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Sample records for 2-oxoacid-dependent dioxygenase involved

  1. Involvement of a flavosemiquinone in the enzymatic oxidation of nitroalkanes catalyzed by 2-nitropropane dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Francis, Kevin; Russell, Bethany; Gadda, Giovanni

    2005-02-18

    2-Nitropropane dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.32) catalyzes the oxidation of nitroalkanes into their corresponding carbonyl compounds and nitrite. In this study, the ncd-2 gene encoding for the enzyme in Neurospora crassa was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resulting enzyme was purified. Size exclusion chromatography, heat denaturation, and mass spectroscopic analyses showed that 2-nitropropane dioxygenase is a homodimer of 80 kDa, containing a mole of non-covalently bound FMN per mole of subunit, and is devoid of iron. With neutral nitroalkanes and anionic nitronates other than propyl-1- and propyl-2-nitronate, for which a non-enzymatic free radical reaction involving superoxide was established using superoxide dismutase, substrate oxidation occurs within the enzyme active site. The enzyme was more specific for nitronates than nitroalkanes, as suggested by the second order rate constant k(cat)/K(m) determined with 2-nitropropane and primary nitroalkanes with alkyl chain lengths between 2 and 6 carbons. The steady state kinetic mechanism with 2-nitropropane, nitroethane, nitrobutane, and nitrohexane, in either the neutral or anionic form, was determined to be sequential, consistent with oxygen reacting with a reduced form of enzyme before release of the carbonyl product. Enzyme-monitored turnover with ethyl nitronate as substrate indicated that the catalytically relevant reduced form of enzyme is an anionic flavin semiquinone, whose formation requires the substrate, but not molecular oxygen, as suggested by anaerobic substrate reduction with nitroethane or ethyl nitronate. Substrate deuterium kinetic isotope effects with 1,2-[(2)H(4)]nitroethane and 1,1,2-[(2)H(3) ethyl nitronate at pH 8 yielded normal and inverse effects on the k(cat)/K(m) value, respectively, and were negligible on the k(cat) value. The k(cat)/K(m) and k(cat) pH profiles with anionic nitronates showed the requirement of an acid, whereas those for neutral nitroalkanes were consistent with

  2. Benzoate degradation by Rhodococcus opacus 1CP after dormancy: Characterization of dioxygenases involved in the process.

    PubMed

    Solyanikova, Inna P; Emelyanova, Elena V; Borzova, Oksana V; Golovleva, Ludmila A

    2016-01-01

    The process of benzoate degradation by strain Rhodococcus opacus 1CP after a five-year dormancy was investigated and its peculiarities were revealed. The strain was shown to be capable of growth on benzoate at a concentration of up to 10 g L(-1). The substrate specificity of benzoate dioxygenase (BDO) during the culture growth on a medium with a low (200-250 mg L(-1)) and high (4 g L(-1)) concentration of benzoate was assessed. BDO of R. opacus 1CP was shown to be an extremely narrow specificity enzyme. Out of 31 substituted benzoates, only with one, 3-chlorobenzoate, its activity was higher than 9% of that of benzoate. Two dioxygenases, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (Cat 1,2-DO) and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (PCA 3,4-DO), were identified in a cell-free extract, purified and characterized. The substrate specificity of Cat 1,2-DO isolated from cells of strain 1CP after the dormancy was found to differ significantly from that of Cat 1,2-DO isolated earlier from cells of this strain grown on benzoate. By its substrate specificity, the described Cat 1,2-DO was close to the Cat 1,2-DO from strain 1CP grown on 4-methylbenzoate. Neither activity nor inhibition by protocatechuate was observed during the reaction of Cat 1,2-DO with catechol, and catechol had no inhibitory effect on the reaction of PCA 3,4-DO with protocatechuate. PMID:26669259

  3. Characterization and Functional Identification of a Novel Plant 4,5-Extradiol Dioxygenase Involved in Betalain Pigment Biosynthesis in Portulaca grandiflora

    PubMed Central

    Christinet, Laurent; Burdet, Frédéric X.; Zaiko, Maïa; Hinz, Ursula; Zrÿd, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Betalains are pigments that replace anthocyanins in the majority of families of the plant order Caryophyllales. Betalamic acid is the common chromophore of betalains. The key enzyme of the betalain biosynthetic pathway is an extradiol dioxygenase that opens the cyclic ring of dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) between carbons 4 and 5, thus producing an unstable seco-DOPA that rearranges nonenzymatically to betalamic acid. A gene for a 4,5-DOPA-dioxygenase has already been isolated from the fungus Amanita muscaria, but no homolog was ever found in plants. To identify the plant gene, we constructed subtractive libraries between different colored phenotypes of isogenic lines of Portulaca grandiflora (Portulacaceae) and between different stages of flower bud formation. Using in silico analysis of differentially expressed cDNAs, we identified a candidate showing strong homology at the level of translated protein with the LigB domain present in several bacterial extradiol 4,5-dioxygenases. The gene was expressed only in colored flower petals. The function of this gene in the betalain biosynthetic pathway was confirmed by biolistic genetic complementation in white petals of P. grandiflora genotypes lacking the gene for color formation. This gene named DODA is the first characterized member of a novel family of plant dioxygenases phylogenetically distinct from Amanita sp. DOPA-dioxygenase. Homologs of DODA are present not only in betalain-producing plants but also, albeit with some changes near the catalytic site, in other angiosperms and in the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. These homologs are part of a novel conserved plant gene family probably involved in aromatic compound metabolism. PMID:14730069

  4. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Is Involved in the Inflammation Response of Corneal Epithelial Cells to Aspergillus fumigatus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Guiqiu; Lin, Jing; Hu, Liting; Che, Chengye; Li, Cui; Wang, Qian; Xu, Qiang; Peng, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which is mainly expressed in activated dendritic cells, is known as a regulator of immune responses. However, the role of IDO in immune responses against fungal corneal infection has not been investigated. To evaluate the regulatory mechanisms of IDO in fungal inflammation, we resorted to human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs), known as the first barrier of cornea against pathogenic microorganisms. We found that IDO was significantly up-regulated in corneal epithelium infected with Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) and HCECs incubated with spores of A. fumigatus. Furthermore, IDO inhibitor (1-methyltryptophan, 1-MT) enhanced inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 expression which were up-regulated by A. fumigatus spores infection. Dectin-1, as one of the important C-type lectin receptors, can identify β-glucan, and mediate fungal innate immune responses. In the present study, pre-treatment with curdlan, a Dectin-1 agonist, further enhanced IDO expression compared with A. fumigatus stimulation. While laminarin, the Dectin-1 specific inhibitor, partially inhibited IDO expression stimulated by A. fumigatus. Further studies demonstrated inhibition of IDO activity amplified the expressions of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 induced by activation of Dectin-1. These results suggested that IDO was involved in the immune responses of fungal keratitis. The activation of Dectin-1 may contribute to A. fumigatus spores-induced up-regulation of IDO. PMID:26361229

  5. Possible involvement of toluene-2,3-dioxygenase in defluorination of 3-fluoro-substituted benzenes by toluene-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain T-12

    SciTech Connect

    Renganathan, V. )

    1989-02-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain T-12 cells in which the toluene-degradative pathway enzymes have been induced can transform many 3-fluoro-substituted benzenes to the corresponding 2,3-catechols with simultaneous elimination of the fluorine substituent as inorganic fluoride. Substrates for this transformation included 3-fluorotoluen, 3-fluorotrifluorotuluene, 3-fluorohalobenzenes, 3-fluoroanisole, and 3-fluorobenzonitrile. While 3-fluorotoluene and 3-fluoroaniole produced only defluorinated catechols, other substrates generated catechol products with and without the fluorine substituent. The steric size of the C-1 substituent affected the ratio of defluorinated to fluorinated catechols formed from a substrate. A mechanism for the defluorination reaction involving toluene-2,3-dioxygenase is proposed.

  6. Cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase genes of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum: possible involvement in hypotaurine synthesis and adaptation to hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Toshihiro; Hongo, Yuki; Koito, Tomoko; Nakamura-Kusakabe, Ikumi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Inoue, Koji

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that invertebrates inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vent areas use the sulfinic acid hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine, to protect against the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide contained in the seawater from the vent. In this protective system, hypotaurine is accumulated in the gill, the primary site of sulfide exposure. However, the pathway for hypotaurine synthesis in mollusks has not been identified. In this study, we screened for the mRNAs of enzymes involved in hypotaurine synthesis in the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum and cloned cDNAs encoding cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase. As mRNAs encoding cysteamine dioxygenase and cysteine lyase were not detected, the cysteine sulfinate pathway is suggested to be the major pathway of hypotaurine and taurine synthesis. The two genes were found to be expressed in all the tissues examined, but the gill exhibited the highest expression. The mRNA level in the gill was not significantly changed by exposure to sulfides or thiosulfate. These results suggests that the gill of B. septemdierum maintains high levels of expression of the two genes regardless of ambient sulfide level and accumulates hypotaurine continuously to protect against sudden exposure to high level of sulfide. PMID:25501502

  7. Cytosolic and Plastoglobule-targeted Carotenoid Dioxygenases from Crocus sativus Are Both Involved in β-Ionone Release*

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Angela; Rambla, José Luís; Santaella, Marcella; Gómez, M. Dolores; Orzaez, Diego; Granell, Antonio; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2008-01-01

    Saffron, the processed stigma of Crocus sativus, is characterized by the presence of several apocarotenoids that contribute to the color, flavor, and aroma of the spice. However, little is known about the synthesis of aroma compounds during the development of the C. sativus stigma. The developing stigma is nearly odorless, but before and at anthesis, the aromatic compound β-ionone becomes the principal norisoprenoid volatile in the stigma. In this study, four carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) genes, CsCCD1a, CsCCD1b, CsCCD4a, and CsCCD4b, were isolated from C. sativus. Expression analysis showed that CsCCD1a was constitutively expressed, CsCCD1b was unique to the stigma tissue, but only CsCCD4a and -b had expression patterns consistent with the highest levels of β-carotene and emission of β-ionone derived during the stigma development. The CsCCD4 enzymes were localized in plastids and more specifically were present in the plastoglobules. The enzymatic activities of CsCCD1a, CsCCD1b, and CsCCD4 enzymes were determined by Escherichia coli expression, and subsequent analysis of the volatile products was generated by GC/MS. The four CCDs fell in two phylogenetically divergent dioxygenase classes, but all could cleave β-carotene at the 9,10(9′,10′) positions to yield β-ionone. The data obtained suggest that all four C. sativus CCD enzymes may contribute in different ways to the production of β-ionone. In addition, the location and precise timing of β-ionone synthesis, together with its known activity as a fragrance and insect attractant, suggest that this volatile may have a role in Crocus pollination. PMID:18611853

  8. Enzymes Involved in the Aerobic Bacterial Degradation of N-Heteroaromatic Compounds: Molybdenum Hydroxylases and Ring-Opening 2,4-Dioxygenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzner, S.

    Many N-heteroaromatic compounds are utilized by micro-organisms as a source of carbon (and nitrogen) and energy. The aerobic bacterial degradation of these growth substrates frequently involves several hydroxylation steps and subsequent dioxygenolytic cleavage of (di)hydroxy-substituted heteroaromatic intermediates to aliphatic metabolites which finally are channeled into central metabolic pathways. As a rule, the initial bacterial hydroxylation of a N-heteroaromatic compound is catalyzed by a molybdenum hydroxylase, which uses a water molecule as source of the incorporated oxygen. The enzyme's redox-active centers - the active site molybdenum ion coordinated to a distinct pyranopterin cofactor, two different [2Fe2S] centers, and in most cases, flavin adenine dinucleotide - transfer electrons from the N-heterocyclic substrate to an electron acceptor, which for many molybdenum hydroxylases is still unknown. Ring-opening 2,4-dioxygenases involved in the bacterial degradation of quinaldine and 1H-4-oxoquinoline catalyze the cleavage of two carbon-carbon bonds with concomitant formation of carbon monoxide. Since they contain neither a metal center nor an organic cofactor, and since they do not show any sequence similarity to known oxygenases, these unique dioxygenases form a separate enzyme family. Quite surprisingly, however, they appear to be structurally and mechanistically related to enzymes of the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. Microbial enzymes are a great resource for biotechnological applications. Microbial strains or their enzymes may be used for degradative (bioremediation) or synthetic (biotransformation) purposes. Modern bioremediation or biotransformation strategies may even involve microbial catalysts or strains designed by protein engineering or pathway engineering. Prerequisite for developing such modern tools of biotechnology is a comprehensive understanding of microbial metabolic pathways, of the structure and function of enzymes, and of the

  9. Staphylococcus aureus CstB Is a Novel Multidomain Persulfide Dioxygenase-Sulfurtransferase Involved in Hydrogen Sulfide Detoxification.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiangchuan; Keithly, Mary E; Armstrong, Richard N; Higgins, Khadine A; Edmonds, Katherine A; Giedroc, David P

    2015-07-28

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is both a lethal gas and an emerging gasotransmitter in humans, suggesting that the cellular H2S level must be tightly regulated. CstB is encoded by the cst operon of the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is under the transcriptional control of the persulfide sensor CstR and H2S. Here, we show that CstB is a multifunctional Fe(II)-containing persulfide dioxygenase (PDO), analogous to the vertebrate protein ETHE1 (ethylmalonic encephalopathy protein 1). Chromosomal deletion of ethe1 is fatal in vertebrates. In the presence of molecular oxygen (O2), hETHE1 oxidizes glutathione persulfide (GSSH) to generate sulfite and reduced glutathione. In contrast, CstB oxidizes major cellular low molecular weight (LMW) persulfide substrates from S. aureus, coenzyme A persulfide (CoASSH) and bacillithiol persulfide (BSSH), directly to generate thiosulfate (TS) and reduced thiols, thereby avoiding the cellular toxicity of sulfite. Both Cys201 in the N-terminal PDO domain (CstB(PDO)) and Cys408 in the C-terminal rhodanese domain (CstB(Rhod)) strongly enhance the TS generating activity of CstB. CstB also possesses persulfide transferase (PT; reverse rhodanese) activity, which generates TS when provided with LMW persulfides and sulfite, as well as conventional thiosulfate transferase (TST; rhodanese) activity; both of these activities require Cys408. CstB protects S. aureus against H2S toxicity, with the C201S and C408S cstB genes being unable to rescue a NaHS-induced ΔcstB growth phenotype. Induction of the cst operon by NaHS reveals that functional CstB impacts cellular TS concentrations. These data collectively suggest that CstB may have evolved to facilitate the clearance of LMW persulfides that occur upon elevation of the level of cellular H2S and hence may have an impact on bacterial viability under H2S misregulation, in concert with the other enzymes encoded by the cst operon. PMID:26177047

  10. Expression of 2-halobenzoate dioxygenase genes (cbdSABC) involved in the degradation of benzoate and 2-halobenzoate in Burkholderia sp. TH2.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Ogawa, N; Miyashita, K

    2001-01-10

    Burkholderia sp. TH2, isolated from soil, utilizes 2-chlorobenzoate (2CB) and benzoate (BA) as its sole source of carbon and energy. The genes for 2-halobenzoate dioxygenase (cbdABC) from Burkholderia sp. TH2 were cloned and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequences of all the gene products are highly similar to the cbd gene products of Pseudomonas sp. 2CBS. Disruption of the promoter region of cbdA resulted in loss of growth on 2CB and BA, indicating that these genes are involved in the growth of TH2 on these substrates. Expression of the cbd genes was analyzed by transcriptional fusion assay. The cbdS gene, a possible araC/xylS-type transcriptional regulatory gene, was shown to positively regulate the expression of cbdA. In addition, the effectors of CbdS were shown to be 2CB, 2-bromobenzoate, o-toluate (2-methylbenzoate), 2-iodobenzoate, and BA. Primer extension analysis showed that the cbdA mRNA started at two positions, 14 and 15 nucleotides upstream from the cbdA start codon, ATG. A pair of direct repeats, identical to that of the Pm promoter of the TOL plasmid, was found upstream of -35 hexamer of the cbdA promoter. PMID:11179677

  11. Characterization of the Promoter Region of an Arabidopsis Gene for 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase Involved in Dehydration-Inducible Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Behnam, Babak; Iuchi, Satoshi; Fujita, Miki; Fujita, Yasunari; Takasaki, Hironori; Osakabe, Yuriko; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Plants respond to dehydration stress and tolerate water-deficit status through complex physiological and cellular processes. Many genes are induced by water deficit. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in tolerance to dehydration stress by inducing many stress genes. ABA is synthesized de novo in response to dehydration. Most of the genes involved in ABA biosynthesis have been identified, and they are expressed mainly in leaf vascular tissues. Of the products of such genes, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis. One of the five NCED genes in Arabidopsis, AtNCED3, is significantly induced by dehydration. To understand the regulatory mechanism of the early stages of the dehydration stress response, it is important to analyse the transcriptional regulatory systems of AtNCED3. In the present study, we found that an overlapping G-box recognition sequence (5′-CACGTG-3′) at −2248 bp from the transcriptional start site of AtNCED3 is an important cis-acting element in the induction of the dehydration response. We discuss the possible transcriptional regulatory system of dehydration-responsive AtNCED3 expression, and how this may control the level of ABA under water-deficit conditions. PMID:23604098

  12. Crystal Structure and Mechanism of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase, a Heme Enzyme Involved in Tryptophan Catabolism and in Quinolinate Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Kang, S.; Mukherjee, T.; Bale, S.; Crane, B.; Begley, T.; Ealick, S.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) from Ralstonia metallidurans was determined at 2.4 {angstrom}. TDO catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of L-tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, which is the initial step in tryptophan catabolism. TDO is a heme-containing enzyme and is highly specific for its substrate L-tryptophan. The structure is a tetramer with a heme cofactor bound at each active site. The monomeric fold, as well as the heme binding site, is similar to that of the large domain of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an enzyme that catalyzes the same reaction except with a broader substrate tolerance. Modeling of the putative (S)-tryptophan hydroperoxide intermediate into the active site, as well as substrate analogue and mutagenesis studies, are consistent with a Criegee mechanism for the reaction.

  13. Hydroperoxylation by Hydroxyethylphosphonate Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyethylphosphonate dioxygenase (HEPD) catalyzes the O2-dependent cleavage of the carbon−carbon bond of 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (2-HEP) to afford hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP) and formate without input of electrons or use of any organic cofactors. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for this reaction. One involves initial hydroxylation of substrate to an acetal intermediate and its subsequent attack onto an Fe(IV)-oxo species. The second mechanism features initial hydroperoxylation of substrate followed by a Criegee rearrangement. To distinguish between the two mechanisms, substrate analogues were synthesized and presented to the enzyme. Hydroxymethylphosphonate was converted into phosphate and formate, and 1-hydroxyethylphosphonate was converted to acetylphosphate, which is an inhibitor of the enzyme. These results provide strong support for a Criegee rearrangement with a phosphorus-based migrating group and require that the O−O bond of molecular oxygen is not cleaved prior to substrate activation. (2R)-Hydroxypropylphosphonate partitioned between conversion to 2-oxopropylphosphonate and hydroxymethylphosphonate, with the latter in turn converted to phosphate and formate. Collectively, these results support a mechanism that proceeds by hydroperoxylation followed by a Criegee rearrangement. PMID:19839620

  14. Molecular characterization of the gallate dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida KT2440. The prototype of a new subgroup of extradiol dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Nogales, Juan; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2005-10-21

    In this work we have characterized the galA gene product from Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a ring-cleavage dioxygenase that acts specifically on gallate to produce 4-oxalomesaconate. The protein is a trimer composed by three identical subunits of 47.6 kDa (419 amino acids) that uses Fe2+ as the main cofactor. The gallate dioxygenase showed maximum activity at pH 7.0, and the Km and Vmax values for gallate were 144 microM and 53.2 micromol/min/mg of protein, respectively. A phylogenetic study suggests that the gallate dioxygenase from P. putida KT2440 is the prototype of a new subgroup of type II extradiol dioxygenases that share a common ancestor with protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenases and whose two-domain architecture might have evolved from the fusion of the large and small subunits of the latter. A three-dimensional model for the N-terminal domain (residues 1-281) and C-terminal domain (residues 294-420) of the gallate dioxygenase from P. putida KT2440 was generated by comparison with the crystal structures of the large (LigB) and small (LigA) subunits of the protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6. The expression of the galA gene was specifically induced when P. putida KT2440 cells grew in the presence of gallate. A P. putida KT2440 galA mutant strain was unable to use gallate as the sole carbon source and it did not show gallate dioxygenase activity, suggesting that the GalA protein is the only dioxygenase involved in gallate cleavage in this bacterium. This work points to the existence of a new pathway that is devoted to the catabolism of gallic acid and that remained unknown in the paradigmatic P. putida KT2440 strain. PMID:16030014

  15. Ring-Cleaving Dioxygenases with a Cupin Fold

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ring-cleaving dioxygenases catalyze key reactions in the aerobic microbial degradation of aromatic compounds. Many pathways converge to catecholic intermediates, which are subject to ortho or meta cleavage by intradiol or extradiol dioxygenases, respectively. However, a number of degradation pathways proceed via noncatecholic hydroxy-substituted aromatic carboxylic acids like gentisate, salicylate, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate, or aminohydroxybenzoates. The ring-cleaving dioxygenases active toward these compounds belong to the cupin superfamily, which is characterized by a six-stranded β-barrel fold and conserved amino acid motifs that provide the 3His or 2- or 3His-1Glu ligand environment of a divalent metal ion. Most cupin-type ring cleavage dioxygenases use an FeII center for catalysis, and the proposed mechanism is very similar to that of the canonical (type I) extradiol dioxygenases. The metal ion is presumed to act as an electron conduit for single electron transfer from the metal-bound substrate anion to O2, resulting in activation of both substrates to radical species. The family of cupin-type dioxygenases also involves quercetinase (flavonol 2,4-dioxygenase), which opens up two C-C bonds of the heterocyclic ring of quercetin, a wide-spread plant flavonol. Remarkably, bacterial quercetinases are capable of using different divalent metal ions for catalysis, suggesting that the redox properties of the metal are relatively unimportant for the catalytic reaction. The major role of the active-site metal ion could be to correctly position the substrate and to stabilize transition states and intermediates rather than to mediate electron transfer. The tentative hypothesis that quercetinase catalysis involves direct electron transfer from metal-bound flavonolate to O2 is supported by model chemistry. PMID:22287012

  16. Substrate Oxidation by Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Elizabeth S.; Basran, Jaswir; Lee, Michael; Handa, Sandeep; Raven, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway is the major route of l-tryptophan (l-Trp) catabolism in biology, leading ultimately to the formation of NAD+. The initial and rate-limiting step of the kynurenine pathway involves oxidation of l-Trp to N-formylkynurenine. This is an O2-dependent process and catalyzed by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. More than 60 years after these dioxygenase enzymes were first isolated (Kotake, Y., and Masayama, I. (1936) Z. Physiol. Chem. 243, 237–244), the mechanism of the reaction is not established. We examined the mechanism of substrate oxidation for a series of substituted tryptophan analogues by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. We observed formation of a transient intermediate, assigned as a Compound II (ferryl) species, during oxidation of l-Trp, 1-methyl-l-Trp, and a number of other substrate analogues. The data are consistent with a common reaction mechanism for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-catalyzed oxidation of tryptophan and other tryptophan analogues. PMID:26511316

  17. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase depletes tryptophan, activates general control non-derepressible 2 kinase and down-regulates key enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis in primary human CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2015-10-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is expressed in antigen-presenting cells and exerts immunosuppressive effects on CD4(+) T cells. One mechanism is through the inhibition of aerobic glycolysis. Another prerequisite for T-cell proliferation and differentiation into effector cells is increased fatty acid (FA) synthesis. The effect of IDO on enzymes involved in FA synthesis was evaluated in primary human cells both in mixed lymphocyte reactions in the presence or not of the IDO inhibitor 1-dl-methyl-tryptophan, and in stimulated CD4(+) T cells in the presence or not of the general control non-derepressible 2 (GCN2) kinase activator tryptophanol (TRP). IDO or TRP inhibited cell proliferation. By assessing the level of GCN2 kinase or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 substrates along with a kynurenine free system we showed that IDO exerts its effect mainly through activation of GCN2 kinase. IDO or TRP down-regulated ATP-citrate lyase and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase 1, key enzymes involved in FA synthesis. Also, IDO or TRP altered the expression of enzymes that control the availability of carbon atoms for FA synthesis, such as lactate dehydrogenase-A, pyruvate dehydrogenase, glutaminase 1 and glutaminase 2, in a way that inhibits FA synthesis. In conclusion, IDO through GCN2 kinase activation inhibits CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and down-regulates key enzymes that directly or indirectly promote FA synthesis, a prerequisite for CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and differentiation into effector cell lineages. PMID:26147366

  18. Studies on the isopropylbenzene 2,3-dioxygenase and the 3-isopropylcatechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes encoded by the linear plasmid of Rhodococcus erythropolis BD2.

    PubMed

    Kesseler, M; Dabbs, E R; Averhoff, B; Gottschalk, G

    1996-11-01

    The enzymes responsible for the degradation of isopropylbenzene (IPB) and co-oxidation of trichloroethene (TCE) by Rhodococcus erythropolis BD2 are encoded by the linear plasmid pBD2. Fragments containing IPB catabolic genes were cloned from pBD2 and the nucleotide sequence was determined. By means of database searches and expression of the cloned genes in recombinant strains, we identified five clustered genes, ipbA1A2A3A4C, which encode the three components of the IPB 2,3-dioxygenase system, reductaseIPB (ipbA4), ferredoxinIPB (ipbA3) and the two subunits of the terminal dioxygenase (ipbA1A2), as well as the 3-isopropylcatechol (IPC) 2,3-dioxygenase (ipbC). The protein sequences deduced from the ipbA1A2A3A4C gene cluster exhibited significant homology with the corresponding proteins of analogous degradative pathways in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, but the gene order differed from most of them. IPB 2,3-dioxygenase and 3-IPC 2,3-dioxygenase could both be expressed in Escherichia coli, but the IPB 2,3-dioxygenase activities were too low to be detected by polarographic and TCE degradative means. However, inhibitor studies with the R. erythropolis BD2 wild-type are in accordance with the involvement of the IPB 2,3-dioxygenase in TCE oxidation. PMID:8969521

  19. Microbial Dioxygenase Gene Population Shifts during Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Ní Chadhain, Sinéad M.; Norman, R. Sean; Pesce, Karen V.; Kukor, Jerome J.; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    2006-01-01

    The degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by bacteria has been widely studied. While many pure cultures have been isolated and characterized for their ability to grow on PAHs, limited information is available on the diversity of microbes involved in PAH degradation in the environment. We have designed generic PCR primers targeting the gene fragment encoding the Rieske iron sulfur center common to all PAH dioxygenase enzymes. These Rieske primers were employed to track dioxygenase gene population shifts in soil enrichment cultures following exposure to naphthalene, phenanthrene, or pyrene. PAH degradation was monitored by gas chromatograph with flame ionization detection. DNA was extracted from the enrichment cultures following PAH degradation. 16S rRNA and Rieske gene fragments were PCR amplified from DNA extracted from each enrichment culture and an unamended treatment. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. Molecular monitoring of the enrichment cultures before and after PAH degradation using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene libraries suggests that specific phylotypes of bacteria were associated with the degradation of each PAH. Sequencing of the cloned Rieske gene fragments showed that different suites of genes were present in soil microbe populations under each enrichment culture condition. Many of the Rieske gene fragment sequences fell into clades which are distinct from the reference dioxygenase gene sequences used to design the PCR primers. The ability to profile not only the bacterial community but also the dioxygenases which they encode provides a powerful tool for both assessing bioremediation potential in the environment and for the discovery of novel dioxygenase genes. PMID:16751518

  20. Development of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase-specific primers for monitoring bioremediation by competitive quantitative PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Mesarch, M.B.; Nakatsu, C.H.; Nies, L.

    2000-02-01

    Benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenol, naphthalene, and biphenyl are among a group of compounds that have at least one reported pathway for biodegradation involving catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzymes. Thus, detection of the corresponding catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes can serve as a basis for identifying and quantifying bacteria that have these catabolic abilities. Primes that can successfully amplify a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene fragment from eight different bacteria are described. The identities of the amplicons were confirmed by hybridization with a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase probe. The detection limit was 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} gene copies, which was lowered to 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 1} gene copies of hybridization. Using the dioxygenase-specific primers, an increase in catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes was detected in petroleum-amended soils. The dioxygenase genes were enumerated by competitive quantitative PCR and a 163-bp competitor that was amplified using the same primers. Target and competitor sequences had identical amplification kinetics. Potential PCR inhibitors that could coextract with DNA, nonamplifying DNA, soil factors (humics), and soil pollutants (toluene) did not impact enumeration. Therefore, this technique can be used to accurately and reproducibly quantify catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes in complex environments such as petroleum-contaminated soil. Direct, non-cultivation-based molecular techniques for detecting and enumerating microbial pollutant-biodegrading genes in environmental samples are powerful tools for monitoring bioremediation and developing field evidence in support of natural attenuation.

  1. Molecular Cloning, Nucleotide Sequence, and Expression of Genes Encoding a Polycyclic Aromatic Ring Dioxygenase from Mycobacterium sp. Strain PYR-1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ashraf A.; Wang, Rong-Fu; Cao, Wei-Wen; Doerge, Daniel R.; Wennerstrom, David; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 degrades high-molecular-weight polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAHs) primarily through the introduction of both atoms of molecular oxygen by a dioxygenase. To clone the dioxygenase genes involved in PAH degradation, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis of PAH-induced proteins from cultures of Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 was used to detect proteins that increased after phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, and pyrene exposure. Comparison of proteins from induced and uninduced cultures on 2D gels indicated that at least six major proteins were expressed (105, 81, 52, 50, 43, and 13 kDa). The N-terminal sequence of the 50-kDa protein was similar to those of other dioxygenases. A digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probe designed from this protein sequence was used to screen dioxygenase-positive clones from a genomic library of Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1. Three clones, each containing a 5,288-bp DNA insert with three genes of the dioxygenase system, were obtained. The genes in the DNA insert, from the 5′ to the 3′ direction, were a dehydrogenase, the dioxygenase small (β)-subunit, and the dioxygenase large (α)-subunit genes, arranged in a sequence different from those of genes encoding other bacterial dioxygenase systems. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the large α subunit did not cluster with most of the known α-subunit sequences but rather with three newly described α subunits of dioxygenases from Rhodococcus spp. and Nocardioides spp. The genes from Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 were subcloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with the pBAD/ThioFusion system. The functionality of the genes for PAH degradation was confirmed in a phagemid clone containing all three genes, as well as in plasmid subclones containing the two genes encoding the dioxygenase subunits. PMID:11472934

  2. Probes of the Catalytic Site of Cysteine Dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chai,S.; Bruyere, J.; Maroney, M.

    2006-01-01

    The first major step of cysteine catabolism, the oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, is catalyzed by cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). In the present work, we utilize recombinant rat liver CDO and cysteine derivatives to elucidate structural parameters involved in substrate recognition and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to probe the interaction of the active site iron center with cysteine. Kinetic studies using cysteine structural analogs show that most are inhibitors and that a terminal functional group bearing a negative charge (e.g. a carboxylate) is required for binding. The substrate-binding site has no stringent restrictions with respect to the size of the amino acid. Lack of the amino or carboxyl groups at the a-carbon does not prevent the molecules from interacting with the active site. In fact, cysteamine is shown to be a potent activator of the enzyme without being a substrate. CDO was also rendered inactive upon complexation with the metal-binding inhibitors azide and cyanide. Unlike many non-heme iron dioxygenases that employ a-keto acids as cofactors, CDO was shown to be the only dioxygenase known to be inhibited by {alpha}-ketoglutarate.

  3. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  4. Biochemical Characterization of Inducible 'Reductase' Component of Benzoate Dioxygenase and Phthalate Isomer Dioxygenases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4.

    PubMed

    Karandikar, Rohini; Badri, Abinaya; Phale, Prashant S

    2015-09-01

    The first step involved in the degradation of phthalate isomers (phthalate, isophthalate and terephthalate) is the double hydroxylation by respective aromatic-ring hydroxylating dioxygenases. These are two component enzymes consisting of 'oxygenase' and 'reductase' components. Soil isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4 degrades phthalate isomers via protocatechuate and benzoate via catechol 'ortho' ring cleavage pathway. Metabolic studies suggest that strain PP4 has carbon source-specific inducible phthalate isomer dioxygenase and benzoate dioxygenase. Thus, it was of interest to study the properties of reductase components of these enzymes. Reductase activity from phthalate isomer-grown cells was 3-5-folds higher than benzoate grown cells. In-gel activity staining profile showed a reductase activity band of R f 0.56 for phthalate isomer-grown cells as compared to R f 0.73 from benzoate-grown cells. Partially purified reductase components from phthalate isomer grown cells showed K m in the range of 30-40 μM and V max = 34-48 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). However, reductase from benzoate grown cells showed K m = 49 μM and V max = 10 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). Strikingly similar molecular and kinetic properties of reductase component from phthalate isomer-grown cells suggest that probably the same reductase component is employed in three phthalate isomer dioxygenases. However, reductase component is different, with respect to kinetic properties and zymogram analysis, from benzoate-grown cells when compared to that from phthalate isomer grown cells of PP4. PMID:26201480

  5. Substrate Stereo-specificity in Tryptophan dioxygenase and Indoleamine 2,3- dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Capece, L.; Arrar, M.; Roitberg, A. E.; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Marti, M. A.; Estrin, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    The first and rate-limiting step of the kynurenine pathway, in which tryptophan (Trp) is converted to N-formylkynurenine is catalyzed by two heme-containing proteins, Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). In mammals, TDO is found exclusively in liver tissue, IDO is found ubiquitously in all tissues. IDO has become increasingly popular in pharmaceutical research as it was found to be involved in many physiological situations, including immune escape of cancer. More importantly, small-molecule inhibitors of IDO are currently utilized in cancer therapy. One of the main concerns for the design of human IDO (hIDO) inhibitors is that they should be selective enough to avoid inhibition of TDO. In this work we have used a combination of classical molecular dynamics (MD) and hybrid quantum-classical (QM/MM) methodologies to establish the structural basis that determine the differences in a) the interactions of TDO and IDO with small ligands (CO/O2) and b) the substrate stereo-specificity in hIDO and TDO. Our results indicate that the differences in small ligand bound structures of IDO and TDO arise from slight differences in the structure of the bound substrate complex. The results also show that substrate stereo-specificity of TDO is achieved by the perfect fit of L-Trp, but not D-Trp, which exhibits weaker interactions with the protein matrix-. For hIDO, the presence of multiple stable binding conformations for L/D-Trp reveal the presence of a large and dynamic active site. Taken together, our data allow determination of key interactions useful for the future design of more potent hIDO-selective inhibitors. PMID:20715188

  6. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs). Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry. PMID:24278729

  7. Characterization of a Novel Angular Dioxygenase from Fluorene-Degrading Sphingomonas sp. Strain LB126▿

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, Luc; Ní Chadhain, Sinéad M.; Jouanneau, Yves; Meyer, Christine; Zylstra, Gerben J.; Hols, Pascal; Agathos, Spiros N.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the genes involved in the initial attack on fluorene by Sphingomonas sp. strain LB126 were investigated. The α and β subunits of a dioxygenase complex (FlnA1-FlnA2), showing 63 and 51% sequence identity, respectively, to the subunits of an angular dioxygenase from the gram-positive dibenzofuran degrader Terrabacter sp. strain DBF63, were identified. When overexpressed in Escherichia coli, FlnA1-FlnA2 was responsible for the angular oxidation of fluorene, 9-hydroxyfluorene, 9-fluorenone, dibenzofuran, and dibenzo-p-dioxin. Moreover, FlnA1-FlnA2 was able to oxidize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heteroaromatics, some of which were not oxidized by the dioxygenase from Terrabacter sp. strain DBF63. The quantification of resulting oxidation products showed that fluorene and phenanthrene were the preferred substrates of FlnA1-FlnA2. PMID:18156320

  8. Molecular characterization of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases and the effect of gibberellin, abscisic acid, and sodium chloride on the expression of genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway and carotenoid accumulation in the callus of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Kim, Jae Kwang; Lee, Sanghyun; Chae, Soo Cheon; Park, Sang Un

    2013-06-12

    Three cDNAs encoding carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (SbCCD1, SbCCD4, and SbNCED) were isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis , an important traditional herb in Asia and North America. Amino acid sequence alignments showed that they share high identity and similarity to their orthologs in other plant species. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that SbCCD1 and SbCCD4 were most strongly expressed in flowers, whereas SbNCED was expressed at the highest level in roots. The expression levels of phytoene synthase (SbPSY), phytoene desaturase (SbPDS), ξ-carotene desaturase (SbZDS), β-ring carotene hydroxylase (SbCHXB), zeaxanthin epoxidase (SbZEP), SbCCD1, SbCCD4, and SbNCED in the callus of S. baicalensis varied under different concentrations of gibberellic acid (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA). Under NaCl treatment, expression levels of all genes increased with increasing NaCl concentrations. Except for zeaxanthin, increasing GA3, ABA, and NaCl concentrations caused higher losses in the total carotenoid content. The total carotenoid content substantially decreased with increasing GA3, ABA, and NaCl concentrations, with the biggest reductions observed in the NaCl treatment. The isolation and characterization of SbCCD1, SbCCD4, and SbNCED together with the study on the effect of GA3, ABA, and NaCl on carotenoid biosynthesis will be helpful to elucidate the carotenoid biosynthesis mechanism in S. baicalensis and may set new trends in metabolic engineering of carotenoids in plants. PMID:23683071

  9. Spectroscopic Studies of the Catechol Dioxygenases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Que, Lawrence Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The catechol dioxygenases are bacterial iron-containing enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of catechols. These enzymes serve as a component of nature's mechanisms for degrading aromatic compounds in the environment. The structure and mechanistic aspects of these enzymes are described. (JN)

  10. Oxidative Transformation of Aminodinitrotoluene Isomers by Multicomponent Dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Glenn R.; Smets, Barth F.; Spain, Jim C.

    2001-01-01

    The electron-withdrawing nitro substituents of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) make the aromatic ring highly resistant to oxidative transformation. The typical biological transformation of TNT involves reduction of one or more of the nitro groups of the ring to produce the corresponding amine. Reduction of a single nitro substituent of TNT to an amino substituent increases the electron density of the aromatic nucleus considerably. The comparatively electron-dense nuclei of the aminodinitrotoluene (ADNT) isomers would be expected to be more susceptible to oxygenase attack than TNT. The hypothesis was tested by evaluating three nitroarene dioxygenases for the ability to hydroxylate the ADNT isomers. The predominant reaction was dioxygenation of the ring to yield nitrite and the corresponding aminomethylnitrocatechol. A secondary reaction was benzylic monooxygenation to form aminodinitrobenzyl alcohol. The substrate preferences and catalytic specificities of the three enzymes differed considerably. The discovery that the ADNT isomers are substrates for the nitroarene dioxygenases reveals the potential for extensive bacterial transformation of TNT under aerobic conditions. PMID:11722893

  11. The first step of the dioxygenation reaction carried out by tryptophan dioxygenase and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase as revealed by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical studies

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Luciana; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Di Russo, Natali; Estrin, Dario A.

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO) and indole-amine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) are two heme-containing enzymes which catalyze the conversion of L-tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). In mammals, TDO is mostly expressed in liver and is involved in controlling homeostatic serum tryptophan concentrations, whereas IDO is ubiquitous and is involved in modulating immune responses. Previous studies suggested that the first step of the dioxygenase reaction involves the deprotonation of the indoleamine group of the substrate by an evolutionarily conserved distal histidine residue in TDO and the heme-bound dioxygen in IDO. Here, we used classical molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods to evaluate the base-catalyzed mechanism. Our data suggest that the deprotonation of the indoleamine group of the substrate by either histidine in TDO or heme-bound dioxygen in IDO is not energetically favorable. Instead, the dioxygenase reaction can be initiated by a direct attack of heme-bound dioxygen on the C2=C3 bond of the indole ring, leading to a protein-stabilized 2,3-alkylperoxide transition state and a ferryl epoxide intermediate, which subsequently recombine to generate NFK. The novel sequential two-step oxygen addition mechanism is fully supported by our recent resonance Raman data that allowed identification of the ferryl intermediate (Lewis-Ballester et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106:17371–17376, 2009). The results reveal the subtle differences between the TDO and IDO reactions and highlight the importance of protein matrix in modulating stereoelectronic factors for oxygen activation and the stabilization of both transition and intermediate states. PMID:20361220

  12. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunoregulatory enzyme. Remarkably, we discovered IDO-specific T cells that can influence adaptive immune reactions in patients with cancer. Further, a recent phase I clinical trial demonstrated long-lasting disease stabilization without toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were vaccinated with an IDO-derived HLA-A2-restricted epitope. PMID:25949864

  13. Genetic Analysis of Dioxin Dioxygenase of Sphingomonas sp. Strain RW1: Catabolic Genes Dispersed on the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Armengaud, Jean; Happe, Birgitta; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    1998-01-01

    The dioxin dioxygenase of Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1 activates dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran for further metabolism by introducing two atoms of oxygen at a pair of vicinal carbon atoms, one of which is involved in one of the bridges between the two aromatic rings, i.e., an angular dioxygenation. The dxnA1 and dxnA2 cistrons encoding this dioxygenase have been cloned and shown to be located just upstream of a hydrolase gene which specifies an enzyme involved in the subsequent step of the dibenzofuran biodegradative pathway. Genes encoding the electron supply system of the dioxygenase are not clustered with the dioxygenase gene but rather are located on two other distinct and separate genome segments. Moreover, whereas expression of dxnA1A2 is modulated according to the available carbon source, expression of the dbfB gene encoding the ring cleavage enzyme of the dibenzofuran pathway, which is located in the neighborhood of dxnA1A2 but oriented in the opposite direction, is constitutive. The scattering of genes for the component proteins of dioxin dioxygenase system around the genome of Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1, and the differential expression of dioxin pathway genes, is unusual and contrasts with the typical genetic organization of catabolic pathways where component cistrons tend to be clustered in multicistronic transcriptional units. The sequences of the α and β subunits of the dioxin dioxygenase exhibit only weak similarity to other three component dioxygenases, but some motifs such as the Fe(II) binding site and the [2Fe-2S] cluster ligands are conserved. Dioxin dioxygenase activity in Escherichia coli cells containing the cloned dxnA1A2 gene was achieved only through coexpression of the cognate electron supply system from RW1. Under these conditions, exclusively angular dioxygenation of dibenzofuran and dibenzo-p-dioxin was obtained. The dioxin dioxygenase was not active in E. coli cells coexpressing a class IIB electron supply system. In the course of

  14. Antitumour agents as inhibitors of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Pantouris, Georgios; Mowat, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) in cancer biology has recently been described, with the enzyme playing an immunomodulatory role, suppressing antitumour immune responses and promoting tumour cell survival and proliferation. This finding reinforces the need for specific inhibitors of TDO that may potentially be developed for therapeutic use. In this work we have screened ~2800 compounds from the library of the National Cancer Institute USA and identified seven potent inhibitors of TDO with inhibition constants in the nanomolar or low micromolar range. All seven have antitumour properties, killing various cancer cell lines. For comparison, the inhibition potencies of these compounds were tested against IDO and their inhibition constants are reported. Interestingly, this work reveals that NSC 36398 (dihydroquercetin, taxifolin), with an in vitro inhibition constant of ~16 μM, is the first TDO-selective inhibitor reported. PMID:24269239

  15. Thiol Dioxygenases: Unique Families of Cupin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, C. R.; Karplus, P. A.; Dominy, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins in the cupin superfamily have a wide range of biological functions in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. Although proteins in the cupin superfamily show very low overall sequence similarity, they all contain two short but partially conserved cupin sequence motifs separated by a less conserved intermotif region that varies both in length and amino acid sequence. Furthermore, these proteins all share a common architecture described as a 6-stranded β-barrel core, and this canonical cupin or “jelly roll” β-barrel is formed with cupin motif 1, the intermotif region, and cupin motif 2 each forming two of the core six β-strands in the folded protein structure. The recently obtained crystal structures of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO), with contains conserved cupin motifs, show that it has the predicted canonical cupin β-barrel fold. Although there had been no reports of CDO activity in prokaryotes, we identified a number of bacterial cupin proteins of unknown function that share low similarity with mammalian CDO and that conserve many residues in the active site pocket of CDO. Putative bacterial CDOs predicted to have CDO activity were shown to have similar substrate specificity and kinetic parameters as eukaryotic CDOs. Information gleaned from crystal structures of mammalian CDO along with sequence information for homologs shown to have CDO activity facilitated the identification of a CDO family fingerprint motif. One key feature of the CDO fingerprint motif is that the canonical metal-binding glutamate residue in cupin motif 1 is replaced by a cysteine (in mammalian CDOs) or by a glycine (bacterial CDOs). The recent report that some putative bacterial CDO homologs are actually 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases suggests that the CDO family may include proteins with specificities for other thiol substrates. A paralog of CDO in mammals was also identified and shown to be the other mammalian thiol dioxygenase, cysteamine dioxygenase (ADO). A tentative

  16. The "Gln-Type" Thiol Dioxygenase from Azotobacter vinelandii is a 3-Mercaptopropionic Acid Dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brad S; Subedi, Bishnu P; Sardar, Sinjinee; Crowell, Joshua K

    2015-12-29

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes the O2-dependent oxidation of l-cysteine to produce cysteinesulfinic acid. Bacterial CDOs have been subdivided as either "Arg-type" or "Gln-type" on the basis of the identity of conserved active site residues. To date, "Gln-type" enzymes remain largely uncharacterized. It was recently noted that the "Gln-type" enzymes are more homologous with another thiol dioxygenase [3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase (MDO)] identified in Variovorax paradoxus, suggesting that enzymes of the "Gln-type" subclass are in fact MDOs. In this work, a putative "Gln-type" thiol dioxygenase from Azotobacter vinelandii (Av) was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Steady-state assays were performed using three substrates [3-mercaptopropionic acid (3mpa), l-cysteine (cys), and cysteamine (ca)]. Despite comparable maximal velocities, the "Gln-type" Av enzyme exhibited a specificity for 3mpa (kcat/KM = 72000 M(-1) s(-1)) nearly 2 orders of magnitude greater than those for cys (110 M(-1) s(-1)) and ca (11 M(-1) s(-1)). Supporting X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies were performed using nitric oxide (NO) as a surrogate for O2 binding to confirm obligate-ordered addition of substrate prior to NO. Stoichimetric addition of NO to solutions of 3mpa-bound enzyme quantitatively yields an iron-nitrosyl species (Av ES-NO) with EPR features consistent with a mononuclear (S = (3)/2) {FeNO}(7) site. Conversely, two distinct substrate-bound conformations were observed in Av ES-NO samples prepared with cys and ca, suggesting heterogeneous binding within the enzymatic active site. Analytical EPR simulations are provided to establish the relative binding affinity for each substrate (3map > cys > ca). Both kinetic and spectroscopic results presented here are consistent with 3mpa being the preferred substrate for this enzyme. PMID:26624219

  17. Crystal structure of 2-nitropropane dioxygenase complexed with FMN and substrate. Identification of the catalytic base.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jun Yong; Min, Ji Young; Lee, Su Kyung; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Do Jin; Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Lee, Hyung Ho; Kim, Hye Kyung; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Suh, Se Won

    2006-07-01

    Nitroalkane compounds are widely used in chemical industry and are also produced by microorganisms and plants. Some nitroalkanes have been demonstrated to be carcinogenic, and enzymatic oxidation of nitroalkanes is of considerable interest. 2-Nitropropane dioxygenases from Neurospora crassa and Williopsis mrakii (Hansenula mrakii), members of one family of the nitroalkane-oxidizing enzymes, contain FMN and FAD, respectively. The enzymatic oxidation of nitroalkanes by 2-nitropropane dioxygenase operates by an oxidase-style catalytic mechanism, which was recently shown to involve the formation of an anionic flavin semiquinone. This represents a unique case in which an anionic flavin semiquinone has been experimentally observed in the catalytic pathway for oxidation catalyzed by a flavin-dependent enzyme. Here we report the first crystal structure of 2-nitropropane dioxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in two forms: a binary complex with FMN and a ternary complex with both FMN and 2-nitropropane. The structure identifies His(152) as the proposed catalytic base, thus providing a structural framework for a better understanding of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:16682407

  18. Sll0254 (CrtLdiox) Is a Bifunctional Lycopene Cyclase/Dioxygenase in Cyanobacteria Producing Myxoxanthophyll

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hatem E.; Vermaas, Wim F. J.

    2006-01-01

    Upon depletion of Sll0254 in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, cyclized carotenoids were replaced by linear, relatively hydrophilic carotenoids, and the amount of the two photosystems decreased greatly. Full segregants of the sll0254 deletion in Synechocystis were not obtained, implying that this gene is essential for survival, most likely to allow normal cell division. The N-terminal half of Sll0254 has limited similarity to the family of lycopene cyclases, has an additional dehydrogenase motif near the N terminus, and is followed by a Rieske 2Fe-2S center sequence signature. To test whether Sll0254 serves as a lycopene cyclase in Synechocystis, the corresponding gene was expressed in Escherichia coli strains that can produce lycopene or neurosporene. In the presence of Sll0254 these linear carotenoids were converted into cyclized, relatively hydrophilic pigments, with masses consistent with the introduction of two hydroxyl groups and with spectra indicative of only small changes in the number of conjugated double bonds. This suggests that Sll0254 catalyzes formation of oxygenated, cyclized carotenoids. We interpret the appearance of the hydroxyl groups in the carotenoids to be due to dioxygenase activity involving the Rieske 2Fe-2S center and the additional dehydrogenase domain. This dioxygenase activity is required in the myxoxanthophyll biosynthesis pathway, after or concomitant with cyclization on the other end of the molecule. We interpret Sll0254 to be a dual-function enzyme with both lycopene cyclase and dioxygenase activity and have named it CrtLdiox. PMID:16621828

  19. Purification and characterization of hydroquinone dioxygenase from Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hydroquinone-1,2-dioxygenase, an enzyme involved in the degradation of alkylphenols in Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3 was purified to apparent homogeneity. The extradiol dioxygenase catalyzed the ring fission of hydroquinone to 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde and the degradation of chlorinated and several alkylated hydroquinones. The activity of 1 mg of the purified enzyme with unsubstituted hydroquinone was 6.1 μmol per minute, the apparent Km 2.2 μM. ICP-MS analysis revealed an iron content of 1.4 moles per mole enzyme. The enzyme lost activity upon exposure to oxygen, but could be reactivated by Fe(II) in presence of ascorbate. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified enzyme yielded two bands of an apparent size of 38 kDa and 19 kDa, respectively. Data from MALDI-TOF analyses of peptides of the respective bands matched with the deduced amino acid sequences of two neighboring open reading frames found in genomic DNA of Sphingomonas sp strain TTNP3. The deduced amino acid sequences showed 62% and 47% identity to the large and small subunit of hydroquinone dioxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens strain ACB, respectively. This heterotetrameric enzyme is the first of its kind found in a strain of the genus Sphingomonas sensu latu. PMID:21906340

  20. Identification of metabolites from phenanthrene oxidation by phenoloxidases and dioxygenases of Polyporus sp. S133.

    PubMed

    Hadibarata, Tony; Tachibana, Sanro; Askari, Muhamad

    2011-03-01

    Phenanthrene degradation by Polyporus sp. S133, a new phenanthrene-degrading strain, was investigated in this work. The analysis of degradation was performed by calculation of the remaining phenanthrene by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. When cells were grown in phenanthrene culture after 92 h, all but 200 and 250 mg/l of the phenanthrene had been degraded. New metabolic pathways of phenanthrene and a better understanding of the phenoloxidases and dioxygenase mechanism involved in degradation of phenanthrene were explored in this research. The mechanism of degradation was determined through identification of the several metabolites; 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, 2,2'-diphenic acid, salicylic acid, and catechol. 9,10-Oxidation and ring cleavage to give 9,10-phenanthrenequinone is the major fate of phenanthrene in ligninolytic Polyporus sp. S133. The identification of 2,2'-diphenic acid in culture extracts indicates that phenanthrene was initially attacked through dioxigenation at C9 and C10 to give cis-9,10-dihydrodiol. Dehydrogenation of phenanthrene-cis-9,10-dihydrodiol to produce the corresponding diol, followed by ortho-cleavage of the oxygenated ring, produced 2,2'-diphenic acid. Several enzymes (manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, laccase, 1,2-dioxygenase, and 2,3-dioxygenase) produced by Polyporus sp. S133 was detected during the incubation. The highest level of activity was shown at 92 h of culture. PMID:21464602

  1. Novel flavonol 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenase: affinity purification, characterization, and kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, D; Ibrahim, R K

    2000-10-15

    A 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase [EC 1.14.11-] that catalyzes the 6-hydroxylation of partially methylated flavonols has been purified to near homogeneity from Chrysosplenium americanum. Enzyme purification was achieved by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superose 12 and Mono Q columns as well as by affinity chromatography on 2-oxoglutarate-Sepharose and immunoaffinity columns. The specific activity of the 6-hydroxylase eluted from Mono Q (97.1 pkat/mg) was enriched 538-fold, with a 0.63% recovery. Both affinity chromatography steps resulted in the elimination of most contaminating proteins, but not without loss of enzyme activity and stability. The molecular mass of both the native and denatured enzyme was found to be 42 and 45 kDa, respectively, suggesting a monomeric protein. The enzyme exhibits strict specificity for position 6 of partially methylated flavonols possessing a 7-methoxyl group, indicating its involvement in the biosynthesis of polymethylated flavonols in this plant. The cofactor dependence of the enzyme is similar to that of other plant dioxygenases, particularly its dependence on ferrous ions for catalytic activity and reactivation. Internal amino acid sequence information indicated its relatedness to other plant flavonoid dioxygenases. The results of substrate interaction kinetics and product inhibition studies suggest an ordered, sequential reaction mechanism (TerTer), where 2-oxoglutarate is the first substrate to bind, followed by O2 and the flavonol substrate. Product release occurs in the reverse order where the hydroxylated flavonol is the first to be released, followed by CO2 and succinate. To our knowledge, this is the first reported 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase that catalyzes the aromatic hydroxylation of a flavonoid compound. PMID:11068865

  2. Mechanism and Substrate Recognition of 2-Hydroxyethylphosphonate Dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, Spencer C.; Cooke, Heather A.; Cicchillo, Robert M.; Malova, Petra; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich; Nair, Satish K.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2011-09-20

    HEPD belongs to the superfamily of 2-His-1-carboxylate non-heme iron-dependent dioxygenases. It converts 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (2-HEP) to hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP) and formate. Previously postulated mechanisms for the reaction catalyzed by HEPD cannot explain its conversion of 1-HEP to acetylphosphate. Alternative mechanisms that involve either phosphite or methylphosphonate as intermediates, which potentially explain all experimental studies including isotope labeling experiments and use of substrate analogues, were investigated. The results of these studies reveal that these alternative mechanisms are not correct. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of Lys16, Arg90, and Tyr98 support roles of these residues in binding of 2-HEP. Mutation of Lys16 to Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme, whereas mutation of Arg90 to Ala or Tyr98 to Phe greatly decreased k{sub cat}/K{sub m,2-HEP}. Furthermore, the latter mutants could not be saturated in O{sub 2}. These results suggest that proper binding of 2-HEP is important for O{sub 2} activation and that the enzyme uses a compulsory binding order with 2-HEP binding before O{sub 2}. The Y98F mutant produces methylphosphonate as a minor side product providing indirect support for the proposal that the last step during catalysis involves a ferric hydroxide reacting with a methylphosphonate radical.

  3. Engineering dioxygenases for efficient degradation of environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, K

    2000-06-01

    Dioxygenases have recently been engineered to improve their capabilities for environmental pollutant degradation. The techniques used to achieve this include in vitro DNA shuffling and subunit or domain exchanges between dioxygenases of different bacterial origins. Such evolved enzymes acquire novel and enhanced degradation capabilities of xenobiotic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, trichloroethylene and a variety of aromatic compounds. Hybrid strains in which the evolved genes are integrated into the chromosomal operons exhibit efficient degradation of xenobiotic chlorinated compounds. PMID:10851151

  4. Similarities between the antABC-Encoded Anthranilate Dioxygenase and the benABC-Encoded Benzoate Dioxygenase of Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, Becky M.; Campbell, Alan L.; Neidle, Ellen L.

    1998-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 can use benzoate or anthranilate as a sole carbon source. These structurally similar compounds are independently converted to catechol, allowing further degradation to proceed via the β-ketoadipate pathway. In this study, the first step in anthranilate catabolism was characterized. A mutant unable to grow on anthranilate, ACN26, was selected. The sequence of a wild-type DNA fragment that restored growth revealed the antABC genes, encoding 54-, 19-, and 39-kDa proteins, respectively. The deduced AntABC sequences were homologous to those of class IB multicomponent aromatic ring-dihydroxylating enzymes, including the dioxygenase that initiates benzoate catabolism. Expression of antABC in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that normally does not degrade anthranilate, enabled the conversion of anthranilate to catechol. Unlike benzoate dioxygenase (BenABC), anthranilate dioxygenase (AntABC) catalyzed catechol formation without requiring a dehydrogenase. In Acinetobacter mutants, benC substituted for antC during growth on anthranilate, suggesting relatively broad substrate specificity of the BenC reductase, which transfers electrons from NADH to the terminal oxygenase. In contrast, the benAB genes did not substitute for antAB. An antA point mutation in ACN26 prevented anthranilate degradation, and this mutation was independent of a mucK mutation in the same strain that prevented exogenous muconate degradation. Anthranilate induced expression of antA, although no associated transcriptional regulators were identified. Disruption of three open reading frames in the immediate vicinity of antABC did not prevent the use of anthranilate as a sole carbon source. The antABC genes were mapped on the ADP1 chromosome and were not linked to the two known supraoperonic gene clusters involved in aromatic compound degradation. PMID:9721284

  5. Antitumour agents as inhibitors of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Pantouris, Georgios; Mowat, Christopher G.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •∼2800 National Cancer Institute USA compounds have been screened as potential inhibitors of TDO and/or IDO. •Seven compounds with anti-tumour properties have been identified as potent inhibitors. •NSC 36398 (taxifolin, dihydroquercetin) is selective for TDO with a K{sub i} of 16 M. •This may help further our understanding of the role of TDO in cancer. -- Abstract: The involvement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) in cancer biology has recently been described, with the enzyme playing an immunomodulatory role, suppressing antitumour immune responses and promoting tumour cell survival and proliferation. This finding reinforces the need for specific inhibitors of TDO that may potentially be developed for therapeutic use. In this work we have screened ∼2800 compounds from the library of the National Cancer Institute USA and identified seven potent inhibitors of TDO with inhibition constants in the nanomolar or low micromolar range. All seven have antitumour properties, killing various cancer cell lines. For comparison, the inhibition potencies of these compounds were tested against IDO and their inhibition constants are reported. Interestingly, this work reveals that NSC 36398 (dihydroquercetin, taxifolin), with an in vitro inhibition constant of ∼16 μM, is the first TDO-selective inhibitor reported.

  6. Measurement of Cysteine Dioxygenase Activity and Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Stipanuk, Martha H.; Dominy, John E.; Ueki, Iori; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is an iron (Fe2+)-dependent thiol dioxygenase that uses molecular oxygen to oxidize the sulfhydryl group of cysteine to generate 3-sulfinoalanine (commonly called cysteinesulfinic acid). Cysteine dioxygenase activity is routinely assayed by measuring cysteinesulfinate formation from substrate L-cysteine at pH 6.1 in the presence of ferrous ions to saturate the enzyme with metal cofactor, a copper chelator to diminish substrate oxidation, and hydroxylamine to inhibit pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent degradation of product. The amount of cysteine dioxygenase may be measured by immunoblotting. Upon SDS-PAGE, cysteine dioxygenase can be separated into two major bands, with the upper band representing the 23-kDa protein and the lower band representing the mature enzyme that has undergone formation of an internal thioether cross link in the active site. Formation of this cross link is dependent upon the catalytic turnover of substrate and produces an enzyme with a higher catalytic efficiency and catalytic half-life. PMID:19885389

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the 2,4′-dihydroxyaceto­phenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP

    PubMed Central

    Beaven, G.; Bowyer, A.; Erskine, P.; Wood, S. P.; McCoy, A.; Coates, L.; Keegan, R.; Lebedev, A.; Hopper, D. J.; Kaderbhai, M. A.; Cooper, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (or DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C—C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits each containing nonhaem iron and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. By the use of limited chymotrypsinolysis, the DAD enzyme from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP has been crystallized in a form that diffracts synchrotron radiation to a resolution of 2.2 Å. PMID:24915102

  8. Expression Pattern and Clinicopathological Relevance of the Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase 1/Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase Protein in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Cancer cells use the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) pathway to suppress the host's immune response in order to facilitate survival, growth, invasion, and metastasis of malignant cells. Higher IDO1 expression was shown to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and to be correlated with impaired clinical outcome. However, the potential correlation between the expression of IDO1 in a CRC population with a low mutation rate of the APC gene remains unknown. Material and Methods. Tissues and blood samples were collected from 192 CRC patients. The expressions of IDO1, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO2), and beta-catenin proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Microsatellite instability (MSI) was determined by PCR amplification of microsatellite loci. Results. The results showed that high IDO1 or TDO2 protein expression was associated with characteristics of more aggressive phenotypes of CRC. For the first time, they also revealed a positive correlation between the abnormal expression of beta-catenin and IDO1 or TDO2 proteins in a CRC population with a low mutation rate of APC. Conclusion. We concluded that an IDO1-regulated molecular pathway led to abnormal expression of beta-catenin in the nucleus/cytoplasm of CRC patients with low mutation rate of APC, making IDO1 an interesting target for immunotherapy in CRC. PMID:27578919

  9. Expression Pattern and Clinicopathological Relevance of the Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase 1/Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase Protein in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Chien; Lee, Kuen-Haur; Hsu, Ying-Hua; Wang, Wei-Ran; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Cheng, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Cancer cells use the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) pathway to suppress the host's immune response in order to facilitate survival, growth, invasion, and metastasis of malignant cells. Higher IDO1 expression was shown to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and to be correlated with impaired clinical outcome. However, the potential correlation between the expression of IDO1 in a CRC population with a low mutation rate of the APC gene remains unknown. Material and Methods. Tissues and blood samples were collected from 192 CRC patients. The expressions of IDO1, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO2), and beta-catenin proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Microsatellite instability (MSI) was determined by PCR amplification of microsatellite loci. Results. The results showed that high IDO1 or TDO2 protein expression was associated with characteristics of more aggressive phenotypes of CRC. For the first time, they also revealed a positive correlation between the abnormal expression of beta-catenin and IDO1 or TDO2 proteins in a CRC population with a low mutation rate of APC. Conclusion. We concluded that an IDO1-regulated molecular pathway led to abnormal expression of beta-catenin in the nucleus/cytoplasm of CRC patients with low mutation rate of APC, making IDO1 an interesting target for immunotherapy in CRC. PMID:27578919

  10. Gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase from Haloferax sp. D1227.

    PubMed

    Fu, W; Oriel, P

    1998-11-01

    Gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase from the extreme halophile Haloferax sp. D1227 (Hf. D1227) was purified using a three-step procedure. The enzyme was found to be a homotetramer of 42,000 +/- 1,000 Da subunits, with a native molecular weight of 174,000 +/- 6,000 Da. The optimal salt concentration, temperature, and pH for enzyme activity were 2 M KCl or NaCl, 45 degrees C, and pH 7.2, respectively. The gene encoding Hf. D1227 gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Haloferax volcanii. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited a 9.2% excess acidic over basic amino acids typical of halophilic enzymes. Four novel histidine clusters and a possible extradiol dioxygenase fingerprint region were identified. PMID:9827334

  11. Mercaptosuccinate Dioxygenase, a Cysteine Dioxygenase Homologue, from Variovorax paradoxus Strain B4 Is the Key Enzyme of Mercaptosuccinate Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Ulrike; Schürmann, Marc; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The versatile thiol mercaptosuccinate has a wide range of applications, e.g. in quantum dot research or in bioimaging. Its metabolism is investigated in Variovorax paradoxus strain B4, which can utilize this compound as the sole source of carbon and sulfur. Proteomic studies of strain B4 resulted in the identification of a putative mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase, a cysteine dioxygenase homologue, possibly representing the key enzyme in the degradation of mercaptosuccinate. Therefore, the putative mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase was heterologously expressed, purified, and characterized in this study. The results clearly demonstrated that the enzyme utilizes mercaptosuccinate with concomitant consumption of oxygen. Thus, the enzyme is designated as mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase. Succinate and sulfite were verified as the final reaction products. The enzyme showed an apparent Km of 0.4 mm, and a specific activity (Vmax) of 20.0 μmol min−1 mg−1 corresponding to a kcat of 7.7 s−1. Furthermore, the enzyme was highly specific for mercaptosuccinate, no activity was observed with cysteine, dithiothreitol, 2-mercaptoethanol, and 3-mercaptopropionate. These structurally related thiols did not have an inhibitory effect either. Fe(II) could clearly be identified as metal cofactor of the mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase with a content of 0.6 mol of Fe(II)/mol of enzyme. The recently proposed hypothesis for the degradation pathway of mercaptosuccinate based on proteome analyses could be strengthened in the present study. (i) Mercaptosuccinate is first converted to sulfinosuccinate by this mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase; (ii) sulfinosuccinate is spontaneously desulfinated to succinate and sulfite; and (iii) whereas succinate enters the central metabolism, sulfite is detoxified by the previously identified putative molybdopterin oxidoreductase. PMID:25228698

  12. Structure of the 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, R.; Lebedev, A.; Erskine, P.; Guo, J.; Wood, S. P.; Hopper, D. J.; Rigby, S. E. J.; Cooper, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C—C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits, each containing nonhaem iron, and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. In this paper, the first X-ray structure of a DAD enzyme from the Gram-negative bacterium Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP is reported, at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The structure establishes that the enzyme adopts a cupin fold, forming dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. The catalytic iron is coordinated by three histidine residues (76, 78 and 114) within a buried active-site cavity. The iron also appears to be tightly coordinated by an additional ligand which was putatively assigned as a carbonate dianion since this fits the electron density optimally, although it might also be the product formate. The modelled carbonate is located in a position which is highly likely to be occupied by the α-hydroxyketone group of the bound substrate during catalysis. Modelling of a substrate molecule in this position indicates that it will interact with many conserved amino acids in the predominantly hydrophobic active-site pocket where it undergoes peroxide radical-mediated heterolysis. PMID:25195757

  13. Chemistry of the catalytic conversion of phthalate into its cis-dihydrodiol during the reaction of oxygen with the reduced form of phthalate dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Tarasev, Michael; Ballou, David P

    2005-04-26

    The phthalate dioxygenase system, a Rieske non-heme iron dioxygenase, catalyzes the dihydroxylation of phthalate to form the 4,5-dihydro-cis-dihydrodiol of phthalate (DHD). It has two components: phthalate dioxygenase (PDO), a multimer with one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] and one mononuclear Fe(II) center per monomer, and a reductase (PDR) that contains flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and a plant-type ferredoxin [2Fe-2S] center. This work shows that product formation in steady-state reactions is tightly coupled to electron delivery, with 1 dihydrodiol (DHD) of phthalate formed for every 2 electrons delivered from NADH. However, in reactions of reduced PDO with O(2), only about 0.5 DHD is formed per Rieske center that becomes oxidized. Although the product forms rapidly, its release from PDO is slow in these reactions with oxygen that do not include reductase and NADH. EPR data show that, at the completion of the oxidation, iron in the mononuclear center remains in the ferrous state. In contrast, naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) [Wolfe, M. D., Parales, J. V., Gibson, D. T., and Lipscomb, J. D. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 1945-1953] and benzoate dioxygenase (BZDO) [Wolfe, M. D., Altier, D. J., Stubna, A., Popescu, C. V., Munck, E., and Lipscomb, J. D. (2002) Biochemistry, 41, 9611-9626], related Rieske non-heme iron dioxygenases, form 1 DHD per Rieske center oxidized, and the mononuclear center iron ends up ferric. Thus, both electrons from reduced NDO and BZDO monomers are used to form the product, whereas only the reduced Rieske centers in PDO become oxidized during production of DHD. This emphasizes the importance of PDO subunit interaction in catalysis. Electron redistribution was practically unaffected by the presence of oxidized PDR. A scheme is presented that emphasizes some of the differences in the mechanisms involved in substrate hydroxylation employed by PDO and either NDO or BZDO. PMID:15835907

  14. The Reaumuria trigyna leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (RtLDOX) gene complements anthocyanidin synthesis and increases the salt tolerance potential of a transgenic Arabidopsis LDOX mutant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huirong; Du, Chao; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jia; Zheng, Linlin; Wang, Yingchun

    2016-09-01

    Reaumuria trigyna is a typical, native desert halophyte that grows under extreme conditions in Inner Mongolia. In a previous transcriptomic profiling analysis, flavonoid pathway-related genes in R. trigyna showed significant differences in transcript abundance under salt stress. Leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (LDOX, EC 1.14.11.19) is one of three dioxygenases in the flavonoid pathway that catalyzes the formation of anthocyanidins from leucoanthocyanidins. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of R. trigyna LDOX (RtLDOX), and found RtLDOX recombinant protein was able to replace flavanone-3-hydroxylase (F3H, EC 1.14.11.9), another dioxygenase in the flavonoid pathway, to convert naringenin to dihydrokaempferol in vitro. R. trigyna LDOX can complement the Arabidopsis LDOX mutant transparent testa11 (tt11-11), which has reduced proanthocyanin (PA) and anthocyanin levels in seeds, to accumulate these two compounds. Thus, RtLDOX acts as a multifunctional dioxygenase to effect the synthesis of PA and anthocyanins and can perform F3H dioxygenase activities in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The RtLDOX promoter harbored many cis-acting elements that might be recognized and bound by transcription factors related to stress response. RtLDOX expression was strongly increased under salt stress, and RtLDOX transgenic Arabidopsis mutant under NaCl stress accumulated the content of flavonoids leading to an increased antioxidant activities and plant biomass. These results suggest that RtLDOX as a multifunctional dioxygenase in flavonoid biosynthesis involves in enhancing plant response to NaCl stress. PMID:27219053

  15. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 (IDO2) and the kynurenine pathway: characteristics and potential roles in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Fatokun, Amos A; Hunt, Nicholas H; Ball, Helen J

    2013-12-01

    The kynurenine pathway is the major route for the oxidative degradation of the amino acid tryptophan. Activity of the pathway is involved in several disease conditions, both in the periphery and the central nervous system, including cancer, inflammatory disorders, neurological conditions, psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Three enzymes are now known to catalyze the first and rate-limiting step in the catabolism of tryptophan along this pathway: tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, subsequently named IDO1), both of which have been extensively studied, and a third enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 (IDO2), a relative newcomer to the kynurenine pathway field. The adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent, 1-methyl-D-tryptophan, was intially suggested to target IDO2, implying involvement of IDO2 in tumorigenesis. Subsequently this compound has been suggested to have alternative actions and the physiological and pathophysiological roles of IDO2 are unclear. Targeted genetic interventions and selective inhibitors provide approaches for investigating the biology of IDO2. This review focuses on the current knowledge of IDO2 biology and discusses tools that will assist in further characterizing the enzymes of the kynurenine pathway. PMID:24105077

  16. Hydroquinone Dioxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB: a Novel Member of the Family of Nonheme-Iron(II)-Dependent Dioxygenases▿

    PubMed Central

    Moonen, Mariëlle J. H.; Synowsky, Silvia A.; van den Berg, Willy A. M.; Westphal, Adrie H.; Heck, Albert J. R.; van den Heuvel, Robert H. H.; Fraaije, Marco W.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Hydroquinone 1,2-dioxygenase (HQDO), an enzyme involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxyacetophenone in Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB, was purified to apparent homogeneity. Ligandation with 4-hydroxybenzoate prevented the enzyme from irreversible inactivation. HQDO was activated by iron(II) ions and catalyzed the ring fission of a wide range of hydroquinones to the corresponding 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehydes. HQDO was inactivated by 2,2′-dipyridyl, o-phenanthroline, and hydrogen peroxide and inhibited by phenolic compounds. The inhibition with 4-hydroxybenzoate (Ki = 14 μM) was competitive with hydroquinone. Online size-exclusion chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that HQDO is an α2β2 heterotetramer of 112.4 kDa, which is composed of an α-subunit of 17.8 kDa and a β-subunit of 38.3 kDa. Each β-subunit binds one molecule of 4-hydroxybenzoate and one iron(II) ion. N-terminal sequencing and peptide mapping and sequencing based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization—two-stage time of flight analysis established that the HQDO subunits are encoded by neighboring open reading frames (hapC and hapD) of a gene cluster, implicated to be involved in 4-hydroxyacetophenone degradation. HQDO is a novel member of the family of nonheme-iron(II)-dependent dioxygenases. The enzyme shows insignificant sequence identity with known dioxygenases. PMID:18502867

  17. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Nitroaromatic Contaminant Transformations by Nitroarene Dioxygenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Sarah G.; Kohler, Hans-Peter E.; Hofstetter, Thomas B.

    2014-05-01

    Dioxygenation is an important biochemical reaction that often initiates the mineralization of recalcitrant organic contaminants such as nitroaromatic explosives, chlorinated benzenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. However, to assess the extent of dioxygenation in contaminated environments is difficult because of competing transformation processes and further reactions of the dioxygenation products. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers a new approach to reliably quantify biodegradation initiated by dioxygenation based on changes in stable isotope ratios of the pollutant. For CSIA it is essential to know the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) pertinent to the dioxygenation mechanism of organic contaminants. Unfortunately, the range of KIEs of such reactions is poorly constrained although many dioxygenase enzymes with a broad substrate specificity have been reported. Dioxygenase enzymes usually exhibit complex reaction kinetics involving multiple substrates and substrate-specific binding modes which makes the determination of KIEs challenging. The goal of this study was to explore the magnitude and variability of 13C-, 2H-, and 15N-KIEs for the dioxygenation of one contaminant class, that is nitroaromatic contaminants (NACs). To this end, we investigated the C, H, and N isotope fractionation during the dioxygenation of nitrobenzene (NB), 2-nitrotoluene (2-NT), and 3-nitrotoluene (3-NT) by pure cultures, E. coli clones, cell extracts, and purified enzymes. From isotope fractionations measured in the substrates and reaction products, we determined dioxygenation KIEs for different combinations of the three substrates with nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) and 2-nitrotoluene dioxygenase (2NTDO). The 13C-, 2H-, and 15N-KIEs for the dioxygenation of NB by NBDO were consistent for all experimental systems considered (i.e., Comamonas sp. Strain JS765, E. coli clones, cell extracts of E. coli clones, and purified NBDO). This observation suggests that the isotope

  18. Structure of the 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP

    SciTech Connect

    Keegan, R.; Lebedev, A.; Erskine, P.; Guo, J.; Wood, S. P.; Hopper, D. J.; Rigby, S. E. J.; Cooper, J. B.

    2014-09-01

    The first X-ray structure of a 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP at a resolution of 2.2 Å is reported. This structure establishes that the enzyme adopts the cupin-fold, forming compact dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. Each monomer possesses a catalytic ferrous iron that is coordinated by three histidines (76, 78 and 114) and an additional ligand which has been putatively assigned as a carbonate, although formate and acetate are possibilities. The enzyme 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C—C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits, each containing nonhaem iron, and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. In this paper, the first X-ray structure of a DAD enzyme from the Gram-negative bacterium Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP is reported, at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The structure establishes that the enzyme adopts a cupin fold, forming dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. The catalytic iron is coordinated by three histidine residues (76, 78 and 114) within a buried active-site cavity. The iron also appears to be tightly coordinated by an additional ligand which was putatively assigned as a carbonate dianion since this fits the electron density optimally, although it might also be the product formate. The modelled carbonate is located in a position which is highly likely to be occupied by the α-hydroxyketone group of the bound substrate during catalysis. Modelling of a substrate molecule in this position indicates that it will interact with many conserved amino acids in

  19. Engineering nitric oxide synthase chimeras to function as NO dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Binder, Katherine; Sharma, Manisha; Wei, Chin-Chuan; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) catalyze a two-step oxidation of l-arginine to form nitric oxide (NO) and l-citrulline. NOS contains a N-terminal oxygenase domain (NOSoxy) that is the site of NO synthesis, and a C-terminal reductase domain (NOSred) that binds nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and provides electrons to the NOSoxy heme during catalysis. The three NOS isoforms in mammals inducible NOS (iNOS), neuronal NOS (nNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS) share high structural similarity but differ in NO release rates and catalytic properties due to differences in enzyme kinetic parameters. These parameters must be balanced for NOS enzymes to release NO, rather than consume it in a competing, inherent NO dioxygenase reaction. To improve understanding, we drew on a global catalytic model and previous findings to design three NOS chimeras that may predominantly function as NO dioxygenases: iNOSoxy/nNOSred (Wild type (WT) chimera), V346I iNOSoxy/nNOSred (V346I chimera) and iNOSoxy/S1412D nNOSred (S1412D chimera). The WT and S1412D chimeras had higher NO release than the parent iNOS, while the V346I chimera exhibited much lower NO release, consistent with expectations. Measurements indicated that a greater NO dioxygenase activity was achieved, particularly in the V346I chimera, which dioxygenated an estimated two to four NO per NO that it released, while the other chimeras had nearly equivalent NO dioxygenase and NO release activities. Computer simulations of the global catalytic model using the measured kinetic parameters produced results that mimicked the measured outcomes, and this provided further insights on the catalytic behaviors of the chimeras and basis of their increased NO dioxygenase activities. PMID:27013266

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase from Arthrobacter nitroguajacolicus Rü61a: a cofactor-devoid dioxygenase of the α/β-hydrolase-fold superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Roberto A.; Frerichs-Deeken, Ursula; Fetzner, Susanne

    2007-05-01

    Preliminary crystallographic data are reported for 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase (HOD) from A. nitroguajacolicus Rü61a. 1H-3-Hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase (HOD) is a cofactor-devoid dioxygenase that is involved in the anthranilate pathway of quinaldine degradation. HOD has been proposed to belong to the α/β-hydrolase-fold superfamily of enzymes. N-terminally His{sub 6}-tagged HOD has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using sodium/potassium tartrate as a precipitant and CuCl{sub 2} as an additive. The structure was solved by the single anomalous dispersion (SAD) technique using data collected to 3.5 Å resolution at the Cu absorption peak wavelength. The crystals belong to the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 153.788, c = 120.872 Å.

  1. The Role of 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase in Enhancement of Solid-Phase Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, Charles E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Lowy, Daniel A.; Poppy, Tara E.; Maloney, Andrea; Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    2009-05-01

    ABSTRACT - While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane associated c-type cytochromes and electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of the tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. We determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione ([2-(2- chloro- 4- methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA, which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates at which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E°') of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on our findings, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in S. oneidensis MR-1.

  2. THE ROLE OF 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE IN ENHANCEMENT OF SOLID-PHASE ELECTRON TRANSFER BY SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, C; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-06-01

    While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane-associated c-type cytochromes and redox active electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. In this study, we determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione (2-(2-chloro-4-methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates, with which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide, were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E{sup o}{prime}) of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on this work, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in Shewanella oneidensis.

  3. Molecular Insights into Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Forouhar,F.; Ross Anderson, J.; Mowat, C.; Vorobiev, S.; Hussain, A.; Abashidze, M.; Bruckmann, C.; Thackray, S.; Seetharaman, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) constitute an important, yet relatively poorly understood, family of heme-containing enzymes. Here, we report extensive structural and biochemical studies of the Xanthomonas campestris TDO and a related protein SO4414 from Shewanella oneidensis, including the structure at 1.6-{angstrom} resolution of the catalytically active, ferrous form of TDO in a binary complex with the substrate l-Trp. The carboxylate and ammonium moieties of tryptophan are recognized by electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the enzyme and a propionate group of the heme, thus defining the l-stereospecificity. A second, possibly allosteric, l-Trp-binding site is present at the tetramer interface. The sixth coordination site of the heme-iron is vacant, providing a dioxygen-binding site that would also involve interactions with the ammonium moiety of l-Trp and the amide nitrogen of a glycine residue. The indole ring is positioned correctly for oxygenation at the C2 and C3 atoms. The active site is fully formed only in the binary complex, and biochemical experiments confirm this induced-fit behavior of the enzyme. The active site is completely devoid of water during catalysis, which is supported by our electrochemical studies showing significant stabilization of the enzyme upon substrate binding.

  4. Phthalate catabolic gene cluster is linked to the angular dioxygenase gene in Terrabacter sp. strain DBF63.

    PubMed

    Habe, H; Miyakoshi, M; Chung, J; Kasuga, K; Yoshida, T; Nojiri, H; Omori, T

    2003-03-01

    Phthalate is a metabolic intermediate of the pathway of fluorene (FN) degradation via angular dioxygenation. A gene cluster responsible for the conversion of phthalate to protocatechuate was cloned from the dibenzofuran (DF)- and FN-degrading bacterium Terrabacter sp. strain DBF63 and sequenced. The genes encoding seven catabolic enzymes, oxygenase large subunit of phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase (phtA1), oxygenase small subunit of phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase (phtA2), cis-3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrophthalate dehydrogenase (phtB), [3Fe-4S] or [4Fe-4S] type of ferredoxin (phtA3), ferredoxin reductase (phtA4), 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate decarboxylase (phtC) and putative regulatory protein (phtR), were found in the upstream region of the angular dioxygenase gene (dbfA1A2), encoded in this order. Escherichia coli carrying phtA1A2BA3A4 genes converted phthalate to 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate, and the 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate decarboxylase activity by E. coli cells carrying phtC was finally detected with the introduction of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence in the upstream region of its initiation codon. Homology analysis on the upstream region of the pht gene cluster revealed that there was an insertion sequence (IS) (ISTesp2; ORF14 and its flanking region), part of which was almost 100% identical to the orf1 and its flanking region adjacent to the extradiol dioxygenase gene ( bphC1) involved in the DF degradation of Terrabacter sp. strain DPO360 [Schmid et al. (1997) J Bacteriol 179:53-62]. This suggests that ISTesp2 plays a role in the metabolism of aromatic compounds in Terrabacter sp. strains DBF63 and DPO360. PMID:12658514

  5. Catalytic mechanism of cofactor-free dioxygenases and how they circumvent spin-forbidden oxygenation of their substrates.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ortega, Aitor; Quesne, Matthew G; Bui, Soi; Heyes, Derren J; Steiner, Roberto A; Scrutton, Nigel S; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-06-17

    Dioxygenases catalyze a diverse range of biological reactions by incorporating molecular oxygen into organic substrates. Typically, they use transition metals or organic cofactors for catalysis. Bacterial 1-H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine-2,4-dioxygenase (HOD) catalyzes the spin-forbidden transfer of dioxygen to its N-heteroaromatic substrate in the absence of any cofactor. We combined kinetics, spectroscopic and computational approaches to establish a novel reaction mechanism. The present work gives insight into the rate limiting steps in the reaction mechanism, the effect of first-coordination sphere amino acids as well as electron-donating/electron-withdrawing substituents on the substrate. We highlight the role of active site residues Ser101/Trp160/His251 and their involvement in the reaction mechanism. The work shows, for the first time, that the reaction is initiated by triplet dioxygen and its binding to deprotonated substrate and only thereafter a spin state crossing to the singlet spin state occurs. As revealed by steady- and transient-state kinetics the oxygen-dependent steps are rate-limiting, whereas Trp160 and His251 are essential residues for catalysis and contribute to substrate positioning and activation, respectively. Computational modeling further confirms the experimental observations and rationalizes the electron transfer pathways, and the effect of substrate and substrate binding pocket residues. Finally, we make a direct comparison with iron-based dioxygenases and explain the mechanistic and electronic differences with cofactor-free dioxygenases. Our multidisciplinary study confirms that the oxygenation reaction can take place in absence of any cofactor by a unique mechanism in which the specially designed fit-for-purpose active-site architecture modulates substrate reactivity toward oxygen. PMID:25988744

  6. The Complete Reaction Mechanism of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase as Revealed by QM/MM Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Luciana; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Estrin, Dario A.; Marti, Marcelo A.

    2012-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO) are two heme-proteins that catalyze the oxidation reaction of tryptophan (Trp) to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). Human IDO (hIDO) has recently been recognized as a potent anti-cancer drug target, a fact that triggered intense research on the reaction and inhibition mechanisms of hIDO. Our recent studies revealed that the dioxygenase reaction catalyzed by hIDO and TDO is initiated by addition of the ferric iron-bound superoxide to the C2=C3 bond of Trp to form a ferryl and Trp-epoxide intermediate, via a 2-indolenylperoxo radical transition state. The data demonstrate that the two atoms of dioxygen are inserted into the substrate in a stepwise fashion, challenging the paradigm of heme-based dioxygenase chemistry. In the current study, we used QM/MM methods to decipher the mechanism by which the second ferryl oxygen is inserted into the Trp-epoxide to form the NFK product in hIDO. Our results show that the most energetically favored pathway involves proton transfer from Trp-NH3+ to the epoxide oxygen, triggering epoxide ring-opening and a concerted nucleophilic attack of the ferryl oxygen to the C2 of Trp that leads to a meta-stable reaction intermediate. This intermediate subsequently converts to NFK, following C2-C3 bond cleavage and the associated back proton transfer from the oxygen to the amino group of Trp. A comparative study with Xantomonas campestris TDO (xcTDO) indicates that the reaction follows a similar pathway, although subtle differences distinguishing the two enzyme reactions are evident. The results underscore the importance of the NH3+ group of Trp in the two-step ferryl-based mechanism of hIDO and xcTDO, by acting as an acid catalyst to facilitate the epoxide ring-opening reaction and ferryl oxygen addition to the indole ring. PMID:22196056

  7. Salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans: crystal structure of a peculiar ring-cleaving dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Matera, Irene; Ferraroni, Marta; Bürger, Sibylle; Scozzafava, Andrea; Stolz, Andreas; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2008-07-25

    The crystallographic structure of salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase (SDO), a new ring fission dioxygenase from the naphthalenesulfonate-degrading strain Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans BN12, which oxidizes salicylate to 2-oxohepta-3,5-dienedioic acid by a novel ring fission mechanism, has been solved by molecular replacement techniques and refined at 2.9 A resolution (R(free) 26.1%; R-factor 19.3%). SDO is a homo-tetramer member of type III extradiol-type dioxygenases with a subunit topology characteristic of the bicupin beta-barrel folds. The catalytic center contains a mononuclear iron(II) ion coordinated to three histidine residues (His119, His121, and His160), located within the N-terminal domain in a solvent-accessible pocket. SDO is markedly different from the known gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases (GDO) or 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate dioxygenase because of its unique ability to oxidatively cleave numerous salicylates, gentisates and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate with high catalytic efficiency. The comparison of the structure and substrate specificity for a series of different substrates with the corresponding data for several GDOs and the docking of salicylates/gentisates in the active site of SDO, allowed the identification of several active site residues responsible for differences of substrate specificity. In particular, a more defined electron density of the N-terminal region allowed the discovery of a novel structure fragment in SDO previously unobserved in GDO. This region contributes several residues to the active site that influence substrate specificity for both of these enzymes. Implications on the catalytic mechanism are discussed. PMID:18572191

  8. Catechol dioxygenases from Escherichia coli (MhpB) and Alcaligenes eutrophus (MpcI): sequence analysis and biochemical properties of a third family of extradiol dioxygenases.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, E L; Kawamukai, M; Sanvoisin, J; Braven, H; Bugg, T D

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli mhpB gene, encoding 2,3-dihydroxyphenylpropionate 1,2-dioxygenase, was determined by sequencing of a 3.1-kb fragment of DNA from Kohara phage 139. The inferred amino acid sequence showed 58% sequence identity with the sequence of an extradiol dioxygenase, MpcI, from Alcaligenes eutrophus and 10 to 20% sequence identity with protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas paucimobilis, with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase from E. coli, and with human 3-hydroxyanthranilate dioxygenase. Sequence similarity between the N- and C-terminal halves of this new family of dioxygenases was detected, with conserved histidine residues in the N-terminal domain. A model is proposed to account for the relationship between this family of enzymes and other extradiol dioxygenases. The A. eutrophus MpcI enzyme was expressed in E. coli, purified, and characterized as a protein with a subunit size of 33.8 kDa. Purified MhpB and MpcI showed similar substrate specificities for a range of 3-substituted catechols, and evidence for essential histidine and cysteine residues in both enzymes was obtained. PMID:8752345

  9. Enhanced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls by directed evolution of biphenyl dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Kumamaru, Tetsuya; Suenaga, Hikaru; Mitsuoka, Mariko; Watanabe, Takahito; Furukawa, Kensuke

    1998-07-01

    Biphenyl dioxygenases (BP Dox) from different organisms, which are involved in the initial oxygenation and subsequent degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), are similar in structure but have different functions. The large subunit of BP Dox, encoded by the bphA1 gene, is crucial for substrate selectivity. Using the process of DNA shuffling, the authors randomly recombined the bphA1 genes of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 and Burkholderia cepacia LB400 and selected for genes that expressed proteins with altered function. Upon expression in Escherichia coli, some of these evolved genes exhibited enhanced degradation capacity, not only for PCB and related biphenyl compounds, but for single aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and toluene, which are poor substrates for the original BP Dox.

  10. Functional diversity of 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases in plant metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Scott C.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative enzymes catalyze many different reactions in plant metabolism. Among this suite of enzymes are the 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases (2-ODDs). Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) as often considered the most versatile oxidative enzymes in nature, but the diversity and complexity of reactions catalyzed by 2-ODDs is superior to the CYPs. The list of oxidative reactions catalyzed by 2-ODDs includes hydroxylations, demethylations, desaturations, ring closure, ring cleavage, epimerization, rearrangement, halogenation, and demethylenation. Furthermore, recent work, including the discovery of 2-ODDs involved in epigenetic regulation, and others catalyzing several characteristic steps in specialized metabolic pathways, support the argument that 2-ODDs are among the most versatile and important oxidizing biological catalysts. In this review, we survey and summarize the pertinent literature with a focus on several key reactions catalyzed by 2-ODDs, and discuss the significance and impact of these enzymes in plant metabolism. PMID:25346740

  11. 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases in the biosynthesis of simple coumarins

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Bun-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Coumarins are natural plant products that have been the subject of extensive phytochemical and pharmacological research studies in the past few decades. The core structure of coumarins is derived from the respective cinnamates via ortho-hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, trans/cis isomerization, and lactonization. Various substitution patterns of coumarins have been reported, whereas the biosynthesis of coumarins remains elusive. Ortho-hydroxylation is a key step in simple coumarin biosynthesis as a branch point from the lignin biosynthetic pathway. 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2OGDs) from plants convert cinnamate derivatives into simple coumarins through the process of ortho-hydroxylation. This review describes the 2OGDs involved in coumarin biosynthesis and their substrate specificities. PMID:25404933

  12. 1,2,3-Triazoles as inhibitors of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 (IDO2).

    PubMed

    Röhrig, Ute F; Majjigapu, Somi Reddy; Caldelari, Daniela; Dilek, Nahzli; Reichenbach, Patrick; Ascencao, Kelly; Irving, Melita; Coukos, George; Vogel, Pierre; Zoete, Vincent; Michielin, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 (IDO2) is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases that involve immune escape such as cancer. In contrast to IDO1, only a very limited number of inhibitors have been described for IDO2 due to inherent difficulties in expressing and purifying a functionally active, soluble form of the enzyme. Starting from our previously discovered highly efficient 4-aryl-1,2,3-triazole IDO1 inhibitor scaffold, we used computational structure-based methods to design inhibitors of IDO2 which we then tested in cellular assays. Our approach yielded low molecular weight inhibitors of IDO2, the most active displaying an IC50 value of 51μM for mIDO2, and twofold selectivity over hIDO1. These compounds could be useful as molecular probes to investigate the biological role of IDO2, and could inspire the design of new IDO2 inhibitors. PMID:27469130

  13. Spliceostatin hemiketal biosynthesis in Burkholderia spp. is catalyzed by an iron/α-ketoglutarate–dependent dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Janso, Jeffrey E.; Ratnayake, Anokha S.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Koehn, Frank E.

    2014-01-01

    Spliceostatins are potent spliceosome inhibitors biosynthesized by a hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase−polyketide synthase (NRPS−PKS) system of the trans-acyl transferase (AT) type. Burkholderia sp. FERM BP-3421 produces hemiketal spliceostatins, such as FR901464, as well as analogs containing a terminal carboxylic acid. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence for hemiketal biosynthesis by oxidative decarboxylation rather than the previously hypothesized Baeyer–Villiger oxidative release postulated to be catalyzed by a flavin-dependent monooxygenase (FMO) activity internal to the last module of the PKS. Inactivation of Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate–dependent dioxygenase gene fr9P led to loss of hemiketal congeners, whereas the mutant was still able to produce all major carboxylic acid-type compounds. FMO mutants, on the other hand, produced both hemiketal and carboxylic acid analogs containing an exocyclic methylene instead of an epoxide, indicating that the FMO is involved in epoxidation rather than Baeyer–Villiger oxidation. Moreover, recombinant Fr9P enzyme was shown to catalyze hydroxylation to form β-hydroxy acids, which upon decarboxylation led to hemiketal FR901464. Finally, a third oxygenase activity encoded in the biosynthetic gene cluster, the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase Fr9R, was assigned as a 4-hydroxylase based on gene inactivation results. Identification and deletion of the gene involved in hemiketal formation allowed us to generate a strain—the dioxygenase fr9P− mutant—that accumulates only the carboxylic acid-type spliceostatins, which are as potent as the hemiketal analogs, when derivatized to increase cell permeability, but are chemically more stable. PMID:25097259

  14. Contributions of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase to the conversion of D-tryptophan to nicotinamide analyzed by using tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Maeta, Akihiro; Sano, Mitsue; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the contribution percentage of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) to the conversion of D-tryptophan to nicotinamide in TDO-knockout mice. The calculated percentage conversions indicated that TDO and IDO oxidized 70 and 30%, respectively, of the dietary L-tryptophan. These results indicate that both TDO and IDO biosynthesize nicotinamide from D-tryptophan and L-tryptophan in mice. PMID:25035993

  15. A Novel Angular Dioxygenase Gene Cluster Encoding 3-Phenoxybenzoate 1′,2′-Dioxygenase in Sphingobium wenxiniae JZ-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenghong; Chen, Qing; Wang, Rui; Shi, Chao; Yan, Xin; Li, Shunpeng

    2014-01-01

    Sphingobium wenxiniae JZ-1 utilizes a wide range of pyrethroids and their metabolic product, 3-phenoxybenzoate, as sources of carbon and energy. A mutant JZ-1 strain, MJZ-1, defective in the degradation of 3-phenoxybenzoate was obtained by successive streaking on LB agar. Comparison of the draft genomes of strains JZ-1 and MJZ-1 revealed that a 29,366-bp DNA fragment containing a putative angular dioxygenase gene cluster (pbaA1A2B) is missing in strain MJZ-1. PbaA1, PbaA2, and PbaB share 65%, 52%, and 10% identity with the corresponding α and β subunits and the ferredoxin component of dioxin dioxygenase from Sphingomonas wittichii RW1, respectively. Complementation of pbaA1A2B in strain MJZ-1 resulted in the active 3-phenoxybenzoate 1′,2′-dioxygenase, but the enzyme activity in Escherichia coli was achieved only through the coexpression of pbaA1A2B and a glutathione reductase (GR)-type reductase gene, pbaC, indicating that the 3-phenoxybenzoate 1′,2′-dioxygenase belongs to a type IV Rieske non-heme iron aromatic ring-hydroxylating oxygenase system consisting of a hetero-oligomeric oxygenase, a [2Fe-2S]-type ferredoxin, and a GR-type reductase. The pbaC gene is not located in the immediate vicinity of pbaA1A2B. 3-Phenoxybenzoate 1′,2′-dioxygenase catalyzes the hydroxylation in the 1′ and 2′ positions of the benzene moiety of 3-phenoxybenzoate, yielding 3-hydroxybenzoate and catechol. Transcription of pbaA1A2B and pbaC was induced by 3-phenoxybenzoate, but the transcriptional level of pbaC was far less than that of pbaA1A2B, implying the possibility that PbaC may not be the only reductase that can physiologically transfer electrons to PbaA1A2B in strain JZ-1. Some GR-type reductases from other sphingomonad strains could also transfer electrons to PbaA1A2B, suggesting that PbaA1A2B has a low specificity for reductase. PMID:24747891

  16. Purification and characterization of protocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase from Bacillus macerans: a new extradiol catecholic dioxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Wolgel, S A; Dege, J E; Perkins-Olson, P E; Jaurez-Garcia, C H; Crawford, R L; Münck, E; Lipscomb, J D

    1993-01-01

    Protocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (2,3-PCD) from Bacillus macerans JJ1b has been purified to homogeneity for the first time. The enzyme catalyzes proximal extradiol ring cleavage of protocatechuate (PCA) with the attendant incorporation of both atoms of oxygen from O2. The holoenzyme has a mass of 143 +/- 7 kDa as determined by ultracentrifugation and other techniques. It is composed of four apparently identical subunits with M(r)s of 35,500, each containing one iron atom. Mössbauer spectroscopy of 57Fe-enriched enzyme showed that the irons are indistinguishable and are high spin (S = 2) Fe2+ in both the uncomplexed and substrate-bound enzyme. However, the quadrupole splitting, delta EQ, and isomer shift, delta, of the Mössbauer spectrum changed from delta EQ = 2.57 mm/s and delta = 1.29 mm/s to delta EQ = 2.73 mm/s and delta = 1.19 mm/s upon PCA binding to the enzyme, showing that the iron environment is altered when substrate is present. The enzyme was also found to bind variable and substoichiometric amounts of Mn2+, but this metal could be removed without loss of activity or stability. The inherently electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-silent Fe2+ of the enzyme reversibly bound nitric oxide to produce an EPR-active species (g = 4.11, 3.95; S = 3/2). The specific activity of the enzyme was found to be correlated with the amount of the S = 3/2 species formed, showing that activity is dependent on Fe2+. Anaerobic addition of substrates to the enzyme-nitric oxide complex significantly altered the EPR spectrum, suggesting that substrates bind to or near the iron. The enzyme was inactivated by reagents that oxidize the Fe2+, such as H2O2 and K3FE(CN)6; full activity was restored after reduction of the iron by ascorbate. Steady-state kinetic data were found to be consistent with an ordered bi-uni mechanism in which the organic substrate must add to 2,3-PCD before O2. The enzyme has the broadest substrate range of any of the well-studied catecholic dioxygenases. All

  17. N-benzylideneaniline and N-benzylaniline are potent inhibitors of lignostilbene-alpha,beta-dioxygenase, a key enzyme in oxidative cleavage of the central double bond of lignostilbene.

    PubMed

    Han, Sun-Young; Inoue, Hiroki; Terada, Tamami; Kamoda, Shigehiro; Saburi, Yoshimasa; Sekimata, Katsuhiko; Saito, Tamio; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yoshida, Shigeo; Asami, Tadao

    2003-06-01

    Lignostilbene-alpha,beta-dioxygenase (LSD, EC 1.13.11.43) is involved in oxidative cleavage of the central double bond of lignostilbene to form the corresponding aldehydes by a mechanism similar to those of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase, key enzymes in abscisic acid biosynthesis and vitamin A biosynthesis, respectively. In this study, several N-benzylideneanilines and amine were synthesized and examined for their efficacy as inhibitors of LSD. N-(4-Hydroxybenzylidene)-3-methoxyaniline was found to be a potent inhibitor with IC50 = 0.3 microM and N-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-3-methoxyaniline was also active with IC50 = 10 microM. The information obtained from the structure-activity relationships study here can aid in discovering inhibitors of both abscisic acid and vitamin A biosynthesis. PMID:14506920

  18. On the Stereochemistry of 2-Hydroxyethylphosphonate Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Stereochemical investigations have shown that the conversion of 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate to hydroxymethylphosphonate by the enzyme HEPD involves removal of the pro-S hydrogen at C2 and, surprisingly, the loss of stereochemical information at C1. As a result, the mechanisms previously proposed for HEPD must be re-evaluated. PMID:21381767

  19. Role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Amanda W S; Terentis, Andrew C; King, Nicholas J C; Thomas, Shane R

    2015-10-01

    IDO1 (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1) is a member of a unique class of mammalian haem dioxygenases that catalyse the oxidative catabolism of the least-abundant essential amino acid, L-Trp (L-tryptophan), along the kynurenine pathway. Significant increases in knowledge have been recently gained with respect to understanding the fundamental biochemistry of IDO1 including its catalytic reaction mechanism, the scope of enzyme reactions it catalyses, the biochemical mechanisms controlling IDO1 expression and enzyme activity, and the discovery of enzyme inhibitors. Major advances in understanding the roles of IDO1 in physiology and disease have also been realised. IDO1 is recognised as a prominent immune regulatory enzyme capable of modulating immune cell activation status and phenotype via several molecular mechanisms including enzyme-dependent deprivation of L-Trp and its conversion into the aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand kynurenine and other bioactive kynurenine pathway metabolites, or non-enzymatic cell signalling actions involving tyrosine phosphorylation of IDO1. Through these different modes of biochemical signalling, IDO1 regulates certain physiological functions (e.g. pregnancy) and modulates the pathogenesis and severity of diverse conditions including chronic inflammation, infectious disease, allergic and autoimmune disorders, transplantation, neuropathology and cancer. In the present review, we detail the current understanding of IDO1's catalytic actions and the biochemical mechanisms regulating IDO1 expression and activity. We also discuss the biological functions of IDO1 with a focus on the enzyme's immune-modulatory function, its medical implications in diverse pathological settings and its utility as a therapeutic target. PMID:26186743

  20. Identification and expression pattern of a new carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase gene member from Bixa orellana

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Ávila, N. L.; Narváez-Zapata, J. A.; Ramírez-Benítez, J. E.; Aguilar-Espinosa, M. L.; Rivera-Madrid, R.

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are a class of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of a broad diversity of secondary metabolites known as apocarotenoids. In plants, CCDs are part of a genetic family with members which cleave specific double bonds of carotenoid molecules. CCDs are involved in the production of diverse and important metabolites such as vitamin A and abscisic acid (ABA). Bixa orellana L. is the main source of the natural pigment annatto or bixin, an apocarotenoid accumulated in large quantities in its seeds. Bixin biosynthesis has been studied and the involvement of a CCD has been confirmed in vitro. However, the CCD genes involved in the biosynthesis of the wide variety of apocarotenoids found in this plant have not been well documented. In this study, a new CCD1 gene member (BoCCD1) was identified and its expression was charaterized in different plant tissues of B. orellana plantlets and adult plants. The BoCCD1 sequence showed high homology with plant CCD1s involved mainly in the cleavage of carotenoids in several sites to generate multiple apocarotenoid products. Here, the expression profiles of the BoCCD1 gene were analysed and discussed in relation to total carotenoids and other important apocarotenoids such as bixin. PMID:21813796

  1. The role of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase in enhancement of solid-phase electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Turick, Charles E; Beliaev, Alex S; Zakrajsek, Brian A; Reardon, Catherine L; Lowy, Daniel A; Poppy, Tara E; Maloney, Andrea; Ekechukwu, Amy A

    2009-05-01

    We hypothesized that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, could utilize environmentally relevant concentrations of tyrosine to produce pyomelanin for enhanced Fe(III) oxide reduction. Because homogentisate is an intermediate of the tyrosine degradation pathway, and a precursor of a redox-cycling metabolite, pyomelanin, we evaluated the process of homogentisate production by S. oneidensis MR-1, in order to identify the key steps involved in pyomelanin production. We determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. We used genetic analysis and physiological characterization of MR-1 strains either deficient in or displaying substantially increased pyomelanin production. The relative significance imparted by pyomelanin on solid-phase electron transfer was also addressed using electrochemical techniques, which allowed us to extend the genetic and physiological findings to biogeochemical cycling of metals. Based on our findings, environmental production of pyomelanin from available organic precursors could contribute to the survival of S. oneidensis MR-1 when dissolved oxygen concentrations become low, by providing an increased capacity for solid-phase metal reduction. This study demonstrates the role of organic precursors and their concentrations in pyomelanin production, solid phase metal reduction and biogeochemical cycling of iron. PMID:19573203

  2. Toluene and ethylbenzene oxidation by purified naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K; Gibson, D T

    1996-01-01

    Purified naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 oxidized toluene to benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde by reactions involving benzylic monooxygenation and dioxygen-dependent alcohol oxidation, respectively. Xylene and nitrotoluene isomers were also oxidized to substituted benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde derivatives. NDO oxidized ethylbenzene sequentially through (S)-1-phenethyl alcohol (77% enantiomeric excess) and acetophenone to 2-hydroxyacetophenone. In addition, NDO also oxidized ethylbenzene through styrene to (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol (74% enantiomeric excess) by reactions involving desaturation and dihydroxylation, respectively. Isotope experiments with 18O2, H2 18O, and D2O suggest that 1-phenethyl alcohol is oxidized to acetophenone by a minor reaction involving desaturation followed by tautomerization. The major reaction in the conversion of 1-phenethyl alcohol and benzyl alcohol to acetophenone and benzaldehyde, respectively, probably involves monohydroxylation to form a gem-diol intermediate which stereospecifically loses the incoming hydroxyl group to leave the carbonyl product. These results are compared with similar reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P-450. PMID:8795196

  3. Synthetic, Spectroscopic and DFT Studies of Iron Complexes with Iminobenzo(semi)quinone Ligands: Implications for o-Aminophenol Dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Michael M.; Kraus, David; Lindeman, Sergey V.; Popescu, Codrina V.; Fiedler, Adam T.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative C-C bond cleavage of o-aminophenols by nonheme Fe dioxygenases is a critical step in both human metabolism (the kynurenine pathway) and the microbial degradation of nitroaromatic pollutants. The catalytic cycle of o-aminophenol dioxygenases (APDOs) has been proposed to involve formation of an Fe(II)/O2/iminobenzosemiquinone complex, although the presence of a substrate radical has been called into question by studies of related ring-cleaving dioxygenases. Recently, we reported the first synthesis of an iron(II) complex coordinated to an iminobenzosemiquinone (ISQ) ligand, namely, [Fe(Ph2Tp)(ISQtBu)] (2a; where Ph2Tp = hydrotris(3,5-diphenylpyrazol-1-yl)borate and ISQtBu is the radical anion derived from 2-amino-4,6-di-tert-butylphenol). In the current manuscript, density functional theory (DFT) calculations and a wide variety of spectroscopic methods (electronic absorption, Mössbauer, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonance Raman) were employed to obtain detailed electronic-structure descriptions of 2a and its one-electron oxidized derivative [3a]+. In addition, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a parallel series of complexes featuring the neutral supporting ligand tris(4,5-diphenyl-1-methylimidazol-2-yl)phosphine (Ph2TIP). The isomer shifts of ~0.97 mm/s obtained via Mössbauer experiments confirm that 2a (and its Ph2TIP-based analogue [2b]+) contain Fe(II) centers, and the presence of an ISQ radical was verified by analysis of the absorption spectra in light of time-dependent DFT calculations. The collective spectroscopic data indicate that one-electron oxidation of the Fe2+–ISQ complexes yields complexes ([3a]+ and [3b]2+) with electronic configurations between the Fe3+–ISQ and Fe2+–IBQ limits (IBQ = iminobenzoquinone), highlighting the ability of o-amidophenolates to access multiple oxidation states. The implications of these results for the mechanism of APDOs and other ring-cleaving dioxygenases are discussed. PMID

  4. Bacterial 2,4-Dioxygenases: New Members of the α/β Hydrolase-Fold Superfamily of Enzymes Functionally Related to Serine Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Frank; Künne, Stefan; Fetzner, Susanne

    1999-01-01

    1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinoline 2,4-dioxygenase (Qdo) from Pseudomonas putida 33/1 and 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase (Hod) from Arthrobacter ilicis Rü61a catalyze an N-heterocyclic-ring cleavage reaction, generating N-formylanthranilate and N-acetylanthranilate, respectively, and carbon monoxide. Amino acid sequence comparisons between Qdo, Hod, and a number of proteins belonging to the α/β hydrolase-fold superfamily of enzymes and analysis of the similarity between the predicted secondary structures of the 2,4-dioxygenases and the known secondary structure of haloalkane dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 strongly suggested that Qdo and Hod are structurally related to the α/β hydrolase-fold enzymes. The residues S95 and H244 of Qdo were found to be arranged like the catalytic nucleophilic residue and the catalytic histidine, respectively, of the α/β hydrolase-fold enzymes. Investigation of the potential functional significance of these and other residues of Qdo through site-directed mutagenesis supported the hypothesis that Qdo is structurally as well as functionally related to serine hydrolases, with S95 being a possible catalytic nucleophile and H244 being a possible catalytic base. A hypothetical reaction mechanism for Qdo-catalyzed 2,4-dioxygenolysis, involving formation of an ester bond between the catalytic serine residue and the carbonyl carbon of the substrate and subsequent dioxygenolysis of the covalently bound anionic intermediate, is discussed. PMID:10482514

  5. Analysis of multi-domain hypothetical proteins containing iron-sulphur clusters and fad ligands reveal rieske dioxygenase activity suggesting their plausible roles in bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayanan, Nitish; Nagendra, Holenarasipur Gundurao

    2012-01-01

    ‘Conserved hypothetical’ proteins pose a challenge not just for functional genomics, but also to biology in general. As long as there are hundreds of conserved proteins with unknown function in model organisms such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, any discussion towards a ‘complete’ understanding of these biological systems will remain a wishful thinking. Insilico approaches exhibit great promise towards attempts that enable appreciating the plausible roles of these hypothetical proteins. Among the majority of genomic proteins, two-thirds in unicellular organisms and more than 80% in metazoa, are multi-domain proteins, created as a result of gene duplication events. Aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases, also called Rieske dioxygenases (RDOs), are class of multi-domain proteins that catalyze the initial step in microbial aerobic degradation of many aromatic compounds. Investigations here address the computational characterization of hypothetical proteins containing Ferredoxin and Flavodoxin signatures. Consensus sequence of each class of oxidoreductase was obtained by a phylogenetic analysis, involving clustering methods based on evolutionary relationship. A synthetic sequence was developed by combining the consensus, which was used as the basis to search for their homologs via BLAST. The exercise yielded 129 multidomain hypothetical proteins containing both 2Fe-2S (Ferredoxin) and FNR (Flavodoxin) domains. In the current study, 40 proteins with N-terminus 2Fe-2S domain and C-terminus FNR domain are characterized, through homology modelling and docking exercises which suggest dioxygenase activity indicating their plausible roles in degradation of aromatic moieties. PMID:23275712

  6. Role of substrate positioning in the catalytic reaction of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase-A QM/MM Study.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Anna; Broclawik, Ewa; Siegbahn, Per E M; Lundberg, Marcus; Moran, Graham; Borowski, Tomasz

    2014-10-15

    Ring hydroxylation and coupled rearrangement reactions catalyzed by 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase were studied with the QM/MM method ONIOM(B3LYP:AMBER). For electrophilic attack of the ferryl species on the aromatic ring, five channels were considered: attacks on the three ring atoms closest to the oxo ligand (C1, C2, C6) and insertion of oxygen across two bonds formed by them (C1-C2, C1-C6). For the subsequent migration of the carboxymethyl substituent, two possible directions were tested (C1→C2, C1→C6), and two different mechanisms were sought (stepwise radical, single-step heterolytic). In addition, formation of an epoxide (side)product and benzylic hydroxylation, as catalyzed by the closely related hydroxymandelate synthase, were investigated. From the computed reaction free energy profiles it follows that the most likely mechanism of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase involves electrophilic attack on the C1 carbon of the ring and subsequent single-step heterolytic migration of the substituent. Computed values of the kinetic isotope effect for this step are inverse, consistent with available experimental data. Electronic structure arguments for the preferred mechanism of attack on the ring are also presented. PMID:25157877

  7. JBP1 and JBP2 Proteins Are Fe2+/2-Oxoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenases Regulating Hydroxylation of Thymidine Residues in Trypanosome DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Cliffe, Laura J.; Hirsch, Gwen; Wang, Jin; Ekanayake, Dilrukshi; Bullard, Whitney; Hu, Muhan; Wang, Yinsheng; Sabatini, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that O-linked glucosylation of thymine in trypanosome DNA (base J) regulates polymerase II transcription initiation. In vivo analysis has indicated that base J synthesis is initiated by the hydroxylation of thymidine by proteins (JBP1 and JBP2) homologous to the Fe2+/2-oxoglutarate (2-OG)-dependent dioxygenase superfamily where hydroxylation is driven by the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-OG, forming succinate and CO2. However, no direct evidence for hydroxylase activity has been reported for the JBP proteins. We now demonstrate recombinant JBP1 hydroxylates thymine specifically in the context of dsDNA in a Fe2+-, 2-OG-, and O2-dependent manner. Under anaerobic conditions, the addition of Fe2+ to JBP1/2-OG results in the formation of a broad absorption spectrum centered at 530 nm attributed to metal chelation of 2-OG bound to JBP, a spectroscopic signature of Fe2+/2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. The N-terminal thymidine hydroxylase domain of JBP1 is sufficient for full activity and mutation of residues involved in coordinating Fe2+ inhibit iron binding and thymidine hydroxylation. Hydroxylation in vitro and J synthesis in vivo is inhibited by known inhibitors of Fe2+/2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. The data clearly demonstrate the JBP enzymes are dioxygenases acting directly on dsDNA, confirming the two-step J synthesis model. Growth of trypanosomes in hypoxic conditions decreases JBP1 and -2 activity, resulting in reduced levels of J and changes in parasite virulence previously characterized in the JBP KO. The influence of environment upon J biosynthesis via oxygen-sensitive regulation of JBP1/2 has exciting implications for the regulation of gene expression and parasite adaptation to different host niches. PMID:22514282

  8. NADH Oxidase Activity of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Rosell, Federico I.; Kuo, Hsin H.; Mauk, A. Grant

    2011-01-01

    The heme enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) was found to oxidize NADH under aerobic conditions in the absence of other enzymes or reactants. This reaction led to the formation of the dioxygen adduct of IDO and supported the oxidation of Trp to N-formylkynurenine. Formation of the dioxygen adduct and oxidation of Trp were accelerated by the addition of small amounts of hydrogen peroxide, and both processes were inhibited in the presence of either superoxide dismutase or catalase. Anaerobic reaction of IDO with NADH proceeded only in the presence of a mediator (e.g. methylene blue) and resulted in formation of the ferrous form of the enzyme. We propose that trace amounts of peroxide previously proposed to occur in NADH solutions as well as solid NADH activate IDO and lead to aerobic formation of superoxide and the reactive dioxygen adduct of the enzyme. PMID:21690092

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Shun-ichiro; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Tadashi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu

    2006-03-01

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, a haem-containing dioxygenase, was crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a haem-containing dioxygenase that catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of the pyrrole ring of indoleamines by the insertion of molecular oxygen. This reaction is the first and the rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway, the major Trp catabolic pathway in mammals. Recombinant human IDO was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique. The addition of 4-phenylimidazole as a haem ligand was essential for crystallization. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 86.1, b = 98.0, c = 131.0 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution.

  10. INHIBITION OF INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE DOES NOT IMPEDE ORAL TOLERANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a tryptophan catabolizing enzyme, regulates immune tolerance through inhibition of T-cell proliferation. Pharmacologic inhibition of IDO, which causes fetal rejection and increased tumor resistance in mice, may prove useful in cancer...

  11. Molecular basis for the substrate stereoselectivity in Tryptophan Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Luciana; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Marti, Marcelo A.; Estrin, Dario A.; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO) and Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) are the only two heme-proteins that catalyze the oxidation reaction of tryptophan (Trp) to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). While human IDO (hIDO) is able to oxidize both L and D-Trp, human TDO (hTDO) displays a major specificity towards L-Trp. In this work we aim to interrogate the molecular basis for the substrate stereoselectivity of hTDO. Our previous molecular dynamics simulation studies of Xanthomonas campestris TDO (xcTDO) showed that an H-bond between T254 (T342 in hTDO) and the ammonium group of the substrate is present in the L-Trp-bound enzyme, but not in the D-Trp bound enzyme. The fact that this is the only notable structural alteration induced by the change in the stereo structure of the substrate prompted us to produce and characterize the T342A mutant of hTDO to evaluate the structural role of T342 in controlling the substrate stereoselectivity of the enzyme. The experimental results indicate that the mutation only slightly perturbs the global structural properties of the enzyme, but it totally abolishes the substrate stereoselectivity. Molecular Dynamics simulations of xcTDO show that T254 controls the substrate stereoselectivity of the enzyme by (i) modulating the H-bonding interaction between the NH3+ group and epoxide oxygen of the ferryl/indole 2,3-epoxide intermediate of the enzyme, and (ii) regulating the dynamics of two active site loops, loop250–260 and loop117–130, critical for substrate-binding. PMID:22082147

  12. Ascorbate as a Co-Factor for Fe- and 2-Oxoglutarate Dependent Dioxygenases: Physiological Activity in Tumor Growth and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Caroline; Vissers, Margreet C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Ascorbate is a specific co-factor for a large family of enzymes known as the Fe- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are found throughout biology and catalyze the addition of a hydroxyl group to various substrates. The proline hydroxylase that is involved in collagen maturation is well known, but in recent times many new enzymes and functions have been uncovered, including those involved in epigenetic control and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) regulation. These discoveries have provided crucial mechanistic insights into how ascorbate may affect tumor biology. In particular, there is growing evidence that HIF-1-dependent tumor progression may be inhibited by increasing tumor ascorbate levels. However, rigorous clinical intervention studies are lacking. This review will explore the physiological role of ascorbate as an enzyme co-factor and how this mechanism relates to cancer biology and treatment. The use of ascorbate in cancer should be informed by clinical studies based on such mechanistic hypotheses. PMID:25540771

  13. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2; a new enzyme in the kynurenine pathway.

    PubMed

    Ball, Helen J; Yuasa, Hajime J; Austin, Christopher J D; Weiser, Silvia; Hunt, Nicholas H

    2009-03-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism converts the amino acid tryptophan into a number of biologically active metabolites. The first and rate-limiting step in this pathway is the conversion of tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine and until recently this reaction was thought to be performed by either of two enzymes, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. A third enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-like protein or proto-indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO2, IDO-2, INDOL1 or proto-IDO), with this activity recently has been described. The gene encoding IDO2 is adjacent and structurally similar to the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase gene and both mouse genes use multiple promoters to express transcripts with alternate 5' exons. The IDO2 protein is expressed in the murine kidney, liver, male and female reproductive system. The two IDO enzymes can utilise a similar range of substrates, however they differ in their selectivity for some inhibitors. The selective inhibition of IDO2 by 1-methyl-D-tryptophan suggests that IDO2 activity may have a role in the inhibition of immune responses to tumours. PMID:18282734

  14. Structures of the multicomponent Rieske non-heme iron toluene 2, 3-dioxygenase enzyme system

    SciTech Connect

    Friemann, Rosmarie; Lee, Kyoung; Brown, Eric N.; Gibson, David T.; Eklund, Hans; Ramaswamy, S.

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structures of the three-component toluene 2, 3-dioxygenase system provide a model for electron transfer among bacterial Rieske non-heme iron dioxygenases. Bacterial Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases catalyze the initial hydroxylation of aromatic hydrocarbon substrates. The structures of all three components of one such system, the toluene 2, 3-dioxygenase system, have now been determined. This system consists of a reductase, a ferredoxin and a terminal dioxygenase. The dioxygenase, which was cocrystallized with toluene, is a heterohexamer containing a catalytic and a structural subunit. The catalytic subunit contains a Rieske [2Fe–2S] cluster and mononuclear iron at the active site. This iron is not strongly bound and is easily removed during enzyme purification. The structures of the enzyme with and without mononuclear iron demonstrate that part of the structure is flexible in the absence of iron. The orientation of the toluene substrate in the active site is consistent with the regiospecificity of oxygen incorporation seen in the product formed. The ferredoxin is Rieske type and contains a [2Fe–2S] cluster close to the protein surface. The reductase belongs to the glutathione reductase family of flavoenzymes and consists of three domains: an FAD-binding domain, an NADH-binding domain and a C-terminal domain. A model for electron transfer from NADH via FAD in the reductase and the ferredoxin to the terminal active-site mononuclear iron of the dioxygenase is proposed.

  15. Computational Study of Catalytic Reaction of Quercetin 2,4-Dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Saito, Toru; Kawakami, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Okumura, Mitsutaka

    2015-06-11

    We present a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and QM-only study on the oxidative ring-cleaving reaction of quercetin catalyzed by quercetin 2,4-dioxygenase (2,4-QD). 2,4-QD has a mononuclear type 2 copper center and incorporates two oxygen atoms at C2 and C4 positions of the substrate. It has not been clear whether dioxygen reacts with a copper ion or a substrate radical as the first step. We have found that dioxygen is more likely to bind to a Cu(2+) ion, involving the dissociation of the substrate from the copper ion. Then a Cu(2+)-alkylperoxo complex can be generated. Comparison of geometry and stability between QM-only and QM/MM results strongly indicates that steric effects of the protein environment contribute to maintain the orientation of the substrate dissociated from the copper center. The present QM/MM results also highlight that a prior rearrangement of the Cu(2+)-alkylperoxo complex and a subsequent hydrogen bond switching assisted by the movement of Glu73 can facilitate formation of an endoperoxide intermediate selectively. PMID:25990020

  16. One protein, two enzymes revisited: A structural entropy switch interconverts the two isoforms of acireductone dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Tingting; Goldsmith, Rachel Beaulieu; Chai, Sergio C.; Maroney, Michael J.; Pochapsky, Susan Sondej; Pochapsky, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Acireductone dioxygenase (ARD) catalyzes different reactions between O2 and 1,2-dihydroxy-3-oxo-5-(methylthio)pent-1-ene (acireductone) depending upon the metal bound in the active site. Ni+2–ARD cleaves acireductone to formate, CO and methylthiopropionate. If Fe+2 is bound (ARD′), the same substrates yield methylthioketobutyrate and formate. The two forms differ in structure, and are chromatographically separable. Paramagnetism of Fe+2 renders the active site of ARD′ inaccessible to standard NMR methods. The structure of ARD′ has been determined using Fe+2 binding parameters determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and NMR restraints from H98S ARD, a metal-free diamagnetic protein that is isostructural with ARD′. ARD′ retains the β-sandwich fold of ARD, but a structural entropy switch increases order at one end of a two-helix system that bisects the β-sandwich and decreases order at the other upon interconversion of ARD and ARD′, causing loss of the C-terminal helix in ARD′ and rearrangements of residues involved in substrate orientation in the active site. PMID:16989860

  17. The key role of water in the dioxygenase function of Escherichia coli flavohemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Dardo N; Boechi, Leonardo; Estrin, Darío A; Martí, Marcelo A

    2013-02-01

    Flavohemoglobins (FHbs) are members of the globin superfamily, widely distributed among prokaryotes and eukaryotes that have been shown to carry out nitric oxide dioxygenase (NOD) activity. In prokaryotes, such as Escherichia coli, NOD activity is a defence mechanism against the NO release by the macrophages of the hosts' immune system during infection. Because of that, FHbs have been studied thoroughly and several drugs have been developed in an effort to fight infectious processes. Nevertheless, the protein's structural determinants involved in the NOD activity are still poorly understood. In this context, the aim of the present work is to unravel the molecular basis of FHbs structural dynamics-to-function relationship using state of the art computer simulation tools. In an effort to fulfill this goal, we studied three key processes that determine NOD activity, namely i) ligand migration into the active site ii) stabilization of the coordinated oxygen and iii) intra-protein electron transfer (ET). Our results allowed us to determine key factors related to all three processes like the presence of a long hydrophobic tunnel for ligand migration, the presence of a water mediated hydrogen bond to stabilize the coordinated oxygen and therefore achieve a high affinity, and the best possible ET paths between the FAD and the heme, where water molecules play an important role. Taken together the presented results close an important gap in our understanding of the wide and diverse globin structural-functional relationships. PMID:23220591

  18. Cysteine Dioxygenase 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Silenced by Promoter Methylation in Multiple Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brait, Mariana; Ling, Shizhang; Nagpal, Jatin K.; Chang, Xiaofei; Park, Hannah Lui; Lee, Juna; Okamura, Jun; Yamashita, Keishi; Sidransky, David; Kim, Myoung Sook

    2012-01-01

    The human cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1) gene is a non-heme structured, iron-containing metalloenzyme involved in the conversion of cysteine to cysteine sulfinate, and plays a key role in taurine biosynthesis. In our search for novel methylated gene promoters, we have analyzed differential RNA expression profiles of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with or without treatment of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Among the genes identified, the CDO1 promoter was found to be differentially methylated in primary CRC tissues with high frequency compared to normal colon tissues. In addition, a statistically significant difference in the frequency of CDO1 promoter methylation was observed between primary normal and tumor tissues derived from breast, esophagus, lung, bladder and stomach. Downregulation of CDO1 mRNA and protein levels were observed in cancer cell lines and tumors derived from these tissue types. Expression of CDO1 was tightly controlled by promoter methylation, suggesting that promoter methylation and silencing of CDO1 may be a common event in human carcinogenesis. Moreover, forced expression of full-length CDO1 in human cancer cells markedly decreased the tumor cell growth in an in vitro cell culture and/or an in vivo mouse model, whereas knockdown of CDO1 increased cell growth in culture. Our data implicate CDO1 as a novel tumor suppressor gene and a potentially valuable molecular marker for human cancer. PMID:23028699

  19. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase elevated in tumor-initiating cells is suppressed by mitocans.

    PubMed

    Stapelberg, Michael; Zobalova, Renata; Nguyen, Maria Nga; Walker, Tom; Stantic, Marina; Goodwin, Jacob; Pasdar, Elham Alizadeh; Thai, Thuan; Prokopova, Katerina; Yan, Bing; Hall, Susan; de Pennington, Nicholas; Thomas, Shane R; Grant, Gary; Stursa, Jan; Bajzikova, Martina; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, Stephen J; Ansorge, Olaf; Dong, Lan-Feng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2014-02-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) often survive therapy and give rise to second-line tumors. We tested the plausibility of sphere cultures as models of TICs. Microarray data and microRNA data analysis confirmed the validity of spheres as models of TICs for breast and prostate cancer as well as mesothelioma cell lines. Microarray data analysis revealed the Trp pathway as the only pathway upregulated significantly in all types of studied TICs, with increased levels of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), the rate-limiting enzyme of Trp metabolism along the kynurenine pathway. All types of TICs also expressed higher levels of the Trp uptake system consisting of CD98 and LAT1 with functional consequences. IDO1 expression was regulated via both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, depending on the cancer type. Serial transplantation of TICs in mice resulted in gradually increased IDO1. Mitocans, represented by α-tocopheryl succinate and mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES), suppressed IDO1 in TICs. MitoVES suppressed IDO1 in TICs with functional mitochondrial complex II, involving transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. IDO1 increase and its suppression by VE analogues were replicated in TICs from primary human glioblastomas. Our work indicates that IDO1 is increased in TICs and that mitocans suppress the protein. PMID:24145120

  20. Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase (IDO) Expression and Activity in Relapsing- Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Roberta; Hernis, Ambra; Agostini, Simone; Rovaris, Marco; Caputo, Domenico; Fuchs, Dietmar; Clerici, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Background Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production induces the transcription of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) resulting in the reduction of T-cell activation and proliferation through the depletion of tryptophan and the elicitation of Treg lymphocytes. IDO was shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases; we investigated whether changes in IDO gene expression and activity could be indicative of onset of relapse in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods IDO and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) gene expression, serum IDO activity (Kynurenine/Tryptophan ratio) and serum neopterin concentration – a protein released by macrophages upon IFN-γ stimulation – were measured in 51 individuals: 36 relapsing remitting (RR)-MS patients (21 in acute phase -AMS, 15 in stable phase -SMS) and 15 healthy controls (HC). PBMCs samples in AMS patients were collected before (BT-AMS) and during glucocorticoids-based therapy (DT-AMS). Results IDO expression was increased and IFN-γ was decreased (p<0.001) in BT-AMS compared to SMS patients. Glucocorticoids-induced disease remission resulted in a significant reduction of IDO and IFN-γ gene expression, IDO catalytic activity (p<0.001). Serum neopterin concentration followed the same trend as IDO expression and activity. Conclusions Measurement of IDO gene expression and activity in blood could be a useful marker to monitor the clinical course of RR-MS. Therapeutic interventions modulating IDO activity may be beneficial in MS. PMID:26110930

  1. Molecular evolution of bacterial indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Hajime J; Ushigoe, Akiko; Ball, Helen J

    2011-10-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that catalyze the first step in L-Trp catabolism via the kynurenine pathway. In mammals, TDO is mainly expressed in the liver and primarily supplies nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). TDO is widely distributed from mammals to bacteria. Active IDO enzymes have been reported only in vertebrates and fungi. In mammals, IDO activity plays a significant role in the immune system while in fungal species, IDO is constitutively expressed and supplies NAD(+), like mammalian TDO. A search of genomic databases reveals that some bacterial species also have a putative IDO gene. A phylogenetic analysis clustered bacterial IDOs into two groups, group I or group II bacterial IDOs. The catalytic efficiencies of group I bacterial IDOs were very low and they are suspected not to contribute significantly to L-Trp metabolism. The bacterial species bearing the group I bacterial IDO are scattered across a few phyla and no phylogenetically close relationship is observed between them. This suggests that the group I bacterial IDOs might be acquired by horizontal gene transmission that occurred in each lineage independently. In contrast, group II bacterial IDOs showed rather high catalytic efficiency. Particularly, the enzymatic characteristics (K(m), V(max) and inhibitor selectivity) of the Gemmatimonas aurantiaca IDO are comparable to those of mammalian IDO1, although comparison of the IDO sequences does not suggest a close evolutionary relationship. In several bacteria, TDO and the kynureninase gene (kynU) are clustered on their chromosome suggesting that these genes could be transcribed in an operon. Interestingly, G. aurantiaca has no TDO, and the IDO is clustered with kynU on its chromosome. Although the G. aurantiaca also has NadA and NadB to synthesize a quinolinic acid (a precursor of NAD(+)) via the aspartate pathway, the high activity of the G. aurantiaca IDO flanking

  2. p-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor-resistant plants.

    PubMed

    Matringe, Michel; Sailland, Alain; Pelissier, Bernard; Rolland, Anne; Zink, Olivier

    2005-03-01

    The enzyme p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) catalyzes the formation of homogentisic acid, the aromatic precursor of plastoquinone and vitamin E. HPPD is the specific target of several herbicide families: isoxazoles, triketones and pyroxazoles. Its inhibition results in the depletion of the plant plastoquinone and vitamin E pools, leading to bleaching symptoms. These herbicides are very potent for the selective pre- and in some cases post-emergence control of a wide range of broadleaf and grass weeds in maize and rice. Their herbicidal potential raised interest in the development of highly resistant transgenic crops. This goal was first achieved by over-expression of a bacterial HPPD in crop plants, and an increased level of resistance was obtained by using a mutant enzyme. A second strategy based on bypassing HPPD in the production of homogentisate was then developed. Recently, a third strategy of resistance based on the increase of p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate substrate flux has been developed. This was achieved by the introduction of the yeast prephenate dehydrogenase gene (PDH) into transgenic plants already overexpressing HPPD. In addition to a high level of herbicide resistance, a massive accumulation of vitamin E, mainly tocotrienols, was observed in leaves of the transgenic HPPD-PDH plants. PMID:15633191

  3. Fe(II) Complexes That Mimic the Active Site Structure of Acetylacetone Dioxygenase: O2 and NO Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Heaweon; Bittner, Michael M.; Baus, Jacob S.; Lindeman, Sergey V.; Fiedler, Adam T.

    2014-01-01

    , spectroscopic, and computational methods. Collectively, the results presented here enhance our understanding of the chemical factors involved in the oxidation of aliphatic substrates by nonheme iron dioxygenases. PMID:22974346

  4. Cloning and functional characterization of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 genes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fong-Chin; Molnár, Péter; Schwab, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Although a number of plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) genes have been functionally characterized in different plant species, little is known about the biochemical role and enzymatic activities of members of the subclass 4 (CCD4). To gain insight into their biological function, CCD4 genes were isolated from apple (Malus x domestica, MdCCD4), chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum x morifolium, CmCCD4a), rose (Rosa x damascena, RdCCD4), and osmanthus (Osmanthus fragrans, OfCCD4), and were expressed, together with AtCCD4, in Escherichia coli. In vivo assays showed that CmCCD4a and MdCCD4 cleaved beta-carotene well to yield beta-ionone, while OfCCD4, RdCCD4, and AtCCD4 were almost inactive towards this substrate. No cleavage products were found for any of the five CCD4 genes when they were co-expressed in E. coli strains that accumulated cis-zeta-carotene and lycopene. In vitro assays, however, demonstrated the breakdown of 8'-apo-beta-caroten-8'-al by AtCCD4 and RdCCD4 to beta-ionone, while this apocarotenal was almost not degraded by OfCCD4, CmCCD4a, and MdCCD4. Sequence analysis of genomic clones of CCD4 genes revealed that RdCCD4, like AtCCD4, contains no intron, while MdCCD, OfCCD4, and CmCCD4a contain introns. These results indicate that plants produce at least two different forms of CCD4 proteins. Although CCD4 enzymes cleave their substrates at the same position (9,10 and 9',10'), they might have different biochemical functions as they accept different (apo)-carotenoid substrates, show various expression patterns, and are genomically differently organized. PMID:19436048

  5. Metal-Dependent Function of a Mammalian Acireductone Dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Aditi R; Wagenpfeil, Karina; Pochapsky, Thomas C; Petsko, Gregory A; Ringe, Dagmar

    2016-03-01

    The two acireductone dioxygenase (ARD) isozymes from the methionine salvage pathway of Klebsiella oxytoca are the only known pair of naturally occurring metalloenzymes with distinct chemical and physical properties determined solely by the identity of the divalent transition metal ion (Fe(2+) or Ni(2+)) in the active site. We now show that this dual chemistry can also occur in mammals. ARD from Mus musculus (MmARD) was studied to relate the metal ion identity and three-dimensional structure to enzyme function. The iron-containing isozyme catalyzes the cleavage of 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-(thiomethyl)pent-1-ene (acireductone) by O2 to formate and the ketoacid precursor of methionine, which is the penultimate step in methionine salvage. The nickel-bound form of ARD catalyzes an off-pathway reaction resulting in formate, carbon monoxide (CO), and 3-(thiomethyl) propionate. Recombinant MmARD was expressed and purified to obtain a homogeneous enzyme with a single transition metal ion bound. The Fe(2+)-bound protein, which shows about 10-fold higher activity than that of others, catalyzes on-pathway chemistry, whereas the Ni(2+), Co(2+), or Mn(2+) forms exhibit off-pathway chemistry, as has been seen with ARD from Klebsiella. Thermal stability of the isozymes is strongly affected by the metal ion identity, with Ni(2+)-bound MmARD being the most stable, followed by Co(2+) and Fe(2+), and Mn(2+)-bound ARD being the least stable. Ni(2+)- and Co(2+)-bound MmARD were crystallized, and the structures of the two proteins found to be similar. Enzyme-ligand complexes provide insight into substrate binding, metal coordination, and the catalytic mechanism. PMID:26858196

  6. High levels of expression of the Iron-Sulfur Proteins Phthalate Dioxygenase and Phthalate Dioxygenase Reductase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jaganaman, Sunil; Pinto, Alex; Tarasev, Michael; Ballou, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Phthalate dioxygenase (PDO), a hexamer with one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] and one Fe (II) - mononuclear center per monomer, and its reductase (PDR), which contains flavin mononucleotide and a plant-type ferredoxin [2Fe-2S] center, are expressed by Burkholderia cepacia at ∼30 mg of crude PDO and ∼1 mg of crude PDR per liter of cell culture when grown with phthalate as the main carbon source. A high level expression system in Escherichia coli was developed for PDO and PDR. Optimization relative to Escherichia coli cell line, growth parameters, time of induction, media composition, and iron-sulfur additives resulted in yields of about 1 g/L for PDO and about 0.2 g/L for PDR. Protein expression was correlated to the increase in pH of the cell culture and exhibited a pronounced (variable from 5 to 20 hours) lag after the induction. The specific activity of purified PDO did not depend on the pH of the cell culture when harvested. However, when the pH of the culture reached 8.5-9, a large fraction of the PDR that was expressed lacked its ferredoxin domain, presumably because of proteolysis. Termination of growth while the pH of the cell culture was < 8 decreased the fraction of proteolyzed enzyme, whereas yields of the unclipped PDR were only marginally lower. Overall, changes in pH of the cell culture were found to be an excellent indicator of the overall level of native protein expression. Its monitoring allowed the real time tracking of the protein expression and made it possible to tailor the expression times to achieve a combination of high quality and high yield of protein. PMID:17049880

  7. Benzo[b]quinolizinium Derivatives Have a Strong Antimalarial Activity and Inhibit Indoleamine Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Jortzik, Esther; Zocher, Kathleen; Isernhagen, Antje; Mailu, Boniface M.; Rahlfs, Stefan; Viola, Giampietro; Wittlin, Sergio; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Ihmels, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    The heme-containing enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1) and IDO-2 catalyze the conversion of the essential amino acid tryptophan into kynurenine. Metabolites of the kynurenine pathway and IDO itself are involved in immunity and the pathology of several diseases, having either immunoregulatory or antimicrobial effects. IDO-1 plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, which is the most severe and often fatal neurological complication of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. Mouse models are usually used to study the underlying pathophysiology. In this study, we screened a natural compound library against mouse IDO-1 and identified 8-aminobenzo[b]quinolizinium (compound 2c) to be an inhibitor of IDO-1 with potency at nanomolar concentrations (50% inhibitory concentration, 164 nM). Twenty-one structurally modified derivatives of compound 2c were synthesized for structure-activity relationship analyses. The compounds were found to be selective for IDO-1 over IDO-2. We therefore compared the roles of prominent amino acids in the catalytic mechanisms of the two isoenzymes via homology modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic analyses. Notably, methionine 385 of IDO-2 was identified to interfere with the entrance of l-tryptophan to the active site of the enzyme, which explains the selectivity of the inhibitors. Most interestingly, several benzo[b]quinolizinium derivatives (6 compounds with 50% effective concentration values between 2.1 and 6.7 nM) were found to be highly effective against P. falciparum 3D7 blood stages in cell culture with a mechanism independent of IDO-1 inhibition. We believe that the class of compounds presented here has unique characteristics; it combines the inhibition of mammalian IDO-1 with strong antiparasitic activity, two features that offer potential for drug development. PMID:26459907

  8. Stepwise conversion of flavonoids by engineered dioxygenases and dehydrogenase: Characterization of novel biotransformation products.

    PubMed

    Overwin, Heike; González, Myriam; Méndez, Valentina; Cárdenas, Franco; Seeger, Michael; Hofer, Bernd

    2015-12-01

    Flavonoids are a large group of plant secondary metabolites that exert various biological and pharmacological effects. In this context, the generation of derivatives is of considerable interest. The introduction of hydroxy groups is of particular relevance, as they are known to be involved in many of the biological interactions and furthermore enable additional modifications, such as glycosylations. Bacterial aryl-hydroxylating dioxygenases (ARHDOs) have proven to be very useful for the conversion of aromatic structures into versatile building blocks for different kinds of derivatizations. Such enzymes have been used with varying success for the oxidation of flavonoids. In order to find better ARHDOs for the hydroxylation of such substrates, we carried out biotransformation trials with a collection of hybrid ARHDOs of different origin, using resting cells of recombinant strains. This identified enzymes able to transform all of the flavonoids examined, typically in yields above 50%. It also showed that moderately reactive substituents of flavonoids, such as hydroxy or amino groups, can lead to spontaneous follow-up reactions with the dienediol structures generated by dioxygenation. A report of flavanone epoxidation, a reaction never before observed to be catalyzed by an ARHDO, is challenged by our results. All ARHDOs examined converted this substrate into a dehydrogenase-transformable dihydrodiol. All dihydrodiols obtained by dioxygenation of the examined flavonoids were successfully re-aromatized into catechols by a bacterial dehydrogenase. These metabolites were usually stable. However, the catechols formed from flavanone and 2'-hydroxy-chalcone, respectively, were interconvertible under mild conditions. Altogether, we isolated and characterized 13 compounds that have not previously been described. The biotransformations reported here give access to novel flavonoid derivatives that may be applied for biological screens as well as for further modification, such as

  9. Hydroquinone Increases 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Formation through Ten Eleven Translocation 1 (TET1) 5-Methylcytosine Dioxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, Jonathan B.; O'Driscoll, Cliona M.; Bressler, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation regulates gene expression throughout development and in a wide range of pathologies such as cancer and neurological disorders. Pathways controlling the dynamic levels and targets of methylation are known to be disrupted by chemicals and are therefore of great interest in both prevention and clinical contexts. Benzene and its metabolite hydroquinone have been shown to lead to decreased levels of DNA methylation, although the mechanism is not known. This study employs a cell culture model to investigate the mechanism of hydroquinone-mediated changes in DNA methylation. Exposures that do not affect HEK293 cell viability led to genomic and methylated reporter DNA demethylation. Hydroquinone caused reactivation of a methylated reporter plasmid that was prevented by the addition of N-acetylcysteine. Hydroquinone also caused an increase in Ten Eleven Translocation 1 activity and global levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine was found enriched at LINE-1 prior to a decrease in both 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and 5-methylcytosine. Ten Eleven Translocation-1 knockdown decreased 5-hydroxymethylcytosine formation following hydroquinone exposure as well as the induction of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit and 14-3-3σ. Finally, Ten Eleven Translocation 1 knockdown decreased the percentage of cells accumulating in G2+M following hydroquinone exposure, indicating that it may have a role in cell cycle changes in response to toxicants. This work demonstrates that hydroquinone exposure leads to active and functional DNA demethylation in HEK293 cells in a mechanism involving reactive oxygen species and Ten Eleven Translocation 1 5-methylcytosine dioxygenase. PMID:23940045

  10. The Metabolic and Developmental Roles of Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase 4 from Potato (Solanum tuberosum L)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The factors that regulate storage organ carotenoid content remain to be fully elucidated despite the nutritional and economic importance of this class of compound. Recent findings suggest that carotenoid pool size is determined at least in part, by the activity of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases. T...

  11. Structures of the Multicomponent Rieske Non-Heme Iron Toluene 2,3-Dioxygenase Enzyme System

    SciTech Connect

    Friemann, R.; Lee, K; Brown, E; Gibson, D; Eklund, H; Ramaswamy, S

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases catalyze the initial hydroxylation of aromatic hydrocarbon substrates. The structures of all three components of one such system, the toluene 2,3-dioxygenase system, have now been determined. This system consists of a reductase, a ferredoxin and a terminal dioxygenase. The dioxygenase, which was cocrystallized with toluene, is a heterohexamer containing a catalytic and a structural subunit. The catalytic subunit contains a Rieske [2Fe-2S] cluster and mononuclear iron at the active site. This iron is not strongly bound and is easily removed during enzyme purification. The structures of the enzyme with and without mononuclear iron demonstrate that part of the structure is flexible in the absence of iron. The orientation of the toluene substrate in the active site is consistent with the regiospecificity of oxygen incorporation seen in the product formed. The ferredoxin is Rieske type and contains a [2Fe-2S] cluster close to the protein surface. The reductase belongs to the glutathione reductase family of flavoenzymes and consists of three domains: an FAD-binding domain, an NADH-binding domain and a C-terminal domain. A model for electron transfer from NADH via FAD in the reductase and the ferredoxin to the terminal active-site mononuclear iron of the dioxygenase is proposed.

  12. Novel bacterial bioassay for a high-throughput screening of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) is the molecular target of a range of synthetic ß-triketone herbicides that are currently used commercially. Their mode of action is based on an irreversible inhibition of HPPD. Therefore, this inhibitory capacity was used to develop a whole cell colo...

  13. CLONING IN PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA: EXPRESSION AND REGULATION OF THE PROTOCATECHUATE 3,4-DIOXYGENASE GENES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genes for the a and B subunits of the enzyme protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase were cloned from the Pseudomonas cepacia DB01 chromosome on a 9.5 kilobase pair PstI fragment into the broad-host-range cloning vector pR023l7. he resultant clone was able to complement protocatechuate 3...

  14. Structural Investigations of the Ferredoxin and Terminal Oxygenase Components of the biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase from Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro,D.; Brown, E.; Yu, C.; Parales, R.; Gibson, D.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2007-01-01

    The initial step involved in oxidative hydroxylation of monoaromatic and polyaromatic compounds by the microorganism Sphingobium yanoikuyae strain B1 (B1), previously known as Sphingomonas yanoikuyae strain B1 and Beijerinckia sp. strain B1, is performed by a set of multiple terminal Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases. These enzymes share a single electron donor system consisting of a reductase and a ferredoxin (BPDO-F{sub B1}). One of the terminal Rieske oxygenases, biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase (BPDO-O{sub B1}), is responsible for B1's ability to dihydroxylate large aromatic compounds, such as chrysene and benzo(a)pyrene. Results: In this study, crystal structures of BPDO-O{sub B1} in both native and biphenyl bound forms are described. Sequence and structural comparisons to other Rieske oxygenases show this enzyme to be most similar, with 43.5 % sequence identity, to naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4. While structurally similar to naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase, the active site entrance is significantly larger than the entrance for naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase. Differences in active site residues also allow the binding of large aromatic substrates. There are no major structural changes observed upon binding of the substrate. BPDO-F{sub B1} has large sequence identity to other bacterial Rieske ferredoxins whose structures are known and demonstrates a high structural homology; however, differences in side chain composition and conformation around the Rieske cluster binding site are noted. Conclusion: This is the first structure of a Rieske oxygenase that oxidizes substrates with five aromatic rings to be reported. This ability to catalyze the oxidation of larger substrates is a result of both a larger entrance to the active site as well as the ability of the active site to accommodate larger substrates. While the biphenyl ferredoxin is structurally similar to other Rieske ferredoxins, there are distinct changes in the amino acids near the iron

  15. Relationship between indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity and lymphatic invasion propensity of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Engin, Atilla; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Engin, Ayse Basak; Karamercan, Ahmet; Sepici Dincel, Aylin; Dursun, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether serum and tumor indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activities can predict lymphatic invasion (LI) or lymph node metastasis in colorectal carcinoma. METHODS: The study group consisted of 44 colorectal carcinoma patients. The patients were re-grouped according to the presence or absence of LI and lymph node metastasis. Forty-three cancer-free subjects without any metabolic disturbances were included into the control group. Serum neopterin was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Urinary neopterin and biopterin, serum tryptophan (Trp) and kynurenine (Kyn) concentrations of all patients were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Kyn/Trp was calculated and its correlation with serum neopterin was determined to estimate the serum indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. Tissue sections from the studied tumors were re-examined histopathologically and were stained by immunohistochemistry with indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase antibodies. RESULTS: Neither serum nor urinary neopterin was significantly different between the patient and control groups (both P > 0.05). However, colorectal carcinoma patients showed a significant positive correlation between the serum neopterin levels and Kyn/Trp (r = 0.450, P < 0.01). Urinary biopterin was significantly higher in cancer cases (P < 0.05). Serum Kyn/Trp was significantly higher in colorectal carcinoma patients (P < 0.01). Lymphatic invasion was present in 23 of 44 patients, of which only 12 patients had lymph node metastasis. Eleven patients with LI had no lymph node metastasis. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase intensity score was significantly higher in LI positive cancer group (44.56% ± 6.11%) than negative colorectal cancer patients (24.04% ± 6.90%), (P < 0.05). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression correlated both with the presence of LI and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). A significant difference between the accuracy of diagnosis by using either total indoleamine-2

  16. Crystal structures of alkylperoxo and anhydride intermediates in an intradiol ring-cleaving dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Knoot, Cory J.; Purpero, Vincent M.; Lipscomb, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Intradiol aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenases use an active site, nonheme Fe3+ to activate O2 and catecholic substrates for reaction. The inability of Fe3+ to directly bind O2 presents a mechanistic conundrum. The reaction mechanism of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase is investigated here using the alternative substrate 4-fluorocatechol. This substrate is found to slow the reaction at several steps throughout the mechanistic cycle, allowing the intermediates to be detected in solution studies. When the reaction was initiated in an enzyme crystal, it was found to halt at one of two intermediates depending on the pH of the surrounding solution. The X-ray crystal structure of the intermediate at pH 6.5 revealed the key alkylperoxo-Fe3+ species, and the anhydride-Fe3+ intermediate was found for a crystal reacted at pH 8.5. Intermediates of these types have not been structurally characterized for intradiol dioxygenases, and they validate four decades of spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational studies. In contrast to our similar in crystallo crystallographic studies of an Fe2+-containing extradiol dioxygenase, no evidence for a superoxo or peroxo intermediate preceding the alkylperoxo was found. This observation and the lack of spectroscopic evidence for an Fe2+ intermediate that could bind O2 are consistent with concerted formation of the alkylperoxo followed by Criegee rearrangement to yield the anhydride and ultimately ring-opened product. Structural comparison of the alkylperoxo intermediates from the intra- and extradiol dioxygenases provides a rationale for site specificity of ring cleavage. PMID:25548185

  17. Purification and properties of 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase from polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying the cloned bphC gene

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, K.; Arimura, N.

    1987-02-01

    2,3-Dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase, involved in biphenyl and polychlorinated biphenyl degradation, was purified from cell extracts of polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 and Pseudomonas aeruginas PAO1161 carrying the cloned bphC gene (encoding 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase). The purified enzyme contained ferrous iron as a prosthetic group. The specific activities decreased with the loss of ferrous iron from the enzyme, and the activity was restored by incubation with ferrous iron in the presence of cysteine. Addition of ferric iron caused the complete inactivation of the enzyme. The molecular weight was estimated to be 250,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band with a molecular weight of 31,000, indicating that the enzyme consists of eight identical subunits. The enzyme was specific only for 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl with a K/sub m/ value of 87 ..mu..M. No significant activity was observed for 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl, catechol, or 3-methyl- and 4-methylcatechol. The molecular weight, subunit structure, ferrous iron requirement, and NH/sub 2/-terminal sequence (starting with serine up to 12 residues) were the same between the two enzymes obtained from KF707 and PAO1161 (bphC).

  18. A Novel Aromatic-Ring-Hydroxylating Dioxygenase from the Diterpenoid-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas abietaniphila BKME-9

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Vincent J. J.; Mohn, William W.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas abietaniphila BKME-9 is able to degrade dehydroabietic acid (DhA) via ring hydroxylation by a novel dioxygenase. The ditA1, ditA2, and ditA3 genes, which encode the α and β subunits of the oxygenase and the ferredoxin of the diterpenoid dioxygenase, respectively, were isolated and sequenced. The ferredoxin gene is 9.2 kb upstream of the oxygenase genes and 872 bp upstream of a putative meta ring cleavage dioxygenase gene, ditC. A Tn5 insertion in the α subunit gene, ditA1, resulted in the accumulation by the mutant strain BKME-941 of the pathway intermediate, 7-oxoDhA. Disruption of the ferredoxin gene, ditA3, in wild-type BKME-9 by mutant-allele exchange resulted in a strain (BKME-91) with a phenotype identical to that of the mutant strain BKME-941. Sequence analysis of the putative ferredoxin indicated that it is likely to be a [4Fe-4S]- or [3Fe-4S]-type ferredoxin and not a [2Fe-2S]-type ferredoxin, as found in all previously described ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases. Expression in Escherichia coli of ditA1A2A3, encoding the diterpenoid dioxygenase without its putative reductase component, resulted in a functional enzyme. The diterpenoid dioxygenase attacks 7-oxoDhA, and not DhA, at C-11 and C-12, producing 7-oxo-11,12-dihydroxy-8,13-abietadien acid, which was identified by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, UV-visible light, and high-resolution mass spectrometry. The organization of the genes encoding the various components of the diterpenoid dioxygenase, the phylogenetic distinctiveness of both the α subunit and the ferredoxin component, and the unusual Fe-S cluster of the ferredoxin all suggest that this enzyme belongs to a new class of aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases. PMID:10217753

  19. Interrogating the Druggability of the 2-Oxoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase Target Class by Chemical Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Joberty, Gérard; Boesche, Markus; Brown, Jack A; Eberhard, Dirk; Garton, Neil S; Humphreys, Philip G; Mathieson, Toby; Muelbaier, Marcel; Ramsden, Nigel G; Reader, Valérie; Rueger, Anne; Sheppard, Robert J; Westaway, Susan M; Bantscheff, Marcus; Lee, Kevin; Wilson, David M; Prinjha, Rab K; Drewes, Gerard

    2016-07-15

    The 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase target class comprises around 60 enzymes including several subfamilies with relevance to human disease, such as the prolyl hydroxylases and the Jumonji-type lysine demethylases. Current drug discovery approaches are largely based on small molecule inhibitors targeting the iron/2-oxoglutarate cofactor binding site. We have devised a chemoproteomics approach based on a combination of unselective active-site ligands tethered to beads, enabling affinity capturing of around 40 different dioxygenase enzymes from human cells. Mass-spectrometry-based quantification of bead-bound enzymes using a free-ligand competition-binding format enabled the comprehensive determination of affinities for the cosubstrate 2-oxoglutarate and for oncometabolites such as 2-hydroxyglutarate. We also profiled a set of representative drug-like inhibitor compounds. The results indicate that intracellular competition by endogenous cofactors and high active site similarity present substantial challenges for drug discovery for this target class. PMID:27197014

  20. Crystal structure of the TK2203 protein from Thermococcus kodakarensis, a putative extradiol dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Yuichi; Simons, Jan Robert; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Miki, Kunio

    2016-06-01

    The TK2203 protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 (262 residues, 29 kDa) is a putative extradiol dioxygenase catalyzing the cleavage of C-C bonds in catechol derivatives. It contains three metal-binding residues, but has no significant sequence similarity to proteins for which structures have been determined. Here, the first crystal structure of the TK2203 protein was determined at 1.41 Å resolution to investigate its functional role. Structure analysis reveals that this protein shares the same fold and catalytic residues as other extradiol dioxygenases, strongly suggesting the same enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the important region contributing to substrate selectivity is discussed. PMID:27303894

  1. Oxidation of nitrotoluenes by toluene dioxygenase: Evidence for a monooxygenase reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.B.; Spain, J.C. ); Haddock, J.D.; Gibson, D.T. )

    1992-08-01

    Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150 initiate toluene degradation by incorporating molecular oxygen into the aromatic nucleus to form cis-1,2-dihydroxy-3-methylcyclohexa-3,5-diene. When toluene-grown cells were incubated with 2- and 3-nitrotoluene, the major products identified were 2- and 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol, respectively. The same cells oxidized 4-nitrotoluene to 2-methyl-5-nitrophenol and 3-methyl-6-nitrocatechol. Escherichia coli JM109(pDTG601), which contains the toluene dioxygenase genes from P. putida F1 under the control of the tac promoter, oxidized the isomeric nitrotoluenes to the same metabolites as those formed by P. putida F1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150. These results extend the range of substrates known to be oxidized by this versatile enzyme and demonstrate for the first time that toluene dioxygenase can oxidize an aromatic methyl substituent.

  2. Trichloroethylene degradation by Escherichia coli containing the cloned Pseudomonas putida F1 toluene dioxygenase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, G.J.; Gibson, D.T. ); Wackett, L.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 has been implicated as an enzyme capable of degrading trichloroethylene. This has now been confirmed with Escherichia coli JM109(pDTG601) that contains the structural genes (todC1C2BA) of toluene dioxygenase under the control of the tac promoter. The extent of trichloroethylene degradation by the recombinant organism depended on the cell concentration and the concentration of trichloroethylene. A linear rate of trichloroethylene degradation was observed with the E. coli recombinant strain. In contrast, P. putida F39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1 that does not contain cis-toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, showed a much faster initial rate of trichloroethylene degradation which decreased over time.

  3. A two-electron shell game: Intermediates of the extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Extradiol catechol ring-cleaving dioxygenases function by binding both the organic substrate and O2 at a divalent metal center in the active site. They have proven to be a particularly versatile group of enzymes with which to study the O2 activation process. Here, recent studies of homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD) are summarized with the objective of showing how Nature can utilize the enzyme structure and the properties of the metal and the substrate to select among many possible chemical paths to achieve both specificity and efficiency. Possible intermediates in the mechanism have been trapped by swapping active site metals, introducing active site amino acid substituted variants, and using substrates with different electron donating capacities. While each of these intermediates could form part of a viable reaction pathway, kinetic measurements significantly limit the likely candidates. Structural, kinetic, spectroscopic and computational analysis of the various intermediates shed light on how catalytic efficiency can be achieved. PMID:24615282

  4. A two-electron-shell game: intermediates of the extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Andrew J; Lipscomb, John D; Que, Lawrence

    2014-06-01

    Extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases function by binding both the organic substrate and O2 at a divalent metal center in the active site. They have proven to be a particularly versatile group of enzymes with which to study the O2 activation process. Here, recent studies of homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase are summarized, showing how nature can utilize the enzyme structure and the properties of the metal and the substrate to select among many possible chemical paths to achieve both specificity and efficiency. Possible intermediates in the mechanism have been trapped by swapping active-site metals, introducing active-site amino acid substituted variants, and using substrates with different electron-donating capacities. Although each of these intermediates could form part of a viable reaction pathway, kinetic measurements significantly limit the likely candidates. Structural, kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational analyses of the various intermediates shed light on how catalytic efficiency can be achieved. PMID:24615282

  5. Functional characterisation of three members of the Vitis vinifera L. carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase gene family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In plants, carotenoids serve as the precursors to C13-norisoprenoids, a group of apocarotenoid compounds with diverse biological functions. Enzymatic cleavage of carotenoids catalysed by members of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) family has been shown to produce a number of industrially important volatile flavour and aroma apocarotenoids including β-ionone, geranylacetone, pseudoionone, α-ionone and 3-hydroxy-β-ionone in a range of plant species. Apocarotenoids contribute to the floral and fruity attributes of many wine cultivars and are thereby, at least partly, responsible for the “varietal character”. Despite their importance in grapes and wine; carotenoid cleavage activity has only been described for VvCCD1 and the mechanism(s) and regulation of carotenoid catabolism remains largely unknown. Results Three grapevine-derived CCD-encoding genes have been isolated and shown to be functional with unique substrate cleavage capacities. Our results demonstrate that the VvCCD4a and VvCCD4b catalyse the cleavage of both linear and cyclic carotenoid substrates. The expression of VvCCD1, VvCCD4a and VvCCD4b was detected in leaf, flower and throughout berry development. VvCCD1 expression was constitutive, whereas VvCCD4a expression was predominant in leaves and VvCCD4b in berries. A transgenic population with a 12-fold range of VvCCD1 expression exhibited a lack of correlation between VvCCD1 expression and carotenoid substrates and/or apocarotenoid products in leaves, providing proof that the in planta function(s) of VvCCD1 in photosynthetically active tissue is distinct from the in vitro activities demonstrated. The isolation and functional characterisation of VvCCD4a and VvCCD4b identify two additional CCDs that are functional in grapevine. Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that the three CCDs are under various levels of control that include gene expression (spatial and temporal), substrate specificity and compartmentalisation

  6. Novel carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase catalyzes the first dedicated step in saffron crocin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Frusciante, Sarah; Diretto, Gianfranco; Bruno, Mark; Ferrante, Paola; Pietrella, Marco; Prado-Cabrero, Alfonso; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Beyer, Peter; Gomez-Gomez, Lourdes; Al-Babili, Salim; Giuliano, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Crocus sativus stigmas are the source of the saffron spice and accumulate the apocarotenoids crocetin, crocins, picrocrocin, and safranal, responsible for its color, taste, and aroma. Through deep transcriptome sequencing, we identified a novel dioxygenase, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 2 (CCD2), expressed early during stigma development and closely related to, but distinct from, the CCD1 dioxygenase family. CCD2 is the only identified member of a novel CCD clade, presents the structural features of a bona fide CCD, and is able to cleave zeaxanthin, the presumed precursor of saffron apocarotenoids, both in Escherichia coli and in maize endosperm. The cleavage products, identified through high-resolution mass spectrometry and comigration with authentic standards, are crocetin dialdehyde and crocetin, respectively. In vitro assays show that CCD2 cleaves sequentially the 7,8 and 7′,8′ double bonds adjacent to a 3-OH-β-ionone ring and that the conversion of zeaxanthin to crocetin dialdehyde proceeds via the C30 intermediate 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal. In contrast, zeaxanthin cleavage dioxygenase (ZCD), an enzyme previously claimed to mediate crocetin formation, did not cleave zeaxanthin or 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal in the test systems used. Sequence comparison and structure prediction suggest that ZCD is an N-truncated CCD4 form, lacking one blade of the β-propeller structure conserved in all CCDs. These results constitute strong evidence that CCD2 catalyzes the first dedicated step in crocin biosynthesis. Similar to CCD1, CCD2 has a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that it may cleave carotenoids localized in the chromoplast outer envelope. PMID:25097262

  7. Induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase: a mechanism of the antitumor activity of interferon. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Y.; Edelstein, M.P.; Duch, D.S.

    1988-02-01

    The antiproliferative effects of interferon ..cap alpha.. (IFN-..cap alpha..) and interferon ..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..) were found to be cell-dependent. Among the human cell lines examined, IFN-..gamma.. had a greater antiproliferative effect against cell lines that exhibited induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, such as the KB oral carcinoma or WiDr colon adenocarcinoma, than against those that lacked the enzyme activity, such as the SW480 colon adenocarcinoma of NCI-H128 small-cell lung carcinoma. Induction of this dioxygenase showed a clear temporal relationship with increased metabolism of L-tryptophan and the depletion of this amino acid in the culture medium. While 70-80% of L-tryptophan remained in the medium of IFN-..cap alpha..- or vehicle-treated cells, virtually all of this amino acid was depleted in the medium of the IFN-..gamma..-treated group following 2-3 days of culture. Supplementing the growth medium with additional L-tryptophan reversed the antiproliferative effect of IFN-..gamma.. against KB cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The antiproliferative effects of IFN-..cap alpha.. and IFN-..gamma.. on SW480 and NCI-H128 cells, which are independent of the dioxygenase activity, and the inability of added L-tryptophan to reverse the effects of IFN-..gamma.. in WiDr cells suggest multiple mechanisms of action of the IFNs. The data show that the antiproliferative effect of IFN-..gamma.. through induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, with a consequent L-tryptophan deprivation, is an effective means of regulating cell growth.

  8. Biochemical characteristics and inhibitor selectivity of mouse indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher Jonathan Daraius; Mailu, B M; Maghzal, G J; Sanchez-Perez, A; Rahlfs, S; Zocher, K; Yuasa, H J; Arthur, J W; Becker, K; Stocker, R; Hunt, N H; Ball, H J

    2010-07-01

    The first step in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism is the cleavage of the 2,3-double bond of the indole ring of tryptophan. In mammals, this reaction is performed independently by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and the recently discovered indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 (IDO2). Here we describe characteristics of a purified recombinant mouse IDO2 enzyme, including its pH stability, thermal stability and structural features. An improved assay system for future studies of recombinant/isolated IDO2 has been developed using cytochrome b (5) as an electron donor. This, the first description of the interaction between IDO2 and cytochrome b (5), provides further evidence of the presence of a physiological electron carrier necessary for activity of enzymes in the "IDO family". Using this assay, the kinetic activity and substrate range of IDO2 were shown to be different to those of IDO1. 1-Methyl-D-tryptophan, a current lead IDO inhibitor used in clinical trials, was a poor inhibitor of both IDO1 and IDO2 activity. This suggests that its immunosuppressive effect may be independent of pharmacological inhibition of IDO enzymes, in the mouse at least. The different biochemical characteristics of the mouse IDO proteins suggest that they have evolved to have distinct biological roles. PMID:20140689

  9. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs

    PubMed Central

    Driggers, Camden M; Hartman, Steven J; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ∼15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases. PMID:25307852

  10. Crystal Structure of the Terminal Oxygenase Component of Cumene Dioxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01†

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xuesong; Fushinobu, Shinya; Fukuda, Eriko; Terada, Tohru; Nakamura, Shugo; Shimizu, Kentaro; Nojiri, Hideaki; Omori, Toshio; Shoun, Hirofumi; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of the terminal component of the cumene dioxygenase multicomponent enzyme system of Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01 (CumDO) was determined at a resolution of 2.2 Å by means of molecular replacement by using the crystal structure of the terminal oxygenase component of naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 (NphDO). The ligation of the two catalytic centers of CumDO (i.e., the nonheme iron and Rieske [2Fe-2S] centers) and the bridging between them in neighboring catalytic subunits by hydrogen bonds through a single amino acid residue, Asp231, are similar to those of NphDO. An unidentified external ligand, possibly dioxygen, was bound at the active site nonheme iron. The entrance to the active site of CumDO is different from the entrance to the active site of NphDO, as the two loops forming the lid exhibit great deviation. On the basis of the complex structure of NphDO, a biphenyl substrate was modeled in the substrate-binding pocket of CumDO. The residues surrounding the modeled biphenyl molecule include residues that have already been shown to be important for its substrate specificity by a number of engineering studies of biphenyl dioxygenases. PMID:15774891

  11. Characterization and evolution of vertebrate indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenases IDOs from monotremes and marsupials.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Hajime J; Ball, Helen J; Ho, Yuen Fern; Austin, Christopher J D; Whittington, Camilla M; Belov, Katherine; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Jermiin, Lars S; Hunt, Nicholas H

    2009-06-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway. TDO is widely distributed in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In contrast, IDO has been found only in mammals and yeast. In 2007, a third enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 (IDO2), was discovered. IDO2 is found not only in mammals but also in lower vertebrates. Interestingly, the Km value of IDO2 for L-Trp was 500-1000 fold higher than that of IDO1. In this study, we isolated both IDO1 and IDO2 cDNA from a monotreme, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), and a marsupial, the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica). We characterized the recombinant proteins and those of other known IDO1/IDO2 in intact cells and a cell-free system. It was found that methylene blue may not be suitable reductant for IDO2, hence resulting in an underestimation of recombinant IDO2 activity. In intact cells, the Km value of IDO2 for L-Trp was estimated to be much higher than that of IDO1 and this high Km value appears to have been conserved during the evolution of IDO2. The protein encoded by the ancestor gene of IDO1 and IDO2 is likely to have had properties more similar to present day IDO2 than to IDO1. PMID:19402226

  12. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0–30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation. PMID:26621792

  13. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0-30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation.

  14. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0-30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+) and Al(3+) and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation. PMID:26621792

  15. Oxidation of aliphatic olefins by toluene dioxygenase: enzyme rates and product identification.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, C C; Wackett, L P

    1997-01-01

    Toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 has been studied extensively with aromatic substrates. The present work examined the toluene dioxygenase-catalyzed oxidation of various halogenated ethenes, propenes, butenes and nonhalogenated cis-2-pentene, an isomeric mix of 2-hexenes, cis-2-heptene, and cis-2-octene as substrates for toluene dioxygenase. Enzyme specific activities were determined for the more water-soluble C2 to C5 compounds and ranged from <4 to 52 nmol per min per mg of protein. Trichloroethene was oxidized at a rate of 33 nmol per min per mg of protein. Products from enzyme reactions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of compounds from whole-cell incubation confirmed the identity of products. Substrates lacking a halogen substituent on sp2 carbon atoms were dioxygenated, while those with halogen and one or more unsubstituted allylic methyl groups were monooxygenated to yield allylic alcohols. 2,3-Dichloro-1-propene, containing both a halogenated double bond and a halogenated allylic methyl group, underwent monooxygenation with allylic rearrangement to yield an isomeric mixture of cis- and trans-2,3-dichloro-2-propene-1-ol. PMID:9190800

  16. Dioxygenases Catalyze O-Demethylation and O,O-Demethylenation with Widespread Roles in Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Metabolism in Opium Poppy*

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Scott C.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    In opium poppy, the antepenultimate and final steps in morphine biosynthesis are catalyzed by the 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases, thebaine 6-O-demethylase (T6ODM) and codeine O-demethylase (CODM). Further investigation into the biochemical functions of CODM and T6ODM revealed extensive and unexpected roles for such enzymes in the metabolism of protopine, benzo[c]phenanthridine, and rhoeadine alkaloids. When assayed with a wide range of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, CODM, T6ODM, and the functionally unassigned paralog DIOX2, renamed protopine O-dealkylase, showed novel and efficient dealkylation activities, including regio- and substrate-specific O-demethylation and O,O-demethylenation. Enzymes catalyzing O,O-demethylenation, which cleave a methylenedioxy bridge leaving two hydroxyl groups, have previously not been reported in plants. Similar cleavage of methylenedioxy bridges on substituted amphetamines is catalyzed by heme-dependent cytochromes P450 in mammals. Preferred substrates for O,O-demethylenation by CODM and protopine O-dealkylase were protopine alkaloids that serve as intermediates in the biosynthesis of benzo[c]phenanthridine and rhoeadine derivatives. Virus-induced gene silencing used to suppress the abundance of CODM and/or T6ODM transcripts indicated a direct physiological role for these enzymes in the metabolism of protopine alkaloids, and they revealed their indirect involvement in the formation of the antimicrobial benzo[c]phenanthridine sanguinarine and certain rhoeadine alkaloids in opium poppy. PMID:23928311

  17. The indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitor 1-methyl-D-tryptophan upregulates IDO1 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Christiane A; Litzenburger, Ulrike M; Opitz, Uta; Sahm, Felix; Ochs, Katharina; Lutz, Christian; Wick, Wolfgang; Platten, Michael

    2011-01-01

    1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-D-MT) is currently being used in clinical trials in patients with relapsed or refractory solid tumors with the aim of inhibiting indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-mediated tumor immune escape. IDO is expressed in tumors and tumor-draining lymph nodes and degrades tryptophan (trp) to create an immunsuppressive micromilieu both by depleting trp and by accumulating immunosuppressive metabolites of the kynurenine (kyn) pathway. Here we show that proliferation of alloreactive T-cells cocultured with IDO1-positive human cancer cells paradoxically was inhibited by 1-D-MT. Surprisingly incubation with 1-D-MT increased kyn production of human cancer cells. Cell-free assays revealed that 1-D-MT did not alter IDO1 enzymatic activity. Instead, 1-D-MT induced IDO1 mRNA and protein expression through pathways involving p38 MAPK and JNK signalling. Treatment of cancer patients with 1-D-MT has transcriptional effects that may promote rather than suppress anti-tumor immune escape by increasing IDO1 in the cancer cells. These off-target effects should be carefully analyzed in the ongoing clinical trials with 1-D-MT. PMID:21625531

  18. Molecular cloning of hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase, a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, from cultured roots of Hyoscyamus niger.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, J; Okabe, S; Hashimoto, T; Yamada, Y

    1991-05-25

    Roots of several solanaceous plants produce anticholinergic alkaloids, hyoscyamine and scopolamine. Hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase, a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase (EC 1.14.11.11), catalyzes hydroxylation of hyoscyamine in the biosynthetic pathway leading to scopolamine. We report here on the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the hydroxylase from a cDNA library made from mRNA of the cultured roots of Hyoscyamus niger. The library was screened with three synthetic oligonucleotides that encode amino acid sequences of internal peptide fragments of the purified hydroxylase. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the cloned cDNA revealed an open reading frame that encodes 344 amino acids (Mr = 38,999). All 12 internal peptide fragments determined in the purified enzyme were found in the amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA. With computer-aided comparison to other proteins we found that the hydroxylase is homologous to two synthases involved in the biosynthesis of beta-lactam antibiotics in some microorganisms and the gene products of tomato pTOM13 cDNA and maize A2 locus which had been proposed to catalyze oxidative reactions in the biosynthesis of ethylene and anthocyan, respectively. RNA blotting hybridization showed that mRNA of the hydroxylase is abundant in cultured roots and present in plant roots, but absent in leaves, stems, and cultured cells of H. niger. PMID:2033047

  19. Characterization of the 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase gene family and the regulation of abscisic acid biosynthesis in avocado.

    PubMed

    Chernys, J T; Zeevaart, J A

    2000-09-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill. cv Lula) is a climacteric fruit that exhibits a rise in ethylene as the fruit ripens. This rise in ethylene is followed by an increase in abscisic acid (ABA), with the highest level occurring just after the peak in ethylene production. ABA is synthesized from the cleavage of carotenoid precursors. The cleavage of carotenoid precursors produces xanthoxin, which can subsequently be converted into ABA via ABA-aldehyde. Indirect evidence indicates that the cleavage reaction, catalyzed by 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), is the regulatory step in ABA synthesis. Three genes encoding NCED cleavage-like enzymes were cloned from avocado fruit. Two genes, PaNCED1 and PaNCED3, were strongly induced as the fruit ripened. The other gene, PaNCED2, was constitutively expressed during fruit ripening, as well as in leaves. This gene lacks a predicted chloroplast transit peptide. It is therefore unlikely to be involved in ABA biosynthesis. PaNCED1 was induced by water stress, but expression of PaNCED3 was not detectable in dehydrated leaves. Recombinant PaNCED1 and PaNCED3 were capable of in vitro cleavage of 9-cis-xanthophylls into xanthoxin and C(25)-apocarotenoids, but PaNCED2 was not. Taken together, the results indicate that ABA biosynthesis in avocado is regulated at the level of carotenoid cleavage. PMID:10982448

  20. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-dependent neurotoxic kynurenine metabolism mediates inflammation-induced deficit in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Heisler, Jillian M; O'Connor, Jason C

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive dysfunction in depression is a prevalent and debilitating symptom that is poorly treated by the currently available pharmacotherapies. Research over the past decade has provided evidence for proinflammatory involvement in the neurobiology of depressive disorders and symptoms associated with these disorders, including aspects of memory dysfunction. Recent clinical studies implicate inflammation-related changes in kynurenine metabolism as a potential pathogenic factor in the development of a range of depressive symptoms, including deficits in cognition and memory. Additionally, preclinical work has demonstrated a number of mood-related depressive-like behaviors to be dependent on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), the inflammation-induced rate-limiting enzyme of the kynurenine pathway. Here, we demonstrate in a mouse model, that peripheral administration of endotoxin induced a deficit in recognition memory. Mice deficient in IDO were protected from cognitive impairment. Furthermore, endotoxin-induced inflammation increased kynurenine metabolism within the perirhinal/entorhinal cortices, brain regions which have been implicated in recognition memory. A single peripheral injection of kynurenine, the metabolic product of IDO1, was sufficient to induce a deficit in recognition memory in both control and IDO null mice. Finally, kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) deficient mice were also protected from inflammation-induced deficits on novel object recognition. These data implicate IDO-dependent neurotoxic kynurenine metabolism as a pathogenic factor for cognitive dysfunction in inflammation-induced depressive disorders and a potential novel target for the treatment of these disorders. PMID:26130057

  1. A Novel Phenanthrene Dioxygenase from Nocardioides sp. Strain KP7: Expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Tokuro; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2000-01-01

    Nocardioides sp. strain KP7 grows on phenanthrene but not on naphthalene. This organism degrades phenanthrene via 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate, o-phthalate, and protocatechuate. The genes responsible for the degradation of phenanthrene to o-phthalate (phd) were found by Southern hybridization to reside on the chromosome. A 10.6-kb DNA fragment containing eight phd genes was cloned and sequenced. The phdA, phdB, phdC, and phdD genes, which encode the α and β subunits of the oxygenase component, a ferredoxin, and a ferredoxin reductase, respectively, of phenanthrene dioxygenase were identified. The gene cluster, phdAB, was located 8.3 kb downstream of the previously characterized phdK gene, which encodes 2-carboxybenzaldehyde dehydrogenase. The phdCD gene cluster was located 2.9 kb downstream of the phdB gene. PhdA and PhdB exhibited moderate (less than 60%) sequence identity to the α and β subunits of other ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases. The PhdC sequence showed features of a [3Fe-4S] or [4Fe-4S] type of ferredoxin, not of the [2Fe-2S] type of ferredoxin that has been found in most of the reported ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases. PhdD also showed moderate (less than 40%) sequence identity to known reductases. The phdABCD genes were expressed poorly in Escherichia coli, even when placed under the control of strong promoters. The introduction of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence upstream of each initiation codon of the phdABCD genes improved their expression in E. coli. E. coli cells carrying phdBCD or phdACD exhibited no phenanthrene-degrading activity, and those carrying phdABD or phdABC exhibited phenanthrene-degrading activity which was significantly less than that in cells carrying the phdABCD genes. It was thus concluded that all of the phdABCD genes are necessary for the efficient expression of phenanthrene-degrading activity. The genetic organization of the phd genes, the phylogenetically diverged positions of these genes, and an unusual type of ferredoxin component

  2. Origin of the Proton-transfer Step in the Cofactor-free (1H)-3-Hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Ortega, Aitor; Quesne, Matthew G.; Bui, Soi; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Steiner, Roberto A.; Heyes, Derren J.; de Visser, Sam P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.

    2014-01-01

    Dioxygenases catalyze a diverse range of chemical reactions that involve the incorporation of oxygen into a substrate and typically use a transition metal or organic cofactor for reaction. Bacterial (1H)-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase (HOD) belongs to a class of oxygenases able to catalyze this energetically unfavorable reaction without any cofactor. In the quinaldine metabolic pathway, HOD breaks down its natural N-heteroaromatic substrate using a mechanism that is still incompletely understood. Experimental and computational approaches were combined to study the initial step of the catalytic cycle. We have investigated the role of the active site His-251/Asp-126 dyad, proposed to be involved in substrate hydroxyl group deprotonation, a critical requirement for subsequent oxygen reaction. The pH profiles obtained under steady-state conditions for the H251A and D126A variants show a strong pH effect on their kcat and kcat/Km constants, with a decrease in kcat/Km of 5500- and 9-fold at pH 10.5, respectively. Substrate deprotonation studies under transient-state conditions show that this step is not rate-limiting and yield a pKa value of ∼7.2 for WT HOD. A large solvent isotope effect was found, and the pKa value was shifted to ∼8.3 in D2O. Crystallographic and computational studies reveal that the mutations have a minor effect on substrate positioning. Computational work shows that both His-251 and Asp-126 are essential for the proton transfer driving force of the initial reaction. This multidisciplinary study offers unambiguous support to the view that substrate deprotonation, driven by the His/Asp dyad, is an essential requirement for its activation. PMID:24482238

  3. Characterization and evolution of vertebrate indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenases IDOs from monotremes and marsupials.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Hajime J; Ball, Helen J; Ho, Yuen Fern; Austin, Christopher J D; Whittington, Camilla M; Belov, Katherine; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Jermiin, Lars S; Hunt, Nicholas H

    2009-06-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway. TDO is widely distributed in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In contrast, IDO has been found only in mammals and yeast. In 2007, a third enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 (IDO2), was discovered. IDO2 is found not only in mammals but also in lower vertebrates. Interestingly, the K(m) value of IDO2 for L-Trp was 500-1000 fold higher than that of IDO1. In this study, we isolated both IDO1 and IDO2 cDNA from a monotreme, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), and a marsupial, the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica). We characterized the recombinant proteins and those of other known IDO1/IDO2 in intact cells and a cell-free system. It was found that methylene blue may not be suitable reductant for IDO2, hence resulting in an underestimation of recombinant IDO2 activity. In intact cells, the K(m) value of IDO2 for L-Trp was estimated to be much higher than that of IDO1 and this high K(m) value appears to have been conserved during the evolution of IDO2. The protein encoded by the ancestor gene of IDO1 and IDO2 is likely to have had properties more similar to present day IDO2 than to IDO1. PMID:19416693

  4. The prognostic significance of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase and the receptors for transforming growth factor β and interferon γ in metastatic lymph nodes in malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Pelak, Maciej J; Śnietura, Mirosław; Lange, Dariusz; Nikiel, Barbara; Pecka, Katarzyna M

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the prognostic significance of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and type 1 receptors for transforming growth factor beta (TGF-βR1) and interferon gamma (IFN-γR1) in resected nodal metastases of 48 malignant melanoma patients. In 32 cases the corresponding skin tumors were available. We used immunohistochemical (IHC) staining which was assessed by pathologists and by a computer-aided algorithm that yielded quantitative results, both absolute and relative. We correlated the results with the patient outcome. We identified absolute computer-assessed IDO levels as positively correlated with increased risk of death in a multivariate model (HR = 1.02; 95% CI: 1.002-1.04; p = 0.03). In univariate analysis, patients with IDO levels below the median had a better overall survival time (30.3 vs. 17.5 months; p = 0.03). TGF-βR1 and IFN-γR1 expression was modestly correlated (R = 0.34; p lt; 0.05) and TGF-βR1 expression was lower in lymph nodes than in matched primary skin tumors (Z = 2.87; p = 0.004). The pathologists' and computer-aided IHC assessment demonstrated high correlation levels (R = 0.61, R = 0.74 and R = 0.88 for IDO, TGF-βR1 and IFN-γR1, respectively). Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase is prognostic for the patient outcome in melanoma with nodal involvement and should be investigated prospectively for its predictive significance. IHC assessment by computer-aided methods is recommended as its gives IHC more objectivity and reproducibility. ecting mismatch repair deficiency. Association of CDX2 and PMS2 in the present study is necessary to conduct further genetic and pathological studies focusing on these two markers together. PMID:27003769

  5. Metabolism of Doubly para-Substituted Hydroxychlorobiphenyls by Bacterial Biphenyl Dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Thi Thanh My; Sondossi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we examined the profile of metabolites produced from the doubly para-substituted biphenyl analogs 4,4′-dihydroxybiphenyl, 4-hydroxy-4′-chlorobiphenyl, 3-hydroxy-4,4′-dichlorobiphenyl, and 3,3′-dihydroxy-4,4′-chlorobiphenyl by biphenyl-induced Pandoraea pnomenusa B356 and by its biphenyl dioxygenase (BPDO). 4-Hydroxy-4′-chlorobiphenyl was hydroxylated principally through a 2,3-dioxygenation of the hydroxylated ring to generate 2,3-dihydro-2,3,4-trihydroxy-4′-chlorobiphenyl and 3,4-dihydroxy-4′-chlorobiphenyl after the removal of water. The former was further oxidized by the biphenyl dioxygenase to produce ultimately 3,4,5-trihydroxy-4′-chlorobiphenyl, a dead-end metabolite. 3-Hydroxy-4,4′-dichlorobiphenyl was oxygenated on both rings. Hydroxylation of the nonhydroxylated ring generated 2,3,3′-trihydroxy-4′-chlorobiphenyl with concomitant dechlorination, and 2,3,3′-trihydroxy-4′-chlorobiphenyl was ultimately metabolized to 2-hydroxy-4-chlorobenzoate, but hydroxylation of the hydroxylated ring generated dead-end metabolites. 3,3′-Dihydroxy-4,4′-dichlorobiphenyl was principally metabolized through a 2,3-dioxygenation to generate 2,3-dihydro-2,3,3′-trihydroxy-4,4′-dichlorobiphenyl, which was ultimately converted to 3-hydroxy-4-chlorobenzoate. Similar metabolites were produced when the biphenyl dioxygenase of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 was used to catalyze the reactions, except that for the three substrates used, the BPDO of LB400 was less efficient than that of B356, and unlike that of B356, it was unable to further oxidize the initial reaction products. Together the data show that BPDO oxidation of doubly para-substituted hydroxychlorobiphenyls may generate nonnegligible amounts of dead-end metabolites. Therefore, biphenyl dioxygenase could produce metabolites other than those expected, corresponding to dihydrodihydroxy metabolites from initial doubly para-substituted substrates. This finding shows that a clear

  6. The second enzyme in pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic pathway is related to the heme-dependent dioxygenase superfamily†

    PubMed Central

    De Laurentis, Walter; Khim, Leang; Anderson, J.L. Ross; Adam, Ariane; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Phillips, Robert S.; Chapman, Stephen K.; van Pee, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin is a commonly used and clinically effective treatment for fungal infections and provides the structural basis for the more widely used fludioxinil. The pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic pathway consists of four chemical steps, the second of which is the rearrangement of 7-chloro-tryptophan by the enzyme PrnB, a reaction that is so far unprecedented in biochemistry. When expressed in Pseudomonas fluorescens, PrnB is red in color due to the fact that it contains 1 mole of heme b per mole of protein. The crystal structure unexpectedly establishes PrnB as a member of the heme-dependent dioxygenase superfamily with significant structural but not sequence homology to the two-domain indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme (IDO). The heme-binding domain is also structurally similar to that of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Here we report the binary complex structures of PrnB with D- and L-tryptophan and D- and L-chloro-tryptophan. The structures identify a common hydrophobic pocket for the indole ring but exhibit unusual heme ligation and substrate binding when compared with that observed in the TDO crystal structures. Our solution studies support the heme ligation observed in the crystal structures. Purification of the hexahistidine-tagged PrnB yields homogeneous protein that only displays in vitro activity with 7-chloro-L-tryptophan after reactivation with crude extract from the host strain, suggesting that an as yet unknown cofactor is required for activity. Mutation of the proximal heme ligand results, not surprisingly, in inactive enzyme. Redox titrations show that PrnB displays a significantly different reduction potential to that of IDO or TDO, indicating possible differences in the PrnB catalytic cycle. This is confirmed by the absence of tryptophan dioxygenase activity in PrnB, although a stable oxyferrous adduct (which is the first intermediate in the TDO/IDO catalytic cycle) can be generated. We propose that PrnB shares a key catalytic step with TDO and IDO

  7. Trichloroethylene removal and oxidation toxicity mediated by toluene dioxygenase of Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.; Jenkins, R.O.

    1994-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a major ground water contaminant and potential health hazard in drinking water. This paper reports on the cometabolism of TCE by a wild-type strain of Pseudomonas putida containing an inducible toluene dioxygenase enzyme. The results show rapid TCE removal by the strain but severe oxidation toxicity and rapid cell death. This is also the first report of enhanced capacity of bacterial cells to remove TCE in the presence of dithiothreitol. Presented also is evidence for induction of toluene degradation by TCE. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Metabolism of Doubly para-Substituted Hydroxychlorobiphenyls by Bacterial Biphenyl Dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Thanh My; Sondossi, Mohammad; Sylvestre, Michel

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we examined the profile of metabolites produced from the doubly para-substituted biphenyl analogs 4,4'-dihydroxybiphenyl, 4-hydroxy-4'-chlorobiphenyl, 3-hydroxy-4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl, and 3,3'-dihydroxy-4,4'-chlorobiphenyl by biphenyl-induced Pandoraea pnomenusa B356 and by its biphenyl dioxygenase (BPDO). 4-Hydroxy-4'-chlorobiphenyl was hydroxylated principally through a 2,3-dioxygenation of the hydroxylated ring to generate 2,3-dihydro-2,3,4-trihydroxy-4'-chlorobiphenyl and 3,4-dihydroxy-4'-chlorobiphenyl after the removal of water. The former was further oxidized by the biphenyl dioxygenase to produce ultimately 3,4,5-trihydroxy-4'-chlorobiphenyl, a dead-end metabolite. 3-Hydroxy-4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl was oxygenated on both rings. Hydroxylation of the nonhydroxylated ring generated 2,3,3'-trihydroxy-4'-chlorobiphenyl with concomitant dechlorination, and 2,3,3'-trihydroxy-4'-chlorobiphenyl was ultimately metabolized to 2-hydroxy-4-chlorobenzoate, but hydroxylation of the hydroxylated ring generated dead-end metabolites. 3,3'-Dihydroxy-4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl was principally metabolized through a 2,3-dioxygenation to generate 2,3-dihydro-2,3,3'-trihydroxy-4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl, which was ultimately converted to 3-hydroxy-4-chlorobenzoate. Similar metabolites were produced when the biphenyl dioxygenase of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 was used to catalyze the reactions, except that for the three substrates used, the BPDO of LB400 was less efficient than that of B356, and unlike that of B356, it was unable to further oxidize the initial reaction products. Together the data show that BPDO oxidation of doubly para-substituted hydroxychlorobiphenyls may generate nonnegligible amounts of dead-end metabolites. Therefore, biphenyl dioxygenase could produce metabolites other than those expected, corresponding to dihydrodihydroxy metabolites from initial doubly para-substituted substrates. This finding shows that a clear picture of the fate of polychlorinated

  9. Heterologous Expression and Characterization of Two 1-Hydroxy-2-Naphthoic Acid Dioxygenases from Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans

    PubMed Central

    Kavakiotis, Konstantinos; Kallimanis, Aristeidis; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Drainas, Constantin; Koukkou, Anna-Irini

    2012-01-01

    A protein fraction exhibiting 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (1-H2NA) dioxygenase activity was purified via ion exchange, hydrophobic interactions, and gel filtration chromatography from Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans sp. nov. strain Sphe3 isolated from a Greek creosote-oil-polluted site. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and tandem MS (MS-MS) analysis revealed that the amino acid sequences of oligopeptides of the major 45-kDa protein species, as analyzed by SDS-PAGE and silver staining, comprising 29% of the whole sequence, exhibited strong homology with 1-H2NA dioxygenase of Nocardioides sp. strain KP7. A BLAST search of the recently sequenced Sphe3 genome revealed two putative open reading frames, named diox1 and diox2, showing 90% nucleotide identity to each other and 85% identity at the amino acid level with the Nocardia sp. homologue. diox1 was found on an indigenous Sphe3 plasmid, whereas diox2 was located on the chromosome. Both genes were induced by the presence of phenanthrene used as a sole carbon and energy source, and as expected, both were subject to carbon catabolite repression. The relative RNA transcription level of the chromosomal (diox2) gene was significantly higher than that of its plasmid (diox1) homologue. Both diox1 and diox2 putative genes were PCR amplified, cloned, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant E. coli cells expressed 1-H2NA dioxygenase activity. Recombinant enzymes exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics with an apparent Km of 35 μM for Diox1 and 29 μM for Diox2, whereas they showed similar kinetic turnover characteristics with Kcat/Km values of 11 × 106 M−1 s−1 and 12 × 106 M−1 s−1, respectively. Occurrence of two diox1 and diox2 homologues in the Sphe3 genome implies that a replicative transposition event has contributed to the evolution of 1-H2NA dioxygenase in A. phenanthrenivorans. PMID:22101055

  10. Synergistic antitumor effect with indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase inhibition and temozolomide in a murine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Hanihara, Mitsuto; Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Oh-Oka, Kyoko; Mitsuka, Kentaro; Nakao, Atsuhito; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a key enzyme of tryptophan (Trp) metabolism, is involved in tumor-derived immune suppression through depletion of Trp and accumulation of the metabolite kynurenine, resulting in inactivation of natural killer cells and generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). It has been reported that high expression of IDO in cancer cells is associated with suppression of the antitumor immune response and is consistent with a poor prognosis. Thus, IDO may be a therapeutic target for malignant cancer. The authors have recently shown that IDO expression is markedly increased in human glioblastoma and secondary glioblastoma with malignant change, suggesting that IDO targeting may also have therapeutic potential for patients with glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of IDO inhibition and to examine the synergistic function of IDO inhibitor and temozolomide (TMZ) in a murine glioma model. METHODS Murine glioma GL261 cells and human glioma U87 cells were included in this study. The authors used 3 mouse models to study glioma cell growth: 1) a subcutaneous ectopic model, 2) a syngeneic intracranial orthotopic model, and 3) an allogenic intracranial orthotopic model. IDO inhibition was achieved via knockdown of IDO in GL261 cells using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and through oral administration of the IDO inhibitor, 1-methyl-l-tryptophan (1-MT). Tumor volume in the subcutaneous model and survival time in the intracranial model were evaluated. RESULTS In the subcutaneous model, oral administration of 1-MT significantly suppressed tumor growth, and synergistic antitumor effects of 1-MT and TMZ were observed (p < 0.01). Mice containing intracranially inoculated IDO knockdown cells had a significantly longer survival period as compared with control mice (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that IDO expression is implicated in immunosuppression and tumor progression in glioma cells. Therefore, combining IDO

  11. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-mediated tryptophan catabolism accelerates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Szántó, Sándor; Koreny, Tamás; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Varga, John

    2007-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is one of the initial and rate-limiting enzymes involved in the catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan. In cultured cells, the induction of IDO leads to depletion of tryptophan and tryptophan starvation. Recent studies suggest that modulation of tryptophan concentration via IDO plays a fundamental role in innate immune responses. Induction of IDO by interferon-gamma in macrophages and dendritic cells results in tryptophan depletion and suppresses the immune-mediated activation of fibroblasts and T, B, and natural killer cells. To assess the role of IDO in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a model of rheumatoid arthritis characterized by a primarily Th1-like immune response, activity of IDO was inhibited by 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) in vivo. The results showed significantly increased incidence and severity of CIA in mice treated with 1-MT. Activity of IDO, as determined by measuring the levels of kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in the sera, was increased in the acute phase of arthritis and was higher in collagen-immunized mice that did not develop arthritis. Treatment with 1-MT resulted in an enhanced cellular and humoral immune response and a more dominant polarization to Th1 in mice with arthritis compared with vehicle-treated arthritic mice. The results demonstrated that development of CIA was associated with increased IDO activity and enhanced tryptophan catabolism in mice. Blocking IDO with 1-MT aggravated the severity of arthritis and enhanced the immune responses. These findings suggest that IDO may play an important and novel role in the negative feedback of CIA and possibly in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17511858

  12. Induction of Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase-1 by Immunostimulatory-DNA Limits Severity of Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Matthew A; Bettonville, Ellen E; McDonald, Keely G; Metz, Richard; Prendergast, George C; Newberry, Rodney D; Stenson, William F

    2010-01-01

    The chronic inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by aberrant innate and adaptive immune responses to commensal luminal bacteria. In both human IBD and in experimental models of colitis there is an increased expression of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). IDO expression has the capacity to exert antimicrobial effects and dampen adaptive immune responses. In the murine TNBS model of colitis, inhibition of this enzyme leads to worsened disease severity suggesting that IDO acts as a natural break in limiting colitis. In this investigation we show that induction of IDO-1 by a TLR-9 agonist, immunostimulatory-DNA (ISS-DNA), critically contributes to its colitis limiting capacities. ISS-DNA induces intestinal expression of IDO-1, but not the recently described paralog enzyme IDO-2. This induction occurred in both epithelial cells and in subsets of CD11c+ and CD11b+ cells of the lamina propria which also increase after ISS-ODN. Signaling required for intestinal IDO-1 induction involves interferon dependent pathways, as IDO-1 was not induced in STAT-1 knockout mice. Using both the TNBS and DSS models of colitis we show the importance of IDO-1s induction in limiting colitis severity. The clinical parameters and histologic correlates of colitis in these models were improved by administration of the TLR-9 agonist; however, when the function of IDO is inhibited, the colitis limiting effects of ISS-ODN were abrogated. These findings support the possibility that targeted induction of IDO-1 is an approach deserving further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for diseases of intestinal inflammation. PMID:20181893

  13. Intron retention and rhythmic diel pattern regulation of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 2 during crocetin biosynthesis in saffron.

    PubMed

    Ahrazem, Oussama; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Argandoña-Picazo, Javier; Castillo, Raquel; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2016-06-01

    The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 2, a new member of the CCD family, catalyzes the conversion of zeaxanthin into crocetin-dialdehyde in Crocus. CCD2 is expressed in flowers, being responsible for the yellow, orange and red colorations displayed by tepals and stigma. Three CsCCD2 genes were identified in Crocus sativus, the longest contains ten exons and the shorter is a truncated copy with no introns and which lacks one exon sequence. Analysis of RNA-seq datasets of three developmental stages of saffron stigma allowed the determination of alternative splicing in CsCCD2, being intron retention (IR) the prevalent form of alternative splicing in CsCCD2. Further, high IR was observed in tissues that do not accumulate crocetin. The analysis of one CsCCD2 promoter showed cis-regulatory motifs involved in the response to light, temperature, and circadian regulation. The light and circadian regulation are common elements shared with the previously characterized CsLycB2a promoter, and these shared common cis-acting elements may represent binding sites for transcription factors responsible for co-regulation of these genes during the development of the stigma in saffron. A daily coordinated rhythmic regulation for CsCCD2 and CsLycB2a was observed, with higher levels of mRNA occurring at low temperatures during darkness, confirming the results obtained in the in silico promoter analysis. In addition, to the light and temperature dependent regulation of CsCCD2 expression, the apocarotenoid β-cyclocitral up-regulated CsCCD2 expression and could acts as a mediator of chromoplast-to-nucleus signalling, coordinating the expression of CsCCD2 with the developmental state of the chromoplast in the developing stigma. PMID:27071403

  14. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase, Tryptophan Catabolism, and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: a Model for Chronic Mycobacterial Infections ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Plain, Karren M.; de Silva, Kumudika; Earl, John; Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Virulent mycobacterial infections progress slowly, with a latent period that leads to clinical disease in a proportion of cases. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen that causes paratuberculosis or Johne's disease (JD), a chronic intestinal disease of ruminants. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme that regulates tryptophan metabolism, was originally reported to have a role in intracellular pathogen killing and has since been shown to have an important immunoregulatory role in chronic immune diseases. Here we demonstrate an association between increased IDO levels and progression to clinical mycobacterial disease in a natural host, characterizing gene expression, protein localization, and functional effects. IDO mRNA levels were significantly increased in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected monocytic cells. Levels of both IDO gene and protein expression were significantly upregulated within the affected tissues of sheep with JD, particularly at the site of primary infection, the ileum, of animals with severe multibacillary disease. Lesion severity was correlated with the level of IDO gene expression. IDO gene expression was also increased in the peripheral blood cells of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed sheep and cattle. IDO breaks down tryptophan, and systemic increases were functional, as shown by decreased plasma tryptophan levels, which correlated with the onset of clinical signs, a stage well known to be associated with Th1 immunosuppression. IDO may be involved in downregulating immune responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and other virulent mycobacteria, which may be an example of the pathogen harnessing host immunoregulatory pathways to aid survival. These findings raise new questions about the host-mycobacterium interactions in the progression from latent to clinical disease. PMID:21730087

  15. Oxidation of alkyl nitronates catalyzed by 2-nitropropane dioxygenase from Hansenula mrakii.

    PubMed

    Mijatovic, Slavica; Gadda, Giovanni

    2008-05-01

    2-Nitropropane dioxygenase from Hansenula mrakii was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and purified in active and stable form using 60% saturation of ammonium sulfate and a single chromatographic step onto a DEAE column. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric and spectrophotometric analyses of the flavin extracted by heat or acid denaturation of the enzyme indicated that FMN, and not FAD as erroneously reported previously, is present in a 1:1 stoichiometry with the protein. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric analysis of the enzyme established that H. mrakii 2-nitropropane dioxygenase contains negligible amounts of iron, manganese, zinc, and copper ions, which are not catalytically relevant. Anaerobic substrate reduction and kinetic data using a Clark oxygen electrode to measure rates of oxygen consumption indicated that the enzyme is active on a broad range of alkyl nitronates, with a marked preference for unbranched substrates over propyl-2-nitronate. Interestingly, the enzyme reacts poorly, if at all, with nitroalkanes, as suggested by lack of both anaerobic reduction of the enzyme-bound flavin and consumption of oxygen with nitroethane, nitrobutane, and 2-nitropropane. Finally, both the tight binding of sulfite (K(d)=90 microM, at pH 8 and 15 degrees C) to the enzyme and the formation of the anionic flavosemiquinone upon anaerobic incubation with alkyl nitronates are consistent with the presence of a positively charged group in proximity of the N1-C2=O atoms of the FMN cofactor. PMID:18329375

  16. The expression and prognostic relevance of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Miia; Halme, Elina; Tiilikainen, Lauri; Luukkainen, Annika; Laranne, Jussi; Rautiainen, Markus; Huhtala, Heini; Paavonen, Timo; Toppila-Salmi, Sanna

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion IDO might be useful for predicting progression of primary tumor stage T2 and T3 in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC), but does not seem like a specific biomarker for diagnosing TSCC and predicting patient survival. Objectives Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is expressed in many cells and it catabolises the essential amino acid tryptophan to kynurenine. IDO acts as an immune modulator through suppression of T-cell immunity and other pathways. In cancer cells, IDO has been proposed to promote tumor progression by enabling malignant cells to escape from the immune system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association and prognostic relevance of IDO expression in TSCC. Method One hundred and eight retrospective tongue and lymph node specimens were stained immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibody anti-indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. The relative abundance of IDO positive epithelial cells, IDO staining intensity, and inflammation were assessed semi-quantitatively with light microscopy. Results IDO was expressed stronger in tongue hyperplasia than in TSCC. However, IDO expression associated with poor survival in the sub-groups with primary tumor stage T2-T4 and in the sub-group with strong inflammation in tumors' invasive front. PMID:26982018

  17. Nitrobenzofurazan derivatives of N'-hydroxyamidines as potent inhibitors of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase 1.

    PubMed

    Paul, Saurav; Roy, Ashalata; Deka, Suman Jyoti; Panda, Subhankar; Trivedi, Vishal; Manna, Debasis

    2016-10-01

    Tryptophan metabolism through the kynurenine pathway is considered as a crucial mechanism in immune tolerance. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) plays a key role in tryptophan catabolism in the immune system and it is also considered as an important therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer and other diseases that are linked with kynurenine pathway. In this study, a series of nitrobenzofurazan derivatives of N'-hydroxybenzimidamides (1) and N'-hydroxy-2-phenylacetimidamides (2) were synthesized and their inhibitory activities against human IDO1 enzyme were tested using in-vitro and cellular enzyme activity assay. The optimization leads to the identification of potent compounds, 1d, 2i and 2k (IC50 = 39-80 nM), which are either competitive or uncompetitive inhibitors of IDO1 enzyme. These compounds also showed IDO1 inhibition potencies in the nanomolar range (IC50 = 50-71 nM) in MDA-MB-231 cells with no/negligible amount of cytotoxicity. The stronger selectivity of the potent compounds for IDO1 enzyme over tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) enzyme (312-1593-fold) also makes them very attractive for further immunotherapeutic applications. PMID:27267006

  18. The metabolic and developmental roles of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase4 from potato.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Raymond; Ducreux, Laurence J M; Morris, Wayne L; Morris, Jenny A; Suttle, Jeffrey C; Ramsay, Gavin; Bryan, Glenn J; Hedley, Pete E; Taylor, Mark A

    2010-10-01

    The factors that regulate storage organ carotenoid content remain to be fully elucidated, despite the nutritional and economic importance of this class of compound. Recent findings suggest that carotenoid pool size is determined, at least in part, by the activity of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase4 (CCD4) activity affects potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber carotenoid content. Microarray analysis revealed elevated expression of the potato CCD4 gene in mature tubers from white-fleshed cultivars compared with higher carotenoid yellow-fleshed tubers. The expression level of the potato CCD4 gene was down-regulated using an RNA interference (RNAi) approach in stable transgenic lines. Down-regulation in tubers resulted in an increased carotenoid content, 2- to 5-fold higher than in control plants. The increase in carotenoid content was mainly due to elevated violaxanthin content, implying that this carotenoid may act as the in vivo substrate. Although transcript level was also reduced in plant organs other than tubers, such as leaves, stems, and roots , there was no change in carotenoid content in these organs. However, carotenoid levels were elevated in flower petals from RNAi lines. As well as changes in tuber carotenoid content, tubers from RNAi lines exhibited phenotypes such as heat sprouting, formation of chain tubers, and an elongated shape. These results suggest that the product of the CCD4 reaction may be an important factor in tuber heat responses. PMID:20688977

  19. Crystal Structure of the Non-heme Iron Dioxygenase PtlH in Pentalenolactone Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    You, Zheng; Omura, Satoshi; Ikeda, Haruo; Cane, David E.; Jogl, Gerwald

    2010-01-01

    The non-heme iron dioxygenase PtlH from the soil organism Streptomyces avermitilis is a member of the iron(II)/α-ketoglutarate–dependent dioxygenase superfamily and catalyzes an essential reaction in the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpenoid antibiotic pentalenolactone. To investigate the structural basis for substrate recognition and catalysis, we have determined the X-ray crystal structure of PtlH in several complexes with the cofactors iron, α-ketoglutarate, and the non-reactive enantiomer of the substrate, ent-1-deoxypentalenic acid, in four different crystal forms to up to 1.31 Å resolution. The overall structure of PtlH forms a double-stranded barrel helix fold and the cofactor-binding site for iron and α-keto-glutarate is similar to other double-stranded barrel helix fold enzymes. Additional secondary structure elements that contribute to the substrate-binding site in PtlH are not conserved in other double-stranded barrel helix fold enzymes. Binding of the substrate enantiomer induces a reorganization of the monoclinic crystal lattice leading to a disorder-order transition of a C-terminal α–helix. The newly formed helix blocks the major access to the active site and effectively traps the bound substrate. Kinetic analysis of wild type and site-directed mutant proteins confirms a critical function of two arginine residues in substrate binding, while simulated docking of the enzymatic reaction product reveals the likely orientation of bound substrate. PMID:17942405

  20. Pivotal role of anthranilate dioxygenase genes in the adaptation of Burkholderia multivorans ATCC 17616 in soil.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Eri; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka

    2012-05-01

    In our recent screen for soil-induced genes, the expression of andA operon (andAcAdAbAa) for anthranilate catabolism in Burkholderia multivorans ATCC 17616 was found to increase dramatically in a soil sample (Nishiyama et al., Environ Microbiol 12: 2539, 2010). The operon was preceded by andR encoding a putative transcriptional regulator for the andA operon. In this study, the andA promoter was induced by tryptophan and anthranilate in an andR-dependent manner. The andA promoter in a deletion mutant lacking tryptophan dioxygenase (one of enzymes for the catabolism of tryptophan to anthranilate) did not respond to tryptophan, indicating that not tryptophan but anthranilate is the effector of AndR. Although both anthranilate and tryptophan were under the detection levels in the soil sample, andA promoter showed higher activity in the soil sample than in a laboratory medium. Such induction required andR and was moderately dependent on the ferric uptake regulator (Fur). The proliferation ability of andAc mutant in the sterile soil was low compared with the co-incubated wild-type cells. These findings suggested that in the soil environment, anthranilate dioxygenase genes are induced by AndR and Fur, and play a pivotal role in the proliferation in the soil environment. PMID:22360670

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of hydroquinone dioxygenase from Sphingomonas sp. TTNP3

    PubMed Central

    Da Vela, Stefano; Ferraroni, Marta; Kolvenbach, Boris A.; Keller, Eva; Corvini, Philippe F. X.; Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Hydroquinone dioxygenase (HQDO), a novel FeII ring-fission dioxygenase from Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3 which oxidizes a wide range of hydroquinones to the corresponding 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehydes, has been crystallized. The enzyme is an α2β2 heterotetramer constituted of two subunits of 19 and 38 kDa. Diffraction-quality crystals of HQDO were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 277 K from a solution consisting of 16% PEG 4000, 0.3 M MgCl2, 0.1 M Tris pH 8.5. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.4, b = 125.4, c = 90.8 Å, β = 105.3°. The asymmetric unit contained two heterotetramers, i.e. four copies of each of the two different subunits related by noncrystallographic 222 symmetry. A complete data set extending to a maximum resolution of 2.5 Å was collected at 100 K using a wavelength of 0.980 Å. PMID:22691794

  2. Bacterial dioxygenase- and monooxygenase-catalysed sulfoxidation of benzo[b]thiophenes.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Derek R; Sharma, Narain D; McMurray, Brian; Haughey, Simon A; Allen, Christopher C R; Hamilton, John T G; McRoberts, W Colin; O'Ferrall, Rory A More; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Coulombel, Lydie A; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2012-01-28

    Asymmetric heteroatom oxidation of benzo[b]thiophenes to yield the corresponding sulfoxides was catalysed by toluene dioxygenase (TDO), naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) and styrene monooxygenase (SMO) enzymes present in P. putida mutant and E. coli recombinant whole cells. TDO-catalysed oxidation yielded the relatively unstable benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide; its dimerization, followed by dehydrogenation, resulted in the isolation of stable tetracyclic sulfoxides as minor products with cis-dihydrodiols being the dominant metabolites. SMO mainly catalysed the formation of enantioenriched benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide and 2-methyl benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxides which racemized at ambient temperature. The barriers to pyramidal sulfur inversion of 2- and 3-methyl benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide metabolites, obtained using TDO and NDO as biocatalysts, were found to be ca.: 25-27 kcal mol(-1). The absolute configurations of the benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxides were determined by ECD spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and stereochemical correlation. A site-directed mutant E. coli strain containing an engineered form of NDO, was found to change the regioselectivity toward preferential oxidation of the thiophene ring rather than the benzene ring. PMID:22134441

  3. Distribution of naphthalene dioxygenase genes in crude oil-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Wang, Jie; Liao, Jingqiu; Xie, Shuguang; Huang, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one of the major pollutants in soils in oil exploring areas. Biodegradation is the major process for natural elimination of PAHs from contaminated soils. Functional genes can be used as biomarkers to assess the biodegradation potential of indigenous microbial populations. However, little is known about the distribution of PAH-degrading genes in the environment. The links between environmental parameters and the distribution of PAH metabolic genes remain essentially unclear. The present study investigated the abundance and diversity of naphthalene dioxygenase genes in the oil-contaminated soils in the Shengli Oil Field (China). Spatial variations in the density and diversity of naphthalene dioxygenase genes occurred in this area. Four different sequence genotypes were observed in the contaminated soils, with the predominance of novel PAH-degrading genes. Pearson's correlation analysis illustrated that gene abundance had positive correlations with the levels of total organic carbon and aromatic hydrocarbons, while gene diversity showed a negative correlation with the level of polar aromatics. This work could provide some new insights toward the distribution of PAH metabolic genes and PAH biodegradation potential in oil-contaminated ecosystems. PMID:25008984

  4. The role of placental indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in human pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Munn et al. made a scientific observation of major biological importance. For the first time they showed that in the mammal the fetus does survive an immune attack mounted by the mother, and that the mechanism responsible for the survival depends on the fetus and placenta 'actively' defending itself from attack by maternal T cells by means of an enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.42) dependent localised depletion of L-tryptophan. These findings raise critical questions for disease and its prevention during human pregnancy. Specifically, the role of this mechanism (discovered in mouse) in the human, and the extent to which defective activation of this process is responsible for major clinical diseases are unknown. Therefore some key facts about this enzyme expressed in the human placenta have been studied in order to test whether Munn et al.'s findings in mouse are met for human pregnancy. This short review attempts to describe our experimental work on human placental indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. PMID:24328005

  5. Photosystem II-inhibitors play a limited role in sweet corn response to 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase-inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postemergence (POST) application of 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) inhibitors in combination with a photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor, such as atrazine, is common practice in sweet corn production. Given the sensitivity of sweet corn to HPPD-inhibiting herbicides, the objective of this wo...

  6. Abundance, Dynamics, and Biogeographic Distribution of Seven Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Dioxygenase Gene Variants in Coastal Sediments of Patagonia

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Magalí S.; Lozada, Mariana; Di Marzio, Walter D.

    2012-01-01

    Novel polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dioxygenase gene variants were present in abundances similar to or higher than those of phnA1 from Cycloclasticus spp. at a chronically polluted subantarctic coastal marine environment in Patagonia. These novel gene variants were detected over a 6-year time span and were also present in sediments from temperate Patagonian sites. PMID:22226948

  7. Isolation and characterization of a novel strain of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia possessing various dioxygenases for monocyclic hydrocarbon degradation

    PubMed Central

    Urszula, Guzik; Izabela, Greń; Danuta, Wojcieszyńska; Sylwia, Łabużek

    2009-01-01

    A Gram-negative bacterium, designated as strain KB2, was isolated from activated sludge and was found to utilize different aromatic substrates as sole carbon and energy source. On the basis of morphological and physiochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolated strain KB2 was identified as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Strain KB2 is from among different Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains the first one described as exhibiting the activities of three types of dioxygenases depending on the structure of the inducer. The cells grown on benzoate and catechol showed mainly catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity. The activity of 2,3-dioxygenase was detected after phenol induction. Protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase was found in crude cell extracts of this strain after incubation with 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid and vanillic acid. Because of broad spectrum of dioxygenases’ types that Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KB2 can exhibit, this strain appears to be very powerful and useful tool in the biotreatment of wastewaters and in soil decontamination. PMID:24031359

  8. Dendritic cells, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and acquired immune privilege

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Baban, Babak; Johnson, Burles A; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized to stimulate T cell immunity. Paradoxically some DCs suppress T cell responses, and activate regulatory T cells. In this review we focus on a potent counter-regulatory pathway mediated by plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) expressing the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). IDO-expressing pDCs inhibit effector T cell responses, activate regulatory T cells, and attenuate pro-inflammatory responses in settings of chronic inflammation that manifest in clinical syndromes such as infectious, allergic and autoimmune diseases, cancer, and transplantation. Thus IDO-expressing pDCs create immune privilege, and provide novel opportunities to improve immunotherapy in multiple disease syndromes. PMID:20367139

  9. Homogentisate 1,2 Dioxygenase is Expressed in Human Osteoarticular Cells: Implications in Alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Laschi, Marcella; Tinti, Laura; Braconi, Daniela; Millucci, Lia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Amato, Loredana; Selvi, Enrico; Spreafico, Adriano; Bernardini, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) results from defective homogentisate1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), causing degenerative arthropathy. The deposition of ochronotic pigment in joints is so far attributed to homogentisic acid produced by the liver, circulating in the blood and accumulating locally. Human normal and AKU osteoarticular cells were tested for HGD gene expression by RT-PCR, mono- and 2D-Western blotting. HGD gene expression was revealed in chondrocytes, synoviocytes, osteoblasts. Furthermore, HGD expression was confirmed by Western blotting, that also revealed the presence of five enzymatic molecular species. Our findings indicate that AKU osteoarticular cells produce the ochronotic pigment in loco and this may strongly contribute to induction of ochronotic arthropathy. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 3254–3257, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22105303

  10. Homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase is expressed in brain: implications in alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Giulia; Laschi, Marcella; Geminiani, Michela; Braconi, Daniela; Vannuccini, Elisa; Lupetti, Pietro; Manetti, Fabrizio; Millucci, Lia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2015-09-01

    Alkaptonuria is an ultra-rare autosomal recessive disease developed from the lack of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD) activity, causing an accumulation in connective tissues of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized derivatives in polymerized form. The deposition of ochronotic pigment has been so far attributed to homogentisic acid produced by the liver, circulating in the blood, and accumulating locally. In the present paper, we report the expression of HGD in the brain. Mouse and human brain tissues were positively tested for HGD gene expression by western blotting. Furthermore, HGD expression was confirmed in human neuronal cells that also revealed the presence of six HGD molecular species. Moreover, once cultured in HGA excess, human neuronal cells produced ochronotic pigment and amyloid. Our findings indicate that alkaptonuric brain cells produce the ochronotic pigment in loco and this may contribute to induction of neurological complications. PMID:25762405

  11. Homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase is expressed in human osteoarticular cells: implications in alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Laschi, Marcella; Tinti, Laura; Braconi, Daniela; Millucci, Lia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Amato, Loredana; Selvi, Enrico; Spreafico, Adriano; Bernardini, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) results from defective homogentisate1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), causing degenerative arthropathy. The deposition of ochronotic pigment in joints is so far attributed to homogentisic acid produced by the liver, circulating in the blood and accumulating locally. Human normal and AKU osteoarticular cells were tested for HGD gene expression by RT-PCR, mono- and 2D-Western blotting. HGD gene expression was revealed in chondrocytes, synoviocytes, osteoblasts. Furthermore, HGD expression was confirmed by Western blotting, that also revealed the presence of five enzymatic molecular species. Our findings indicate that AKU osteoarticular cells produce the ochronotic pigment in loco and this may strongly contribute to induction of ochronotic arthropathy. PMID:22105303

  12. Ferrous iron and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases in the biosynthesis of microbial natural products.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long-Fei; Meng, Song; Tang, Gong-Li

    2016-05-01

    Apart from its vital role as the terminal electron acceptor in oxidative phosphorylation in nature, dioxygen also serves as a universal agent which diversifies natural products by oxidative transformations. Ferrous iron and α-ketoglutarate (αKG)-dependent dioxygenases (αKGDs) are versatile enzymes that use dioxygen as an oxidant to catalyse various reactions via CH bond activation, including hydroxylation, dealkylation, desaturation, epoxidation, epimerisation, halogenation, cyclisation, peroxide formation, and ring expansion/contraction reactions. This review updates the reported αKGDs that catalyse reactions related to microbial natural product biosynthesis in the past 10 years. We hope that the versatility of αKGDs shown here can serve as an inspiration for future engineering and catalyst design, which could provide alternative methods to meet the on-going demand for fine chemicals and pharmaceutics. PMID:26845569

  13. Formation of indigo and related compounds from indolecarboxylic acids by aromatic acid-degrading bacteria: chromogenic reactions for cloning genes encoding dioxygenases that act on aromatic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, R W; Chapman, P J

    1995-01-01

    The p-cumate-degrading strain Pseudomonas putida F1 and the m- and p-toluate-degrading strain P. putida mt-2 transform indole-2-carboxylate and indole-3-carboxylate to colored products identified here as indigo, indirubin, and isatin. A mechanism by which these products could be formed spontaneously following dioxygenase-catalyzed dihydroxylation of the indolecarboxylates is proposed. Indolecarboxylates were employed as chromogenic substrates for identifying recombinant bacteria carrying genes encoding p-cumate dioxygenase and toluate dioxygenase. Dioxygenase gene-carrying bacteria could be readily distinguished as dark green-blue colonies among other colorless recombinant Escherichia coli colonies on selective agar plates containing either indole-2-carboxylate or indole-3-carboxylate. PMID:7592495

  14. Nitrosyl hydride (HNO) replaces dioxygen in nitroxygenase activity of manganese quercetin dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Murugaeson R.; Zapata, Adrian; Ramirez, Alejandro J.; Bowen, Sara K.; Francisco, Wilson A.; Farmer, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Quercetin dioxygenase (QDO) catalyzes the oxidation of the flavonol quercetin with dioxygen, cleaving the central heterocyclic ring and releasing CO. The QDO from Bacillus subtilis is unusual in that it has been shown to be active with several divalent metal cofactors such as Fe, Mn, and Co. Previous comparison of the catalytic activities suggest that Mn(II) is the preferred cofactor for this enzyme. We herein report the unprecedented substitution of nitrosyl hydride (HNO) for dioxygen in the activity of Mn-QDO, resulting in the incorporation of both N and O atoms into the product. Turnover is demonstrated by consumption of quercetin and other related substrates under anaerobic conditions in the presence of HNO-releasing compounds and the enzyme. As with dioxygenase activity, a nonenzymatic base-catalyzed reaction of quercetin with HNO is observed above pH 7, but no enhancement of this basal reactivity is found upon addition of divalent metal salts. Unique and regioselective N-containing products (14N/15N) have been characterized by MS analysis for both the enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions. Of the several metallo-QDO enzymes examined for nitroxygenase activity under anaerobic condition, only the Mn(II) is active; the Fe(II) and Co(II) substituted enzymes show little or no activity. This result represents an enzymatic catalysis which we denote nitroxygenase activity; the unique reactivity of the Mn-QDO suggests a metal-mediated electron transfer mechanism rather than metal activation of the substrate’s inherent base-catalyzed reactivity. PMID:22084064

  15. Metabolism of chlorobiphenyls by a variant biphenyl dioxygenase exhibiting enhanced activity toward dibenzofuran

    SciTech Connect

    Viger, Jean-Francois; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Barriault, Diane; Sylvestre, Michel

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 biphenyl dioxygenase (BphAE{sub LB400}) metabolizes PCBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Asn338Gln/Leu409Phe double mutation speeds up electron transfer of enzyme reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested how the mutations affect the PCB-degrading abilities of BphAE{sub LB400} variants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The same mutations also broaden the PCB substrate range of BphAE{sub LB400} variants. -- Abstract: The biphenyl dioxygenase of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (BphAE{sub LB400}) catalyzes the dihydroxylation of biphenyl and of several polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) but it poorly oxidizes dibenzofuran. In this work we showed that BphAE{sub RR41}, a variant which was previously found to metabolize dibenzofuran more efficiently than its parent BphAE{sub LB400}, metabolized a broader range of PCBs than BphAE{sub LB400}. Hence, BphAE{sub RR41} was able to metabolize 2,6,2 Prime ,6 Prime -, 3,4,3 Prime ,5 Prime - and 2,4,3 Prime ,4 Prime -tetrachlorobiphenyl that BphAE{sub LB400} is unable to metabolize. BphAE{sub RR41} was obtained by changing Thr335Phe336Asn338Ile341Leu409 of BphAE{sub LB400} to Ala335Met336Gln338Val341Phe409. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to create combinations of each substitution, in order to assess their individual contributions. Data show that the same Asn338Glu/Leu409Phe substitution that enhanced the ability to metabolize dibenzofuran resulted in a broadening of the PCB substrates range of the enzyme. The role of these substitutions on regiospecificities toward selected PCBs is also discussed.

  16. Purification and characterization of the Comamonas testosteroni B-356 biphenyl dioxygenase components.

    PubMed Central

    Hurtubise, Y; Barriault, D; Powlowski, J; Sylvestre, M

    1995-01-01

    In this report, we describe some of the characteristics of the Comamonas testosteroni B-356 biphenyl (BPH)-chlorobiphenyl dioxygenase system, which includes the terminal oxygenase, an iron-sulfur protein (ISPBPH) made up of an alpha subunit (51 kDa) and a beta subunit (22 kDa) encoded by bphA and bphE, respectively; a ferredoxin (FERBPH; 12 kDa) encoded by bphF; and a ferredoxin reductase (REDBPH; 43 kDa) encoded by bphG. ISPBPH subunits were purified from B-356 cells grown on BPH. Since highly purified FERBPH and REDBPH were difficult to obtain from strain B-356, these two components were purified from recombinant Escherichia coli strains by using the His tag purification system. These His-tagged fusion proteins were shown to support BPH 2,3-dioxygenase activity in vitro when added to preparations of ISPBPH in the presence of NADH. FERBPH and REDBPH are thought to pass electrons from NADH to ISPBPH, which then activates molecular oxygen for insertion into the aromatic substrate. The reductase was found to contain approximately 1 mol of flavin adenine dinucleotide per mol of protein and was specific for NADH as an electron donor. The ferredoxin was found to contain a Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] center (epsilon 460, 7,455 M-1 cm-1) which was readily lost from the protein during purification and storage. In the presence of REDBPH and FERBPH, ISPBPH was able to convert BPH into both 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl and 3,4-dihydro-3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl. The significance of this observation is discussed. PMID:7592440

  17. Characterization of a Naphthalene Dioxygenase Endowed with an Exceptionally Broad Substrate Specificity Toward Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanneau,Y.; Meyer, C.; Jakoncic, J.; Stojanoff, V.; Gaillard, J.

    2006-01-01

    In Sphingomonas CHY-1, a single ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase is responsible for the initial attack of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) composed of up to five rings. The components of this enzyme were separately purified and characterized. The oxygenase component (ht-PhnI) was shown to contain one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster and one mononuclear Fe center per {alpha} subunit, based on EPR measurements and iron assay. Steady-state kinetic measurements revealed that the enzyme had a relatively low apparent Michaelis constant for naphthalene (K{sub m} = 0.92 {+-} 0.15 {mu}M) and an apparent specificity constant of 2.0 {+-} 0.3 M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Naphthalene was converted to the corresponding 1,2-dihydrodiol with stoichiometric oxidation of NADH. On the other hand, the oxidation of eight other PAHs occurred at slower rates and with coupling efficiencies that decreased with the enzyme reaction rate. Uncoupling was associated with hydrogen peroxide formation, which is potentially deleterious to cells and might inhibit PAH degradation. In single turnover reactions, ht-PhnI alone catalyzed PAH hydroxylation at a faster rate in the presence of organic solvent, suggesting that the transfer of substrate to the active site is a limiting factor. The four-ring PAHs chrysene and benz[a]anthracene were subjected to a double ring-dihydroxylation, giving rise to the formation of a significant proportion of bis-cis-dihydrodiols. In addition, the dihydroxylation of benz[a]anthracene yielded three dihydrodiols, the enzyme showing a preference for carbons in positions 1,2 and 10,11. This is the first characterization of a dioxygenase able to dihydroxylate PAHs made up of four and five rings.

  18. An Inner Membrane Dioxygenase that Generates the 2-Hydroxymyristate Moiety of Salmonella Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Henry S.; Reynolds, C. Michael; Guan, Ziqiang; Raetz, Christian R.H.

    2009-01-01

    The lipid A residues of certain Gram-negative bacteria, including most strains of Salmonella and Pseudomonas, are esterified with one or two secondary S-2-hydroxyacyl chains. The S-2 hydroxylation process is O2-dependent in vivo, but the relevant enzymatic pathways have not been fully characterized because in vitro assays have not been developed. We previously reported that expression of the Salmonella lpxO gene confers upon Escherichia coli K-12 the ability to synthesize 2-hydroxymyristate modified lipid A (Gibbons, H. S., Lin, S., Cotter, R. J., and Raetz, C. R. H. J. Biol. Chem. 275, 32940–49, 2000). We now demonstrate that inactivation of lpxO, which encodes a putative Fe2+/O2/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, abolishes S-2-hydroxymyristate formation in S. typhimurium. Membranes of E. coli strains expressing lpxO are able to hydroxylate Kdo2-[4′-32P]-lipid A in vitro in the presence of Fe2+, O2, α-ketoglutarate, ascorbate and Triton X-100. The Fe2+ chelator 2,2′-bipyridyl inhibits the reaction. The product generated in vitro is a mono-hydroxylated Kdo2-lipid A derivative. The [4′-32P]-lipid A released by mild acid hydrolysis from the in vitro product migrates with authentic S-2-hydroxlyated lipid A isolated from 32P-labeled S. typhimurium cells. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the in vitro product are consistent with the 2-hydroxylation of the 3′-secondary myristoyl chain of Kdo2-lipid A. LpxO contains two predicted trans-membrane helices (one at each end of the protein), and its active site likely faces the cytoplasm. LpxO is an unusual example of an integral membrane protein that is a member of the Fe2+/O2/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family. PMID:18254598

  19. Rat liver cysteine dioxygenase (cysteine oxidase). Further purification, characterization, and analysis of the activation and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Hosokawa, Y; Kohashi, N; Kori, Y; Sakakibara, S; Ueda, I

    1978-02-01

    Rat liver cysteine dioxygenase has been purified to homogeneity. It is a single subunit protein having a molecular weight of 22,500 +/- 1,000, with a pI of 5.5. The enzyme purified was catalytically inactive and activated by anaerobic incubation with either L-cysteine or its analogues such as carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, carboxyethyl-L-cysteine, S-methyl-L-cysteine, D-cysteine, cysteamine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, and DL-homocysteine. The enzyme thus activated with L-cysteine was rapidly inactivated under aerobic condition. This rapid inactivation was observed at 0 degrees C where no formation of either the reaction product cysteine sulfinate or the autoxidation product of cysteine, cystine, was detected. Further analysis shows that the inactivation of the activated enzyme was due to oxygen but unrelated to either the presence of substrate, enzyme turnover or accumulation of inhibitor produced during assay. A distinct rat liver cytoplasmic protein, called protein-A, could completely prevented the enzyme from the aerobic inactivation. The loss of activity during assay in the absence of protein-A was shown to be a first order decay process. From the plots of log(deltaproduct/min) versus time, the initial velocity (VO) and the velocity at 7 min (V7) were obtained. The apparent Km value for L-cysteine in the absence of protein-A was calculated from the initial velocity as 4.5 X 10(-4)M. Protein-A did not alter the apparent Km value for L-cysteine. The chelating agents such as o-phenanthroline, alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl, bathophenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, EGTA, and EDTA strongly inhibited the enzyme activity when these chelating agents were added before preactivation. The purified cystein dioxygenase contains 1 atom of iron per mol of enzyme protein. By the activation procedure, the enzyme became less susceptible to the heat denaturation, the inhibitory effects of chelating agents and the tryptic digestion. PMID:632231

  20. Characterization of a naphthalene dioxygenase endowed with an exceptionally broad substrate specificity toward polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, Yves; Meyer, Christine; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian; Gaillard, Jacques

    2006-10-10

    In Sphingomonas CHY-1, a single ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase is responsible for the initial attack of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) composed of up to five rings. The components of this enzyme were separately purified and characterized. The oxygenase component (ht-PhnI) was shown to contain one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster and one mononuclear Fe center per alpha subunit, based on EPR measurements and iron assay. Steady-state kinetic measurements revealed that the enzyme had a relatively low apparent Michaelis constant for naphthalene (K(m) = 0.92 +/- 0.15 microM) and an apparent specificity constant of 2.0 +/- 0.3 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1). Naphthalene was converted to the corresponding 1,2-dihydrodiol with stoichiometric oxidation of NADH. On the other hand, the oxidation of eight other PAHs occurred at slower rates and with coupling efficiencies that decreased with the enzyme reaction rate. Uncoupling was associated with hydrogen peroxide formation, which is potentially deleterious to cells and might inhibit PAH degradation. In single turnover reactions, ht-PhnI alone catalyzed PAH hydroxylation at a faster rate in the presence of organic solvent, suggesting that the transfer of substrate to the active site is a limiting factor. The four-ring PAHs chrysene and benz[a]anthracene were subjected to a double ring-dihydroxylation, giving rise to the formation of a significant proportion of bis-cis-dihydrodiols. In addition, the dihydroxylation of benz[a]anthracene yielded three dihydrodiols, the enzyme showing a preference for carbons in positions 1,2 and 10,11. This is the first characterization of a dioxygenase able to dihydroxylate PAHs made up of four and five rings. PMID:17014090

  1. Functional Metagenomics of a Biostimulated Petroleum-Contaminated Soil Reveals an Extraordinary Diversity of Extradiol Dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Terrón-González, Laura; Martín-Cabello, Guadalupe; Ferrer, Manuel; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    A metagenomic library of a petroleum-contaminated soil was constructed in a fosmid vector that allowed heterologous expression of metagenomic DNA. The library, consisting of 6.5 Gb of metagenomic DNA, was screened for extradiol dioxygenase (Edo) activity using catechol and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl as the substrates. Fifty-eight independent clones encoding extradiol dioxygenase activity were identified. Forty-one different Edo-encoding genes were identified. The population of Edo genes was not dominated by a particular gene or by highly similar genes; rather, the genes had an even distribution and high diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that most of the genes could not be ascribed to previously defined subfamilies of Edos. Rather, the Edo genes led to the definition of 10 new subfamilies of type I Edos. Phylogenetic analysis of type II enzymes defined 7 families, 2 of which harbored the type II Edos that were found in this work. Particularly striking was the diversity found in family I.3 Edos; 15 out of the 17 sequences assigned to this family belonged to 7 newly defined subfamilies. A strong bias was found that depended on the substrate used for the screening: catechol mainly led to the detection of Edos belonging to the I.2 family, while 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl led to the detection of most other Edos. Members of the I.2 family showed a clear substrate preference for monocyclic substrates, while those from the I.3 family showed a broader substrate range and high activity toward 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl. This metagenomic analysis has substantially increased our knowledge of the existing biodiversity of Edos. PMID:26896130

  2. The Effects of Individual PCB Congeners on the Soil Bacterial Community Structure and the Abundance of Biphenyl Dioxygenase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Paola A.; Lin, LianShin; Just, Craig L.; Hu, Dingfei; Hornbuckle, Keri C.; Schnoor, Jerald L.; Van Aken, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are toxic environmental contaminants that represent a class of 209 congeners characterized by different degree of chlorination and substitution patterns. Most of experimental studies about microbial degradation of PCBs have been conducted on PCB mixtures, even though evidence accumulated in bacteria and other organisms shows that exposure to different congeners may have different biological effects. Microcosm experiments were conducted using aerobic agitated soil slurries individually exposed to PCB congeners with different degrees of chlorination: PCB-3, 15, 28, and 77, and the commercial mixture Aroclor 1242. After four weeks of incubation, PCBs were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) showing different transformation extents: With the exception of PCB-15 that was not significantly transformed (7%), biodegradation rates decreased with the degree of chlorination, from 75% for PCB-3 to 22% for PCB-77 and Aroclor 1242. The bacterial abundance, as measured by colony counting and 16S rDNA quantification by real-time PCR, was lower (of about 40%) in soil microcosms exposed to the higher-chlorinated congeners, PCB-28, PCB-77, and Aroclor 1242, as compared to non-exposed soils and soils exposed to the lower-chlorinated congeners, PCB-3 and PCB-15. The relative abundance of different taxonomic groups, as determined by real-time PCR, revealed an increase of β-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria in all microcosms exposed to PCBs, as compared with non-exposed soil. In addition, exposure to PCB-77 and Aroclor 1242 resulted in a higher abundance of α-Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Globally, these results suggest that exposure to PCBs (and especially to higher-chlorinated congeners and Aroclor 1242) selected bacterial groups involving most known PCB degraders, i.e., β-Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria. The quantification of biphenyl dioxygenase (BPH) genes - involved in the aerobic degradation of PCBs - using real

  3. Subcellular localization and purification of a p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase from cultured carrot cells and characterization of the corresponding cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, I; Rodgers, M; Lenne, C; Rolland, A; Sailland, A; Matringe, M

    1997-01-01

    p-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase catalyses the transformation of p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate into homogentisate. In plants this enzyme has a crucial role because homogentisate is the aromatic precursor of all prenylquinones. Furthermore this enzyme was recently identified as the molecular target for new families of potent herbicides. In this study we examine precisely the localization of p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase activity within carrot cells. Our results provide evidence that, in cultured carrot cells, p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase is associated with the cytosol. Purification and SDS/PAGE analysis of this enzyme revealed that its activity is associated with a polypeptide of 45-46 kDa. This protein specifically cross-reacts with an antiserum raised against the p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Gel-filtration chromatography indicates that the enzyme behaves as a homodimer. We also report the isolation and nucleotide sequence of a cDNA encoding a carrot p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase. The nucleotide sequence (1684 bp) encodes a protein of 442 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 48094 Da and shows specific C-terminal regions of similarity with other p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenases. This cDNA encodes a functional p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, as evidenced by expression studies with transformed Escherichia coli cells. Comparison of the N-terminal sequence of the 45-46 kDa polypeptide purified from carrot cells with the deduced peptide sequence of the cDNA confirms that this polypeptide supports p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase activity. Immunodetection studies of the native enzyme in carrot cellular extracts reveal that N-terminal proteolysis occurs during the process of purification. This proteolysis explains the difference in molecular masses between the purified protein and the deduced polypeptide. PMID:9271098

  4. Parallel induction of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity in human cells and cell lines by interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, E R; Werner-Felmayer, G; Fuchs, D; Hausen, A; Reibnegger, G; Wachter, H

    1989-01-01

    In all of eight tested human cells and cell lines with inducible indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.17) tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis was activated by interferon-gamma. This was demonstrated by GTP cyclohydrolase I (EC 3.5.4.16) activities and intracellular neopterin and biopterin concentrations. Pteridine synthesis was influenced by extracellular tryptophan. In T 24-cell extracts, submillimolar concentrations of tetrahydrobiopterin stimulated the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase reaction. PMID:2511835

  5. Enzymatic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon intermediates using a recombinant dioxygenase immobilized onto surfactant-activated carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Suma, Yanasinee; Lim, Heejun; Kwean, Oh Sung; Cho, Suyeon; Yang, Junwon; Kim, Yohan; Kang, Christina S; Kim, Han S

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the enzymatic decomposition of aromatic hydrocarbon intermediates (catechol, 4-chlorocatechol, and 3-methylcatechol) using a dioxygenase immobilized onto single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). The surfaces of SWCNTs were activated with surfactants. The dioxygenase was obtained by recombinant technique: the corresponding gene was cloned from Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6, and the enzyme was overexpressed and purified subsequently. The enzyme immobilization yield was 62%, and the high level of enzyme activity was preserved (60-79%) after enzyme immobilization. Kinetic analyses showed that the substrate utilization rates and the catalytic efficiencies of the immobilized enzyme for all substrates (target aromatic hydrocarbon intermediates) tested were similar to those of the free enzyme, indicating that the loss of enzyme activity was minimal during enzyme immobilization. The immobilized enzyme was more stable than the free enzyme against abrupt changes in pH, temperature, and ionic strength. Moreover, it retained high enzyme activity even after repetitive use. PMID:26810145

  6. Effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on microbial community structure and PAH ring hydroxylating dioxygenase gene abundance in soil.

    PubMed

    Sawulski, Przemyslaw; Clipson, Nicholas; Doyle, Evelyn

    2014-11-01

    Development of successful bioremediation strategies for environments contaminated with recalcitrant pollutants requires in-depth knowledge of the microorganisms and microbial processes involved in degradation. The response of soil microbial communities to three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenanthrene (3-ring), fluoranthene (4-ring) and benzo(a)pyrene (5-ring), was examined. Profiles of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities were generated using molecular fingerprinting techniques (TRFLP, ARISA) and multivariate statistical tools were employed to interpret the effect of PAHs on community dynamics and composition. The extent and rate of PAH removal was directly related to the chemical structure, with the 5-ring PAH benzo(a)pyrene degraded more slowly than phenathrene or fluoranthene. Bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities were all significantly affected by PAH amendment, time and their interaction. Based on analysis of clone libraries, Actinobacteria appeared to dominate in fluoranthene amended soil, although they also represented a significant portion of the diversity in phenanthrene amended and unamended soils. In addition there appeared to be more γ-Proteobacteria and less Bacteroidetes in soil amended with either PAH compared to the control. The soil bacterial community clearly possessed the potential to degrade PAHs as evidenced by the abundance of PAH ring hydroxylating (PAH-RHDα) genes from both gram negative (GN) and gram positive (GP) bacteria in PAH-amended and control soils. Although the dioxygenase gene from GP bacteria was less abundant in soil than the gene associated with GN bacteria, significant (p < 0.001) increases in the abundance of the GP PAH-RHDα gene were observed during phenanthrene and fluoranthene degradation, whereas there was no significant difference in the abundance of the GN PAH-RHDα gene during the course of the experiment. Few studies to-date have examined the effect of pollutants on more than one microbial

  7. Regio- and stereospecific oxidation of fluorene, dibenzofuran, and dibenzothiophene by naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4.

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, S M; Gibson, D T

    1996-01-01

    The regio- and stereospecific oxidation of fluorene, dibenzofuran, and dibenzothiophene was examined with mutant and recombinant strains expressing naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4. The initial oxidation products were isolated and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Salicylate-induced cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain 9816/11 and isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside-induced cells of Escherichia coli JM109(DE3)(pDTG141) oxidized fluorene to (+)-(3S,4R)-cis-3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrofluorene (80 to 90% relative yield; > 95% enantiomeric excess [ee]) and 9-fluorenol (< 10% yield). The same cells oxidized dibenzofuran to (1R,2S)-cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1, 2-dihydrodibenzofuran (60 to 70% yield; > 95% ee) and (3S,4R)-cis-3, 4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrodibenzofuran (30 to 40% yield; > 95% ee). Induced cells of both strains, as well as the purified dioxygenase, also oxidized dibenzothiophene to (+)-(1R,2S)-cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1, 2-dihydrodibenzothiophene (84 to 87% yield; > 95% ee) and dibenzothiophene sulfoxide (< 15% yield). The major reaction catalyzed by naphthalene dioxygenase with each substrate was stereospecific dihydroxylation in which the cis-dihydrodiols were of identical regiochemistry and of R configuration at the benzylic center adjacent to the bridgehead carbon atom. The regiospecific oxidation of dibenzofuran differed from that of the other substrates in that a significant amount of the minor cis-3,4-dihydrodiol regioisomer was formed. The results indicate that although the absolute stereochemistry of the cis-diene diols was the same, the nature of the bridging atom or heteroatom influenced the regiospecificity of the reactions catalyzed by naphthalene dioxygenase. PMID:8899998

  8. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog ofmore » uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.« less

  9. Chemical intervention in bacterial lignin degradation pathways: Development of selective inhibitors for intradiol and extradiol catechol dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Paul D; Mineyeva, Yelena; Mycroft, Zoe; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial lignin degradation could be used to generate aromatic chemicals from the renewable resource lignin, provided that the breakdown pathways can be manipulated. In this study, selective inhibitors of enzymatic steps in bacterial degradation pathways were developed and tested for their effects upon lignin degradation. Screening of a collection of hydroxamic acid metallo-oxygenase inhibitors against two catechol dioxygenase enzymes, protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (3,4-PCD) and 2,3-dihydroxyphenylpropionate 1,2-dioxygenase (MhpB), resulted in the identification of selective inhibitors D13 for 3,4-PCD (IC50 15μM) and D3 for MhpB (IC50 110μM). Application of D13 to Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 in minimal media containing ferulic acid led to the appearance of metabolic precursor protocatechuic acid at low concentration. Application of 1mM disulfiram, an inhibitor of mammalian aldehyde dehydrogenase, to R. jostii RHA1, gave rise to 4-carboxymuconolactone on the β-ketoadipate pathway, whereas in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 disulfiram treatment gave rise to a metabolite found to be glycine betaine aldehyde. PMID:25984987

  10. An aryl dioxygenase shows remarkable double dioxygenation capacity for diverse bis-aryl compounds, provided they are carbocyclic.

    PubMed

    Overwin, Heike; González, Myriam; Méndez, Valentina; Seeger, Michael; Wray, Victor; Hofer, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial dioxygenation of mono- or polycyclic aromatic compounds is an intensely studied field. However, only in a few cases has the repeated dioxygenation of a substrate possessing more than a single aromatic ring been described. We previously characterized the aryl-hydroxylating dioxygenase BphA-B4h, an artificial hybrid of the dioxygenases of the biphenyl degraders Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 and Pseudomonas sp. strain B4-Magdeburg, which contains the active site of the latter enzyme, as an exceptionally powerful biocatalyst. We now show that this dioxygenase possesses a remarkable capacity for the double dioxygenation of various bicyclic aromatic compounds, provided that they are carbocyclic. Two groups of biphenyl analogues were examined: series A compounds containing one heterocyclic aromatic ring and series B compounds containing two homocyclic aromatic rings. Whereas all of the seven partially heterocyclic biphenyl analogues were solely dioxygenated in the homocyclic ring, four of the six carbocyclic bis-aryls were converted into ortho,meta-hydroxylated bis-dihydrodiols. Potential reasons for failure of heterocyclic dioxygenations are discussed. The obtained bis-dihydrodiols may, as we also show here, be enzymatically re-aromatized to yield the corresponding tetraphenols. This opens a way to a range of new polyphenolic products, a class of compounds known to exert multiple biological activities. Several of the obtained compounds are novel molecules. PMID:27147529

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase PheB from Bacillus stearothermophilus BR219

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Keisuke; Matsufuzi, Kazuki; Ohnuma, Hiroaki; Senda, Miki; Fukuda, Masao; Senda, Toshiya

    2006-02-01

    PheB, an extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenase, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, and diffracts to 2.3 Å resolution. Class II extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenase, a key enzyme of aromatic compound degradation in bacteria, cleaves the aromatic ring of catechol by adding two O atoms. PheB is one of the class II extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenases and shows a high substrate specificity for catechol derivatives, which have one aromatic ring. In order to reveal the mechanism of the substrate specificity of PheB, PheB has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The space group of the obtained crystal was P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.5, b = 119.2, c = 158.7 Å. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution.

  12. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.

  13. The potato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 catalyzes a single cleavage of β-ionone ring-containing carotenes and non-epoxidated xanthophylls.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mark; Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim

    2015-04-15

    Down-regulation of the potato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (StCCD4) transcript level led to tubers with altered morphology and sprouting activity, which also accumulated higher levels of violaxanthin and lutein leading to elevated carotenoid amounts. This phenotype indicates a role of this enzyme in tuber development, which may be exerted by a cleavage product. In this work, we investigated the enzymatic activity of StCCD4, by expressing the corresponding cDNA in carotenoid accumulating Escherichia coli strains and by performing in vitro assays with heterologously expressed enzyme. StCCD4 catalyzed the cleavage of all-trans-β-carotene at the C9'-C10' double bond, leading to β-ionone and all-trans-β-apo-10'-carotenal, both in vivo and in vitro. The enzyme also cleaved β,β-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein either at the C9'-C10' or the C9-C10 double bond in vitro. In contrast, we did not observe any conversion of violaxanthin and only traces of activity with 9-cis-β-carotene, which led to 9-cis-β-apo-10'-carotenal. Our data indicate that all-trans-β-carotene is the likely substrate of StCCD4 in planta, and that this carotene may be precursor of an unknown compound involved in tuber development. PMID:25703194

  14. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Edwin R; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G; Kaltcheva, Teodora I; Thompson, Curtis B; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms, such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for more than 25 years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This observation was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not seen using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8(+) T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC. PMID:26134178

  15. Expression of 9-cis-EPOXYCAROTENOID DIOXYGENASE4 Is Essential for Thermoinhibition of Lettuce Seed Germination but Not for Seed Development or Stress Tolerance[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Heqiang; Dahal, Peetambar; Kunusoth, Keshavulu; McCallum, Claire M.; Bradford, Kent J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermoinhibition, or failure of seeds to germinate at warm temperatures, is common in lettuce (Lactuca sativa) cultivars. Using a recombinant inbred line population developed from a lettuce cultivar (Salinas) and thermotolerant Lactuca serriola accession UC96US23 (UC), we previously mapped a quantitative trait locus associated with thermoinhibition of germination to a genomic region containing a gene encoding a key regulated enzyme in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, 9-cis-EPOXYCAROTENOID DIOXYGENASE4 (NCED4). NCED4 from either Salinas or UC complements seeds of the Arabidopsis thaliana nced6-1 nced9-1 double mutant by restoring germination thermosensitivity, indicating that both NCED4 genes encode functional proteins. Transgenic expression of Salinas NCED4 in UC seeds resulted in thermoinhibition, whereas silencing of NCED4 in Salinas seeds led to loss of thermoinhibition. Mutations in NCED4 also alleviated thermoinhibition. NCED4 expression was elevated during late seed development but was not required for seed maturation. Heat but not water stress elevated NCED4 expression in leaves, while NCED2 and NCED3 exhibited the opposite responses. Silencing of NCED4 altered the expression of genes involved in ABA, gibberellin, and ethylene biosynthesis and signaling pathways. Together, these data demonstrate that NCED4 expression is required for thermoinhibition of lettuce seeds and that it may play additional roles in plant responses to elevated temperature. PMID:23503626

  16. 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases are sensors of energy metabolism, oxygen availability, and iron homeostasis: potential role in the regulation of aging process.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the members of an ancient family of nonheme Fe(2+)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-OGDO) are involved in the functions associated with the aging process. 2-Oxoglutarate and O2 are the obligatory substrates and Fe(2+) a cofactor in the activation of 2-OGDO enzymes, which can induce the hydroxylation of distinct proteins and the demethylation of DNA and histones. For instance, ten-eleven translocation 1-3 (TET1-3) are the demethylases of DNA, whereas Jumonji C domain-containing histone lysine demethylases (KDM2-7) are the major epigenetic regulators of chromatin landscape, known to be altered with aging. The functions of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) as well as those of collagen hydroxylases are associated with age-related degeneration. Moreover, the ribosomal hydroxylase OGFOD1 controls mRNA translation, which is known to decline with aging. 2-OGDO enzymes are the sensors of energy metabolism, since the Krebs cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate is an activator whereas succinate and fumarate are the potent inhibitors of 2-OGDO enzymes. In addition, O2 availability and iron redox homeostasis control the activities of 2-OGDO enzymes in tissues. We will briefly elucidate the catalytic mechanisms of 2-OGDO enzymes and then review the potential functions of the above-mentioned 2-OGDO enzymes in the control of the aging process. PMID:26118662

  17. Increased activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in serum from acutely infected dengue patients linked to gamma interferon antiviral function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Aniuska; Warke, Rajas V.; Xhaja, Kris; Evans, Barbara; Evans, James; Martin, Katherine; de Bosch, Norma; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2009-01-01

    The depletion of l-tryptophan (L-Trp) has been associated with the inhibition of growth of micro-organisms and also has profound effects on T cell proliferation and immune tolerance. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyses the rate-limiting step in the catabolic pathway of L-Trp. Gene expression analysis has shown upregulation of genes involved in L-Trp catabolism in in vitro models of dengue virus (DENV) infection. To understand the role of IDO during DENV infection, we measured IDO activity in sera from control and DENV-infected patients. We found increased IDO activity, lower levels of L-Trp and higher levels of l-kynurenine in sera from DENV-infected patients during the febrile days of the disease compared with patients with other febrile illnesses and healthy donors. Furthermore, we confirmed upregulation of IDO mRNA expression in response to DENV infection in vitro, using a dendritic cell (DC) model of DENV infection. We found that the antiviral effect of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in DENV-infected DCs in vitro was partially dependent on IDO activity. Our results demonstrate that IDO plays an important role in the antiviral effect of IFN-γ against DENV infection in vitro and suggest that it has a role in the immune response to DENV infections in vivo. PMID:19264674

  18. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M.; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5 μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4 μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200 μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown. PMID:23867649

  19. Tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition ameliorates neurodegeneration by modulation of kynurenine pathway metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Breda, Carlo; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V.; Sograte Idrissi, Shama; Notarangelo, Francesca M.; Estranero, Jasper G.; Moore, Gareth G. L.; Green, Edward W.; Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; Schwarcz, Robert; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan (TRP) degradation have been closely linked to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders. Recent work has highlighted the therapeutic potential of inhibiting two critical regulatory enzymes in this pathway—kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) and tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Much evidence indicates that the efficacy of KMO inhibition arises from normalizing an imbalance between neurotoxic [3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK); quinolinic acid (QUIN)] and neuroprotective [kynurenic acid (KYNA)] KP metabolites. However, it is not clear if TDO inhibition is protective via a similar mechanism or if this is instead due to increased levels of TRP—the substrate of TDO. Here, we find that increased levels of KYNA relative to 3-HK are likely central to the protection conferred by TDO inhibition in a fruit fly model of Huntington’s disease and that TRP treatment strongly reduces neurodegeneration by shifting KP flux toward KYNA synthesis. In fly models of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, we provide genetic evidence that inhibition of TDO or KMO improves locomotor performance and ameliorates shortened life span, as well as reducing neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's model flies. Critically, we find that treatment with a chemical TDO inhibitor is robustly protective in these models. Consequently, our work strongly supports targeting of the KP as a potential treatment strategy for several major neurodegenerative disorders and suggests that alterations in the levels of neuroactive KP metabolites could underlie several therapeutic benefits. PMID:27114543

  20. The Crystal Structures of Zea mays and Arabidopsis 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Fritze, Iris M.; Linden, Lars; Freigang, Jörg; Auerbach, Günter; Huber, Robert; Steinbacher, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The transformation of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate to homogentisate, catalyzed by 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), plays an important role in degrading aromatic amino acids. As the reaction product homogentisate serves as aromatic precursor for prenylquinone synthesis in plants, the enzyme is an interesting target for herbicides. In this study we report the first x-ray structures of the plant HPPDs of Zea mays and Arabidopsis in their substrate-free form at 2.0 Å and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Previous biochemical characterizations have demonstrated that eukaryotic enzymes behave as homodimers in contrast to prokaryotic HPPDs, which are homotetramers. Plant and bacterial enzymes share the overall fold but use orthogonal surfaces for oligomerization. In addition, comparison of both structures provides direct evidence that the C-terminal helix gates substrate access to the active site around a nonheme ferrous iron center. In the Z. mays HPPD structure this helix packs into the active site, sequestering it completely from the solvent. In contrast, in the Arabidopsis structure this helix tilted by about 60° into the solvent and leaves the active site fully accessible. By elucidating the structure of plant HPPD enzymes we aim to provide a structural basis for the development of new herbicides. PMID:15084729

  1. Novel bacterial bioassay for a high-throughput screening of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rocaboy-Faquet, Emilie; Noguer, Thierry; Romdhane, Sana; Bertrand, Cédric; Dayan, Franck Emmanuel; Barthelmebs, Lise

    2014-08-01

    Plant 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) is the molecular target of a range of synthetic β-triketone herbicides that are currently used commercially. Their mode of action is based on an irreversible inhibition of HPPD. Therefore, this inhibitory capacity was used to develop a whole-cell colorimetric bioassay with a recombinant Escherichia coli expressing a plant HPPD for the herbicide analysis of β-triketones. The principle of the bioassay is based on the ability of the recombinant E. coli clone to produce a soluble melanin-like pigment, from tyrosine catabolism through p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate and homogentisate. The addition of sulcotrione, a HPPD inhibitor, decreased the pigment production. With the aim to optimize the assay, the E. coli recombinant clone was immobilized in sol-gel or agarose matrix in a 96-well microplate format. The limit of detection for mesotrione, tembotrione, sulcotrione, and leptospermone was 0.069, 0.051, 0.038, and 20 μM, respectively, allowing to validate the whole-cell colorimetric bioassay as a simple and cost-effective alternative tool for laboratory use. The bioassay results from sulcotrione-spiked soil samples were confirmed with high-performance liquid chromatography. PMID:24816780

  2. Synthesis and Herbicidal Activity of Triketone-Quinoline Hybrids as Novel 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Yan; Cao, Run-Jie; Chen, Tao; Wu, Feng-Xu; Hao, Ge-Fei; Chen, Qiong; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-06-17

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.27, HPPD) is one of the most important targets for herbicide discovery. In the search for new HPPD inhibitors with novel scaffolds, triketone-quinoline hybrids were designed and subsequently optimized on the basis of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed potent inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana HPPD (AtHPPD), and some of them exhibited broad-spectrum and promising herbicidal activity at the rate of 150 g ai/ha by postemergence application. Most promisingly, compound III-l, 3-hydroxy-2-(2-methoxy-7-(methylthio)quinoline-3-carbonyl)cyclohex-2-enone (Ki = 0.009 μM, AtHPPD), had broader spectrum of weed control than mesotrione. Furthermore, compound III-l was much safer to maize at the rate of 150 g ai/ha than mesotrione, demonstrating its great potential as herbicide for weed control in maize fields. Therefore, triketone-quinoline hybrids may serve as new lead structures for novel herbicide discovery. PMID:26006257

  3. Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and regulation of T cell immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Mellor, Andrew . E-mail: amellor@mcg.edu

    2005-12-09

    Regulation of adaptive immune responses is critically important to allow the adaptive immune system to eradicate infections while causing minimal collateral damage to infected tissues, as well as preventing autoimmune disease mediated by self-reactive lymphocytes. Tumors and pathogens that cause persistent infections can subvert immunoregulatory processes to protect themselves from destruction by T cells, to the detriment of patients. A growing body of evidence supports the hypothesis that specialized subsets of dendritic cells expressing indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), which catalyzes oxidative catabolism of tryptophan, play critical roles in regulation of T cell-mediated immune responses. IDO-dependent T cell suppression by dendritic cells suggests that biochemical changes due to tryptophan catabolism have profound effects on T cell proliferation, differentiation, effector functions, and viability. This has critical implications for immunotherapeutic manipulations designed for patients with cancer and chronic infectious diseases. In this review, I focus on dendritic cells that can express IDO, and which acquire potent T cell regulatory functions as a consequence.

  4. Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mazarei, Gelareh; Leavitt, Blair R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Within the past decade, there has been increasing interest in the role of tryptophan (Trp) metabolites and the kynurenine pathway (KP) in diseases of the brain such as Huntington’s disease (HD). Evidence is accumulating to suggest that this pathway is imbalanced in neurologic disease states. The KP diverges into two branches that can lead to production of either neuroprotective or neurotoxic metabolites. In one branch, kynurenine (Kyn) produced as a result of tryptophan (Trp) catabolism is further metabolized to neurotoxic metabolites such as 3-hydroxykunurenine (3-HK) and quinolinic acid (QA). In the other branch, Kyn is converted to the neuroprotective metabolite kynurenic acid (KA). The enzyme Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO1) catalyzes the conversion of Trp into Kyn, the first and rate-limiting enzymatic step of the KP. This reaction takes place throughout the body in multiple cell types as a required step in the degradation of the essential amino acid Trp. Studies of IDO1 in brain have focused primarily on a potential role in depression, immune tolerance associated with brain tumours, and multiple sclerosis; however the role of this enzyme in neurodegenerative disease has garnered significant attention in recent years. This review will provide a summary of the current understanding of the role of IDO1 in Huntington’s disease and will assess this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target for HD. PMID:26397892

  5. Blockade of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase protects mice against lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Jung, In Duk; Lee, Min-Goo; Chang, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jun Sik; Jeong, Young-Il; Lee, Chang-Min; Park, Won Sun; Han, Jin; Seo, Su-Kil; Lee, Sang Yong; Park, Yeong-Min

    2009-03-01

    Suppression of an excessive systemic inflammatory response is a promising and potent strategy for treating endotoxic sepsis. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which is the rate-limiting enzyme for tryptophan catabolism, may play a critical role in various inflammatory disorders. In this study, we report a critical role for IDO in the dysregulated immune response associated with endotoxin shock. We found that IDO knockout (IDO(-/-)) mice and 1-methyl-D-tryptophan-treated, endotoxin-shocked mice had decreased levels of the cytokines, TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12, and enhanced levels of IL-10. Blockade of IDO is thought to promote host survival in LPS-induced endotoxin shock, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate IDO expression during endotoxin shock. In vitro and in vivo, IDO expression was increased by exogenous IL-12, but decreased by exogenous IL-10 in dendritic cells and splenic dendritic cells. Interestingly, whereas LPS-induced IL-12 levels in serum were higher than those of IL-10, the balance between serum IL-12 and IL-10 following challenge became reversed in IDO(-/-)- or 1-methyl-D-tryptophan-treated mice. Our findings demonstrate that the detrimental immune response to endotoxin shock may occur via IDO modulation. Restoring the IL-12 and IL-10 balance by blocking IDO represents a potential strategy for sepsis treatment. PMID:19234212

  6. Effects of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenases in carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatitis model of rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Cai, Haidong; Hou, Min; Fu, Da; Ma, Yushui; Luo, Qiong; Yuan, Xueyu; Lv, Mingli; Zhang, Xiaoping; Cong, Xianling; Lv, Zhongwei

    2012-06-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) converts tryptophan to l-kynurenine, and it is noted as a relevant molecule in promoting tolerance and suppressing adaptive immunity. In this study, to investigate the effects of IDO in carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4) )-induced hepatitis model, the levels of IDO enzymic activities in the mock group, the control group and the 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-MT)-treated group were confirmed by determination of l-kynurenine concentrations. Serum alanine aminotransferase levels in 1-MT-treated rats after CCl(4) injection significantly increased compared with those in mock and control groups. In CCl(4)-induced hepatitis models, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is critical in the development of liver injury. The mRNA expression and secretion levels of TNF-α in the liver from 1-MT-treated rats were more enhanced compared with those in the mock and the control groups. Moreover, the levels of cytokine and chemokine from mock, control group and 1-MT-treated rats after treated with CCl(4) were analyzed by ELISA, and the level of interleukin-6 was found to increase in 1-MT-treated rats. It was concluded that the deficiency of IDO exacerbated liver injury in CCl(4)-induced hepatitis and its effect may be connected with TNF-α and interleukin-6. PMID:22249930

  7. Sphingobium Chlorophenolicum Dichlorohydroquinone Dioxygenase (PcpA) Is Alkaline Resistant and Thermally Stable

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wanpeng; Sammynaiken, Ramaswami; Chen, Lifeng; Maley, Jason; Schatte, Gabriele; Zhou, Yijiang; Yang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Dichlorohydroquinone dioxygenase (PcpA) is the ring-cleavage enzyme in the PCP biodegradation pathway in Sphingobium chlorophenolicum strain ATCC 39723. PcpA dehalogenates and oxidizes 2,6-dichlorohydroquinone to form 2-chloromaleylacetate, which is subsequently converted to succinyl coenzyme A and acetyl coenzyme A via 3-oxoadipate. Previous studies have shown that PcpA is highly substrate-specific and only uses 2,6-dichlorohydroquinone as its substrate. In the current study, we overexpressed and purified recombinant PcpA and showed that PcpA was highly alkaline resistant and thermally stable. PcpA exhibited two activity peaks at pH 7.0 and 10.0, respectively. The apparent kcat and Km were measured as 0.19 ± 0.01 s-1 and 0.24 ± 0.08 mM, respectively at pH 7.0, and 0.17 ± 0.01 s-1 and 0.77 ± 0.29 mM, respectively at pH 10.0. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies showed rapid oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in PcpA and the formation of a stable radical intermediate during the enzyme catalysis. The stable radical was predicted to be an epoxide type dichloro radical with the unpaired electron density localized on C3. PMID:22043174

  8. D2HGDH regulates alpha-ketoglutarate levels and dioxygenase function by modulating IDH2

    PubMed Central

    Lin, An-Ping; Abbas, Saman; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ortega, Manoela; Bouamar, Hakim; Escobedo, Yissela; Varadarajan, Prakash; Qin, Yuejuan; Sudderth, Jessica; Schulz, Eduard; Deutsch, Alexander; Mohan, Sumitra; Ulz, Peter; Neumeister, Peter; Rakheja, Dinesh; Gao, Xiaoli; Hinck, Andrew; Weintraub, Susan T.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Sill, Heinz; Dahia, Patricia L. M.; Aguiar, Ricardo C. T.

    2015-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH) convert isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG). In cancer, mutant IDH1/2 reduces α-KG to D2-hydroxyglutarate (D2-HG) disrupting α-KG-dependent dioxygenases. However, the physiological relevance of controlling the interconversion of D2-HG into α-KG, mediated by D2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (D2HGDH), remains obscure. Here we show that wild-type D2HGDH elevates α-KG levels, influencing histone and DNA methylation, and HIF1α hydroxylation. Conversely, the D2HGDH mutants that we find in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are enzymatically inert. D2-HG is a low-abundance metabolite, but we show that it can meaningfully elevate α-KG levels by positively modulating mitochondrial IDH activity and inducing IDH2 expression. Accordingly, genetic depletion of IDH2 abrogates D2HGDH effects, whereas ectopic IDH2 rescues D2HGDH-deficient cells. Our data link D2HGDH to cancer and describe an additional role for the enzyme: the regulation of IDH2 activity and α-KG-mediated epigenetic remodelling. These data further expose the intricacies of mitochondrial metabolism and inform on the pathogenesis of D2HGDH-deficient diseases. PMID:26178471

  9. Degradation of trichloroethylene by toluene dioxygenase in whole-cell studies with Pseudomonas putida F1.

    PubMed Central

    Wackett, L P; Gibson, D T

    1988-01-01

    Toluene-induced cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 removed trichloroethylene from growth media at a significantly greater initial rate than the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. With toluene-induced P. putida F1, the initial degradation rate varied linearly with trichloroethylene concentration over the range of 8 to 80 microM (1.05 to 10.5 ppm). At 80 microM (10.5 ppm) trichloroethylene and 30 degrees C, the initial rate was 1.8 nmol/min per mg of total cell protein, but the rate decreased rapidly with time. A series of mutant strains derived from P. putida F1 that are defective in the todC gene, which encodes the oxygenase component of toluene dioxygenase, failed to degrade trichloroethylene and to oxidize indole to indigo. A spontaneous revertant selected from a todC culture regained simultaneously the abilities to oxidize toluene, to form indigo, and to degrade trichloroethylene. The three isomeric dichloroethylenes were degraded by P. putida F1, but tetrachloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethylene were not removed from incubation mixtures. PMID:3415234

  10. Catalytic Activity of Human Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (hIDO1) at Low Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Ayodele O.; Hixon, Brian P.; Dameron, Laura S.; Chrisman, Ian M.; Smirnov, Valeriy V.

    2015-01-01

    A cytokine-inducible extrahepatic human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (hIDO1) catalyzes the first step of the kynurenine pathway. Immunosuppressive activity of hIDO1 in tumor cells weakens host T-cell immunity, contributing to the progression of cancer. Here we report on enzyme kinetics and catalytic mechanism of hIDO1, studied at varied levels of dioxygen (O2) and L-tryptophan (L-Trp). Using a cytochrome b5-based activating system, we measured the initial rates of O2 decay with a Clark-type oxygen electrode at physiologically-relevant levels of both substrates. Kinetics was also studied in the presence of two substrate analogs: 1-methyl-L-tryptophan and norharmane. Quantitative analysis supports a steady-state rather than a rapid equilibrium kinetic mechanism, where the rates of individual pathways, leading to a ternary complex, are significantly different, and the overall rate of catalysis depends on contributions of both routes. One path, where O2 binds to ferrous hIDO1 first, is faster than the second route, which starts with the binding of L-Trp. However, L-Trp complexation with free ferrous hIDO1 is more rapid than that of O2. As the level of L-Trp increases, the slower route becomes a significant contributor to the overall rate, resulting in observed substrate inhibition. PMID:25712221

  11. Genomewide Analysis of Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenases in Unicellular and Filamentous Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongli; Wang, Yinchu; Qin, Song

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage steps from carotenoids to various carotenoid cleavage products. Some ccd genes have been identified and encoded enzymes functionally characterized in many higher plants, but little in cyanobacteria. We performed a comparative analysis of ccd sequences and explored their distribution, classification, phylogeny, evolution, and structure among 37 cyanobacteria. Totally 61 putative ccd sequences were identified, which are abundant in Acaryochloris marina MBIC 11017, filamentous N2-fixing cyanobacteria, and unicellular cyanobacterial Cyanothece. According to phylogenetic trees of 16S rDNA and CCD, nced and ccd8 genes occur later than the divergence of ccd7, apco, and ccd1. All CCD enzymes share conserved basic structure domains constituted by a single loop formed with seven β-strands and one helix. In this paper, a general framework of sequence-function-evolution connection for the ccd has been revealed, which may provide new insight for functional investigation. PMID:22474409

  12. Cysteine dioxygenase type 1 promotes adipogenesis via interaction with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Peng; Chen, Yi; Ji, Ning; Lin, Yunfeng; Yuan, Quan; Ye, Ling; Chen, Qianming

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian cysteine dioxygenase type 1 (CDO1) is an essential enzyme for taurine biosynthesis and the biodegradation of toxic cysteine. As previously suggested, Cdo1 may be a marker of liposarcoma progression and adipogenic differentiation, but the role of Cdo1 in adipogenesis has yet been reported. In this study, we found that the expression of Cdo1 is dramatically elevated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs). Conversely, knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 cells and mBMSCs. Mechanistically, we found Cdo1 interacted with Pparγ in response to adipogenic stimulus. Further, depletion of Cdo1 reduced the recruitment of Pparγ to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4. Collectively, our finding indicates that Cdo1 may be a co-activator of Pparγ in adipogenesis, and may contribute to the development of disease associated with excessive adipose tissue. - Highlights: • Cdo1expression is highly up-regulated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 and mBMSCs. • Depletion of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation. • Cdo1interacts with Pparγ during adipogenesis. • Knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited Pparγ binding to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4.

  13. Chemical rescue of the distal histidine mutants of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jiafeng; Dornevil, Kednerlin; Liu, Aimin

    2012-07-25

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) is a heme-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative degradation of L-tryptophan (L-Trp) to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). A highly conserved histidine residue in the distal heme pocket has attracted great attention in the mechanistic studies of TDO. However, a consensus has not been reached regarding whether and how this distal histidine plays a catalytic role after substrate binding. In this study, three mutant proteins, H72S, H72N, and Q73F were generated to investigate the function of the distal histidine residue in Cupriavidus metallidurans TDO (cmTDO). Spectroscopic characterizations, enzymatic kinetic analysis, and chemical rescue assays were employed to study the biochemical properties of the wild-type enzyme and the mutant proteins. Rapid kinetic methods were utilized to explore the molecular basis for the observed stimulation of catalytic activity by 2-methylimidazole in the His72 variants. The results indicate that the distal histidine plays multiple roles in cmTDO. First, His72 contributes to but is not essential for substrate binding. In addition, it shields the heme center from nonproductive binding of exogenous small ligand molecules (i.e., imidazole and its analogs) via steric hindrance. Most importantly, His72 participates in the subsequent chemical catalytic steps after substrate binding possibly by providing H-bonding interactions to the heme-bound oxygen. PMID:22742206

  14. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-10-15

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown. PMID:23867649

  15. Thymic Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Positive Eosinophils in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Tulic, Meri K.; Sly, Peter D.; Andrews, David; Crook, Maxine; Davoine, Francis; Odemuyiwa, Solomon O.; Charles, Adrian; Hodder, Megan L.; Prescott, Susan L.; Holt, Patrick G.; Moqbel, Redwan

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophils expressing indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) may contribute to T-helper cell (Th)2 predominance. To characterize human thymus IDO+ eosinophil ontogeny relative to Th2 regulatory gene expression, we processed surgically obtained thymi from 22 children (age: 7 days to 12 years) for immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis, and measured cytokine and kynurenine levels in tissue homogenates. Luna+ eosinophils (∼2% of total thymic cells) decreased in number with age (P = 0.02) and were IDO+. Thymic IDO immunoreactivity (P = 0.01) and kynurenine concentration (P = 0.01) decreased with age as well. In addition, constitutively-expressed interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 in thymus supernatants was highest in youngest children. Eosinophil numbers correlated positively with expression of the Th2 cytokines IL-5, IL-13 (r = 0.44, P = 0.002), and IL-4 (r = 0.46, P = 0.005), transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription-6 (r = 0.68, P = 0.001), and the chemokine receptor, CCR3 (r = 0.17, P = 0.04), but negatively with IL-17 mRNA (r = −0.57, P = 0.02) and toll-like receptor 4 expression (r = −0.74, P = 0.002). Taken together, these results suggest that functional thymic IDO+ eosinophils during human infant life may have an immunomodulatory role in Th2 immune responses. PMID:19815714

  16. D2HGDH regulates alpha-ketoglutarate levels and dioxygenase function by modulating IDH2.

    PubMed

    Lin, An-Ping; Abbas, Saman; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ortega, Manoela; Bouamar, Hakim; Escobedo, Yissela; Varadarajan, Prakash; Qin, Yuejuan; Sudderth, Jessica; Schulz, Eduard; Deutsch, Alexander; Mohan, Sumitra; Ulz, Peter; Neumeister, Peter; Rakheja, Dinesh; Gao, Xiaoli; Hinck, Andrew; Weintraub, Susan T; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Sill, Heinz; Dahia, Patricia L M; Aguiar, Ricardo C T

    2015-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH) convert isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG). In cancer, mutant IDH1/2 reduces α-KG to D2-hydroxyglutarate (D2-HG) disrupting α-KG-dependent dioxygenases. However, the physiological relevance of controlling the interconversion of D2-HG into α-KG, mediated by D2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (D2HGDH), remains obscure. Here we show that wild-type D2HGDH elevates α-KG levels, influencing histone and DNA methylation, and HIF1α hydroxylation. Conversely, the D2HGDH mutants that we find in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are enzymatically inert. D2-HG is a low-abundance metabolite, but we show that it can meaningfully elevate α-KG levels by positively modulating mitochondrial IDH activity and inducing IDH2 expression. Accordingly, genetic depletion of IDH2 abrogates D2HGDH effects, whereas ectopic IDH2 rescues D2HGDH-deficient cells. Our data link D2HGDH to cancer and describe an additional role for the enzyme: the regulation of IDH2 activity and α-KG-mediated epigenetic remodelling. These data further expose the intricacies of mitochondrial metabolism and inform on the pathogenesis of D2HGDH-deficient diseases. PMID:26178471

  17. The Role of Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase in Immune Suppression and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Mbongue, Jacques C.; Nicholas, Dequina A.; Torrez, Timothy W.; Kim, Nan-Sun; Firek, Anthony F.; Langridge, William H.R.

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the first and rate limiting catabolic enzyme in the degradation pathway of the essential amino acid tryptophan. By cleaving the aromatic indole ring of tryptophan, IDO initiates the production of a variety of tryptophan degradation products called “kynurenines” that are known to exert important immuno-regulatory functions. Because tryptophan must be supplied in the diet, regulation of tryptophan catabolism may exert profound effects by activating or inhibiting metabolism and immune responses. Important for survival, the regulation of IDO biosynthesis and its activity in cells of the immune system can critically alter their responses to immunological insults, such as infection, autoimmunity and cancer. In this review, we assess how IDO-mediated catabolism of tryptophan can modulate the immune system to arrest inflammation, suppress immunity to cancer and inhibit allergy, autoimmunity and the rejection of transplanted tissues. Finally, we examine how vaccines may enhance immune suppression of autoimmunity through the upregulation of IDO biosynthesis in human dendritic cells. PMID:26378585

  18. Broad 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor herbicide tolerance in soybean with an optimized enzyme and expression cassette.

    PubMed

    Siehl, Daniel L; Tao, Yumin; Albert, Henrik; Dong, Yuxia; Heckert, Matthew; Madrigal, Alfredo; Lincoln-Cabatu, Brishette; Lu, Jian; Fenwick, Tamara; Bermudez, Ericka; Sandoval, Marian; Horn, Caroline; Green, Jerry M; Hale, Theresa; Pagano, Peggy; Clark, Jenna; Udranszky, Ingrid A; Rizzo, Nancy; Bourett, Timothy; Howard, Richard J; Johnson, David H; Vogt, Mark; Akinsola, Goke; Castle, Linda A

    2014-11-01

    With an optimized expression cassette consisting of the soybean (Glycine max) native promoter modified for enhanced expression driving a chimeric gene coding for the soybean native amino-terminal 86 amino acids fused to an insensitive shuffled variant of maize (Zea mays) 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), we achieved field tolerance in transgenic soybean plants to the HPPD-inhibiting herbicides mesotrione, isoxaflutole, and tembotrione. Directed evolution of maize HPPD was accomplished by progressively incorporating amino acids from naturally occurring diversity and novel substitutions identified by saturation mutagenesis, combined at random through shuffling. Localization of heterologously expressed HPPD mimicked that of the native enzyme, which was shown to be dually targeted to chloroplasts and the cytosol. Analysis of the native soybean HPPD gene revealed two transcription start sites, leading to transcripts encoding two HPPD polypeptides. The N-terminal region of the longer encoded peptide directs proteins to the chloroplast, while the short form remains in the cytosol. In contrast, maize HPPD was found almost exclusively in chloroplasts. Evolved HPPD enzymes showed insensitivity to five inhibitor herbicides. In 2013 field trials, transgenic soybean events made with optimized promoter and HPPD variant expression cassettes were tested with three herbicides and showed tolerance to four times the labeled rates of mesotrione and isoxaflutole and two times the labeled rates of tembotrione. PMID:25192697

  19. Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by the Cofactor-Independent Dioxygenase DpgC+

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding,E.; Widboom, P.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    The enzyme DpgC belongs to a small class of oxygenases not dependent on accessory cofactors for activity. DpgC is in the biosynthetic pathway for the nonproteinogenic amino acid 3, 5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in actinomycetes bacteria responsible for the production of the vancomycin/teicoplanin family of antibiotic natural products. The X-ray structure of DpgC confirmed the absence of cofactors and defined a novel hydrophobic dioxygen binding pocket adjacent to a bound substrate analogue. In this paper, the role specific amino acids play in substrate recognition and catalysis is examined through biochemical and structural characterization of site-specific enzyme mutations and alternate substrates. The results establish the importance of three amino acids, Arg254, Glu299, and Glu189, in the chemistry of DpgC. Arg254 and Glu189 join to form a specific contact with one of the phenolic hydroxyls of the substrate, and this interaction plays a key role in both substrate recognition and catalysis. The X-ray crystal structure of Arg254Lys was determined to address the role this residue plays in the chemistry. In addition, characterization of alternate substrate analogues demonstrates the presence and position of phenol groups are necessary for both enzyme recognition and downstream oxidation chemistry. Overall, this work defines the mechanism of substrate recognition and specificity by the cofactor-independent dioxygenase DpgC.

  20. Emerging concepts on inhibitors of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Filippini, P; Del Papa, N; Sambataro, D; Del Bufalo, A; Locatelli, F; Rutella, S

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) finely regulates both innate and adaptive immune responses through the degradation of the essential amino acid tryptophan into kynurenine and other downstream metabolites, which suppress effector T-cell function and promote the differentiation of regulatory T cells. A novel role for IDO1 as a signaling molecule and a modifier of innate inflammatory responses is now emerging. In particular, IDO1 can either support or antagonize inflammation in a context- and tissuedependent manner. Studies in experimental arthritis have unravelled a previously unappreciated role for IDO in controlling B-cell activation and autoantibody production. IDO dysregulation has been documented in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and Sjogren's syndrome, as well as in severe sepsis and chronic kidney disease. This article summarizes the contribution of IDO to the pathophysiology of inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, and discusses whether strategies to restore metabolic equilibrium in the kynurenine pathway might be pursued in diseases states such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic sclerosis. PMID:22963664

  1. Salmonella overcomes tumor immune tolerance by inhibition of tumor indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Diao; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, Salmonella has been proven capable of inhibiting tumor growth. It can specifically target tumors and due to its facultative anaerobic property, can be more penetrative than other drug therapies. However, the molecular mechanism by which Salmonella inhibits tumor growth is still incompletely known. The antitumor therapeutic effect mediated by Salmonella is associated with an inflammatory immune response at the tumor site and a T cell-dependent immune response. Many tumors have been proven to have a high expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), which is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan to kynurenine, thus causing immune tolerance within the tumor microenvironment. With decreased expression of IDO, increased immune response can be observed, which might be helpful when developing cancer immunotherapy. The expression of IDO was decreased after tumor cells were infected with Salmonella. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of phospho-protein kinase B (P-AKT), phospho-mammalian targets of rapamycin (P-mTOR), and phospho-p70 ribosomal s6 kinase (P-p70s6K) in tumor cells were decreased after Salmonella infection. In conclusion, our results indicate that Salmonella inhibits IDO expression and plays a crucial role in anti-tumor therapy, which might be a promising strategy combined with other cancer treatments. PMID:26517244

  2. Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis l-Isoleucine Dioxygenase for Production of Useful Amino Acids▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Makoto; Kawashima, Takashi; Kodera, Tomohiro; Smirnov, Sergey V.; Sokolov, Pavel M.; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Shimizu, Sakayu; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Ogawa, Jun

    2011-01-01

    We determined the enzymatic characteristics of an industrially important biocatalyst, α-ketoglutarate-dependent l-isoleucine dioxygenase (IDO), which was found to be the enzyme responsible for the generation of (2S,3R,4S)-4-hydroxyisoleucine in Bacillus thuringiensis 2e2. Depending on the amino acid used as the substrate, IDO catalyzed three different types of oxidation reactions: hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and sulfoxidation. IDO stereoselectively hydroxylated several hydrophobic aliphatic l-amino acids, as well as l-isoleucine, and produced (S)-3-hydroxy-l-allo-isoleucine, 4-hydroxy-l-leucine, (S)-4-hydroxy-l-norvaline, 4-hydroxy-l-norleucine, and 5-hydroxy-l-norleucine. The IDO reaction product of l-isoleucine, (2S,3R,4S)-4-hydroxyisoleucine, was again reacted with IDO and dehydrogenated into (2S,3R)-2-amino-3-methyl-4-ketopentanoate, which is also a metabolite found in B. thuringiensis 2e2. Interestingly, IDO catalyzed the sulfoxidation of some sulfur-containing l-amino acids and generated l-methionine sulfoxide and l-ethionine sulfoxide. Consequently, the effective production of various modified amino acids would be possible using IDO as the biocatalyst. PMID:21821743

  3. Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis L-isoleucine dioxygenase for production of useful amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Makoto; Kawashima, Takashi; Kodera, Tomohiro; Smirnov, Sergey V; Sokolov, Pavel M; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Shimizu, Sakayu; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Ogawa, Jun

    2011-10-01

    We determined the enzymatic characteristics of an industrially important biocatalyst, α-ketoglutarate-dependent l-isoleucine dioxygenase (IDO), which was found to be the enzyme responsible for the generation of (2S,3R,4S)-4-hydroxyisoleucine in Bacillus thuringiensis 2e2. Depending on the amino acid used as the substrate, IDO catalyzed three different types of oxidation reactions: hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and sulfoxidation. IDO stereoselectively hydroxylated several hydrophobic aliphatic l-amino acids, as well as l-isoleucine, and produced (S)-3-hydroxy-l-allo-isoleucine, 4-hydroxy-l-leucine, (S)-4-hydroxy-l-norvaline, 4-hydroxy-l-norleucine, and 5-hydroxy-l-norleucine. The IDO reaction product of l-isoleucine, (2S,3R,4S)-4-hydroxyisoleucine, was again reacted with IDO and dehydrogenated into (2S,3R)-2-amino-3-methyl-4-ketopentanoate, which is also a metabolite found in B. thuringiensis 2e2. Interestingly, IDO catalyzed the sulfoxidation of some sulfur-containing l-amino acids and generated l-methionine sulfoxide and l-ethionine sulfoxide. Consequently, the effective production of various modified amino acids would be possible using IDO as the biocatalyst. PMID:21821743

  4. The Role of Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase in Immune Suppression and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mbongue, Jacques C; Nicholas, Dequina A; Torrez, Timothy W; Kim, Nan-Sun; Firek, Anthony F; Langridge, William H R

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the first and rate limiting catabolic enzyme in the degradation pathway of the essential amino acid tryptophan. By cleaving the aromatic indole ring of tryptophan, IDO initiates the production of a variety of tryptophan degradation products called "kynurenines" that are known to exert important immuno-regulatory functions. Because tryptophan must be supplied in the diet, regulation of tryptophan catabolism may exert profound effects by activating or inhibiting metabolism and immune responses. Important for survival, the regulation of IDO biosynthesis and its activity in cells of the immune system can critically alter their responses to immunological insults, such as infection, autoimmunity and cancer. In this review, we assess how IDO-mediated catabolism of tryptophan can modulate the immune system to arrest inflammation, suppress immunity to cancer and inhibit allergy, autoimmunity and the rejection of transplanted tissues. Finally, we examine how vaccines may enhance immune suppression of autoimmunity through the upregulation of IDO biosynthesis in human dendritic cells. PMID:26378585

  5. Pyrazolone-quinazolone hybrids: a novel class of human 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Ling; Lin, Hong-Yan; Cao, Run-Jie; Ming, Ze-Zhong; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2014-10-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), converting 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate acid to homogentisate, is an important target for treating type I tyrosinemia and alkaptonuria due to its significant role in tyrosine catabolism. However, only one commercial drug, NTBC, also known as nitisinone, has been available for clinical use so far. Herein, we have elucidated the structure-based design of a series of pyrazolone-quinazolone hybrids that are novel potent human HPPD inhibitors through the successful integration of various techniques including computational simulations, organic synthesis, and biochemical characterization. Most of the new compounds displayed potent inhibitory activity against the recombinant human HPPD in nanomolar range. Compounds 3h and 3u were identified as the most potent candidates with Ki values of around 10 nM against human HPPD, about three-fold more potent than NTBC. Molecular modeling indicated that the interaction between the pyrazolone ring and ferrous ion, and the hydrophobic interaction of quinazolone with its surrounding residues, such as Phe347 and Phe364, contributed greatly to the high potency of these inhibitors. Therefore, compounds 3h and 3u could be potentially useful for the treatment of type I tyrosinemia and other diseases with defects in tyrosine degradation. PMID:25182962

  6. Tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition ameliorates neurodegeneration by modulation of kynurenine pathway metabolites.

    PubMed

    Breda, Carlo; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Sograte Idrissi, Shama; Notarangelo, Francesca M; Estranero, Jasper G; Moore, Gareth G L; Green, Edward W; Kyriacou, Charalambos P; Schwarcz, Robert; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2016-05-10

    Metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan (TRP) degradation have been closely linked to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders. Recent work has highlighted the therapeutic potential of inhibiting two critical regulatory enzymes in this pathway-kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) and tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Much evidence indicates that the efficacy of KMO inhibition arises from normalizing an imbalance between neurotoxic [3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK); quinolinic acid (QUIN)] and neuroprotective [kynurenic acid (KYNA)] KP metabolites. However, it is not clear if TDO inhibition is protective via a similar mechanism or if this is instead due to increased levels of TRP-the substrate of TDO. Here, we find that increased levels of KYNA relative to 3-HK are likely central to the protection conferred by TDO inhibition in a fruit fly model of Huntington's disease and that TRP treatment strongly reduces neurodegeneration by shifting KP flux toward KYNA synthesis. In fly models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, we provide genetic evidence that inhibition of TDO or KMO improves locomotor performance and ameliorates shortened life span, as well as reducing neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's model flies. Critically, we find that treatment with a chemical TDO inhibitor is robustly protective in these models. Consequently, our work strongly supports targeting of the KP as a potential treatment strategy for several major neurodegenerative disorders and suggests that alterations in the levels of neuroactive KP metabolites could underlie several therapeutic benefits. PMID:27114543

  7. Insights into DNA hydroxymethylation in the honeybee from in-depth analyses of TET dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Marek; Rafalski, Dominik; Kucharski, Robert; Misztal, Katarzyna; Maleszka, Joanna; Bochtler, Matthias; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, a family of TET enzymes producing oxidized forms of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) plays an important role in modulating DNA demethylation dynamics. In contrast, nothing is known about the function of a single TET orthologue present in invertebrates. Here, we show that the honeybee TET (AmTET) catalytic domain has dioxygenase activity and converts 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in a HEK293T cell assay. In vivo, the levels of 5hmC are condition-dependent and relatively low, but in testes and ovaries 5hmC is present at approximately 7–10% of the total level of 5mC, which is comparable to that reported for certain mammalian cells types. AmTET is alternatively spliced and highly expressed throughout development and in adult tissues with the highest expression found in adult brains. Our findings reveal an additional level of flexible genomic modifications in the honeybee that may be important for the selection of multiple pathways controlling contrasting phenotypic outcomes in this species. In a broader context, our study extends the current, mammalian-centred attention to TET-driven DNA hydroxymethylation to an easily manageable organism with attractive and unique biology. PMID:25100549

  8. Suicide inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-halocatechols

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, I.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Reineke, W.

    1984-03-01

    The inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-chloro- and 3-fluorocatechol and the iron-chelating agent Tiron (catechol-3,5-disulfonate) was studied. Whereas inactivation by Tiron is an oxygen-independent and mostly reversible process, inactivation by the 3-halocatechols was only observed in the presence of oxygen and was largely irreversible. The rate constants for inactivation (K/sub 2/) were 1.62 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-chlorocatechol and 2.38 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-fluorocatechol. The inhibitor constants (K/sub i/) were 23 ..mu..M for 3-chlorocatechol and 17 ..mu..M for 3-fluorocatechol. The kinetic data for 3-fluorocatechol could only be obtained in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Besides inactivated enzyme, some 2-hydroxyhexa-2,4-dienoic acid as the actual suicide product of meta-cleavage. A side product of 3-fluorocatechol cleavage is a yellow compound with the spectral characteristics of a 2-hydroxy-6-oxohexa-2,4-dienoci acid indicating 1,6-cleavage. Rates of inactivation by 3-fluorocatechol were reduced in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, formate, and mannitol, which implies that superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical exhibit additional inactivation. 64 references.

  9. Niacin metabolism and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activation in malnourished patients with flaky paint dermatosis.

    PubMed

    Maltos, André Luiz; Portari, Guilherme Vannucchi; Moraes, Giselle Vanessa; Monteiro, Marina Casteli Rodrigues; Vannucchi, Helio; da Cunha, Daniel Ferreira

    2015-06-01

    Flaky paint dermatosis, characterized by extensive, often bilateral areas of flaking and pigmentation, mostly in sun unexposed areas is considered a feature of kwashiorkor in both children and adults, and must be differentiated from other dermatosis, including chapped and xerotica skin, and pellagra. In this case series we provide evidence that malnourished patients with flaky paint dermatosis and infection/inflammation shown laboratory data suggestive of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activation, besides decreased urinary excretion of N1-methylnicotinamide (N1 MN), a marker of pellagra. We study nine adult patients showing flaky paint dermatosis and clinical features of infection or inflammation, and increased serum C-reactive protein, characteristic of the presence of acute phase response syndrome. As a group, they had low or deficient urinary N1 MN excretion (0.52 ± 0.39 mg/g creatinine) compatible with pellagra. They also showed low serum tryptophan levels (<29 μmol/L) and a serum kynurenine/tryptophan ratio higher than 0.04, suggesting increased IDO expression and increase in the tryptophan oxidation. Findings suggest that some patients with flaky paint dermatosis showed laboratory data suggestive of IDO activation, besides decreased N1 MN urinary excretion. Taken together, the data support the idea that flaky paint dermatosis could be a skin manifestation of niacin deficiency. PMID:25933499

  10. The Human Enzyme That Converts Dietary Provitamin A Carotenoids to Vitamin A Is a Dioxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    dela Seña, Carlo; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Narayanasamy, Sureshbabu; Curley, Robert W.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Harrison, Earl H.

    2014-01-01

    β-Carotene 15–15′-oxygenase (BCO1) catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of dietary provitamin A carotenoids to retinal (vitamin A aldehyde). Aldehydes readily exchange their carbonyl oxygen with water, making oxygen labeling experiments challenging. BCO1 has been thought to be a monooxygenase, incorporating oxygen from O2 and H2O into its cleavage products. This was based on a study that used conditions that favored oxygen exchange with water. We incubated purified recombinant human BCO1 and β-carotene in either 16O2-H218O or 18O2-H216O medium for 15 min at 37 °C, and the relative amounts of 18O-retinal and 16O-retinal were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. At least 79% of the retinal produced by the reaction has the same oxygen isotope as the O2 gas used. Together with the data from 18O-retinal-H216O and 16O-retinal-H218O incubations to account for nonenzymatic oxygen exchange, our results show that BCO1 incorporates only oxygen from O2 into retinal. Thus, BCO1 is a dioxygenase. PMID:24668807

  11. Antiviral and immunoregulatory effects of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lepiller, Quentin; Soulier, Eric; Li, Qisheng; Lambotin, Mélanie; Barths, Jochen; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Liang, T. Jake; Barth, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    In patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, enhanced activity of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO) has been reported. IDO - a tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme – has been considered as both an innate defence mechanism and an important regulator of the immune response. The molecular mechanism of IDO induction in HCV infection and its role in the antiviral immune response remain unknown. Using primary human hepatocytes, we show that HCV infection stimulates IDO expression. IDO gene induction was transient and coincided with the expression of type I and type III interferons (IFNs) and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in HCV-infected hepatocytes. Overexpression of hepatic IDO prior to HCV infection markedly impaired HCV replication in hepatocytes, suggesting that IDO limits the spread of HCV within the liver. siRNA-mediated IDO knockdown revealed that IDO functions as an IFN-mediated anti-HCV effector. Hepatic IDO was most potently induced by IFN-γ and ongoing HCV replication could significantly upregulate IDO expression. IRF1 and STAT1 regulated hepatic IDO expression. Hepatic IDO expression also had a significant inhibitory effect on CD4+ T cell proliferation. Our data suggest that hepatic IDO plays a dual role during HCV infection by retarding viral replication and also regulating host immune responses. PMID:25792183

  12. Negative Impact of Hypoxia on Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase Function

    PubMed Central

    Elbers, Frank; Woite, Claudia; Antoni, Valentina; Stein, Sara; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Schares, Gereon; Däubener, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid for hosts and pathogens. The liver enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) provokes, by its ability to degrade tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine, the precursor of the immune-relevant kynurenines, direct and indirect antimicrobial and immunoregulatory states. Up to now these TDO-mediated broad-spectrum effector functions have never been observed under hypoxia in vitro, although physiologic oxygen concentrations in liver tissue are low, especially in case of infection. Here we analysed recombinant expressed human TDO and ex vivo murine TDO functions under different oxygen conditions and show that TDO-induced restrictions of clinically relevant pathogens (bacteria, parasites) and of T cell proliferation are abrogated under hypoxic conditions. We pinpointed the loss of TDO efficiency to the reduction of TDO activity, since cell survival and TDO protein levels were unaffected. In conclusion, the potent antimicrobial as well as immunoregulatory effects of TDO were substantially impaired under hypoxic conditions that pathophysiologically occur in vivo. This might be detrimental for the appropriate host immune response towards relevant pathogens. PMID:27563172

  13. Association of a functional Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 genotype with specific immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Køllgaard, Tania; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Idorn, Manja; Holmgaard, Rikke Bæk; Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2012-01-01

    Two frequent single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) are present in the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 (IDO2) gene that influence its enzymatic activity. Thus, one SNP (R248W) is associated with a reduction in IDO2 catalytic activity, whereas the other SNP (Y359stop) generates a premature stop codon abolishing activity completely. In the present study, we describe the presence of a specific cellular immune response in the periphery which correlated with the functional status of the IDO2 protein. Hence, the induction of IDO2-specific T cells in peripheral blood requires the presence of a functional IDO2 protein and, consequently, is restricted to individuals that are not homozygous for the stop codon. Furthermore, we detected stronger T-cell responses in donors with the homozygous Y wild type at position 359 when compared with the heterozygous genotype. Interestingly, we found a higher number of immune responses against IDO2 in patients homozygous for the 248W giving reduction in IDO2 activity compared with the 248R. Hence, spontaneous immune responses against IDO2 seem to be correlated with reduced enzymatic activity of IDO2. The patient IDO2 genotype may well influence the outcome of IDO2-based anti-cancer vaccination. PMID:22754762

  14. Functional expression of a valencene dioxygenase from Pleurotus sapidus in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zelena, Kateryna; Krings, Ulrich; Berger, Ralf G

    2012-03-01

    Valencene dioxygenase (ValOx) from the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus sapidus converted the sesquiterpene (+)-valencene to the valuable grapefruit flavour (+)-nootkatone and to nootkatols through intermediate hydroperoxides. Expression of the enzyme was carried out in the cytosol and periplasm of Escherichia coli. The heterologous production led to high yields of inclusion bodies. The poor yield of soluble recombinant protein was improved by various strategies including cold shock expression, chaperone co-expression, and employment of mutant E. coli strains. Up to 60 mg of the biologically active, soluble ValOx was produced by cold shock under control of the cspA promoter at 8 °C in the BL21(DE3)Star strain and co-expression of the E. coli trigger factor. The recombinant enzyme, purified using the N-terminal His tag, showed the catalytic properties of the wild-type enzyme, as was confirmed by the LC-MS analysis of hydroperoxide intermediates and GC-MS analysis of the volatile products. PMID:22264428

  15. The hepatocyte growth factor antagonist NK4 inhibits indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase expression via the c-Met-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongdong; Saga, Yasushi; Sato, Naoto; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Takikawa, Osamu; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunosuppressive enzyme involved in tumor malignancy. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying its involvement remains largely uncharacterized. The present study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that NK4, an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), can regulate IDO and to characterize the signaling mechanism involved. Following successful transfection of the human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3 (which constitutively expresses IDO) with an NK4 expression vector, we observed that NK4 expression suppressed IDO expression; furthermore, NK4 expression did not suppress cancer cell growth in vitro [in the absence of natural killer (NK) cells], but did influence tumor growth in vivo. In addition, NK4 enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to NK cells in vitro and promoted NK cell accumulation in the tumor stroma in vivo. In an effort to clarify the mechanisms by which NK4 interacts with IDO, we performed investigations utilizing various biochemical inhibitors. The results of these investigations were as follows. First, c-Met (a receptor of HGF) tyrosine kinase inhibitor PHA-665752, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 both suppress IDO expression. Second, enhanced expression of PTEN (a known tumor suppressor) via negative regulation within a PI3K-AKT pathway, inhibits IDO expression. Conversely, neither the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 nor the STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 affects IDO expression. These results suggest that NK4 inhibits IDO expression via a c-Met-PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. PMID:27082119

  16. The hepatocyte growth factor antagonist NK4 inhibits indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase expression via the c-Met-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DONGDONG; SAGA, YASUSHI; SATO, NAOTO; NAKAMURA, TOSHIKAZU; TAKIKAWA, OSAMU; MIZUKAMI, HIROAKI; MATSUBARA, SHIGEKI; FUJIWARA, HIROYUKI

    2016-01-01

    Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunosuppressive enzyme involved in tumor malignancy. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying its involvement remains largely uncharacterized. The present study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that NK4, an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), can regulate IDO and to characterize the signaling mechanism involved. Following successful transfection of the human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3 (which constitutively expresses IDO) with an NK4 expression vector, we observed that NK4 expression suppressed IDO expression; furthermore, NK4 expression did not suppress cancer cell growth in vitro [in the absence of natural killer (NK) cells], but did influence tumor growth in vivo. In addition, NK4 enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to NK cells in vitro and promoted NK cell accumulation in the tumor stroma in vivo. In an effort to clarify the mechanisms by which NK4 interacts with IDO, we performed investigations utilizing various biochemical inhibitors. The results of these investigations were as follows. First, c-Met (a receptor of HGF) tyrosine kinase inhibitor PHA-665752, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 both suppress IDO expression. Second, enhanced expression of PTEN (a known tumor suppressor) via negative regulation within a PI3K-AKT pathway, inhibits IDO expression. Conversely, neither the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 nor the STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 affects IDO expression. These results suggest that NK4 inhibits IDO expression via a c-Met-PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. PMID:27082119

  17. Re-evaluation of dioxygenase gene phylogeny for the development and validation of a quantitative assay for environmental aromatic hydrocarbon degraders

    PubMed Central

    Meynet, Paola; Head, Ian M.; Werner, David; Davenport, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases enzymes have been widely studied, as they catalyse essential reactions initiating the bacterial degradation of organic compounds, for instance aromatic hydrocarbons. The genes encoding these enzymes offer a potential target for studying aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading organisms in the environment. However, previously reported primer sets that target dioxygenase gene sequences or the common conserved Rieske centre of aromatics dioxygenases have limited specificity and/or target non-dioxygenase genes. In this work, an extensive database of dioxygenase α-subunit gene sequences was constructed, and primer sets targeting the conserved Rieske centre were developed. The high specificity of the primers was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis, agarose gel electrophoresis and sequencing. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were also developed and optimized, following MIQE guidelines (Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments). Comparison of the qPCR quantification of dioxygenases in spiked sediment samples and in pure cultures demonstrated an underestimation of the Ct value, and the requirement for a correction factor at gene abundances below 108 gene copies per g of sediment. Externally validated qPCR provides a valuable tool to monitor aromatic hydrocarbon degrader population abundances at contaminated sites. PMID:25944871

  18. Prostaglandin D2 is a novel repressor of IFNγ induced indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase via the DP1 receptor and cAMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Bassal, Nesrine Kamal; Hughes, Bernard P; Costabile, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    Expression of elevated levels of Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is well established as a mechanism of cancer induced immunosuppression. Pharmacological inhibition of IDO activity is thus a promising alternative in the treatment of cancer. Previously we demonstrated that cyclooxygenase derived metabolites of arachidonic acid inhibited the interferon-gamma mediated induction of IDO in both THP-1 cells and human monocytes. Here we identified that of the five primary prostanoids produced by COX-1/COX-2, only PGD2 displayed significant repressor activity. PGD2 inhibited IDO activity with an IC50 of 7.2µM in THP-1 cells and 5.2µM in monocytes. PGD2 caused a significant decrease in both IDO mRNA and protein. Using receptor specific agonists, PGD2 was found to act via the DP1 receptor, while the CRTH2 receptor was not involved. A DP1 antagonist significantly reduced the activity of PGD2, while CRTH2 agonists were ineffective. PGD2 increased intracellular cAMP levels and exogenous N(6)-cAMP was also found to be highly inhibitory. The effects of PGD2 via cAMP were blocked by Rp-cAMP indicating involvement of PKA. PGD2 also stimulated CREB phosphorylation, a PKA dependent transcription factor. This is the first report demonstrating that PGD2, a prostanoid typically associated with allergy, can inhibit IDO activity via the DP1/cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway. Our findings suggest that PGD2 and its derivatives may form the basis of novel repressors of IFNγ-mediated IDO expression. PMID:26995677

  19. Up-regulated expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 in non-Hodgkin lymphoma correlates with increased regulatory T-cell infiltration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Qian; Lu, Kang; Feng, Li-Li; Ding, Mei; Gao, Jun-Ming; Ge, Xue-Ling; Wang, Xin

    2014-02-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), which is a key enzyme in tryptophan metabolism expressed in some subsets of normal and neoplastic cells, participates in tumor-induced tolerance. However, the mechanisms involved are not clearly understood. A hypothesis suggests that IDO1 may be involved in proliferation and conversion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this study, we evaluated the levels of IDO1 and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) tissues and performed ex vivo experiments to investigate the role of IDO1 on T-cell tolerance in NHL. The results showed that expressions of IDO1 mRNA and protein were coincidentally higher in NHL tissues than in reactive hyperplasia of lymph node tissues. Up-regulation of IDO1 was correlated with later clinical phases, larger tumors and higher serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and indicated a worse prognosis. FoxP3 mRNA and protein levels were markedly increased alongside elevated IDO1 levels. Co-culture of murine CD4 + CD25- T cells with A20 cells could initiate the conversion of CD4 + CD25+ T cells, which showed a suppressive function in the mixed lymphocyte reaction. Moreover, the potent inhibitor of IDO1, 1-methyl-l-tryptophan, attenuated the conversion of CD4 + CD25- T cells into CD4 + CD25+ FoxP3 + T cells. The results suggested that up-regulation of IDO1 in NHL tissues could induce local immune tolerance by favoring development and infiltration of FoxP3 + Tregs through the conversion of CD4 + CD25- T cells into CD4 + CD25+ FoxP3 + T cells in the tumor microenvironment. This could be a novel mechanism of NHL escape from immune control. PMID:23682557

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Nocardioides aromaticivorans IC177

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kengo; Ashikawa, Yuji; Usami, Yusuke; Noguchi, Haruko; Fujimoto, Zui; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2007-10-01

    The ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from N. aromaticivorans IC177 was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution. Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) catalyzes the dihydroxylation of carbazole by angular position (C9a) carbon bonding to the imino nitrogen and its adjacent C1 carbon. CARDO consists of a terminal oxygenase component and two electron-transfer components: ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase. The ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Nocardioides aromaticivorans IC177 was crystallized at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals, which were improved by macroseeding, diffract to 2.0 Å resolution and belong to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the terminal oxygenase component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Nocardioides aromaticivorans IC177

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kengo; Ashikawa, Yuji; Usami, Yusuke; Noguchi, Haruko; Fujimoto, Zui; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2006-12-01

    The terminal oxygenase component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from N. aromaticivorans IC177 was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.30 Å resolution. Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) catalyzes the dihydroxylation of carbazole by angular-position (C9a) carbon bonding to the imino nitrogen and its adjacent C1 carbon. CARDO consists of a terminal oxygenase component and two electron-transfer components: ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase. The terminal oxygenase component (43.9 kDa) of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Nocardioides aromaticivorans IC177 was crystallized at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals diffract to 2.3 Å resolution and belong to space group C2.

  2. Peptide mapping and amino acid sequencing of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases (CD I1 and CD I2) from Acinetobacter lwoffii K24.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Ha, K S

    1997-10-31

    The partial amino acid sequences of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases (CD I1 and CD I2) from Acinetobacter lwoffii K24 have been determined by analysis of peptides after cleavages with endopeptidase Lys-C, endopeptidase Glu-C, trypsin, and chemicals (cyanogen bromide and BNPS-skatole). They include 248 amino acid sequences (4 fragments) of CD I1 and 211 amino acid sequences (5 fragments) of CD I2. Two enzymes have more than 50% sequence homology with type I catechol 1,2-dioxygenases and less than 30% sequence homology with type II catechol 1,2-dioxygenases. Two enzymes have similar hydropathy profiles in the N-terminal region, suggesting that they have similar secondary structures. PMID:9387151

  3. Involvement of the Kynurenine Pathway in Human Glioma Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Seray; Teo, Charles; McDonald, Kerrie L.; Zinger, Anna; Bustamante, Sonia; Lim, Chai K.; Sundaram, Gayathri; Braidy, Nady; Brew, Bruce J.; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) is the principal route of L-tryptophan (TRP) catabolism leading to the production of kynurenine (KYN), the neuroprotectants, kynurenic acid (KYNA) and picolinic acid (PIC), the excitotoxin, quinolinic acid (QUIN) and the essential pyridine nucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). The enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 (IDO-2) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO-2) initiate the first step of the KP. IDO-1 and TDO-2 induction in tumors are crucial mechanisms implicated to play pivotal roles in suppressing anti-tumor immunity. Here, we report the first comprehensive characterisation of the KP in 1) cultured human glioma cells and 2) plasma from patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Our data revealed that interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) stimulation significantly potentiated the expression of the KP enzymes, IDO-1 IDO-2, kynureninase (KYNU), kynurenine hydroxylase (KMO) and significantly down-regulated 2-amino-3-carboxymuconate semialdehyde decarboxylase (ACMSD) and kynurenine aminotransferase-I (KAT-I) expression in cultured human glioma cells. This significantly increased KP activity but significantly lowered the KYNA/KYN neuroprotective ratio in human cultured glioma cells. KP activation (KYN/TRP) was significantly higher, whereas the concentrations of the neuroreactive KP metabolites TRP, KYNA, QUIN and PIC and the KYNA/KYN ratio were significantly lower in GBM patient plasma (n = 18) compared to controls. These results provide further evidence for the involvement of the KP in glioma pathophysiology and highlight a potential role of KP products as novel and highly attractive therapeutic targets to evaluate for the treatment of brain tumors, aimed at restoring anti-tumor immunity and reducing the capacity for malignant cells to produce NAD+, which is necessary for energy production and DNA repair. PMID:25415278

  4. Involvement of the kynurenine pathway in human glioma pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Adams, Seray; Teo, Charles; McDonald, Kerrie L; Zinger, Anna; Bustamante, Sonia; Lim, Chai K; Sundaram, Gayathri; Braidy, Nady; Brew, Bruce J; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) is the principal route of L-tryptophan (TRP) catabolism leading to the production of kynurenine (KYN), the neuroprotectants, kynurenic acid (KYNA) and picolinic acid (PIC), the excitotoxin, quinolinic acid (QUIN) and the essential pyridine nucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). The enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 (IDO-2) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO-2) initiate the first step of the KP. IDO-1 and TDO-2 induction in tumors are crucial mechanisms implicated to play pivotal roles in suppressing anti-tumor immunity. Here, we report the first comprehensive characterisation of the KP in 1) cultured human glioma cells and 2) plasma from patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Our data revealed that interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) stimulation significantly potentiated the expression of the KP enzymes, IDO-1 IDO-2, kynureninase (KYNU), kynurenine hydroxylase (KMO) and significantly down-regulated 2-amino-3-carboxymuconate semialdehyde decarboxylase (ACMSD) and kynurenine aminotransferase-I (KAT-I) expression in cultured human glioma cells. This significantly increased KP activity but significantly lowered the KYNA/KYN neuroprotective ratio in human cultured glioma cells. KP activation (KYN/TRP) was significantly higher, whereas the concentrations of the neuroreactive KP metabolites TRP, KYNA, QUIN and PIC and the KYNA/KYN ratio were significantly lower in GBM patient plasma (n = 18) compared to controls. These results provide further evidence for the involvement of the KP in glioma pathophysiology and highlight a potential role of KP products as novel and highly attractive therapeutic targets to evaluate for the treatment of brain tumors, aimed at restoring anti-tumor immunity and reducing the capacity for malignant cells to produce NAD(+), which is necessary for energy production and DNA repair. PMID:25415278

  5. Characterizing the Promiscuity of LigAB, a Lignin Catabolite Degrading Extradiol Dioxygenase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Kevin P.; Taylor, Erika A.

    2014-01-01

    LigAB from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 is the only structurally characterized dioxygenase of the largely uncharacterized superfamily of Type II extradiol dioxygenases (EDO). This enzyme catalyzes the oxidative ring-opening of protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid or PCA) in a pathway allowing the degradation of lignin derived aromatic compounds (LDACs). LigAB has also been shown to utilize two other LDACs from the same metabolic pathway as substrates, gallate, and 3-O-methyl gallate; however, kcat/KM had not been reported for any of these compounds. In order to assess the catalytic efficiency and get insights into the observed promiscuity of this enzyme, steady-state kinetic analyses were performed for LigAB with these and a library of related compounds. The dioxygenation of PCA by LigAB was highly efficient, with a kcat of 51 s−1 and a kcat/KM of 4.26 × 106 M−1s−1. LigAB demonstrated the ability to use a variety of catecholic molecules as substrates beyond the previously identified gallate and 3-O-methyl gallate, including 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide, homoprotocatechuate, catechol, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile. Interestingly, 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide (DHBAm) behaves in a manner similar to that of the preferred benzoic acid substrates, with a kcat/Km value only ~4-fold lower than that for gallate and ~10-fold higher than that for 3-O-methyl gallate. All of these most active substrates demonstrate mechanistic inactivation of LigAB. Additionally, DHBAm exhibits potent product inhibition that leads to an inactive enzyme, being more highly deactivating at lower substrate concentration, a phenomena that, to our knowledge, has not been reported for another dioxygenase substrate/product pair. These results provide valuable catalytic insight into the reactions catalyzed by LigAB and make it the first Type II EDO that is fully characterized both structurally and kinetically. PMID:23977959

  6. Selection for Growth on 3-Nitrotoluene by 2-Nitrotoluene-Utilizing Acidovorax sp. Strain JS42 Identifies Nitroarene Dioxygenases with Altered Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Mahan, Kristina M.; Penrod, Joseph T.; Ju, Kou-San; Al Kass, Natascia; Tan, Watumesa A.; Truong, Richard; Parales, Juanito V.

    2014-01-01

    Acidovorax sp. strain JS42 uses 2-nitrotoluene as a sole source of carbon and energy. The first enzyme of the degradation pathway, 2-nitrotoluene 2,3-dioxygenase, adds both atoms of molecular oxygen to 2-nitrotoluene, forming nitrite and 3-methylcatechol. All three mononitrotoluene isomers serve as substrates for 2-nitrotoluene dioxygenase, but strain JS42 is unable to grow on 3- or 4-nitrotoluene. Using both long- and short-term selections, we obtained spontaneous mutants of strain JS42 that grew on 3-nitrotoluene. All of the strains obtained by short-term selection had mutations in the gene encoding the α subunit of 2-nitrotoluene dioxygenase that changed isoleucine 204 at the active site to valine. Those strains obtained by long-term selections had mutations that changed the same residue to valine, alanine, or threonine or changed the alanine at position 405, which is just outside the active site, to glycine. All of these changes altered the regiospecificity of the enzymes with 3-nitrotoluene such that 4-methylcatechol was the primary product rather than 3-methylcatechol. Kinetic analyses indicated that the evolved enzymes had enhanced affinities for 3-nitrotoluene and were more catalytically efficient with 3-nitrotoluene than the wild-type enzyme. In contrast, the corresponding amino acid substitutions in the closely related enzyme nitrobenzene 1,2-dioxygenase were detrimental to enzyme activity. When cloned genes encoding the evolved dioxygenases were introduced into a JS42 mutant lacking a functional dioxygenase, the strains acquired the ability to grow on 3-nitrotoluene but with significantly longer doubling times than the evolved strains, suggesting that additional beneficial mutations occurred elsewhere in the genome. PMID:25344236

  7. Nucleotide sequences of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus benABC genes for benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase reveal evolutionary relationships among multicomponent oxygenases.

    PubMed Central

    Neidle, E L; Hartnett, C; Ornston, L N; Bairoch, A; Rekik, M; Harayama, S

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus benABC genes encoding a multicomponent oxygenase for the conversion of benzoate to a nonaromatic cis-diol were determined. The enzyme, benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase, is composed of a hydroxylase component, encoded by benAB, and an electron transfer component, encoded by benC. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of BenABC with related sequences, including those for the multicomponent toluate, toluene, benzene, and naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenases, indicated that the similarly sized subunits of the hydroxylase components were derived from a common ancestor. Conserved cysteine and histidine residues may bind a [2Fe-2S] Rieske-type cluster to the alpha-subunits of all the hydroxylases. Conserved histidines and tyrosines may coordinate a mononuclear Fe(II) ion. The less conserved beta-subunits of the hydroxylases may be responsible for determining substrate specificity. Each dioxygenase had either one or two electron transfer proteins. The electron transfer component of benzoate dioxygenase, encoded by benC, and the corresponding protein of the toluate 1,2-dioxygenase, encoded by xylZ, were each found to have an N-terminal region which resembled chloroplast-type ferredoxins and a C-terminal region which resembled several oxidoreductases. These BenC and XylZ proteins had regions similar to certain monooxygenase components but did not appear to be evolutionarily related to the two-protein electron transfer systems of the benzene, toluene, and naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenases. Regions of possible NAD and flavin adenine dinucleotide binding were identified. PMID:1885518

  8. Diversity and distribution of catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase genes in surface sediments of the Bohai Sea.

    PubMed

    He, Peiqing; Li, Li; Liu, Jihua; Bai, Yazhi; Fang, Xisheng

    2016-05-01

    Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase (C23O) is the key enzyme for aerobic aromatic degradation. Based on clone libraries and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we characterized diversity and distribution patterns of C23O genes in surface sediments of the Bohai Sea. The results showed that sediments of the Bohai Sea were dominated by genes related to C23O subfamily I.2.A. The samples from wastewater discharge area (DG) and aquaculture farm (KL) showed distinct composition of C23O genes when compared to the samples from Bohai Bay (BH), and total organic carbon was a crucial determinant accounted for the composition variation. C6BH12-38 and C2BH2-35 displayed the highest gene copies and highest ratios to the 16S rRNA genes in KL, and they might prefer biologically labile aromatic hydrocarbons via aquaculture inputs. Meanwhile, C7BH3-48 showed the highest gene copies and highest ratios to the 16S rRNA genes in DG, and this could be selective effect of organic loadings from wastewater discharge. An evident increase in C6BH12-38 and C7BH3-48 gene copies and reduction in diversity of C23O genes in DG and KL indicated composition perturbations of C23O genes and potential loss in functional redundancy. We suggest that ecological habitat and trophic specificity could shape the distribution of C23O genes in the Bohai Sea sediments. PMID:27190241

  9. Inflated kinetic isotope effects in the branched mechanism of Neurospora crassa 2-nitropropane dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Francis, Kevin; Gadda, Giovanni

    2009-03-24

    Catalytic turnover of Neurospora crassa 2-nitropropane dioxygenase with nitroethane as substrate occurs through both nonoxidative and oxidative pathways. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effects with [1,1-(2)H(2)]nitroethane as substrate was measured in the current study by monitoring the formation of the nitronate product in the nonoxidative pathway. The kinetic isotope effect on the second-order rate constant for nitronate formation, k(cat)/K(m), decreased from an upper limiting value of 23 +/- 1 at low pH to a lower limiting value of 11 +/- 1 at high pH. These kinetic isotope effects are three times larger than those determined previously through measurements of oxygen consumption that occurs in the oxidative pathway of the enzyme [(2006) Biochemistry 45, 13889]. Analytical expressions for the k(cat)/K(m) values determined in each study show that the difference in the kinetic isotope effects arises from the branching of an enzyme-ethylnitronate reaction intermediate through oxidative and nonoxidative turnover. This branching is isotope sensitive due to a kinetic isotope effect on nitronate release rather than on flavin reduction as indicated by the pH-independent (D)k(red) value of 0.99 +/- 0.06 with ethylnitronate as substrate. The kinetic isotope effect on ethylnitronate release arises from the deprotonation of histidine 196, which provides electrostatic interactions with the nitronate to keep it bound in the active site for oxidation. The isotope effect on branching results in an inflation of the kinetic isotope observed for the nonoxidative pathway to values that are larger than the intrinsic values associated with CH bond cleavage. PMID:19199786

  10. Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in a murine model of Aspergillus fumigatus keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jing; Hu, Li-Ting; Che, Cheng-Ye; Li, Cui; Wang, Qian; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Peng, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To observe the presence and expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) during the corneal immunity to Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) in the murine models. METHODS The murine model of fungal keratitis was established by smearing with colonies of A. fumigatus after scraping central epithelium of cornea and covering with contact lenses in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were randomly divided into control group, sham group and A. fumigatus keratitis group. The cornea was monitored daily using a slit lamp and recorded disease score after infection. Corneal lesion was detected by immunofluorescence staining. IDO mRNA and protein were also detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. RESULTS The disease score and slit lamp photography indicated that disease severity was consistent with corneal inflammation in the murine models, and the disease scores in A. fumigatus keratitis group were obviously higher than those in the sham group. By immunofluorescence staining, IDO was mainly localized in corneal epithelium and stroma in the murine corneal tissues with A. fumigatus keratitis. Compared with the sham group, IDO mRNA expression was significantly enhanced in corneal epithelium infected by A. fumigatus. Furthermore, IDO protein expression detected by Western blot was in accord with transcript levels of IDO mRNA measured by qRT-PCR. IDO protein expression was enhanced after A. fumigatus infection compared with the sham group. CONCLUSION IDO is detected in corneal epithelium and stroma locally, which indicates IDO takes part in the pathogenesis of A. fumigatus keratitis and plays a key role in immune regulation at the early stage. PMID:27162718