3]. To achieve continuous tuning of the resonant OPO output without mode hopping, it is necessary to vary the OPO cavity length synchronously with the seed-frequency. On the other hand, the OPG does not require a cavity and instead rely on sufficient conversion efficiency to be obtained with a single pass through the crystal. The single-frequency oscillation of the OPG was achieved by injection seeding. The CO2-DIAL was operated with the range-height indicator (RHI) mode, and the 2-D measurement provided inhomogeneity in the boundary layer. Vertical CO2 concentration profiles and wind profiles were also measured simultaneously. The elevation angle was fixed at 52 deg and CO2 concentration profiles were obtained up to 1 km altitude with 200 m height resolution. Vertical

  5. IR DIAL performance modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sharlemann, E.T.

    1994-07-01

    We are developing a DIAL performance model for CALIOPE at LLNL. The intent of the model is to provide quick and interactive parameter sensitivity calculations with immediate graphical output. A brief overview of the features of the performance model is given, along with an example of performance calculations for a non-CALIOPE application.

  6. Preliminary DIAL model

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, S.; Taylor, J.; Stephenson, D.

    1994-06-01

    A unique end-to-end LIDAR sensor model has been developed supporting the concept development stage of the CALIOPE UV DIAL and UV laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) efforts. The model focuses on preserving the temporal and spectral nature of signals as they pass through the atmosphere, are collected by the optics, detected by the sensor, and processed by the sensor electronics and algorithms. This is done by developing accurate component sub-models with realistic inputs and outputs, as well as internal noise sources and operating parameters. These sub-models are then configured using data-flow diagrams to operate together to reflect the performance of the entire DIAL system. This modeling philosophy allows the developer to have a realistic indication of the nature of signals throughout the system and to design components and processing in a realistic environment. Current component models include atmospheric absorption and scattering losses, plume absorption and scattering losses, background, telescope and optical filter models, PMT (photomultiplier tube) with realistic noise sources, amplifier operation and noise, A/D converter operation, noise and distortion, pulse averaging, and DIAL computation. Preliminary results of the model will be presented indicating the expected model operation depicting the October field test at the NTS spill test facility. Indications will be given concerning near-term upgrades to the model.

  7. Radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, R.E.; Lucas, H.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The population of radium dial workers who were exposed to radium 30 to 50 years ago are currently being followed by the Center for Human Radiobiology at the Argonne National Laboratory. It is not clear that radium has induced additional malignancies in this population, other than the well-known bone sarcomas and head carcinomas, but elevated incidence rates for multiple myeloma and cancers of the colon, rectum, stomach, and breast suggest that radium might be involved. Continued follow-up of this population may resolve these questions. Finally, the question of the effect of fetal irradiation on the offspring of these women remains to be resolved. No evidence exists to suggest that any effects have occurred, but there is no question that a chronic irradiation of the developing fetus did take place. No formal follow-up of these children has yet been initiated.

  8. Dial Access Libraries; Their Use and Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Karl M.; Bloch, Alice D.

    1974-01-01

    Medical dial access libraries (DALs) are an innovative information service for health professionals. This report is an evaluation of the general value, effectiveness, and efficiency of the dial access services. (Author/PG)

  9. Data and Information Access Link (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, R.; Di, L.; McDonald, K.

    2001-05-01

    The Data and Information Access Link (DIAL) is a web based package of software tools for geospatial data storage, visualization and distribution. The DIAL software provides a web based easy to use software solution to small data producers to organize and distribute remote sensing data and metadata. DIAL system can handle heterogeneous types of remote sensing and field campaign data for Earth science applications. DIAL works with image data, grid, swath, and tabular, multidimensional array and point data. The DIAL system supports NASA's Earth Observing System and Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data standards HDF- EOS, Hierarchical Data Format (HDF), and network Common Data Format (netCDF). Data format translators are also available between HDF-EOS and Arc-Info, Geo-tiff, and shape formats. DIAL software works with data from the EOS Terra, LANDSAT 7, TRMM, SeaWiFS missions and many other types of legacy data from NASA. DIAL software is freely available for users. DIAL features: Catalog services: Spatial, temporal, and parameter-based search; Catalog search at inventory and directory levels; Automatic creation of metadata catalog; Supports ODBC/JDBC compatible databases for storing metadata/catalog; User-friendly Java search interface with query preview. Data services: On-line access to data and metadata; Single- and multi-granule subsetting and sub sampling based on array coordinates or record numbers; Single- and multi-granule sub setting and sub sampling based on geographic/map coordinates and physical parameters; Browse and dynamic/interactive visualization of data; Animation of time series or multi dimensional data; Interactive color composites of multi-spectral data; Overlay of coastal and political boundaries; On-line downloading of data in multiple formats; X-Y plotting for non-image data. DIAL can work as a standalone application or in a distributed environment. DIAL is integrated with NASA's Earth Science Data Gateway (EDG) providing support for the

  10. Laser Doppler Velocimeter particle velocity measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.W.; Srikantaiah, D.V.; Philip, T.; George, A.

    1993-10-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the operation of the Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) system maintained by DIAL at MSU. LDV is used for the measurement of flow velocities and turbulence levels in various fluid flow settings. Ills report details the operation and maintenance of the LDV system and provides a first-time user with pertinent information regarding the system`s setup for a particular application. Particular attention has been given to the use of the Doppler signal analyzer (DSA) and the burst spectrum analyzer (BSA) signal processors and data analysis.

  11. Advanced Atmospheric Water Vapor DIAL Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; DeYoung, Russell J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor is very important for understanding the Earth's climate and water cycle. The remote sensing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is a powerful method to perform such measurement from aircraft and space. This thesis describes a new advanced detection system, which incorporates major improvements regarding sensitivity and size. These improvements include a low noise advanced avalanche photodiode detector, a custom analog circuit, a 14-bit digitizer, a microcontroller for on board averaging and finally a fast computer interface. This thesis describes the design and validation of this new water vapor DIAL detection system which was integrated onto a small Printed Circuit Board (PCB) with minimal weight and power consumption. Comparing its measurements to an existing DIAL system for aerosol and water vapor profiling validated the detection system.

  12. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  13. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  14. 47 CFR 51.205 - Dialing parity: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dialing parity: General. 51.205 Section 51.205... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.205 Dialing parity: General. A local exchange carrier (LEC) shall provide local and toll dialing parity to competing providers of telephone exchange service...

  15. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  16. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  17. 47 CFR 51.205 - Dialing parity: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dialing parity: General. 51.205 Section 51.205... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.205 Dialing parity: General. A local exchange carrier (LEC) shall provide local and toll dialing parity to competing providers of telephone exchange service...

  18. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  19. 47 CFR 51.205 - Dialing parity: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dialing parity: General. 51.205 Section 51.205... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.205 Dialing parity: General. A local exchange carrier (LEC) shall provide local and toll dialing parity to competing providers of telephone exchange service...

  20. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost recovery. (a) A LEC may recover the incremental costs necessary for the implementation of toll dialing...

  1. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost recovery. (a) A LEC may recover the incremental costs necessary for the implementation of toll dialing...

  2. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  3. 47 CFR 51.205 - Dialing parity: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dialing parity: General. 51.205 Section 51.205... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.205 Dialing parity: General. A local exchange carrier (LEC) shall provide local and toll dialing parity to competing providers of telephone exchange service...

  4. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  5. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  6. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  7. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost recovery. (a) A LEC may recover the incremental costs necessary for the implementation of toll dialing...

  8. 47 CFR 51.205 - Dialing parity: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dialing parity: General. 51.205 Section 51.205... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.205 Dialing parity: General. A local exchange carrier (LEC) shall provide local and toll dialing parity to competing providers of telephone exchange service...

  9. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost recovery. (a) A LEC may recover the incremental costs necessary for the implementation of toll dialing...

  10. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit telephone exchange service customers within a local calling area to dial the same number of digits to make a...

  11. Correlating the DIAL and the BTBC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarachan-Deily, Ann Beth; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The degree of correlation of the "concept" subtest of the Developmental Indicators of the Assessment of Learning (DIAL) with the Boehm Test of Basic Concepts (BTBC) was studied with 95 beginning kindergarten children. Both measures were highly correlated, indicating the evaluation of similar abilities. (Author/SEW)

  12. FY05 FM Dial Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W.; Strasburg, Jana D.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Batdorf, Michael T.

    2005-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Infrared Sensors team is focused on developing methods for standoff detection of nuclear proliferation. In FY05, PNNL continued the development of the FM DIAL (frequency-modulated differential absorption LIDAR) experiment. Additional improvements to the FM DIAL trailer provided greater stability during field campaigns which made it easier to explore new locations for field campaigns. In addition to the Hanford Townsite, successful experiments were conducted at the Marine Science Laboratory in Sequim, WA and the Nevada Test Site located outside Las Vegas, NV. The range of chemicals that can be detected by FM DIAL has also increased. Prior to FY05, distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCL) were used in the FM DIAL experiments. With these lasers, only simple chemicals with narrow (1-2 cm-1) absorption spectra, such as CO2 and N2O, could be detected. Fabry-Perot (FP) QC lasers have much broader spectra (20-40 cm-1) which allows for the detection of larger chemicals and a wider array of chemicals that can be detected. A FP-QCL has been characterized and used during initial studies detecting DMMP (dimethyl methylphosphonate).

  13. Doppler echocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Labovitz, A.J.; Williams, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors are successful in presenting a basic book on clinical quantitative Doppler echocardiography. It is not intended to be a comprehensive text, but it does cover clinical applications in a succinct fashion. Only the more common diseases in the adult are considered. The subjects are presented logically and are easy to comprehend. The illustrations are good, and the book is paperbound. The basic principles of Doppler echocardiography are presented briefly. The book ends with chapters on left ventricular function (stroke volume and cardiac output), congenital heart disease, and color Doppler echo-cardiography. There are numerous references and a good glossary and index.

  14. Tuning the dials of Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Arpino, James A. J.; Hancock, Edward J.; Anderson, James; Barahona, Mauricio; Stan, Guy-Bart V.; Polizzi, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic Biology is the ‘Engineering of Biology’ – it aims to use a forward-engineering design cycle based on specifications, modelling, analysis, experimental implementation, testing and validation to modify natural or design new, synthetic biology systems so that they behave in a predictable fashion. Motivated by the need for truly plug-and-play synthetic biological components, we present a comprehensive review of ways in which the various parts of a biological system can be modified systematically. In particular, we review the list of ‘dials’ that are available to the designer and discuss how they can be modelled, tuned and implemented. The dials are categorized according to whether they operate at the global, transcriptional, translational or post-translational level and the resolution that they operate at. We end this review with a discussion on the relative advantages and disadvantages of some dials over others. PMID:23704788

  15. Airborne water vapor DIAL system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.

    1990-01-01

    A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system developed at NASA Langley Research Center for the remote measurement of atmospheric H2O and aerosols from an aircraft is briefly discussed. This DIAL system utilizes a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser as the off-line transmitter and a narrowband, tunable Alexandrite laser as the on-line transmitter. A 1-m monochromator and a multipass absorption cell are used to position the on-line laser to the center of the H2O line. The receiver system has a 14-in. diameter, f/7 Celestron telescope to collect the backscattered laser light and focus in into the detector optics. Return signals are converted to electrical signals by the optical detector and are digitalized and stored on magnetic tape. The results of fligh tests of the system are shown.

  16. Correlation of DIAL Ozone Observations with Lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Kuang, Shi; Koshak, William J.; Newchurch, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to see whether ozone maxima measured by the DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) instrument in Huntsville, AL may be traced back to lightning events occurring 24-48 hours beforehand. The methodology is to start with lidar measurements of ozone from DIAL. The HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model is then used to determine the origin of these ozone maxima 24-48 hours prior. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are used to examine the presence/absence of lightning along the trajectory. This type of analysis suggests that lightning-produced NOx may be responsible for some of the ozone maxima over Huntsville.

  17. Correlation of DIAL Ozone Observations with Lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Kuang, Shi; Koshak, William J.; Newchurch, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to see whether ozone maxima measured by the DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) instrument in Huntsville, AL may be traced back to lightning events occurring 24- 48 hours beforehand. The methodology is to start with lidar measurements of ozone from DIAL as well as ozonesonde measurements. The HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model is then used to determine the origin of these ozone maxima 24-48 hours prior. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are used to examine the presence/absence of lightning along the trajectory. This type of analysis suggests that lightning-produced NOx may be responsible for some of the ozone maxima over Huntsville.

  18. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements from Air and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems have been used for the measurement of ozone, water vapor, and aerosols from aircraft platforms for over 18 years, yielding new insights into atmospheric chemistry, composition, and dynamics in large-scale field experiments conducted all over the world. The successful deployment of the lidar in-space technology experiment (LITE) in September 1994 demonstrated that space-based lidars can also collect valuable information on the global atmosphere. This paper reviews some of the contributions of the NASA Langley Research Center's airborne ozone and water vapor DIAL systems and space-based LITE system to the understanding of the atmosphere and discusses the feasibility and advantages of putting DIAL systems in space for routine atmospheric measurements of ozone and/or water vapor and aerosols and clouds. The technology and applications of the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique have progressed significantly since the first DIAL measurements of Schotland, and airborne DIAL measurements of ozone and water vapor are frequently being made in a wide range of field experiments. In addition, plans are underway to develop DIAL systems for use on satellites for continuous global measurements. This paper will highlight the history of airborne lidar and DIAL systems, summarize the major accomplishments of the NASA Langley DIAL program, and discuss specifications and goals for DIAL systems in space.

  19. Lidar/DIAL detection of bomb factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorani, Luca; Puiu, Adriana; Rosa, Olga; Palucci, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    One of the aims of the project BONAS (BOmb factory detection by Networks of Advanced Sensors) is to develop a lidar/DIAL (differential absorption lidar) to detect precursors employed in the manufacturing of improvised explosive devices (IEDs). At first, a spectroscopic study has been carried out: the infrared (IR) gas phase spectrum of acetone, one of the more important IED precursors, has been procured from available databases and checked with cell measurements. Then, the feasibility of a lidar/DIAL for the detection of acetone vapors has been shown in laboratory, simulating the experimental conditions of a field campaign. Eventually, having in mind measurements in a real scenario, an interferent study has been performed, looking for all known compounds that share with acetone IR absorption in the spectral band selected for its detection. Possible interfering species were investigated, simulating both urban and industrial atmospheres and limits of acetone detection in both environments were identified. This study confirmed that a lidar/DIAL can detect low concentration of acetone at considerable distances.

  20. Automated alexandrite transmitter for airborne DIAL experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the performance characteristics and development status of an automated dual alexandrite laser transmitter that is to be carried aloft by NASA's ER-2 research aircraft for water vapor DIAL experiments; these efforts are part of NASA's Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE). The LASE transmitter encompasses control unit, thermal unit, and two lamp driver unit subsystems. Major reductions in system size and weight relative to commercially available alexandrite lasers were necessary; a total weight of only 330 lbs has been achieved. Attention is given to subsystem flight test results.

  1. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit...

  2. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit...

  3. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit...

  4. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit...

  5. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section 51.215 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost...

  6. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate state commission or the Commission. (b) A LEC's implementation plan must include: (1) A proposal that explains...

  7. DIAL Measurements of Free-Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in Huntsville, AL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve

    2007-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by NASA and the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH), measures free-tropospheric ozone profiles between 4-10 km. Located at 192 meters altitude in the Regional Atmospheric Profiling Laboratory for Discovery (RAPCD) on the UAH campus in Huntsville, AL, USA, this tropospheric ozone lidar operates under both daytime and nighttime conditions. Frequent coincident ozonesonde flights and theoretical calculations provide evidence to indicate the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 8% at 4km to 40%-60% at 10 kin with 750-m vertical resolution and 30-minute integration. With anticipated improvements to allow retrievals at both higher and lower altitudes, this ozone lidar, along with co-located aerosol and Doppler Wind Lidars, will provide a unique 18 dataset for investigations of PBL and free-tropospheric chemical and dynamic processes.

  8. Doppler tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher Jacob

    This study addresses the development of a methodology using the Doppler Effect for high-resolution, short-range tracking of small projectiles and vehicles. Minimal impact on the design of the moving object is achieved by incorporating only a transmitter in it and using ground stations for all other components. This is particularly useful for tracking objects such as sports balls that have configurations and materials that are not conducive to housing onboard instrumentation. The methodology developed here uses four or more receivers to monitor a constant frequency signal emitted by the object. Efficient and accurate schemes for filtering the raw signals, determining the instantaneous frequencies, time synching the frequencies from each receiver, smoothing the synced frequencies, determining the relative velocity and radius of the object and solving the nonlinear system of equations for object position in three dimensions as a function of time are developed and described here.

  9. Measurements of CO2 Concentration and Wind Profiles with A Scanning 1.6μm DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo, M.; Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Nagai, T.; Sakai, T.; Tsukamoto, M.

    2012-12-01

    Horizontal carbon dioxide (CO2) distribution and wind profiles are important information for understanding of the regional sink and source of CO2. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and the Doppler lidar with the range resolution is expected to bring several advantages over passive measurements. We have developed a new scanning 1.6μm DIAL and incoherent Doppler lidar system to perform simultaniously measurements of CO2 concentration and wind speed profiles in the atmosphere. The 1.6μm DIAL and Doppler lidar system consists of the Optical Parametric Generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate (500 Hz). The receiving optics include the near-infrared photomultiplier tube with high quantum efficiency operating at the photon counting mode, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filter to detct Doppler shift, and a 25 cm telescope[1][2]. Laser beam is transmitted coaxially and motorized scanning mirror system can scan the laser beam and field of view 0-360deg horizontally and 0-52deg vertically. We report the results of vertical CO2 scanning measurenents and vertical wind profiles. The scanning elevation angles were from 12deg to 24deg with angular step of 4deg and CO2 concentration profiles were obtained up to 1 km altitude with 200 m altitude resolution. We also obtained vertical wind vector profiles by measuring line-of-sight wind profiles at two azimuth angles with a fixed elevation angle 52deg. Vertical wind vector profiles were obtained up to 5 km altitude with 1 km altitude rasolution. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency. References [1] L. B. Vann, et al., "Narrowband fiber-optic phase-shifted Fabry-Perot Bragg grating filters for atmospheric water vapor lidar measurements", Appl. Opt., 44, pp. 7371-7377 (2005). [2] Y. Shibata, et al., "1.5μm incoherent Doppler lidar using a FBG filter", Proceedings

  10. Frequency agile OPO-based transmitters for multiwavelength DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S.P.; Ruggiero, A.; Herman, M.

    1996-09-01

    We describe a first generation mid-infrared transmitter with pulse to pulse frequency agility and both wide and narrow band capability. This transmitter was used to make multicomponent Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) measurements in the field.

  11. Educational Materials Development in Primary Science: Dial Thermometer Instructional Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Frank L.; Huff, Roger

    1976-01-01

    Described in the fourth of a series of articles dealing with primary science instructional materials for visually handicapped students, is a field test (with 61 Ss in grades 2 to 4) of a dial thermometer instructional unit. (IM)

  12. 11. EASTERN END OF ZEOLITE BUILDING. NOTE DIAL TO LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. EASTERN END OF ZEOLITE BUILDING. NOTE DIAL TO LEFT OF CLOCK GAUGING TOTAL ZEOLITE INFLUENT IN MILLIONS OF GALLONS PER DAY. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Advanced Detector and Waveform Digitizer for Water Vapor DIAL Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Luck, William S., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor has become a major requirement for understanding moist-air processes. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is a technique best suited for the measurement of atmospheric water vapor. NASA Langley Research Center is continually developing improved DIAL systems. One aspect of current development is focused on the enhancement of a DIAL receiver by applying state-of-the-art technology in building a new compact detection system that will be placed directly on the DIAL receiver telescope. The newly developed detection system has the capability of being digitally interfaced with a simple personal computer, using a discrete input/output interface. This has the potential of transmitting digital data over relatively long distances instead of analog signals, which greatly reduces measurement noise. In this paper, we discuss some results from the new compact water vapor DIAL detection system which includes a silicon based avalanche photodiode (APD) detector, a 14-bit, 10-MHz waveform digitizer, a microcontroller and other auxiliary electronics. All of which are contained on a small printed-circuit-board. This will significantly reduce the weight and volume over the current CAMAC system and eventually will be used in a water vapor DIAL system on an unpiloted atmospheric vehicle (UAV) aircraft, or alternatively on an orbiting spacecraft.

  14. CALIOPE airborne CO{sub 2} DIAL (CACDI) system design

    SciTech Connect

    Mietz, D.; Archuleta, B.; Archuleta, J.

    1997-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently developing an airborne CO{sub 2} Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system based on second generation technology demonstrated last summer at NTS. The CALIOPE Airborne CO{sub 2} DIAL (CACDI) system requirements have been compiled based on the mission objectives and SONDIAL model trade studies. Subsystem designs have been developed based on flow down from these system requirements, as well as experience gained from second generation ground tests and N-ABLE (Non-proliferation AirBorne Lidar Experiments) airborne experiments. This paper presents the CACDI mission objectives, system requirements, the current subsystem design, and provides an overview of the airborne experimental plan.

  15. Airborne water vapor DIAL research: System development and field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Chyba, Thomas H.; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurement of water vapor (H2O) and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. The airborne H2O DIAL system was flight tested aboard the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Electra aircraft in three separate field deployments between 1989 and 1991. Atmospheric measurements were made under a variety of atmospheric conditions during the flight tests, and several modifications were implemented during this development period to improve system operation. A brief description of the system and major modifications will be presented, and the most significant atmospheric observations will be described.

  16. DOPPLER WEATHER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Gary J.

    2002-08-05

    The SRS Doppler Weather System consists of a Doppler Server, A Master Server (also known as the Weather Server), several Doppler Slave Servers, and client-side software program called the Doppler Radar Client. This system is used to display near rel-time images taken from the SRS Weather Center's Doppler Radar computer. The Doppler Server is software that resides on the SRS Doppler Computer. It gathers raw data, 24-bit color weather images via screen scraping ever five minutes as requested by the Master Server. The Doppler Server then reduces the 24-bit color images to 8-bit color using a fixed color table for analysis and compression. This preserves the fidelity of the image color and arranges the colors in specific order for display. At the time of color reduction, the white color used for the city names on the background images are remapped to a different index (color) of white that the white on the weather scale. The Weather Server places a time stamp on the image, then compresses the image and passes it to all Doppler Slave servers. Each of the Doppler Slave servers mainitain a circular buffer of the eight most current images representing the last 40 minutes of weather data. As a new image is added, the oldest drops off. The Doppler Radar Client is an optional install program for any site-wide workstation. When a Client session is started, the Client requests Doppler Slave server assignment from the Master Server. Upon its initial request to the Slave Server, the Client obtains all eight current images and maintains its own circular buffer, updating its images every five minutes as the Doppler Slave is updated. Three background reference images are stored as part of the Client. The Client brings up the appropriate background image, decompresses the doppler data, and displays the doppler data on the background image.

  17. DOPPLER WEATHER SYSTEM

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-08-05

    The SRS Doppler Weather System consists of a Doppler Server, A Master Server (also known as the Weather Server), several Doppler Slave Servers, and client-side software program called the Doppler Radar Client. This system is used to display near rel-time images taken from the SRS Weather Center's Doppler Radar computer. The Doppler Server is software that resides on the SRS Doppler Computer. It gathers raw data, 24-bit color weather images via screen scraping ever fivemore » minutes as requested by the Master Server. The Doppler Server then reduces the 24-bit color images to 8-bit color using a fixed color table for analysis and compression. This preserves the fidelity of the image color and arranges the colors in specific order for display. At the time of color reduction, the white color used for the city names on the background images are remapped to a different index (color) of white that the white on the weather scale. The Weather Server places a time stamp on the image, then compresses the image and passes it to all Doppler Slave servers. Each of the Doppler Slave servers mainitain a circular buffer of the eight most current images representing the last 40 minutes of weather data. As a new image is added, the oldest drops off. The Doppler Radar Client is an optional install program for any site-wide workstation. When a Client session is started, the Client requests Doppler Slave server assignment from the Master Server. Upon its initial request to the Slave Server, the Client obtains all eight current images and maintains its own circular buffer, updating its images every five minutes as the Doppler Slave is updated. Three background reference images are stored as part of the Client. The Client brings up the appropriate background image, decompresses the doppler data, and displays the doppler data on the background image.« less

  18. Airborne Dial Remote Sensing of the Arctic Ozone Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, Martin; Renger, Wolfgang; Ehret, Gerhard

    1992-01-01

    A combined ozone and aerosol LIDAR was developed at the Institute of Physics of the Atmosphere at the DLR in Oberpfaffenhofen. It is an airborne version, that, based on the DIAL-principle, permits the recording of two-dimensional ozone profiles. This presentation will focus on the ozone-part; the aerosol subsection will be treated later.

  19. Christian Doppler and the Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Kurt

    1984-04-01

    A summary is given of Doppler's life and career. He was born 180 years ago on November 29, 1803, in Salzburg, Austria. He died on March 17, 1853 in Venice. The effect bearing his name was first announced in a presentation before the Royal Bohemian Society of the Sciences in Prague on May 25, 1842. Doppler considered his work a generalization of the aberration theorem as discovered by Bradley. With it came the inference that the perception of physical phenomena can change with the state of motion of the observer. Acceptance of the principle was not without controversy. In 1852, the mathematician Petzval claimed that no useful scientific deductions can be made from Doppler's elementary equations. In 1860, Ernst Mach resolved the misunderstanding that clouded this controversy. The Doppler effect is alive and well. Its role in radio science and related disciplines is enumerated.

  20. Rayleigh-backscattering doppler broadening correction for differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lanlan; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Guo, Pan; Chen, He

    2015-11-01

    The spectral broadening by Rayleigh backscattering can cause large changes in water vapor echo signals, causing errors when the water vapor concentration is inversed by differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A correction algorithm is proposed to revise the errors due to the effect of laser spectral broadening. The relative errors of water vapor are calculated in cases of different aerosol distribution and temperature changes before and after correction. The results show that measurement errors due to the Doppler broadening are more than 5% before correction and a 2% measurement error after corrected for the case of a smooth, background aerosol distribution. However, due to the high aerosol gradients and strong temperature inversion, errors can be up to 40% and 10% with no corrections for this effect, respectively. The relative errors can reduce to less than 2% after correction. Hence, the correction algorithm for Rayleigh Doppler broadening can improve detection accuracy in H2O DIAL measurements especially when it is applied to high aerosol concentration or strong temperature inversion.

  1. Advances in Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    We review the principle and some recent applications of Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT). The advances of the phase-resolved Doppler OCT method are described. Functional OCT algorithms which are based on an extension of the phase-resolved scheme are also introduced. Recent applications of Doppler OCT for quantification of flow, imaging of microvasculature and vocal fold vibration, and optical coherence elastography are briefly discussed. PMID:24443649

  2. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  3. The Cognitive Doppler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozoil, Micah E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the learning needs of students in the concrete operational stage in mathematics. Identifies the phenomenon of reduced cognitive performance in an out-of-class environment as the "Cognitive Doppler." Suggests methods of reducing the pronounced effects of the Cognitive Doppler by capitalizing on the students' ability to memorize effective…

  4. Efficient 1.6 Micron Laser Source for Methane DIAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuman, Timothy; Burnham, Ralph; Nehrir, Amin R.; Ismail, Syed; Hair, Johnathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and on a per molecule basis has a warming influence 72 times that of carbon dioxide over a 20 year horizon. Therefore, it is important to look at near term radiative effects due to methane to develop mitigation strategies to counteract global warming trends via ground and airborne based measurements systems. These systems require the development of a time-resolved DIAL capability using a narrow-line laser source allowing observation of atmospheric methane on local, regional and global scales. In this work, a demonstrated and efficient nonlinear conversion scheme meeting the performance requirements of a deployable methane DIAL system is presented. By combining a single frequency 1064 nm pump source and a seeded KTP OPO more than 5 mJ of 1.6 µm pulse energy is generated with conversion efficiencies in excess of 20%. Even without active cavity control instrument limited linewidths (50 pm) were achieved with an estimated spectral purity of 95%. Tunable operation over 400 pm (limited by the tuning range of the seed laser) was also demonstrated. This source demonstrated the critical needs for a methane DIAL system motivating additional development of the technology.

  5. Indoor radon and lung cancer in the radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuberger, J.S.; Rundo, J.

    1996-12-31

    Internally deposited radium has long been known to have tumorigenic effects in the form of sarcomas of the bone and carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. However, the radium dial workers were also exposed to radiation hazards other than that occurring from ingestion of the radium paint, viz., external gamma radiation and elevated concentrations of airborne radon. The uranium miners were also exposed to high concentrations of radon in the 1950s and later, and numerous cases of lung cancer have occurred in that population. However, unlike the atmosphere in the uranium mines, the air in the dial painting plants was probably rather clean and perhaps not much different from the air in many houses. In view of the current concern over the possibility of lung cancer fin the general population being caused by radon (progeny) in houses, it is important to examine the mortality due to this usually fatal disease in the dial workers and to attempt to relate it to their exposure to radon, to the extent that this is possible.

  6. Comparison of 2 micron Ho and 10 micron CO2 lidar for atmospheric backscatter and Doppler windshear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killinger, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    The development of eye-safe, solid-state Lidar systems is discussed, with an emphasis on Coherent Doppler Lidar for Atmospheric Wind Measurements. The following subject areas are covered: tunable Ho DIAL (Differential Absorption Lidar)/lidar atmospheric measurements; atmospheric turbulence measurements and detector arrays; diurnal measurements of C(sub n)(sup 2) for KSC lidar measurements; and development of single-frequency Ho laser/lidar.

  7. Doppler radar flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Petlevich, Walter J.; Sverdrup, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    A Doppler radar flowmeter comprises a transceiver which produces an audio frequency output related to the Doppler shift in frequency between radio waves backscattered from particulate matter carried in a fluid and the radiated radio waves. A variable gain amplifier and low pass filter are provided for amplifying and filtering the transceiver output. A frequency counter having a variable triggering level is also provided to determine the magnitude of the Doppler shift. A calibration method is disclosed wherein the amplifier gain and frequency counter trigger level are adjusted to achieve plateaus in the output of the frequency counter and thereby allow calibration without the necessity of being able to visually observe the flow.

  8. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  9. Color Doppler flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Foley, W D; Erickson, S J

    1991-01-01

    The performance requirements and operational parameters of a color Doppler system are outlined. The ability of an operator to recognize normal and abnormal variations in physiologic flow and artifacts caused by noise and aliasing is emphasized. The use of color Doppler flow imaging is described for the vessels of the neck and extremities, upper abdomen and abdominal transplants, obstetrics and gynecology, dialysis fistulas, and testicular and penile flow imaging. PMID:1898567

  10. Tunable Single-Frequency Near IR Lasers for DIAL Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Marquardt, John H.; Carrig, Timothy J.; Gatt, Phil; Smith, Duane D.; Hale, Charley P.

    2000-01-01

    Tunable single-frequency sources in the 2-4 micron wavelength region are useful for remote DIAL measurements of chemicals and pollutants. We are developing tunable single-frequency transmitters and receivers for both direct and coherent detection lidar measurement applications. We have demonstrated a direct-diode-pumped PPLN-based OPO that operates single frequency, produces greater than 10 mW cw and is tunable over the 2.5 - 3.9 micron wavelength region. This laser has been used to injection seed a pulsed PPLN OPO, pumped by a 1.064 micron Nd:YAG laser, producing 50-100 microJoule single-frequency pulses at 100 Hz PRF near 3.6 micron wavelength. In addition, we have demonstrated a cw Cr:ZnSe laser that is tunable over the 2.1 - 2.8 micron wavelength region. This laser is pumped by a cw diode-pumped Tm:YALO laser and has produced over 1.8 W cw. Tm- and Tm, Ho-doped single-frequency solid-state lasers that produce over 50 mW cw and are tunable over approximately 10 nm in the 2 -2.1 micron band with fast PZT tuning have also been demonstrated. A fast PZT-tunable Tm, Ho:YLF laser was used for a direct-detection column content DIAL measurement of atmospheric CO2. Modeling shows that that all these cw and pulsed sources are useful for column-content coherent DIAL measurements at several km range using topographic targets.

  11. Measurements of fugitive hydrocarbon emissions with a tunable infrared DIAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, M. J. T.; Woods, P. T.; Jolliffe, B. W.; Swann, N. R. W.; Robinson, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    A tunable infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been designed and developed at the National Physics Lab (NPL) which is capable of making measurements throughout the spectral region 3.0 to 4.2 micro-m. It is ideally suited to measuring a range of organic and inorganic species including methane, propane, and butane. The system also has an ultraviolet channel that is capable of making simultaneous measurements of aromatic hydrocarbons such as Toluene and benzene. This paper describes the source and detection system, together with some measurements of fugitive hydrocarbon emissions performed at various petrochemical plants.

  12. Raman-shifted dye laser for water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, B. E.; Singh, U. N.; Cotnoir, L. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.; Higdon, N. S.; Browell, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    For improved DIAL measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, narrowband (about 0.03/cm) laser radiation at 720- and 940-nm wavelengths was generated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), using the narrow linewidth (about 0.02/cm) output of a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser. For a hydrogen pressure of 350 psi, the first Stokes conversion efficiencies to 940 nm were 20 percent and 35 percent, when using a conventional and waveguide Raman cell, respectively. The linewidth of the first Stokes line at high cell pressures, and the inferred collisional broadening coefficients, agree well with those previously measured in spontaneous Raman scattering.

  13. Alexandrite laser characterization and airborne lidar developments for water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, P.; Higdon, N. S.; Grossmann, B. E.; Browell, E. V.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of an Alexandrite laser used for making water vapor DIAL measurements have been evaluated. The optical servo-system used to lock the laser wavelength on a water vapor absorption line is described. A brief description of the DIAL system is given and the data obtained with this lidar during flight tests in March 1990 are also presented.

  14. 75 FR 33821 - Section 8 Random Digit Dialing Fair Market Rent Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Section 8 Random Digit Dialing Fair Market Rent Surveys AGENCY: Office of the Chief... provides HUD with a fast, inexpensive way to estimate Section 8 Fair Market Rents (FMRs) in areas not... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Section 8 Random Digit Dialing Fair Market...

  15. Calculus, Radio Dials and the Straight-Line Frequency Variable Capacitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyadzhiev, Khristo N.

    2010-01-01

    Most often radio dials of analogue radios are not uniformly graded; the frequencies are cramped on the left side or on the right side. This makes tuning more difficult. Why are dials made this way? We shall see here that simple calculus can help understand this problem and solve it. (Contains 7 figures.)

  16. Occupational exposure to dial painters and assemblers of radioluminous timepieces.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Shuman, F G; Moghissi, A A; Blackburn, J A; Bailey, E D

    1983-05-01

    An evaluation of available personnel monitoring data and radium body burden records of dial painters handling an annual average of 1.5 Ci of radium indicates that they received an average of about 2 rem/person whole body exposure, 3 rem to the lungs from radon inhalation and 0.2 rad to the bone from radium body burdens. Among groups of similar workers handling tritium in Texas plants, the highest occupational exposures were about 160 mrem annually per person received by refinishers of tritium dial timepieces and back-lit watch assemblers. Based upon scenarios of exposures to 147Pm, repairers of timepieces containing 147Pm receive about 4.4 X 10(-4) mrem/person/yr whole body dose equivalent. The amounts that they process are in the microcurie range. Although the trend is away from the use of radium as a luminizing activator, there are indications that it is still used in timepieces even as tritium and 147Pm are increasingly being used for this purpose. PMID:6853170

  17. Ultrasonic Doppler Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortoli, Piero; Fidanzati, Paolo; Luca, Bassi

    Any US equipment includes Doppler facilities capable of providing information about moving structures inside the human body. In most cases, the primary interest is in the investigation of blood flow dynamics, since this may be helpful for early diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. However, there is also an increasing interest in tracking the movements of human tissues, since such movements can give an indirect evaluation of their elastic properties, which are valuable indicators of the possible presence of pathologies. This paper aims at presenting an overview of the different ways in which the Doppler technique has been developed and used in medical ultrasound (US), from early continuous wave (CW) systems to advanced pulsed wave (PW) colour-Doppler equipment. In particular, the most important technical features and clinical applications of CW, single-gate PW, multi-gate PW and flow-imaging systems are reviewed. The main signal processing approaches used for detection of Doppler frequencies are described, including time-domain and frequency-domain (spectral) methods, as well as novel strategies like, e.g., harmonic Doppler mode, which have been recently introduced to exploit the benefits of US contrast agents.

  18. Polarimetric Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2001-10-01

    This work provides a detailed introduction to the principles of Doppler and polarimetric radar, focusing in particular on their use in the analysis of weather systems. The authors first discuss underlying topics such as electromagnetic scattering, polarization, and wave propagation. They then detail the engineering aspects of pulsed Doppler polarimetric radar, before examining key applications in meteorology and remote sensing. The book is aimed at graduate students of electrical engineering and atmospheric science as well as practitioners involved in the applications of polarimetric radar.

  19. Statistical evaluation and modeling of Internet dial-up traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faerber, Johannes; Bodamer, Stefan; Charzinski, Joachim

    1999-08-01

    In times of Internet access being a popular consumer applications even for `normal' residential users, some telephone exchanges are congested by customers using modem or ISDN dial-up connections to their Internet Service Providers. In order to estimate the number of additional lines and switching capacity required in an exchange or a trunk group, Internet access traffic must be characterized in terms of holding time and call interarrival time distributions. In this paper, we analyze log files tracing the usage of the central ISDN access line pool at University of Stuttgart for a period of six months. Mathematical distributions are fitted to the measured data and the fit quality is evaluated with respect to the blocking probability caused by the synthetic traffic in a multiple server loss system. We show how the synthetic traffic model scales with the number of subscribers and how the model could be applied to compute economy of scale results for Internet access trunks or access servers.

  20. Diode laser based water vapor DIAL using modulated pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong Le Hoai; Abo, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring lower-tropospheric water vapor profile using the modulated pulse technique. The transmitter is based on single-mode diode laser and tapered semiconductor optical amplifier with a peak power of 10W around 800nm absorption band, and the receiver telescope diameter is 35cm. The selected wavelengths are compared to referenced wavelengths in terms of random error and systematic errors. The key component of modulated pulse technique, a macropulse, is generated with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, and the modulation within the macropulse is coded according to a pseudorandom sequence with 100ns chip width. As a result, we evaluate both single pulse modulation and pseudorandom coded pulse modulation technique. The water vapor profiles conducted from these modulation techniques are compared to the real observation data in summer in Japan.

  1. Dial a feeling: Detecting moderation of affect decline during ostracism

    PubMed Central

    Wesselmann, Eric D.; Wirth, James H.; Mroczek, Daniel K.; Williams, Kipling D.

    2013-01-01

    Ostracism, being excluded and ignored, is a common and painful experience. Previous research has found ostracism's immediate effects robust to moderation by individual differences. However, this could be the result of using retrospective measures taken after the ostracism occurs, rather than assessing the effects of ostracism throughout the episode. Participants completed measures of loneliness and social avoidance and distress before either being ostracized or included in a virtual ball-toss game, Cyberball. During Cyberball, participants recorded second-by-second phenomenological affect using a dial device. Individual differences in loneliness and social avoidance and distress moderated affective reactions throughout ostracism and inclusion. Lonely individuals, compared to less-lonely individuals, had slower affect decrease when ostracized but quicker affective increase when included. Additionally, socially-avoidant individuals recovered more slowly from ostracism than less-avoidant individuals. Replicating previous research, moderation by individual differences was not detected with measures taken only at end of the interaction or with retrospective measures. PMID:23585705

  2. Alexandrite laser transmitter development for airborne water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas H.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    In the DIAL technique, the water vapor concentration profile is determined by analyzing the lidar backscatter signals for laser wavelengths tuned 'on' and 'off' a water vapor absorption line. Desired characteristics of the on-line transmitted laser beam include: pulse energy greater than or equal to 100 mJ, high-resolution tuning capability (uncertainty less than 0.25 pm), good spectral stability (jitter less than 0.5 pm about the mean), and high spectral purity (greater than 99 percent). The off-line laser is generally detuned less than 100 pm away from the water vapor line. Its spectral requirements are much less stringent. In our past research, we developed and demonstrated the airborne DIAL technique for water vapor measurements in the 720-nm spectral region using a system based on an alexandrite laser as the transmitter for the on-line wavelength and a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser for the off-line wavelength. This off-line laser has been replaced by a second alexandrite laser. Diode lasers are used to injection seed both lasers for frequency and linewidth control. This eliminates the need for the two intracavity etalons utilized in our previous alexandrite laser and thereby greatly reduces the risk of optical damage. Consequently, the transmitted pulse energy can be substantially increased, resulting in greater measurement range, higher data density, and increased measurement precision. In this paper, we describe the diode injection seed source, the two alexandrite lasers, and the device used to line lock the on-line seed source to the water vapor absorption feature.

  3. III-V Compound Detectors for CO2 DIAL Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Sulima, Oleg V.; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2005-01-01

    Profiling of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is important for understanding the natural carbon cycle on Earth and its influence on global warming and climate change. Differential absorption lidar is a powerful remote sensing technique used for profiling and monitoring atmospheric constituents. Recently there has been an interest to apply this technique, at the 2 m wavelength, for investigating atmospheric CO2. This drives the need for high quality detectors at this wavelength. Although 2 m detectors are commercially available, the quest for a better detector is still on. The detector performance, regarding quantum efficiency, gain and associated noise, affects the DIAL signal-to-noise ratio and background signal, thereby influencing the instrument sensitivity and dynamic range. Detectors based on the III-V based compound materials shows a strong potential for such application. In this paper the detector requirements for a long range CO2 DIAL profiles will be discussed. These requirements were compared to newly developed III-V compound infrared detectors. The performance of ternary InGaSb pn junction devices will be presented using different substrates, as well as quaternary InGaAsSb npn structure. The performance study was based on experimental characterization of the devices dark current, spectral response, gain and noise. The final results are compared to the current state-of-the-art InGaAs technology. Npn phototransistor structure showed the best performance, regarding the internal gain and therefore the device signal-to-noise ratio. 2-micrometers detectivity as high as 3.9 x 10(exp 11) cmHz(sup 1/2)/W was obtained at a temperature of -20 C and 4 V bias voltage. This corresponds to a responsivity of 2650 A/W with about 60% quantum efficiency.

  4. Finnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Ewan OConnor

    2015-03-27

    This doppler lidar system provides co-polar and cross polar attenuated backscatter coefficients,signal strength, and doppler velocities in the cloud and in the boundary level, including uncertainties for all parameters. Using the doppler beam swinging DBS technique, and Vertical Azimuthal Display (VAD) this system also provides vertical profiles of horizontal winds.

  5. The Doppler Pendulum Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, C. K.; Wong, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment to verify the Doppler effect of sound waves is described. An ultrasonic source is mounted at the end of a simple pendulum. As the pendulum swings, the rapid change of frequency can be recorded by a stationary receiver using a simple frequency-to-voltage converter. The experimental results are in close agreement with the Doppler…

  6. Development of Field-deployable Diode-laser-based Water Vapor Dial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Le Hoai, Phong; Abo, Makoto; Sakai, Tetsu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for lower-tropospheric water vapor observation in Tokyo, Japan. A photoacoustic cell is used for spectroscopy experiment around absorption peaks of 829.022 nm and 829.054 nm. The water vapor density extracted from the observational data agrees with the referenced radiosonde data. Furthermore, we applied modulated pulse technique for DIAL transmitter. It enables DIAL to measure water vapor profile for both low and high altitude regions.

  7. Comparison of ozone profiles obtained with NIES DIAL and SAGE II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakane, Hideaki; Sasano, Yasuhiro; Hayashida-Amano, Sachiko; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Minato, Atsushi; Mccormick, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Ozone profiles obtained with the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) (Tsukuba, Japan) were compared with data provided by the satellite sensor SAGE II. The SAGE II data were selected based on criteria of spatial and temporal differences between the DIAL and the SAGE II measurements: five degrees in latitude and 15 degrees in longitude, within a latitudinal band from 31 deg to 41 deg N, and within one, three and five days after or before the DIAL measurements. Results show very good agreement for the individual and the zonal-mean profiles. The average mean difference between the DIAL and the SAGE II measurements over the altitudes 15-50 km was about 10 percent.

  8. Doppler radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are covered in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) a summary of radar flight data collected; (2) a video of combined aft cockpit, nose camera, and radar hazard displays; (3) a comparison of airborne radar F-factor measurements with in situ and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) F-factors for some sample events; and (4) a summary of wind shear detection performance.

  9. Linear operating region in the ozone dial photon counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrawis, Madeleine

    1995-01-01

    Ozone is a relatively unstable molecule found in Earth's atmosphere. An ozone molecule is made up of three atoms of oxygen. Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life on Earth. High in the atmosphere, about 15 miles up, ozone acts as a shield to protect Earth's surface from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. Without this shield, we would be more susceptible to skin cancer, cataracts, and impaired immune systems. Closer to Earth, in the air we breathe, ozone is a harmful pollutant that causes damage to lung tissue and plants. Since the early 1980's, airborne lidar systems have been used for making measurements of ozone. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is used in the remote measurement of O3. This system allows the O3 to be measured as function of the range in the atmosphere. Two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are used to pump tunable dye lasers. The lasers are operating at 289 nm for the DIAL on-line wavelength of O3, and the other one is operated at 300 nm for the off-line wavelength. The DIAL wavelengths are produced in sequential laser pulses with a time separation of 300 micro s. The backscattered laser energy is collected by telescopes and measured using photon counting systems. The photon counting system measures the light signal by making use of the photon nature of light. The output pulse from the Photo-Multiplier Tube (PE), caused by a photon striking the PMT photo-cathode, is amplified and passed to a pulse height discriminator. The peak value of the pulse is compared to a reference voltage (discrimination level). If the pulse amplitude exceeds the discrimination level, the discriminator generates a standard pulse which is counted by the digital counter. Non-linearity in the system is caused by the overlapping of pulses and the finite response time of the electronics. At low count rates one expects the system to register one event for each output pulse from the PMT corresponding to a photon incident upon the

  10. Laser double Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poffo, L.; Goujon, J.-M.; Le Page, R.; Lemaitre, J.; Guendouz, M.; Lorrain, N.; Bosc, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive method for estimating the tissular blood flow and speed at a microscopic scale (microcirculation). It is used for medical research as well as for the diagnosis of diseases related to circulatory system tissues and organs including the issues of microvascular flow (perfusion). It is based on the Doppler effect, created by the interaction between the laser light and tissues. LDF measures the mean blood flow in a volume formed by the single laser beam, that penetrate into the skin. The size of this measurement volume is crucial and depends on skin absorption, and is not directly reachable. Therefore, current developments of the LDF are focused on the use of always more complex and sophisticated signal processing methods. On the other hand, laser Double Doppler Flowmeter (FL2D) proposes to use two laser beams to generate the measurement volume. This volume would be perfectly stable and localized at the intersection of the two laser beams. With FL2D we will be able to determine the absolute blood flow of a specific artery. One aimed application would be to help clinical physicians in health care units.

  11. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Werkmeister, René M.; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  12. Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Rainer A; Werkmeister, René M; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  13. Atmospheric contributions to the column variance in direct-detection dial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, M. J. T.; Woods, P. T.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most important parameters of a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is the delay time between the on and off resonant pulses. It is important that this delay time is sufficiently small to ensure that the atmosphere is effectively frozen between the pulses. Therefore, most Dial systems were designed with two lasers firing alternately less than 1 msec apart. Despite the importance of this parameter in the design of DIAL systems and its contribution to the overall error of a column measurement, very little is known about the size of the error for the case of a direct-detection system using atmospheric backscatter. The ultraviolet DIAL system uses two independent YAG/dye lasers and is therefore suitable for measuring the effects of different pulse delays on the variance of column measurements for a variety of atmospheric conditions. A set of DIAL returns were acquired with the two lasers tuned to the same wavelength and with a range of pulse delay times between 250 microseconds and several minutes. This data set was recorded in full on a computer and was used both to test different averaging techniques and also to evaluate atmospheric contributions to DIAL columns.

  14. User perceptions of the knowledge underpinning practice orientation dial (KUPOD) as a tool to enhance learning.

    PubMed

    Borlase, Jeanette; Abelson-Mitchell, Nadine

    2008-01-01

    The concern of academics and clinicians about the alleged dichotomy between theoretical concepts and the practice of nursing has been the catalyst for the development of a pocket-sized aid for nurses, known as the Knowledge Underpinning Practice Orientation Dial (KUPOD [N]/The Dial). A mixed method approach was used incorporating a questionnaire and a focus group of educators. The Dial was introduced, as part of a module, undertaken by a cohort of second-year Diploma in Nursing (Adult Branch) students. Twenty-eight students returned the questionnaire (response rate=85%). Results revealed that the Dial was easy to use in a variety of situations and locations. Respondents used the Dial within clinical and classroom settings and for self directed study. They reported that it was a practical and effective aid to learning, assisting in correlating theory and practice. It supported reflection and enhanced confidence in the clinical area, indicating that this economically produced tool helps to bridge the theory-practice gap. The Dial is now being introduced as a learning resource to a wider range of students. PMID:18086449

  15. Flight tests of the Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System (DIALS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, N.

    1984-01-01

    The design, development, implementation and flight tests of the Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System (DIALS) are discussed. The system was implemented and flight tested on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV), a Boeing 737-100. The design uses modern optimal control methods. The direct digital design obtained uses a 10 Hz rate for the sampling of sensors and the control commands. The basic structure of the control law consists of a steady state Kalman filter followed by a control gain matrix. The sensor information used includes Microwave Landing System (MLS) position, attitude, calibrated airspeed, and body accelerations. The phases of the final approach considered are localized and steep glideslope capture (which may be performed simultaneously or independently), localizer and glideslope track, crab/decrab, and flare to touchdown. The system can capture, track, and flare from conventional, as well as steep, glideslopes ranging from 2.5 deg to 5.5 deg. All of the modes of the control law including the Kalman filters were implemented on the TSRV flight computers which use fixed point arithmetic with 16 bit words. The implementation considerations are described as well as an analysis of the flight test results.

  16. Survival times of pre-1950 US women radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Stehney, A.F.

    1994-05-01

    Survival times of US women radium dial workers to the end of 1989 were examined by life table methods. Included were 1301 women rust employed before 1930 and 1242 first employed in 1930-1949. Expected numbers of deaths were estimated from age- and time-specific death rates for US white females. In the early group, 85 deaths from the well-known radium-induced cancers - bone sarcomas and head carcinomas - were observed, but only 724 deaths from aH other causes were observed vs 755 expected. Life shortening ({plus_minus}S.E.) of 1.8 {plus_minus}0.5 y compared to the general population of US white females was calculated from the time distribution of all deaths in the pre-1930 group. In the 1930--1949 group, 350 deaths were observed vs 343 expected and no bone sarcomas or head carcinomas occurred. Among women who survived at least 2 y after rust measurement of body radium, a significant excess of observed vs expected deaths was found only for radium intakes greater than 1.85 MBq of {sup 226}Ra + {sup 228}Ra, and no trend of deaths or reduction of life expectancy was found with length of employment.

  17. Clinical applications of doppler ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.J.W.; Burns, P.N.; Well, P.N.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book introduces a guide to the physical principles and instrumentation of duplex Doppler ultrasound and its applications in obstetrics, gynecology, neonatology, gastroentology, and evaluation of peripheral vascular disease. The book provides information needed to perform Doppler ultrasound examinations and interpret the results. An introduction to Doppler physics and instrumentation is followed by a thorough review of hemodynamics, which explains the principles underlying interpretation of Doppler signals. Of special note is the state-of-the-art coverage of new applications of Doppler in recognition of high-risk pregnancy, diagnosis of intrauterine growth retardation, investigation of neonatal blood flow, evaluation of first-trimester pregnancy, and diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease. The book also offers guidelines on the use of Doppler ultrasound in diagnosing carotid disease, deep venous thrombosis, and aorta/femoral disease.

  18. Laser Doppler diagnostics for orthodontia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkova, Anastasia V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Kharish, Natalia A.

    2004-06-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of intensity fluctuations of light, scattered from mucous membrane of oral cavity of healthy volunteers and patients, abused by the orthodontic diseases, are presented. Analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, is carried out. New approach to monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of Doppler measuring system on formation of the output signal is studied.

  19. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  20. Terminal Doppler weather radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, M.; Shrader, W. W.; Wieler, J. G.

    1990-02-01

    The terminal Doppler weather radar (TDWR) system, now under development, will provide automatic detection of microbursts and low-level wind shear. This paper discusses the TDWR performance parameters and describes its structural elements, including the antenna subsystem, the transmitter, the receiver/exciter, the digital signal processor, and the radar product generator/remote monitoring subsystem. Attention is also given to the processes of the base data formation, point target removal, signal-to-noise thresholding, and velocity de-aliasing and to the TDWR algorithms and displays. A schematic diagram of the TDWR system is presented.

  1. Laser Doppler velocimetry primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced research in experimental fluid dynamics required a familiarity with sophisticated measurement techniques. In some cases, the development and application of new techniques is required for difficult measurements. Optical methods and in particular, the laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) are now recognized as the most reliable means for performing measurements in complex turbulent flows. And such, the experimental fluid dynamicist should be familiar with the principles of operation of the method and the details associated with its application. Thus, the goals of this primer are to efficiently transmit the basic concepts of the LDV method to potential users and to provide references that describe the specific areas in greater detail.

  2. Comparison of lower tropospheric ozone columns observed by DIAL and GOSAT TANSO-FTS TIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, O.; Sakai, T.; Nagai, T.; Morino, I.; Ohyama, H.; Kawakami, S.; Shiomi, K.; Kawasaki, T.; Akaho, T.; Okumura, H.; Arai, K.; Matsunaga, T.; Yokota, T.

    2013-12-01

    Ozone plays important roles in climate change and air quality. We have been improving the ozone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) installed at Saga (33.24N, 130.29E), Japan in March 2011. Current DIAL consists of four Stimulated Raman Scattering lines (276, 287, 299, and 312 nm) which are generated by the fourth harmonic (266 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser and a 2-m Raman cell filled with 8-atm CO2 gas, and 10-cm and 50-cm dia. receiving telescopes. With this DIAL, ozone profiles could be measured from ~ 300 m to 6 km~10 km altitude. Total and tropospheric ozone columns have been retrieved from the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Fourier Transform Spectrometer, measuring in the Thermal InfraRed (TANSO-FTS TIR) onboard the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) launched on 23, January 2009. Lower tropospheric ozone columns between 1 km and 6 km retrieved from GOSAT TANSO-FTS TIR (9.6 μm band) within ×1 degree longitude/latitude centered at DIAL were compared with those of DIAL data in 2012 which were applied with GOSAT TANSO-FTS TIR averaging kernels. Although GOSAT TANSO-FTS TIR data were lower than DIAL data by 10×11%, they were in reasonable agreement with a correlation coefficient of 0.79. Seasonal variations of lower tropospheric ozone columns are clearly seen, and high ozone mixing ratio events around 2 km altitude observed by DIAL are reported.

  3. Characterization of an Ozone DIAL Receiver for Operation on an Unpiloted Atmospheric Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldschmidt, Soenke; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    Laser remote sensing from aircraft has become a very important technique for observing ozone in the environment. NASA Langley has an active aircraft based research program which presently uses Nd:YAG-pumped dye lasers that are then doubled into the UV to probe both the stratosphere and troposphere for ozone using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. This large system can only fly on large (NASA DC-8, Electra) aircraft and has been deployed on many missions throughout the world. In the future it will be desirable to fly autonomous, lightweight, compact ozone DIAL instruments on unpiloted atmospheric vehicles (UAV) aircraft. Such aircraft could fly at high altitudes for extended times collecting science data without risk to the operator. Cost for such missions may be substantially reduced over present large aircraft based missions. Presently there are no ozone DIAL systems capable of flying on an UAV aircraft. In order to facilitate UAV missions, small more efficient laser transmitters need to be developed that emit approximately 25mJ near 300nm for each of the DIAL 'on' and 'off' line pulses. Also lightweight, compact DIAL receiver systems need to be built and demonstrated. Such receiver systems may incorporate fiber optic coupled telescopes for maximum light gathering capability per unit area, high quantum efficiency gated photomultiplier tubes with reasonable gain and very narrow-band filters for background light rejection with high light throughput. A compact high-performance 16-bit digitizer and a data storage system are also required. A conceptional design of such a UAV DIAL instrument is presented. Here a pulsed UV laser emits pulses into the atmosphere where elastic scattering occurs which results in light being scattered into the receiver telescope. The subject of this paper is the design, construction and testing of a robust, compact ozone DIAL receiver system that would be a prototype for eventual use in a UAV aircraft.

  4. ANL Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karplus, H. B.; Raptis, A. C.; Lee, S.; Simpson, T.

    1985-10-01

    A flowmeter has been developed for measuring flow velocity in hot slurries. The flowmeter works on an ultrasonic Doppler principle in which ultrasound is injected into the flowing fluid through the solid pipe wall. Isolating waveguides separate the hot pipe from conventional ultrasonic transducers. Special clamp-on high-temperature transducers also can be adapted to work well in this application. Typical flows in pilot plants were found to be laminar, giving rise to broad-band Doppler spectra. A special circuit based on a servomechanism sensor was devised to determine the frequency average of such a broad spectrum. The device was tested at different pilot plants. Slurries with particulates greater than 70 microns (0.003 in.) yielded good signals, but slurries with extremely fine particulates were unpredictable. Small bubbles can replace the coarse particles to provide a good signal if there are not too many. Successful operation with very fine particulate slurries may have been enhanced by the presence of microbubbles.

  5. Doppler Beats or Interference Fringes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Paul S.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the following: another version of Doppler beats; alternate proof of spin-1 sin-1/2 problems; some mechanisms related to Dirac's strings; Doppler redshift in oblique approach of source and observer; undergraduate experiment on noise thermometry; use of the time evolution operator; resolution of an entropy maximization controversy;…

  6. High resolution Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abreu, Vincent J.; Hays, Paul B.; Barnes, John E.

    1989-01-01

    A high resolution lidar system was implemented to measure winds in the lower atmosphere. The wind speed along the line of sight was determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the aerosol backscattered laser signal. The system in its present configuration is stable, and behaves as indicated by theoretical simulations. This system was built to demonstrate the capabilities of the detector system as a prototype for a spaceborne lidar. The detector system investigated consisted of a plane Fabry-Perot etalon, and a 12-ring anode detector. This system is generically similar to the Fabry-Perot interferometer developed for passive wind measurements on board the Dynamics Explorer satellite. That this detector system performs well in a lidar configuration was demonstrated.

  7. Calling for Help? Considering Function and Meaning when Patients Drunk-Dial Psychotherapists

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Kelly; LaPaglia, Donna; Steinfeld, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Drunk-dialing is a term documented in both popular culture and academic literatures to describe a behavior in which a person contacts another individual by phone while intoxicated. In our collective clinical experience we have found that clients drunk-dial their clinicians too, particularly while in substance use treatment, and yet there is a noticeable absence of research on the topic to guide clinical decision-making within a process-based understanding of these events. As the parameters within which psychotherapy takes place become increasingly technologized, a literature base to document clients’ idiosyncratic use of technology will become increasingly necessary and useful. We provide a brief review of the existing research on drunk-dialing and conclude with specific questions to guide future research and practice. PMID:24023519

  8. Development of a high-altitude airborne dial system: The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Vaughan, W. R.; Hall, W. M.; Degnan, J. J.; Averill, R. D.; Wells, J. G.; Hinton, D. E.; Goad, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system to measure vertical profiles of H2O in the lower atmosphere was demonstrated both in ground-based and airborne experiments. In these experiments, tunable lasers were used that required real-time experimenter control to locate and lock onto the atmospheric H2O absorption line for the DIAL measurements. The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is the first step in a long-range effort to develop and demonstrate an autonomous DIAL system for airborne and spaceborne flight experiments. The LASE instrument is being developed to measure H2O, aerosol, and cloud profiles from a high-altitude ER-2 (extended range U-2) aircraft. The science of the LASE program, the LASE system design, and the expected measurement capability of the system are discussed.

  9. Effect of differential spectral reflectance on DIAL measurements using topographic targets. [Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric gases and temperature made using topographic targets to provide the backscattered signal are subject to errors from the differential spectral reflectance of the target materials. The magnitude of this effect is estimated for a number of DIAL measurements reported in the literature. Calculations are presented for several topographic targets. In general the effect on a DIAL measurement increases directly with increasing wavelength and laser line separation, and inversely with differential absorption coefficient and distance to the target. The effect can be minimized by using tunable or isotope lasers to reduce the laser line separation or by using additional reference wavelengths to determine the surface differential spectral reflectance.

  10. DialBetics With a Multimedia Food Recording Tool, FoodLog

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Kayo; Aizawa, Kiyoharu; Kato, Shigeko; Fujita, Hideo; Lee, Hanae; Kobayashi, Haruka; Ogawa, Makoto; Mouri, Keisuke; Kadowaki, Takashi; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes self-management education is an essential element of diabetes care. Systems based on information and communication technology (ICT) for supporting lifestyle modification and self-management of diabetes are promising tools for helping patients better cope with diabetes. An earlier study had determined that diet improved and HbA1c declined for the patients who had used DialBetics during a 3-month randomized clinical trial. The objective of the current study was to test a more patient-friendly version of DialBetics, whose development was based on the original participants’ feedback about the previous version of DialBetics. Method: DialBetics comprises 4 modules: data transmission, evaluation, exercise input, and food recording and dietary evaluation. Food recording uses a multimedia food record, FoodLog. A 1-week pilot study was designed to determine if usability and compliance improved over the previous version, especially with the new meal-input function. Results: In the earlier 3-month, diet-evaluation study, HbA1c had declined a significant 0.4% among those who used DialBetics compared with the control group. In the current 1-week study, input of meal photos was higher than with the previous version (84.8 ± 13.2% vs 77.1% ± 35.1% in the first 2 weeks of the 3-month trial). Interviews after the 1-week study showed that 4 of the 5 participants thought the meal-input function improved; the fifth found input easier, but did not consider the result an improvement. Conclusions: DialBetics with FoodLog was shown to be an effective and convenient tool, its new meal-photo input function helping provide patients with real-time support for diet modification. PMID:25883164

  11. Comparison of performance capabilities of spread spectrum coherent and direct detection CO2 DIAL systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, Victor H.; Kovacs, Mark A.

    2002-02-01

    This paper compares the performance of a conventional direct detection CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system with the coherent spread spectrum approach developed and patented by Textron. The analysis shows that the coherent approach is far superior in terms of maximum attainable standoff range at a specified transmitter average power and substantially reduced system power and associated size and weight at a predetermined range. The requirements on local oscillator stability are fairly relaxed and the spread spectrum/coherent DIAL concept is fairly easy to implement. Some comparative validation data are provided.

  12. Single frequency and wavelength stabilized near infrared laser source for water vapor DIAL remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti; Walters, Brooke; Shuman, Tim; Losee, Andrew; Schum, Tom; Puffenberger, Kent; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-02-01

    Fibertek has demonstrated a single frequency, wavelength stabilized near infrared laser transmitter for NASA airborne water vapor DIAL application. The application required a single-frequency laser transmitter operating at 935 nm near infrared (NIR) region of the water vapor absorption spectrum, capable of being wavelength seeded and locked to a reference laser source and being tuned at least 100 pm across the water absorption spectrum for DIAL on/off measurements. Fibertek is building a laser transmitter system based on the demonstrated results. The laser system will be deployed in a high altitude aircraft (ER-2 or UAV) to autonomously perform remote, long duration and high altitude water vapor measurements.

  13. Initial airborne CO{sub 2} DIAL measurements: Discussion of results and data analysis considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Tiee, J.J.; Foy, B.R.; Quick, C.R.

    1997-07-01

    A detailed discussion of airborne CO{sub 2}, DIAL measurements obtained from the first joint N-ABLE field campaign at INEL is presented. System performance characteristics, including return signal strength, averaging statistics, and temporal correlation as well as multi-line DIAL spectral data are discussed. In particular, we review data acquisition and analysis strategies pertinent to chemical detection from a moving platform, such as range determination and correction, and return signal processing (waveform vs. box-car integration, baseline correction). We also report observed effects and variations due to near-field light scattering, pointing and tracking stability, and stack-release plume dynamics.

  14. The Six-Point Dial of Treatment: A Useful Framework for Novice Therapists

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Tracy K.; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The six-point dial of treatment described in this case report was developed to guide graduate student psychological trainees through treatment and includes the following components: assessment of dangerousness, diagnosis, diagnosis-based treatment, ongoing evaluation of treatment response, obstacles to treatment, and motivation. In this case report, we describe the dial of treatment and present a case study of a client with paranoid schizophrenia (John) who presented at a graduate student training clinic to illustrate how this framework can be successfully applied. John has exhibited marked improvement, based on both objective measures and clinician judgment of global functioning. PMID:20563280

  15. Doppler ultrasound--basics revisited.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Mary

    Palpation of pedal pulses alone is known to be an unreliable indicator for the presence of arterial disease. Using portable Doppler ultrasound to measure the resting ankle brachial pressure index is superior to palpation of peripheral pulses as an assessment of the adequacy pf the arterial supply in the lower limb. Revisiting basics, this article aims to aid the clinician to understand and perform hand-held Doppler ultrasound effectively while involving the client or patient in the process. The author describes the basics of Doppler ultrasound, how to select correct equipment for the process, and interpretation of results to further enhance clinicians' knowledge. PMID:16835512

  16. Digital Doppler measurement with spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Hinedi, Sami M.; Labelle, Remi C.; Bevan, Roland P.; Del Castillo, Hector M.; Chong, Dwayne C.

    1991-01-01

    Digital and analog phase-locked loop (PLL) receivers were operated in parallel, each tracking the residual carrier from a spacecraft. The PLL tracked the downlink carrier and measured its instantaneous phase. This information, combined with a knowledge of the uplink carrier and the transponder ratio, permitted the computation of a Doppler observable. In this way, two separate Doppler measurements were obtained for one observation window. The two receivers agreed on the magnitude of the Doppler effect to within 1 mHz. There was less jitter on the data from the digital receiver. This was due to its smaller noise bandwidth. The demonstration and its results are described.

  17. MyOcean Internal Information System (Dial-P)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Frederique; Jolibois, Tony; Loubrieu, Thomas; Manzella, Giuseppe; Mazzetti, Paolo; Nativi, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    , trajectory, station, grid, etc., which will be implemented in netCDF format. SeaDataNet is recommending ODV and NetCDF formats. Another problem related to data curation and interoperability is the possibility to use common vocabularies. Common vocabularies are developed in many international initiatives, such as GEMET (promoted by INSPIRE as a multilingual thesaurus), UNIDATA, SeaDataNet, Marine Metadata Initiative (MMI). MIS is considering the SeaDataNet vocabulary as a base for interoperability. Four layers of different abstraction levels of interoperability an be defined: - Technical/basic: this layer is implemented at each TAC or MFC through internet connection and basic services for data transfer and browsing (e.g FTP, HTTP, etc). - Syntactic: allowing the interchange of metadata and protocol elements. This layer corresponds to a definition Core Metadata Set, the format of exchange/delivery for the data and associated metadata and possible software. This layer is implemented by the DIAL-P logical interface (e.g. adoption of INSPIRE compliant metadata set and common data formats). - Functional/pragmatic: based on a common set of functional primitives or on a common set of service definitions. This layer refers to the definition of services based on Web services standards. This layer is implemented by the DIAL-P logical interface (e.g. adoption of INSPIRE compliant network services). - Semantic: allowing to access similar classes of objects and services across multiple sites, with multilinguality of content as one specific aspect. This layer corresponds to MIS interface, terminology and thesaurus. Given the above requirements, the proposed solution is a federation of systems, where the individual participants are self-contained autonomous systems, but together form a consistent wider picture. A mid-tier integration layer mediates between existing systems, adapting their data and service model schema to the MIS. The developed MIS is a read-only system, i.e. does not allow

  18. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  19. Dual-Doppler Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    When two or more Doppler weather radar systems are monitoring the same region, the Doppler velocities can be combined to form a three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector field thus providing for a more intuitive analysis of the wind field. A real-time display of the 3-D winds can assist forecasters in predicting the onset of convection and severe weather. The data can also be used to initialize local numerical weather prediction models. Two operational Doppler Radar systems are in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS); these systems are operated by the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) and the National Weather Service Melbourne, Fla. (NWS MLB). Dual-Doppler applications were considered by the 45 SW in choosing the site for the new radar. Accordingly, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), NWS MLB and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to investigate the feasibility of establishing dual-Doppler capability using the two existing systems. This study investigated technical, hardware, and software requirements necessary to enable the establishment of a dual-Doppler capability. Review of the available literature pertaining to the dual-Doppler technique and consultation with experts revealed that the physical locations and resulting beam crossing angles of the 45 SW and NWS MLB radars make them ideally suited for a dual-Doppler capability. The dual-Doppler equations were derived to facilitate complete understanding of dual-Doppler synthesis; to determine the technical information requirements; and to determine the components of wind velocity from the equation of continuity and radial velocity data collected by the two Doppler radars. Analysis confirmed the suitability of the existing systems to provide the desired capability. In addition, it is possible that both 45 SW radar data and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data from Orlando International Airport could be used to alleviate any

  20. Doppler tracking of planetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    This article concerns the measurement of Doppler shift on microwave links that connect planetary spacecraft with the Deep Space Network. Such measurements are made by tracking the Doppler effect with phase-locked loop receivers. A description of equipment and techniques as well as a summary of the appropriate mathematical models are given. The two-way Doppler shift is measured by transmitting a highly-stable microwave (uplink) carrier from a ground station, having the spacecraft coherently transpond this carrier, and using a phase-locked loop receiver at the ground station to track the returned (downlink) carrier. The largest sources of measurement error are usually plasma noise and thermal noise. The plasma noise, which may originate in the ionosphere or the solar corona, is discussed; and a technique to partially calibrate its effect, involving the use of two simultaneous downlink carriers that are coherently related, is described. Range measurements employing Doppler rate-aiding are also described.

  1. Doppler characteristics of sea clutter.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-06-01

    Doppler radars can distinguish targets from clutter if the target's velocity along the radar line of sight is beyond that of the clutter. Some targets of interest may have a Doppler shift similar to that of clutter. The nature of sea clutter is different in the clutter and exo-clutter regions. This behavior requires special consideration regarding where a radar can expect to find sea-clutter returns in Doppler space and what detection algorithms are most appropriate to help mitigate false alarms and increase probability of detection of a target. This paper studies the existing state-of-the-art in the understanding of Doppler characteristics of sea clutter and scattering from the ocean to better understand the design and performance choices of a radar in differentiating targets from clutter under prevailing sea conditions.

  2. Mathematical Models for Doppler Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, William M.

    1987-01-01

    Error analysis increases precision of navigation. Report presents improved mathematical models of analysis of Doppler measurements and measurement errors of spacecraft navigation. To take advantage of potential navigational accuracy of Doppler measurements, precise equations relate measured cycle count to position and velocity. Drifts and random variations in transmitter and receiver oscillator frequencies taken into account. Mathematical models also adapted to aircraft navigation, radar, sonar, lidar, and interferometry.

  3. High Resolution Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Grant supported the development of an incoherent lidar system to measure winds and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. During this period the following activities occurred: (1) an active feedback system was developed to improve the laser frequency stability; (2) a detailed forward model of the instrument was developed to take into account many subtle effects, such as detector non-linearity; (3) a non-linear least squares inversion method was developed to recover the Doppler shift and aerosol backscatter without requiring assumptions about the molecular component of the signal; (4) a study was done of the effects of systematic errors due to multiple etalon misalignment. It was discovered that even for small offsets and high aerosol loadings, the wind determination can be biased by as much as 1 m/s. The forward model and inversion process were modified to account for this effect; and (5) the lidar measurements were validated using rawinsonde balloon measurements. The measurements were found to be in agreement within 1-2 m/s.

  4. Compact Doppler magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Moynihan, Philip I.; Vaughan, Arthur H.; Cacciani, Alessandro

    1998-11-01

    We designed a low-cost flight instrument that images the full solar disk through two narrow band filters at the red nd blue 'wings' of the solar potassium absorption line. The images are produced on a 1024 X 1024 charge-coupled device with a resolution of 2 arcsec per pixel. Four filtergrams taken in a very short time at both wings in the left and right states of circular polarization are used to yield a Dopplergram and a magnetogram simultaneously. The noise-equivalent velocity associated with each pixel is less than 3 m/s. The measured signal is linearly proportional to the velocity in the range +/- 4000 m/s. The range of magnetic fields is from 3 to 3000 Gauss. The optical system of the instrument is simple and easily aligned. With a pixel size of 12 micrometers , the effective focal length is 126 cm. A Raleigh resolution limit of 4 arcsec is achieved with a 5-cm entrance apertures, providing an f/25 focal ratio. The foreoptic is a two-component telephoto lens serving to limit the overall optical length to 89 cm or less. The mass of the instrument is 14 kg. the power required is less than 30 Watts. The Compact Doppler Magnetograph can be used in space mission with severe mass and power requirements. It can also be effectively used for ground-based observations: large telescope, dome or other observatory facilities are not required.

  5. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  6. Synthetic Array Heterodyne Detection: Developments within the Caliope CO{sub 2} DIAL Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rehse, S.J.; Strauss, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    A new technique, Synthetic Array Heterodyne Detection, offers a wider field of view and improved signal to noise for coherent DIAL systems by reducing speckle interference. We have implemented a synthetic multi-pixel array using a CO{sub 2} laser on a single element HgCdTe photodiode.

  7. The McCarron-Dial System--An Approach to Clinical, Vocational, and Educational Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dial, Jack G.; And Others

    The McCarron-Dial System is useful for both vocational and clinical evaluation of neuropsychologically disabled adults. Five factors (verbal-cognitive, sensory, motor, emotional, and integration coping) are used to predict vocational competency, which is measured by work samples and behavior scales, during the first twelve months of a client's…

  8. Development and Evaluation of a High Sensitivity DIAL System for Profiling Atmospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady J.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. N.; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    A ground-based 2-micron Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) CO2 profiling system for atmospheric boundary layer studies and validation of space-based CO2 sensors is being developed and tested at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the NASA Instrument Incubator Program. To capture the variability of CO2 in the lower troposphere a precision of 1-2 ppm of CO2 (less than 0.5%) with 0.5 to 1 km vertical resolution from near surface to free troposphere (4-5 km) is one of the goals of this program. In addition, a 1% (3 ppm) absolute accuracy with a 1 km resolution over 0.5 km to free troposphere (4-5 km) is also a goal of the program. This DIAL system leverages 2-micron laser technology developed under NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and other NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements. This presentation describes the capabilities of this system for atmospheric CO2 and aerosol profiling. Examples of atmospheric measurements in the lidar and DIAL mode will be presented.

  9. An Analysis of the Dial-A-Teacher Assistance Program (DATALINE), School District of Philadelphia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, William R.

    The Dial-A-Teacher Assistance project (DATALINE) is a telephone resource center which provides assistance or information to parents and pupils about problems related to homework, as well as information about Parent Partnership activities and services available to parents and children in the School District of Philadelphia. The theory behind the…

  10. Mid-IR DIAL for high-resolution mapping of explosive precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitev, V.; Babichenko, S.; Bennes, J.; Borelli, R.; Dolfi-Bouteyre, A.; Fiorani, L.; Hespel, L.; Huet, T.; Palucci, A.; Pistilli, M.; Puiu, A.; Rebane, O.; Sobolev, I.

    2013-10-01

    A DIAL instrument on a moving platform is seen as a valuable remote sensing component in a sensor network for area monitoring, targeting sites involved in unauthorised explosive manufacturing. Such instrument will perform the area mapping of the vapour concentration of key substances, known to be used as precursors in explosive fabrication, such as acetone and nitromethane. The IR spectra of acetone and nitromethane vapours have been defined from available spectroscopy databases and from laboratory measurements as showing optimal spectral band for the DIAL operation in the spectral range of 3.0 μm - 3.5 μm. The DIAL operation has been numerically simulated, with inputs based on the HITRAN database, the U.S. Standard Atmosphere and aerosol simulation software package OPAC. A combination of OPO and OPA has been chosen as a transmitter, where the idler wavelength is used for probing, with wavelength tuning in sequence. A scanner mounted on top of the coaxially aligned laser and receiver, is capable of covering almost 360 degrees horizontally and +/-30 degrees vertically. The detection is performed by a photovoltaic photodiode with 4-stage cooling, with a signal digitalisation having 14 bit amplitude resolution and 125 Ms/s sampling rate. Here we present the development and the first test of the DIAL instrument.

  11. Airborne water vapor DIAL system and measurements of water and aerosol profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    The Lidar Applications Group at NASA Langley Research Center has developed a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system for the remote measurement of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols from an aircraft. The airborne H2O DIAL system is designed for extended flights to perform mesoscale investigations of H2O and aerosol distributions. This DIAL system utilizes a Nd:YAG-laser-pumped dye laser as the off-line transmitter and a narrowband, tunable Alexandrite laser as the on-line transmitter. The dye laser has an oscillator/amplifier configuration which incorporates a grating and prism in the oscillator cavity to narrow the output linewidth to approximately 15 pm. This linewidth can be maintained over the wavelength range of 725 to 730 nm, and it is sufficiently narrow to satisfy the off-line spectral requirements. In the Alexandrite laser, three intracavity tuning elements combine to produce an output linewidth of 1.1 pm. These spectral devices include a five-plate birefringent tuner, a 1-mm thick solid etalon and a 1-cm air-spaced etalon. A wavelength stability of +/- 0.35 pm is achieved by active feedback control of the two Fabry-Perot etalons using a frequency stabilized He-Ne laser as a wavelength reference. The three tuning elements can be synchronously scanned over a 150 pm range with microprocessor-based scanning electronics. Other aspects of the DIAL system are discussed.

  12. Prevalence of technical mesothorium in self-luminous compounds used by New Jersey radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, A.T.; Holtzmann, R.B.; Rundo, J.

    1994-05-01

    Forty-five sealed glass ampoules containing samples of radium dial paint prepared by the US Radium Corporation (USRC) and used by New Jersey dial workers in the period 1915--1928, were analyzed for radium-226 and radium-228 activity by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Radium-228 was found to be the dominant activating agent at the probable time of use in most of the sampled paints in which the ratio of radium-228 to radium-226 activity was determinable, the calculated radium-228 to radium-226 activity ratio in 1920 in these ranging from 7.2 to 10 (median 8.4), indicating that radium element chemically separated from commercialthorium ores (technical mesothorium) was used as the activator. Published isotopic activity ratios in USRC dial-paint samples that were appreciably in excess of those we found are shown invariably to be due to errors in calculation. Our results and information in the early literature suggested the hypothesis that dial paints used at USRC before July 1919 were activated with isotopically pure radium-226 whereas compounds used thereafter until the year 1925 were activated with technical mesothorium- Isotopic activity ratios predicted by the hypothesis compared well with median ratios observed in two groups of former workers. We conclude that inaccuracies in dates of hire and termination at USRC might well be the principal source of uncertainty in estimates of skeletal dose for former workers in whom the isotopic activity ratio has not been measured.

  13. Remote sensing of tropospheric gases and aerosols with airborne DIAL system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    The multipurpose airborne DIAL system developed at NASA Langley Research Center is characterized, and the published results of tropospheric O3, H2O, and aerosol-backscatter remote-sensing experiments performed in 1980 and 1981 are summarized. The system comprises two tunable dye lasers pumped by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers, dielectric-coated steering optics, a 36-cm-diameter Cassegrain receiver telescope, gateable photomultiplier tubes, and a minicomputer data-processing unit for real-time calculation of gas concentrations and backscattering profiles. The transmitted energy of the 100-microsec-separated dye-laser pulses is 40, 80, or 50 mJ/pulse at around 300, 600, or 720-nm wavelength, respectively. Good agreement was found between DIAL-remote-sensed and in-situ H2O and O3 profiles of the lower troposphere and O3 profiles of the tropopause region, and the usefulness of DIAL backscattering measurements in the study of boundary-layer and tropospheric dynamics is demonstrated. The feasibility of DIAL sensing of power-plant or urban plume SO2, of urban-area (or rural-area column-content) NO2, and of temperature and H2O (simultaneously using a third laser) has been suggested by simulation studies.

  14. Mortality from cancers of major sites in female radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbings, J.H.; Lucas, H.F.; Stehney, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    The female radium dial workers have now experienced significant mortality from cancers other than the bone sarcomas and head carcinomas long known to be radium induced. The relationships of radium exposure to mortality from cancers of the stomach, pancreas, colon, rectum, liver, lung, breast, cervix, and corpus uteri, and from leukemia were studied in 1,285 pre-1930 dial workers. Mortality was compared with that expected from rates for US white females, with and without adjustment for local area mortality rates, and with mortality in dial workers exposed from 1930 to 1949. For the 693 cases whose body content of radium has been measured since 1955, dose-response relationships of cancer to systemic intake of radium and duration of employment were examined. Liver, pancreatic, cervical, and uterine cancers were clearly unrelated to radium exposure. Other cancers of the digestive tract appeared to be indirectly, if at all, associated with work in radium facilities. Lung cancer requires further investigation; inhalation exposures of the dial workers were reviewed. Analyses of the breast cancer data uncovered several observations inconsistent with the previously suggested causal association with radium exposure. Multiple myeloma was also reviewed. A threefold excess risk of death due to multiple myeloma has occurred, but is more closely correlated with duration of employment (a surrogate for external gamma radiation) than with radium intake.

  15. Estimation of boundary layer humidity fluxes and statistics from airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, Christoph; Ehret, Gerhard; Giez, Andreas; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.

    1997-12-01

    The water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) was flown aboard the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Electra research aircraft during the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). The downward looking lidar system measured two-dimensional fields of aerosol backscatter and water vapor mixing ratio in the convective boundary layer (CBL) and across the CBL top (zt). We show a case study of DIAL observations of vertical profiles of mean water vapor, water vapor variance, skewness, and integral scale in the CBL. In the entrainment zone (EZ) and down to about 0.3 zi the DIAL observations agree with in situ observations and mixed-layer similarity theory. Below, the water vapor optical depth becomes large and the DIAL signal-to-noise ratio degrades. Knowing the water vapor surface flux and the convective velocity scale w* from in situ aircraft measurements, we derive entrainment fluxes by applying the mixed-layer gradient (MLG) and mixed-layer variance (MLV) methods to DIAL mixing ratio gradient and variance profiles. Entrainment flux estimates are sensitive to our estimate of zt. They are shown to be rather insensitive to the input surface flux and to the DIAL data spatial resolution within the investigated range. The estimates break down above about 0.9 zt as the flux-gradient and flux-variance relationships were developed to describe the large-scale mixing in the mid-CBL. The agreement with in situ entrainment flux estimations is within 30% for the MLV method. On a flight leg with significant mesoscale variability the entrainment flux turns out to be 70% higher than the in situ value. This is in good agreement with the fact that large-eddy simulations (LES) of mean water vapor profiles and variances, upon which the MLG and MLV methods are based, do not include mesoscale variability. The additional water vapor variance from mesoscales may then lead to the overestimate of the flux. Deviations from

  16. Power Doppler imaging: clinical experience and correlation with color Doppler US and other imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Hamper, U M; DeJong, M R; Caskey, C I; Sheth, S

    1997-01-01

    Power Doppler imaging has recently gained attention as an additional color flow imaging technique that overcomes some of the limitations of conventional color Doppler ultrasound (US). Limitations of conventional color Doppler US include angle dependence, aliasing, and difficulty in separating background noise from true flow in slow-flow states. Owing to its increased sensitivity to flow, power Doppler sonography is valuable in low-flow states and when optimal Doppler angles cannot be obtained. Longer segments of vessels and more individual vessels can be visualized with power Doppler US than with conventional color Doppler sonography. Power Doppler sonography increases diagnostic confidence when verifying or excluding testicular or ovarian torsion and confirming thrombosis or occlusion of vessels. Power Doppler sonography also improves evaluation of parenchymal flow and decreases examination times in technically challenging cases. Power Doppler US is a useful adjunct to mean-frequency color Doppler sonography, especially when color Doppler US cannot adequately obtain or display diagnostic information. PMID:9084086

  17. Can-Dial. An experiment in health education and cancer control.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, G S; Mirand, E A; Graham, S

    1976-01-01

    A dial-access public information system providing information about cancer to the populace has been developed by Roswell Park Memorial Institute. The system is comprised of a tape library consisting of 36 pre-recorded tapes in English on a variety of cancer-related topics and Spanish translations of 28 of the tapes. Interested persons can select and listen to topics of their choice over the telephone. Telephones are manned by operators 16 hours a day, 7 days a week. Persons who call are asked to volunteer certain descriptive information such as name, address, telephone number, sex, age, occupation, and source of information about Can-Dial. These data are used in evaluating the program. Two types of evaluation are being conducted. The first entails a constant monitoring of the system based upon information collected by operators concerning each call. The second type consists of interviews with a sample of callers and a sample of noncallers for the purpose of comparing the characteristics of both groups and ascertaining the impact of Can-Dial on the behavior of its users. Preliminary assessments indicate that Can-Dial is being used by all socioeconomic status groups, by more urban than rural residents, and by the younger rather than older age groups. In its first 23 months of operation, the system handled more than 68,700 calls, at an average cost of $1.58 per call. A tentative conclusion is that Can-Dial is fulfilling a public need and may have a favorable impact in improving health behavior. PMID:818658

  18. Theory and operation of the real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1986-01-01

    The improvement of computer hardware and software of the NASA Multipurpose Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is documented. The NASA DIAL system is undergoing development and experimental deployment at NASA Langley Research Center for the remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed capable of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. Test flights of the DIAL system were successfully performed onboard the NASA Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft from 1980 to 1985. The DIAL Data Acquisition System has undergone a number of improvements over the past few years. These improvements have now been field tested. The theory behind a real time computer system as it applies to the needs of the DIAL system is discussed. This report is designed to be used as an operational manual for the DIAL DAS.

  19. Planetary Doppler Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, N.; Jefferies, S.; Hart, M.; Hubbard, W. B.; Showman, A. P.; Hernandez, G.; Rudd, L.

    2014-12-01

    Determining the internal structure of the solar system's gas and ice giant planets is key to understanding their formation and evolution (Hubbard et al., 1999, 2002, Guillot 2005), and in turn the formation and evolution of the solar system. While internal structure can be constrained theoretically, measurements of internal density distributions are needed to uncover the details of the deep interior where significant ambiguities exist. To date the interiors of giant planets have been probed by measuring gravitational moments using spacecraft passing close to, or in orbit around the planet. Gravity measurements are effective in determining structure in the outer envelope of a planet, and also probing dynamics (e.g. the Cassini and Juno missions), but are less effective in probing deep structure or the presence of discrete boundaries. A promising technique for overcoming this limitation is planetary seismology (analogous to helioseismology in the solar case), postulated by Vorontsov, 1976. Using trapped pressure waves to probe giant planet interiors allows insight into the density and temperature distribution (via the sound speed) down to the planetary core, and is also sensitive to sharp boundaries, for example at the molecular to metallic hydrogen transition or at the core-envelope interface. Detecting such boundaries is not only important in understanding the overall structure of the planet, but also has implications for our understanding of the basic properties of matter at extreme pressures. Recent Doppler measurements of Jupiter by Gaulme et al (2011) claimed a promising detection of trapped oscillations, while Hedman and Nicholson (2013) have shown that trapped waves in Saturn cause detectable perturbations in Saturn's C ring. Both these papers have fueled interest in using seismology as a tool for studying the solar system's giant planets. To fully exploit planetary seismology as a tool for understanding giant planet structure, measurements need to be made

  20. Development of a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W.; Bares, A.; Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.

    2010-12-01

    Rising levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Earth’s atmosphere have been identified as a major contributor to climate change. Geologic carbon sequestration has the potential for mitigating CO2 emission into the atmosphere by capturing CO2 at power generation facilities and storing the CO2 in geologic formations. Several technological challenges need to be overcome for successful geologic sequestration of CO2 including surface monitoring tools and techniques for monitoring CO2 sequestration sites to ensure site integrity and public safety. Researchers at Montana State University are developing an eye-safe scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) capable of spatially mapping above-ground CO2 number densities for carbon sequestration site monitoring. The eye-safe scanning CO2 DIAL utilizes a temperature tunable fiber pigtailed distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating wavelength of 1.573 μm to access CO2 absorption features. The output of the DFB laser is split using an inline fiber splitter with part of the light sent to an optical wavemeter to monitor the operating wavelength of the laser transmitter. The remaining light is modulated using an inline acousto-optic modulator producing a pulse train with a 20 kHz pulse repetition frequency and a 2 μs duration. This pulse train is amplified in a commercial fiber amplifier producing up to 80 μJ per pulse energy. The output from the fiber amplifier is sent horizontally through the atmosphere and the scattered light is collected using a 28 cm diameter commercial Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. The light collected by the telescope is collimated and focused into a multimode optical fiber. A fiber coupled photomultiplier (PMT) tube is then used to monitor the light collected by the DIAL receiver. Data is collected in the following manner. The DFB laser is tuned to the online wavelength of the CO2 absorption feature and data is collected for a user defined time. A feedback loop utilizing the optical wavemeter is used

  1. Understanding Doppler Broadening of Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Sullivan, John P.

    2014-07-03

    Doppler-broadened gamma ray peaks are observed routinely in the collection and analysis of gamma-ray spectra. If not recognized and understood, the appearance of Doppler broadening can complicate the interpretation of a spectrum and the correct identification of the gamma ray-emitting material. We have conducted a study using a simulation code to demonstrate how Doppler broadening arises and provide a real-world example in which Doppler broadening is found. This report describes that study and its results.

  2. Hybrid column generation and large neighborhood search for the dial-a-ride problem.

    PubMed

    Parragh, Sophie N; Schmid, Verena

    2013-01-01

    Demographic change towards an ever aging population entails an increasing demand for specialized transportation systems to complement the traditional public means of transportation. Typically, users place transportation requests, specifying a pickup and a drop off location and a fleet of minibuses or taxis is used to serve these requests. The underlying optimization problem can be modeled as a dial-a-ride problem. In the dial-a-ride problem considered in this paper, total routing costs are minimized while respecting time window, maximum user ride time, maximum route duration, and vehicle capacity restrictions. We propose a hybrid column generation and large neighborhood search algorithm and compare different hybridization strategies on a set of benchmark instances from the literature. PMID:23471127

  3. Field Testing of a Two-Micron DIAL System for Profiling Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady J.; Diaz, Liza; Davis, Ken; Rubio, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    A 2-m DIAL system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center through the NASA Instrument Incubator Program. The system utilizes a tunable 2-m pulsed laser and an IR phototransistor for the transmitter and the receiver, respectively. The system targets the CO2 absorption line R22 in the 2.05-m band. Field experiments were conducted at West Branch, Iowa, for evaluating the system for CO2 measurement by comparison with in-situ sensors. The CO2 in-situ sensors were located on the NOAA's WBI tower at 31, 99 and 379 m altitudes, besides the NOAA s aircraft was sampling at higher altitudes. Preliminary results demonstrated the capabilities of the DIAL system in profiling atmospheric CO2 using the 2-m wavelength. Results of these experiments will be presented and discussed.

  4. The Doppler Effect--A New Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the Doppler effect as it applies to different situations, such as a stationary source of sound with the observer moving, a stationary observer, and the sound source and observer both moving. Police radar, satellite surveillance radar, radar astronomy, and the Doppler navigator, are discussed as applications of Doppler shift. (JR)

  5. JAWS multiple Doppler derived winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Kimberly L.

    1987-01-01

    An elementary working knowledge is given of the advantages and limitations of the multiple Doppler radar analyses that have recently become available from the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) project. What Doppler radar is and what it does is addressed and the way Doppler radars were used in the JAWS project to gather wind shear data is described. The working definition of wind shear used is winds that affect aircraft flight over a span of 15 to 45 seconds and turbulence is defined as air motion that cause abrupt aircraft motions. The JAWS data current available contain no turbulence data. The concept of multiple Doppler analysis and the geometry of how it works are described, followed by an explanation of how data gathered in radar space are interpolated to a common Cartesian coordinate system and the limitations involved. A discussion is also presented of the analysis grid and how it was constructed. What the user actually gets is discussed, followed by a discussion of the expected errors in the three orthogonal wind components. Finally, a discussion is presented of why JAWS data are significant.

  6. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  7. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  8. Compartment A123, ship's laundry view aft to forward. Large dial ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Compartment A-123, ship's laundry view aft to forward. Large dial at left center appears to be a timer for controlling washing machine at lower right. Low, round machine to the left of the washer is a centrifuge used for spin drying laundry. Laundry was not part of original equipment but was added in the refurbishment of 1899. (024) - USS Olympia, Penn's Landing, 211 South Columbus Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. Design and development of a compact lidar/DIAL system for aerial surveillance of urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Malizia, A.; Richetta, M.; Antonucci, A.; Ventura, P.; Murari, A.; Vega, J.

    2013-10-01

    Recently surveying large areas in an automatic way, for early detection of harmful chemical agents, has become a strategic objective of defence and public health organisations. The Lidar-Dial techniques are widely recognized as a cost-effective alternative to monitor large portions of the atmosphere but, up to now, they have been mainly deployed as ground based stations. The design reported in this paper concerns the development of a Lidar-Dial system compact enough to be carried by a small airplane and capable of detecting sudden releases in air of harmful and/or polluting substances. The proposed approach consists of continuous monitoring of the area under surveillance with a Lidar type measurement. Once a significant increase in the density of backscattering substances is revealed, it is intended to switch to the Dial technique to identify the released chemicals and to determine its concentration. In this paper, the design of the proposed system is described and the simulations carried out to determine its performances are reported. For the Lidar measurements, commercially available Nd- YAG laser sources have already been tested and their performances, in combination with avalanche photodiodes, have been experimentally verified to meet the required specifications. With regard to the DIAL measurements, new compact CO2 laser sources are being investigated. The most promising candidate presents an energy per pulse of about 50 mJ typical, sufficient for a range of at least 500m. The laser also provides the so called "agile tuning" option that allows to quickly tune the wavelength. To guarantee continuous, automatic surveying of large areas, innovative solutions are required for the data acquisition, self monitoring of the system and data analysis. The results of the design, the simulations and some preliminary tests illustrate the potential of the chosen, integrated approach.

  10. Diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S.; Weckwerth, T.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carbone, R.

    2012-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating the performance of an eye-safe, low-cost, diode-laser-based, water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler. This class of instrument may be capable of providing continuous water vapor and aerosol backscatter profiles at high vertical resolution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for periods of months to years. The technology potentially fills a national long term observing facility gap and could greatly benefit micro- and meso-meteorology, water cycle, carbon cycle and, more generally, biosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere interaction research at both weather and climate variability time scales. For the evaluation, the Montana State University 3rd generation water vapor DIAL was modified to enable unattended operation for a period of several weeks. The performance of this V3.5 version DIAL was tested at MSU and NCAR in June and July of 2012. Further tests are currently in progress with Howard University at Beltsville, Maryland; and with the National Weather Service and Oklahoma University at Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The presentation will include a comparison of DIAL profiles against meteorological "truth" at the aforementioned locations including: radiosondes, Raman lidars, microwave and IR radiometers, AERONET and SUOMINET systems. Instrument reliability, uncertainty, systematic biases, detection height statistics, and environmental complications will be evaluated. Performance will be judged in the context of diverse scientific applications that range from operational weather prediction and seasonal climate variability, to more demanding climate system process studies at the land-canopy-ABL interface. Estimating the extent to which such research and operational applications can be satisfied with a low cost autonomous network of similar instruments is our principal objective.

  11. Two Wavelength Ti:sapphire Laser for Ozone DIAL Measurements from Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Situ, Wen; DeYoung, Russel J.

    1998-01-01

    Laser remote sensing of ozone from aircraft has proven to be a valuable technique for understanding the distribution and dynamics of ozone in the atmosphere. Presently the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique, using dual ND:YAG lasers that are doubled to pump dye lasers which in turn are doubled into the UV for the "on" and "off' line lasers, is used on either the NASA DC-8 or P-3 aircraft. Typically, the laser output for each line is 40-mJ and this is split into two beams, one looking up and the other downward, each beam having about 20-mJ. The residual ND:YAG (1.06 micron) and dye laser energies are also transmitted to obtain information on the atmospheric aerosols. While this system has operated well, there are several system characteristics that make the system less than ideal for aircraft operations. The system, which uses separate "on" and "off" line lasers, is quite large and massive requiring valuable aircraft volume and weight. The dye slowly degrades with time requiring replacement. The laser complexity requires a number of technical people to maintain the system performance. There is also the future interest in deploying an ozone DIAL system in an Unpiloted Atmospheric Vehicle (UAV) which would require a total payload mass of less than 150 kg and power requirement of less than 1500 W. A laser technology has emerged that could potentially provide significant enhancements over the present ozone DIAL system. The flashlamp pumped Ti:sapphire laser system is an emerging technology that could reduce the mass and volume over the present system and also provide a system with fewer conversion steps, reducing system complexity. This paper will discuss preliminary results from a flashlamp-pumped Ti:sapphire laser constructed as a radiation source for a UV DIAL system to measure ozone.

  12. Flight test results for the Digital Integrated Automatic Landing Systems (DIALS): A modern control full-state feedback design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System (DIALS) is discussed. The DIALS is a modern control theory design performing all the maneuver modes associated with current autoland systems: localizer capture and track, glideslope capture and track, decrab, and flare. The DIALS is an integrated full-state feedback system which was designed using direct-digital methods. The DIALS uses standard aircraft sensors and the digital Microwave Landing System (MLS) signals as measurements. It consists of separately designed longitudinal and lateral channels although some cross-coupling variables are fed between channels for improved state estimates and trajectory commands. The DIALS was implemented within the 16-bit fixed-point flight computers of the ATOPS research aircraft, a small twin jet commercial transport outfitted with a second research cockpit and a fly-by-wire system. The DIALS became the first modern control theory design to be successfully flight tested on a commercial-type aircraft. Flight tests were conducted in late 1981 using a wide coverage MLS on Runway 22 at Wallops Flight Center. All the modes were exercised including the capture and track of steep glidescopes up to 5 degrees.

  13. Results obtained with the Tropospheric Ozone DIAL System Using a YAG Laser and Raman Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    This poster will detail the findings of the ground based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system built and operated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (Beltsville, MD 38.99° N, 76.84° W) in 2012. Current atmospheric satellites cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, NASA has funded the ground based Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNET) which currently consists of five stations across the US. The Goddard instrument is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, and has initially transmitted two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm, and the DIAL technique exploits this difference between the two returned signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman Cells, filled with high pressure Hydrogen and Deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering within the focus shifts the pump wavelength, and the first Stokes shift in each cell produces the required wavelengths. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the vertical number density can then be derived. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make long term ozone profile measurements in the Washington, DC - Baltimore area.

  14. Ultra Narrowband Optical Filters for Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenholm, Ingrid; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2001-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are being deployed to make vertical profile measurements of atmospheric water vapor from ground and airborne platforms. One goal of this work is to improve the technology of such DIAL systems that they could be deployed on space-based platforms. Since background radiation reduces system performance, it is important to reduce it. One way to reduce it is to narrow the bandwidth of the optical receiver system. However, since the DIAL technique uses two or more wavelengths, in this case separated by 0.1 nm, a fixed-wavelength narrowband filter that would encompass both wavelengths would be broader than required for each line, approximately 0.02 nm. The approach employed in this project is to use a pair of tunable narrowband reflective fiber Bragg gratings. The Bragg gratings are germanium-doped silica core fiber that is exposed to ultraviolet radiation to produce index-of-refraction changes along the length of the fiber. The gratings can be tuned by stretching. The backscattered laser radiation is transmitted through an optical circulator to the gratings, reflected back to the optical circulator by one of the gratings, and then sent to a photodiode. The filter reflectivities were >90 percent, and the overall system efficiency was 30 percent.

  15. Diode-Laser-Based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Long Term Autonomous Field Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, D.; Repasky, K. S.; Spuler, S.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly changing spatial and temporal distribution of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer influences dynamical and physical processes that drive weather phenomena, general circulation patterns, radiative transfer, and the global water cycle. The ability to measure the water vapor distribution continuously within the lower troposphere has been identified as a high priority measurement capability needed by both the weather forecasting and climate science communities. This presentation provides an update on an economical and compact diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) which has demonstrated the capability of meeting these high priority measurement needs. The DIAL instrument utilizes two continuous wave distributed feedback diode lasers to injection seed a current modulated tapered semiconductor optical amplifier. An improved switching time between the on-line and off-line wavelength, on the order of 16.7 ms, allows the instrument to retrieve water vapor profiles in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions. A shared telescope design based on a 40.64 cm diameter Dobsonian telescope allows the outgoing beam to be eye-safe at the exit of the telescope. The DIAL receiver utilizes the Dobsonian telescope to collect the scattered light and direct it through an optical narrow bandpass filter (NBF) and a Fabry-Perot etalon with a free spectral range of 0.1 nm which is equal to the wavelength difference between the on-line and off-line DIAL wavelengths. A beam splitter directs 90% of the scattered light through a second NBF, and couples it onto a fiber coupled avalanche photodiode (APD), providing a far field measurement. The remaining 10% of the light passing through the beam splitter is incident on a free space coupled APD, providing a wider field of view for water vapor measurements at lower altitudes. The two channel receiver allows water vapor measurement between 500 m and 4 km/6km during daytime/nighttime operation, respectively. The DIAL

  16. A Fast, Locally Adaptive, Interactive Retrieval Algorithm for the Analysis of DIAL Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarov, D. V.; Rogers, R.; Hair, J. W.; Douglass, K. O.; Plusquellic, D.

    2010-12-01

    Differential absorption light detection and ranging (DIAL) is a laser-based tool which is used for remote, range-resolved measurement of particular gases in the atmosphere, such as carbon-dioxide and methane. In many instances it is of interest to study how these gases are distributed over a region such as a landfill, factory, or farm. While a single DIAL measurement only tells us about the distribution of a gas along a single path, a sequence of consecutive measurements provides us with information on how that gas is distributed over a region, making DIAL a natural choice for such studies. DIAL measurements present a number of interesting challenges; first, in order to convert the raw data to concentration it is necessary to estimate the derivative along the path of the measurement. Second, as the distribution of gases across a region can be highly heterogeneous it is important that the spatial nature of the measurements be taken into account. Finally, since it is common for the set of collected measurements to be quite large it is important for the method to be computationally efficient. Existing work based on Local Polynomial Regression (LPR) has been developed which addresses the first two issues, but the issue of computational speed remains an open problem. In addition to the latter, another desirable property is to allow user input into the algorithm. In this talk we present a novel method based on LPR which utilizes a variant of the RODEO algorithm to provide a fast, locally adaptive and interactive approach to the analysis of DIAL measurements. This methodology is motivated by and applied to several simulated examples and a study out of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) looking at the estimation of aerosol extinction in the atmosphere. A comparison study of our method against several other algorithms is also presented. References Chaudhuri, P., Marron, J.S., Scale-space view of curve estimation, Annals of Statistics 28 (2000) 408-428. Duong, T., Cowling

  17. Azimuthal Doppler Effect in Optical Vortex Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Toda, Yasunori; Morisaki, Tomohiro; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortices (OV) are a set of solutions of the paraxial Helmholtz equation in the cylindrical coordinates, and its wave front has a spiral shape. Since the Doppler shift is caused by the phase change by the movement in a wave field, the observer in the OV, which has the three-dimensional structured wave front, feels a three-dimensional Doppler effect. Since the multi-dimensional Doppler components are mixed into a single Doppler spectrum, development of a decomposition method is required. We performed a modified saturated absorption spectroscopy to separate the components. The OV and plane wave are used as a probe beam and pump beam, respectively. Although the plane-wave pump laser cancels the z-direction Doppler shift, the azimuthal Doppler shift remains in the saturated dip. The spatial variation of the dip width gives the information of the azimuthal Doppler shift. The some results of optical vortex spectroscopy will be presented.

  18. Theory and operation of the real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Carolyn; Spencer, Randall

    1988-01-01

    The improvement of computer hardware and software of the NASA Multipurpose Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is documented. The NASA DIAL system has undergone development and experimental deployment at NASA/Langley Res. Center for the remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed capable of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. The DIAL Data Acquisition System (DAS) has undergone a number of improvements also. Due to the participation of the DIAL in the Global Tropospheric Experiment, modifications and improvements of the system were tested and used both in the lab and in air. Therefore, this is an operational manual for the DIAL DAS.

  19. Doppler ultrasound evaluation in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide preeclampsia (PE) is the leading cause of maternal death and affects 5 to 8% of pregnant women. PE is characterized by elevated blood pressure and proteinuria. Doppler Ultrasound (US) evaluation has been considered a useful method for prediction of PE; however, there is no complete data about the most frequently altered US parameters in the pathology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the uterine, umbilical, and the middle cerebral arteries using Doppler US parameters [resistance index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), notch (N), systolic peak (SP) and their combinations] in pregnant women, in order to make a global evaluation of hemodynamic repercussion caused by the established PE. Results A total of 102 pregnant Mexican women (65 PE women and 37 normotensive women) were recruited in a cases and controls study. Blood velocity waveforms from uterine, umbilical, and middle cerebral arteries, in pregnancies from 24 to 37 weeks of gestation were recorded by trans-abdominal examination with a Toshiba Ultrasound Power Vision 6000 SSA-370A, with a 3.5 MHz convex transducer. Abnormal general Doppler US profile showed a positive association with PE [odds ratio (OR) = 2.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2 - 7.3, P = 0.021)], and a specificity and predictive positive value of 89.2% and 88.6%, respectively. Other parameters like N presence, RI and PI of umbilical artery, as well as the PI of middle cerebral artery, showed differences between groups (P values < 0.05). Conclusion General Doppler US result, as well as N from uterine vessel, RI from umbilical artery, and PI from umbilical and middle cerebral arteries in their individual form, may be considered as tools to determine hemodynamic repercussion caused by PE. PMID:24252303

  20. DialBetics: A Novel Smartphone-based Self-management Support System for Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Waki, Kayo; Fujita, Hideo; Uchimura, Yuji; Omae, Koji; Aramaki, Eiji; Kato, Shigeko; Lee, Hanae; Kobayashi, Haruka; Kadowaki, Takashi; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-13

    Numerous diabetes-management systems and programs for improving glycemic control to meet guideline targets have been proposed, using IT technology. But all of them allow only limited-or no-real-time interaction between patients and the system in terms of system response to patient input; few studies have effectively assessed the systems' usability and feasibility to determine how well patients understand and can adopt the technology involved. DialBetics is composed of 4 modules: (1) data transmission module, (2) evaluation module, (3) communication module, and (4) dietary evaluation module. A 3-month randomized study was designed to assess the safety and usability of a remote health-data monitoring system, and especially its impact on modifying patient lifestyles to improve diabetes self-management and, thus, clinical outcomes. Fifty-four type 2 diabetes patients were randomly divided into 2 groups, 27 in the DialBetics group and 27 in the non-DialBetics control group. HbA1c and fasting blood sugar (FBS) values declined significantly in the DialBetics group: HbA1c decreased an average of 0.4% (from 7.1 ± 1.0% to 6.7 ± 0.7%) compared with an average increase of 0.1% in the non-DialBetics group (from 7.0 ± 0.9% to 7.1 ± 1.1%) (P = .015); The DialBetics group FBS decreased an average of 5.5 mg/dl compared with a non-DialBetics group average increase of 16.9 mg/dl (P = .019). BMI improvement-although not statistically significant because of the small sample size-was greater in the DialBetics group. DialBetics was shown to be a feasible and an effective tool for improving HbA1c by providing patients with real-time support based on their measurements and inputs. PMID:24876569

  1. Measurement of the Doppler power of flowing blood using ultrasound Doppler devices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Pay-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of the Doppler power of signals backscattered from flowing blood (henceforth referred to as the Doppler power of flowing blood) and the echogenicity of flowing blood have been used widely to assess the degree of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation for more than 20 y. Many studies have used Doppler flowmeters based on an analogue circuit design to obtain the Doppler shifts in the signals backscattered from flowing blood; however, some recent studies have mentioned that the analogue Doppler flowmeter exhibits a frequency-response problem whereby the backscattered energy is lost at higher Doppler shift frequencies. Therefore, the measured Doppler power of flowing blood and evaluations of RBC aggregation obtained using an analogue Doppler device may be inaccurate. To overcome this problem, the present study implemented a field-programmable gate array-based digital pulsed-wave Doppler flowmeter to measure the Doppler power of flowing blood, in the aim of providing more accurate assessments of RBC aggregation. A clinical duplex ultrasound imaging system that can acquire pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms is now available, but its usefulness for estimating the ultrasound scattering properties of blood is still in doubt. Therefore, the echogenicity and Doppler power of flowing blood under the same flow conditions were measured using a laboratory pulser-receiver system and a clinical ultrasound system, respectively, for comparisons. The experiments were carried out using porcine blood under steady laminar flow with both RBC suspensions and whole blood. The experimental results indicated that a clinical ultrasound system used to measure the Doppler spectrograms is not suitable for quantifying Doppler power. However, the Doppler power measured using a digital Doppler flowmeter can reveal the relationship between backscattering signals and the properties of blood cells because the effects of frequency response are eliminated. The measurements of the Doppler power and

  2. Generic Doppler processor speeds radar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engler, Harold F., Jr.; West, Philip D.; Austin, Mark D.; Gardos, Thomas R.

    1991-03-01

    The design and operation of a generic Doppler processor (GDP) are described in detail and illustrated with diagrams. The GDP was developed to facilitate the selection of a Doppler processing method for a radar system; it operates on an industrial desktop computer and makes it possible to switch rapidly among different Doppler processing bandwidths and center frequencies, filtering methods (FFT, analog, etc.), windowing methods, numbers of bits for quantization, and output display formats. The principal components are a programmable baseband clutter filter module, a Doppler processor chassis, a synthetic range-Doppler display, and a spectrum-analyzer-type real-Doppler display. The GDP provides + or - 5O kHz coverage with filter bandwidth 200 Hz, a maximum of 512 channels, 10 range gates, and an instantaneous dynamic range of 60 dB. Also discussed is the efficient finite-impulse-response filter design used to simulate analog filter banks.

  3. Narrow linewidth UV laser transmitter for ozone DIAL remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti; Hansell, Joe; Shuman, Tim; Schum, Tom; Puffenberger, Kent; Burnham, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    Fibertek has demonstrated a dual-wavelength narrow linewidth UV laser transmitter for NASA airborne ozone DIAL remote sensing application. The application requires two narrow linewidth lasers in the UV region between 300 nm and 320 nm with at least 12 nm separation between the two wavelengths. Each UV laser was based on a novel ring structure incorporating an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and a sum frequency generator (SFG). The fundamental pump source of the UV laser was a single frequency 532 nm laser, which was frequency-doubled from a diode-pumped, injection-seeded single frequency Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm and 50 Hz repetition rate. The ring frequency converters generated UV wavelengths at 304 nm and 316 nm respectively. The demonstrated output energies were 2.6 mJ for 304 nm and 2.3 mJ for 316 nm UV lines, with room to potentially achieve more energy for each laser. Linewidth narrowing was achieved using a volume Bragg grating as the output coupler of the OPO in each ring oscillator. We obtained spectral linewidths (FWHM) of 0.12 nm for the 304 nm line and 0.1 nm for the 316 nm line, and the UV energy conversion efficiencies of 12.2% and 9.1%. Fibertek built an airborne DIAL transmitter based on the reported demonstration, which was a single optical module with dual-wavelength output at the demonstrated wavelengths. NASA plans to field the UV laser transmitter as a key component of the High Spectral Resolution Lidar-II (HSRL-II) high altitude airborne instrument to perform autonomous global ozone DIAL remote sensing field campaigns.

  4. A New Technique for the Retrieval of Near Surface Water Vapor Using DIAL Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Kooi, Susan; Ferrare, Richard; Winker, David; Hair, Johnathan; Nehrir, Amin; Notari, Anthony; Hostetler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the most important atmospheric trace gas species and influences radiation, climate, cloud formation, surface evaporation, precipitation, storm development, transport, dynamics, and chemistry. For improvements in NWP (numerical weather prediction) and climate studies, global water vapor measurements with higher accuracy and vertical resolution are needed than are currently available. Current satellite sensors are challenged to characterize the content and distribution of water vapor in the Boundary Layer (BL) and particularly near the first few hundred meters above the surface within the BL. These measurements are critically needed to infer surface evaporation rates in cloud formation and climate studies. The NASA Langley Research Center Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system, which uses the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, has demonstrated the capability to provide high quality water vapor measurements in the BL and across the troposphere. A new retrieval technique is investigated to extend these DIAL water vapor measurements to the surface. This method uses signals from both atmospheric backscattering and the strong surface returns (even over low reflectivity oceanic surfaces) using multiple gain channels to cover the large signal dynamic range. Measurements can be made between broken clouds and in presence of optically thin cirrus. Examples of LASE measurements from a variety of conditions encountered during NASA hurricane field experiments over the Atlantic Ocean are presented. Comparisons of retrieved water vapor profiles from LASE near the surface with dropsonde measurements show very good agreement. This presentation also includes a discussion of the feasibility of developing space-based DIAL capability for high resolution water vapor measurements in the BL and above and an assessment of the technology needed for developing this capability.

  5. Preliminary results of a lidar-dial integrated system for the automatic detection of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Richetta, M.

    2012-11-01

    In the last decades, atmospheric pollution in urban and industrial areas has become a major concern of both developed and developing countries. In this context, surveying relative large areas in an automatic way is an increasing common objective of public health organisations. The Lidar-Dial techniques are widely recognized as a cost-effective approach to monitor large portions of the atmosphere and, for example, they have been successful applied to the early detection of forest fire. The studies and preliminary results reported in this paper concern the development of an integrated Lidar-Dial system able to detect sudden releases in air of harmful and polluting substances. The propose approach consists of continuous monitoring of the area under surveillance with a Lidar type measurement (by means of a low cost system). Once a significant increase in the density of a pollutant is revealed, the Dial technique is used to identify the released chemicals. In this paper, the specifications of the proposed station are discussed. The most stringent requirement is the need for a very compact system with a range of at least 600-700 m. Of course, the optical wavelengths must be in an absolute eye-safe range for humans. A conceptual design of the entire system is described and the most important characteristic of the main elements are provided. In particular the capability of the envisaged laser sources, Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers, to provide the necessary quality of the measurements is carefully assessed. Since the detection of dangerous substances must be performed in an automatic way, the monitoring station will be equipped with an adequate set of control and communication devices for independent autonomous operation. The results of the first preliminary tests illustrate the potential of the chosen approach.

  6. Central nervous system tumors and related intracranial pathologies in radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbings, J.H.; Semkiw, W.

    1988-01-01

    Among the female radiation workers in the radium dial industry there is no overall excess of brain or central nervous system tumors. A significant excess did appear, however, in one of three major cohorts; the excess was not due to an excess of gliomas and cannot be ascribed with certainty to radium or external radiation. A significant proportional excess of tumors outside the brain was observed, and is consistent with irradiation of nervous system tissue from adjacent bone. Early deaths from brain abscess or mastoiditis, which are coded as diseases of the nervous system and sense organs, were observed. 12 refs., 11 tabs.

  7. Aperture averaging of optical scintillations in CO{sub 2} DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; Schmitt, M.J.; Whitehead, M.C.; Walters, D.L.

    1997-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence causes several effects on a propagating laser beam. The authors have previously studied the effects of beam spreading and beam wander, and feel they have a good understanding of their impact on CO{sub 2} DIAL. Another effect is scintillation where atmospheric turbulence causes irradiance fluctuations within the envelope of the beam profile. They believe that scintillation at the target plays an important role in LIDAR return statistics. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics computer simulation for propagating beams through atmospheric optical turbulence has been previously developed. They modify this simulation to include the effects of reflective speckle and examine its application in comparison with experimental data.

  8. MS-DIAL: Data Independent MS/MS Deconvolution for Comprehensive Metabolome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Cajka, Tomas; Kind, Tobias; Ma, Yan; Higgins, Brendan; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Kanazawa, Mitsuhiro; VanderGheynst, Jean; Fiehn, Oliver; Arita, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition (DIA) in liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) provides more comprehensive untargeted acquisition of molecular data. Here we provide an open-source software pipeline, MS-DIAL, to demonstrate how DIA improves simultaneous identification and quantification of small molecules by mass spectral deconvolution. For reversed phase LC-MS/MS, our program with an enriched LipidBlast library identified total 1,023 lipid compounds from nine algal strains to highlight their chemotaxonomic relationships. PMID:25938372

  9. DIAL measurements of the vertical ozone distribution at the Siberian lidar station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Burlakov, V. D.; Dolgii, S. I.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Nevzorov, A. A.; Nevzorov, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents the results of DIAL measurements of the vertical ozone distribution at the Siberian lidar station. Sensing is performed according to the method of differential absorption and scattering at wavelength pair of 299/341 nm, which are, respectively, the first and second Stokes components of SRS conversion of 4th harmonic of Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) in hydrogen. Lidar with receiving mirror 0.5 m in diameter is used to implement sensing of vertical ozone distribution in altitude range of 6-16 km. The temperature correction of zone absorption coefficients is introduced in the software to reduce the retrieval errors.

  10. Optimization of a Raman shifted dye laser system for DIAL applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Chu, Zhiping; Mahon, Rita; Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient Raman shifted dye laser system that generates tunable radiation at 765 and 940 nm with a bandwidth of 0.03/cm is described. Operating a Raman cell at hydrogen pressure below 14 atm, optimum first Stokes energy conversions of 45 percent and of 37 percent at 765 and 940 nm, respectively, were recorded. Optical depth measurements made at the centers of twenty-five absorption lines in the P branch of the oxygen A band imply a high spectral purity for both the laser and the Raman shifted radiation, and thus indicate the feasibility of using the stimulated Raman scattered radiation for differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements.

  11. DIAL monitoring of atmospheric climate-determining gases employing high-power pulsed laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penchev, Stoyan P.; Naboko, Sergei V.; Naboko, Vassily N.; Pencheva, Vasilka H.; Donchev, T.; Pavlov, Lyubomir Y.; Simeonov, P.

    2003-11-01

    High-power pulsed laser diodes are employed for determining atmospheric humidity and methane. The proposed DIAL method optimizes the spectral properties of laser radiation within the molecular absorption bands of 0.86 - 0.9 μm of these major greenhouse gases. The explicit absorption spectrum is explored by computational convolution method based on reference data on spectral linestrengths modulated by the characteristic broad laser line of the selected laser diodes. The lidar scheme is ultimately compact, of low-energy consumption and suggests a large potential for ecological monitoring.

  12. Mapping of airborne Doppler radar data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.; Dodge, P.; Marks, F.D. Jr.; Hildebrand, P.H. NOAA, Miami, FL )

    1994-04-01

    Two sets of equations are derived to (1) map airborne Doppler radar data from an aircraft-relative coordinate system to an earth-relative coordinate system, and (2) remove the platform motion from the observed Doppler velocities. These equations can be applied to data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D system, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Electra Doppler Radar (ELDORA) system, and other airborne radar systems.

  13. Performance Of A Doppler-Corrected MDPSK Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.; Jedrey, Thomas C.; Hinedi, Sami; Agan, Martin J.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents theoretical analysis of effect of rate of change of Doppler shift of received multiple-differential-phase-shift-keyed (MDPSK) radio signal on performance of Doppler-corrected differential detector. In particular detector, phase of received signal corrected for Doppler shift by use of Doppler estimator designed to operate in presence of negligibly small Doppler rate.

  14. Doppler effects on periodicities in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere of Saturn exhibits a wide variety of periodic phenomena in magnetic fields, charged particles, and radio emissions. The periodicities are observed from a moving spacecraft, so an issue arises about the periodicities being influenced by the Doppler effects. Doppler effects can be investigated using models of the periodicities and then flying the spacecraft through the model, effectively measuring any Doppler phenomena with the simulation. Using 200 days of typical elliptical orbits from the Cassini mission at Saturn, three models were tested: an azimuthal wave (or "searchlight") model, a radial wave (or "pond ripple") model, and a model of an outwardly traveling spiral wave. The azimuthal wave model produced virtually no Doppler effects in the periodicities because its wave vector is nearly perpendicular to the spacecraft trajectory. The radial wave model generated strong Doppler effects of an upshifted and a downshifted signal (a dual period) on either side of the true period, because the wave vector is either parallel or antiparallel to the spacecraft trajectory. Being intermediate to the searchlight and radial waves, the spiral wave produced Doppler effects but only for low wave speeds (<10 RS/h). For higher wave speeds the Doppler effects were not as clear. The Doppler effects can be mitigated by employing only observations beyond ~15 RS where the spacecraft speed is low compared to the wave speed. The observed periodicities over the same 200 day interval do not show evidence of Doppler effects but generally display a single feature at the expected ~10.7 h period.

  15. Comparison of eye-safe solid state laser DIAL with passive gas filter correlation measurements from aircraft and spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Robert V.; Staton, Leo D.; Wallio, H. Andrew; Wang, Liang-Guo

    1992-07-01

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) using solid state Ti:sapphire lasers finds current application in the NASA/LASE Project for H2O vapor measurements in the approximately = 0.820 micron region for the lower and mid-troposphere and in potential future applications in planned measurements of the approximately = 0.940 micron region where both strong and weak absorption lines enables measurements throughout the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The challenge exists to perform measurements in the eye-safe greater than 1.5 micron region. A comparison between DIAL and passive Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR) measurements is made. The essence of the differences in signal to noise ratio for DIAL and passive GFCR measurements is examined. The state of the art of lasers and optical parametric oscillators (OPO's) is discussed.

  16. Measurement of Lower-Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Distribution Using a Compact 1.6 μm DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of present carbon sources and sinks including their spatial distribution and their variation in time is one of the essential information for predicting future CO2 atmospheric concentration levels. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is expected to measure atmospheric CO2 profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer and lower troposphere from a ground platform. We have succeeded to develop a compact 1.6 μm DIAL system for measuring CO2 concentration profiles in the lower atmosphere. This 1.6 μm DIAL system consists of the optical parametric generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube operating at the analog mode and a 25 cm telescope. CO2 concentration profiles were obtained up to 2.5 km altitude.

  17. Comparison of eye-safe solid state laser DIAL with passive gas filter correlation measurements from aircraft and spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Robert V.; Staton, Leo D.; Wallio, H. Andrew; Wang, Liang-Guo

    1992-01-01

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) using solid state Ti:sapphire lasers finds current application in the NASA/LASE Project for H2O vapor measurements in the approximately = 0.820 micron region for the lower and mid-troposphere and in potential future applications in planned measurements of the approximately = 0.940 micron region where both strong and weak absorption lines enables measurements throughout the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The challenge exists to perform measurements in the eye-safe greater than 1.5 micron region. A comparison between DIAL and passive Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR) measurements is made. The essence of the differences in signal to noise ratio for DIAL and passive GFCR measurements is examined. The state of the art of lasers and optical parametric oscillators (OPO's) is discussed.

  18. Test Review: C. Mardell & D. S. Goldenberg. "Speed Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning-Fourth Edition" ("Speed DIAL-4")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doskey, Elena M.; Lagunas, Brenda; SooHoo, Michelle; Lomax, Amanda; Bullick, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Speed DIAL-4 was developed from the Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning, Fourth Edition (DIAL-4), a screening designed to identify children between the ages of 2 years, 6 months through 5 years, 11 months "who are in need of intervention or diagnostic assessment in the following areas: motor, concepts, language,…

  19. The use of rotational optical encoders for dial sensing in the Virtual translumenal Endoscopic Surgical Trainer (VTEST.

    PubMed

    Dargar, Saurabh; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; De, Suvranu

    2013-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a minimally invasive procedure, known for its scar-less nature and short post operative recovery periods. A critical skill necessary for a NOTES procedure is the surgeon's ability to navigate and gain visualization of the target organ, which is done by moving the endoscope tip using the dials on the handle. We have developed an accurate and high resolution optical encoder based system to measure that dial manipulations, as part of a larger project to develop a VR-NOTES surgical simulator. PMID:23400138

  20. InGaAsSb Detectors' Characterization for 2-Micron CO2 Lidar/DIAL Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2003-01-01

    Recent interest in monitoring atmospheric CO2 focuses attention on infrared remote sensing using the 2-micron lidar/differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. Quantum detectors are critical components in this technique, and many research efforts concentrate on developing such devices for the 2-micron wavelength. Characterization results of InGaAsSb quantum detectors for the 2-micron wavelength range are presented, including experimental setup and procedure. Detectors are prototype devices manufactured by using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) structures. Characterization experiments include V-I measurements, spectral response and its variation with bias voltage and temperature, noise measurements, noise-equivalent-power (NEP) and detectivity calculations, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation. A slight increase in the output signal occurred with increased bias voltage and was associated with a noise level increase. Cooling down the detectors reduces noise and shifts the cutoff wavelength to shorter values. Further improvement in the design and manufacturing process, by increasing the device gain and lowering its noise level, is necessary to meet the required CO2 lidar/DIAL specifications.

  1. New concept design of differential absorption lidar: fusion of DIAL and TDLS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkine, Alexandre; Lau, Brian; Lim, Alan; Jaeger, Wolfgang; Tulip, John

    2007-10-01

    We propose a new approach to range-resolved remote gas sensing in the atmosphere based on a combination of a DIAL and tunable-laser diode spectroscopy (TDLS) methods. To add range-resolving capabilities to a TDLS sensor we propose to arrange a group of retroreflectors (RRs) dividing an absorption path into adjacent measurement sections similar to those utilized by conventional DIAL systems. We implemented two techniques for the interrogation of the RRs: 1) scanning a beam of a continuous-wave laser over RRs sequentially; 2) using a time delay between returns from different RRs illuminated with a pulsed laser. We employed scanning technique with a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) operating near 1389 nm. A single-pulse interrogation method was demonstrated with a 10.9-μm quantum cascade laser (QCL) suitable for detection of ammonia, ethylene and water vapor in the atmosphere. Gas sensing and ranging was performed over distances varying from ~ 1 m up to ~ 1 km. Using VCSEL we attained a 0.5-s time resolution in gas concentration profiling with a 10-cm spatial resolution. Minimum interrogation time of a group of RRs was ~ 9 ms. A new generation of differential absorption LIDARs can be developed for range-resolved gas sensing in the atmosphere over distances up to ~ 1 km. The instruments can be used for a variety of applications ranging from fencing industrial areas to monitor fluxes of atmospheric pollutants to continuous air quality control in populated areas

  2. Bioassay procedures and health physics recommendations for a promethium-147 luminescent dial painting industry

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the hazard to workers who were applying a radioactive luminescent paint to devices such as clock dials and hands, signs, etc. The paint used was a mixture of macrospheres containing /sup 147/Pm, ZnS, and a binder. It was applied by workers either manually or by machine. This study was designed to determine the radiological safety of these operations. The potential routes of intake of /sup 147/Pm by workers were identified as inhalation and ingestion. Air samples were taken at work stations; total and respirable-sized /sup 147/Pm particles were measured. Both were shown to be at a safe level. An animal inhalation study was conducted to determine deposition of respirable-sized /sup 147/Pm particles. Testing by a bioassay procedure developed specifically for this purpose revealed low levels of deposited activity in the respiratory systems of these animals. A health physics evaluation of the dial painting facility firm and operation revealed that extensive improvements in engineering controls and worker protection were needed. The health physics recommendations made, as a result, should be adopted as a minimum for maximization of long term benefits to both the employee and the employer.

  3. Interpretation of DIAL Measurements of Lower Stratospheric Ozone in Regions with Pinatubo Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Fenn, Marta A.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Veiga, Robert E.; Mayor, Shane D.; Fishman, Jack; Nganga, D.; Minga, A.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of volcanic aerosols on stratospheric ozone is a topic of current interest, especially with the June 15, 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines. Lidar has been used in the past to provide aerosol profiles which could be compared with ozone profiles measured using ozonesondes to look for coincidences between volcanic aerosols and ozone decreases. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique has the advantages of being able to measure ozone and aerosol profiles simultaneously as well as being able to cover large geographical regions rapidly. While there are problems associated with correcting the ozone profiles for the presence of aerosols, the corrections can be made reliably when the wavelengths are closely spaced and the Bernoulli method is applied. The DIAL measurements considered in this paper are those obtained in the tropical stratosphere in January 1992 during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE-II). The determination of ozone profiles in the presence of Pinatubo aerosols is discussed in a companion paper.

  4. Compact Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Transmitter Using Solid-State Dye Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Alton L., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Elsayid-Ele, Hani

    2001-01-01

    A new potential DIAL laser transmitter is described that uses solid-state dye laser materials to make a simpler, more compact, lower mass laser system. Two solid-state dye laser materials were tested to evaluate their performance in a laser oscillator cavity end pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. The polymer host polymethyl-methacrylate was injected with a pyrromethene laser dye, PM 580, or PM 597. A narrowband laser oscillator cavity was constructed to produce visible wavelengths of 578 and 600 nm which were frequency doubled into the UV region (299 or 300 nm) by using a BBO crystal, resulting in a maximum energy of 11 mJ at a wavelength of 578 nm when pumped by the Nd:YAG laser at an energy of 100 mJ (532 nm). A maximum output energy of 378 microJ was achieved in the UV region at a wavelength of 289 nm but lasted only 2000 laser shots at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The results are promising and show that a solid-state dye laser based ozone DIAL system is possible with improvements in the design of the laser transmitter.

  5. Introducing heterogeneous users and vehicles into models and algorithms for the dial-a-ride problem.

    PubMed

    Parragh, Sophie N

    2011-08-01

    Dial-a-ride problems deal with the transportation of people between pickup and delivery locations. Given the fact that people are subject to transportation, constraints related to quality of service are usually present, such as time windows and maximum user ride time limits. In many real world applications, different types of users exist. In the field of patient and disabled people transportation, up to four different transportation modes can be distinguished. In this article we consider staff seats, patient seats, stretchers and wheelchair places. Furthermore, most companies involved in the transportation of the disabled or ill dispose of different types of vehicles. We introduce both aspects into state-of-the-art formulations and branch-and-cut algorithms for the standard dial-a-ride problem. Also a recent metaheuristic method is adapted to this new problem. In addition, a further service quality related issue is analyzed: vehicle waiting time with passengers aboard. Instances with up to 40 requests are solved to optimality. High quality solutions are obtained with the heuristic method. PMID:24511211

  6. Characterising the experience of interaction: an evaluation of automotive rotary dials.

    PubMed

    Wellings, Tom; Pitts, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Optimising sensory product qualities is a priority for automotive manufacturers when developing human-machine interfaces, as user experience frameworks consider sensory aesthetics to be a main influencing factor of the overall judgement of product appeal. This empirical study examines whether users' overall judgements of product appeal can be predicted from measures of non-visual aesthetic qualities. Ninety-one UK owners of Supermini segment cars assessed five examples of rotary temperature dials. Factor analysis gave four clear factors common across all samples, of which 'unrefined loudness' and 'positivity/precision' predicted up to 26% variance in the hedonic score; both factors were similarly important in the regression models. Significant differences in appeal were observed between the samples; however, there were no effects due to age or gender. Practitioner Summary: The research shows that the overall appeal of automotive rotary dials is partially predicted by their non-visual aesthetics. These findings are applicable to the design of any products where improving the user experience is a goal, as it demonstrates that user experience models are applicable to product domains other than computing and information technology. PMID:22897607

  7. Introducing heterogeneous users and vehicles into models and algorithms for the dial-a-ride problem

    PubMed Central

    Parragh, Sophie N.

    2011-01-01

    Dial-a-ride problems deal with the transportation of people between pickup and delivery locations. Given the fact that people are subject to transportation, constraints related to quality of service are usually present, such as time windows and maximum user ride time limits. In many real world applications, different types of users exist. In the field of patient and disabled people transportation, up to four different transportation modes can be distinguished. In this article we consider staff seats, patient seats, stretchers and wheelchair places. Furthermore, most companies involved in the transportation of the disabled or ill dispose of different types of vehicles. We introduce both aspects into state-of-the-art formulations and branch-and-cut algorithms for the standard dial-a-ride problem. Also a recent metaheuristic method is adapted to this new problem. In addition, a further service quality related issue is analyzed: vehicle waiting time with passengers aboard. Instances with up to 40 requests are solved to optimality. High quality solutions are obtained with the heuristic method. PMID:24511211

  8. The portable P300 dialing system based on tablet and Emotiv Epoc headset.

    PubMed

    Tong Jijun; Zhang Peng; Xiao Ran; Ding Lei

    2015-08-01

    A Brain-computer interface (BCI) is a novel communication system that translates brain signals into a control signal. Now with the appearance of the commercial EEG headsets and mobile smart platforms (tablet, smartphone), it is possible to develop the mobile BCI system, which can greatly improve the life quality of patients suffering from motor disease, such as amyotrophic lateral scleroses (ALS), multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy and head trauma. This study adopted a 14-channel Emotiv EPOC headset and Microsoft surface pro 3 to realize a dialing system, which was represented by 4×3 matrices of alphanumeric characters. The performance of the online portable dialing system based on P300 is satisfying. The average classification accuracy reaches 88.75±10.57% in lab and 73.75±16.94% in metro, while the information transfer rate (ITR) reaches 7.17±1.80 and 5.05±2.17 bits/min respectively. This means the commercial EEG headset and tablet has good prospect in developing real time BCI system in realistic environments. PMID:26736325

  9. Real-time atmospheric absorption spectra for in-flight tuning of an airborne dial system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dombrowski, M.; Walden, H.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Milrod, J.; Korb, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    Real-time measurements of atmospheric absorption spectra are displayed and used to precisely calibrate and fix the frequency of an Alexandrite laser to specific oxygen absorption features for airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric pressure and temperature. The DIAL system used contains two narrowband tunable Alexandrite lasers: one is electronically scanned to tune to oxygen absorption features for on-line signals while the second is used to obtain off-line (nonabsorbed) atmospheric return signals. The lidar operator may select the number of shots to be averaged, the altitude, and altitude interval over which the signals are averaged using single key stroke commands. The operator also determines exactly which oxygen absorption lines are scanned by comparing the line spacings and relative strengths with known line parameters, thus calibrating the laser wavelength readout. The system was used successfully to measure the atmospheric pressure profile on the first flights of this lidar, November 20, and December 9, 1985, aboard the NASA Wallops Electra aircraft.

  10. Observation of atmospheric ozone by dial with Raman lasers pumped by a KrF laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, M.; Shibata, T.

    1986-01-01

    Since the XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) was first used in Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for stratospheric ozone detection, the XeCl ozone lidar became a useful tool for the monitoring of the stratospheric ozone concentration. Shorter wavelength lasers are needed for the observation of ozone in the troposphere where the ozone concentration is about one order of magnitude smaller than in the stratosphere. In 1983, tropospheric ozone was observed with the combination of the second Stokes line (290.4 nm) of stimulated Raman scattering from methane pumped by a KrF laser and the XeCl laser line. The measurement of the ozone distribution from ground to 30 km was reported, using three Stokes lines of Raman lasers pumped by a KrF laser. At wavelengths shorter than 295 nm, the background solar radiation is effectively suppressed by atmospheric ozone. Such a solar-blind effect can be expected when two wavelengths 277 and 290.4 nm are used for DIAL ozone detection. A preliminary measurement of the day time ozone distribution in the troposphere is presented using these wavelengths generated by a KrF laser with a Raman shifter. Analysis using the lidar equation predicts the maximum detectable range is 7 km.

  11. Dose-response relationships for female radium dial workers: A new look

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, R.E.

    1994-05-01

    The values of initial systemic intake and of skeletal dose for all of the U.S. radium cases have recently been revised. This revision was required following the demonstrations by Rundo and by Keane that humans who were exposed to radium as adults lost radium at a rate that depended on the quantity of radium originally deposited within their bodies. These new values have been used to define new dose-response relationships for both the bone sarcomas and the carcinomas arising in the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells induced by internally deposited radium. The population examined was employed in the U.S. dial painting industry prior to 1950 and consisted of 1530 female dial workers for whom radium body burden measurements were available. By the end of 1990, 46 cases of bone sarcomas and 19 cases of head carcinomas had been diagnosed in this cohort. The head carcinoma incidence can be adequately fitted by a simple linear function, as was found in previous analyses. The bone sarcoma cases were previously fitted by a dose-squared-exponential function. With the revised values of systemic intake, the sarcoma results could not be satisfactorily fitted with this expression. When the exponent on D was increased to larger values, excellent fits were obtained.

  12. Detection and monitoring of pollutant sources with Lidar/Dial techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Malizia, A.; Parracino, S.; Richetta, M.; De Leo, L.; Perrimezzi, C.; Bellecci, C.

    2015-11-01

    It's well known that air pollution due to anthropogenic sources can have adverse effects on humans and the ecosystem. Therefore, in the last years, surveying large regions of the atmosphere in an automatic way has become a strategic objective of various public health organizations for early detection of pollutant sources in urban and industrial areas. The Lidar and Dial techniques have become well established laser based methods for the remote sensing of the atmosphere. They are often implemented to probe almost any level of the atmosphere and to acquire information to validate theoretical models about different topics of atmospheric physics. They can also be used for environment surveying by monitoring particles, aerosols and molecules. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the potential of these methods to detect pollutants emitted from local sources (such as particulate and/or chemical compounds) and to evaluate their concentration. This is exemplified with the help of experimental data acquired in an industrial area in the south of Italy by mean of experimental campaign by use of pollutants simulated source. For this purpose, two mobile systems Lidar and Dial have been developed by the authors. In this paper there will be presented the operating principles of the system and the results of the experimental campaign.

  13. On-line wavelength calibration of pulsed laser for CO2 DIAL sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ge; Gong, Wei; Lin, Hong; Ma, Xin; Xiang, Chengzhi

    2014-12-01

    Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for sensing atmospheric CO2 using the DIAL technique. Drastic fluctuations in the intensity of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength determination and stabilization, resulting in CO2 retrievals lacking the desired accuracy for global climate change and carbon cycle research. To tackle this problem, a two-stage wavelength calibration method based on Voigt fitting was proposed in this work. Simulation analysis demonstrated that the proposed method is superior to the conventional method and provides wavelength calibration results with an accuracy of 0.1 pm when the noise level does not exceed than 5 %. This conclusion was confirmed through experiments with real signals. Furthermore, simulation analysis revealed that the proposed method could yield results with an accuracy of 0.1 pm by increasing the number of sample points, even for signals with noise levels of up to 20 %. This is a promising feature that could facilitate the development of DIAL systems without gas cells.

  14. Selection of an averaging technique by simulation study of a DIAL system for toxic agents monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudeja, Jai Paul; Jindal, Mukesh Kumar; Veerabuthiran, S.

    2007-10-01

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a very effective technique for standoff detection of various toxic agents in the atmosphere. The Lidar backscattered signal received usually has poor signal to noise (SNR) ratio. In order to improve the SNR, statistical averaging over a number of laser pulses is employed. The aim of the present work is to select a particular statistical averaging technique, which is most suitable in removing the noise in Lidar return signals. The DIAL system considered here uses laser transmitters based on OPO based (2-5 μm) and TEA CO2 (9-11μm) lasers. Eight commonly used chemical warfare agents including five nerve agents and three blister agents have been considered here as examples of toxic agents. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) software has been developed in LabVIEW to simulate return signals mixed with the expected noise levels. A toxic agent cloud with a given thickness and concentration has been assumed to be detected in the ambient atmospheric conditions at various ranges up to 5 Km. Data for 200 pulses per agent was stored in the computer memory. Various known statistical averaging techniques were used and number concentrations of particular agent have been computed and compared with ideal Lidar return signal values. This exercise was repeated for all the eight agents and based on the results obtained; the most suitable averaging technique has been selected.

  15. Ozone Measurements with the US EPA UV-DIAL: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmueller, H.; Diebel, D.; Bundy, D. H.; Bristow, M. P.; Alvarez, R. J., II; Kovalev, V. A.; Edmonds, C. M.; Turner, R. M.; Mcelroy, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A compact airborne down-looking lidar system was developed at the Environmental Protection Agency in Las Vegas. This differential absorption lidar (DIAL) was designed to simultaneously measure range-resolved concentrations of ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the lower troposphere, together with an indication of the aerosol distribution. The five laser wavelengths (i.e., lambda(sub 1) = 277 nm, lambda(sub 2) = 292 nm, lambda(sub 3) = 313 nm, lambda(sub4) = 319 nm, lambda(sub 5) = 369 nm) were generated via Raman conversion of a focused KrF excimer laser. The system is currently installed in a truck-based mobile laboratory. For the ground testing, an opening in the truck floor together with a folding mirror under the truck makes a horizontal, or upwardly inclined direction of measurement possible. Initial ground testing has been performed in the vicinity of a Desert Research Institute (DRI) ambient air monitoring site, located at Cottonwood Cove approximately 85 km south east of Las Vegas, Nevada. At this site O3 and SO2 concentrations are continuously monitored with an average accuracy better than +/- 10 percent. A temporary ozone measurement station with identical accuracy was set up at a distance to get a second point of comparison for the range-resolved DIAL measurements.

  16. Multiple myeloma, leukemia, and breast cancer among the US radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbings, J.H.; Lucas, H.F.; Stehney, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The relationships of radium exposure to mortality from multiple myeloma, leukemia, and breast cancer were studied in three cohorts of female dial workers defined by year of first employment. Mortality was compared with that expected from US white female rates, with and without adjustment for local mortality rates. Dose-response relationships of these cancers to systemic intake of radium were determined in workers whose body burdens had been measured in vivo since 1955. Incident cases of multiple myeloma occurred in the pre-1930 cohort; however, analyses of body burdens and durations of employment suggest that external radiation was more likely to have been responsible than was internal radium. Leukemia incidence and mortality have not been elevated overall among the female dial workers, either in the pre-1930 or the post-1930 cohorts, but cases have tended to occur early and in subjects with higher body burdens. Extensive analyses of breast cancer data have uncovered several observations weighing against a causal interpretation of the association between radium and breast cancer.

  17. Development of the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE): An Advanced Airborne DIAL Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alvah S., Jr.; Brown, Kevin E.; Hall, William M.; Barnes, James C.; Edwards, William C.; Petway, Larry B.; Little, Alan D.; Luck, William S., Jr.; Jones, Irby W.; Antill, Charles W., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) Instrument is the first fully-engineered, autonomous Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) System for the measurement of water vapor in the troposphere (aerosol and cloud measurements are included). LASE uses a double-pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser for the transmitter with a 30 ns pulse length and 150 mJ/pulse. The laser beam is "seeded" to operate on a selected water vapor absorption line in the 815-nm region using a laser diode and an onboard absorption reference cell. A 40 cm diameter telescope collects the backscattered signals and directs them onto two detectors. LASE collects DIAL data at 5 Hz while onboard a NASA/Ames ER-2 aircraft flying at altitudes from 16-21 km. LASE was designed to operate autonomously within the environment and physical constraints of the ER-2 aircraft and to make water vapor profile measurements across the troposphere to better than 10% accuracy. LASE has flown 19 times during the development of the instrument and the validation of the science data. This paper describes the design, operation, and reliability of the LASE Instrument.

  18. Airborne Differential Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.; Bidwell, S.; Liao, L.; Rincon, R.; Heymsfield, G.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Precipitation Radar aboard the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite has shown the potential for spaceborne sensing of snow and rain by means of an incoherent pulsed radar operating at 13.8 GHz. The primary advantage of radar relative to passive instruments arises from the fact that the radar can image the 3-dimensional structure of storms. As a consequence, the radar data can be used to determine the vertical rain structure, rain type (convective/stratiform) effective storm height, and location of the melting layer. The radar, moreover, can be used to detect snow and improve the estimation of rain rate over land. To move toward spaceborne weather radars that can be deployed routinely as part of an instrument set consisting of passive and active sensors will require the development of less expensive, lighter-weight radars that consume less power. At the same time, the addition of a second frequency and an upgrade to Doppler capability are features that are needed to retrieve information on the characteristics of the drop size distribution, vertical air motion and storm dynamics. One approach to the problem is to use a single broad-band transmitter-receiver and antenna where two narrow-band frequencies are spaced apart by 5% to 10% of the center frequency. Use of Ka-band frequencies (26.5 GHz - 40 GHz) affords two advantages: adequate spatial resolution can be attained with a relatively small antenna and the differential reflectivity and mean Doppler signals are directly related to the median mass diameter of the snow and raindrop size distributions. The differential mean Doppler signal has the additional property that this quantity depends only on that part of the radial speed of the hydrometeors that is drop-size dependent. In principle, the mean and differential mean Doppler from a near-nadir viewing radar can be used to retrieve vertical air motion as well as the total mean radial velocity. In the paper, we present theoretical calculations for the

  19. Doppler photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound in blood with optical contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinfeld, Adi; Eyal, Avishay

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry as well as Doppler ultrasound were performed in acoustic resolution regime on tubes filled with flowing blood with indocyanine green (ICG) at different concentrations. The photoacoustic excitation utilized a pair of directly-modulated fiber-coupled 830nm laser-diodes, modulated with either CW or tone-bursts for depthresolved measurements. The amplitude of the Doppler peak in photoacoustic Doppler measurements was found to be proportional to the ICG concentration. Photoacoustic Doppler was measured in ICG at human safe concentrations, but not in whole blood. Comparing the results between the two modalities implied that using a wavelength with higher optical absorption may improve the photoacoustic signal in blood.

  20. Development of the doppler electron velocimeter: theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2007-03-01

    Measurement of dynamic events at the nano-scale is currently impossible. This paper presents the theoretical underpinnings of a method for making these measurements using electron microscopes. Building on the work of Moellenstedt and Lichte who demonstrated Doppler shifting of an electron beam with a moving electron mirror, further work is proposed to perfect and utilize this concept in dynamic measurements. Specifically, using the concept of ''fringe-counting'' with the current principles of transmission electron holography, an extension of these methods to dynamic measurements is proposed. A presentation of the theory of Doppler electron wave shifting is given, starting from the development of the de Broglie wave, up through the equations describing interference effects and Doppler shifting in electron waves. A mathematical demonstration that Doppler shifting is identical to the conceptually easier to understand idea of counting moving fringes is given by analogy to optical interferometry. Finally, potential developmental experiments and uses of a Doppler electron microscope are discussed.

  1. Observation of the Zero Doppler Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jia; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Xiaodong; Fang, Kai; Zhao, Junfei; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The normal Doppler effect has well-established applications in many areas of science and technology. Recently, a few experimental demonstrations of the inverse Doppler effect have begun to appear in negative-index metamaterials. Here we report an experimental observation of the zero Doppler effect, that is, no frequency shift irrespective of the relative motion between the wave signal source and the detector in a zero-index metamaterial. This unique phenomenon, accompanied by the normal and inverse Doppler effects, is generated by reflecting a wave from a moving discontinuity in a composite right/left-handed transmission line loaded with varactors when operating in the near zero-index passband, or the right/left-handed passband. This work has revealed a complete picture of the Doppler effect in metamaterials and may lead to potential applications in electromagnetic wave related metrology. PMID:27046395

  2. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  3. Observation of the Zero Doppler Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Jia; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Xiaodong; Fang, Kai; Zhao, Junfei; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-01

    The normal Doppler effect has well-established applications in many areas of science and technology. Recently, a few experimental demonstrations of the inverse Doppler effect have begun to appear in negative-index metamaterials. Here we report an experimental observation of the zero Doppler effect, that is, no frequency shift irrespective of the relative motion between the wave signal source and the detector in a zero-index metamaterial. This unique phenomenon, accompanied by the normal and inverse Doppler effects, is generated by reflecting a wave from a moving discontinuity in a composite right/left-handed transmission line loaded with varactors when operating in the near zero-index passband, or the right/left-handed passband. This work has revealed a complete picture of the Doppler effect in metamaterials and may lead to potential applications in electromagnetic wave related metrology.

  4. Observation of the Zero Doppler Effect.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jia; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Xiaodong; Fang, Kai; Zhao, Junfei; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The normal Doppler effect has well-established applications in many areas of science and technology. Recently, a few experimental demonstrations of the inverse Doppler effect have begun to appear in negative-index metamaterials. Here we report an experimental observation of the zero Doppler effect, that is, no frequency shift irrespective of the relative motion between the wave signal source and the detector in a zero-index metamaterial. This unique phenomenon, accompanied by the normal and inverse Doppler effects, is generated by reflecting a wave from a moving discontinuity in a composite right/left-handed transmission line loaded with varactors when operating in the near zero-index passband, or the right/left-handed passband. This work has revealed a complete picture of the Doppler effect in metamaterials and may lead to potential applications in electromagnetic wave related metrology. PMID:27046395

  5. Laser Doppler dust devil measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, J. W.; Jeffreys, H. B.; Kaufman, J. W.; Weaver, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning laser doppler velocimeter (SLDV) system was used to detect, track, and measure the velocity flow field of naturally occurring tornado-like flows (dust devils) in the atmosphere. A general description of the dust devil phenomenon is given along with a description of the test program, measurement system, and data processing techniques used to collect information on the dust devil flow field. The general meteorological conditions occurring during the test program are also described, and the information collected on two selected dust devils are discussed in detail to show the type of information which can be obtained with a SLDV system. The results from these measurements agree well with those of other investigators and illustrate the potential for the SLDV in future endeavors.

  6. Techniques in Doppler gravity inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The types of Doppler gravity data available for local as opposed to planetwide geophysical modeling are reviewed. Those gravity fields that are determined dynamically in orbit determination programs yield a smoothed representation of the local gravity field that may be used for quantitative modeling. An estimate of the difference between smoothed and true fields can be considered as a noise limitation in generating local gravity models. A nonlinear inversion for the geometry, depth, and density of the Mare Serenitatis mascon using an ellipsoidal model yielded a global least squares minimum in horizontal dimensions, depth, and thickness-density contrast product. It was subsequently found, by using a linear model, that there were an infinite number of solutions corresponding to various combinations of depth and lateral inhomogeneity. Linear modeling was performed by means of generalized inverse theory.

  7. Effect of spectral time-lag correlation coefficient and signal averaging on airborne CO2 DIAL measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Avishai; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Gotoff, Steven W.; D'Amico, Francis M.

    1997-10-01

    The effects of flight geometry, signal averaging and time- lag correlation coefficient on airborne CO2 dial lidar measurements are shown in simulations and field measurements. These factors have implications for multi- vapor measurements and also for measuring a shingle vapor with a wide absorption spectra for which one would like to make DIAL measurements at many wavelengths across the absorption spectra of the gas. Thus it is of interest to know how many wavelengths and how many groups of wavelengths can be used effectively in DIAL measurements. Our data indicate that for our lidar about 80 wavelengths can be used for DIAL measurements of a stationary vapor. The lidar signal is composed of fluctuations with three time scales: a very short time scale due to system noise which is faster than the data acquisition sampling rate of the receiver, a medium time scale due to atmospheric turbulence, and a long time scale due to slow atmospheric transmission drift from aerosol in homogeneities. The decorrelation time scale of fluctuations for airborne lidar measurements depends on the flight geometry.

  8. Reconstruction of N2O and CH4 Content by Dial Measurements at Wavelengths of Overtone CO Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Matvienko, G. G.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory experiments on measurement of absorption and extinction of radiation of the overtone Co laser at wavelengths used for sensing of methane and N2O in the mid-IR spectral range with the differential absorption (DIAL) method, as well as the concentrations of the studied gases reconstructed from the analysis of experimentally obtained absorption coefficients.

  9. 75 FR 17943 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Section 8 Random Digit Dialing Fair...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... Dialing Fair Market Rent Telephone Survey AGENCY: Office of Policy Development and Research, HUD. ACTION..., SW., Room 8224, Washington, DC 20410; telephone (202) 402-5866; e-mail marie_l._lihn@hud.gov . This... collection of information on those who are to respond; including the use of appropriate automated...

  10. Development of an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Carbon Dioxide Profilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carlsten, J.

    2011-12-01

    A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for monitoring carbon dioxide (CO2) is under development at Montana State University using commercially available parts. Two distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, one at the on-line wavelength and one at the off-line wavelength are used to injection seed a fiber amplifier. The DIAL operates in the 1.57 micron carbon dioxide absorption band at an on-line wavelength of 1.5714060 microns. The laser transmitter produces 40 μJ pulses with a pulse duration of 1 μs and a pulse repetition frequency of 20 kHz. The scattered light from the laser transmitter is collected using a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. The light collected by the telescope is collimated and then filtered using a 0.8 nm FWHM narrowband interference filter. After the optical filter, the light is coupled into a multimode optical fiber with a 1000 μm core diameter. The output from the optical fiber is coupled into a photomultiplier tube (PMT) used to monitor the return signal. The analog output from the PMT is next incident on a discriminator producing TTL logic pulses for photon counting. The output from the PMT and discriminator is monitored using a multichannel scalar card allowing the counting of the TTL pulses as a function of range. Data from the DIAL instrument is collected in the following manner. The fiber amplifier is injection seeded first with the on-line DFB laser. The return signal as a function of range is integrated using the multichannel scalar for a user defined time, typically set at 6 s. The off-line DFB laser is then used to injection seed the fiber amplifier and the process is repeated. This process is repeated for a user defined period. The CO2 concentration as a function of range is calculated using the on-line and off-line return signals with the DIAL equation. A comparison of the CO2 concentration measured using the DIAL instrument at 1.5 km and a Li-Cor LI-820 in situ sensor located at 1.5 km from the DIAL over a 2.5 hour period

  11. Staggered Multiple-PRF Ultrafast Color Doppler.

    PubMed

    Posada, Daniel; Poree, Jonathan; Pellissier, Arnaud; Chayer, Boris; Tournoux, Francois; Cloutier, Guy; Garcia, Damien

    2016-06-01

    Color Doppler imaging is an established pulsed ultrasound technique to visualize blood flow non-invasively. High-frame-rate (ultrafast) color Doppler, by emissions of plane or circular wavefronts, allows severalfold increase in frame rates. Conventional and ultrafast color Doppler are both limited by the range-velocity dilemma, which may result in velocity folding (aliasing) for large depths and/or large velocities. We investigated multiple pulse-repetition-frequency (PRF) emissions arranged in a series of staggered intervals to remove aliasing in ultrafast color Doppler. Staggered PRF is an emission process where time delays between successive pulse transmissions change in an alternating way. We tested staggered dual- and triple-PRF ultrafast color Doppler, 1) in vitro in a spinning disc and a free jet flow, and 2) in vivo in a human left ventricle. The in vitro results showed that the Nyquist velocity could be extended to up to 6 times the conventional limit. We found coefficients of determination r(2) ≥ 0.98 between the de-aliased and ground-truth velocities. Consistent de-aliased Doppler images were also obtained in the human left heart. Our results demonstrate that staggered multiple-PRF ultrafast color Doppler is efficient for high-velocity high-frame-rate blood flow imaging. This is particularly relevant for new developments in ultrasound imaging relying on accurate velocity measurements. PMID:26780789

  12. Rotational Doppler effect in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guixin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-08-01

    The translational Doppler effect of electromagnetic and sound waves has been successfully applied in measurements of the speed and direction of vehicles, astronomical objects and blood flow in human bodies, and for the Global Positioning System. The Doppler effect plays a key role for some important quantum phenomena such as the broadened emission spectra of atoms and has benefited cooling and trapping of atoms with laser light. Despite numerous successful applications of the translational Doppler effect, it fails to measure the rotation frequency of a spinning object when the probing wave propagates along its rotation axis. This constraint was circumvented by deploying the angular momentum of electromagnetic waves--the so-called rotational Doppler effect. Here, we report on the demonstration of rotational Doppler shift in nonlinear optics. The Doppler frequency shift is determined for the second harmonic generation of a circularly polarized beam passing through a spinning nonlinear optical crystal with three-fold rotational symmetry. We find that the second harmonic generation signal with circular polarization opposite to that of the fundamental beam experiences a Doppler shift of three times the rotation frequency of the optical crystal. This demonstration is of fundamental significance in nonlinear optics, as it provides us with insight into the interaction of light with moving media in the nonlinear optical regime.

  13. Monitoring Tropospheric Ozone Enhancement in the Front Range Using the Gsfc Tropoz DIAL during Discover - AQ 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Hoff, R. M.; Twigg, L.; Sumnicht, G. K.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Fort Collins, CO from 200 m to 16 km AGL. These measurements were taken as part of NASA's DISCOVER-AQ campaign in July/August 2014. Measurements were made during simultaneous aircraft spirals over the lidar site as well as collocated ozonesonde launches. Ozone enhancement from local sources typically occurred in the mid-afternoon convection period, especially when there was light winds and low cloud cover. Interesting ozone profiles and time series data will be shown. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. Three of these lidars, including the GSFC TROPOZ DIAL, recorded measurements during the DISCOVER-AQ campaign. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived.

  14. Performance evaluation of a 1.6-µm methane DIAL system from ground, aircraft and UAV platforms.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Ismail, Syed; Nehrir, Amin R; Hair, John W; Crawford, James H; Leifer, Ira; Shuman, Timothy

    2013-12-16

    Methane is an efficient absorber of infrared radiation and a potent greenhouse gas with a warming potential 72 times greater than carbon dioxide on a per molecule basis. Development of methane active remote sensing capability using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique enables scientific assessments of the gas emission and impacts on the climate. A performance evaluation of a pulsed DIAL system for monitoring atmospheric methane is presented. This system leverages a robust injection-seeded pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) laser technology operating in the 1.645 µm spectral band. The system also leverages an efficient low noise, commercially available, InGaAs avalanche photo-detector (APD). Lidar signals and error budget are analyzed for system operation on ground in the range-resolved DIAL mode and from airborne platforms in the integrated path DIAL (IPDA) mode. Results indicate system capability of measuring methane concentration profiles with <1.0% total error up to 4.5 km range with 5 minute averaging from ground. For airborne IPDA, the total error in the column dry mixing ratio is less than 0.3% with 0.1 sec average using ground returns. This system has a unique capability of combining signals from the atmospheric scattering from layers above the surface with ground return signals, which provides methane column measurement between the atmospheric scattering layer and the ground directly. In such case 0.5% and 1.2% total errors are achieved with 10 sec average from airborne platforms at 8 km and 15.24 km altitudes, respectively. Due to the pulsed nature of the transmitter, the system is relatively insensitive to aerosol and cloud interferences. Such DIAL system would be ideal for investigating high latitude methane releases over polar ice sheets, permafrost regions, wetlands, and over ocean during day and night. This system would have commercial potential for fossil fuel leaks detection and industrial monitoring applications

  15. Correction of DIAL Stratospheric Ozone Measurements in the Presence of Pinatubo Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenn, Marta A.; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley's airborne lidar system measured aerosol and ozone distributions in the stratosphere from Jan. - Mar. 1992 as part of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric expedition (AASE-2). The eruption of Mount Pinatubo in Jun. 1991 has increased the aerosol burden of the stratosphere and thereby increased the importance of applying an aerosol correction to the ozone measurements. The correction relies on a Bernoulli solution to derive a backscatter correction to the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) returns at two wavelengths in the ultraviolet spectral region (lambda(sub on) = 301.5 nm, lambda(sub off) = 310.87 nm) as described in earlier works. This paper discusses how the parameters for the correction were optimized for application to the AASE-2 data set.

  16. Moving the Dial to Advance Population Health Equity in New York City Asian American Populations

    PubMed Central

    Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Kwon, Simona C.; Nadkarni, Smiti Kapadia; Islam, Nadia S.

    2015-01-01

    The shift toward a health equity framework for eliminating the health disparities burden of racial/ethnic minority populations has moved away from a disease-focused model to a social determinants framework that aims to achieve the highest attainment of health for all. The New York University Center for the Study of Asian American Health (CSAAH) has identified core themes and strategies for advancing population health equity for Asian American populations in New York City that are rooted in the following: social determinants of health; multisectoral, community-engaged approaches; leveraging community assets; improved disaggregated data collection and access to care; and building sustainability through community leadership and infrastructure-building activities. We describe the strategies CSAAH employed to move the dial on population health equity. PMID:25905858

  17. CO2 DIAL sensitivity studies for measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockman, P.; Hess, R. V.; Bair, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the accuracy of infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of trace constituents in the atmosphere. Expressions are derived for the signal-to-noise ratios applicable in the detection of a signal from a scattering cell for the cases of single-detection heterodyne detection and direct detection. Results of computer simulations of the expectation value of the measured return for various measurement conditions are presented which illustrate the sensitivities of plume measurements for horizontal range-resolved and vertical content measurements of NH3 in heterodyne and direct detection. Advantages for long-range measurements of the use of rare isotope laser frequencies, tuning by collision broadening, and closely spaced on and off frequencies are pointed out.

  18. An Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Receiver System for Use on Unpiloted Atmospheric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Goldschmidt, Soenke

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of global atmosphere ozone concentrations call for flexible lidar systems that can be operated from an unpiloted atmospheric vehicle (UAV) to reduce the cost of measurement missions. A lidar receiver system consisting of a fiber-optic-coupled telescope has been designed and tested for this purpose. The system weight is 13 kg and its volume of 0.06 m 3 would fit into the payload compartment of a Perseus B UAV. The optical efficiency of the telescope is 37 percent at 288 nm and 64 percent at 300 nm. Atmospheric measurements with a DIAL laser system have been performed, and the measured ozone density has matched the data from ozonesondes to an altitude of 7 km.

  19. Single Frequency, Pulsed Laser Diode Transmitter for Dial Water Vapor Measurements at 935nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, Gregg W.; Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.; Rall, Johnathan A. R.

    1998-01-01

    We report a tunable, single frequency, narrow linewidth, pulsed laser diode transmitter at 935.68nm for remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. The transmitter consists of a CW, tunable, external cavity diode laser whose output is amplified 2OdB using a tapered diode amplifier. The output is pulsed for range resolved DIAL lidar by pulsing the drive current to the diode amplifier at 4kHz with a .5% duty cycle. The output from the transmitter is 36OnJ/pulse and is single spatial mode. It maintains a linewidth of less than 25MHz as its wavelength is tuned across the water vapor absorption line at 935.68nm. The transmitter design and its use in a water vapor measurement will be discussed.

  20. Setting up a mobile Lidar (DIAL) system for detecting chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavosh Tehrani, M.; Mohammad, M. Malek; Jaafari, E.; Mobashery, A.

    2015-03-01

    The mobile light detection and ranging DIAL system of Malek Ashtar University of Technology has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agents whose absorption wavelengths are in the range of 9.2-10.8 μm tunable CO2 lasers of the system. In this paper, this system is first described and then ammonia detection is analyzed experimentally. Also, experimental results of detecting a sarin agent simulant, dimethyl-methyl phosphonate (DMMP), are presented. The power levels received from different ranges to detect specific concentrations of NH3 and DMMP have been measured and debated. The primary test results with a 150 ns clipped pulse width by passive pinhole plasma shutter indicate that the system is capable of monitoring several species of pollutants in the range of about 1 km, with a 20 m spatial and 2 min temporal resolution.

  1. A pulsed, high repetition rate 2-micron laser transmitter for coherent CO2 DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Bai, Y.; Petzar, P.; Petros, M.; Chen, S.; Trieu, B.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Singh, U. N.

    2009-12-01

    A Holmium solid-state 2-µm pulsed laser, end-pumped by a Thulium fiber laser, is being developed for coherent CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). It combines the advantages of high efficient fiber laser technology with the mature high energy solid state laser technology to produce desired energy levels at a high repetition rate. To obtain high beam quality that is required by coherent detection technique, the effect of “spatial hole burning” in the laser gain medium must be prevented. This is achieved by the use of ring cavity configuration in which the laser light is forced to travel in one direction, so that no standing waves are formed. The pump beam and laser beam are mode-matched in the laser crystals to improve the laser efficiency. At the pumping power of 13.25W, optical-to-optical efficiency of 52% was obtained with the pulse repetition rate of 1.25 kHz, which gives the energy per pulse of ~5.5mJ. The pulse energy can be scaled by increasing the pump power or by reducing the pulse repetition rate. The pulse length of this laser is at ~50ns. The wavelengths of the Ho pulse laser are tunable over several characteristic absorption lines of CO2. The exact wavelengths of the Ho pulse laser are controlled by well-controlled continuous wave (CW) seed lasers to provide the required sequential, on-and-off line wavelength pulses for DIAL applications. Three CW lasers were used to provide the accurate on-and-off wavelengths. The first CW laser is locked to the center of a characteristic CO2 absorption line through a CO2 cell by the frequency modulation technique. The frequency of the second CW laser was shifted related to the first CW laser by a few GHz to the wing of the CO2 absorption line, and used as the on-line frequency of the CO2 DIAL. This frequency shift is necessary to obtain a better weighting function for the CO2 measurement. The standard deviation of the CW on-line frequency can be controlled within 250 KHz. The third CW laser provides the off

  2. Moving the dial to advance population health equity in New York City Asian American populations.

    PubMed

    Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Kwon, Simona C; Park, Rebecca; Nadkarni, Smiti Kapadia; Islam, Nadia S

    2015-07-01

    The shift toward a health equity framework for eliminating the health disparities burden of racial/ethnic minority populations has moved away from a disease-focused model to a social determinants framework that aims to achieve the highest attainment of health for all. The New York University Center for the Study of Asian American Health (CSAAH) has identified core themes and strategies for advancing population health equity for Asian American populations in New York City that are rooted in the following: social determinants of health; multisectoral, community-engaged approaches; leveraging community assets; improved disaggregated data collection and access to care; and building sustainability through community leadership and infrastructure-building activities. We describe the strategies CSAAH employed to move the dial on population health equity. PMID:25905858

  3. Airborne remote sensing of tropospheric water vapor using a near infrared DIAL system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehret, G.; Kiemle, C.; Renger, W.; Simmet, G.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized here are the results of airborne water vapor measurements in the lower middle and upper troposphere using the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique in the near infrared. The measurements were performed in July 1990 in Southern Bavaria between Allersberg and Straubing from 20 to 23 UTC taking advantage of night time conditions. The tropospheric H2O profiles were range investigated both horizontally and vertically. With the DIAL system that was used, water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere have been carried out for the first time. To calibrate the H2O-retrievals, effective absorption cross sections of selected H2O lines in terms of altitude around 724 nm were calculated using line parameter data from the literature (B. E. Grossmann et al). The frequency of the on-line measurements was adjusted by the spectra of a Polyacenic Semiconductor (PAS) cell filled with H2O. We found that the calibration error ranged between 0.005 and 0.015 cm(exp -1). The systematic errors of the H2O as a function of altitude were estimated below 7 km and 12 percent accuracy in the upper troposphere. The vertical H2O profile agrees well with in situ measurements in the investigated range between the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) up to near the tropopause. Horizontal and vertical H2O profiles are calculated by means of averaging single lidar returns. Typical horizontal resolutions range from 4 km in the lower to 11 km in the upper troposphere with vertical resolutions varying from 0.3 km up to 1 km, respectively, in order to satisfy a 5 - 10 percent accuracy in the statistical error. The measurement sensibility of the water vapor mixing ration in the upper troposphere is 0.01 g/kg.

  4. Metaheuristics for the dynamic stochastic dial-a-ride problem with expected return transports.

    PubMed

    Schilde, M; Doerner, K F; Hartl, R F

    2011-12-01

    The problem of transporting patients or elderly people has been widely studied in literature and is usually modeled as a dial-a-ride problem (DARP). In this paper we analyze the corresponding problem arising in the daily operation of the Austrian Red Cross. This nongovernmental organization is the largest organization performing patient transportation in Austria. The aim is to design vehicle routes to serve partially dynamic transportation requests using a fixed vehicle fleet. Each request requires transportation from a patient's home location to a hospital (outbound request) or back home from the hospital (inbound request). Some of these requests are known in advance. Some requests are dynamic in the sense that they appear during the day without any prior information. Finally, some inbound requests are stochastic. More precisely, with a certain probability each outbound request causes a corresponding inbound request on the same day. Some stochastic information about these return transports is available from historical data. The purpose of this study is to investigate, whether using this information in designing the routes has a significant positive effect on the solution quality. The problem is modeled as a dynamic stochastic dial-a-ride problem with expected return transports. We propose four different modifications of metaheuristic solution approaches for this problem. In detail, we test dynamic versions of variable neighborhood search (VNS) and stochastic VNS (S-VNS) as well as modified versions of the multiple plan approach (MPA) and the multiple scenario approach (MSA). Tests are performed using 12 sets of test instances based on a real road network. Various demand scenarios are generated based on the available real data. Results show that using the stochastic information on return transports leads to average improvements of around 15%. Moreover, improvements of up to 41% can be achieved for some test instances. PMID:23543641

  5. Characteristics of direct detection 1.6μm CO2 DIAL with OPG transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, C.; Shibata, Y.; Abo, M.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in a QPM nonlinear optical frequency conversion efficienfy. The QPM condition is produced to use periodically poled ferroelectric crystals. An optical parametric oscillator (OPO), amplifier (OPA), and generator (OPG) devices are widely recognized as versatile coherent tunable spectroscopic sources. Many applications of PPLN-parametric radiation sources, such as laser remote sensing and molecular spectroscopy, require broadly tunable and narrow linewidth operation in the infrared region. We developed an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) transmitter for the first 1.6 μm CO2 DIAL. In order to improve the measurement accuracy of CO2 profiles, development of high power and wavelength stabilized laser system has been conducted. We have developed a new high-power 1.6 μm laser transmitter based on a parametric master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) system pumped by a LD-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser which has the injection seed laser locked to the iodine absorption line. The master oscillator is the OPG transmitter and the amplifier is the OPA transmitter. Since the OPO transmitter has a cavity mirror, running the system without mode hopping requires complex control of cavity length. By contrast, the OPG transmitter has no cavity mirror, so there is no need to control cavity length. We report detail characteristics of the direct detection 1.6 μm CO2 DIAL with the OPG transmitter. Moreover, we report the technique of the simultaneously measurement temperature profiles with the CO2 concentration profiles using a CO2 absorption profile because of improvement of measurement accuracy of the CO2 concentration. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  6. Ozone entrainment flux using ozone DIAL and Compact Wind Aerosol Lidar (CWAL) in Huntsville AL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Newchurch, M.; kuang, S.; Wang, L.; Cantrell, W.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have proved that the impact of high ozone amounts in the residual layer can account for up to 80% of the surface ozone maxima during the following day. This high ozone in the residual layer mixes into to the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) through the entrainment processes as the growth of PBL occurs in the morning. Conversely, anthropogenic pollutants emitted from the surface mix into the Free Troposphere (FT) and are transported to other places. Therefore, entrainment flux is one of the important connections between the local-scale/urban-scale and the regional scale. In this study, we will present a study of ozone entrainment fluxes using continuous observation by co-located ozone DIAL and Compact Wind Aerosol Lidar (CWAL) at the campus of University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). As a part of Tropospheric Ozone Lidar NETwork (TOLNET), UAH ozone DIAL can provide continuous ozone observation at the range of 125 m AGL to 12 km, with 10-min temporal resolution and 150 - 550 m vertical resolution [Kuang et al., 2013]. We also perform an ozone budget study using Dutch Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulation (DALES), reasonable approximations of dry deposition, in conjunction with ozone entrainment flux observations. We work towards building a comprehensive understanding of the quantitative impacts of ozone entrainment processes on surface ozone amounts in a medium-sized urban area like Huntsville AL. Shi Kuang, Michael J. Newchurch, John Burris, and Xiong Liu, "Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements," Appl. Opt. 52, 3557-3566 (2013)

  7. IIP Update: A Packaged Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Transceiver. Doppler Aerosol WiNd Lidar (DAWN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent Doppler wind lidar system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid Doppler wind lidar solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  8. Doppler Lidar Descent Sensor for Planetary Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amzajerdian, F.; Pierrottet, D. F.; Petway, L. B.; Hines, G. D.; Barnes, B. W.

    2012-06-01

    Future robotic and manned missions to Mars demand accurate knowledge of ground velocity and altitude to ensure soft landing at the designated landing location. To meet this requirement, a prototype Doppler lidar has been developed and demonstrated.

  9. Generalized Doppler Formula in a Nonstatic Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Peter G.

    1977-01-01

    Derives the general Doppler formula in a nonstatic universe using assumptions of special relativity, homogeneity and isotropy of the universe. Examples of applications to physical cosmology are given. (SL)

  10. Evaluation of a pulsed ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, M. K.

    1973-01-01

    The in vivo application of the pulsed ultrasound Doppler velocity meter (PUDVM) for measuring arterial velocity waveforms is reported. In particular, the performance of the PUDVM is compared with a hot film anemometer of proven accuracy.

  11. Student Microwave Experiments Involving the Doppler Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, F. Neff; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Described is the use of the Doppler Effect with microwaves in the measurement of the acceleration due to gravity of falling objects. The experiments described add to the repertoire of quantitative student microwave experiments. (Author/DS)

  12. High range resolution micro-Doppler analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammenga, Zachary A.; Smith, Graeme E.; Baker, Christopher J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses use of the micro-Doppler effect and the use of high range-resolution profiles to observe complex targets in complex target scenes. The combination of micro-Doppler and high range-resolution provides the ability to separate the motion of complex targets from one another. This ability leads to the differentiation of targets based on their micro-Doppler signatures. Without the high-range resolution, this would not be possible because the individual signatures would not be separable. This paper also addresses the use of the micro-Doppler information and high range-resolution profiles to generate an approximation of the scattering properties of a complex target. This approximation gives insight into the structure of the complex target and, critically, is created without using a pre-determined target model.

  13. Implementing torsional-mode Doppler ladar.

    PubMed

    Fluckiger, David U

    2002-08-20

    Laguerre-Gaussian laser modes carry orbital angular momentum as a consequence of their helical-phase front screw dislocation. This torsional beam structure interacts with rotating targets, changing the orbital angular momentum (azimuthal Doppler) of the scattered beam because angular momentum is a conserved quantity. I show how to measure this change independently from the usual longitudinal momentum (normal Doppler shift) and derive the apropos coherent mixing efficiencies for monostatic, truncated Laguerre and Gaussian-mode ladar antenna patterns. PMID:12206220

  14. Pulsed Doppler lidar airborne scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimarzio, C. A.; Mcvicker, D. B.; Morrow, C. E.; Negus, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    This report covers the work accomplished during the reporting period on Pulsed Doppler Lidar Airborne Scanner and describes plans for the next reporting period. The objectives during the current phase of the contract are divided into four phases. Phase 1 includes ground testing of the system and analysis of data from the 1981 Severe Storms Test Flights. Phase 2 consists of preflight preparation and planning for the 1983 flight series. The flight test itself will be performed during Phase 3, and Phase 4 consists of post-flight analysis and operation of the system after that flight test. The range profile from five samples taken during Flight 10, around 1700 Z is given. The lowest curve is taken from data collected upwind of Mt. Shasta at about 10,000 feet of altitude, in a clear atmosphere, where no signals were observed. It thus is a good representation of the noise level as a function of range. The next curve was taken downwind of the mountain, and shows evidence of atmospheric returns. There is some question as to whether the data are valid at all ranges, or some ranges are contaminated by the others.

  15. Pulsed Doppler lidar airborne scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimarzio, C. A.; McVicker, D. B.; Morrow, C. E.; Negus, C. C.

    1985-10-01

    This report covers the work accomplished during the reporting period on Pulsed Doppler Lidar Airborne Scanner and describes plans for the next reporting period. The objectives during the current phase of the contract are divided into four phases. Phase 1 includes ground testing of the system and analysis of data from the 1981 Severe Storms Test Flights. Phase 2 consists of preflight preparation and planning for the 1983 flight series. The flight test itself will be performed during Phase 3, and Phase 4 consists of post-flight analysis and operation of the system after that flight test. The range profile from five samples taken during Flight 10, around 1700 Z is given. The lowest curve is taken from data collected upwind of Mt. Shasta at about 10,000 feet of altitude, in a clear atmosphere, where no signals were observed. It thus is a good representation of the noise level as a function of range. The next curve was taken downwind of the mountain, and shows evidence of atmospheric returns. There is some question as to whether the data are valid at all ranges, or some ranges are contaminated by the others.

  16. Doppler-corrected differential detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Doppler in a communication system operating with a multiple differential phase-shift-keyed format (MDPSK) creates an adverse phase shift in an incoming signal. An open loop frequency estimation is derived from a Doppler-contaminated incoming signal. Based upon the recognition that, whereas the change in phase of the received signal over a full symbol contains both the differentially encoded data and the Doppler induced phase shift, the same change in phase over half a symbol (within a given symbol interval) contains only the Doppler induced phase shift, and the Doppler effect can be estimated and removed from the incoming signal. Doppler correction occurs prior to the receiver's final output of decoded data. A multiphase system can operate with two samplings per symbol interval at no penalty in signal-to-noise ratio provided that an ideal low pass pre-detection filter is employed, and two samples, at 1/4 and 3/4 of the symbol interval T sub s, are taken and summed together prior to incoming signal data detection.

  17. Doppler micro sense and avoid radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for small Sense and Avoid (SAA) systems for small and micro Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to avoid collisions with obstacles and other aircraft. The proposed SAA systems will give drones the ability to "see" close up and give them the agility to maneuver through tight areas. Doppler radar is proposed for use in this sense and avoid system because in contrast to optical or infrared (IR) systems Doppler can work in more harsh conditions such as at dusk, and in rain and snow. And in contrast to ultrasound based systems, Doppler can better sense small sized obstacles such as wires and it can provide a sensing range from a few inches to several miles. An SAA systems comprised of Doppler radar modules and an array of directional antennas that are distributed around the perimeter of the drone can cover the entire sky. These modules are designed so that they can provide the direction to the obstacle and simultaneously generate an alarm signal if the obstacle enters within the SAA system's adjustable "Protection Border". The alarm signal alerts the drone's autopilot to automatically initiate an avoidance maneuver. A series of Doppler radar modules with different ranges, angles of view and transmitting power have been designed for drones of different sizes and applications. The proposed Doppler radar micro SAA system has simple circuitry, works from a 5 volt source and has low power consumption. It is light weight, inexpensive and it can be used for a variety of small unmanned aircraft.

  18. Retroreflector for photonic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoski, Thomas J.; Coutu, Ronald A., Jr.; Starman, LaVern A.

    2009-08-01

    In order to meet the goals of the Department of Defense (DoD) for smaller and more accurate weapons, numerous projects are currently investigating the miniaturization of weapons and munition fuze components. One of these efforts is to characterize the performance of small detonators. The velocity of the flyer, the key component needed to initiate a detonation sequence, can be measured using a photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV). The purpose of this research was to develop a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device that would act as an optimal retroreflective surface for the PDV. Two MEMS solutions were explored: one using the PolyMUMPsTM fabrication process and one in-house fabrication design using silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers. The in-house design consisted of an array of corner reflectors created using an SOI wafer. Each corner reflector consisted of three separate mirror plates which were self-assembled by photoresist pad hinges. When heated to a critical temperature (typically 140-160 °C), the photoresist pads melted and the resulting surface tension caused each mirror to rotate into place. The resulting array of corner reflectors was then coated with a thin layer of gold to increase reflectivity. Despite the successful assembly of a PolyMUMPsTM corner reflector, assembling an array of these reflectors was found to be unfeasible. Although the SOI corner reflector design was completed, these devices were not fabricated in time for testing during this research. However, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) and optical cross section (OCS) of commercially available retroreflective tapes were measured. These results can be used as a baseline comparison for future testing of a fabricated SOI corner reflector array.

  19. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) via atmospheric aerosol (cloud) backscattering: recent results of coherent CO2 lidar measurements conducted at the Maui Space Surveillance Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willman, Benjamin C.; Kovacs, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Textron Systems, under the US Army Space and Missile Defense Command's Field Ladar Tactical Transition Demonstration program, has been evaluating coherently detected, atmospheric aerosol backscattering as a method to extend the utility of the DIAL technique. This paper present recently obtained long range, multi-wavelength DIAL measurements utilizing cloud formations and a laboratory positioned absorption test cell. Good agreement between cloud and continuous wave laboratory measurements of the absorption spectra of ammonia have been obtained.

  20. 2-μm Ho emitter-based coherent DIAL for CO(2) profiling in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Gibert, F; Edouart, D; Cénac, C; Le Mounier, F; Dumas, A

    2015-07-01

    We report on the use of a thulium-fiber-pumped holmium-based emitter in a coherent differential absorption lidar (CDIAL) experiment for high time and space resolution of CO(2) absorption field in the atmosphere. The 2-μm high-power dual-wavelength single-mode Q-switched Ho:YLF oscillator delivers 10-mJ pulses with a duration of 40 ns at 2 kHz. Both short pulse duration and high repetition rate were chosen to increase the DIAL precision and time and space resolution in coherent detection. The CDIAL provides 150-m range and 15-min time-resolved CO(2) absorption coefficient with a calculated instrumental error of 0.5% at 500 m and less than 2% at 1 km. Dry-air CO(2) mixing ratio estimates from the DIAL system are compared with simultaneous in situ gas analyzer measurements during a 20-h-long experiment. PMID:26125375

  1. Comparison of performance capabilities of spread spectrum coherent and direct detection CO2 DIAL systems and associated hardware fielding implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, Victor H.; Dryden, Gordon L.

    2002-07-01

    This paper reviews the performance of a conventional direct detection CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system with the coherent spread spectrum approach developed, validated and patented by Textron. The analysis shows that the coherent approach is far superior in terms of maximum attainable standoff range at a specified transmitter average power and substantially reduced system power and associated size and weight at a predetermined range. The requirements on local oscillator stability are fairly relaxed and the spread spectrum/coherent DIAL concept is fairly easy to implement. Performance parameter maps are presented for ground-based, low-altitude and high-altitude airborne systems with a range of aperture sizes and pulse formats.

  2. Development of 1.6 micron CW modulation ground-based DIAL system for CO2 monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Shumpei; Imaki, Masaharu; Hirano, Yoshihito; Ueno, Shinichi; Kawakami, Shuji; Nakajima, Masakatsu

    2008-12-01

    We have demonstrated the 1.6 micron CW modulation hard-target DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for CO2 sensing. In this system, ON and OFF wavelength laser lights are intensity modulated with CW modulation signal. Received lights of the two wavelengths from the hard-target are discriminated by modulation frequencies in electrical signal domain. Since the optical circuit is fiber-based, the system is compact, flexible, and reliable. It is shown that stable CO2 concentration measurement corresponding to 4 ppm(rms) can be realized in the measurement time of 32s. This measurement stability is better than those obtained by the conventional CO2 sensing DIAL systems in the same measurement time. And the diurnal change of the measured results is in good agreement with the ones measured by an in-situ CO2 meter.

  3. Stabilized 1.6μm OPG/OPA system for CO2 DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo, M.; Nagasawa, C.; Shibata, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Wavelength accuracy and stability are key requirements for CO2 differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We developed a high-power 1.6μm laser transmitter based on a parametric master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) system pumped by a LD-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser which has the injection seed laser locked to the iodine absorption line. The master oscillator is an optical parametric generator (OPG), based on an MgO-doped periodically poled LiTaO3 (PPMgLT) crystal. The OPGs do not require a cavity and instead rely on sufficient conversion efficiency to be obtained with a single pass through the crystal. The single-frequency oscillation of the OPG was achieved by injection seeding. The 1.6μm emission of the OPG is amplified by two-stage optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs). The each PPMgLT crystal was mounted on the copper holder, and the temperature control of the each holder was carried out within 0.01 K. The wavelength feedback system of the Nd:YAG seed laser is performed with the side locking of the iodine absorption spectrum (line No.1107) and the frequency stability is realized within 10 MHz rms. The on-line 1.6μm DFB seed laser is locked to the center of a CO2 absorption line with the Pound-Drever-Hall technique using a fiber coupled multipass CO2 gas cell. The off-line seed laser is locked using a thermally stabilized fiber coupled Fabry-Perot interferometer. For temperature measurement, we use offset locked seed laser using heterodyne technique. The beam quality of OPA was TEM00 mode, the pulse energy was 12 mJ at 500 Hz repetition rate and the frequency stability was less than 10MHz rms. The unique performances of this optical parametric system make a relevant transmitter for CO2 DIAL. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency. Reference D. Sakaisawa, C. Nagasawa, T. Nagai, M. Abo, Y. Shibata, H. Nagai, M. Nakazato, and T. Sakai, Development of a

  4. The leicester Doppler phantom--a digital electronic phantom for ultrasound pulsed Doppler system testing.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John; Martin, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Doppler flow and string phantoms have been used to assess the performance of ultrasound Doppler systems in terms of parameters such as sensitivity, velocity accuracy and sample volume registration. However, because of the nature of their construction, they cannot challenge the accuracy and repeatability of modern digital ultrasound systems or give objective measures of system performance. Electronic Doppler phantoms are able to make use of electronically generated test signals, which may be controlled precisely in terms of frequency, amplitude and timing. The Leicester Electronic Doppler Phantom uses modern digital signal processing methods and field programmable gate array technology to overcome some of the limitations of previously described electronic phantoms. In its present form, it is able to give quantitative graphical assessments of frequency response and range gate characteristics, as well as measures of dynamic range and velocity measurement accuracy. The use of direct acoustic coupling eliminates uncertainties caused by Doppler beam effects, such as intrinsic spectral broadening, but prevents their evaluation. PMID:20350689

  5. Proposal for a probabilistic 'dial-up' generator of Fock states in a traveling-wave optical field

    SciTech Connect

    Gerry, Christopher C.; Benmoussa, Adil

    2006-06-15

    We discuss a method for generating Fock (number) states in a single-mode traveling-wave optical field, based on a method we recently proposed for performing a quantum nondemolition measurement of parity and for the generation of parity eigenstates [C. C. Gerry, A. Benmoussa, and R. A. Campos, Phys. Rev. A 72, 053818 (2005)]. The approach is a kind of 'dial-up' scheme that is probabilistic but also depends partially on directed state reductive measurements.

  6. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Quick, C.R.; Zardecki, A.; Porch, W.M.; Whitehead, M.; Walters, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  7. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO2 differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Douglas H.; Petrin, Roger R.; MacKerrow, Edward P.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Quick, Charles R., Jr.; Zardecki, Andrew; Porch, William M.; Whitehead, Michael C.; Walters, Donald L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO2 differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. We will address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO2 DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  8. Spacecraft Doppler Tracking as a Xylophone Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo

    1996-01-01

    We discuss spacecraft Doppler tracking in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. By using the four-link radio system first proposed by Vessot and Levine, we derive a new method for removing from the combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. Our method provides also for reducing by several orders of magnitude, at selected Fourier components, the frequency fluctuations due to other noise sources, such as the clock on board the spacecraft or the antenna and buffeting of the probe by non-gravitational forces. In this respect spacecraft Doppler tracking can be regarded as a xylophone detector. Estimates of the sensitivities achievable by this xylophone are presented for two tests of Einstein's theory of relativity: searches for gravitational waves and measurements of the gravitational red shift. This experimental technique could be extended to other tests of the theory of relativity, and to radio science experiments that rely on high-precision Doppler measurements.

  9. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  10. Doppler-corrected differential detection of MPSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin K.; Divsalar, Dariush

    1989-01-01

    An open-loop technique is presented for estimating and correcting Doppler frequency shift in an M-ary differential phase-shift-keyed (MDPSK) receiver. The novelty of the scheme is based on the observation that whereas the change in phase of the received signal over a full symbol contains the sum of the data (phase) and the Doppler-induced phase shift, the same change in phase over half a symbol (within a given symbol interval) contains only the Doppler-induced phase shift. Thus, by proper processing, the latter can be estimated and removed from the former. Analytical and simulation results are given for the variance of the above estimator, and the error probability performance of the MDPSK receiver is evaluated in the presence of the Doppler correction. Next, the practical considerations associated with the application of this technique on bandlimited Nyquist channels are discussed and incorporated into the final design. It is shown that the receiver can, in the absence of timing jitter, be designed to allow combined Doppler correction and data detection with no penalty due to intersymbol interference (ISI). The effects of ISI due to timing jitter are assessed by computer simulation.

  11. A Fiber-Optic Coupled Telescope for Water Vapor DIAL Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Lonn, Frederick

    1998-01-01

    A fiber-optic coupled telescope of low complexity was constructed and tested. The major loss mechanisms of the optical system have been characterized. Light collected by the receiver mirror is focused onto an optical fiber, and the output of the fiber is filtered by an interference filter and then focused onto an APD detector. This system was used in lidar field measurements with a 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam. The results were encouraging. A numerical model used for calculation of the expected return signal agreed with the lidar return signal obtained. The assembled system was easy to align and operate and weighed about 8 kg for a 30 cm (12") mirror system. This weight is low enough to allow mounting of the fiber-optic telescope receiver system in a UAV. Furthermore, the good agreement between the numerical lidar model and the performance of the actual receiver system, suggests that this model may be used for estimation of the performance of this and other lidar systems in the future. Such telescopes are relatively easy to construct and align. The fiber optic cable allows easy placement of the optical detector in any position. These telescope systems should find widespread use in aircraft and space home DIAL water vapor receiver systems.

  12. Multi-wavelength injection seeded mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator for DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.S.; Stanion, K.B.; Deane, D.J.

    1996-01-27

    We have constructed and fielded a multi-wavelength injection seeded mid-IR OPO source for DIAL. This OPO system was built for ground based remote sensing measurements of species with both broad (300 cm{sup -1}) and narrow absorption bandwidths (0.07 cm{sup -1} FWHM). The OPO utilizes a single frequency tunable diode laser for the injection seeded signal wavelength in the region from 6400 to 6700 cm{sup -1} and an angle phase-matched 5 cm LiNbO3 crystal to provide large tuning excursions on a slow time scale. The pump was a diode pumped Nd:YAG MOPA (9398 cm{sup -1}) running at 180 Hz. This pump source was repeatedly injection seeded with a different wavelength on each of film sequential shots forming a set of three pulses having wavelength separations on the order of 0.4 cm{sup -1} at a three color set repetition rate of 60 Hz. This combination of OPO signal and pump source produced a set of three time staggered idler wavelengths separated by 0.4 cm{sup -1} with the center wavelength tunable from 2700 to 3000 cm{sup -1}. This OPO system was used in field test experiments to detect the release of chemicals from a standoff distance of 3.3 Km. We present key OPO design criteria, performance data, and numerical simulations that agree with our observations of pump induced spectral impurities in the OPO output.

  13. Compact mid-infrared DIAL lidar for ground-based and airborne pipeline monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtiarev, Egor V.; Geiger, Allen R.; Richmond, Richard D.

    2003-04-01

    We report the progress in the development of a compact mid-infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for ground-based and airborne monitoring of leaks in natural gas pipeline systems. This sensor, named Lidar II, weighs approximately 30 kg (70 lbs) and occupies a volume of 0.08 m3 (3.5 ft3). Lidar II can be used on the ground in a topographic mode or in a look-down mode from a helicopter platform. The 10-Hz pulse repetition rate and burst-mode averaging currently limit the airborne inspection speed to 30 km/h. The Lidar II laser transmitter employs an intracavity optical parametric oscillator. Wavelength tuning is accomplished through two mechanisms: a servo-controlled crystal rotation for slow and broad-band tuning and a fast piezo-activated wavelength shifter for on-line/off-line switching in less than 10 ms. The sensor operates in the 3.2-3.5-μm band with the primary focus on hydrocarbons and volatile organics. In the pipeline inspection work, the two main targets are methane and ethane, the latter chemical being important in preventing false positives. Initial results of Lidar II testing on actual pipeline leaks are reported. To supplement the mapping capabilities of Lidar II with range-resolved information, a short-range (less than 300 m) aerosol backscatter lidar is currently under development.

  14. Measurements of the effect of horizontal variability of atmospheric backscatter on dial measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, G. K.; Korb, C. L.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The horizontal variability of atmospheric backscatter may have a substantial effect on how Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) data must be taken and analyzed. To minimize errors, lidar pulse pairs are taken with time separations which are short compared to the time scales associated with variations in atmospheric backscatter. To assess the atmospheric variability for time scales which are long compared to the lidar pulse repetition rate, the variance of the lidar return signal in a given channel can be computed. The variances of the on-line, off-line, and ration of the on-line to off-line signals at given altitudes obtained with the dual solid-state Alexandrite laser system were calculated. These evaluations were made for both down-looking aircraft and up-looking ground-based lidar data. Data were taken with 200 microsecond separation between on-line and off-line laser pulses, 30 m altitude resolution, 5 Hz repetition rate, and the signal were normalized for outgoing laser energy.

  15. Field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for profiling water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Morley, B.; Moen, D.; Hayman, M.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    A field-deployable water vapor profiling instrument that builds on the foundation of the preceding generations of diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laboratory prototypes was constructed and tested. Significant advances are discussed, including a unique shared telescope design that allows expansion of the outgoing beam for eye-safe operation with optomechanical and thermal stability; multistage optical filtering enabling measurement during daytime bright-cloud conditions; rapid spectral switching between the online and offline wavelengths enabling measurements during changing atmospheric conditions; and enhanced performance at lower ranges by the introduction of a new filter design and the addition of a wide field-of-view channel. Performance modeling, testing, and intercomparisons are performed and discussed. In general, the instrument has a 150 m range resolution with a 10 min temporal resolution; 1 min temporal resolution in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere is demonstrated. The instrument is shown capable of autonomous long-term field operation - 50 days with a > 95% uptime - under a broad set of atmospheric conditions and potentially forms the basis for a ground-based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments needed for the atmospheric sciences research and forecasting communities.

  16. Dial Measurements of Free-Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in Huntsville, AL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; Burris, John; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system has been developed jointly by NASA and the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH). Two separated Nd:YAG pumped dye laser systems produce the laser pulses with wavelengths of 285 and 291 nm at 20 Hz frequency. The receiver is a Newtonian telescope with a 40 cm primary and a two-channel aft optics unit. The detection system currently uses photon counting to facilitate operations at the maximum achievable altitude. This lidar measures free-tropospheric ozone profiles between 4-10 km at Regional Atmospheric Profiling Laboratory for Discovery (RAPCD) in UAH campus (ASL 206 m) under both daytime and nighttime conditions. Frequent coincident ozonesonde flights and theoretical calculations provide evidence to indicate the retrieval accuracy ranges from approx.5% at 4 km to approx.60% at 10 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 30-minute integration. Three Hamamatsu 7400 PMTs and analog detection technique will be added on the current system to extend the measurement to approx.100 m above ground to monitor the PBL and lower tropospheric ozone variations.

  17. Field deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for profiling water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Morley, B.; Moen, D.; Hayman, M.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2014-11-01

    A field deployable water vapor profiling instrument that builds on the foundation of the preceding generations of diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laboratory prototypes has been constructed and tested. Significant advances are discussed, including: a unique shared telescope design that allows expansion of the outgoing beam for eye-safe operation with opto-mechanical and thermal stability, multi-stage optical filtering enabling measurement during daytime bright-cloud conditions, rapid spectral switching between the online and offline wavelengths enabling measurements during changing atmospheric conditions, and enhanced performance at lower ranges by the introduction of a new filter design and the addition of a wide field-of-view channel. Performance modeling, testing and intercomparisons have been performed and are discussed. In general, the instrument has 150 m range resolution with 10 min temporal resolution - 1 min temporal resolution in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere is demonstrated. The instrument was shown capable of autonomous long term field operation - 50 days with a >95% uptime - under a broad set of atmospheric conditions and potentially forms the basis for a ground-based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments needed for the atmospheric sciences research and forecasting communities.

  18. 1.6μm DIAL System for Measurements of CO2 Concentration Profiles in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.; Shibata, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a direct detection 1.6 μm differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to perform range-resolved measurements of vertical CO2 concentration profiles in the atmosphere. Our 1.6 μm DIAL system has a 60 cm telescope for vertical measurement and a 25 cm scanning telescope for horizontal measurement. This 1.6 μm DIAL system is also available to measure CO2 concentration profiles for daytime by using narrow-band interference filters. The 1.6 μm DIAL measurement was achieved successfully the vertical CO2 profile up to 7 km altitude with an error less than 1.0 % by integration time of 30 minutes and vertical resolution of 300 - 600 m. The CO2 DIAL was also operated with the range-height indicator (RHI) mode, and the 2-D measurement provided inhomogeneity in the boundary layer. The vertical distribution of CO2 concentration from 2 km to 7 km altitude has been observed using two telescopes with different apertures. We hope to get the data of the CO2 concentration from lower altitude to 7 km at the same time. Since the change of signal intensity is larger near the ground, it is also important to the install the photon counter with the faster count rate to expand the dynamic range. The high speed counter and the telescope system make the dynamic range expand more than 10 times and the vertical distribution observation of CO2 concentration from 0.5 km to 7 km altitude is performed. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency. References Sakaizawa, D., C. Nagasawa, T. Nagai, M. Abo, Y. Shibata, H. Nagai, M. Nakazato, and T. Sakai, Development of a 1.6μm differential absorption lidar with a quasi-phase-matching optical parametric oscillator and photon-counting detector for the vertical CO2 profile, Applied Optics, Vol.48, No.4, pp. 748-757, 2009. Stephens, B. B. et al., Weak Northern and Strong Tropical Land Carbon Uptake from Vertical Profiles of

  19. Compression of polyphase codes with Doppler shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, W. D.

    It is shown that pulse compression with sufficient Doppler tolerance may be achieved with polyphase codes derived from linear frequency modulation (LFM) and nonlinear frequency modulation (NLFM). Low sidelobes in range and Doppler are required especially for the radar search function. These may be achieved by an LFM derived phase coder together with Hamming weighting or by applying a PNL polyphase code derived from NLFM. For a discrete and known Doppler frequency with an expanded and mismatched reference vector a sidelobe reduction is possible. The compression is then achieved without a loss in resolution. A set up for the expanded reference gives zero sidelobes only in an interval around the signal peak or a least square minimization for all range elements. This version may be useful for target tracking.

  20. Inline Ultrasonic Rheometry by Pulsed Doppler

    SciTech Connect

    Pfund, David M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Pappas, Richard A.

    2006-12-22

    This will be a discussion of the non-invasive determination of the viscosity of a non-Newtonian fluid in laminar pipe flow over the range of shear rates present in the pipe. The procedure used requires knowledge of the flow profile in and the pressure drop along a long straight run of pipe. The profile is determined by using a pulsed ultrasonic Doppler velocimeter. This approach is ideal for making non-invasive, real-time measurements for monitoring and control. Rheograms of a shear thinning, thixotropic gel will be presented. The operating parameters and limitations of the Doppler-based instrument will be discussed. The most significant limitation is velocity gradient broadening of the Doppler spectra near the walls of the pipe. This limitation can be significant for strongly shear thinning fluids (depending also on the ratio of beam to pipe diameter and the transducer's insertion angle).

  1. Doppler tomography of accretion in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeghs, D.

    2004-03-01

    Since its conception, Doppler tomography has matured into a versatile and widely used tool. It exploits the information contained in the highly-structured spectral line-profiles typically observed in mass-transferring binaries. Using inversion techniques akin to medical imaging, it permits the reconstruction of Doppler maps that image the accretion flow on micro-arcsecond scales. I summarise the basic concepts behind the technique and highlight two recent results; the use of donor star emission as a means to system parameter determination, and the real-time movies of the evolving accretion flow in the cataclysmic variable WZ Sge during its 2001 outburst. I conclude with future opportunities in Doppler tomography by exploiting the combination of superior data sets, second generation reconstruction codes and simulated theoretical tomograms to delve deeper into the physics of accretion flows.

  2. Doppler experiments with Cassini radio system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comoretto, G.; Bertotti, B.; Iess, L.; Ambrosini, R.

    1992-01-01

    The radio system of the Cassini orbiter will include a K-alpha band downlink channel, mainly intended for telemetry. A K-alpha uplink has also been proposed to allow for a highly accurate gravitational wave experiment. The fourfold increase in frequency will reduce the plasma noise by a factor of 12 and will allow a Doppler accuracy better than 10 exp -15 for time scales of 10 exp 3 - 10 exp 4 s. Extensive Doppler measurements of the gravitational field of Saturn and its satellites can be performed, exploiting the induced change in the velocity of the spacecraft. Possible sources of low-frequency gravitational waves and errors in the Doppler link are discussed.

  3. Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, Mario; Molek, Christopher; Vesely, Annamaria; Lasem Team

    2013-06-01

    We report our progress towards adapting the well-known Global Dopper Velocimetry (GDV) technique, popular in the aerodynamics community, to the order-of-magnitude higher velocities pertinent to shock experiments. In GDV, the narrow-line illumination laser is tuned to an edge of a molecular iodine absorption line; an iodine gas cell converts the Doppler shift of the reflected light to transmitted intensity. We follow the suggestion in the original 1990 patent by Komine and broaden the absorption lines of alkali metal atoms by adding a buffer gas, thereby tuning the transmission edge spectrum to match the Doppler shift (surface velocity) range of interest. We use atomic rubidium vapor cells, with 0 to 1 atmosphere pressures of molecular nitrogen buffer gas, and coin the name ``Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered'' (RALF) Doppler velocimetry. [96ABW-2013-0036

  4. Analysis of Doppler lidar wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Doppler lidar and multiple Doppler radar data were obtained in a convectively mixed planetary boundary layer. The lidar measurements were possible due to scattering from existing aerosols; radar reflecting chaff was released in the atmosphere to make it visible to the multiple Doppler radar network. The data were analyzed to obtain detailed horizontal wind structures. The divergence of the horizontal wind was calculated and the anelastic continuity equation integrated to obtain vertical air motions. Differences between the areally averaged quantities and the grid point values provided a measure of the fluctuations in the wind components or the turbulent wind fluctuations. Vertical profiles of the mean winds and quantities related to the turbulent kinetic energy components and the turbulent momentum transfers were also calculated.

  5. Broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobb, E.D.

    1993-01-01

    The broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler is an instrument that determines velocity based on the Doppler principle by reflecting acoustic signals off sediment particles in the water. The instrument is capable of measuring velocity magnitude and direction throughout a water column and of measuring water depth. It is also capable of bottom tracking and can, therefore, keep track of its own relative position as it is moved across a channel. Discharge measurements can be made quickly and, based on limited tests, accurately with this instrument. ?? 1993.

  6. A visual demo of the Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papacosta, Pangratios

    2010-09-01

    Most physics teachers are familiar with the standard classroom demonstration of the Doppler effect. We invite students to explain the periodic variation of the pitch produced when we swirl a sounding buzzer over our heads. Students are quick to connect this phenomenon to everyday life experiences such as listening to the sound of the siren of a fast-approaching police car or the bell of an approaching train. In addition to these aural experiences, our understanding of the Doppler effect can be strengthened with a useful visual metaphor.

  7. Laser Doppler And Range Systems For Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, P. W.; Gagliardi, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Report discusses two types of proposed laser systems containing active transponders measuring distance (range) and line-of-sight velocity (via Doppler effect) between deep space vehicle and earth-orbiting satellite. Laser system offers diffraction advantage over microwave system. Delivers comparable power to distant receiver while using smaller transmitting and receiving antennas and less-powerful transmitter. Less subject to phase scintillations caused by passage through such inhomogeneous media as solar corona. One type of system called "incoherent" because range and Doppler measurements do not require coherence with laser carrier signals. Other type of system called "coherent" because successful operation requires coherent tracking of laser signals.

  8. Ultrasonographic Doppler Use for Female Reproduction Management.

    PubMed

    Bollwein, Heinrich; Heppelmann, Maike; Lüttgenau, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Transrectal color Doppler ultrasonography is a useful technique to get new information about physiologic and pathophysiologic alterations of the uterus and ovaries in female cattle. During all reproductive stages characteristic changes in uterine blood flow are observed. Cows with puerperal disturbances show delayed decrease in uterine blood flow in the first few weeks postparturition compared with healthy cows. Measurement of follicular blood flow is used to identify normally developing follicles and predict superovulatory response. Determination of luteal blood is more reliable than B-mode sonography to distinguish between functional and nonfunctional corpora lutea. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a promising tool to improve reproductive management in female cattle. PMID:26922117

  9. Velocity precision measurements using laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopheide, D.; Taux, G.; Narjes, L.

    1985-07-01

    A Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) was calibrated to determine its applicability to high pressure measurements (up to 10 bars) for industrial purposes. The measurement procedure with LDA and the experimental computerized layouts are presented. The calibration procedure is based on absolute accuracy of Doppler frequency and calibration of interference strip intervals. A four-quadrant detector allows comparison of the interference strip distance measurements and computer profiles. Further development of LDA is recommended to increase accuracy (0.1% inaccuracy) and to apply the method industrially.

  10. Laser Doppler velocimeter aerial spray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Eberle, W. R.; Howle, R. E.; Shrider, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental research program for measuring the location, spatial extent, and relative concentration of airborne spray clouds generated by agricultural aircraft is described. The measurements were conducted with a ground-based laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote sensing instrumentation, experimental tests, and the results of the flight tests are discussed. The cross section of the aerial spray cloud and the observed location, extent, and relative concentration of the airborne particulates are presented. It is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to track and monitor the transport and dispersion of aerial spray generated by an agricultural aircraft.

  11. Selection effects in Doppler velocity planet searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, Simon; Tinney, Chris; Jones, Hugh

    2008-05-01

    The majority of extra-solar planets have been discovered by measuring the Doppler velocities of the host star. Like all exoplanet detection methods, the Doppler method is rife with observational biases. Before any robust comparison of mass, orbital period and eccentricity distributions can be made with theory, a detailed understanding of these selection effects is required, something which up to now is lacking. We present here a progress report on our analysis of the selection effects present in Anglo-Australian Planet Search data, including the methodology used and some preliminary results.

  12. Photoacoustic Doppler Effect from Flowing Small Light-Absorbing Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-11-01

    From the flow of a suspension of micrometer-scale carbon particles, the photoacoustic Doppler shift is observed. As predicted theoretically, the observed Doppler shift equals half of that in Doppler ultrasound and does not depend on the direction of laser illumination. This new physical phenomenon provides a basis for developing photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry, which can potentially be used for detecting fluid flow in optically scattering media and especially low-speed blood flow of relatively deep microcirculation in biological tissue.

  13. Chaotic system for self-synchronizing Doppler measurement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Thomas L

    2005-03-01

    In a radar system, it is necessary to measure both range and velocity of a target. The movement of the target causes a Doppler shift of the radar signal, and the size of the Doppler shift is used to measure the velocity of the target. In this work, a chaotic drive-response system is simulated that detects a Doppler shift in a chaotic signal. The response system can detect Doppler shifts in more than one signal at a time. PMID:15836263

  14. Doppler effect of subluminal and superluminal sources in eight dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandola, H. C.; Rajput, B. S.

    1984-06-01

    The study of the relativistic Doppler effect of subliminal and superluminal sources has been undertaken in the eight-dimensional space. It has been shown that correct Doppler shifts are obtained in the external spaces of these sources and the conformal correspondence between Doppler effect curves holds in case of approaching and receeding sources but not in the transverse case.

  15. Satellite Doppler data processing using a microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.; Lynn, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    A microcomputer which was developed to compute ground radio beacon position locations using satellite measurements of Doppler frequency shift is described. Both the computational algorithms and the microcomputer hardware incorporating these algorithms were discussed. Results are presented where the microcomputer in conjunction with the NIMBUS-6 random access measurement system provides real time calculation of beacon latitude and longitude.

  16. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  17. Method for Canceling Ionospheric Doppler Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1982-01-01

    Unified transponder system with hydrogen-maser oscillators at both stations can compensate for both motional and ionospheric components of Doppler shift. Appropriate choices of frequency shift in output of mixer m3. System exploits proportionality between dispersive component of frequency shift and reciprocal of frequency to achieve cancellation of dispersive component at output.

  18. Analysis of Doppler radar windshear data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F.; Mckinney, P.; Ozmen, F.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to process Lincoln Laboratory Doppler radar data obtained during FLOWS testing at Huntsville, Alabama, in the summer of 1986, to characterize windshear events. The processing includes plotting velocity and F-factor profiles, histogram analysis to summarize statistics, and correlation analysis to demonstrate any correlation between different data fields.

  19. Three-dimensional power Doppler angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhenyu; Durand, Louis-Gilles; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to improve the quantification of peripheral arterial stenosis using 3D power Doppler angiography and investigate the potential of this technique for generating the arterial tree of the lower limb for surgery planning. Stenotic wall-less agar arteries were created to simulate the femoral and carotid arteries. 3D power Doppler angiograms of those arteries were generated under different hemodynamic conditions using a 3D ultrasound imaging system developed by the Life Imaging System Inc. The effect of multiple stenoses on the 3D power Doppler angiograms was investigated using the femoral arterial phantoms. Using the carotid arterial phantoms, 3D power Doppler angiograms of the carotid arteries were generated and compared with the known geometry. To image a whole lower limb arterial tree for lower limb salvage surgery planning, multiple scans are required to cover the entire field-of- view interested by using a water-coupled scanner. Preliminary in vivo test was performed using water-coupled scanning.

  20. Atmospheric laser Doppler velocimetry - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Research, development, and application of atmospheric laser Doppler velocimetry are overviewed. Consideration is given to operation principles of CO2 heterodyne systems. Global wind, pollution, V/STOL flow, and true airspeed measurements are outlined. Wind energy, dust devils, water spouts, tornadoes, and aircraft wake vortices are covered.

  1. Cross-frequency Doppler sensitive signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Ronald A.

    2005-04-01

    When there is relative motion between an acoustic source and a receiver, a signal can be Doppler shifted in frequency and enter or leave the processing bins of the conventional signal processor. The amount of the shift is determined by the frequency and the rate of change in the distance between the source and the receiver. This frequency Doppler shifting can cause severe reductions in the processors performance. Special cross-frequency signal processing algorithms have recently been developed to mitigate the effects of Doppler. They do this by using calculation paths that cut across frequency bins in order to follow signals during frequency shifting. Cross-frequency spectral grams of a fast-flying sound source were compared to conventional grams, to evaluate the performance of this new signal processing method. The Doppler shifts in the data ranged up to 70 contiguous frequency bins. The resulting cross-frequency grams showed that three paths provided small to no improvement. Four paths showed improvements for either up-frequency or down-frequency shifting, but not for both. Two paths showed substantial improvement for both up-frequency and down-frequency shifting. The cross-frequency paths will be defined, and comparisons between conventional and cross-frequency grams will be presented. [Work supported by Miltec Corporation.

  2. Calculating "g" from Acoustic Doppler Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Sebastian; Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, the Doppler effect for sound is introduced in high school and college physics courses. Students calculate the perceived frequency for several scenarios relating a stationary or moving observer and a stationary or moving sound source. These calculations assume a constant velocity of the observer and/or source. Although seldom…

  3. Characterizing the Vertical Processes of Ozone in Colorado's Front Range Using the GSFC Ozone DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, John T.; McGee, Thomas J.; Hoff, Raymond M.; Sumnicht, Grant; Twigg, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Although characterizing the interactions of ozone throughout the entire troposphere are important for health and climate processes, there is a lack of routine measurements of vertical profiles within the United States. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) has been developed and validated within the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet). Two scientifically interesting ozone episodes are presented that were observed during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER AQ) campaign at Ft. Collins, Colorado. The first case study, occurring between 22-23 July 2014, indicates enhanced concentrations of ozone at Ft. Collins during nighttime hours, which was due to the complex recirculation of ozone within the foothills of the Rocky Mountain region. Although quantifying the ozone increase aloft during recirculation episodes has been historically difficult, results indicate that an increase of 20 - 30 ppbv of ozone at the Ft. Collins site has been attributed to this recirculation. The second case, occurring between Aug 4-8th 2014, characterizes a dynamical exchange of ozone between the stratosphere and the troposphere. This case, along with seasonal model parameters from previous years, is used to estimate the stratospheric contribution to the Rocky Mountain region. Results suggest that a large amount of stratospheric air is residing in the troposphere in the summertime near Ft. Collins, CO. The results also indicate that warmer tropopauses are correlated with an increase in stratospheric air below the tropopause in the Rocky Mountain Region.

  4. Doppler optical coherence tomography of retinal circulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ou; Wang, Yimin; Konduru, Ranjith K; Zhang, Xinbo; Sadda, SriniVas R; Huang, David

    2012-01-01

    Noncontact retinal blood flow measurements are performed with a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a circumpapillary double circular scan (CDCS) that scans around the optic nerve head at 3.40 mm and 3.75 mm diameters. The double concentric circles are performed 6 times consecutively over 2 sec. The CDCS scan is saved with Doppler shift information from which flow can be calculated. The standard clinical protocol calls for 3 CDCS scans made with the OCT beam passing through the superonasal edge of the pupil and 3 CDCS scan through the inferonal pupil. This double-angle protocol ensures that acceptable Doppler angle is obtained on each retinal branch vessel in at least 1 scan. The CDCS scan data, a 3-dimensional volumetric OCT scan of the optic disc scan, and a color photograph of the optic disc are used together to obtain retinal blood flow measurement on an eye. We have developed a blood flow measurement software called "Doppler optical coherence tomography of retinal circulation" (DOCTORC). This semi-automated software is used to measure total retinal blood flow, vessel cross section area, and average blood velocity. The flow of each vessel is calculated from the Doppler shift in the vessel cross-sectional area and the Doppler angle between the vessel and the OCT beam. Total retinal blood flow measurement is summed from the veins around the optic disc. The results obtained at our Doppler OCT reading center showed good reproducibility between graders and methods (<10%). Total retinal blood flow could be useful in the management of glaucoma, other retinal diseases, and retinal diseases. In glaucoma patients, OCT retinal blood flow measurement was highly correlated with visual field loss (R(2)>0.57 with visual field pattern deviation). Doppler OCT is a new method to perform rapid, noncontact, and repeatable measurement of total retinal blood flow using widely available Fourier-domain OCT instrumentation. This new technology may improve the

  5. A MAGNETIC CALIBRATION OF PHOTOSPHERIC DOPPLER VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H.; Sun, Xudong

    2013-03-10

    The zero point of measured photospheric Doppler shifts is uncertain for at least two reasons: instrumental variations (from, e.g., thermal drifts); and the convective blueshift, a known correlation between intensity and upflows. Accurate knowledge of the zero point is, however, useful for (1) improving estimates of the Poynting flux of magnetic energy across the photosphere, and (2) constraining processes underlying flux cancellation, the mutual apparent loss of magnetic flux in closely spaced, opposite-polarity magnetogram features. We present a method to absolutely calibrate line-of-sight (LOS) velocities in solar active regions (ARs) near disk center using three successive vector magnetograms and one Dopplergram coincident with the central magnetogram. It exploits the fact that Doppler shifts measured along polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the LOS magnetic field determine one component of the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field, and optimizes consistency between changes in LOS flux near PILs and the transport of transverse magnetic flux by LOS velocities, assuming that ideal electric fields govern the magnetic evolution. Previous calibrations fitted the center-to-limb variation of Doppler velocities, but this approach cannot, by itself, account for residual convective shifts at the limb. We apply our method to vector magnetograms of AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and find clear evidence of offsets in the Doppler zero point in the range of 50-550 m s{sup -1}. In addition, we note that a simpler calibration can be determined from an LOS magnetogram and Dopplergram pair from the median Doppler velocity among all near-disk-center PIL pixels. We briefly discuss shortcomings in our initial implementation, and suggest ways to address these. In addition, as a step in our data reduction, we discuss the use of temporal continuity in the transverse magnetic field direction to correct apparently

  6. Acute hemodialysis effects on doppler echocardiographic indices.

    PubMed

    Abid, Leila; Rekik, Hajer; Jarraya, Fayçal; Kharrat, Ilyes; Hachicha, Jamil; Kammoun, Samir

    2014-07-01

    Conventional echocardiographic (ECHO) parameters of systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricular (LV) have been shown to be load dependent. However, the impact of pre-load reduction on tissue Doppler (TD) parameters of LV function is incompletely understood. To evaluate the effect of a single hemodialysis (HD) session on LV systolic and diastolic function using pulsed Doppler echocardiography and pulsed tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), we studied 81 chronic HD patients (40 males; mean age 52.4 ± 16.4 years) with these tools. ECHO parameters were obtained 30 min before and 30 min after HD. Fluid volume removed by HD was 1640 ± 730 cm³. HD led to reduction in LV end-diastolic volume (P <0.001), end-systolic volume (P <0.001), left atrium area (P <0.001), peak early (E-wave) trans-mitral flow velocity (P <0.001), the ratio of early to late Doppler velocities of diastolic mitral inflow (P <0.001) and aortic time velocity integral (P <0.001). No significant change in peak S velocity of pulmonary vein flow after HD was noted. Early and late diastolic (E') TDI velocities and the ratio of early to late TDI diastolic velocities (E'/A') on the lateral side of the mitral annulus decreased significantly after HD (P = 0.013; P = 0.007 and P = 0.008, respectively). Velocity of flow progression (Vp) during diastole was not affected by pre-load reduction. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure and the diameter of the inferior vena cava decreased significantly (P <0.001 and P <0.001, respectively) after HD. We conclude that most of the Doppler-derived indices of diastolic function are pre-load-dependent and velocity of flow progression was minimally affected by pre-load reduction in HD patients. PMID:24969184

  7. The Novel Nonlinear Adaptive Doppler Shift Estimation Technique and the Coherent Doppler Lidar System Validation Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    The signal processing aspect of a 2-m wavelength coherent Doppler lidar system under development at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia is investigated in this paper. The lidar system is named VALIDAR (validation lidar) and its signal processing program estimates and displays various wind parameters in real-time as data acquisition occurs. The goal is to improve the quality of the current estimates such as power, Doppler shift, wind speed, and wind direction, especially in low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) regime. A novel Nonlinear Adaptive Doppler Shift Estimation Technique (NADSET) is developed on such behalf and its performance is analyzed using the wind data acquired over a long period of time by VALIDAR. The quality of Doppler shift and power estimations by conventional Fourier-transform-based spectrum estimation methods deteriorates rapidly as SNR decreases. NADSET compensates such deterioration in the quality of wind parameter estimates by adaptively utilizing the statistics of Doppler shift estimate in a strong SNR range and identifying sporadic range bins where good Doppler shift estimates are found. The authenticity of NADSET is established by comparing the trend of wind parameters with and without NADSET applied to the long-period lidar return data.

  8. An electronic Doppler signal generator for assessing continuous-wave ultrasonic Doppler flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallwood, R. H.; Dixon, P.

    1986-03-01

    The design and performance of the electric Doppler signal generator are described. The features of the CW ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter, which operates in the 2-10 MHz range, that are relevant to the design of the generator are examined. Methods for evaluating the bandwidth, dynamic range, directional separation, and linearity of the zero-crossing detector are discussed. The use of a polyphase network as a phase shifter to generate a single sideband (SSB) signal is analyzed. The SSB generation is performed at a frequency of 100 kHz and the advantages of generation at this frequency are stated. The selection of proper SSB signals for the system is investigated. The performance of the Doppler signal generator is evaluated with a frequency analyzer; sideband rejection ratios and phase error in the quadrature oscillator are calculated. The Doppler generator was applied to a CW flowmeter and output signal levels were measured. The test reveals that the Doppler signal generator's performance exceeds the flowmeter requirements; rejection of the unwanted sideband exceeds 40 dB for Doppler frequencies up to 10 kHz, which is the minimum upper frequency for 10 MHz flowmeters.

  9. DIAL with heterodyne detection including speckle noise: Aircraft/shuttle measurements of O3, H2O, and NH3 with pulsed tunable CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockman, P.; Hess, R. V.; Staton, L. D.; Bair, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    Atmospheric trace constituent measurements with higher vertical resolution than attainable with passive radiometers are discussed. Infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL), which depends on Mie scattering from aerosols, has special advantages for tropospheric and lower stratospheric applications and has great potential importance for measurements from shuttle and aircraft. Differential absorption lidar data reduction involves comparing large amplitude signals which have small differences. The accuracy of the trace constituent concentration inferred from DIAL measurements depends strongly on the errors in determining the amplitude of the signals. Thus, the commonly used SNR expression (signal divided by noise in the absence of signal) is not adequate to describe DIAL measurement accuracy and must be replaced by an expression which includes the random coherent (speckle) noise within the signal. A comprehensive DIAL computer algorithm is modified to include heterodyne detection and speckle noise. Examples for monitoring vertical distributions of O3, H2O, and NH3 using a ground-, aircraft-, or shuttle-based pulsed tunable CO2 laser DIAL system are given.

  10. High Power and Frequency-Agile Optical Parametric Oscillators for Airborne DIAL Measurements of CH4 and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Shuman, T.; Chuang, T.; Hair, J. W.; Refaat, T. F.; Ismail, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Notari, A.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) has the second largest radiative forcing of the long-lived greenhouse gasses (GHG) after carbon dioxide. However, methane's much shorter atmospheric lifetime and much stronger warming potential make its radiative forcing equivalent to that for CO2 over a 20-year time horizon which makes CH4 a particularly attractive target for mitigation strategies. Similar to CH4, water vapor (H2O) is the most dominant of the short-lived GHG in the atmosphere and plays a key role in many atmospheric processes. Atmospheric H2O concentrations span over four orders of magnitude from the planetary boundary layer where high impact weather initiates to lower levels in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) where water vapor has significant and long term impacts on the Earth's radiation budget. NASA Langley has fostered the technology development with Fibertek, Inc. to develop frequency agile and high power (> 3 W) pulsed lasers using similar architectures in the 1645 nm and 935 nm spectral bands for DIAL measurements of CH4 and H2O, respectively. Both systems utilize high power 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency Nd:YAG lasers to generate high power laser emission at the desired wavelength via optical parametric oscillators (OPO). The CH4 OPO, currently in its final build stage in a SBIR Phase II program has demonstrated >2 W average power with injection seeding from a distributed feedback (DFB) laser during risk reduction experiments. The H2O OPO has demonstrated high power operation (>2 W) during the SBIR Phase I program while being injection seeded with a DFB laser, and is currently funded via an SBIR Phase II to build a robust system for future integration into an airborne water vapor DIAL system capable of profiling from the boundary layer up to the UTLS. Both systems have demonstrated operation with active OPO wavelength control to allow for optimization of the DIAL measurements for operation at different altitudes and geographic regions. An

  11. Doppler lidar results from the San Gorgonio Pass experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Skarda, J. R.; Renne, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    During FY-84, the Doppler Lidar data from the San Gorgonio Pass experiments were analyzed, evaluated, and interpreted with regard to signal strength, signal width, magnitude and direction of velocity component and a goodness parameter associated with the expected noise level of the signal. From these parameters, a screening criteria was developed to eliminate questionable data. For the most part analysis supports the validity of Doppler Lidar data obtained at San Gorgonio Pass with respect to the mean velocity magnitude and direction. The question as to whether the Doppler width could be interpreted as a measure of the variance of the turbulence within the Doppler Lidar System (DLS) focal volume was not resolved. The stochastic nature of the Doppler broadening from finite residence time of the particles in the beam as well as other Doppler broadening phenomenon tend to mask the Doppler spread associated with small scale turbulence. Future tests with longer pulses may assist in better understanding.

  12. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  13. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104–5  ×  107 microbubbles ml‑1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75–366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s‑1, prior to the onset

  14. Normal Echocardiographic Measurements in a Korean Population Study: Part II. Doppler and Tissue Doppler Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Oh; Shin, Mi-Seung; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Jung, Hae Ok; Park, Jeong Rang; Sohn, Il Suk; Kim, Hyungseop; Park, Seong-Mi; Yoo, Nam Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Lee, Mi-Rae; Park, Jin-Sun; Shim, Chi Young; Kim, Dae-Hee; Shin, Dae-Hee; Shin, Gil Ja; Shin, Sung Hee; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Lee, Sang Yeub; Kim, Woo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic and functional evaluation with Doppler and tissue Doppler study as a part of comprehensive echocardiography is essential but normal reference values have never been reported from Korean normal population especially according to age and sex. Methods Using Normal echOcaRdiographic Measurements in a KoreAn popuLation study subjects, we obtained normal reference values for Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiography including tricuspid annular velocities according to current guidelines and compared values according to gender and age groups. Results Mitral early diastolic (E) and late diastolic (A) velocity as well as E/A ratio were significantly higher in women compared to those in men. Conversely, mitral peak systolic and late diastolic annular velocity in both septal and lateral mitral annulus were significantly lower in women compared to those in men. However, there were no significant differences in both septal and lateral mitral early diastolic annular (e') velocity between men and women. In both men and women, mitral E velocity and its deceleration time as well as both E/A and E/e' ratio considerably increased with age. There were no significant differences in tricuspid inflow velocities and tricuspid lateral annular velocities between men and women except e' velocity, which was significantly higher in women compared to that in men. However, changes in both tricuspid inflow and lateral annular velocities according to age were similar to those in mitral velocities. Conclusion Since there were significant differences in Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiographic variables between men and women and changes according to age were even more considerable in both gender groups, normal Doppler echocardiographic values should be differentially applied based on age and sex. PMID:27358707

  15. Effects of transducer, velocity, Doppler angle, and instrument settings on the accuracy of color Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S F

    2001-04-01

    The accuracy of a commercial color Doppler ultrasound (US) system was assessed in vitro using a rotating torus phantom. The phantom consisted of a thin rubber tube filled with a blood-mimicking fluid, joined at the ends to form a torus. The torus was mounted on a disk suspended in water, and rotated at constant speeds by a motor. The torus fluid was shown in a previous study to rotate as a solid body, so that the actual fluid velocity was dependent only on the motor speed and sample volume radius. The fluid velocity could, thus, be easily compared to the color Doppler-derived velocity. The effects of instrument settings, velocity and the Doppler angle was assessed in four transducers: a 2.0-MHz phased-array transducer designed for cardiac use, a 4.0-MHz curved-array transducer designed for general thoracic use, and two linear transducers designed for vascular use (one 4.0 MHz and one 6.0 MHz). The color Doppler accuracy was found to be significantly dependent on the transducer used, the pulse-repetition frequency and wall-filter frequency, the actual fluid velocity and the Doppler angle (p < 0.001 by analysis of variance). In particular, the phased array and curved array were observed to be significantly more accurate than the two linear arrays. The torus phantom was found to provide a sensitive measure of color Doppler accuracy. Clinicians need to be aware of these effects when performing color Doppler US exams. PMID:11368866

  16. Development of Compact 1.6 μm DIAL System for Measurement of Lower-Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, C.; Shibata, Y.; Abo, M.

    2014-12-01

    For the detailed analysis of forest carbon dynamics and CO2 fluxes of urban area, the CO2 concentration measurement techniques with high spatial and temporal resolution are required in the lower atmosphere. We had developed the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system to achieve high accurate measurements of vertical CO2 profiles and the vertical distribution of CO2 concentration from 2 km to 7 km altitude has been observed1. In order to measure the CO2 concentration distribution in the lower altitude, the dynamic range of the photon counter and the output power of transmitter of the CO2 DIAL have improved. We develope the compact 1.6 μm CO2 DIAL with the high-speed photon counter (10 GHz) and the small power transmitter to perform high-precision measurements of CO2 concentration profiles in the lower atmosphere. This compact mobile DIAL system has a 2 mJ OPG transmitter and a 25 cm coaxial telescope for measurements of limitted range. As the transmitter beam of this DIAL system is able to scan from -4 degree to 52 degree with elevation angle, the vertical distribution of lower CO2 concentration as well as the horizontal distribution from short range can be measured with high precision. The compact DIAL was conducted test observations and achieved successfully measurements of CO2 concentration profiles for the range from 0.25 to 3 km with integration time of 30 minutes and range resolution of 300 m. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency. REFERENCES Y. Shibata, C. Nagasawa, M. Abo, Proc. SPIE 8894, 889406 (2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2029359

  17. ROTATIONAL DOPPLER BEAMING IN ECLIPSING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, Paul J.

    2012-01-20

    In eclipsing binaries the stellar rotation of the two components will cause a rotational Doppler beaming during eclipse ingress and egress when only part of the eclipsed component is covered. For eclipsing binaries with fast spinning components this photometric analog of the well-known spectroscopic Rossiter-McLaughlin effect can exceed the strength of the orbital effect. Example light curves are shown for a detached double white dwarf binary, a massive O-star binary and a transiting exoplanet case, similar to WASP-33b. Inclusion of the rotational Doppler beaming in eclipsing systems is a prerequisite for deriving the correct stellar parameters from fitting high-quality photometric light curves and can be used to determine stellar obliquities as well as, e.g., an independent measure of the rotational velocity in those systems that may be expected to be fully synchronized.

  18. Design of a Doppler reflectometer for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. D. Nam, Y. U.; Seo, Seong-Heon; Kim, Y. S.

    2014-11-15

    A Doppler reflectometer has been designed to measure the poloidal propagation velocity on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. It has the operating frequency range of V-band (50-75 GHz) and the monostatic antenna configuration with extraordinary mode (X-mode). The single sideband modulation with an intermediate frequency of 50 MHz is used for the heterodyne measurement with the 200 MHz in-phase and quadrature (I/Q) phase detector. The corrugated conical horn antenna is used to approximate the Gaussian beam propagation and it is installed together with the oversized rectangular waveguides in the vacuum vessel. The first commissioning test of the Doppler reflectometer system on the KSTAR tokamak is planned in the 2014 KSTAR experimental campaign.

  19. Uterine artery Doppler and prediction of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Lovgren, Todd R; Dugoff, Lorraine; Galan, Henry L

    2010-12-01

    Identifying patients at risk for preeclampsia would allow an increase in perinatal surveillance and possibly decrease the inherent maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality associated with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia. First and second trimester uterine artery Doppler velocimetry is a sensitive screening tool for the detection of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) requiring delivery before 34 weeks. The performance of uterine artery Doppler velocimetry as a screening test depends on the prevalence of the adverse outcome in the studied population and whether the adverse outcomes are assessed individually or collectively as a group. Future research in this area should focus on identification of additional markers that may be incorporated into a prediction model for early identification of patients at risk for adverse outcomes. PMID:21048456

  20. The Doppler spread theory and parameterization revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Colin O.

    2004-07-01

    The author's earlier Doppler Spread Theory (DST) and Doppler Spread Parameterization (DSP) are revisited with a new understanding of the dichotomous roles played by nonlinearity in Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates, respectively. An embryo Lagrangian DST is introduced and employed to assess the original DST. Earlier results near the Eulerian spectral peak are found to be reasonably valid, whereas those at greater vertical wavenumber are confirmed to have produced too much spreading. The earlier DSP is found to need little if any change, though specific values are suggested for its two most important ``fudge factors''. In a more general context, the continuing identity of a wave undergoing certain nonlinear interactions with other waves is discussed.

  1. Doppler ultrasound studies in pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Tinkanen, H; Kujansuu, E

    1992-01-01

    Ten women with tubo-ovarian abscess caused by pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) were investigated by transvaginal Doppler ultrasound during the acute and healing phases of the infection. The pulsatility index (PI) of the uterine arteries was measured and compared with the values obtained from 19 healthy women. Each control patient was investigated three times during a single menstrual cycle. In PID patients, the PI values were significantly lower than in controls in the same phase of the menstrual cycle. When C-reactive protein was > 50, the PI values were lowest and reverted to normal values when the infection subsided. In a case of chronic infection, the PI did not rise to normal despite normal infection parameters. Doppler ultrasound seems to offer a new method of assessing PID. PMID:1487185

  2. Minior Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan E. Hertel; Dwayne Blaylock

    2008-04-10

    The "Minor Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment" was a Department of Energy (DOE) U-NERI funded project intended to assess the viability of using either the FLATTOP or the COMET critical assembly to measure high temperature Doppler coefficients. The goal of the project was to calculate using the MCNP5 code the gram amounts of Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-241, AM-241, AM-242m, Am-243, and CM-244 needed to produce a 1E-5 in reactivity for a change in operating temperature 800C to 1000C. After determining the viability of using the assemblies and calculating the amounts of each actinide an experiment will be designed to verify the calculated results. The calculations and any doncuted experiments are designed to support the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative in conducting safety analysis of advanced fast reactor or acceoerator-driven transmutation systems with fuel containing high minor actinide content.

  3. Measuring Doppler Beaming with Kepler and TESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga, Laura; Jackiewicz, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler mission offered unparalleled insight into stellar systems. Due to Kepler's high precision photometry, we can study the reflected light from a planet, the ellipsoidal variations of a star, and the small Doppler beaming signal due to the gravitational interaction between a planet and host star. To predict how the beaming signal varies as a function of stellar system parameters, we numerically simulate the beaming signals both Kepler and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) would detect. We predict what mass planets TESS will be capable of detecting given the solar neighborhood population of stars and known population of exoplanets. Doppler beaming is largest for massive, short-period planets around cool stars and is more easily detectable by Kepler than TESS. Kepler's advantage is its bluer bandpass, longer time baseline, and higher precision.

  4. Straylight correction to Doppler rotation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, B. N.

    1985-07-01

    The correction of the Pierce and LoPresto (1984) Doppler data on the plasma rotation rate for stray light increases the observed equatorial rotation velocity from 1977 to 2004 m/sec. This correction has an uncertainty of approximately 10 m/sec, because the accurate form of the stray light function is not available. The correction is noted to be largest for the blue lines, in virtue of increased scattering, and for the weak lines, due to the limb effect.

  5. Doppler, Johann Christian Andreas (1803-53)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Born in Salzburg, Austria, Doppler studied and taught mathematics in Vienna. On the verge, because of economic hardship, of emigrating to America, he was offered posts in Prague. Despite huge teaching loads, he was able to carry out some research of his own (in the face of complaints of neglect by his students). In 1842 read a paper to the Royal Bohemian Society `On the colored light of the doubl...

  6. Directional acoustic measurements by laser Doppler velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Overbey, R. L.; Testerman, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimeters (LDVs) are used as velocity microphones to measure sound pressure level in the range from 90 to 130 dB, spectral components, and two-point correlation functions for acoustic-noise source identification. Close agreement between LDV and microphone data is observed. Directional sensitivity and the ability to measure remotely make LDVs useful tools for acoustic measurement where placement of any physical probe is difficult or undesirable, as in the diagnosis of jet noise.

  7. Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, R. K.; Sivaraman, C.; Shippert, T. R.; Riihimaki, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    Wind speed and direction, together with pressure, temperature, and relative humidity, are the most fundamental atmospheric state parameters. Accurate measurement of these parameters is crucial for numerical weather prediction. Vertically resolved wind measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer are particularly important for modeling pollutant and aerosol transport. Raw data from a scanning coherent Doppler lidar system can be processed to generate accurate height-resolved measurements of wind speed and direction in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  8. Coastal salinity measurement using a Doppler Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Benjamin S.; Tatnall, Adrian R. L.; Lewis, Hugh G.

    2012-10-01

    Coastal salinity is characterised by large and variable salinity contrasts on relatively small scales. Measurements of salinity at a resolution compatible with these coastal regions on a regular basis would provide a rich source of information that could be used for a number of applications that have a fundamental bearing on the world's lifestyle. Doppler radiometry offers an approach to capture such measurements, as it reduces the number of required antennas needed to form an image, compared with an Interferometer type instrument. In this work, a Doppler Radiometer type instrument on free-flying satellites is introduced. This approach removes the need for a physical connection between all the antennas, affords the system a degree of reconfigurability, yet is still able to provide data of sufficient resolution. A Y-shaped central hub (similar to the SMOS configuration) is employed with additional antennas mounted on free flying platforms surrounding the central hub. The additional baselines formed between the antennas of the free flying satellites and central hub as well as between the free flying satellites extend the u-v coverage beyond that of just the central hub. The spatial resolution of a Doppler Radiometer system with a Y-shaped hub with a SMOS configuration of antennas, with each arm extended by five 6 m spaced free flying antennas would be of the order of 5 km, when imaging from 800 km. This paper will present some initial results from a study into an instrument concept that could provide coastal salinity measurements at microwave wavelengths. The study focuses on antenna array design and on quantifying the improvement in spatial resolution available by using this method, and includes an investigation into the effects of the relative motion between the hub and the free flying satellites on the imaging. Further, whilst this paper focuses on the application of the Doppler Radiometer to salinity measurement, the techniques described are applicable to other

  9. Progress Toward an Autonomous Field Deployable Diode Laser Based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Profiling Water Vapor in the Lower Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasky, K. S.; Spuler, S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Moen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Water vapor is the most dominant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and plays an important role in many key atmospheric processes associated with both weather and climate. Water vapor is highly variable in space and time due to large scale transport and biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Having long-term, high-resolution, vertical profiles of water vapor will help to better understand the water vapor structure and variability and its associated impact on weather and climate. A diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for full-time water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere has been demonstrated at Montana State University. This prototype instrument has the potential to form the basis of a ground based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments that can provide important information on the spatial and temporal variability of water vapor in the lower troposphere. To achieve this potential, major improvements to the prototype instrument need to be implemented and demonstrated including developing a laser transmitter capable of long term operation and modifying the optical receiver to make measurement below 0.5 km. During the past year, work on incorporating a new laser transmitter based on two distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) diode lasers, one operating at the on-line/side-line wavelength and the second operating at the off-line wavelength to injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration has been completed. Recent work on the optical receiver is driven by the fact that the majority of the atmospheric water vapor resides below 2 km. The current single channel DIAL receiver has a narrow field of view and does not come in to full overlap until approximately 2 km. A two channel DIAL receiver has been designed that will allow the DIAL to achieve full overlap at ranges of less the 0.5 km providing significant improvement to the instrument performance. A discussion of

  10. Laser Doppler systems in pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. R.; Sonnenschein, C. M.; Herget, W. F.; Huffaker, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports on a program undertaken to determine the feasibility of using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) to measure smoke-stack gas exit velocity, particulate concentration, and mass flow. Measurements made with a CO2 laser Doppler radar system at a coal-burning power plant are compared with in-stack measurements made by a pitot tube. The operational principles of a LDV are briefly described along with the system employed in the present study. Data discussed include typical Doppler spectra from smoke-stack effluents at various laser elevation angles, the measured velocity profile across the stack exit, and the LDV-measured exit velocity as a function of the exit velocity measured by the in-stack instrument. The in-stack velocity is found to be about 14% higher than the LDV velocity, but this discrepancy is regarded as a systematic error. In general, linear relationships are observed between the laser data, the exit velocity, and the particulate concentration. It is concluded that an LDV has the capability of determining both the mass concentration and the mass flow from a power-plant smoke stack.

  11. Laser Doppler measurement techniques for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Two techniques are proposed for using laser links to measure the relative radial velocity of two spacecraft. The first technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on a transponded radio-frequency subcarrier. The subcarrier intensity-modulates reciprocating laser beams. The second technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on an optical frequency carrier which is transponded between spacecraft using optical Costas loops. The first technique might be used in conjunction with noncoherent optical communications, while the second technique is compatible with coherent optical communications. The first technique simultaneously exploits the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the maturity of radio-frequency phase-locked loop technology. The second technique exploits both the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the large Doppler effect at optical frequencies. The second technique has the potential for greater accuracy; unfortunately, it is more difficult to implement since it involves optical Costas loops.

  12. Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, George D.; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Mary-land, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other sensors will be presented. A simulation and data product for wind measurement at Venus will be presented.

  13. Compact Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) for an airborne ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Storm, Mark E.; Marsh, Waverly D.; Petway, Larry B.; Edwards, William C.; Barnes, James C.

    2001-02-01

    A compact and high-pulse-energy Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) has been developed for an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to study the distributions and concentrations of the ozone throughout the troposphere. The Ti:Sapphire laser, pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and seeded by a single mode diode laser, is operated either at 867 nm or at 900 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 20 Hz. High energy laser pulses (more than 110 mJ/pulse) at 867 nm or 900 nm with a desired beam quality have been achieved and utilized to generate its third harmonics at 289nm or 300nm, which are on-line and off-line wavelengths of an airborne ozone DIAL. After experimentally compared with Beta-Barium Borate (b-BaB2O4 or BBO) nonlinear crystals, two Lithium Triborate (LBO) crystals (5'5'20 mm3) are selected for the Third Harmonic Generation (THG). In this paper, we report the Ti:Sapphire laser at 900nm and its third harmonics at 300nm. The desired high ultraviolet (UV) output pulse energy is more than 30mJ at 300nm and the energy conversion efficiency from 900nm to 300nm is 30%.

  14. UMEL: A new regression tool to identify measurement peaks in LIDAR/DIAL systems for environmental physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfusa, M.; Gaudio, P.; Malizia, A.; Murari, A.; Vega, J.; Richetta, M.; Gonzalez, S.

    2014-06-01

    Recently, surveying large areas in an automatic way, for early detection of both harmful chemical agents and forest fires, has become a strategic objective of defence and public health organisations. The Lidar and Dial techniques are widely recognized as a cost-effective alternative to monitor large portions of the atmosphere. To maximize the effectiveness of the measurements and to guarantee reliable monitoring of large areas, new data analysis techniques are required. In this paper, an original tool, the Universal Multi Event Locator, is applied to the problem of automatically identifying the time location of peaks in Lidar and Dial measurements for environmental physics applications. This analysis technique improves various aspects of the measurements, ranging from the resilience to drift in the laser sources to the increase of the system sensitivity. The method is also fully general, purely software, and can therefore be applied to a large variety of problems without any additional cost. The potential of the proposed technique is exemplified with the help of data of various instruments acquired during several experimental campaigns in the field.

  15. Implementation and flight tests for the Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System (DIALS). Part 2: Complete set of flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Five flight tests of the Digital Automated Landing System (DIALS) were conducted on the Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) Transportation Research Vehicle (TSRV)--a modified Boeing 737 Aircraft for advanced controls and displays research. These flight tests were conducted at NASA's Wallops Flight Center using the Microwave Landing System (MLS) installation on Runway 22. This report is primarily a collection of data plots of all performance variables recorded for the entire five flight tests. A description and source of the performance variables is included. Performance variables include inertial data, air data, automatic control commands, control servo positions, sensor data, DIALS guidance and control parameters, and Kalman filter data. This data illustrates low overshoot captures of the localizer for intercept angles of 20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 50 deg intercept angles, and low overshoot captures of the glideslope slope for 3 deg, 4.5 deg, and 5 deg glideslopes. Flare maneuvers were successfully performed from the various glideslope angles and good decrab maneuvers were performed in crosswinds of 6 knots. In 18 to 20 knot crosswind conditions rudder limiting occurred which caused lateral drifting although heading alignment was achieved.

  16. Computer vision approach for ultrasound Doppler angle estimation.

    PubMed

    Saad, Ashraf A; Loupas, Thanasis; Shapiro, Linda G

    2009-12-01

    Doppler ultrasound is an important noninvasive diagnostic tool for cardiovascular diseases. Modern ultrasound imaging systems utilize spectral Doppler techniques for quantitative evaluation of blood flow velocities, and these measurements play a crucial rule in the diagnosis and grading of arterial stenosis. One drawback of Doppler-based blood flow quantification is that the operator has to manually specify the angle between the Doppler ultrasound beam and the vessel orientation, which is called the Doppler angle, in order to calculate flow velocities. In this paper, we will describe a computer vision approach to automate the Doppler angle estimation. Our approach starts with the segmentation of blood vessels in ultrasound color Doppler images. The segmentation step is followed by an estimation technique for the Doppler angle based on a skeleton representation of the segmented vessel. We conducted preliminary clinical experiments to evaluate the agreement between the expert operator's angle specification and the new automated method. Statistical regression analysis showed strong agreement between the manual and automated methods. We hypothesize that the automation of the Doppler angle will enhance the workflow of the ultrasound Doppler exam and achieve more standardized clinical outcome. PMID:18488268

  17. Doppler Wind Measurements of Mars Atmospheric Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Sandor, B. J.; Moriarty-Schieven, G. H.

    2003-05-01

    The late August 2003 opposition of Mars, which occurs very near Mars perihelion, presents its largest angular diameter (25 arcsec) over the previous and subsequent 20 years. Sub-millimeter observations from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on August 27 (also scheduled for September 3) will provide 345 Ghz CO line integrations at five beam positions on the Mars disk. Differencing spectral line absorptions observed at east, west, south, and north offset positions from a disk center spectrum yields highly accurate measurements of projected doppler velocities relative to the disk center. As demonstrated in similar Venus mesospheric (90-110 km altitude) wind measurements obtained from JCMT in March 2001 and November 2002 (Clancy et al., 2002), this method provides excellent sensitivity (5 m/sec at 40-80 km altitudes) for short integration periods (10-15 minutes). Systematic uncertainties associated with the absorption lineshape and spectrometer baseline and channel characteristics are minimized, and the steep sub-millimeter line core shapes provide improved doppler shift sensitivity relative to millimeter measurements. Direct wind measurements for the Mars atmosphere are extremely important for validation of Mars general circulation models (GCM, e.g. Forget et al., 1999), yet remain beyond current spacecraft mission capabilities. Lellouch et al. (1993) obtained equinoctial (Ls=200) wind determinations in significant disagreement with Mars GCM predictions, employing 230 Ghz CO doppler line shifts from IRAM. JCMT sub-millimeter CO doppler shifts observed during the August 2003 Mars opposition should be much more accurate, with critical zonal and meridional resolution during the key southern summer season. Atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles (0-75km) will also be retrieved from each disk position 12CO spectrum, complementing the Ls dependence of disk average measurements obtained from previous whole disk JCMT Mars 12CO observations. In addition to doppler

  18. The delta Doppler technique for LDV measurements at long distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for measuring velocity, referred to as a Delta Doppler technique, was presented. This technique determines scattering source velocities by measuring the difference in Doppler shifts of two different frequencies. By transmitting the two frequencies along the same path, a moving fringe pattern is established such that a nonmoving scatterer at the sensing volume would see an intensity variation exactly equal to the difference in the transmitted frequencies. If the particle has a velocity component along an axis which bisects the angle formed by the transmitter and receiver axes, a Doppler shift in the difference frequency can be measured and the velocity component computed. The frequency measured would correspond to the difference in Doppler frequencies that two laser Doppler velocimeters using separate frequencies (the same frequencies as used previously) would have measured, thus the term Delta Doppler.

  19. The portable Doppler: practical applications in EMS care.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, K M; Bookman, L

    1976-12-01

    The practical application of a new, commercially available, portable Doppler ultrasound device to the operation of a busy city-county emergency department and ambulance service was investigated. An initial evaluation using healthy volunteers confirmed accuracy and reproducibility of the Doppler blood pressure readings comparable to that of auscultatory and palpatory measurement. In selected patients, the Doppler readings correlated well with readings from patients who had intra-arterial lines. When used in several low flow states, such as testing adequacy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and verification of electromechanical dissociation, the Doppler aided the clinical evaluation and treatment in many cases where traditional methods were useless. The Doppler was also helpful in the evaluation of local arterial injury but this unit was not found sensitive enough for venous disease. Finally, the Doppler enhanced the obtaining of vital signs in the noisy environment of our ambulances. PMID:1018378

  20. a Compact Dial LIDAR for Ground-Based Ozone Atmospheric Profiling Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, R.; Carrion, W.; Pliutau, D.; Ganoe, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    A compact differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone campaigns. This lidar will be integrated into the Air Quality lidar Network (AQLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver box with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consist of a Coherent Evolution 30 TEM00 1-kHz diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. A custom-designed Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser has a wavelength range of 282 to 300-nm that is selectable between two or more wavelengths. The current wavelengths are online 286.4 nm and offline 293.1 nm. The 527-nm visible beam is transmitted into the atmosphere for aerosol measurements. The fourth harmonic 262 nm beam is split by a beamsplitter into two pump beams that pump each face of the Ce:LiCAF crystal. A short laser cavity consisting of a 60% reflective (1m radius of curvature) output mirror, a dispersive prism and a flat HR mirror is used to produce the UV wavelengths. In order to produce different wavelengths, the high-reflectivity rear mirror is mounted on a servo controlled galvanometer motor to allow rapid tuning between the on and offline ozone wavelengths. Typical laser results are 6.8-W at 527-nm, 800-mW at 262-nm and 130-mW at the UV transmitted wavelengths. The lidar receiver system consists of a receiver telescope with a 40-cm diameter parabolic mirror. A fiber optic cable transmits the received signal from the telescope to the receiver box, which houses the detectors. A separate one inch diameter telescope with PMT and filter is used to sample the very near field to allow

  1. Spacecraft Doppler Tracking as a Xylophone Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, M.

    1995-01-01

    Spacecraft Doppler tracking is discussed for detecting gravitational waves in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. A new method is derived for removing from combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. The remaining non-zero gravitational wave signal could be used for detecting gravitational waves.

  2. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  3. Doppler and speckle methods for diagnostics in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Kharish, Natalia A.; Osipova, Yulia; Karpovich, Alexander

    2002-02-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of scattered intensity, obtained from tissues of oral cavity membrane of healthy volunteers, are presented. The dependence of the spectral moments of Doppler signal on cutoff frequency is investigated. Some results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, are presented. New approach for monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of measuring system on formation of speckle-interferometric signal is studied.

  4. Eliminating Doppler Effects in Synthetic-Aperture Radar Optical Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantindes, N. J.; Bicknell, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Pair of photodetectors generates correction signals. Instrument detects Doppler shifts in radar and corrects processing parameters so ambiguities caused by shifts not manifested as double or overlapping images.

  5. FirstSearch and NetFirst--Web and Dial-up Access: Plus Ca Change, Plus C'est la Meme Chose?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Wallace; Mincey, Danielle

    1996-01-01

    Compares and evaluates the differences between OCLC's dial-up and World Wide Web FirstSearch access methods and their interfaces with the underlying databases. Also examines NetFirst, OCLC's new Internet catalog, the only Internet tracking database from a "traditional" database service. (Author/PEN)

  6. Factor Structure of the DIAL-3: A Test of the Theory-Driven Conceptualization versus an Empirically Driven Conceptualization in a Nationally Representative Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assel, Mike A.; Anthony, Jason L.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the standardization sample of the "Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning--Third Edition" (DIAL-3), this study compared the usefulness of an empirically derived factor structure introduced by Anthony, Assel, and Williams with the author's theoretical conceptualization. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) were…

  7. Dialing for Duke: Reaching Out to Touch Alumni Raises $400,000 in the First Year of Broad-Scale Phonathons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Mary McGranahan

    1982-01-01

    Phonathons are seen as a highly personal, effective, and informative type of solicitation. Duke University's "Dialing for Duke" phonathon is described. Suggestions for phonathon success are: relentless recruitment of volunteers, upbeat atmosphere, a sense of competition, good training, staff supervision, and a realistic goal. (MLW)

  8. Observation of vertcal CO2 concentration profiles in the lower-atmosphere using a compact direct detection 1.6 μm DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, C.; Shibata, Y.; Abo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of present carbon sources and sinks including their spatial profile and their variation in time is one of the essential informations for predicting future CO2 atmospheric concentration levels. Moewover, for the detailed analysis of forest carbon dynamics and CO2 fluxes of urban area, the CO2 concentration measurement techniques with high spatial and temporal resolution are required in the lower atmosphere. A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is expected to measure atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer from a ground platform. We have succeeded to develop a compact direct detection 1.6 μm DIAL system for measuring CO2 concentration profiles in the lower atmosphere. This DIAL system consists of the optical parametric generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube operating at the analog mode and the 25 cm telescope. We have succeeded in observing the daytime temporal change of vertical CO2 concentration profiles for the range from 0.25 to 2.5 km with integration time of 30 minutes and range resolution of 300 m. This compact direct detection CO2 DIAL is usefull for the estimation of CO2 flux. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  9. PRECISE DOPPLER MONITORING OF BARNARD'S STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jieun; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; McCarthy, Chris; Fischer, Debra A.; Johnson, John A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2013-02-20

    We present 248 precise Doppler measurements of Barnard's Star (Gl 699), the second nearest star system to Earth, obtained from Lick and Keck Observatories during the 25 years between 1987 and 2012. The early precision was 20 m s{sup -1} but was 2 m s{sup -1} during the last 8 years, constituting the most extensive and sensitive search for Doppler signatures of planets around this stellar neighbor. We carefully analyze the 136 Keck radial velocities spanning 8 years by first applying a periodogram analysis to search for nearly circular orbits. We find no significant periodic Doppler signals with amplitudes above {approx}2 m s{sup -1}, setting firm upper limits on the minimum mass (Msin i) of any planets with orbital periods from 0.1 to 1000 days. Using a Monte Carlo analysis for circular orbits, we determine that planetary companions to Barnard's Star with masses above 2 M {sub Circled-Plus} and periods below 10 days would have been detected. Planets with periods up to 2 years and masses above 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} (0.03 M {sub Jup}) are also ruled out. A similar analysis allowing for eccentric orbits yields comparable mass limits. The habitable zone of Barnard's Star appears to be devoid of roughly Earth-mass planets or larger, save for face-on orbits. Previous claims of planets around the star by van de Kamp are strongly refuted. The radial velocity of Barnard's Star increases with time at 4.515 {+-} 0.002 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, consistent with the predicted geometrical effect, secular acceleration, that exchanges transverse for radial components of velocity.

  10. Christian Doppler is 200 years young.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Alfred; Partsch, Hugo

    2003-11-01

    Christian Doppler was born 200 years ago in Salzburg, Austria, on November 29, 1803, worked in Prague and Vienna and died 150 years ago in Venice. In an article of eight pages he described the principle, which made him famous. It appeared in 1842 with the exotic title: "On the Coloured Light of the Double Stars and Certain Other Stars of the Heaven". The validity of his principle for velocity measurement was confirmed by trumpet sounds produced on a train moving towards and away from the observer. Around 1960 Japanese scientists suggested that flow velocity in blood vessels could be determined by analysing the difference of frequency between emitted and backscattered ultrasound. Rushmer and coworkers built machines suitable for medicine in Seattle, where Eugene Strandness recognized their potential and applied them in first studies. In 1967 the technique jumped to Europe and started to be used worldwide. Already by using continuous wave ultrasound it was possible to diagnose occlusive disease of neck and limb arteries, venous thrombosis and valvular insufficiency with accuracy. Measurements of postestenotic ankle blood pressure were facilitated by Doppler sensing. Over the years more sophisticated instruments were developed. Pulsed emission of ultrasound waves opened a way to study flow velocity profiles across large vessels. By combining the method with A or B mode ultrasound blood flow could be quantified and finally perfused segments of blood vessels visualized. Duplex scanning in its simple and then in its colour coded version is nowadays the standard non-invasive technique that nobody would like to miss. Vascular territories like intracranial, renal and intestinal arteries can also be explored. For the assessment of microvascular flow in skin and mucosae laser Doppler instruments were introduced. PMID:14694774

  11. Current-induced spin wave Doppler shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleul, Matthieu

    2010-03-01

    In metal ferromagnets -namely Fe, Co and Ni and their alloys- magnetism and electrical transport are strongly entangled (itinerant magnetism). This results in a number of properties such as the tunnel and giant magnetoresistance (i.e. the dependence of the electrical resistance on the magnetic state) and the more recently addressed spin transfer (i.e. the ability to manipulate the magnetic state with the help of an electrical current). The spin waves, being the low-energy elementary excitations of any ferromagnet, also exist in itinerant magnets, but they are expected to exhibit some peculiar properties due the itinerant character of the carriers. Accessing these specific properties experimentally could shed a new light on the microscopic mechanism governing itinerant magnetism, which -in turn- could help in optimizing material properties for spintronics applications. As a simple example of these specific properties, it was predicted theoretically that forcing a DC current through a ferromagnetic metal should induce a shift of the frequency of the spin waves [1,2]. This shift can be identified to a Doppler shift undergone by the electron system when it is put in motion by the electrical current. We will show how detailed spin wave measurements allow one to access this current-induced Doppler shift [3]. From an experimental point of view, we will discuss the peculiarities of propagating spin wave spectroscopy experiments carried out at a sub-micrometer length-scale and with MHz frequency resolution. Then, we will discuss the measured value of the Doppler shift in the context of both the old two-current model of spin-polarized transport and the more recent model of adiabatic spin transfer torque. [4pt] [1] P.Lederer and D.L. Mills, Phys.Rev. 148, 542 (1966).[0pt] [2] J. Fernandez-Rossier et al., Phys. Rev. B 69, 174412 (2004)[0pt] [3] V. Vlaminck and M. Bailleul, Science 322, 410 (2008).

  12. An improved instantaneous laser Doppler velocity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desio, Charles V.; Olcmen, Semih; Schinetsky, Philip

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, improvements made on a single velocity component instantaneous laser Doppler velocimetry (ILDV) system are detailed. The ILDV system developed in this research effort is capable of measuring a single velocity component at a rate as high as two megahertz. The current system accounts for the effects of the laser intensity variation on the measured velocity and eliminates the use of a Pockels cell used in previous ILDV systems. The system developed in the current effort was tested using compressible, subsonic jet flows. The ILDV system developed would be most beneficial where a high data capture rate is needed such as in shock tubes, and high-speed wind tunnels.

  13. Left ventricular performance indices by transesophageal Doppler.

    PubMed

    Thys, D M; Hillel, Z

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether blood flow velocity signals, obtained by esophageal continuous-wave Doppler, reflect changes in ventricular performance. Ventricular performance has previously been determined by analysis of blood flow velocity signals sampled in the ascending aorta. In this investigation velocity signals were acquired from the descending aorta, with the use of an esophageal Doppler transducer. Maximum blood flow velocity (Vm), maximum blood flow volume acceleration (Accv), and maximum linear blood flow acceleration (Acc) were the velocity signals used to evaluate left ventricular performance. Twenty-six patients scheduled for myocardial revascularization and anesthetized with fentanyl (50 micrograms/kg) and pancuronium (0.15 mg/kg) were studied. In seven patients (Group I) a good correlation (r = 0.91) was observed between Accv in the ascending and descending aorta. In 10 patients (Group 2), halothane (0.5 and 1.0 MAC end-tidal) was added to the anesthetic. At these halothane concentrations Vm, Accv, and Acc measured in the descending aorta remained unchanged. Decreases were noted in the product of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and Acc (P-Acc; decreased 20% at 0.5 MAC and 39% at 1 MAC) and the product of systemic vascular resistance and Acc (R-Acc; decreased 25% at 1 MAC). In nine patients (Group 3), phenylephrine was used to reverse the decrease in MAP induced by 1 MAC halothane. Under these conditions Vm, Accv, Acc, and P-Acc showed similar decreases (approximately 30% of baseline values), whereas R-Acc returned to baseline values. In summary, indices of blood flow in the descending aorta were easily determined with a commercial transesophageal continuous-wave Doppler device. Descending and ascending aortic blood flow Accv correlated well, and the changes in the product of MAP and Acc in the descending aorta reflected the anticipated, halothane-induced, changes in left ventricular performance. In conclusion, descending aortic blood

  14. [Color Doppler sonography of focal abdominal lesions].

    PubMed

    Licanin, Zoran; Lincender, Lidija; Djurović, V; Salihefendić, Nizama; Smajlović, Fahrudin

    2004-01-01

    Color Doppler sonography (CDS--spectral, color and power), harmonic imaging techniques (THI, PHI), possibility of 3D analysis of picture, usage of contrast agents, have raised the values of ultrasound as a diagnostic method to a very high level. THI--non-linear gray scale modality, is based on the processing of higher reflected frequencies, that has improved a picture resolution, which is presented with less artifacts and limiting effects of obesity and gases. Ultrasound contrast agents improve analysis of micro and macro circulation of the examined area, and with the assessment of velocity of supply in ROI (wash in), distribution and time of signal weakening (wash out), are significantly increasing diagnostic value of ultrasound. Besides the anatomical and topographic presentation of examined region (color, power), Color Doppler sonography gives us haemodynamic-functional information on vascularisation of that region, as well as on pathologic vascularisation if present. Avascular aspect of a focal pathologic lesion corresponds to a cyst or haematoma, while coloration and positive spectral curve discover that anechogenic lesions actually represents aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms or AVF. In local inflammatory lesion, abscess in an acute phase, CDS shows first increased, and then decreased central perfusion, while in a chronic phase, a pericapsular vascularisation is present. Contribution of CDS in differentiation of hepatic tumors (hemangioma, HCC and metastasis) is very significant. Central color dots along the peripheral blood vessels and the blush phenomenon are characteristics of capillary hemangioma, peritumoral vascular ring "basket" of HCC, and "detour" sign of metastasis. The central artery, RI from 0.45 to 0.60 and radial spreading characterize FNH. Hepatic adenoma is characterized by an intratumoral vein, and rarely by a vascular hallo. Further on, blood velocity in tumor defined by Color Doppler, distinguishes malignant from benign lesion, where 40 cm/s is a

  15. Everyday relativity and the Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picton Drake, Samuel; Purvis, Alan

    2014-01-01

    It is generally believed that special relativistic effects are important only when studying objects moving at speeds close to that of light. This belief leaves many practicing scientists and engineers with the impression that an understanding of relativity is not necessary for their day jobs. Our aim is to show that the ideas and mathematics of the special theory of relativity are used in practical applications involving objects moving much slower than the speed of light. In particular, we show how the Doppler shift for sound and light can be calculated from the postulates of relativity.

  16. Applying Zeeman Doppler imaging to solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, G. A. J.; Saar, S. H.; Collier Cameron, A.

    2004-03-01

    A new generation of spectro-polarimeters with high throughput (e.g. CFHT/ESPADONS and LBT/PEPSI) is becoming available. This opportunity can be exploited using Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI), a technique that inverts time-series of Stokes V spectra to map stellar surface magnetic fields (Semel 1989). ZDI is assisted by ``Least squares deconvolution'' (LSD), which sums up the signal from 1000's of photospheric lines to produce a mean deconvolved profile with higher S:N (Donati & Collier Cameron 1997).

  17. Short pulse C-band Doppler scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, Artashes K.; Hambaryan, Astghik K.; Smolin, Aleksander I.; Karyan, Vanik V.; Hovhannesyan, Gagik G.; Alaverdyan, Eduard R.; Arakelyan, Arsen A.; Hambaryan, Vardan K.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper C-band (~5.75GHz), dual polarization, Doppler scatterometer is developed, for short distance remote sensing of water surface microwave reflective and spectrum characteristics simultaneous and coincident measurements, under laboratory-control conditions. Developed system will be set on a mobile bogie moving on the height of 6.5m along a stationary platform of 32m of length. It will allow carry out polarimetric (vv, vh, hh, hv), simultaneous and coincident microwave active measurements of pool water surface parameters at angles of incidence from the while of 0-40o.

  18. In-suit Doppler technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Arthur E.; Greene, Ernest R.; Nadeau, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to perform a technology assessment survey of non-invasive air embolism detection utilizing Doppler ultrasound methodologies. The primary application of this technology will be a continuous monitor for astronauts while performing extravehicular activities (EVA's). The technology assessment was to include: (1) development of a full understanding of all relevant background research; and (2) a survey of the medical ultrasound marketplace for expertise, information, and technical capability relevant to this development. Upon completion of the assessment, LSR was to provide an overview of technological approaches and R&D/manufacturing organizations.

  19. Solar Doppler shifts - Sources of continuous spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Oscillation observations can be used to study nonoscillatory solar phenomena that exhibit Doppler shifts. The paper discusses several effects of these phenomena and their associated temporal and spatial power spectra: (1) they limit the signal-to-noise ratio and sometimes detectability of oscillation modes; (2) there is the potential for better understanding and/or detection of solar phenomena; (3) large-scale convection may spatially modulate oscillation modes, leading to a continuous background spectrum; and (4) in regions of the spectrum where the resolution to separate modes is lacking one can determine upper limits for the integrated effects of modes.

  20. Transmission media effects on precise Doppler tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. S.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of the transmission media - the earth's troposphere and ionosphere, and the solar wind - on precise Doppler tracking are discussed. The charged particle effects can be largely removed by dual frequency observations; however there are limitations to these corrections (besides system noise and/or finite integration times) including the effects of magnetic fields, diffraction, and differential refraction, all of which must be carefully evaluated. The earth's troposphere can contribute an error of delta f/f approximately 10 to the minus 14th power.

  1. The new Adelaide medium frequency Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. M.; Vandepeer, B. G. W.; Dillon, S.; Fuller, B.

    1993-08-01

    The Buckland Park Aerial Array (35 deg S, 138 deg E) is situated about 40 km north of Adelaide on a flat coastal plain. It was designed by Basil Briggs and Graham Elford, and constructed between 1965 and 1968. The first results were published in the late 1960's. Some aspects of the history of the array are described in Briggs (1993). A new MF Doppler Radar utilizing the array has been developed. This paper describes some of the technical details of this new facility.

  2. Applications of Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiqiang

    A major development in biomedical imaging in the last decade has been optical coherence tomography (OCT). This technique enables microscale resolution, depth resolved imaging of the detailed morphology of transparent and nontransparent biological tissue in a noncontact and quasi-noninvasive way. In the first part of this dissertation, we will describe the development and the performance of our home-made OCT systems working with different wavelength regions based on free-space and optical fiber Michelson interferometers. The second part will focus on Doppler OCT (DOCT), an important extension of OCT, which enables the simultaneous evaluation of the structural information and of the fluid flow distribution at a localized position beneath the sample surface. Much effort has been spent during the past few years in our laboratory aimed at providing more accurate velocity measurements with an extended dynamic range. We also applied our technique in different research areas such as microfluidics and hemodynamics. Investigations on the optical properties of the biological tissues (such as absorption and scattering) corresponding to different center wavelengths, have been performed in our laboratory. We used a 10 femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser centered at about 810 nm associated with a free-space Michelson interferometer. The infrared sources were centered at about 1310 and 1560 nm with all-fiber interferometers. Comparative studies using three different sources for several in vitro biological tissues based on a graphical method illustrated how the optical properties affect the quality of the OCT images in terms of the penetration depth and backscattering intensity. We have shown the advantage of working with 810-nm emission wavelength for good backscattering amplitude and contrast, while sources emitting at 1570 nm give good penetration depth. The 1330-nm sources provide a good compromise between the two. Therefore, the choice of the source will ultimately determine the

  3. Coronary Artery Imaging with Transthoracic Doppler Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaaki; Nakazono, Akemi

    2016-07-01

    Coronary artery imaging with transthoracic Doppler echocardiography is a simple and useful technique to diagnose significant coronary artery stenosis. The visualization of mosaic flow in the proximal left coronary artery provides a direct indication of the presence of significant stenosis at the corresponding site during routine echocardiography. Coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) has a high diagnostic accuracy and feasibility in detecting the presence of functionally significant coronary stenosis in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and in the right coronary artery. The measurement of CFVR in the LAD also provides prognostic information in patients with intermediate coronary stenosis. This review summarizes the utility of transthoracic coronary artery imaging. PMID:27216843

  4. Detection of microemboli by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, D G; Georgiadis, D; Kelman, A W; Cowburn, P; Stirling, S; Lees, K R; Faichney, A; Mallinson, A; Quin, R; Bone, I; Pettigrew, L; Brodie, E; MacKay, T; Wheatley, D J

    1996-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound detection of abnormally high-pitched signals within the arterial waveform offers a new method for diagnosis, and potentially for prediction, of embolic complications in at-risk patients. The nature of Doppler "microembolic" signals is of particular interest in patients with prosthetic heart valves, where a high prevalence of these signals is observed. Monitoring the middle cerebral artery with 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TC-2000, Nicolet Biomedical; Warwick, UK), we looked for microemboli signals in 150 patients (95 women and 55 men), and found 1 or more signals during a 30-min recording in 89% of 70 patients with Bjork-Shiley valves (principally monostrut), 54% of 50 patients with Medtronic-Hall valves, and 50% of 30 patients with Carpentier-Edwards valves (p < 0.001, chi 2). In the patients with Bjork-Shiley valves, the mean number of signals per hour was 59 (range, 42-86; 95% confidence interval), which was significantly higher than the mean in patients with Medtronic-Hall and Carpentier-Edwards valves (1.5[range, 0.5-2.5] and 1 [range, 0-5.3], respectively; both p < 0.04, multiple comparisons. Bonferroni correction). In the patients undergoing serial pre- and postoperative studies, the causative role of the valve implant was emphasized. There was no correlation between the number of emboli signals and a prior history of neurologic deficit, cardiac rhythm, previous cardiac surgery, or the intensity of oral anticoagulation, in patients with prosthetic heart valves. In Bjork-Shiley patients, dual (mitral and aortic) valves were associated with more signals than were single valves. In Medtronic-Hall patients, the signal count was greater for valves in the aortic position than it was for valves in the mitral position. Comparative studies of Doppler emboli signals in other clinical settings suggest a difference in composition or size of the underlying maternal between prosthetic valve patients and patients with carotid stenosis. These

  5. Doppler cooling to the quantum limit.

    PubMed

    Chalony, M; Kastberg, A; Klappauf, B; Wilkowski, D

    2011-12-01

    Doppler cooling on a narrow transition is limited by the noise of single scattering events. It shows novel features, which are in sharp contrast with cooling on a broad transition, such as a non-gaussian momentum distribution, and divergence of its mean square value close to the resonance. We have observed those features using 1D cooling on an intercombination transition in strontium, and compared the measurements with theoretical predictions and Monte Carlo simulations. We also find that for very a narrow transition, cooling can be improved using a dipole trap, where the clock shift is canceled. PMID:22242994

  6. Catadioptric optics for laser Doppler velocimeter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the adaptation of low-cost Schmidt-Cassegrain astronomical telescopes to perform the laser-beam-focusing and scattered-light collection tasks associated with dual-beam laser Doppler velocimetry. A generic telescope design is analyzed using ray-tracing methods and Gaussian beam-propagation theory. A straightforward modification procedure to convert from infinite to near unity conjugate-ratio operation with very low residual aberration is identified and tested with a 200-mm-aperture telescope modified for f/10 operation. Performance data for this modified telescope configuration are near the diffraction limit and agree well with predictions.

  7. Respiratory effort energy estimation using Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Shahhaidar, Ehsaneh; Yavari, Ehsan; Young, Jared; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Stickley, Cris

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory effort can be harvested to power wearable biosensors and mobile electronic devices. The very first step toward designing a harvester is to estimate available energy and power. This paper describes an estimation of the available power and energy due to the movements of the torso during breathing, using Doppler radar by detecting breathing rate, torso displacement, torso movement velocity and acceleration along the sagittal movement of the torso. The accuracy of the detected variables is verified by two reference methods. The experimental result obtained from a healthy female human subject shows that the available power from circumferential movement can be higher than the power from the sagittal movement. PMID:23365993

  8. Water vapour emission in vegetable fuel: absorption cell measurements and detection limits of our CO II Dial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellecci, C.; De Leo, L.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Lo Feudo, T.; Martellucci, S.; Richetta, M.

    2006-09-01

    Forest fires can be the cause of serious environmental and economic damages. For this reason a considerable effort has been directed toward the forest protection and fire fighting. In the early forest fire detection, Lidar technique present considerable advantages compared to the passive detection methods based on infrared cameras currently in common use, due its higher sensitivity and ability to accurately locate the fire. The combustion phase of the vegetable matter causes a great amount of water vapour emission, thus the water molecule behaviour will be studied to obtain a fire detection system ready and efficient also before the flame propagation. A first evaluation of increment of the water vapour concentration compared to standard one will be estimated by a numerical simulation. These results will be compared with the experimental measurements carried out into a cell with a CO II Dial system, burning different kinds of vegetable fuel. Our results and their comparison will be reported in this paper.

  9. A Ground-Based 2-Micron DIAL System to Profile Tropospheric CO2 and Aerosol Distributions for Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Abedin, Nurul; Refaat, Tamer; Rubio, Manuel; Davis, Kenneth; Miller, Charles; Singh, Upendra

    2006-01-01

    System will operate at a temperature insensitive CO2 line (2050.967 nm) with side-line tuning and off-set locking. Demonstrated an order of magnitude improvement in laser line locking needed for high precision measurements, side-line operation, and simultaneously double pulsing and line locking. Detector testing of phototransistor has demonstrated sensitivity to aerosol features over long distances in the atmosphere and resolve features approx. 100m. Optical systems that collect light onto small area detectors work well. Receiver optical designs are being optimized and data acquisition systems developed. CO2 line parameter characterization in progress In situ sensor calibration in progress for validation of DIAL CO2 system.

  10. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) in Alberta: A New Remote Sensing Tool for Wide Area Measurement of Particulates, CO2, and CH4 Emissions from Energy Extraction and Production Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, M.; Lemon, R.; Crowther, B. G.; Valupadas, P.; Fu, L.; Yang, Z.; Huda, Q.; Leung, B.; Chambers, A.

    2014-12-01

    Alberta Environmental Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting Agency (AEMERA) in cooperation with the Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) of Utah State University, have developed a mobile DIAL sensor designed specifically for particle, CO2 and CH4 emissions measurement. Rapid expansion of the oil and gas industry in Alberta, including the oil sands, has challenged the Alberta Government to keep pace in its efforts to monitor and mitigate the environmental impacts of development. The limitations of current monitoring systems has pushed the provincial government to seek out advanced sensing technologies such as differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to help assess the impact of energy development and industrial operations. This instrument is housed inside a 36' trailer and can be quickly staged and used to characterize source emissions and to locate fugitive leaks. DIAL is capable of measuring concentrations for carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) at ranges of up to 3 km with a spatial resolution of 1.5 m. DIAL can map both CO2 and CH4, as well as particulate matter (PM) in a linear fashion; by scanning the laser beam in both azimuth and elevation, DIAL can create images of emissions concentrations and ultimately can be used to determine emission factors, locate fugitive leaks, assess plume dispersion and confirm air dispersion modeling. The DIAL system has been deployed at a landfill, a coal-fired power plant, and an oil sands production area. A system overview of the DIAL instrument and recent results will be discussed.

  11. Is Doppler ultrasound useful for evaluating gestational trophoblastic disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence H; Bernardes, Lisandra S; Hase, Eliane A; Fushida, Koji; Francisco, Rossana P V

    2015-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound is a non-invasive method for evaluating vascularization and is widely used in clinical practice. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia includes a group of highly vascularized malignancies derived from placental cells. This review summarizes data found in the literature regarding the applications of Doppler ultrasound in managing patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. The PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane and LILACS databases were searched for articles published in English until 2014 using the following keywords: “Gestational trophoblastic disease AND Ultrasonography, Doppler.” Twenty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria and were separated into the 4 following groups according to the aim of the study. 1 Doppler ultrasound does not seem to be capable of differentiating partial from complete moles, but it might be useful when evaluating pregnancies in which a complete mole coexists with a normal fetus. 2 There is controversy in the role of uterine artery Doppler velocimetry in the prediction of development of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. 3 Doppler ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia because abnormal myometrial vascularization and lower uterine artery Doppler indices seem to be correlated with invasive disease. 4 Lower uterine artery Doppler indices in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia are associated with methotrexate resistance and might play a role in prognosis. CONCLUSION: Several studies support the importance of Doppler ultrasound in the management of patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, particularly the role of Doppler velocimetry in the prediction of trophoblastic neoplasia and the chemoresistance of trophoblastic tumors. Doppler findings should be used as ancillary tools, along with human chorionic gonadotropin assessment, in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. PMID:26735221

  12. Cas A Dynamics: Doppler and Proper Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaney, Tracey; Smith, J.; Rudnick, L.; Ennis, J.; Rho, J.; Reach, W.; Kozasa, T.; Gomez, H.

    2006-06-01

    We present Doppler velocity images of the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A in the infrared emission lines of Ar, Ne, Si, and S observed with the Spitzer IRS and covering nearly the whole extent of the remnant. The measured infrared velocities of the shocked ejecta range from -4000 km/s to +6000 km/s. The Si and S emission near the center of the remnant, that is associated with ejecta that have not yet encountered the reverse shock, also shows both red- and blue-shifted structures with velocities between -3000 km/s and +3000 km/s. These unshocked ejecta provide a unique opportunity to study the kinematics of the explosion free from the influences of the reverse shock and CSM. The infrared kinematics are compared to optical and X-ray Doppler velocities and optical, X-ray, and radio proper motions. This work was performed for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, sponsored by the United States Government under Prime Contract between California Institute of Technology and NASA.

  13. Windowed multipole for cross section Doppler broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josey, C.; Ducru, P.; Forget, B.; Smith, K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an in-depth analysis on the accuracy and performance of the windowed multipole Doppler broadening method. The basic theory behind cross section data is described, along with the basic multipole formalism followed by the approximations leading to windowed multipole method and the algorithm used to efficiently evaluate Doppler broadened cross sections. The method is tested by simulating the BEAVRS benchmark with a windowed multipole library composed of 70 nuclides. Accuracy of the method is demonstrated on a single assembly case where total neutron production rates and 238U capture rates compare within 0.1% to ACE format files at the same temperature. With regards to performance, clock cycle counts and cache misses were measured for single temperature ACE table lookup and for windowed multipole. The windowed multipole method was found to require 39.6% more clock cycles to evaluate, translating to a 7.9% performance loss overall. However, the algorithm has significantly better last-level cache performance, with 3 fewer misses per evaluation, or a 65% reduction in last-level misses. This is due to the small memory footprint of the windowed multipole method and better memory access pattern of the algorithm.

  14. Doppler global velocimetry data in circular jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, John; Burton, Lucinda; Scarberry, Tom

    2002-07-01

    A two-component Doppler global velocimeter (DGV) system has been improved through the use of vapour-limited iodine cells that have temperature-independent responses, along with nonpolarizing beam splitters and lower f-number lenses. Two-component DGV velocity measurements have been obtained for a 1 inch diameter uniform circular jet flow at a nominal exit velocity of 60 m s-1, as well as for an annular jet and a swirling jet. These data generally agree with earlier point Doppler velocimeter and hot wire anemometer results to within about 2-4 m s-1, and display a total variability from a smooth curve of ±2-3 m s-1. This level of accuracy has been obtained for a system that uses a cw argon ion laser and eight-bit CCD cameras and digitizers. Exceptions to this level of accuracy are noted in regions of significant secondary scattering, due to scattered laser light that is reflected off the lip of the jet nozzle, as well as in regions of low smoke seeding levels, resulting in low signal-to-noise ratios. A significant amount of the variability of the data from a smooth curve is due to the flat field correction.

  15. Ambiguity resolution for satellite Doppler positioning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argentiero, P.; Marini, J.

    1979-01-01

    The implementation of satellite-based Doppler positioning systems frequently requires the recovery of transmitter position from a single pass of Doppler data. The least-squares approach to the problem yields conjugate solutions on either side of the satellite subtrack. It is important to develop a procedure for choosing the proper solution which is correct in a high percentage of cases. A test for ambiguity resolution which is the most powerful in the sense that it maximizes the probability of a correct decision is derived. When systematic error sources are properly included in the least-squares reduction process to yield an optimal solution the test reduces to choosing the solution which provides the smaller valuation of the least-squares loss function. When systematic error sources are ignored in the least-squares reduction, the most powerful test is a quadratic form comparison with the weighting matrix of the quadratic form obtained by computing the pseudoinverse of a reduced-rank square matrix. A formula for computing the power of the most powerful test is provided. Numerical examples are included in which the power of the test is computed for situations that are relevant to the design of a satellite-aided search and rescue system.

  16. Comparison of Triature Doppler Velocimetry and VISAR

    SciTech Connect

    Cenobio H Gallegos, Bruce Marshall, Matthew Teel, Vincent T Romero, Abel Diaz, and Michael Berninger

    2010-01-01

    Triature Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (TDV) is an adaptation of Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) that rejects common-mode data noise after splitting PDV three ways, with each signal 120° out of phase from each other. Testing has demonstrated that TDV also improves temporal resolution from the typical five nanoseconds of PDV to a subnanosecond range. This paper compares the temporal response of TDV with that of PDV and VISAR [velocity interferometer system for any reflector] in an experiment with a subnanosecond (~120-picosecond rise time) shock source. Laboratory tests were performed using a high-power laser on targets of copper and aluminum. A Buce Marshall fast VISAR with a single-point PDV and a prototype TDV were used. A special probe that combined PDV, TDV, and fast VISAR made simultaneous velocity measurements. Breakout velocities of 1.3 km/second on copper and 2.5 km/second on aluminum were observed, where TDV resolved rise times of ~200 ps. This resolution was better than that of a fast VISAR, which can achieve ~500 ps temporal resolution. Test methods and results are presented.

  17. Investigations of atmospheric dynamics using a CW Doppler sounder array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional CW Doppler sounding system currently under operation at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama is described. The properties of the neutral atmosphere are discussed along with the theory of Doppler sounding technique. Methods of data analyses used to investigate the dynamical phenomena at the ionospheric heights are presented and suggestions for future investigations provided.

  18. Doppler weather radar with predictive wind shear detection capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntman, Daryal

    1991-01-01

    The status of Bendix research on Doppler weather radar with predictive wind shear detection capability is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on the RDR-4A, a fully coherent, solid state transmitter having Doppler turbulence capability. Frequency generation data, plans, modifications, system characteristics and certification requirements are covered.

  19. New Doppler echocardiographic applications for the study of diastolic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.; Klein, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    Doppler echocardiography is one of the most useful clinical tools for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) diastolic function. Doppler indices of LV filling and pulmonary venous (PV) flow are used not only for diagnostic purposes but also for establishing prognosis and evaluating the effect of therapeutic interventions. The utility of these indices is limited, however, by the confounding effects of different physiologic variables such as LV relaxation, compliance and filling pressure. Since alterations in these variables result in changes in Doppler indices of opposite direction, it is often difficult to determine the status of a given variable when a specific Doppler filling pattern is observed. Recently, color M-mode and tissue Doppler have provided useful insights in the study of diastolic function. These new Doppler applications have been shown to provide an accurate estimate of LV relaxation and appear to be relatively insensitive to the effects of preload compensation. This review will focus on the complementary role of color M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography and traditional Doppler indices of LV filling and PV flow in the assessment of diastolic function.

  20. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550 Section 892.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1550 Ultrasonic pulsed doppler...

  1. A study for developing an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermans, M.; Bregman, R.

    1984-06-01

    The system parameters for low cost ultrasonic Doppler flowmeters for medical applications were investigated. A flowmeter was built. A phase locked loop is used to find the correct Doppler shift. Laboratory and field tests prove the success of the development, although very often insufficient reflectors exist in the liquids. The accuracy is + or - 5%; the reproducibility is + or - 0.5%.

  2. Micro-Doppler classification of riders and riderless horses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmoush, David

    2014-05-01

    Micro-range Micro-Doppler can be used to isolate particular parts of the radar signature, and in this case we demonstrate the differences in the signature between a walking horse versus a walking horse with a rider. Using micro-range micro-Doppler, we can distinguish the radar returns from the rider as separate from the radar returns of the horse.

  3. Imaging doppler velocimeter with downward heterodyning in the optical domain

    DOEpatents

    Reu, Phillip L; Hansche, Bruce D

    2013-05-21

    In a Doppler velocimeter, the incoming Doppler-shifted beams are heterodyned to reduce their frequencies into the bandwidth of a digital camera. This permits the digital camera to produce at every sampling interval a complete two-dimensional array of pixel values. This sequence of pixel value arrays provides a velocity image of the target.

  4. Rotational Doppler effect in x-ray photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-11-15

    The energy of the photoelectron experiences a red or blue Doppler shift when the molecule recedes from the detector or approaches him. This results in a broadening of the photoelectron line due to the translational thermal motion. However, the molecules also have rotational degrees of freedom and we show that the translational Doppler effect has its rotational counterpart. This rotational Doppler effect leads to an additional broadening of the spectral line of the same magnitude as the Doppler broadening caused by translational thermal motion. The rotational Doppler broadening as well as the rotational recoil broadening is sensitive to the molecular orbital from which the photoelectron is ejected. This broadening should be taken into account in analysis of x-ray photoemission spectra of super-high resolution and it can be directly observed using x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy.

  5. Doppler-cancelled response to VLF gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caporali, A.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of long periodic gravitational waves with a three link microwave system known as the Doppler Cancelling System is discussed. This system, which was developed for a gravitational redshift experiment, uses one-way and two-way Doppler informatin to construct the beat signal of two reference oscillators moving with respect to each other. The geometric optics approximation is used to derive the frequency shift produced on a light signal propagating in a gravitational wave space-time. The signature left on the Doppler-cancelled beat by burst and continuous gravitational waves is analyzed. A comparison is made between the response to gravitational waves of the Doppler Cancelling System and that of a Doppler tracking system which employs two-way, round-trip radio waves. A three-fold repetition of the gravitational wave form is found to be a common feature of the response functions of both systems. These two functions otherwise exhibit interesting differences.

  6. The joint estimation of differential delay, Doppler, and phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wax, M.

    1982-09-01

    In radio and sonar applications it sometimes happens that narrow-band signals, originated from a remote source and observed at a pair of receivers, differ by unknown differential phase and Doppler shift in addition to the differential delay corresponding to the range difference. The correspondence presents the joint maximum likelihood (ML) estimate of the differential delay, Doppler, and phase and examines their accuracy by deriving the Cramer-Rao bound. It is shown that joint ML estimators are the values of the delay and Doppler that maximize the magnitude of a generalized ambiguity function analogous to the one used in radar. It is also shown that for long observation time and high enough signal-to-noise ratio there is no degradation in the accuracy of the time-delay estimator due to the additional phase and Doppler uncertainty and that the differential Doppler is uncorrelated with the differential delay and phase estimators.

  7. One way Doppler extractor. Volume 1: Vernier technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasco, R. W.; Klein, S.; Nossen, E. J.; Starner, E. R.; Yanosov, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A feasibility analysis, trade-offs, and implementation for a One Way Doppler Extraction system are discussed. A Doppler error analysis shows that quantization error is a primary source of Doppler measurement error. Several competing extraction techniques are compared and a Vernier technique is developed which obtains high Doppler resolution with low speed logic. Parameter trade-offs and sensitivities for the Vernier technique are analyzed, leading to a hardware design configuration. A detailed design, operation, and performance evaluation of the resulting breadboard model is presented which verifies the theoretical performance predictions. Performance tests have verified that the breadboard is capable of extracting Doppler, on an S-band signal, to an accuracy of less than 0.02 Hertz for a one second averaging period. This corresponds to a range rate error of no more than 3 millimeters per second.

  8. Development of a Ground-based 2-Micron DIAL System to Profile Tropospheric CO2 and Aerosol Distributions for Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, S.; Koch, G. J.; Abedin, N.; Refaat, T.; Rubio, M.; Davis, K.; Miller, C.; Singh, U.

    2006-12-01

    NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) has funded a 3 year Instrument Incubator Program to develop a ground-based 2-micron Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) CO2 profiling system. This is a collaborative program between NASA Langley, Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Development of this field deployable instrument is an initial step towards the eventual development of a space-based DIAL system and involves the design, development, evaluation, and fielding of a ground-based CO2 profiling system. This system will be capable of providing high resolution measurements of CO2 and aerosol profiles and will be used in a number of atmospheric studies involving the atmospheric boundary layer where the sources and sinks of CO2 are located; and in the studies of dynamical, transport, pollution, and biogenic activity in the atmosphere. After a successful development of this system, it can be used as a validation tool of the OCO (Orbiting Carbon Observatory). This instrument leverages 2-micron laser technology developed under a number of NASA programs to develop new solid-state YLF laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to cover a large signal dynamic range with minimum signal distortions to achieve high precision DIAL measurements. High sensitivity in situ LI-COR 7000 sensors are being calibrated at PSU for the validation of DIAL measurements and high resolution spectroscopic measurements are being conducted at JPL to characterize the CO2 line parameters for DIAL application. This paper will review the need for and the advantage of a CO2 DIAL profiling system, provide

  9. The superiority of combined continuous wave Doppler examination over periorbital Doppler for the detection of extracranial carotid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Trockel, U; Hennerici, M; Aulich, A; Sandmann, W

    1984-01-01

    Non-invasive examination of 431 vessels in 333 patients with cerebrovascular disease in all stages was performed in order to compare the reliability of the periorbital Doppler test alone and together with the more difficult insonation of the carotid arteries in the neck (combined Doppler). These findings were compared with those of subsequent arteriography. Extracranial obstructive (greater than 50%) carotid disease was detected with 100% sensitivity by the combined Doppler, but with only 48% sensitivity by the periorbital indirect test. The specific ability of both methods to identify non-stenotic carotid arteries (less than 50%) was similar at about 98%. Only the combined Doppler examination reliably differentiated various degrees of obstruction, comparable to that obtained with arteriography. Non-obstructive plaques could not be detected or excluded by either Doppler test. More refined methods will be necessary for their evaluation. Images PMID:6693913

  10. Lunar gravity - Apollo 15 Doppler radio tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, P. M.; Sjogren, W. L.; Wollenhaupt, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis and interpretation of the lunar gravity measurements obtained from Apollo 15 Doppler radio tracking data. The extent of surface coverage was limited to the trajectory paths of the command and service module during revolutions 3 through 11, when it was at a relatively low periapsis altitude just prior to undocking with the lunar module. The trajectory was close to the most optimal for study of the details of the Serenitatis and Crisium mascons. The periapsis altitude was about 12 km at the center of Mare Serenitatis, one of the largest mascons, and the one in the most favorable viewing geometry. The results obtained strengthen Booker's (1970) contention that all mascons have approximately the same thickness.

  11. Hands-Free Transcranial Color Doppler Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Robert; Madala, Srihdar; Sattler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Current transcranial color Doppler (TCD) transducer probes are bulky and difficult to move in tiny increments to search and optimize TCD signals. This invention provides miniature motions of a TCD transducer probe to optimize TCD signals. The mechanical probe uses spherical bearing in guiding and locating the tilting crystal face. The lateral motion of the crystal face as it tilts across the full range of motion was achieved by minimizing the distance between the pivot location and the crystal face. The smallest commonly available metal spherical bearing was used with an outer diameter of 12 mm, a 3-mm tall retaining ring, and 5-mm overall height. Small geared motors were used that would provide sufficient power in a very compact package. After confirming the validity of the basic positioning concept, optimization design loops were completed to yield the final design.

  12. Spacecraft Doppler tracking with a VLBI antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comoretto, G.; Iess, L.; Bertotti, B.; Brenkle, J. P.; Horton, T.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported from Doppler-shift measurements to the Voyager-2 spacecraft at a distance of 26 AU, obtained using the 32-m VLBI antenna at Medicina (Italy) during July and August 1988. The apparatus comprises the el-az antenna, an S-X-band receiver, a hydrogen maser to generate the reference signal, a Mark III VLBI terminal, and a digital tone extractor capable of isolating a tone of known frequency from a noisy signal and giving its phase and amplitude. A signal transmitted in S-band from the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) station in Australia and retransmitted coherently in X-band by Voyager, was received 7 h 6 min later at Medicina and at the DSN station in Madrid. Sample data are presented graphically and shown to be of generally high quality; further in-depth analysis is under way.

  13. Microscale Heat Conduction Models and Doppler Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2015-01-22

    The objective of this project is to establish an approach for providing the fundamental input that is needed to estimate the magnitude and time-dependence of the Doppler feedback mechanism in Very High Temperature reactors. This mechanism is the foremost contributor to the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature reactors that use fuel based on Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) coated particles. Therefore, its correct prediction is essential to the conduct of safety analyses for these reactors. Since the effect is directly dependent on the actual temperature reached by the fuel during transients, the underlying phenomena of heat deposition, heat transfer and temperature rise must be correctly predicted. To achieve the above objective, this project will explore an approach that accounts for lattice effects as well as local temperature variations and the correct definition of temperature and related local effects.

  14. Role of transcranial Doppler in cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Amit A; Sharma, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only noninvasive modality for the assessment of real-time cerebral blood flow. It complements various anatomic imaging modalities by providing physiological-flow related information. It is relatively cheap, easily available, and can be performed at the bedside. It has been suggested as an essential component of a comprehensive stroke centre. In addition to its importance in acute cerebrovascular ischemia, its role is expanding in the evaluation of cerebral hemodynamics in various disorders of the brain. The "established" clinical indications for the use of TCD include cerebral ischemia, sickle cell disease, detection of right-to-left shunts, subarachnoid hemorrhage, periprocedural or surgical monitoring, and brain death. We present the role of TCD in acute cerebrovascular ischemia, sonothrombolysis, and intracranial stenosis. PMID:27625245

  15. Pulsed laser Doppler measurements of wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimarzio, C.; Harris, C.; Bilbro, J. W.; Weaver, E. A.; Burnham, D. C.; Hallock, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    There is a need for a sensor at the airport that can remotely detect, identify, and track wind shears near the airport in order to assure aircraft safety. To determine the viability of a laser wind-shear system, the NASA pulsed coherent Doppler CO2 lidar (Jelalian et al., 1972) was installed in a semitrailer van with a rooftop-mounted hemispherical scanner and was used to monitor thunderstorm gust fronts. Wind shears associated with the gust fronts at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) between 5 July and 4 August 1978 were measured and tracked. The most significant data collected at KSC are discussed. The wind shears were clearly visible in both real-time velocity vs. azimuth plots and in postprocessing displays of velocities vs. position. The results indicate that a lidar system cannot be used effectively when moderate precipitation exists between the sensor and the region of interest.

  16. Color Doppler imaging of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Galina; Kato, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Color Doppler imaging (CDI) is a widely used method for evaluating ocular circulation that has been used in a number of studies on retinal diseases. CDI assesses blood velocity parameters by using ultrasound waves. In ophthalmology, these assessments are mainly performed on the retrobulbar blood vessels: the ophthalmic, the central retinal, and the short posterior ciliary arteries. In this review, we discuss CDI use for the assessment of retinal diseases classified into the following: vascular diseases, degenerations, dystrophies, and detachment. The retinal vascular diseases that have been investigated by CDI include diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions, retinal artery occlusions, ocular ischemic conditions, and retinopathy of prematurity. Degenerations and dystrophies included in this review are age-related macular degeneration, myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. CDI has been used for the differential diagnosis of retinal detachment, as well as the evaluation of retrobulbar circulation in this condition. CDI is valuable for research and is a potentially useful diagnostic tool in the clinical setting. PMID:20385332

  17. DC coupled Doppler radar physiological monitor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Song, Chenyan; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in Doppler radar systems for physiological monitoring is a large DC offset in baseband outputs. Typically, AC coupling is used to eliminate this DC offset. Since the physiological signals of interest include frequency content near DC, it is not desirable to simply use AC coupling on the radar outputs. While AC coupling effectively removes DC offset, it also introduces a large time delay and distortion. This paper presents the first DC coupled IQ demodulator printed circuit board (PCB) design and measurements. The DC coupling is achieved by using a mixer with high LO to RF port isolation, resulting in a very low radar DC offset on the order of mV. The DC coupled signals from the PCB radar system were successfully detected with significant LNA gain without saturation. Compared to the AC coupled results, the DC coupled results show great advantages of less signal distortion and more accurate rate estimation. PMID:22254704

  18. Laser Doppler systems in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1976-01-01

    The loss of heterodyne signal power for the Marshall Space Flight Center laser Doppler system due to the random changes in the atmospheric index of refraction is investigated. The current status in the physics of low energy laser propagation through turbulent atmosphere is presented. The analysis and approximate evaluation of the loss of the heterodyne signal power due to the atmospheric absorption, scattering, and turbulence are estimated for the conditions of the January 1973 flight tests. Theoretical and experimental signal to noise values are compared. Maximum and minimum values of the atmospheric attenuation over a two way path of 20 km range are calculated as a function of altitude using models of atmosphere, aerosol concentration, and turbulence.

  19. Doppler cooling and trapping on forbidden transitions.

    PubMed

    Binnewies, T; Wilpers, G; Sterr, U; Riehle, F; Helmcke, J; Mehlstäubler, T E; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2001-09-17

    Ultracold atoms at temperatures close to the recoil limit have been achieved by extending Doppler cooling to forbidden transitions. A cloud of (40)Ca atoms has been cooled and trapped to a temperature as low as 6 microK by operating a magnetooptical trap on the spin-forbidden intercombination transition. Quenching the long-lived excited state with an additional laser enhanced the scattering rate by a factor of 15, while a high selectivity in velocity was preserved. With this method, more than 10% of precooled atoms from a standard magnetooptical trap have been transferred to the ultracold trap. Monte Carlo simulations of the cooling process are in good agreement with the experiments. PMID:11580503

  20. The solar oscillations investigation: Michelson Doppler imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. Todd; Scherrer, P. H.; Bush, R. I.; Title, A.; Tarbell, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Solar Oscillations Investigation (SOI) developed the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) to investigate the properties of the solar interior using the tools of helioseismology and of the photosphere and corona using more conventional techniques. The fundamental goal is to understand the Sun by determining its structure and observing its dynamics. The basic observables, velocity, intensity, and magnetic field, are computed on board from up to twenty 1024 by 1024 filtergrams made each minute. Subsequent analysis will extend the region to be explored downward into the solar interior and upward into the corona. While the instrument is dedicated to producing an uninterrupted series of helioseismology data, several magnetograms will be made each day and special eight hour campaigns are being developed to address specific scientific questions, some in coordination with other SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) instruments.

  1. Parallax effects in laser Doppler spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, V I

    1999-12-31

    Parallax effects in laser Doppler spectroscopy, associated with the variation of the scattering angle during motion of a particle through the probed volume, were investigated by a numerical simulation method based on the Mie scattering theory. It was found that, in general, the shifts of the spectral profile parameters (the average frequency, broadening, asymmetry, and kurtosis) become significant as the parallax number N{sub {psi}{alpha}=}(2/{pi}){psi}{alpha} ({psi} is the angular size of the probed volume, {alpha} = {pi}d/{lambda} is the relative particle diameter) increases. The anomalous ranges of the parameters of the particle and of the optical system, in which marked distortions (such as the polymodal nature and the splitting of the spectral profile) are observed even for a low parallax number (N{sub {psi}{alpha}} || 1), were discovered. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Widefield laser doppler velocimeter: development and theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansche, Bruce David; Reu, Phillip L.; Massad, Jordan Elias

    2007-03-01

    The widefield laser Doppler velocimeter is a new measurement technique that significantly expands the functionality of a traditional scanning system. This new technique allows full-field velocity measurements without scanning, a drawback of traditional measurement techniques. This is particularly important for tests in which the sample is destroyed or the motion of the sample is non-repetitive. The goal of creating ''velocity movies'' was accomplished during the research, and this report describes the current functionality and operation of the system. The mathematical underpinnings and system setup are thoroughly described. Two prototype experiments are then presented to show the practical use of the current system. Details of the corresponding hardware used to collect the data and the associated software to analyze the data are presented.

  3. Planar Particle Imaging Doppler Velocimetry Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2000-01-01

    Two current techniques exist for the measurement of planar, three-component velocity fields. Both techniques require multiple views of the illumination plane in order to extract all three velocity components. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a high-resolution, high accuracy, planar velocimetry technique that provides valuable instantaneous velocity information in aeropropulsion test facilities. PIV can provide three-component flow-field measurements using a two-camera, stereo viewing configuration. Doppler global velocimetry (DGV) is another planar velocimetry technique that can provide three component flow-field measurements; however, it requires three detector systems that must be located at oblique angles from the measurement plane. The three-dimensional configurations of either technique require multiple (DGV) or at least large (stereo PIV) optical access ports in the facility in which the measurements are being conducted. Optical access is extremely limited in aeropropulsion test facilities. In many cases, only one optical access port is available. A hybrid measurement technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, planar particle image and Doppler velocimetry (PPIDV), which combines elements from both the PIV and DGV techniques into a single detection system that can measure all three components of velocity across a planar region of a flow field through a single optical access port. In the standard PIV technique, a pulsed laser is used to illuminate the flow field at two closely spaced instances in time, which are recorded on a "frame-straddling" camera, yielding a pair of single-exposure image frames. The PIV camera is oriented perpendicular to the light sheet, and the processed PIV data yield the two-component velocity field in the plane of the light sheet. In the standard DGV technique, an injection-seeded Nd:YAG pulsed laser light sheet illuminates the seeded flow field, and three receiver systems are used to measure three components

  4. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  5. Myocardial Tissue Doppler Velocity in Child Growth

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Ha; Kim, Nam Kyun; Jung, Jo Won; Choi, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background In adults, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a recommended component of routine echocardiography. However, TDI velocities are less accepted in pediatrics, due to their strong variability and age dependence in children. This study examines the distribution of myocardial tissue Doppler velocities in healthy children to assess the effect of age with cardiac growth on the various echocardiographic measurements. Methods Total 144 healthy children were enrolled in this study. They were recruited from the pediatric outpatient clinic for routine well-child visits. The statistical relationships between age and TDI values were analyzed. Also, the statistical relationships between body surface area (BSA) and TDI values, left ventricle end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD) and TDI values were analyzed. Also, we conducted multivariate analysis of cardiac growth parameters such as, age, BSA, LVEDD and TDI velocity data. Results All of the age, BSA, and LVEDD had positive correlations with deceleration time (DT), pressure half-time (PHT), peak early diastolic myocardial velocity, peak systolic myocardial velocity, and had negative correlations with peak late diastolic velocity (A) and the ratio of trans-mitral inflow velocity to early diastolic velocity of mitral annulus (E/E'). In the multivariate analysis, all of the age, BSA, and LVEDD had positive correlations with DT, PHT, and negative correlations with A and E/E'. Conclusion The cardiac growth parameters related alterations of E/E' may suggest that diastolic myocardial velocities are cardiac growth dependent, and diastolic function has positive correlation with cardiac growth in pediatric group. This cardiac growth related myocardial functional variation would be important for assessment of cardiac involvement either in healthy and sick child. PMID:27081443

  6. Duplex Doppler ultrasound study of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Stagnitti, A.; Marini, A.; Impara, L.; Drudi, F.M.; Lo mele, L.; Lillo Odoardi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The anatomy and physiology of the temporomandibular joint can be studied clinically and by diagnostic imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiography (X-ray) and computed tomography (CT) have thus for many years contributed to the study of the kinetics in the mandibular condyle. However, also duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examination is widely used in the study of structures during movement, particularly vascular structures. Materials and methods A total of 30 patients were referred by the Department of Orthodontics to the Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, University of Rome “La Sapienza”. All patients underwent duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examination of the temporomandibular joint using Toshiba APLIO SSA-770A equipment and duplex Doppler multi-display technique, which allows simultaneous display of US images and color Doppler signals. A linear phased array probe with crystal elements was used operating at a basic frequency of 6 MHz during pulsed Doppler spectral analysis and 7.5 MHz during US imaging. Results In normal patients a regular alternation in the spectral Doppler waveforms was obtained, while in patients with temporomandibular joint meniscus dysfunction there was no regularity in the sum of the Fourier series with an unsteady waveform pattern related to irregular movements of the temporomandibular joint. Conclusions In all cases duplex Doppler US examination proved able to differentiate between normal and pathological patients and among the latter this technique permitted identification of the most significant aspects of the dysfunctional diseases. PMID:23397016

  7. Use of Doppler ultrasound for non-invasive urodynamic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Hideo; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Uematsu, Katsutoshi; Sasaki, Katsumi; Inoue, Miyabi; Kumon, Hiromi

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: A totally non-invasive transperineal urodynamic technique using Doppler ultrasonography has been developed. Methods: Since normal urine does not have blood cells, urine was thought not to produce the Doppler effects. However, basic studies confirmed that the decrease of pressure at high velocity (Bernouilli effect) caused dissolved gas to form microbubbles, which are detected by Doppler ultrasonography. Subjects sat and the probe was advanced via remote control to achieve gentle contact with the perineal skin. The digital uroflow data signals and the color Doppler ultrasound video images were processed on a personal computer. The flow-velocity curves from two sites; the distal prostatic urethra just above the external sphincter (V1) and the sphincteric urethra (V2) were plotted against time. The parameters of both the pressure-flow studies and the Doppler ultrasound urodynamic studies were compared in men who had various degrees of obstruction. Results: Functional cross-sectional area at prostatic urethra (A1), calculated by Qmax/V1, was lower in the group of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) vs. control group. Velocity ratio (VR), which was calculated by V1/V2, was the parameter having the best correlation with BOO index, though A1 had a similar correlation. This method is viable to diagnose the degree of BOO. Conclusions: The development of non-invasive Doppler ultrasound videourodynamics (Doppler UDS) will dramatically expand the information on voiding function. PMID:19468440

  8. Optimization of the GSFC TROPOZ DIAL retrieval using synthetic lidar returns and ozonesondes - Part 1: Algorithm validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Leblanc, T.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.

    2015-04-01

    The main purpose of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) is to measure the vertical distribution of tropospheric ozone for science investigations. Because of the important health and climate impacts of tropospheric ozone, it is imperative to quantify background photochemical and aloft ozone concentrations, especially during air quality episodes. To better characterize tropospheric ozone, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has recently been developed, which currently consists of five different ozone DIAL instruments, including the TROPOZ. This paper addresses the necessary procedures to validate the TROPOZ retrieval algorithm and develops a primary standard for retrieval consistency and optimization within TOLNet. This paper is focused on ensuring the TROPOZ and future TOLNet algorithms are properly quantifying ozone concentrations and the following paper will focus on defining a systematic uncertainty analysis standard for all TOLNet instruments. Although this paper is used to optimize the TROPOZ retrieval, the methodology presented may be extended and applied to most other DIAL instruments, even if the atmospheric product of interest is not tropospheric ozone (e.g. temperature or water vapor). The analysis begins by computing synthetic lidar returns from actual TROPOZ lidar return signals in combination with a known ozone profile. From these synthetic signals, it is possible to explicitly determine retrieval algorithm biases from the known profile, thereby identifying any areas that may need refinement for a new operational version of the TROPOZ retrieval algorithm. A new vertical resolution scheme is presented, which was upgraded from a constant vertical resolution to a variable vertical resolution, in order to yield a statistical uncertainty of <10%. The optimized vertical resolution scheme retains the ability to resolve fluctuations in the known ozone profile and now allows near

  9. Pulsed Doppler echocardiographic analysis of mitral regurgitation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Loperfido, F; Biasucci, L M; Pennestri, F; Laurenzi, F; Gimigliano, F; Vigna, C; Rossi, E; Favuzzi, A; Santarelli, P; Manzoli, U

    1986-10-01

    In 72 patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI), mitral regurgitation (MR) was assessed by pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography and compared with physical and 2-dimensional echocardiographic findings. MR was found by Doppler in 29 of 42 patients (62%) with anterior MI, 11 of 30 (37%) with inferior MI (p less than 0.01) and in none of 20 normal control subjects. MR was more frequent in patients who underwent Doppler study 3 months after MI than in those who underwent Doppler at discharge (anterior MI = 83% vs 50%, p less than 0.01; inferior MI = 47% vs 27%, p = not significant). Of 15 patients who underwent Doppler studies both times, 3 (all with anterior MI) had MR only on the second study. Of the patients with Doppler MR, 12 of 27 (44%) with a left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) greater than 30% and 1 of 13 (8%) with an EF of 30% or less (p less than 0.01) had an MR systolic murmur. Mitral prolapse or eversion and papillary muscle fibrosis were infrequent in MI patients, whether or not Doppler MR was present. The degree of Doppler MR correlated with EF (r = -0.61), LV systolic volume (r = 0.47), and systolic and diastolic mitral anulus circumference (r = 0.52 and 0.51, respectively). Doppler MR was present in 24 of 28 patients (86%) with an EF of 40% or less and in 16 of 44 (36%) with EF more than 40% (p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3766410

  10. Characteristics of the OPG System USIG Quasiphase-Matched Nonlinear Crystals for 1.6 μm CO2 Dial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a direct detection 1.6 μm differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to perform range-resolved measurements of vertical CO2 concentration profiles in the atmosphere. Our 1.6 μm DIAL system consists of the optical parametric generator (OPG) and amplifier (OPA) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate (500 Hz). The OPG system consists of a quasi-phase-matched (QPM) crystal and does not need a cavity. The output power of the OPA system is 6 mJ, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the spectrum is about 280 MHz and spectrum purity is 91.0 +- 0.2 ~ 0.5%. CO2 concentration error from fluctuation of the spectrum purity is 0.3% at 6 km altitude and 0.4 % at 10 km altitude.

  11. Solid-state Raman frequency converters for CO2-DIAL systems at 1.6 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Hanjo; Lisinetskii, Victor; Kaminskii, Alexander A.; Eichler, Hans-Joachim

    2009-09-01

    Measurement of the three-dimensional distribution of atmospheric trace gases, especially CO2, is an important factor to improve the accuracy of climate models and to understand the global effects of the greenhouse effect. This can be achieved by differential absorption Lidar (DIAL). The absorption spectrum of CO2 features several suitable absorption lines for a ground-based or air-borne DIAL system working at wavelengths between 1.57 μm and 1.61 μm. An appropriate laser transmitter must emit laser pulses with pulse energies of more than 10 mJ and pulse duration in the nanosecond range. For high spectral purity the bandwidth is required to be less than 60 MHz. OPOs and Er-doped solid-state lasers emit around 1.6 μm, but we describe here alternatively Nd:YAG and Nd:glass laser systems with Raman converters. The use of stimulated Raman scattering in crystalline and ceramic materials is a possibility to shift the wavelength of existing lasers depending on the size of the Raman shift. After the investigation of a large number of Raman-active materials some of them could be identified as promising candidates for the conversion of typical Nd:YAG emission wavelengths, including LiNH2C6H4SO3•H2O, Ba(NO3)2, Li2SO4•H2O, Y(HCOO)3•2H2O, β-BBO and diamond. Our experiments with Ba(NO3)2 showed that the choice of the material should not be restricted to those with an adequate first order Stokes Raman line position, but also second or third order Raman shift should be considered. Development of Raman frequency converters for high pulse energies concentrates on linear and folded resonator designs and seeded Raman amplifiers using the Raman material as a direct amplifier. With Ba(NO3)2 pulse energy up to 116 mJ and 42 % quantum efficiency at the third Stokes wavelength with 1599 nm has been demonstrated. High power operation at 5 W with compensation of thermal lensing was achieved.

  12. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, W. R.; Beaver, W. L.; Meindl, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were made of (1) blood flow redistribution during lower body negative pressure (LBNP), (2) the profile of blood flow across the mitral annulus of the heart (both perpendicular and parallel to the commissures), (3) testing and evaluation of a number of pulsed Doppler systems, (4) acute calibration of perivascular Doppler transducers, (5) redesign of the mitral flow transducers to improve reliability and ease of construction, and (6) a frequency offset generator designed for use in distinguishing forward and reverse components of blood flow by producing frequencies above and below the offset frequency. Finally methodology was developed and initial results were obtained from a computer analysis of time-varying Doppler spectra.

  13. Relativistic formulation for the Doppler-broadened line profile

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Young-Sea; Chiue, Juang-Han; Huang, Yi-Chi; Hsiung, Te-Chih

    2010-07-15

    Profiles of spectral lines due to the thermal motion of light-emitting particles are formulated based on the classical and the relativistic Doppler effects, respectively. For the classical case, the well-known Doppler-broadened line profile is reproduced. For the relativistic case, the line profile obtained is asymmetrically broadened with increasing temperature. However, the peak frequency remains unshifted, in contrast to blueshifted, as has been predicted in the current literature. Reasoning is given as to why the relativistic Doppler-broadened line profile currently accepted is probably invalid.

  14. [Feasibility study of the Doppler exploration of the renal artery].

    PubMed

    Milon, P; Clavier, E; Genevois, A; Benozio, M

    1990-03-01

    Using arteriography as a reference, the authors investigate the feasibility of pulsed doppler exploration of the normal or pathological renal arteries in 46 successive patients. The poor sensitivity of pulsed doppler, mainly due to the considerable anatomical variations of the renal pedicle, does not currently allow using this technique for the detection of renal arterial stenosis. When combined with angiography, pulsed doppler becomes a definite asset in therapeutic radiology to help in the choice of a treatment and in follow-up. PMID:2191123

  15. Sub-Doppler laser cooling of potassium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, M.; Roy, S.; Carcagní, L.; Trypogeorgos, D.; Fattori, M.; Inguscio, M.; Modugno, G.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the sub-Doppler laser cooling of bosonic potassium isotopes, whose small hyperfine splitting has so far prevented cooling below the Doppler temperature. We find instead that the combination of a dark optical molasses scheme that naturally arises in this kind of system and an adiabatic ramping of the laser parameters allows us to reach sub-Doppler temperatures for small laser detunings. We demonstrate temperatures as low as 25±3 μK and 47±5 μK in high-density samples of the two isotopes 39K and 41K, respectively. Our findings should find application to other atomic systems.

  16. Advances in Direct Detection Doppler Lidar Technology and Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we will describe the ground based Doppler lidar system which is mounted in a modified delivery van to allow field deployment and operations. The system includes an aerosol double edge receiver optimized for aerosol backscatter Doppler measurements at 1064 nm and a molecular double edge receiver which operates at 355 nm. The lidar system will be described including details of the injection seeded diode pumped laser transmitter and the piezoelectrically tunable high spectral resolution Fabry Perot etalon which is used to measure the Doppler shift. Examples of tropospheric wind profiles obtained with the system will also be presented to demonstrate its capabilities.

  17. Is tissue Doppler echocardiography the Holy Grail for the intensivist?

    PubMed Central

    Poelaert, Jan; Roosens, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Assessment of left ventricular diastolic function in the critically ill patient remains a difficult issue in clinical practice. Combined use of routine transmitral and pulmonary venous Doppler patterns in conjunction with tissue Doppler imaging have been claimed to allow bedside diagnosis of diastolic dysfunction. Although in the previous issue of Critical Care it was clearly demonstrated there might be a difference in load dependency of the early myocardial tissue Doppler velocity between lateral and septal placed sample volume, there remain still several unanswered questions, particularly with respect to the preload dependency of these indices. PMID:17567926

  18. Sub-Doppler laser cooling of potassium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Landini, M.; Roy, S.; Carcagni, L.; Trypogeorgos, D.; Fattori, M.; Inguscio, M.; Modugno, G.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the sub-Doppler laser cooling of bosonic potassium isotopes, whose small hyperfine splitting has so far prevented cooling below the Doppler temperature. We find instead that the combination of a dark optical molasses scheme that naturally arises in this kind of system and an adiabatic ramping of the laser parameters allows us to reach sub-Doppler temperatures for small laser detunings. We demonstrate temperatures as low as 25{+-}3 {mu}K and 47{+-}5 {mu}K in high-density samples of the two isotopes {sup 39}K and {sup 41}K, respectively. Our findings should find application to other atomic systems.

  19. Mitigating Doppler shift effect in HF multitone data modem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonlu, Yasar

    1989-09-01

    Digital communications over High Frequency (HF) radio channels are getting important in recent years. Current HF requirements are for data transmission at rates 2.4 kbps or more to accommodate computer data links and digital secure voice. HF modems which were produced to meet these speeds are, serial modems and parallel modems. On the other hand, the HF sky-wave communication medium, the ionosphere, has some propagation problems such as multipath and Doppler shift. The effect of Doppler shift in a parallel modem which employs Differential Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (DQPSK) modulation is considered and a correction method to mitigate the Doppler Shift effect is introduced.

  20. Interferometric millimeter wave and THz wave doppler radar

    DOEpatents

    Liao, Shaolin; Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Elmer, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    A mixerless high frequency interferometric Doppler radar system and methods has been invented, numerically validated and experimentally tested. A continuous wave source, phase modulator (e.g., a continuously oscillating reference mirror) and intensity detector are utilized. The intensity detector measures the intensity of the combined reflected Doppler signal and the modulated reference beam. Rigorous mathematics formulas have been developed to extract bot amplitude and phase from the measured intensity signal. Software in Matlab has been developed and used to extract such amplitude and phase information from the experimental data. Both amplitude and phase are calculated and the Doppler frequency signature of the object is determined.

  1. Doppler ultrasound signal denoising based on wavelet frames.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, W; Liu, B

    2001-05-01

    A novel approach was proposed to denoise the Doppler ultrasound signal. Using this method, wavelet coefficients of the Doppler signal at multiple scales were first obtained using the discrete wavelet frame analysis. Then, a soft thresholding-based denoising algorithm was employed to deal with these coefficients to get the denoised signal. In the simulation experiments, the SNR improvements and the maximum frequency estimation precision were studied for the denoised signal. From the simulation and clinical studies, it was concluded that the performance of this discrete wavelet frame (DWF) approach is higher than that of the standard (critically sampled) wavelet transform (DWT) for the Doppler ultrasound signal denoising. PMID:11381694

  2. Rotational Doppler Effect and Barnett Field in Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Harii, Kazuya; Matsuo, Mamoru; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Ono, Masao; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of the rotational Doppler effect using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have developed a coil-spinning technique that enables measurements by rotating a detector and fixing a sample. We found that the rotational Doppler effect gives rise to NMR frequency shifts equal to the rotation frequency. We formulate the rotational Doppler effect and the Barnett field using a vector model for the nuclear magnetic moment. This formulation reveals that, with just the sample rotating, both effects cancel each other, thereby explaining the absence of an NMR frequency shift in conventional sample-spinning NMR measurements.

  3. Development of frequency-agile high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} DIAL systems for long range chemical remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, C.R. Jr.; Fite, C.B.; Foy, B.R.; Jolin, J.; Mietz, D.E.

    1997-11-01

    Issues related to the development of direct detection, long-range CO{sub 2} DIAL systems for chemical detection and identification are presented and discussed including: data handling and display techniques for large, multi-{lambda} data sets, turbulence effects, slant path propagation, and speckle averaging. Data examples from various field campaigns and CO{sub 2} lidar platforms are used to illustrate the issues.

  4. Huygens-Fresnel Wave-Optics Simulation of Atmosphere Optical Turbulence and Reflective Speckle in CO{sub 2} Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Foy, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; McVey, B.D.; Quick, C.R.; Porch, W.M.; Tiee, J.J.; Fite, C.B.; Archuleta, F.A.; Whitehead, M.C.; Walters, D.L.

    1999-03-23

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. We have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to simulate the effects of two of these process: effects caused by beam propagation through atmospheric optical turbulence and effects caused by reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. In this work, we briefly review a description of our model including the limitations along with previous simulation s of individual effects. The performance of our modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements and show good agreement. In addition, advanced studies have been performed to demonstrate the utility of our model in assessing the effects for different lidar geometries on RMS noise and correlation ''size'' in the receiver plane.

  5. Huygens-Fresnel wave-optics simulation of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle in CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.; Petrin, R.; MacKerrow, E.; Schmitt, M.; Foy, B.; Koskelo, A.; McVey, B.; Quick, C.; Porch, W.; Fite, C.; Archuleta, F.; Whitehead, M.; Tiee, J.; Walters, D.

    1999-04-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to simulate the effects of two of these processes: effects caused by beam propagation through atmospheric optical turbulence and effects caused by reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. The performance of the modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements. The limitations of the model are also discussed. In addition, studies have been performed to determine the importance of key parameters in the simulation. The results of these studies and their impact on the overall results will be presented.

  6. The Next Generation Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Salazar, Jorge; Chandrasekar, V.

    2013-04-01

    NCAR's Electra Doppler radar (ELDORA) with a dual-beam slotted waveguide array using dual-transmitter, dual-beam, rapid scan and step-chirped waveform significantly improved the spatial scale to 300m (Hildebrand et al. 1996). However, ELDORA X-band radar's penetration into precipitation is limited by attenuation and is not designed to collect polarimetric measurements to remotely estimate microphysics. ELDORA has been placed on dormancy because its airborne platform (P3 587) was retired in January 2013. The US research community has strongly voiced the need to continue measurement capability similar to the ELDORA. A critical weather research area is quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting (QPE/QPF). In recent years, hurricane intensity change involving eye-eyewall interactions has drawn research attention (Montgomery et al., 2006; Bell and Montgomery, 2006). In the case of convective precipitation, two issues, namely, (1) when and where convection will be initiated, and (2) determining the organization and structure of ensuing convection, are key for QPF. Therefore collocated measurements of 3-D winds and precipitation microphysics are required for achieving significant skills in QPF and QPE. Multiple radars in dual-Doppler configuration with polarization capability estimate dynamical and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation are mostly available over land. However, storms over complex terrain, the ocean and in forest regions are not observable by ground-based radars (Bluestein and Wakimoto, 2003). NCAR/EOL is investigating potential configurations for the next generation airborne radar that is capable of retrieving dynamic and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. ELDORA's slotted waveguide array radar is not compatible for dual-polarization measurements. Therefore, the new design has to address both dual-polarization capability and platform requirements to replace the ELDORA system. NCAR maintains a C-130

  7. Monitoring of volcanic sulphur dioxide emissions using differential absorption lidar (DIAL), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weibring, P.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.; Cecchi, G.; Pantani, L.; Ferrara, R.; Caltabiano, T.

    1998-10-01

    The total fluxes of sulphur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano were studied using optical remote sensing techniques in three shipborne field experiments (1992, 1994, and 1997). The main purpose of the experiments was to compare active (laser) techniques with passive monitoring. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements were implemented by placing the Swedish mobile lidar system on board the Italian research vessel Urania, sailing under the volcanic plumes. Simultaneously, the passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique was used for assessing the total overhead gas burden. Finally, correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was also implemented in one of the campaigns. Differences in integrated gas column assessment are expected and observed, mostly connected to complex scattering conditions influencing the passive measurements. Since such measurements are much employed in routine volcanic monitoring it is of great interest to model and provide corrections to the raw data obtained. Lidar measurements proved to be quite useful for this purpose. By combining the integrated gas concentration over the plume cross section with wind velocity data, SO2 fluxes of the order of 1000, 100, and 10 tonnes/day were measured for Mt. Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano, respectively.

  8. Analysis of ovarian dose of women employed in the radium watch dial industry: A macrodosimetric and microdosimetric approach

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, J.C.; Stinchcomb, T.G.; Schieve, L.; Keane, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the 1920s, painters in the radium watch dial industry frequently tipped their brushes with their tongues resulting in the ingestion of radium-226 and/or radium-228. Earlier dosimetric studies (1950--1990) attempted to correlate the magnitude of biological effects (e.g., increased cancer incidence) with variations in radium uptake. Recently, there is a renewed interest on the part of epidemiologists studying additional possible effects (e.g., low birthrate and sex ratio). The goal of this work is to review and update the determination of dose to the ovaries from both external and internal radiation hazards in an attempt to correlate ovarian dose with these additional possible effects. The dose to the ovaries can be attributed to four major sources: (1) external gamma irradiation from the containers of radium paint; (2) alpha and (3) beta particle emissions due to sources which decay within the ovaries; and (4) internal gamma irradiation released throughout the body. Data obtained in earlier dosimetric studies on the quantity of Ra-226 and/or Ra-228 ingested were used in this study. Dose is estimated on a macroscopic scale by calculating the average dose deposited within the entire ovary. In addition, a microdosimetric analysis is performed which considers the statistical variation of energy deposited within individual oocyte nuclei. Sources of uncertainty, and the use of these data in new epidemiological studies are discussed.

  9. Integrating stochastic time-dependent travel speed in solution methods for the dynamic dial-a-ride problem

    PubMed Central

    Schilde, M.; Doerner, K.F.; Hartl, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    In urban areas, logistic transportation operations often run into problems because travel speeds change, depending on the current traffic situation. If not accounted for, time-dependent and stochastic travel speeds frequently lead to missed time windows and thus poorer service. Especially in the case of passenger transportation, it often leads to excessive passenger ride times as well. Therefore, time-dependent and stochastic influences on travel speeds are relevant for finding feasible and reliable solutions. This study considers the effect of exploiting statistical information available about historical accidents, using stochastic solution approaches for the dynamic dial-a-ride problem (dynamic DARP). The authors propose two pairs of metaheuristic solution approaches, each consisting of a deterministic method (average time-dependent travel speeds for planning) and its corresponding stochastic version (exploiting stochastic information while planning). The results, using test instances with up to 762 requests based on a real-world road network, show that in certain conditions, exploiting stochastic information about travel speeds leads to significant improvements over deterministic approaches. PMID:25844013

  10. The estimation and potential radiobiological significance of the intake of 228Ra by early Ra dial workers in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Keane, A T; Lucas, H F; Markun, F; Essling, M A; Holtzman, R B

    1986-09-01

    We made radiochemical determinations of 226Ra and the 228Ra-decay product, 228Th, in samples of bone from former Ra dial workers who belonged to a major cohort of Ra-exposed persons under study for health effects at our institution. Most of the former workers were long-term residents of two communities supplied with drinking water containing elevated natural levels of 228Ra and 226Ra, so determinations also were made of radioactivity in samples of bone from long-term residents not occupationally exposed to Ra. The 228Th activity of the bones of the former workers, after correction for the presence of natural radioactivity, showed that some had significant occupational intakes of 228Ra, contrary to published reports that 228Ra was never used by the Illinois company that had employed the cohort of early workers. For 14 workers hired in the years 1920-23, the calculated ratio of the occupational intake of 228Ra to 226Ra activity averaged 0.15 (coefficient of variation 0.65), whereas for three workers hired in 1924, it was not significantly different from zero (mean 0.05, coefficient of variation 1.5). The risk of radiogenic cancer for the typical worker hired before 1924 may have been nearly twice that incurred in the absence of the 228Ra component of the Ra intakes. PMID:3744831

  11. Spatio-Temporal Variability of Water Vapor in the Free Troposphere Investigated by Dial and Ftir Vertical Soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelmann, H.; Sussmann, R.; Trickl, T.; Reichert, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the free tropospheric spatio-temporal variability of water vapor investigated by the analysis of a five-year period of water vapor vertical soundings above Mt. Zugspitze (2962 m a.s.l., Germany). Our results are obtained from a combination of measurements of vertically integrated water vapor (IWV), recorded with a solar Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer and of water vapor profiles recorded with the nearby differential absorption lidar (DIAL). The special geometrical arrangement of one zenith-viewing and one sun-pointing instrument and the temporal resolution of both optical instruments allow for an investigation of the spatio-temporal variability of IWV on a spatial scale of less than one kilometer and on a time scale of less than one hour. We investigated the short-term variability of both IWV and water vapor profiles from statistical analyses. The latter was also examined by case studies with a clear assignment to certain atmospheric processes as local convection or long-range transport. This study is described in great detail in our recent publication [1].

  12. Analysis and design methodology for the development of optimized, direct-detection CO{sub 2} DIAL receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Cafferty, M.

    1996-12-31

    The analysis methodology and corresponding analytical tools for the design of optimized, low-noise, hard target return CO{sub 2} Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) receiver systems implementing both single element detectors and multi-pixel imaging arrays for passive/active, remote-sensing applications are presented. System parameters and components composing the receiver include: aperture, focal length, field of view, cold shield requirements, image plane dimensions, pixel dimensions, pixel pitch and fill factor, detection quantum efficiency, optical filter requirements, amplifier and temporal sampling parameters. The performance analysis is accomplished by calculating the system`s CO{sub 2} laser range response, total noise, optical geometric form factor and optical resolution. The noise components include speckle, photon noise due to signal, scene and atmospheric background, cold shield, and electronic noise. System resolution is simulated through cascaded optical transfer functions and includes effects due to atmosphere, optics, image sampling, and system motion. Experimental results of a developmental single-element detector receiver designed to detect 100 ns wide laser pulses (10 - 100 kHz pulse repetition rates) backscattered from hard-targets at nominal ranges of 10 km are presented. The receiver sensitivity is near-background noise limited, given an 8.5-11.5 {mu}m radiant optical bandwidth, with the total noise floor spectrally white for maximum pulse averaging efficiency.

  13. Doppler electron velocimetry : notes on creating a practical tool.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Milster, Tom

    2008-11-01

    The Doppler electron velocimeter (DEV) has been shown to be theoretically possible. This report attempts to answer the next logical question: Is it a practical instrument? The answer hinges upon whether enough electrons are available to create a time-varying Doppler current to be measured by a detector with enough sensitivity and bandwidth. The answer to both of these questions is a qualified yes. A target Doppler frequency of 1 MHz was set as a minimum rate of interest. At this target a theoretical beam current signal-to-noise ratio of 25-to-1 is shown for existing electron holography equipment. A detector is also demonstrated with a bandwidth of 1-MHz at a current of 10 pA. Additionally, a Linnik-type interferometer that would increase the available beam current is shown that would offer a more flexible arrangement for Doppler electron measurements over the traditional biprism.

  14. Quantitative Measurement of the Doppler Shift at an Ultrasonic Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerbun, R. C.; Leskovec, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Discussed is a Doppler shift laboratory experiment for an introductory college physics course. Ultrasonic transducers and a digital phase detector circuit "black box" are used to overcome room noise and "standing waves" and to produce an observable frequency shift. (SL)

  15. Extracting and analyzing micro-Doppler from ladar signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmoush, Dave

    2015-05-01

    Ladar and other 3D imaging modalities have the capability of creating 3D micro-Doppler to analyze the micro-motions of human subjects. An additional capability to the recognition of micro-motion is the recognition of the moving part, such as the hand or arm. Combined with measured RCS values of the body, ladar imaging can be used to ground-truth the more sensitive radar micro-Doppler measurements and associate the moving part of the subject with the measured Doppler and RCS from the radar system. The 3D ladar signatures can also be used to classify activities and actions on their own, achieving an 86% accuracy using a micro-Doppler based classification strategy.

  16. Laser Doppler technology applied to atmospheric environmental operating problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E. A.; Bilbro, J. W.; Dunkin, J. A.; Jeffreys, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon dioxide laser Doppler ground wind data were very favorably compared with data from standard anemometers. As a result of these measurements, two breadboard systems were developed for taking research data: a continuous wave velocimeter and a pulsed Doppler system. The scanning continuous wave laser Doppler velocimeter developed for detecting, tracking and measuring aircraft wake vortices was successfully tested at an airport where it located vortices to an accuracy of 3 meters at a range of 150 meters. The airborne pulsed laser Doppler system was developed to detect and measure clear air turbulence (CAT). This system was tested aboard an aircraft, but jet stream CAT was not encountered. However, low altitude turbulence in cumulus clouds near a mountain range was detected by the system and encountered by the aircraft at the predicted time.

  17. Modifications and Moving Measurements of Mobile Doppler LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing-Yi; Liu, Zhi-Shen; Song, Xiao-Quan; Wu, Song-Hua; Bi, De-Cang; Wang, Xi-Tao; Yin, Qi-Wei; Reitebuch, Oliver

    2010-10-01

    In the last annual report of ID. 5291 LIDAR Cal/Val, a mobile Doppler lidar had been developed for 3D wind measurements by the Chinese partners from Ocean Remote Sensing Institute, Ocean University of China. In this year, in order to further improve the mobility of the mobile Doppler lidar for lidar calibration and validation, both GPS and inertial navigation system are integrated on the vehicle for performing measurements during movement. The modifications of the system and the results of the moving measurements are presented. This work simplifies the construction of the mobile Doppler system and makes the lidar more flexible for ground-based wind measurements and validation with the ADM-Aeolus spaceborne Doppler lidar.

  18. Exploratory Meeting on Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, G. H. (Editor); Kaufman, J. W. (Editor); Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific interests and applications of the Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement System to severe storms and local weather are discussed. The main areas include convective phenomena, local circulation, atmospheric boundary layer, atmospheric dispersion, and industrial aerodynamics.

  19. A digital multigate Doppler method for high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Ye, Zongying; Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Yan; Chi, Liyang; Mu, Peitian; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive visualization of blood flow with high frequency Doppler ultrasound has been extensively used to assess the morphology and hemodynamics of the microcirculation. A completely digital implementation of multigate pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler method was proposed in this paper for high frequency ultrasound applications. Analog mixer was eliminated by a digital demodulator and the same data acquisition path was shared with traditional B-mode imaging which made the design compact and flexible. Hilbert transform based quadrature demodulation scheme was employed to achieve the multigate Doppler acquisition. A programmable high frequency ultrasound platform was also proposed to facilitate the multigate flow visualization. Experimental results showed good performance of the proposed method. Parabolic velocity gradient inside the vessel and velocity profile with different time slots were acquired to demonstrate the functionality of the multigate Doppler. Slow wall motion was also recorded by the proposed method. PMID:25061836

  20. Radiowave Phase Scintillation and Precision Doppler Tracking of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Phase scintillation cause by propagation through irregularities in the solar wind, ionosphere, and tropospher, introduces noise in spacecraft radio science experiments. The observations reported here are uses to refine the propagation noise model for Doppler tracking of deep space probes.

  1. Laser Doppler instrument measures fluid velocity without reference beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourquin, K. R.; Shigemoto, F. H.

    1971-01-01

    Fluid velocity is measured by focusing laser beam on moving fluid and measuring Doppler shift in frequency which results when radiation is scattered by particles either originally present or deliberately injected into moving fluid.

  2. Numerical studies of HF Doppler variations caused by ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takefu, M.; Hiroshige, N.

    HF Doppler variations caused by ionospheric disturbances are studied using an ionosphere model containing sinusoidal traveling electron density fluctuations. The present study uses a more realistic ionosphere model and a more accurate numerical method than previous works using corrugated specular reflector models. The study gives a clue to estimate the TID-associated fluctuations of ionospheric electron density by means of HF Doppler measurements. It is shown that some kinds of characteristic HF Doppler traces result depending on the wavelength of the disturbance and its traveling direction. Numerical results suggest that more or less 5 percent of the background electron density can explain most of the quasi-periodic variations on the observed HF Doppler records.

  3. A Digital Multigate Doppler Method for High Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Weibao; Ye, Zongying; Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Yan; Chi, Liyang; Mu, Peitian; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive visualization of blood flow with high frequency Doppler ultrasound has been extensively used to assess the morphology and hemodynamics of the microcirculation. A completely digital implementation of multigate pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler method was proposed in this paper for high frequency ultrasound applications. Analog mixer was eliminated by a digital demodulator and the same data acquisition path was shared with traditional B-mode imaging which made the design compact and flexible. Hilbert transform based quadrature demodulation scheme was employed to achieve the multigate Doppler acquisition. A programmable high frequency ultrasound platform was also proposed to facilitate the multigate flow visualization. Experimental results showed good performance of the proposed method. Parabolic velocity gradient inside the vessel and velocity profile with different time slots were acquired to demonstrate the functionality of the multigate Doppler. Slow wall motion was also recorded by the proposed method. PMID:25061836

  4. Apparatus and method for noninvasive particle detection using doppler spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2016-05-31

    An apparatus and method for noninvasively detecting the presence of solid particulate matter suspended in a fluid flowing through a pipe or an oil and gas wellbore are described. Fluid flowing through a conduit containing the particulate solids is exposed to a fixed frequency (>1 MHz) of ultrasonic vibrations from a transducer attached to the outside of the pipe. The returning Doppler frequency shifted signal derived from the scattering of sound from the moving solid particles is detected by an adjacent transducer. The transmitted signal and the Doppler signal are combined to provide sensitive particulate detection. The magnitude of the signal and the Doppler frequency shift are used to determine the particle size distribution and the velocity of the particles. Measurement of the phase shift between the applied frequency and the detected Doppler shifted may be used to determine the direction of motion of the particles.

  5. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Precision Navigation of Spacecrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Petway, Larry; Hines, Glenn; Lockhard, George; Barnes, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-based coherent Doppler lidar, utilizing an FMCW technique, has been developed and its capabilities demonstrated through two successful helicopter flight test campaigns. This Doppler lidar is expected to play a critical role in future planetary exploration missions because of its ability in providing the necessary data for soft landing on the planetary bodies and for landing missions requiring precision navigation to the designated location on the ground. Compared with radars, the Doppler lidar can provide significantly higher precision velocity and altitude data at a much higher rate without concerns for measurement ambiguity or target clutter. Future work calls for testing the Doppler lidar onboard a rocket-powered free-flyer platform operating in a closed-loop with the vehicle s guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) unit.

  6. The Doppler Effect: A Consideration of Quasar Redshifts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Kurtiss J.

    1980-01-01

    Provides information on the calculation of the redshift to blueshift ratio introduced by the transverse Doppler effect at relativistic speeds. Indicates that this shift should be mentioned in discussions of whether quasars are "local" rather than "cosmological" objects. (GS)

  7. Doing the Doppler. How to Drive This Concept Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koser, John F.

    1990-01-01

    An outdoor activity that demonstrates the Doppler effect is described. Class predictions are verified by actual involvement in collecting data. Presented is a method of analyzing data. Safety concerns are discussed. (KR)

  8. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Jordan, Jay D.; Kim, Theodore J.

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  9. Digital Doppler extraction demonstration with the advanced receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, S.; Bevan, R.; Delcastillo, H.; Kinman, P.; Chong, D.; Labelle, R.

    1990-01-01

    A digital Doppler extraction demonstration with the Advanced Receiver 2 (ARX 2) tracking Pioneer 10 and Voyager 2 is described. The measured results are compared with those of the Block 4 receiver that was operating in parallel with the ARX 2. It is shown that the ARX 2 outperforms the Block 4 receiver in terms of Allan variance of the Doppler residuals, the amount of which depends on the scenario of interest.

  10. Software For Clear-Air Doppler-Radar Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    System of software developed to present plan-position-indicator scans of clear-air Doppler radar station on color graphical cathode-ray-tube display. Designed to incorporate latest accepted standards for equipment, computer programs, and meteorological data bases. Includes use of Ada programming language, of "Graphical-Kernel-System-like" graphics interface, and of Common Doppler Radar Exchange Format. Features include portability and maintainability. Use of Ada software packages produced number of software modules reused on other related projects.

  11. Monitoring and Analysis of Respiratory Patterns Using Microwave Doppler Radar

    PubMed Central

    Pathirana, Pubudu N.; Steinfort, Christopher Louis; Caelli, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Noncontact detection characteristic of Doppler radar provides an unobtrusive means of respiration detection and monitoring. This avoids additional preparations, such as physical sensor attachment or special clothing, which can be useful for certain healthcare applications. Furthermore, robustness of Doppler radar against environmental factors, such as light, ambient temperature, interference from other signals occupying the same bandwidth, fading effects, reduce environmental constraints and strengthens the possibility of employing Doppler radar in long-term respiration detection, and monitoring applications such as sleep studies. This paper presents an evaluation in the of use of microwave Doppler radar for capturing different dynamics of breathing patterns in addition to the respiration rate. Although finding the respiration rate is essential, identifying abnormal breathing patterns in real-time could be used to gain further insights into respiratory disorders and refine diagnostic procedures. Several known breathing disorders were professionally role played and captured in a real-time laboratory environment using a noncontact Doppler radar to evaluate the feasibility of this noncontact form of measurement in capturing breathing patterns under different conditions associated with certain breathing disorders. In addition to that, inhalation and exhalation flow patterns under different breathing scenarios were investigated to further support the feasibility of Doppler radar to accurately estimate the tidal volume. The results obtained for both experiments were compared with the gold standard measurement schemes, such as respiration belt and spirometry readings, yielding significant correlations with the Doppler radar-based information. In summary, Doppler radar is highlighted as an alternative approach not only for determining respiration rates, but also for identifying breathing patterns and tidal volumes as a preferred nonwearable alternative to the conventional

  12. Muscle activity characterization by laser Doppler Myography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Casaccia, Sara; Marchionni, Paolo; Ercoli, Ilaria; Primo Tomasini, Enrico

    2013-09-01

    Electromiography (EMG) is the gold-standard technique used for the evaluation of muscle activity. This technique is used in biomechanics, sport medicine, neurology and rehabilitation therapy and it provides the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles. Among the parameters measured with EMG, two very important quantities are: signal amplitude and duration of muscle contraction, muscle fatigue and maximum muscle power. Recently, a new measurement procedure, named Laser Doppler Myography (LDMi), for the non contact assessment of muscle activity has been proposed to measure the vibro-mechanical behaviour of the muscle. The aim of this study is to present the LDMi technique and to evaluate its capacity to measure some characteristic features proper of the muscle. In this paper LDMi is compared with standard superficial EMG (sEMG) requiring the application of sensors on the skin of each patient. sEMG and LDMi signals have been simultaneously acquired and processed to test correlations. Three parameters has been analyzed to compare these techniques: Muscle activation timing, signal amplitude and muscle fatigue. LDMi appears to be a reliable and promising measurement technique allowing the measurements without contact with the patient skin.

  13. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Total recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.

  14. Atmospheric aerosol and Doppler lidar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeff; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Jarzembski, M.; Cutten, D.; Mccaul, E. W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies were performed of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and atmospheric dynamics with Doppler lidar as a primary tool. Activities include field and laboratory measurement and analysis efforts. The primary focus of activities related to understanding aerosol backscatter is the GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program. GLOBE is a multi-element effort designed toward developing a global aerosol model to describe tropospheric clean background backscatter conditions that Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) is likely to encounter. Two survey missions were designed and flown in the NASA DC-8 in November 1989 and May to June 1990 over the remote Pacific Ocean, a region where backscatter values are low and where LAWS wind measurements could make a major contribution. The instrument complement consisted of pulsed and continuous-wave (CW) CO2 gas and solid state lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, optical particle counters measuring aerosol concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition, a filter/impactor system collecting aerosol samples for subsequent analysis, and integrating nephelometers measuring visible scattering coefficients. The GLOBE instrument package and survey missions were carefully planned to achieve complementary measurements under clean background backscatter conditions.

  15. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Totalmore » recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.« less

  16. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  17. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  18. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  19. Evaluating microcirculation by pulsatile laser Doppler signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, P. T.; Jan, M. Y.; Hsiu, H.; Hsu, T. L.; Wang, W. K.; Wang, Y. Y. Lin

    2006-02-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a popular method for monitoring the microcirculation, but it does not provide absolute measurements. Instead, the mean flux response or energy distribution in the frequency domain is generally compared before and after stimulus. Using the heartbeat as a trigger, we investigated whether the relation between pressure and flux can be used to discriminate different microcirculatory conditions. We propose the following three pulsatile indices for evaluating the microcirculation condition from the normalized pressure and flux segment with a synchronized-averaging method: peak delay time (PDT), pressure rise time and flux rise time (FRT). The abdominal aortic blood pressure and renal cortex flux (RCF) signals were measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). The mean value of the RCF did not differ between SHR and WKY. However, the PDT was longer in SHR (87.14 ± 5.54 ms, mean ± SD) than in WKY (76.92 ± 2.62 ms; p < 0.001). The FRT was also longer in SHR (66.56 ± 1.98 ms) than in WKY (58.02 ± 1.77 ms; p < 0.001). We propose that a new dimension for comparing the LDF signals, which the results from the present study show, can be used to discriminate RCF signals that cannot be discriminated using traditional methods.

  20. Doppler radar detection of vortex hazard indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nespor, Jerald D.; Hudson, B.; Stegall, R. L.; Freedman, Jerome E.

    1994-01-01

    Wake vortex experiments were conducted at White Sands Missile Range, NM using the AN/MPS-39 Multiple Object Tracking Radar (MOTR). The purpose of these experiments was twofold. The first objective was to verify that radar returns from wake vortex are observed for some time after the passage of an aircraft. The second objective was to verify that other vortex hazard indicators such as ambient wind speed and direction could also be detected. The present study addresses the Doppler characteristics of wake vortex and clear air returns based upon measurements employing MOTR, a very sensitive C-Band phased array radar. In this regard, the experiment was conducted so that the spectral characteristics could be determined on a dwell to-dwell basis. Results are presented from measurements of the backscattered power (equivalent structure constant), radial velocity and spectral width when the aircraft flies transverse and axial to the radar beam. The statistics of the backscattered power and spectral width for each case are given. In addition, the scan strategy, experimental test procedure and radar parameters are presented.

  1. Resonant Doppler imaging with common path OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Edmund; Hammer, Daniel; Wang, Siqian; Cuevas, Maximiliano; Walther, Julia

    2009-07-01

    Resonant Doppler flow imaging based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a recently developed imaging modality that provides, besides the structural information, dynamic blood flow information. We show that this method can be applied to a common path OCT system by mounting the mirror in the reference arm on a small piezo actor leading to a simpler and more stable system design. Besides the known 3 state cycle, we describe other cycles with any number of states leading to higher measurement speed or larger velocity range. The hysteresis of the piezo actor is compensated by applying an optimized electrical signal. Two different approaches, one using a Levenberg-Marquardt optimization, the other using the Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for compensation of hysteresis, are applied to generate the optimized control signal. Besides providing an analytical formula for the calculation of the axial velocity for cycles having certain spacings in the reference velocity, we describe deviations from the signal degradation caused by the transversal part of the motion causing errors in the velocity estimation. The performance of the system with two and three states is first evaluated with a mirror on a loud speaker. Measurements with a flow phantom consisting of 1 % Intralipid dilution flowing through small diameter capillaries show the suitability of the system and the expected deviations at high velocities.

  2. Doppler velocity measurements from large and small arteries of mice

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Madala, Sridhar; Entman, Mark L.; Michael, Lloyd H.; Taffet, George E.

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of genetic engineering, mice have become increasingly common as models of human diseases, and this has stimulated the development of techniques to assess the murine cardiovascular system. Our group has developed nonimaging and dedicated Doppler techniques for measuring blood velocity in the large and small peripheral arteries of anesthetized mice. We translated technology originally designed for human vessels for use in smaller mouse vessels at higher heart rates by using higher ultrasonic frequencies, smaller transducers, and higher-speed signal processing. With these methods one can measure cardiac filling and ejection velocities, velocity pulse arrival times for determining pulse wave velocity, peripheral blood velocity and vessel wall motion waveforms, jet velocities for the calculation of the pressure drop across stenoses, and left main coronary velocity for the estimation of coronary flow reserve. These noninvasive methods are convenient and easy to apply, but care must be taken in interpreting measurements due to Doppler sample volume size and angle of incidence. Doppler methods have been used to characterize and evaluate numerous cardiovascular phenotypes in mice and have been particularly useful in evaluating the cardiac and vascular remodeling that occur following transverse aortic constriction. Although duplex ultrasonic echo-Doppler instruments are being applied to mice, dedicated Doppler systems are more suitable for some applications. The magnitudes and waveforms of blood velocities from both cardiac and peripheral sites are similar in mice and humans, such that much of what is learned using Doppler technology in mice may be translated back to humans. PMID:21572013

  3. Analysis of airborne Doppler lidar, Doppler radar and tall tower measurements of atmospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluestein, H. B.; Doviak, R. J.; Eilts, M. D.; Mccaul, E. W.; Rabin, R.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Zrnic, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The first experiment to combine airborne Doppler Lidar and ground-based dual Doppler Radar measurements of wind to detail the lower tropospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather was conducted in central Oklahoma during four days in June-July 1981. Data from these unique remote sensing instruments, coupled with data from conventional in-situ facilities, i.e., 500-m meteorological tower, rawinsonde, and surface based sensors, were analyzed to enhance understanding of wind, waves and turbulence. The purposes of the study were to: (1) compare winds mapped by ground-based dual Doppler radars, airborne Doppler lidar, and anemometers on a tower; (2) compare measured atmospheric boundary layer flow with flows predicted by theoretical models; (3) investigate the kinematic structure of air mass boundaries that precede the development of severe storms; and (4) study the kinematic structure of thunderstorm phenomena (downdrafts, gust fronts, etc.) that produce wind shear and turbulence hazardous to aircraft operations. The report consists of three parts: Part 1, Intercomparison of Wind Data from Airborne Lidar, Ground-Based Radars and Instrumented 444 m Tower; Part 2, The Structure of the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer as Revealed by Lidar and Doppler Radars; and Part 3, Doppler Lidar Observations in Thunderstorm Environments.

  4. Developments in laser Doppler accelerometry (LDAc) and comparison with laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Steve; Hocknell, Alan; Coupland, Jeremy

    This paper outlines the principles and early development of an interferometric technique for remote measurement of vibration acceleration — laser Doppler accelerometry (LDAc). One of the key advantages of LDAc over laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is its ability to measure extremely high vibration accelerations and shocks, effectively without limit, and this point is expanded upon in the paper. Early LDAc development showed how unwanted, velocity-dependent optical beats could occur on the photodetector but novel use of a frequency shifting device, whose primary purpose was for direction discrimination, was successful in isolating the required acceleration-dependent beat. A problem remained in the rate at which the velocity-dependent and acceleration-dependent beats broadened during target motion. In a further development, it was possible to 'select' a back reflection to produce a velocity-dependent beat that was NOT modulated in the presence of target motion. The acceleration-dependent beat could then be demodulated and preliminary results are given to demonstrate this outcome.

  5. Developments in laser Doppler accelerometry (LDAc) and comparison with laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Steve; Hocknell, Alan; Coupland, Jeremy

    1999-12-01

    This paper outlines the principles and early development of an interferometric technique for remote measurement of vibration acceleration - laser Doppler accelerometry (LDAc). One of the key advantages of LDAc over laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is its ability to measure extremely high vibration accelerations and shocks, effectively without limit, and this point is expanded upon in the paper. Early LDAc development showed how unwanted, velocity-dependent optical beats could occur on the photodetector but novel use of a frequency shifting device, whose primary purpose was for direction discrimination, was successful in isolating the required acceleration-dependent beat. A problem remained in the rate at which the velocity-dependent and acceleration-dependent beats broadened during target motion. In a further development, it was possible to 'select' a back reflection to produce a velocity-dependent beat that was NOT modulated in the presence of target motion. The acceleration-dependent beat could then be demodulated and preliminary results are given to demonstrate this outcome.

  6. Sub-Doppler Spectroscopy of H_3^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; Perry, Adam J.; Siller, Brian M.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    Spectroscopy of H_3^+ is of fundamental interest for advancing ab initio efforts to calculate spectra with high precision and accuracy. H_3^+ is the simplest polyatomic ion, which is why it is an excellent benchmark for theory. In order to perform calculations with spectroscopic accuracy, relativistic and non-adiabatic corrections to the Born-Oppenhiemer approximation must be included; calculations with these considerations agree to within hundredths of a wavenumber. Increasing the precision of the calculations further will require a treatment of quantum electrodynamic effects, as has already been implemented for the diatomic case, and testing these calculations will require higher-precision experimental data to guide ab initio calculations. Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy, or NICE-OHVMS, is a highly sensitive, highly precise technique that we have employed to observe transitions in the ν_2 fundamental band of H_3^+. It combines the advantages of cavity enhancement and heterodyne detection with the ion-neutral discrimination afforded by velocity modulation. Combining a cavity with a high power mid-infrared light source, we can saturate rovibrational transitions. The resulting Lamb dips may be fit in order to determine line centers to a much higher precision than is possible for ordinary Doppler broadened profiles. Additionally, a frequency comb is used to surpass the limited accuracy and precision of a wavemeter. Here we present the results from comb calibrated H_3^+ transitions observed via NICE-OHVMS. Precision and accuracy of ˜ 1 MHz were achieved representing the most accurate and precise H_3^+ line list that has been obtained to date. O. L. Polyansky, J. Tennyson, J. Chem. Phys. (1999), 110, 5056--5064. J. Komasa, et al. J. Chem. Theor. Comp. (2011), 7, 3105--3115. B. M. Siller, et al. Opt. Express (2011), 19, 24822--7. K. N. Crabtree, et al. Chem. Phys. Lett. (2012), 551, 1--6.

  7. Right Ventricular Tissue Doppler in Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas R.; Barratt, Michael R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ebert, Douglas; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Martin, David S.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Tissue Doppler (TD) registers movement of a given sample of cardiac tissue throughout the cardiac cycle. TD spectra of the right ventricle (RV) were obtained from a long-duration ISS crewmember as a portion of an ongoing experiment ("Braslet" test objective). To our knowledge, this is the first report of RV TD conducted in space flight, and the data represent reproducibility and fidelity of this application in space and serve as the first "space normal" data set. Methods RV TD was performed by astronaut scientists remotely guided by an ultrasound expert from Mission Control Center, Houston, TX. In four of the subjects, RV TD was acquired from the free wall near the tricuspid annulus in two separate sessions 4 to 7 days apart. A fifth subject had only one session. All digital DICOM frames were exported for off-line analysis. Systolic (S ), early diastolic (E ) and late diastolic (A ) velocities were measured. RV Tei-index was calculated using diastolic and systolic time intervals as a combined measure of myocardial performance. Results and Discussion The mean values from the first 4 subjects (8 sessions) were used as the on-orbit reference data, and subject 5 was considered as a hypothetical patient for comparison (see Table). The greatest difference was in the early diastolic A (31 %) yet the standard deviation (a) for A amongst the reference subjects was 2.25 (mean = 16.02). Of interest is the Tei index, a simple and feasible indicator of overall ventricular function; it was similar amongst all the subjects. The late diastolic A seems to compensate for the variance in E . Normal Tei index for the RV is < 0.3, yet our data show all but one subject consistently above this level, notwithstanding their nominal responses to daily exercise in microgravity. These data remind us that the physiology of RV preload in altered gravity environments is still not completely understood.

  8. Hands-Free Transcranial Color Doppler Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Robert; Madala, Srihdar; Sattler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Current transcranial color Doppler (TCD) transducer probes are bulky and difficult to move in tiny increments to search and optimize TCD signals. This invention provides miniature motions of a TCD transducer probe to optimize TCD signals. The mechanical probe uses a spherical bearing in guiding and locating the tilting crystal face. The lateral motion of the crystal face as it tilts across the full range of motion was achieved by minimizing the distance between the pivot location and the crystal face. The smallest commonly available metal spherical bearing was used with an outer diameter of 12 mm, a 3-mm tall retaining ring, and 5-mm overall height. Small geared motors were used that would provide sufficient power in a very compact package. After confirming the validity of the basic positioning concept, optimization design loops were completed to yield the final design. A parallel motor configuration was used to minimize the amount of space wasted inside the probe case while minimizing the overall case dimensions. The distance from the front edge of the crystal to the edge of the case was also minimized to allow positioning of the probe very close to the ear on the temporal lobe. The mechanical probe is able to achieve a +/-20deg tip and tilt with smooth repeatable action in a very compact package. The enclosed probe is about 7 cm long, 4 cm wide, and 1.8 cm tall. The device is compact, hands-free, and can be adjusted via an innovative touchscreen. Positioning of the probe to the head is performed via conventional transducer gels and pillows. This device is amendable to having advanced software, which could intelligently focus and optimize the TCD signal.

  9. Single Mode, Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Christian; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Betters, Christopher H.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2014-04-01

    The `holy grail' of exoplanet research today is the detection of an earth-like planet: a rocky planet in the habitable zone around a main-sequence star. Extremely precise Doppler spectroscopy is an indispensable tool to find and characterize earth-like planets; however, to find these planets around solar-type stars, we need nearly one order of magnitude better radial velocity (RV) precision than the best current spectrographs provide. Recent developments in astrophotonics (Bland-Hawthorn & Horton 2006, Bland-Hawthorn et al. 2010) and adaptive optics (AO) enable single mode fiber (SMF) fed, high resolution spectrographs, which can realize the next step in precision. SMF feeds have intrinsic advantages over multimode fiber or slit coupled spectrographs: The intensity distribution at the fiber exit is extremely stable, and as a result the line spread function of a well-designed spectrograph is fully decoupled from input coupling conditions, like guiding or seeing variations (Ihle et al. 2010). Modal noise, a limiting factor in current multimode fiber fed instruments (Baudrand & Walker 2001), can be eliminated by proper design, and the diffraction limited input to the spectrograph allows for very compact instrument designs, which provide excellent optomechanical stability. A SMF is the ideal interface for new, very precise wavelength calibrators, like laser frequency combs (Steinmetz et al. 2008, Osterman et al. 2012), or SMF based Fabry-Perot Etalons (Halverson et al. 2013). At near infrared wavelengths, these technologies are ready to be implemented in on-sky instruments, or already in use. We discuss a novel concept for such a spectrograph.

  10. Doppler findings in intrapartum fetal distress.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Laleh; Tooba, Khatereh

    2011-01-01

    The umbilical vein (UV) has a non pulsating and even pattern in normal fetuses. Pulsation of UV has been described in severely growth restricted fetuses with chronic hypoxia. We wanted to see whether UV pulsations could also be seen in fetuses with heart deceleration during labor, as an adjunctive measure to assess the intra partum hypoxia. In a prospective study Doppler examination was performed on 34 fetuses with normal cardiotocography (CGT) and 26 fetuses with abnormal CTGs (GA>37w and cervical dilatation>3cm). Perinatal outcome was assessed according to presence or absence of UV pulsations. The 2 groups were similar regarding gestational age, cervical dilatation, Umbilical artery blood pH, S/D ratio,Pulsatility Index( PI) and Resistance Index (RI). Intraabdominal UV pulsation were present in 6 (23.1%) of abnormal CTG group but no case were seen in normal CTG group (P= 0.005). Five of 6 (83.3%) fetuses with UV pulsation underwent cesarean delivery. The rate of cesarean delivery was 90% in abnormal CTG group without pulsation and 14.7% in normal CTG group. The frequency of Apgar score <7 was more in fetuses with UV pulsations (16.7% vs 5%) although not statistically significant. NICU admission was considerably more in UV pulsation group (33% vs 5%, P= 0.123). After exclusion of LBW fetuses the UV pulsation was present in 4 (19%) of abnormal CTG group, who 3 of them underwent cesarean section. Neither umbilical artery pH<7 nor Apger score <7 or NICU admission were seen in these 4 neonates. Pulsation in UV was seen in 23% of fetuses with abnormal CTG during intra partum period. Cesarean delivery and NICU admission was increased in fetuses with UV pulsations, although not statistically significant. When LBW fetuses were excluded no case of UA pH<7, Apgar sore <7or NICU admission were seen. PMID:22009812

  11. DOPPLER SIGNATURES OF THE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION ON HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Shabram, Megan

    2013-01-01

    The meteorology of hot Jupiters has been characterized primarily with thermal measurements, but recent observations suggest the possibility of directly detecting the winds by observing the Doppler shift of spectral lines seen during transit. Motivated by these observations, we show how Doppler measurements can place powerful constraints on the meteorology. We show that the atmospheric circulation-and Doppler signature-of hot Jupiters splits into two regimes. Under weak stellar insolation, the day-night thermal forcing generates fast zonal jet streams from the interaction of atmospheric waves with the mean flow. In this regime, air along the terminator (as seen during transit) flows toward Earth in some regions and away from Earth in others, leading to a Doppler signature exhibiting superposed blueshifted and redshifted components. Under intense stellar insolation, however, the strong thermal forcing damps these planetary-scale waves, inhibiting their ability to generate jets. Strong frictional drag likewise damps these waves and inhibits jet formation. As a result, this second regime exhibits a circulation dominated by high-altitude, day-to-night airflow, leading to a predominantly blueshifted Doppler signature during transit. We present state-of-the-art circulation models including non-gray radiative transfer to quantify this regime shift and the resulting Doppler signatures; these models suggest that cool planets like GJ 436b lie in the first regime, HD 189733b is transitional, while planets hotter than HD 209458b lie in the second regime. Moreover, we show how the amplitude of the Doppler shifts constrains the strength of frictional drag in the upper atmospheres of hot Jupiters. If due to winds, the {approx}2 km s{sup -1} blueshift inferred on HD 209458b may require drag time constants as short as 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} s, possibly the result of Lorentz-force braking on this planet's hot dayside.

  12. Cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadel, Daniel R.; Lowe, K. Todd

    2015-08-01

    A flow velocimetry method, cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV), is presented as a robust, simplified, and high dynamic range implementation of the Doppler global/planar Doppler velocimetry technique. A sweep of several gigahertz of the vapor absorption spectrum is used for each velocity sample, with signals acquired from both Doppler-shifted scattered light within the flow and a non-Doppler shifted reference beam. Cross-correlation of these signals yields the Doppler shift between them, averaged over the duration of the scan. With presently available equipment, velocities from 0 ms-1 to over 3000 ms-1 can notionally be measured simultaneously, making the technique ideal for high speed flows. The processing routine is shown to be robust against large changes in the vapor pressure of the iodine cell, benefiting performance of the system in facilities where ambient conditions cannot be easily regulated. Validation of the system was performed with measurements of a model wind turbine blade boundary layer made in a 1.83 m by 1.83 m subsonic wind tunnel for which laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements were acquired alongside the CC-DGV results. CC-DGV uncertainties of ±1.30 ms-1, ±0.64 ms-1, and ±1.11 ms-1 were determined for the orthogonal stream-wise, transverse-horizontal, and transverse-vertical velocity components, and root-mean-square deviations of 2.77 ms-1 and 1.34 ms-1 from the LDV validation results were observed for Reynolds numbers of 1.5 million and 2 million, respectively. Volumetric mean velocity measurements are also presented for a supersonic jet, with velocity uncertainties of ±4.48 ms-1, ±16.93 ms-1, and ±0.50 ms-1 for the orthogonal components, and self-validation done by collapsing the data with a physical scaling.

  13. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  14. Development of a 1.65 μm pulsed laser DIAL System to map atmospheric CH4 distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, S.; Crawford, J. H.; Leifer, I.; Hovis, F.; Hair, J. W.; Brown, L. R.; Hardesty, R.; Fix, A.; Abedin, N.; Devi, V.; Benner, D.; Sung, K.; Diskin, G. S.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    We present the results of a system study conducted to develop and demonstrate a high sensitivity ground-based and airborne DIAL System for measuring atmospheric CH_{4}. This program addresses the 2007 NRC Decadal Survey recommendation that ‘if appropriate and cost-effective methane technology becomes available, methane capability should be added’ to close the carbon budget. A highly efficient absorber of IR radiation, methane is a potent greenhouse gas with a warming potential 72 times greater than CO_{2} per molecule, over a 20-year horizon. The proposed measurement will enable scientific assessments globally, and in particular of northern latitude CH_{4} emission impacts on climate and enhance understanding of ecosystem response to climate variability and land cover change. This system will provide simultaneous ranging and high resolution measurements of aerosol and cloud distributions. This will incorporate a pulsed 1.65 μm OPO laser; an existing receiver system redesigned to optimize its performance for this wavelength by incorporating an optical filter; a commercially available InGaAs APD and an existing 3-D scanner. High resolution FTIR laboratory spectroscopic measurements in the R4 transitions of 2ν_{3} of CH_{4} will be conducted to maximize accuracy of retrievals. This development demonstrates an azimuthal scanning system for ground-based mapping and monitoring of range-resolved, near-surface CH_{4} emissions and airborne detection of dry CH_{4} boundary layer and total vertical column fractions. Due to its relative insensitivity to aerosol and cloud interferences, this system will be ideal for investigating high latitude CH_{4} releases over polar ice sheets, permafrost regions, wetlands, and over open ocean during night and day as well as commercial applications in of natural gas leaks. The proposed task is applicable to NASA sub-orbital, satellite validation, and venture class programs.

  15. 975nm high-peak power ns-diode laser based MOPA system suitable for water vapor DIAL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumpf, Bernd; Klehr, Andreas; Vu, Thi Nghiem; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2015-03-01

    Micro-DIAL (differential absorption LIDAR) systems require light sources with peak powers in the range of several 10 W together with a spectral line width smaller than the width of absorption lines under study. For water vapor at atmospheric pressure this width should be smaller than 10 pm at 975 nm. In this paper, an all semiconductor master oscillator power amplifier system at an emission wavelength of 975 nm will be presented. This spectral range was selected with respect to a targeted absorption path length of 5000 m and H2O line strengths. A distributed feedback (DFB) ridge waveguide diode laser operated in continuous wave is used as master oscillator whereas a tapered amplifier consisting of a RW section and a flared section is implemented as power amplifier. The RW section acts as optical gate. The current pulses injected into the RW part have a length of 8 ns and the tapered part is driven with 15 ns long pulses. The delay between the pulses is adjusted for optimal pulse shape. The repetition rate is in both cases 25 kHz. A maximal pulse output power of about 16 W limited by the available current supply is achieved. The spectral line width of the system determined by the properties of the DFB laser is smaller than 10 pm. The tuning range amounts 0.9 nm and a SMSR of 40 dB is observed. From the dependence of the peak power on the power injected into the tapered amplifier, the saturation power is determined to 5.3 mW.

  16. Multispecies transmitter for DIAL sensing of atmospheric water vapour, methane and carbon dioxide in the 2 μm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammez, Dominique; Cadiou, Erwan; Dherbecourt, Jean-Baptiste; Raybaut, Myriam; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Godard, Antoine; Gorju, Guillaume; Pelon, Jacques; Lefebvre, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Integrated-path differential absorption lidar (IPDIAL) is an attractive technique to monitor greenhouse gases from space. For that purpose, suitable absorption lines have been identified as good candidates around 2.05 μm for CO2, 2.29 μm for CH4, and 2.06 μm for H2O. In this context, we have developed a high energy transmitter around 2 μm based on frequency conversion in a nested cavity doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (NesCOPO) followed by high energy parametric amplification. This master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) architecture enables the generation of tunable single-frequency high energy nanosecond pulses (tens of mJ) suitable for atmospheric DIAL applications. Moreover, taking advantage of the wide spectral coverage capability of the NesCOPO, we demonstrate the potential for this single emitter to address the aforementioned spectral lines, without the use of additional seeding devices. The emitter provides energies up to 20 mJ for the signal waves in the vicinity of CO2 and H2O lines, and 16 mJ at 2290 nm for the CH4 line. By implementing a control loop based on a wavemeter frequency measurement, the signal fluctuations can be maintained below 1 MHz rms for 10 s averaging time. Finally, from optical heterodyne analysis of the beat note between our emitter and a stabilized laser diode, the optical parametric source linewidth was estimated to be better than 60 MHz (Full width at half maximum).

  17. Influence of speckle effect on doppler velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Changming, Zhao; Haiyang, Zhang; Suhui, Yang; Dehua, Zhang; Xingyuan, Zheng; Hongzhi, Yang

    2016-06-01

    In a coherent Lidar system, velocity measurement of a target is achieved by measuring Doppler frequency shift between the echo and local oscillator (LO) signals. The measurement accuracy is proportional to the spectrum width of Doppler signal. Actually, the speckle effect caused by the scattering of laser from a target will broaden the Doppler signal's spectrum and bring uncertainty to the velocity measurement. In this paper, a theoretical model is proposed to predict the broadening of Doppler spectrum with respect to different target's surface and motion parameters. The velocity measurement uncertainty caused by the broadening of spectrum is analyzed. Based on the analysis, we design a coherent Lidar system to measure the velocity of the targets with different surface roughness and transverse velocities. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical analysis. It is found that the target's surface roughness and transverse velocity can significantly affect the spectrum width of Doppler signal. With the increase of surface roughness and transverse velocity, the measurement accuracy becomes worse. However, the influence of surface roughness becomes weaker when the spot size of laser beam on the target is smaller.

  18. Results of the international ionospheric Doppler sounder network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, Jan; Chum, Jaroslav

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes main recent results reached by the Czech-lead international network of ionospheric Doppler sounders. The network consists of Doppler sounders in the western half of Czechia (5 measuring paths, 3 frequencies with central receivers in Prague), northern Taiwan (3 transmitters, two separated receivers, 1 frequency), and three similar systems (3 measuring paths with 1 receiver and 1 frequency) in Tucuman (north-western Argentina), Hermanus (the southernmost South Africa) and Luisville (northern South Africa). Three main areas of research have been (1) statistical properties of gravity waves, (2) ionospheric effects of earthquakes, and (3) low latitude/equatorial phenomena. Some results: (1) the theoretically expected dominance of gravity wave propagation against wind has been confirmed; (2) impact of the Tohoku 2001 M9.0 earthquake was registered in the ionosphere over the Czech Republic as long-period infrasound on the distance of about 9000 km from epicenter; analysis of ionospheric infrasound excited by the Nepal 2015 M7.8 earthquake observed by the Czech and Taiwan Doppler sounders showed that the intensity of ionospheric signal is significantly height dependent and that the Doppler shift depends not only on the advection (up and down motion) of the reflecting layer but also on the compression/rarefaction of the electron gas; (3) spread F structures observed by Doppler sounders in Tucuman and Taiwan (both under the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly) provide results consistent with S4 scintillation data and with previous optical, GPS and satellite measurements.

  19. A rotating torus phantom for assessing color Doppler accuracy.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S F

    1999-10-01

    A rotating torus phantom was designed to assess the accuracy of color Doppler ultrasound. A thin rubber tube was filled with blood analog fluid and joined at the ends to form a torus, then mounted on a disk submerged in water and rotated at constant speeds by a motor. Flow visualization experiments and finite element analyses demonstrated that the fluid accelerates quickly to the speed of the torus and spins as a solid body. The actual fluid velocity was found to be dependent only on the motor speed and location of the sample volume. The phantom was used to assess the accuracy of Doppler-derived velocities during two-dimensional (2-D) color imaging using a commercial ultrasound system. The Doppler-derived velocities averaged 0.81 +/- 0.11 of the imposed velocity, with the variations significantly dependent on velocity, pulse-repetition frequency and wall filter frequency (p < 0.001). The torus phantom was found to have certain advantages over currently available Doppler accuracy phantoms: 1. It has a high maximum velocity; 2. it has low velocity gradients, simplifying the calibration of 2-D color Doppler; and 3. it uses a real moving fluid that gives a realistic backscatter signal. PMID:10576268

  20. Ultrasonic bistatic Doppler sonar in air for personnel motion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekimov, Alexander; Hickey, Craig J.

    2012-06-01

    The National Center for Physical Acoustics (NCPA) at the University of Mississippi is working on the application of ultrasonic Doppler sonars in air for personnel motion detection. Two traditional Doppler sonar configurations, a monostatic and a bistatic, are being studied. In the monostatic configuration, the distance between the transmitter and the receiver is small. The proximity of the source to the receiver places a limitation on the system associated with the overloading of the receivers' input due to acoustic energy leakage from the transmitters' output. The maximum range of detection is therefore limited by the dynamic range of the acquisition system. In a bistatic Doppler ultrasonic sonar, the source and receiver are spaced apart and the acoustic energy along the direct path does not constrain the maximum acoustic power level output of the transmitter. In a monostatic configuration the acoustic signal suffers from beam spreading and natural absorption during propagation from the transmitter to the target and from the target back to the receiver. In a bistatic configuration the acoustic propagation is in one direction only and theoretically the detection distance can be twice the monostatic distance. For comparison the experiments of a human walking in a building hallway using the bistatic and monostaic Doppler sonars in air were conducted. The experimental results for human signatures from these Doppler sonars are presented and discussed.

  1. GEOS 3 STDN S band Doppler tracking investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, B.

    1979-01-01

    GEOS 3S Doppler band and laser ranging data, acquired from August 1975 to March 1976 in the spacecraft altimeter calibration area, are examined. An evaluation of two-way and three-way Doppler data, for the positioning of Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network S band stations is presented, as well as the Goddard Space Flight Center laser system that is used to reference the exact position of the Doppler stations. The two-way and three-way Doppler tracking devices, situated at Rosman and Bermuda, have yielded data for the recovery of GEOS 3 arc height with an uncertainty of only 1 m. Attention is given to the effects of beacon signal frequency instability, controlled by a temperature sensitive auxiliary crystal oscillator on board the spacecraft, and to the one-way range rate tracking noise that was found to be within a range of 2 to 10 cm/s. 1- and 2-way passes and their different arc meters are graphed, showing the Doppler tracking interval. It was concluded that other accurate computations and recovery of station coordinates could be performed employing tracking data from S band stations.

  2. Temporal enhancement of two-dimensional color doppler echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentjev, Alexey B.; Settlemier, Scott H.; Perrin, Douglas P.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Shturts, Igor V.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography is widely used for assessing blood flow inside the heart and blood vessels. Currently, frame acquisition time for this method varies from tens to hundreds of milliseconds, depending on Doppler sector parameters. This leads to low frame rates of resulting video sequences equal to tens of Hz, which is insufficient for some diagnostic purposes, especially in pediatrics. In this paper, we present a new approach for reconstruction of 2D color Doppler cardiac images, which results in the frame rate being increased to hundreds of Hz. This approach relies on a modified method of frame reordering originally applied to real-time 3D echocardiography. There are no previous publications describing application of this method to 2D Color Doppler data. The approach has been tested on several in-vivo cardiac 2D color Doppler datasets with approximate duration of 30 sec and native frame rate of 15 Hz. The resulting image sequences had equivalent frame rates to 500Hz.

  3. High-resolution Doppler model of the human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisheimer, Jonathan L.; Greneker, Eugene F., III; Marshall, William S.

    2002-07-01

    A high resolution Doppler model of the walking human was developed for analyzing the continuous wave (CW) radar gait signature. Data for twenty subjects were collected simultaneously using an infrared motion capture system along with a two channel 10.525 GHz CW radar. The motion capture system recorded three-dimensional coordinates of infrared markers placed on the body. These body marker coordinates were used as inputs to create the theoretical Doppler output using a model constructed in MATLAB. The outputs of the model are the simulated Doppler signals due to each of the major limbs and the thorax. An estimated radar cross section for each part of the body was assigned using the Lund & Browder chart of estimated body surface area. The resultant Doppler model was then compared with the actual recorded Doppler gait signature in the frequency domain using the spectrogram. Comparison of the two sets of data has revealed several identifiable biomechanical features in the radar gait signature due to leg and body motion. The result of the research shows that a wealth of information can be unlocked from the radar gait signature, which may be useful in security and biometric applications.

  4. Boundary Layer Observations of Water Vapor and Aerosol Profiles with an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.; Ismail, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of real-time high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of combined water vapor and aerosols in the boundary layer have been a long standing observational challenge to the meteorological, weather forecasting, and climate science communities. To overcome the high reoccurring costs associated with radiosondes as well as the lack of sufficient water vapor measurements over the continental united states, a compact and low cost eye-safe all semiconductor-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere. The laser transmitter utilizes two continuous wave external cavity diode lasers operating in the 830 nm absorption band as the online and offline seed laser sources. An optical switch is used to sequentially injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) with the two seed laser sources in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The TSOA is actively current pulsed to produce up to 7 μJ of output energy over a 1 μs pulse duration (150 m vertical resolution) at a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The measured laser transmitter spectral linewidth is less than 500 kHz while the long term frequency stability of the stabilized on-line wavelength is ± 55 MHz. The laser transmitter spectral purity was measured to be greater than 0.9996, allowing for simultaneous measurements of water vapor in the lower and upper troposphere. The DIAL receiver utilizes a commercially available full sky-scanning capable 35 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect the scattered light from the laser transmitter. Light collected by the telescope is spectrally filtered to suppress background noise and is coupled into a fiber optic cable which acts as the system field stop and limits the full angle field of view to 140 μrad. The light is sampled by a fiber coupled APD operated in a Geiger mode. The DIAL instrument is operated autonomously where water vapor and

  5. The Solar Oscillations Investigation - Michelson Doppler Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Bogart, R. S.; Bush, R. I.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Schou, J.; Rosenberg, W.; Springer, L.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A.; Wolfson, C. J.; Zayer, I.; MDI Engineering Team

    1995-12-01

    The Solar Oscillations Investigation (SOI) uses the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument to probe the interior of the Sun by measuring the photospheric manifestations of solar oscillations. Characteristics of the modes reveal the static and dynamic properties of the convection zone and core. Knowledge of these properties will improve our understanding of the solar cycle and of stellar evolution. Other photospheric observations will contribute to our knowledge of the solar magnetic field and surface motions. The investigation consists of coordinated efforts by several teams pursuing specific scientific objectives. The instrument images the Sun on a 10242 CCD camera through a series of increasingly narrow spectral filters. The final elements, a pair of tunable Michelson interferometers, enable MDI to record filtergrams with a FWHM bandwidth of 94 mÅ. Normally 20 images centered at 5 wavelengths near the Ni I 6768 spectral line are recorded each minute. MDI calculates velocity and continuum intensity from the filtergrams with a resolution of 4″ over the whole disk. An extensive calibration program has verified the end-to-end performance of the instrument. To provide continuous observations of the longest-lived modes that reveal the internal structure of the Sun, a carefully-selected set of spatial averages are computed and downlinked at all times. About half the time MDI will also be able to downlink complete velocity and intensity images each minute. This high rate telemetry (HRT) coverage is available for at least a continuous 60-day interval each year and for 8 hours each day during the rest of the year. During the 8-hour HRT intervals, 10 of the exposures each minute can be programmed for other observations, such as measurements in MDI's higher resolution (1.25″) field centered about 160″ north of the equator; meanwhile, the continuous structure program proceeds during the other half minute. Several times each day, polarizers will be inserted to

  6. A case study of mixed-layer ozone diurnal variation by ozone DIAL and Large-eddy simulation coupled a chemical module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Newchurch, M.; Kuang, S.; Wang, L.; Ouwersloot, H.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the diurnal variation of mixed-layer ozone in Huntsville AL, Southeast United States on September, 6, 2013 during the SEAC4RS field campaign. The dynamics and chemistry of the mixed layer are studied with a Large-Eddy Simulation model coupled with a chemical module and Ozone DIAL observations. In this study, we will present calculations of ozone entrainment fluxes using continuous observation by co-located ozone DIAL and Compact Wind Aerosol Lidar (CWAL) at the campus of University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). As a part of Tropospheric Ozone Lidar NETwork (TOLNET), UAH ozone DIAL can provide continuous ozone observation in the altitude range from 125 m AGL to 12 km, with 10-min temporal resolution and 150 - 550 m vertical resolution. We also perform an ozone budget study using the Dutch Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulation (DALES), reasonable approximations of dry deposition, in conjunction with ozone entrainment observations. In this case study, the enhancement of ozone in the mixed layer results from the local emissions of NOx and VOCs. The NOx and VOCs emitted at surface entered into mixed layer by atmospheric turbulence and produced ozone within the whole mixed layer. Simultaneously, non-turbulent air in the residual layer, which is at top of the morning mixed layer, participates in convective mixing through entrainment processes. The clean air in the residual layer decreases the ozone enhancement rate in the mixed layer. After the mixed layer reaches its stable height at 1700m, the large-scale subsidence not only decreases PBL growth but also enhances the entrainment process. The PBL NOx and VOCs mix into the free troposphere through detrainment before producing ozone by photochemical reaction. We have following conclusions from this case study: 1) the relationship between boundary layer height and PBL ozone is complicated. Higher PBL height does not always mean lower PBL ozone. 2) The LES calculation results illuminate the interaction between

  7. DIAL measurement of lower tropospheric ozone over Saga (33.24° N, 130.29° E), Japan, and comparison with a chemsitry-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, O.; Sakai, T.; Nagai, T.; Morino, I.; Maki, T.; Deushi, M.; Shibata, K.; Kajino, M.; Kawasaki, T.; Akaho, T.; Takubo, S.; Okumura, H.; Arai, K.; Nakazato, M.; Matsunaga, T.; Yokota, T.; Kawakami, S.; Kita, K.; Sasano, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We have improved an ozone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, originally developed in March 2010. The improved DIAL system consists of a Nd:YAG laser and a 2 m Raman cell filled with 8.1 × 105 Pa of CO2 gas which generate four Stokes lines (276, 287, 299, and 312 nm) of stimulated Raman scattering, and two receiving telescopes with diameters of 49 and 10 cm. Using this system, 44 ozone profiles were observed in the 1-6 km altitude range over Saga (33.24° N, 130.29° E) in 2012. High ozone concentration layers were observed at around 2 km altitude during April and May. Ozone column amounts within the 1-6 km altitude range were almost constant from January to March, and increased from late April to July. From mid-July through August, ozone column amounts decreased greatly because of exchanges of continental and maritime air masses. Then in mid-September they increased again within 1-6 km, and subsequently decreased slowly, becoming almost constant by December. The Meteorological Research Institute's Chemistry-Climate Model version 2 (MRI-CCM2) successfully predicted most of these ozone variations with the following exceptions. MRI-CCM2 could not predict the high ozone-mixing ratios measured at around 2 km altitude on 5 May and 11 May, possibly in part because emissions were assumed in the model to be constant (climatological data were used). Ozone-mixing ratios predicted by MRI-CCM2 were low in the 2-6 km range on 7 July and high in the 1-4 km range on 19 July compared with those measured by DIAL.

  8. DIAL measurement of lower tropospheric ozone over Saga (33.24° N, 130.29° E), Japan, and comparison with a chemistry-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, O.; Sakai, T.; Nagai, T.; Morino, I.; Maki, T.; Deushi, M.; Shibata, K.; Kajino, M.; Kawasaki, T.; Akaho, T.; Takubo, S.; Okumura, H.; Arai, K.; Nakazato, M.; Matsunaga, T.; Yokota, T.; Kawakami, S.; Kita, K.; Sasano, Y.

    2014-05-01

    We have improved an ozone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, originally developed in March 2010. The improved DIAL system consists of a Nd:YAG laser and a 2 m Raman cell filled with 8.1 × 105 Pa of CO2 gas which generate four Stokes lines (276, 287, 299, and 312 nm) of stimulated Raman scattering, and two receiving telescopes with diameters of 49 and 10 cm. Using this system, 44 ozone profiles were observed in the 1-6 km altitude range over Saga (33.24° N, 130.29° E) in 2012. High-ozone layers were observed at around 2 km altitude during April and May. Ozone column amounts within the 1-6 km altitude range were almost constant (19.1 DU on average) from January to March, and increased to 26.7 DU from late April to July. From mid-July through August, ozone column amounts decreased greatly to 14.3 DU because of exchanges of continental and maritime air masses. Then in mid-September they increased again to 22.1 DU within 1-6 km, and subsequently decreased slowly to 17.3 DU, becoming almost constant by December. The Meteorological Research Institute's chemistry-climate model version 2 (MRI-CCM2) successfully predicted most of these ozone variations with the following exceptions. MRI-CCM2 could not predict the high-ozone volume mixing ratios measured at around 2 km altitude on 5 May and 11 May, possibly in part because emissions were assumed in the model to be constant (climatological data were used). Ozone volume mixing ratios predicted by MRI-CCM2 were low in the 2-6 km range on 7 July and high in the 1-4 km range on 19 July compared with those measured by DIAL.

  9. Carbon dioxide sequestration monitoring and verification via laser based detection system in the 2 mum band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Seth David

    Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a known contributor to the green house gas effect. Emissions of CO2 are rising as the global demand for inexpensive energy is placated through the consumption and combustion of fossil fuels. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) may provide a method to prevent CO2 from being exhausted to the atmosphere. The carbon may be captured after fossil fuel combustion in a power plant and then stored in a long term facility such as a deep geologic feature. The ability to verify the integrity of carbon storage at a location is key to the success of all CCS projects. A laser-based instrument has been built and tested at Montana State University (MSU) to measure CO2 concentrations above a carbon storage location. The CO2 Detection by Differential Absorption (CODDA) Instrument uses a temperature-tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode that is capable of accessing a spectral region, 2.0027 to 2.0042 mum, that contains three CO2 absorption lines and a water vapor absorption line. This instrument laser is aimed over an open-air, two-way path of about 100 m, allowing measurements of CO2 concentrations to be made directly above a carbon dioxide release test site. The performance of the instrument for carbon sequestration site monitoring is studied using a newly developed CO2 controlled release facility. The field and CO2 releases are managed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at MSU. Two test injections were carried out through vertical wells simulating seepage up well paths. Three test injections were done as CO2 escaped up through a slotted horizontal pipe simulating seepage up through geologic fault zones. The results from these 5 separate controlled release experiments over the course of three summers show that the CODDA Instrument is clearly capable of verifying the integrity of full-scale CO2 storage operations.

  10. A Direct Detection 1.6μm DIAL with Three Wavelengths for Measurements of Vertical CO2 Concentration and Temperature Profiles in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.; Shibata, Y.; Nagai, T.; Tsukamoto, M.

    2012-12-01

    We report the new 1.6 μm DIAL system that can measure the temperature profiles with the CO2 concentration profiles in the atmosphere because of improvement of measurement accuracy of the CO2 density and mixing ratio (ppm). We have developed a direct detection 1.6 μm differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to perform range-resolved measurements of vertical CO2 concentration profiles in the atmosphere [Sakaizawa et al. 2009]. Our 1.6 μm DIAL system consists of the Optical Parametric Generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate (500 Hz) and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube with high quantum efficiency operating at the photon counting mode and the telescope with larger aperture than that of the coherent detection method. Laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption line is transmitted alternately to the atmosphere for measurements of CO2 concentration and temperature profiles. Moreover, a few retrieval algorithms of CO2-DIAL are also performed for improvement of measurement accuracy. The accurate vertical CO2 profiles in the troposphere are highly desirable in the inverse techniques to improve quantification and understanding of the global budget of CO2 and also global climate changes [Stephens et al. 2007]. In comparison with the ground-based monitoring network, CO2 measurements for vertical profiles in the troposphere have been limited to campaign-style aircraft and commercial airline observations with the limited spatial and temporal coverage. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency. References Sakaizawa, D., C. Nagasawa, T. Nagai, M. Abo, Y. Shibata, H. Nagai, M. Nakazato, and T. Sakai, Development of a 1.6μm differential absorption lidar with a quasi-phase-matching optical parametric oscillator and photon-counting detector for the vertical

  11. In-cell measurements of smoke backscattering coefficients using a CO2 laser system for application to lidar-dial forest fire detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellecci, Carlo; Gaudio, Pasquale; Gelfusa, Michela; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Murari, Andrea; Richetta, Maria; de Leo, Leonerdo

    2010-12-01

    In the lidar-dial method, the amount of the water vapor present in the smoke of the vegetable fuel is detected to reduce the number of false alarms. We report the measurements of the smoke backscattering coefficients for the CO2 laser lines 10R20 and 10R18 as determined in an absorption cell for two different vegetable fuels (eucalyptus and conifer). These experimental backscattering coefficients enable us to determine the error to be associated to the water vapor measurements when the traditional first-order approximation is assumed. We find that this first-order approximation is valid for combustion rates as low as 100 g/s.

  12. Imaging nanoparticle flow using magneto-motive optical Doppler tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehyun; Oh, Junghwan; Milner, Thomas E; Nelson, J Stuart

    2007-01-24

    We introduce a novel approach for imaging solutions of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles using magneto-motive optical Doppler tomography (MM-ODT). MM-ODT combines an externally applied temporally oscillating high-strength magnetic field with ODT to detect nanoparticles flowing through a microfluidic channel. A solenoid with a cone-shaped ferrite core extensively increased the magnetic field strength (B(max) = 1 T, [Formula: see text]) at the tip of the core and also focused the magnetic field in microfluidic channels containing nanoparticle solutions. Nanoparticle contrast was demonstrated in a microfluidic channel filled with an SPIO solution by imaging the Doppler frequency shift which was observed independently of the nanoparticle flow rate and direction. Results suggest that MM-ODT may be applied to image Doppler shift of SPIO nanoparticles in microfluidic flows with high contrast. PMID:19636123

  13. Non-intrusive Shock Measurements Using Laser Doppler Vibrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Shannon M.; Kolaini, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    Stud mount accelerometers are widely used by the aerospace industry to measure shock environments during hardware qualification. The commonly used contact-based sensors, however, interfere with the shock waves and distort the acquired signature, which is a concern not actively discussed in the community. To alleviate these interference issues, engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are investigating the use of non-intrusive sensors, specifically Laser Doppler Vibrometers, as alternatives to the stud mounted accelerometers. This paper will describe shock simulation tests completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, compare the measurements from stud mounted accelerometers and Laser Doppler Vibrometers, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of introducing Laser Doppler Vibrometers as alternative sensors for measuring shock environments.

  14. Automatic human micro-Doppler signature separation by Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Jin, Tian; Qiu, Lei; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-12-01

    The micro-Doppler signature is one of the most prominent information for target classification and identification. As Hough transform (HT) is an efficient tool for detecting weak straight target traces in the image, an HT based algorithm is proposed for micro-Doppler signature separation of multiple persons. Few seconds data is processed at one time to ensure human motion traces approximate to straight lines in the radar slow time-range image. Taking HT to the slow time-range image, each human's motion trace can be recovered through recursively searching the peaks in HT space. Applying time-frequency transform to the range cells around each recovered line, the human micro-Doppler signature can be achieved and separated. Experimental results are given to illustrate the validity of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Three-dimensional laser cooling at the Doppler limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, R.; Hoendervanger, A. L.; Bouton, Q.; Fang, Y.; Klafka, T.; Audo, K.; Aspect, A.; Westbrook, C. I.; Clément, D.

    2014-12-01

    Many predictions of Doppler-cooling theory of two-level atoms have never been verified in a three-dimensional geometry, including the celebrated minimum achievable temperature ℏ Γ /2 kB , where Γ is the transition linewidth. Here we show that, despite their degenerate level structure, we can use helium-4 atoms to achieve a situation in which these predictions can be verified. We make measurements of atomic temperatures, magneto-optical trap sizes, and the sensitivity of optical molasses to a power imbalance in the laser beams, finding excellent agreement with Doppler theory. We show that the special properties of helium, particularly its small mass and narrow transition linewidth, prevent effective sub-Doppler cooling with red-detuned optical molasses. This discussion can be generalized to identify when a given species is likely to be subject to the same limitation.

  16. Application of neural networks to range-Doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Zhaoda

    1991-10-01

    The use of neural networks are investigated for 2-D range Doppler microwave imaging. The range resolution of the microwave image is obtained by transmitting a wideband signal and the cross-range resolution is achieved by the Doppler frequency gradient in the same range bin. Hopfield neural networks are used to estimate the Doppler spectrum to enhance the cross- range resolution and reduce the processing time. There is a large number of neurons needed for the high cross-range resolution. In order to cut down the number of neurons, the reflectivities are replaced with their minimum norm estimates. The original Hopfield networks converge often to a local minina instead of the global minima. Simulated annealing is applied to control the gain of Hopfield networks to yield better convergence to the global minima. Results of imaging a model airplane from real microwave data are presented.

  17. Analysis of MSFC ground-based Doppler lidar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, J.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of data collected during the participation of the MSFC 10.6 micron pulsed Doppler lidar system (DLS) in the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) experiment is concluded. Observations from more than one Doppler lidar are combined to derive the three-dimensional Cartesian wind field. A comparison of radial velocity estimates at low elevations made by the MSFC lidar and the NCAR 5.5 cm Doppler radar revealed a substantial r.m.s. difference of 3 mls, and a mean difference of lmls. Detailed measurements of the horizontal wind fields and tropospheric backscattering were acquired at MSFC. These data are useful for defining future flight experiments, instrument design, and satellite DLS development.

  18. One way Doppler Extractor. Volume 2: Digital VCO technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nossen, E. J.; Starner, E. R.

    1974-01-01

    A feasibility analysis and trade-offs for a one-way Doppler extractor using digital VCO techniques is presented. The method of Doppler measurement involves the use of a digital phase lock loop; once this loop is locked to the incoming signal, the precise frequency and hence the Doppler component can be determined directly from the contents of the digital control register. The only serious error source is due to internally generated noise. Techniques are presented for minimizing this error source and achieving an accuracy of 0.01 Hz in a one second averaging period. A number of digitally controlled oscillators were analyzed from a performance and complexity point of view. The most promising technique uses an arithmetic synthesizer as a digital waveform generator.

  19. Spaceborne Doppler Precipitation Radar: System Configurations and Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of the global distribution of the vertical velocity of precipitation is important in in the study of energy transportation in the atmosphere, the climate and weather. Such knowledge can only be directly acquired with the use of spaceborne Doppler precipitation radars. Although the high relative speed of the radar with respect to the rainfall particles introduces significant broadening in the Doppler spectrum, recent studies have shown that the average vertical velocity can be measured to acceptable accuracy levels by appropriate selection of radar parameters. Furthermore, methods to correct for specific errors arising from NUBF effects and pointing uncertainties have recently been developed. In this paper we will present the results of the trade studies on the performances of a spaceborne Doppler radar with different system parameters configurations.

  20. Doppler tomography in cataclysmic variables: an historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, J.

    To mark the half-century anniversary of this newly-born field of Cataclysmic Variables, a special emphasis is made in this review, on the Doppler Effect as a tool in astrophysics. The Doppler Effect was in fact, discovered almost 170 years ago, and has been since, one of the most important tools which helped to develop modern astrophysics. We describe and discuss here, its use in Cataclysmic Variables which, combined with another important tool, the tomography, first devised for medical purposes 70 years ago, helped to devise the astronomical Doppler Tomography, developed only two decades ago. A discussion is made since the first trailed spectra provided a one dimensional analysis of these binaries; on the establishment of a 2D velocity profiling of the accretion discs; and unto modern techniques, which include Roche Tomography, time modulation and 3D imaging.

  1. An introduction and guide to effective Doppler assessment.

    PubMed

    Benbow, Maureen

    2014-12-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of leg ulceration is an essential factor in making evidence-based, effective decisions regarding patient management with the aim of swift wound healing and/or referral to the appropriate specialty. Nurses are professionally responsible for ensuring that patients receive the appropriate assessment and evidence-based management. This article examines the most up-to-date guidance on Doppler ultrasound as a key element of this assessment. Approaches to assessment will be explored, with emphasis on the need to include a Doppler ultrasound as one key element of a larger, holistic assessment. An introduction to the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) will be given, followed by a step-by-step guide to standard procedures for carrying out a full Doppler ultrasound. Alternative options for measuring ABPI are also provided. PMID:25478852

  2. Resting Doppler ankle brachial pressure index measurement: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sihlangu, Dorcus; Bliss, Julie

    2012-07-01

    Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is under-diagnosed in primary and acute settings. The use of Doppler ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) is effective in diagnosing PVD , aid in determining aetiology of leg ulcers and is cost efficient in reducing the effects of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. The aim of this literature review was to review practitioners' experience in using Doppler ABPI, different skills used to measure ABPI and to examine practitioners' confidence in ABPI. The findings identified variation in method for Doppler measurement: including position of the artery, arm measurement, resting period and type of equipment for measuring blood pressure, variations in practitioners' training and experience have demonstrated variability in ABPI results. Although limited in number, the studies have demonstrated knowledge gap, and the need for training among health professionals. PMID:22875182

  3. Intelligent target recognition using micro-Doppler radar signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayaparan, Thayananthan; Stankovic, Ljubisa; Djurovic, Igor; Penamati, Suresh; Venkataramaniah, Kamisetti

    2009-05-01

    We present an effective quadratic time-frequency S-method based approach in conjunction with the Viterbi algorithm to extract m-D features. The effectiveness of the S-method in extracting m-D features is demonstrated through the application to indoor and outdoor experimental data sets such as rotating fan and human gait. The Viterbi algorithm for the instantaneous frequency estimation is used to enhance the weak human micro-Doppler features in relatively high noise environments. As such, this paper contributes additional experimental micro-Doppler data and analysis, which should help in developing a better picture of the human gait micro-Doppler research and its applications to indoor and outdoor imaging and automatic gait recognition systems.

  4. A Human Gait Classification Method Based on Radar Doppler Spectrograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivive, Fok Hing Chi; Bouzerdoum, Abdesselam; Amin, Moeness G.

    2010-12-01

    An image classification technique, which has recently been introduced for visual pattern recognition, is successfully applied for human gait classification based on radar Doppler signatures depicted in the time-frequency domain. The proposed method has three processing stages. The first two stages are designed to extract Doppler features that can effectively characterize human motion based on the nature of arm swings, and the third stage performs classification. Three types of arm motion are considered: free-arm swings, one-arm confined swings, and no-arm swings. The last two arm motions can be indicative of a human carrying objects or a person in stressed situations. The paper discusses the different steps of the proposed method for extracting distinctive Doppler features and demonstrates their contributions to the final and desirable classification rates.

  5. Pulsed and Color Doppler Sonographic Findings of Penile Mondor's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hye Yeon; Kim, Kum Won; Hwang, Cheol Mog

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the color and pulsed Doppler US findings of penile Mondor's disease. The pulsed Doppler US findings of penile Mondor's disease have not been previously published, so we report here for the first time on the cavernosal arterial flow signal pattern of penile Mondor's disease. Penile Mondor's disease is rare disease that's characterized by thrombosis in the dorsal vein of the penis. The previous reports on penile Mondor's disease are concerned with the color Doppler US finding without the flow signals in this area, but these findings are insufficient to understand the hemodynamics in penile Mondor's disease. We report for the first time on a cavernosal artery flow signal pattern of low peak systolic velocity and high-resistance. PMID:18385566

  6. Observational limitations of the Doppler theory of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, J. V.; Subramanian, K.

    1982-09-01

    The viability of the hypothesis that the redshift of a quasar is due entirely to the Doppler effect which arises from its high ejection speed in a nearby center of explosion is examined in light of data on the aligned triplets of quasars discovered by Arp and Hazard (1980). In view of a physical association of the quasars in a triplet, the computation of the various parameters of the Doppler problem is illustrated and constraints are placed on quasar ejection scenarios in order to critically examine Holyle's recent (1980) hypothesis that quasars emit the bulk of their radiation in a specified backward cone. It is found that the four triplets provide prima facie evidence for such a hypothesis, and further checks on the Doppler model are suggested. A very small, but nonzero fraction of blueshifted quasars is predicted by the model.

  7. Theoretical analysis and experimental verification on optical rotational Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hailong; Fu, Dongzhi; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical model to sufficiently investigate the optical rotational Doppler effect based on modal expansion method. We find that the frequency shift content is only determined by the surface of spinning object and the reduced Doppler shift is linear to the difference of mode index between input and output orbital angular momentum (OAM) light, and linear to the rotating speed of spinning object as well. An experiment is carried out to verify the theoretical model. We explicitly suggest that the spatial spiral phase distribution of spinning object determines the frequency content. The theoretical model makes us better understand the physical processes of rotational Doppler effect, and thus has many related application fields, such as detection of rotating bodies, imaging of surface and measurement of OAM light. PMID:27137615

  8. It's all in the past: Deconstructing the temporal Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Aksentijevic, Aleksandar; Treider, John Melvin Gudnyson

    2016-10-01

    A recent study reported an asymmetry between subjective estimates of future and past distances with passive estimation and virtual movement. The temporal Doppler effect refers to the contraction of future distance judgments relative to past ones. We aimed to replicate the effect using real and imagined motion in both directions as well as different temporal perspectives. To avoid the problem of subjective anchoring, we compared real- and imagined-, ego- and time-moving conditions to a control group. Generally, Doppler-like distortion was only observed in conditions in which the distance between the participant and a frontal target increased. No effects of temporal perspective were observed. The "past-directed temporal Doppler effect" presents a challenge for the current theories of temporal cognition by demonstrating absence of psychological movement into the future. The effect could open new avenues in memory research and serve as a starting point in a systematic examination of how the humans construct future. PMID:27395440

  9. Manipulating the spin-dependent splitting by geometric Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yachao; Ke, Yougang; Zhou, Junxiao; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2015-06-29

    We report the manipulation of spin-dependent splitting by geometric Doppler effect based on dielectric metasurfaces. The extrapolation of rotational Doppler effect from temporal to spatial coordinate gives the phase change when the local optical axes of dielectric metasurfaces are rotating in space. Therefore, the continuous variation of local optical axes in a certain direction will introduce a phase gradient in the same direction at the beam cross section. This is additive to the phase gradient appeared when breaking the rotational symmetry of linearly polarized cylindrical vector beams, which leads to the deflections of different spin components of light, i.e., photonic spin Hall effect. Hence, it is possible to manipulate the spin-dependent splitting by introducing the geometric Doppler effect. Theoretically and experimentally, we show that the magnitude and orientation of the spin-dependent splitting are both tunable when changing the spatial rotation rate of local optical axes and incident polarization. PMID:26191680

  10. Rotational Doppler Effect: A Probe for Molecular Orbitals Anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Quan; Travnikova, Oksana; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Kimberg, Victor; Sun, Yu-Ping; Thomas, T Darrah; Nicolas, Christophe; Patanen, Minna; Miron, Catalin

    2015-05-01

    The vibrationally resolved X-ray photoelectron spectra of X2Σg+(3σg−1) and B2Σu+(2σu−1) states of N2+ were recorded for different photon energies and orientations of the polarization vector. Clear dependencies of the spectral line widths on the X-ray polarization as well as on the symmetry of the final electronic states are observed. Contrary to the translational Doppler, the rotational Doppler broadening is sensitive to the photoelectron emission anisotropy. On the basis of theoretical modeling, we suggest that the different rotational Doppler broadenings observed for gerade and ungerade final states result from a Young's double-slit interference phenomenon. PMID:26263315

  11. Theoretical analysis and experimental verification on optical rotational Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hailong; Fu, Dongzhi; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical model to sufficiently investigate the optical rotational Doppler effect based on modal expansion method. We find that the frequency shift content is only determined by the surface of spinning object and the reduced Doppler shift is linear to the difference of mode index between input and output orbital angular momentum (OAM) light, and linear to the rotating speed of spinning object as well. An experiment is carried out to verify the theoretical model. We explicitly suggest that the spatial spiral phase distribution of spinning object determines the frequency content. The theoretical model makes us better understand the physical processes of rotational Doppler effect, and thus has many related application fields, such as detection of rotating bodies, imaging of surface and measurement of OAM light.

  12. Can the ductus venosus doppler predict the hemoglobinopathies?

    PubMed Central

    Karateke, Atilla; Silfeler, Dilek Benk; Güngören, Arif; Kurt, Raziye Keskin; Okyay, Ayşe Güler; Dokuyucu, Recep; Ulutas, Turker; Un, Burak; Paksoy, Hacer; Hakverdi, Ali Ulvi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate the ductus venosus doppler between 11-13+6 (week-day) in pregnant women with hemoglobinopaties and its relation with fetal outcomes. Material and methods: A total of 100 pregnant women with hemoglobinopathies and 100 healthy pregnant women were included in our study. Ultrasonography (USG) was performed to all pregnant women and the ductus venosus doppler (DVD) flows were evaluated. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: The mean hemoglobin level was significantly lower in hemoglobinopathy group (9.7 ± 0.7) than control group (10.67 ± 0.82) (P<0.001). There was a significant relationship between Vmax, Vmin, S/D and reverse ‘a’ wave in fetuses with hemoglobinopathies. Vmax, Vmin and S/D parameters were higher in the group of hemoglobinopathies (respectively mean value, 31.3 ± 1.66, 8.90 ± 0.81, 2.97 ± 0.49). Reverse ‘a’ wave was detected especially in all fetuses with sickle cell anemia. There was no significantly relationship between the groups in terms of PI, RI and HR. In a logistic regression analyses, fetal hemoglobinopathy was independently associated with Vmin (β = 1.07, P = 0.001), S/D (β = 2.61, P = 0.001) and reverse ‘a’ wave (β = 2.46, P = 0.004). Conclusion: Pregnant women with hemoglobinopathies had changed ductus venosus doppler values in compared to normal pregnant women. Maternal anemia may cause this doppler changes. Furthermore all fetuses with sickle cell anemia (n = 5) had abnormal ductus venosus doppler findings. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between abnormal ductus venosus doppler findings and fetuses diagnosed with sickle cell anemia. PMID:26064361

  13. Reducing Antenna Mechanical Noise in Precision Doppler Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Estabrook, F. B.; Asmar, S. W.; Iess, L.; Tortora, P.

    2006-05-01

    Precision Doppler tracking of deep-space probes is central to spacecraft navigation and many radio science investigations. The most sensitive Doppler observations to date have been taken using the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna DSS 25, a 34-m-diameter beam-waveguide station especially instrumented with simultaneous X-band (approximately 8.4-GHz) and Ka-band (approximately 32-GHz) links and tropospheric scintillation calibration equipment, tracking the Cassini spacecraft. These Cassini observations achieved Doppler fractional frequency stability (Doppler frequency fluctuation divided by center frequency, Delta f / f_o ) of approximately 3 x 10^-15 at tau = 1000 s integration. In those very-high-sensitivity tracks, the leading disturbance was antenna mechanical noise: time-dependent unmodeled physical motion of the ground antenna's phase center caused by antenna sag as the elevation angle changed, unmodeled subreflector motion, wind loading, bulk motion of the antenna as it rolled over irregularities in the supporting azimuth ring, differential thermal expansion of the structure, etc. This noise has seemed irreducible at reasonable cost, since it is unclear how to build a practical, large, moving, steel structure having mechanical stability significantly better than that of current tracking stations. Here we show how the mechanical noise of a large tracking antenna can effectively be removed when two-way Doppler tracking data from an existing DSN antenna are suitably combined with simultaneous tracking data using an ancillary (smaller and stiffer) antenna. Using our method, the mechanical noise in the final Doppler observable can be reduced, substantially, to that of the stiffer antenna.

  14. Doppler displacements in kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Marcel; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Terradas, Jaume; Verth, Gary; Soler, Roberto

    Doppler displacements in kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes Presenting author: M. Goossens Co-authors: R. Soler, J. Terradas, T. Van Doorsselaere, G. Verth The standard interpretation of the transverse MHD waves observed in the solar atmosphere is that they are non-axisymmetric kink m=1) waves on magnetic flux tubes. This interpretation is based on the fact that axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fluting waves do not displace the axis of the loop and the loop as a whole while kink waves indeed do so. A uniform transverse motion produces a Doppler displacement that is constant across the magnetic flux tube. A recent development is the observation of Doppler displacements that vary across the loop. The aim of the present contribution is to show that spatial variations of the Doppler displacements across the loop can be caused by kink waves. The motion associated with a kink wave is purely transverse only when the flux tube is uniform and sufficiently thin. Only in that case do the radial and azimuthal components of displacement have the same amplitude and is the azimuthal component a quarter of a period ahead of the radial component. This results in a unidirectional or transverse displacement. When the flux tube is non-uniform and has a non-zero radius the conditions for the generation of a purely transverse motion are not any longer met. In that case the motion in a kink wave is the sum of a transverse motion and a non-axisymmetric rotational motion that depends on the azimuthal angle. It can produce complicated variations of the Doppler displacement across the loop. I shall discuss the various cases of possible Doppler displacenents that can occur depending on the relative sizes of the amplitudes of the radial and azimuthal components of the displacement in the kink wave and on the orientation of the line of sight.

  15. Doppler and Reflectivity Measurements at Two Closely-Spaced Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Bidwell, S.; Liao, L.; Heymsfield, G.; Rincon, R.; Tokay, A.; Hildebrand, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spaceborne and airborne radars are limited with a respect to the mass and size of the instrument and the power available to operate it. As a consequence, dual-wavelength radars that require separate antennas and power amplifiers are expensive and often impractical. However, if the frequency difference can be reduced so that a single antenna and the same radio-frequency subsystem can be used for both frequencies, dual- wavelength Doppler measurements can be made with a radar of about the same size and mass as its single-frequency counterpart. In the first part of the paper we present calculations of the reflectivity factor differences as functions of the center frequency from 10 to 35 GHz and for frequency differences between -10% and 10% of the center frequency. The results indicate that differential-frequency operation at Ka-band frequencies (26.5 - 40 GHz) provides relatively strong differential signals if the frequencies can be separated by at least 5%. Unlike lower frequency operation, the differential signals at Ka-band (both reflectivity and Doppler) are directly related to the median mass diameter. An important feature of the differential mean Doppler is that it depends only on the drop-size dependent part of the radial velocity. In principle, the mean and mean differential Doppler data from a nadir-looking platform can be used to infer vertical air motion and characteristics of the particle size distribution. To test the instrument concept, the ER-2 Doppler radar was modified for differential frequency operation. Measurements by the modified radar, operating at frequencies of 9.1 GHz and 10 GHz, were made using an 8 degree zenith-pointing offset parabolic antenna. Simultaneous data were taken with an optical rain gauge and an impact disdrometer. Measured and DSD-estimated values of the differential dBZ mean Doppler are presented.

  16. Browsing a wealth of millimeter-wavelength doppler spectra data

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson,K.; Luke,E.; Kollias, P.; Remillard, J.; Widener, K.; Jensen, M.

    2010-03-15

    The ARM Climate Research Facility has collected an extensive archive of vertically pointing millimeter wavelength Doppler radar spectra at both 35 and 95 GHz. These data are a rich potential source of detailed microphysical and dynamical cloud and precipitation information. The recording of spectra, which is ongoing, began at the Southern Great Plains site in September of 2003, at the North Slope of Alaska site in April 2004, and at Tropical Western Pacific sites in 2006. Spectra are also being collected during ARM Mobile Facility deployments. The data’s temporal resolution is as high as two seconds, at height intervals of 45 to 90 m. However, the sheer volume of available data can be somewhat daunting to access and search for specific features of interest. Here we present a user interface for spectra browsing, which allows the user to view time-height images of radar moments, select a time or height of interest, and then “drill down” through images of spectrograms to individual Doppler spectra or time- and height-sequences of spectra. Also available are images summarizing spectral characteristics, such as number of spectral peaks, spectral shape information (skewness and kurtosis), moment uncertainty estimates, and hydrometeor vs. clutter identification as produced by the ARM MicroARSCL (Microphysical Active Remote Sensing of Clouds) value-added product. In addition to the access and visualization tools, we are developing a Doppler spectra simulator capable of generating Doppler spectra from liquid, mixed-phase, and solid cloud constituents and precipitation. The Doppler spectra simulator can be used as an interface between explicit microphysics models and Doppler spectra observations from the ARM radars. The plan is to ultimately make the spectra simulator available from within the spectra browser, allowing a user to associate observed spectra with the microphysical conditions capable of producing them.

  17. Multigroup Free-atom Doppler-broadening Approximation. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Mark Girard

    2015-11-06

    Multigroup cross sections at a one target temperature can be Doppler-broadened to multigroup cross sections at a higher target temperature by matrix multiplication if the group structure suf- ficiently resolves the original temperature continuous energy cross section. Matrix elements are the higher temperature group weighted averages of the integral over the lower temperature group boundaries of the free-atom Doppler-broadening kernel. The results match theory for constant and 1/v multigroup cross sections at 618 lanl group structure resolution.

  18. The case of the Doppler effect for photons revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redžić, Dragan V.

    2013-11-01

    A detailed account is presented of the Doppler effect as a photon phenomenon, complementing a recent paper by Giuliani (2013 Eur. J. Phys. 34 1035-47). The essence of Schrödinger's pioneering derivation (1922 Phys. Z. 23 301-3) of a Doppler formula in terms of the corpuscular theory of light, using energy-momentum conservation, is related. Some neglected references that put the whole scene around the Ives-Stilwell experiment into a more precise perspective are highlighted. Atoms as clocks and particle-wave complementarity are also discussed briefly.

  19. Imaging doppler lidar for wind turbine wake profiling

    DOEpatents

    Bossert, David J.

    2015-11-19

    An imaging Doppler lidar (IDL) enables the measurement of the velocity distribution of a large volume, in parallel, and at high spatial resolution in the wake of a wind turbine. Because the IDL is non-scanning, it can be orders of magnitude faster than conventional coherent lidar approaches. Scattering can be obtained from naturally occurring aerosol particles. Furthermore, the wind velocity can be measured directly from Doppler shifts of the laser light, so the measurement can be accomplished at large standoff and at wide fields-of-view.

  20. C IV Doppler shifts observed in active region filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Doppler shift properties of 21 active region filaments were studied using C IV Dopplergram data. Most are associated with corridors of weak magnetic field that separate opposite polarity strong fields seen in photospheric magnetograms. A majority of the filaments are relatively blue shifted, although several lie very close to the dividing lines between blue and red shift. Only one filament in the samples is clearly red shifted. A new calibration procedure for Dopplergrams indicates that sizable zero point offsets are often required. The center-to-limb behavior of the resulting absolute Doppler shifts suggests that filament flows are usually quite small. It is possible that they vanish.