Science.gov

Sample records for 2001-2002 ionising radiation

  1. [Thyroid cancer following exposure to ionising radiation].

    PubMed

    Schlumberger, M; Chevillard, S; Ory, K; Dupuy, C; Le Guen, B; de Vathaire, F

    2011-08-01

    Exposure to ionising radiations during childhood increases the risk of thyroid cancer. Similar risk factors have been found after external radiation exposure or internal contamination with radioactive iodine isotopes. In case of contamination with radioiodines, administration of potassium iodide can prevent thyroid irradiation. PMID:21723770

  2. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    McColl, Neil; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Erdmann, Friederike; de Vries, Esther; Greinert, Rüdiger; Harrison, John; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ionising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other epidemiological studies of groups that have been exposed to radiation from medical, occupational or environmental sources; experimental animal studies; and studies of cellular responses to radiation. Considering exposure to environmental ionising radiation, inhalation of naturally occurring radon is the major source of radiation in the population - in doses orders of magnitude higher than those from nuclear power production or nuclear fallout. Indoor exposure to radon and its decay products is an important cause of lung cancer; radon may cause approximately one in ten lung cancers in Europe. Exposures to radon in buildings can be reduced via a three-step process of identifying those with potentially elevated radon levels, measuring radon levels, and reducing exposure by installation of remediation systems. In the 4th Edition of the European Code against Cancer it is therefore recommended to: "Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels". Non-ionising types of radiation (those with insufficient energy to ionise molecules) - including extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields as well as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields - are not an established cause of cancer and are therefore not addressed in the recommendations to reduce cancer risk. PMID:26126928

  3. Ionising radiation: are orthopaedic surgeons at risk?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G. L.; Briggs, T. W.; Lavy, C. B.; Nordeen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Modern orthopaedic trauma practice involves increased exposure of the surgeon to ionising radiation. However, there have been no studies to investigate whether the doses received are within limits for non-classified workers. In this study, whole body, eye and extremity, namely hand, doses were measured in six orthopaedic surgeons during trauma cases requiring the use of X-rays in theatre. None of the subjects approached the recommended maximum dose levels for either the whole body, eyes or hands. This finding is reassuring. In orthopaedics, the limiting dose is that to the hands. This differs from previously studied groups, such as radiologists and cardiologists, in whom the limiting factor is the dose to the lens of the eye. Although current precautions appear to be adequate, safe practice in the future will depend on continuing vigilance and repetition of studies similar to this one as techniques and workloads change. PMID:1416705

  4. Student Charges & Financial Aid, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, Washington, DC.

    Data from a variety of sources confirmed that the opening of the 2001-2002 academic year brought a return to reduced appropriations for higher education and higher tuition increases. As the impact of the continued economic slowdown and the financial blows from the September terrorist attacks become known, policymakers continue to reduce budgets…

  5. Infants and Toddlers, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroenke, Lillian DeVault, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the 2001-2002 issues of a quarterly journal for teachers and parents of children in Montessori infant and toddler programs. The spring 2001 issue presents articles on the history of infant and toddler programs in Italy and how to fulfill infant needs in Montessori child care, and on learning activities in the kitchen…

  6. Oregon Community College 2001-2002 Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Dept. of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, Salem.

    This document provides numerous tables and graphs illustrating information regarding Oregon community colleges. The four sections of this 2001/2002 Oregon Community College Profile provide information on: (1) students; (2) faculty and staff; (3) finances; and (4) programs and services. The information regarding the student section summarizes…

  7. Occupational Exposure to Natural Sources of Ionising Radiation in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Organo, Catherine; Colgan, Tony; Fenton, David; Synnott, Hugh; Currivan, Lorraine

    2008-08-01

    The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) has recently completed a detailed evaluation of all radiation exposure pathways from sources of both natural and artificial radiation in the Irish environment. This paper presents a compilation of the occupational doses received by Irish workers exposed to natural sources of ionising radiation.

  8. Occupational Exposure to Natural Sources of Ionising Radiation in Ireland

    SciTech Connect

    Organo, Catherine; Colgan, Tony; Fenton, David; Synnott, Hugh; Currivan, Lorraine

    2008-08-07

    The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) has recently completed a detailed evaluation of all radiation exposure pathways from sources of both natural and artificial radiation in the Irish environment. This paper presents a compilation of the occupational doses received by Irish workers exposed to natural sources of ionising radiation.

  9. International GPS Service 2001 - 2002 Technical Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gowey, Ken (Editor); Neilan, Ruth (Editor); Moore, Angelyn (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    Applications of the Global Positioning System (GPS) to Earth Science are numerous. The International GPS Service (IGS), a federation of government agencies and universities, plays an increasingly critical role in support of GPS-related research and engineering activities. Contributions from the IGS Governing Board and Central Bureau, analysis and data centers, station operators, and others constitute the 2001 / 2002 Technical Reports. Hard copies of each volume can be obtained by contacting the IGS Central Bureau at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This report is published in black and white. To view graphs or plots that use color to represent data trends or information, please refer to the online PDF version at http://igscb.jpl.nasa.gov/overview/pubs.html.

  10. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these.

  11. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B

    2016-07-21

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these. PMID:27351409

  12. IEC STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Voytchev, Miroslav; Ambrosi, P.; Behrens, R.; Chiaro Jr, Peter John

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents IEC/SC 45B Radiation protection instrumentation and its standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation: IEC 61526 Ed. 3 for active personal dosemeters and IEC 62387-1 for passive integrating dosimetry systems. The transposition of these standards as CENELEC (European) standards is also discussed together with the collaboration between IEC/SC 45B and ISO/TC 85/SC 2.

  13. Resonance laser-induced ionisation of sodium vapour taking radiative transfer into account

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, N I; Shaparev, N Ya

    2006-04-30

    The problem of ionisation of atomic sodium in the field of resonance laser radiation is numerically solved taking radiative transfer into account. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of associative ionisation, then they gain energy in superelastic processes (collisions of the second kind) and initiate the avalanche ionisation of the medium by electron impact. We studied the effect of secondary radiation on the laser pulse propagation upon competition between the ionising and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms, on the kinetics of ionisation-induced vapour bleaching, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  14. Some characteristics of the glutathione cycle revealed by ionising and non-ionising electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Holt, J A

    1995-10-01

    The cyclic reaction of GSH-->GSSG-->GSH (designated R(exp) or R(e)) obeys the three specific features of life by producing energy in exponential quantities relative to time, is in effect irreversible and is inherited from generation to generation. In multicellular life, this reaction produces the energy for mitosis and is kept in controlled inactivity until needed to maintain perfection of form and function by energising mitosis. The immediate control of Re appears to be feedback process-dependent on the concentration of GSSG. Ultra high-frequency electromagnetic radiation of 434 MHz (UHF) will change Re from inactive to active and, in so doing, it causes resonance and/or fluorescence of the glutathione cycle which changes its radiosensitivity. Re is the primary direct target of ionising radiation and produces the energy for mitosis. Clinical observations suggest that, in the normal cell, Re is inactive and is not killed by 3 x 2700 rads or 6 x 1650 rads yet, when active, its sensitivity value (DO) is approximately 160 rads. Using the standard radiobiological equation of response to ionising radiation, it can be deduced that radiosensitive cancers have two or three Re units active per cell and radioresistance increases in proportion to the number of potentially active Re units per cell. Re appears to be the main cause of cancers' increased conductivity of electricity compared with normal tissue. In cancer therapy, UHF is the best radiosensitiser ever discovered (up to two or more decades). Re is also intelligent compared with non-exponential reactions but cannot be the basis of intellectual brain functions which must be based on non-electrical chemical processes. PMID:8577298

  15. The New 2001-2002 Term. Supreme Court Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the issues addressed during the 2001-2002 term of the U.S. Supreme Court, which convened on October 1, 2001: (1) school vouchers; (2) affirmative action; (3) online pornography; and (4) the death penalty. (CMK)

  16. Binary-Encounter-Bethe ionisation cross sections for simulation of DNA damage by the direct effect of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Plante, I; Cucinotta, F A

    2015-09-01

    DNA damage is of crucial importance in the understanding of the effects of ionising radiation. To refine existing DNA damage models, an approach using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) cross sections was developed. The differential cross sections for ionisation of the molecular orbitals of the DNA bases, sugars and phosphates are calculated using the electron binding energy, the mean kinetic energy and the occupancy number of each orbital as parameters. The resulting cross section has an analytic form which is quite convenient to use for Monte-Carlo codes that randomly sample the energy loss occurring during an ionisation event. We also describe an algorithm to simulate the interactions of electrons with DNA in the radiation transport code RITRACKS using the integrated BEB cross section for the bases, sugar and phosphates. PMID:25870431

  17. Romanian medical exposure to ionising radiation in 2012.

    PubMed

    Girjoaba, O; Cucu, A

    2015-07-01

    Medical exposure, the main source of artificial exposure, shows an increasing trend in the last years, manifested both by increasing the number of examinations with ionising radiation and by increasing the patient dose level. Annual results obtained for medical exposure to ionising radiation based on the data collected from Romanian hospitals are useful for the update of the national database and optimisation of diagnostic procedures in radiology and nuclear medicine. Medical exposure level is expressed in terms of annual collective dose and is evaluated from annual frequencies and the average effective dose per procedure for different types of radiological and nuclear medicine procedures. The Romanian hospitals reported during 2012 a number of 5,505,792 radiological examinations and 17,088 diagnostic procedures of nuclear medicine. Based on the data reported, the average effective doses and their contributions to the collective dose were evaluated. The main contributions to the collective dose of the radiological procedures are registered for CT abdomen and pelvis region, followed by thorax CT and head CT examinations. The next positions are fluoroscopic examination of the thorax and gastrointestinal disease and radiographic examination of the lumbar spine and thorax, which in spite of their low effective dose have an important contribution to the collective dose due to the large number of examinations. For nuclear medicine procedures, major contributions to collective dose are given by bone scintigraphy, followed by PET-CT and thyroid scintigraphy. PMID:25848102

  18. Hazards of ionising radiation: 100 years of observations on man.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R.

    1995-01-01

    In November 1895, when Conrad Röntgen serendipitously discovered X-rays, epidemiology was effectively limited to the study of infectious disease. What little epidemiological work was done in other fields was done as part of clinical medicine or under the heading of geographical pathology. The risks from exposure to X-rays and subsequently from other types of ionising radiation were consequently discovered by qualitative association or animal experiment. They did not begin to be quantified in humans until half a century later, when epidemiology emerged as a scientific discipline capable of quantifying risks of non-infectious disease and the scientific world was alerted to the need for assessing the effects of the radiation to which large populations might be exposed by the use of nuclear energy in peace and war. PMID:8519643

  19. Foundation for Child Development Annual Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Child Development, New York, NY.

    This annual report details the activities of the Foundation for Child Development (FCD) for 2001-2002. Beginning the report is a brief description of the Foundations mission, its funding priorities, and application procedures. The report then presents the joint statement of the chair, Karen Gerard, and the president, Ruby Takanishi, focusing on…

  20. Addressing Strategic Challenges. Annual Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Independent Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This report describes the activities of the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) in 2001-2002. In that year, the CIC focused on implementing new programs, services, and initiatives based on the challenges identified in the previous year during the intensive strategic planning effort. Highlights for the year include: (1) new assistance to…

  1. The State of Our Nation's Youth, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    This report details 2001-2002 findings of an annual, national survey of the attitudes and plans of American adolescents. Participating in the telephone survey was a nationally representative sample of 1,014 students 13 to 18 years of age in ninth through twelfth grade. The report summarizes findings "at a glance" and discusses findings under the…

  2. Public Education Information Management System Data Standards, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    The submission of Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) data is required of all Texas school districts. The "Data Standards" document provides instructions regarding the submission of PEIMS data from school districts to the Texas Education Agency. The 2001-2002 standards describe the PEIMS data reporting requirement and provide…

  3. St. Petersburg College FactBook, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Petersburg Junior Coll., FL. Office of Institutional Research.

    This 2001-2002 fact book for St. Petersburg College (SPC) in Florida provides statistical information to support planning and decision-making. It also offers a historical perspective of the institution. SPC was founded in 1927 as St. Petersburg Junior College, Florida's first two-year institution of higher learning. SPC has evolved from an…

  4. Education and training issues in individual monitoring of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, P; Kamenopoulou, V

    2011-03-01

    The present article deals with the education and training (E&T) issues of individual monitoring (IM) of ionising radiation, based on the requirements provided by the Basic Safety Standards Euratom Directive and the European Commission Technical Recommendations for IM of external radiation. The structure and the objectives of E&T programmes addressed to the staff of dosimetry services, in order to allow the recognition and ensure the continuity of expertise are discussed. The necessity for the establishment of a national strategy for building competence in IM through information, education, training and retraining programmes, addressed to the individually monitored personnel is underlined. The train the trainers' concept is recognised as being an important tool for optimising resources and transferring the skills necessary for building competence. The conditions under which an efficient train the trainers' approach can be established are discussed. Examples of curricula concerning the key persons involved in the provision of E&T in occupational radiation protection are also given. PMID:21131663

  5. Water Science and Technology Board Annual Report 2001-2002

    SciTech Connect

    2002-10-01

    This annual report marks the twentieth anniversary of the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) (1982-2002). The WSTB oversees studies of water issues. The principal products of studies are written reports. These reports cover a wide range of water resources issues of national concern. The following three recently issued reports illustrate the scope of the WSTB's studies: Envisioning the Agenda for Water Resources Research in the Twenty-first Century. The Missouri River Ecosystem: Exploring the Prospects for Recovery, and Assessing the TMDL Approach to Water Quality Management. The WSTB generally meets three times each year where discussions are held on ongoing projects, strategic planning, and developing new initiatives. The meetings also foster communication within the water resources community. The annual report includes a discussion on current studies, completed studies 2001-2002, and future plans, as well as a listing of published reports (1983-2002).

  6. Noodle consumption patterns of American consumers: NHANES 2001-2002

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chin Eun; Lee, Kyung Won

    2010-01-01

    Although noodles occupy an important place in the dietary lives of Americans, up until the present time research and in-depth data on the noodle consumption patterns of the US population have been very limited. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the food consumption and diet patterns of noodle consumers and non-consumers according to age, gender, income, and ethnicity. The 2001-2002 NHANES databases were used. The NHANES 2001-2002 data showed that noodle consumers reporting noodle consumption in their 24-h recall were 2,035 individuals (23.3% of total subjects). According to the results, the mean noodle consumption was 304.1 g/day/person, with 334.3 g for males and 268.0 g for females. By age, the intake of those in the age range of 9-18 years old ranked highest at 353.0 g, followed by the order of 19-50 year-olds with 333.5 g, 51-70 year-olds with by 280.4 g, older than 71years old with 252.3 g, and 1-8 year-olds with 221.5 g. By gender, males consumed more noodles than females. Also, according to income, the intake amount for the middle-income level (PIR 1~1.85) of consumers was highest at 312.5 g. Noodle intake also showed different patterns by ethnicity in which the "other" ethnic group consumed the most noodles with 366.1 g, followed by, in order, Hispanics with 318.7 g, Whites with 298.6 g, and Blacks with 289.5 g. After comparing food consumption by dividing the subjects into noodle consumers and non-consumers, the former was more likely to consume milk, fish, citrus fruits, tomatoes, and alcoholic beverages while the latter preferred meat, poultry, bread, and non-alcohol beverages. PMID:20607071

  7. Destruction of Raman biosignatures by ionising radiation and the implications for life detection on Mars.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Page, Kristian; Jorge-Villar, Susana E; Wright, Gary; Munshi, Tasnim; Scowen, Ian J; Ward, John M; Edwards, Howell G M

    2012-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a very effective approach for the detection of microorganisms colonising hostile environments on Earth. The ExoMars rover, due for launch in 2018, will carry a Raman laser spectrometer to analyse samples of the martian subsurface collected by the probe's 2-m drill in a search for similar biosignatures. The martian surface is unprotected from the flux of cosmic rays, an ionising radiation field that will degrade organic molecules and so diminish and distort the detectable Raman signature of potential martian microbial life. This study employs Raman spectroscopy to analyse samples of two model organisms, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and the extremely radiation resistant polyextremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, that have been exposed to increasing doses of ionising radiation. The three most prominent peaks in the Raman spectra are from cellular carotenoids: deinoxanthin in D. radiodurans and β-carotene in Synechocystis. The degradative effect of ionising radiation is clearly seen, with significant diminishment of carotenoid spectral peak heights after 15 kGy and complete erasure of Raman biosignatures by 150 kGy of ionising radiation. The Raman signal of carotenoid in D. radiodurans diminishes more rapidly than that of Synechocystis, believed to be due to deinoxanthin acting as a superior scavenger of radiolytically produced reactive oxygen species, and so being destroyed more quickly than the less efficient antioxidant β-carotene. This study highlights the necessity for further experimental work on the manner and rate of degradation of Raman biosignatures by ionising radiation, as this is of prime importance for the successful detection of microbial life in the martian near subsurface. PMID:22349404

  8. EURADOS strategic research agenda: vision for dosimetry of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Fantuzzi, E; Harrison, R; Schuhmacher, H; Vanhavere, F; Alves, J; Bottollier Depois, J F; Fattibene, P; Knežević, Ž; Lopez, M A; Mayer, S; Miljanić, S; Neumaier, S; Olko, P; Stadtmann, H; Tanner, R; Woda, C

    2016-02-01

    Since autumn 2012, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been developing its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), which is intended to contribute to the identification of future research needs in radiation dosimetry in Europe. The present article summarises-based on input from EURADOS Working Groups (WGs) and Voting Members-five visions in dosimetry and defines key issues in dosimetry research that are considered important for the next decades. The five visions include scientific developments required towards (a) updated fundamental dose concepts and quantities, (b) improved radiation risk estimates deduced from epidemiological cohorts, (c) efficient dose assessment for radiological emergencies, (d) integrated personalised dosimetry in medical applications and (e) improved radiation protection of workers and the public. The SRA of EURADOS will be used as a guideline for future activities of the EURADOS WGs. A detailed version of the SRA can be downloaded as a EURADOS report from the EURADOS website (www.eurados.org). PMID:25752758

  9. Teaching about Radioactivity and Ionising Radiation: An Alternative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millar, Robin; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Children's ideas about radiation and radioactivity are reviewed and several common areas of misunderstanding are identified. An approach to teaching the topic at the secondary school level which seeks to specifically address known difficulties is outlined. (CW)

  10. Radiation safety in the nuclear medicine department: impact of the UK Ionising Radiations Regulations.

    PubMed

    Harding, L K

    1987-09-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine requires integration of radiation safety with patient care and radiopharmaceutical standards. Nationally there was useful discussion in the UK before the Ionising Radiations Regulations and Approved Code of Practice were published, although such consultation had been lacking when the Medicines Act was implemented. Most of the new considerations relating to nuclear medicine stem from Schedule 6 of the Regulations. Generally, the presence of a single patient does not require a controlled area. However, when several patients are present, or radiopharmaceuticals are being prepared prior to injection, a controlled area is required. Classification of workers is not likely to be required in a typical nuclear medicine department in the UK, although most parts of the nuclear medicine department will need to be controlled areas. These include the radiopharmacy, radionuclide dispensary, injection room, and imaging rooms if patients are injected in them. The importance of finger dose measurements is emphasised. Patient wards, however, need not be controlled areas. A particular concern in nuclear medicine was that patients should not need to be admitted to hospital merely to comply with legislation. This is possibly the case and clarification will probably be available when the Notes for Guidance are published. Most procedures in nuclear medicine departments will remain unchanged. Further information is required, however, on patient waiting rooms, handling flood sources, pregnancy, and breast feeding. Within the hospital, detailed and multidisciplinary discussion will need to take place within the forum of the radiation safety committee. PMID:3664186

  11. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Gretchen

    2002-07-01

    The 2001-2002 Kootenai River Network Annual Report reflects the organization's defined set of goals and objectives, and how by accomplishing these goals, we continue to meet the needs of communities and landowners throughout the Kootenai River Basin by protecting the resource. Our completed and ongoing projects throughout the watershed reflect the cooperation and support received and needed to accomplish the rehabilitation and restoration of critical habitat. They show that our mission of facilitation through collaboration with public and private interests can lead to improved resource management, the restoration of water quality and the preservation of pristine aquatic resources. Our vision to empower local citizens and groups from two states, one province, two countries and affected tribal nations to collaborate in natural resource management within the basin is largely successful due to the engagement of the basin's residents--the landowners, town government, local interest groups, businesses and agency representatives who live and work here. We are proof that forging these types of cooperative relationships, such as those exhibited by the Kootenai River subbasin planning process, leads to a sense of entitlement--that the quality of the river and its resources enriches our quality of life. Communication is essential in maintaining these relationships. Allowing ourselves to network and receive ideas and information, as well as to produce quality, accessible research data such as KRIS, shared with like organizations and individuals, is the hallmark of this facilitative organization. We are fortunate in the ability to contribute such information, and continue to strive to meet the standards and the needs of those who seek us out as a model for watershed rehabilitative planning and restoration. Sharing includes maintaining active, ongoing lines of communication with the public we serve--through our web site, quarterly newsletter, public presentations and stream

  12. Occupational exposure to ionising radiation and mortality among workers of the former Spanish Nuclear Energy Board.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Artalejo, F; Castaño Lara, S; de Andrés Manzano, B; García Ferruelo, M; Iglesias Martín, L; Calero, J R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Firstly, to ascertain whether mortality among workers of the former Spanish Nuclear Energy Board (Junta de Energía Nuclear-JEN) was higher than that for the Spanish population overall; and secondly, if this were so, to ascertain whether this difference was associated with exposure to ionising radiation. METHODS: A retrospective follow up of a cohort of 5657 workers was carried out for the period 1954-92. Cohort mortality was compared with that for the Spanish population overall, with standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) adjusted for sex, age, and calendar period. Also, Poisson models were used to analyse mortality from lung cancer in the cohort by level of exposure to ionising radiation. RESULTS: Workers' median and mean cumulative exposures were 4.04 and 11.42 mSv, respectively. Mean annual exposure was 1.33 mSv. Excess mortality due to bone tumours was found for the cohort as a whole (six deaths observed; SMR 2.95; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.08 to 6.43). Among miners, excess mortality was found for non-malignant respiratory diseases (SMR 2.94; 95% CI 2.27 to 3.75), and for lung cancer bordering on statistical significance (SMR 1.50; 95% CI 0.96 to 2.23; P = 0.055). Relative risks of dying of lung cancer from ionising radiation in the dose quartiles 2, 3, and 4 versus the lowest dose quartile, were 1.00, 1.64, and 0.94, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Excess mortality from lung cancer was found among JEN miners. Nevertheless, no clear relation was found between mortality from lung cancer and level of exposure to ionising radiation in the JEN cohort. Continued follow up of the cohort is required to confirm excess mortality from bone tumours. PMID:9155782

  13. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde; Smith, Jim T; Ford, Alex T

    2015-10-01

    Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive. Current phyla-specific dose levels and limits proposed by major regulatory bodies were found to be inadequate to protect species across a range of endpoints including morbidity, mutation and reproduction and examples are discussed within. These findings serve to prioritise areas for future research that will significantly

  14. Comparison of precise ionising Radiation Dose Measurements on board Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindborg, L.; Beck, P.; Bottollier, J. F.; Roos, H.; Spurny, F.; Wissman, F.

    2003-04-01

    The cosmic radiation makes aircrew one of the most exposed occupational groups. The European Council has therefore in its Directive 96/29Euratom on basic safety standards for radiation protection a particular article (42) for the protection of aircrew. One of the measures to be taken is to assess the exposure of the crew. This is, however, not a trivial task. The radiation consists of many different types of radiation with energies that are hardly met on ground. The knowledge on the dose levels on board aircraft has improved gradually during the last decade as several groups around the world have performed measurements on board civil aircraft in cooperation with airlines. Only occasionally has more than one instrument been able to fly at the same time for practical reasons. The statistical uncertainty in a measurement of the dose equivalent rate is typically ±15 % (1 relative standard deviation) if determined during half an hour. Systematic uncertainties add to this. The dose rate depends on flight altitude, geographic coordinates of the flight, the phase of the solar cycle and the prevailing solar wind. For that reason the possibility to fly on the same flight will eliminate some of the systematic uncertainties that limits an evaluation of the measurement techniques. The proposal aims at measurements on board the aircraft on a geographically limited area for a few hours to decrease the statistical uncertainty of the measurements and thereby get an excellent opportunity to look for possible systematic differences between the different measurement systems. As the dose equivalent rate will be quite well established it will also be possible to compare the measured values with calculated ones. The dose rate increases towards the geomagnetic poles and decreases towards the equator. The composition of the radiation components varies also with altitude. For that reason measurements both at southern latitude and at northern latitude are planned.

  15. ASSOCIATION OF URINARY PERCHLORATE WITH INDIRECT MEASURES OFTHYROID DYSFUNCTION BASED ON NHANES 2001-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Aims: Perchlorate is a widespread environmental pollutant. Previous population studies based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002, showed that urinary perchlorate concentrations were associated with increased levels of thyroid stim...

  16. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sjostedt, Svetlana; Bezak, Eva

    2010-09-01

    Modern radiobiology is undergoing rapid change due to new discoveries contradicting the target concept which is currently used to predict dose-response relationships. Thus relatively recently discovered radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs), that include additional death, mutation and radio-adaptation in non-irradiated cells, change our understanding of the target concept and broadens its boundaries. This can be significant from a radioprotection point of view and also has the potential to reassess radiation damage models currently used in radiotherapy. This article reviews briefly the general concepts of RIBEs such as the proposed underlying mechanisms of signal induction and propagation, experimental approaches and biological end points used to investigate these phenomena. It also summarises several mathematical models currently proposed in an attempt to quantify RIBE. The main emphasis of this article is to review and highlight the potential impact of the bystander phenomena in radiotherapy. PMID:20857259

  17. Comparison of low and high dose ionising radiation using topological analysis of gene coexpression networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The growing use of imaging procedures in medicine has raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionising radiation (LDIR). While the disastrous effects of high dose ionising radiation (HDIR) is well documented, the detrimental effects of LDIR is not well understood and has been a topic of much debate. Since little is known about the effects of LDIR, various kinds of wet-lab and computational analyses are required to advance knowledge in this domain. In this paper we carry out an “upside-down pyramid” form of systems biology analysis of microarray data. We characterised the global genomic response following 10 cGy (low dose) and 100 cGy (high dose) doses of X-ray ionising radiation at four time points by analysing the topology of gene coexpression networks. This study includes a rich experimental design and state-of-the-art computational systems biology methods of analysis to study the differences in the transcriptional response of skin cells exposed to low and high doses of radiation. Results Using this method we found important genes that have been linked to immune response, cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, we also were able to identify genes such as BRCA1, ABCA1, TNFRSF1B, MLLT11 that have been associated with various types of cancers. We were also able to detect many genes known to be associated with various medical conditions. Conclusions Our method of applying network topological differences can aid in identifying the differences among similar (eg: radiation effect) yet very different biological conditions (eg: different dose and time) to generate testable hypotheses. This is the first study where a network level analysis was performed across two different radiation doses at various time points, thereby illustrating changes in the cellular response over time. PMID:22594378

  18. EVOLUTION OF THE IEC AND EN STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION.

    PubMed

    Voytchev, M; Behrens, R; Ambrosi, P; Radev, R; Chiaro, P

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the evolution of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the European standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation issued, respectively, from the committees IEC/Sub Committee 45B and European Committee for Electro-technical Standardization/Technical Committee 45B 'Radiation protection instrumentation'. Standards for passive individual photon and beta dosimetry systems as well as those for active individual monitors are discussed. A neutron ambient dose equivalent (rate) meter standard and a technical report concerning the determination of uncertainty in measurement are also covered. PMID:26443545

  19. The perturbation correction factor of ionisation chambers in beta-radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Böhm, J

    1980-01-01

    In determining the absorbed dose in a solid medium by means of gas-filled ionisation chambers, the perturbation of the radiation field by the chamber needs to be taken into account. So far, an appropriate correction factor has neither been calculated nor measured for beta-radiation. This work describes its experimental determination for an extrapolation chamber and beta-radiation fields of 147Pm, 204Tl, and 90Sr + 90Y. The results show that the correction factor may be assumed to be the product of a shield factor and a scatter factor the magnitudes of which depend on the chamber geometry and the radiation field. The change of the perturbation correction factor with phantom depth is important for the measurement of depth dose curves. This is demonstrated by an example. PMID:7360793

  20. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, I; Dini, V; Ricci-Vitiani, L; Biffoni, M; Balduzzi, M; Fratini, E; Belli, M; Campa, A; Esposito, G; Cirrone, G; Romano, F; Stancampiano, C; Pelacchi, F; Pallini, R; Tabocchini, M A

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with (137)Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u(-1) in the dose range of 5-40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality. PMID:25969527

  1. Adaptive response to ionising radiation induced by cadmium in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Choi, V W Y; Ng, C Y P; Kong, M K Y; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2013-03-01

    An adaptive response is a biological response where the exposure of cells or animals to a low priming exposure induces mechanisms that protect the cells or animals against the detrimental effects of a subsequent larger challenging exposure. In realistic environmental situations, living organisms can be exposed to a mixture of stressors, and the resultant effects due to such exposures are referred to as multiple stressor effects. In the present work we demonstrated, via quantification of apoptosis in the embryos, that embryos of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) subjected to a priming exposure provided by one environmental stressor (cadmium in micromolar concentrations) could undergo an adaptive response against a subsequent challenging exposure provided by another environmental stressor (alpha particles). We concluded that zebrafish embryos treated with 1 to 10 μM Cd at 5 h postfertilisation (hpf) for both 1 and 5 h could undergo an adaptive response against subsequent ~4.4 mGy alpha-particle irradiation at 10 hpf, which could be interpreted as an antagonistic multiple stressor effect between Cd and ionising radiation. The zebrafish has become a popular vertebrate model for studying the in vivo response to ionising radiation. As such, our results suggested that multiple stressor effects should be carefully considered for human radiation risk assessment since the risk may be perturbed by another environmental stressor such as a heavy metal. PMID:23296313

  2. Multidisciplinary approach to assess the sensitivity of dwarf tomato plants to low-LET ionising radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Micco, Veronica; De Pascale, Stefania; Aronne, Giovanna; Paradiso, Roberta; Vitaglione, Paola; Turano, Mimmo; Arena, Carmen

    Ionising radiation, acting alone or in interaction with microgravity and other environmental constraints, may affect plant at molecular, morpho-structural and physiological level. The intensity of the plant’s response depends on the properties of radiation and on the features of the plant itself. Indeed, different species are characterised by different susceptibility to radiation which may change during the life course. The aim of this research was to study the radiosensitivity to low-LET ionising radiation of plants of dwarf tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. ‘Microtom’) at two phenological phases (vegetative and reproductive), within the purpose of analysing plants for consideration as candidates for Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS) in Space. To pursue this objective, plants of the cultivar Microtom were irradiated with different doses of X-rays either at the stage of the second true leaf (VP - vegetative phase) or when at least one flower was blossomed (RP - reproductive phase). Plant’s response to ionising radiation was assessed through a multidisciplinary approach combining genetic analyses, ecophysiological measurements, morpho-anatomical characterisation of leaves and fruits, nutritional analyses of fruits. Growth, molecular and morpho-functional traits were measured during plant development up to fruiting in both VP and RP plant groups, and compared with non-irradiated control plants. Plant growth was monitored weekly recording parameters such as plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, flowering and fruiting rate. Potential DNA alterations were explored through Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. The efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus was evaluated by determining photosynthetic pigment composition, photochemistry and leaf gas exchanges. Leaf and fruit structure were analysed through light and epi-fluorescence microscopy. Leaf anatomical traits related to photosynthetic efficiency, and to structural radioprotection

  3. The risk of childhood leukaemia following exposure to ionising radiation--a review.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Since the early years of follow-up of the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, it has been apparent that childhood leukaemia has a particular sensitivity to induction by ionising radiation, the excess relative risk (ERR) being expressed as a temporal wave with time since exposure. This pattern has been generally confirmed by studies of children treated with radiotherapy. Case-control studies of childhood leukaemia and antenatal exposure to diagnostic x-rays, a recent large cohort study of leukaemia following CT examinations of young people, and a recent large case-control study of natural background γ-radiation and childhood leukaemia have found evidence of raised risks following low-level exposure. These findings indicate that an ERR/Sv for childhood leukaemia of ~50, which may be derived from risk models based upon the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, is broadly applicable to low dose or low dose-rate exposure circumstances. PMID:23296257

  4. Preparation of (K:Eu) NaSO4 phosphor for lyoluminescence dosimetry of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Dhoble, S J

    2002-01-01

    Gamma ray dosimetry using lyoluminescence is a low cost and simple system. As sulphate based phosphors are used for TL radiation dosimetry they therefore seem to be a promising material for LL gamma ray dosimetry. A study on LL properties of Eu activated KNaSO4 and K3Na(SO4)2 gamma irradiated materials is reported. Eu doped KNaSO4 shows maximum LL yield in the above system. It shows a linear response from 0.06 to 10 C.kg(-1) and there is not much fading of LL intensity, indicating the phosphor to be suitable as a lyoluminescence dosimetry phosphor of ionising radiation. The doped Eu ion acts as an activator and thus enhances the LL intensity of the phosphor. PMID:12382879

  5. Genotoxicity in earthworm after combined treatment of ionising radiation and mercury.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Tae Ho; An, Kwang-Guk; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2014-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the acute genotoxic effects of mercury and radiation on earthworms (Eisenia fetida). The levels of DNA damage and the repair kinetics in the coelomocytes of E. fetida treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl₂) and ionising radiation (gamma rays) were analysed by means of the comet assay. For detection of DNA damage and repair, E. fetida was exposed to HgCl₂ (0-160 mg kg(-1)) and irradiated with gamma rays (0-50 Gy) in vivo. The increase in DNA damage depended on the concentration of mercury or dose of radiation. The results showed that the more the oxidative stress induced by mercury and radiation the longer the repair time that was required. When a combination of HgCl₂ and gamma rays was applied, the cell damage was much higher than those treated with HgCl₂ or radiation alone, which indicated that the genotoxic effects were increased after the combined treatment of mercury and radiation. PMID:24870361

  6. Institutional Accountability Plan and Progress Report. 2002 Update, Year 9, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pensacola Junior Coll., FL. Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness.

    This document addresses the state approved accountability measure plans for Pensacola Junior College in the academic year 2001-2002. This edition is the ninth annual report on PJC's performance in compliance with Florida Statutes. The document is divided into 24 measures including the following: (1) enrollments, retention and success rates for AA…

  7. Responding to a Strong Economy. Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Apprenticeship and Industry Training.

    In 2001-2002, the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board continued its collaboration with industry, government, and educators to maintain high standards of training and improve access to technical training. The board continued to strengthen the network of local and provincial apprenticeship committees, occupational committees, and…

  8. The Internet Resource Directory for K-12 Teachers and Librarians. 2001-2002 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Elizabeth B.

    Updated and expanded, the 2001-2002 edition of this directory is the eighth in a series of annual publications for identifying the most current, appropriate, and trustworthy Web sites for integration into the school curriculum. The directory presents a broad sampling of some of the best Internet resources for educators, school library media…

  9. Trident Technical College Summary of Assessment Results for 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    This institutional effectiveness (IE) report for Trident Technical College (TTC), South Carolina, describes majors and concentrations, academic advisement, and transfer. The 2001-2002 academic year marked the tenth year of Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) for the college. GAS is a systematic means of developing an individual yardstick for assessing…

  10. The "Isms" of Art. Introduction to the 2001-2002 Clip and Save Art Prints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Provides an introduction to the 2001-2002 Clip and Save Art Prints that will focus on ten art movements from the past 150 years. Includes information on three art movements, or "isms": Classicism, Romanticism, and Realism. Discusses the Clip and Save Art Print format and provides information on three artists. (CMK)

  11. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLETHAL EXPOSURE TO MICROCYSTINS AMONG DIALYSIS PATIENTS, BRAZIL, 2001-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: During winter 2001-2002, an episode of microcystin exposure occurred among dialysis patients in Rio de Janiero, Brazil. During late November 2001, a cyanobacterial water bloom was detected in the Funil reservoir and the Guandu River, both of which supply drinking wate...

  12. Retail food commodity intakes: Mean amounts of retail commodities per individual, 2001-2002

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The table sets of national estimates of the amounts of retail commodities per person were estimated from the day 1 dietary intake data of 9,033 individuals, ages 2 years and over, in What We Eat In America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2002 using the Food Intakes Converted t...

  13. Risk of cancer after low doses of ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study in 15 countries

    PubMed Central

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M; Gilbert, E; Hakama, M; Hill, C; Howe, G; Kaldor, J; Muirhead, C R; Schubauer-Berigan, M; Yoshimura, T; Bermann, F; Cowper, G; Fix, J; Hacker, C; Heinmiller, B; Marshall, M; Thierry-Chef, I; Utterback, D; Ahn, Y-O; Amoros, E; Ashmore, P; Auvinen, A; Bae, J-M; Solano, J Bernar; Biau, A; Combalot, E; Deboodt, P; Sacristan, A Diez; Eklof, M; Engels, H; Engholm, G; Gulis, G; Habib, R; Holan, K; Hyvonen, H; Kerekes, A; Kurtinaitis, J; Malker, H; Martuzzi, M; Mastauskas, A; Monnet, A; Moser, M; Pearce, M S; Richardson, D B; Rodriguez-Artalejo, F; Rogel, A; Tardy, H; Telle-Lamberton, M; Turai, I; Usel, M; Veress, K

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To provide direct estimates of risk of cancer after protracted low doses of ionising radiation and to strengthen the scientific basis of radiation protection standards for environmental, occupational, and medical diagnostic exposures. Design Multinational retrospective cohort study of cancer mortality. Setting Cohorts of workers in the nuclear industry in 15 countries. Participants 407 391 workers individually monitored for external radiation with a total follow-up of 5.2 million person years. Main outcome measurements Estimates of excess relative risks per sievert (Sv) of radiation dose for mortality from cancers other than leukaemia and from leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, the main causes of death considered by radiation protection authorities. Results The excess relative risk for cancers other than leukaemia was 0.97 per Sv, 95% confidence interval 0.14 to 1.97. Analyses of causes of death related or unrelated to smoking indicate that, although confounding by smoking may be present, it is unlikely to explain all of this increased risk. The excess relative risk for leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia was 1.93 per Sv (< 0 to 8.47). On the basis of these estimates, 1-2% of deaths from cancer among workers in this cohort may be attributable to radiation. Conclusions These estimates, from the largest study of nuclear workers ever conducted, are higher than, but statistically compatible with, the risk estimates used for current radiation protection standards. The results suggest that there is a small excess risk of cancer, even at the low doses and dose rates typically received by nuclear workers in this study. PMID:15987704

  14. Age at exposure to ionising radiation and cancer mortality among Hanford workers: follow up through 1994

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S; Richardson, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Studies of workers at the plutonium production factory in Hanford, WA have led to conflicting conclusions about the role of age at exposure as a modifier of associations between ionising radiation and cancer. Aims: To evaluate the influence of age at exposure on radiation risk estimates in an updated follow up of Hanford workers. Methods: A cohort of 26 389 workers hired between 1944 and 1978 was followed through 1994 to ascertain vital status and causes of death. External radiation dose estimates were derived from personal dosimeters. Poisson regression was used to estimate associations between mortality and cumulative external radiation dose at all ages, and in specific age ranges. Results: A total of 8153 deaths were identified, 2265 of which included cancer as an underlying or contributory cause. Estimates of the excess relative risk per Sievert (ERR/Sv) for cumulative radiation doses at all ages combined were negative for all cause and leukaemia and positive for all cancer and lung cancer. Cumulative doses accrued at ages below 35, 35–44, and 45–54 showed little association with mortality. For cumulative dose accrued at ages 55 and above (10 year lag), the estimated ERR/Sv for all cancers was 3.24 (90% CI: 0.80 to 6.17), primarily due to an association with lung cancer (ERR/Sv: 9.05, 90% CI: 2.96 to 17.92). Conclusions: Associations between radiation and cancer mortality in this cohort are primarily a function of doses at older ages and deaths from lung cancer. The association of older age radiation exposures and cancer mortality is similar to observations from several other occupational studies. PMID:15961623

  15. Low-dose ionising radiation and cardiovascular diseases--Strategies for molecular epidemiological studies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Auvinen, Anssi; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Laurier, Dominique; Little, Mark P; Peters, Annette; Raj, Ken; Russell, Nicola S; Tapio, Soile; Zhang, Wei; Gomolka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that high-dose ionising radiation causes cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the evidence for a causal relationship between long-term risk of cardiovascular diseases after moderate doses (0.5-5 Gy) is suggestive and weak after low doses (<0.5 Gy). However, evidence is emerging that doses under 0.5 Gy may also increase long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. This would have major implications for radiation protection with respect to medical use of radiation for diagnostic purposes and occupational or environmental radiation exposure. Therefore, it is of great importance to gain information about the presence and possible magnitude of radiation-related cardiovascular disease risk at doses of less than 0.5 Gy. The biological mechanisms implicated in any such effects are unclear and results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Molecular epidemiological studies can improve the understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk estimation of radiation-induced circulatory disease at low doses. Within the European DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) project, strategies to conduct molecular epidemiological studies in this field have been developed and evaluated. Key potentially useful European cohorts are the Mayak workers, other nuclear workers, uranium miners, Chernobyl liquidators, the Techa river residents and several diagnostic or low-dose radiotherapy patient cohorts. Criteria for informative studies are given and biomarkers to be investigated suggested. A close collaboration between epidemiology, biology and dosimetry is recommended, not only among experts in the radiation field, but also those in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26041268

  16. Ionising Radiation Exposure to Orthopaedic Trainees: The Effect of Sub-Specialty Training

    PubMed Central

    Oddy, MJ; Aldam, CH

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We monitored image intensifier use by orthopaedic trainees to assess their exposure to ionising radiation and to investigate the influence of sub-specialty training. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five different orthopaedic registrars recorded their monthly image intensifier screening times and exposure doses for all cases (trauma and elective), for a combined total of 12 non-consecutive months. Radiation exposure was monitored using shoulder and waist film badges worn both by surgeons and radiographers screening their cases. RESULTS Registrars in spinal sub-specialties were exposed to significantly higher doses per case and cumulative doses per month than non-spinal trainees (P < 0.05), but significantly lower screening times per case (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in cumulative screening times per month (P > 0.05). Regression analysis for all surgeons showed a significant relationship between shoulder film badge reading and cumulative dose exposed per month (P < 0.05), but not for cumulative screening time. Shoulder film badge recordings were significantly higher for spinal compared with non-spinal registrars (P < 0.05), although all badges were below the level for radiation reporting. Only one radiographer badge recorded a dose above threshold. CONCLUSIONS Whilst the long-term effects of sub-reporting doses of radiation are not fully understood, we consider that this study demonstrates that trainees should not be complacent in accepting inadequate radiation protection. The higher doses encountered with spinal imaging means that sub-specialty trainees should be alerted to the risk of their increased exposure. The principle of minimising radiation exposure must be maintained by all trainees at all times. PMID:16720002

  17. Children, sealants, and guardians who smoke: Trends in NHANES 2001-2002 to 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance

    2015-01-01

    Objective There are many factors influencing dental behavior. The relationship of smokers who smoked inside the home toward preventive care (measured as dental sealant placement) of the children living in their homes is examined in this study. Methods Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys in 2001-2002 and in 2011-2012 were analyzed. Data included variables to someone smoking inside the home, dental sealant placement in children ages 6-less than 20 years, and sociodemographics which were obtained from a dental examination and a home interview. Results There were 3,352 eligible participants in 2001-2002 and 2,374 in 2011-2012. The unadjusted odds ratio for not having dental sealants when there was someone who smoked inside the home as compared with not having dental sealants when there was no one who smoked inside the home was 1.57 (95%CI: 1.17, 2.10) in 2001-2002. The unadjusted odds ratio was 1.56 (95% CI: 1.20, 2.03) in 2011-2012. When the data were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, insurance, and income to poverty ratio, the 2001-2002 adjusted odds ratio was 1.31 (95%CI: 0.97, 1.78). The adjusted odds ratio in 2011-2012 was 1.41 (95% CI:1.01, 1.95). Conclusions Children who lived in homes in which someone smoked inside the home were more likely to not have dental sealants compared with children who lived in homes in which no one smoked inside the home. These results are important for understanding the factors related to access to dental care issues for children. PMID:26213630

  18. Reassessment of the 2001-2002 Aseismic Slow Slip Event in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostoglodov, V.; Franco, S. I.; Singh, S. K.; Larson, K. M.; Lowry, A. R.; Santiago, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    In 2001-2002 a network of continuous GPS stations in Mexico recorded an unexpectedly large aseismic slow event (equivalent Mw ~7.4) in Guerrero and in western Oaxaca. This event lasted more than six months and the area involved in the aseismic motion was initially estimated as ~500x250 km2. The event produced a slow thrust slip of ~13-15 cm on the subduction plate interface below the central part of the State of Guerrero. Elastic dislocation models, which fit the observed data, restrict the width of the slip to 150-200 km along the plate interface. This interface was partially locked before, during the steady state interseismic phase associated with the continental plate compression. Unfortunately the GPS network coverage was not sufficient to resolve an important question: Was the seismogenic part of the plate interface involved in the slow thrust slip? A long term record from a permanent GPS station located on the Popocatepetl volcano, POSW, shows unambiguous displacements corresponding to the aseismic slip events of 1997-1998 and 2001-2002. Recent data analysis of 2001, 2002, and 2003 GPS occupation campaigns on 16 sites in Oaxaca reveals that the 2001-2002 slow aseismic slip may have extended SE along almost the entire Pacific coast of Oaxaca. These observations indicate that the total area affected by the last slow aseismic slip event is greater than ~300x700 km2. Most likely the same area was involved in a previous aseismic event of 1972, which is discovered from the analysis of tide gauge data. Frequently occurring aseismic transients should have an important bearing on the recurrence period of large subduction thrust earthquakes in Mexico.

  19. Effect of penetrating ionising radiation on the mechanical properties of pericardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daar, Eman; Woods, E.; Keddie, J. L.; Nisbet, A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2010-07-01

    The pericardium is an anistropic composite material made up of collagen and elastin fibres embedded in an amorphous matrix mainly composed of proteoglycan and hyaluronan. The collagen fibres are arranged in layers, with different directions of alignment in each layer, giving rise to interesting mechanical properties of pericardium, including the ability to undergo large deformation during performance of regular physiological functions. The present study aims to investigate the effect of penetrating photon ionising radiation on bovine pericardium tissue, being part of a study of the effect of cardiac doses received in breast radiotherapy and the possibility that this can give rise to cardiovascular complications. Irradiation doses in the range 5-80 Gy were used. To characterise the various mechanical properties [elastic modulus, stress relaxation, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and fracture] a uniaxial tensile test method was applied. The preliminary results reflect the wide inter-sample variations that are expected in dealing with tissues, with only a weak indication of increase in the UTS of the pericardium tissue with increase in radiation dose. Such an effect has also been observed by others, with reduction in UTS at doses of 80 Gy.

  20. Calibration, performance and type testing of personal dosemeters used in ionising-radiation applications in Greece.

    PubMed

    Boziari, A; Hourdakis, C J

    2007-01-01

    Active Personal Dosemeters (APDs) are widely used in real-time personal dosimetry. Their performance, operational characteristics and limitations, as well as their calibration should be routinely checked to assure satisfactory operation and safe use. This study summarises the results of such type tests and calibrations performed in almost 4750 dosemeters at Ionising Radiation Calibration Laboratory (HIRCL) of Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC). About 13.8% of the pencil type and 4.3% of the electronic dosemeters were found to be out of limits of acceptable performance. For the pencil type dosemeters, the mean calibration factor (CF+/-SD) for high- and low-dose categories was found to be 1.014+/-0.102 (range 0.793-1.458) and 0.995+/-0.059 (range 0.794-1.311), respectively. Of these >85% of them had reproducibility better than 90%, while <1% showed remarkable non-linearity and approximately 10% of them failed to retain the dose reading within the limits after 24 h. For the electronic dosemeters, the mean CF was 1.034+/-0.046 (range 0.967-1.238). The majority of them showed good reproducibility and linearity results while, after irradiation, the dose readings were not shifted through time. The energy response varies with the dosemeter type, reaching in one dosemeter type down to 50%. Both electronic and pencil did not showed electronic equilibrium problems. PMID:17185312

  1. An isotopic analysis of ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-06-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism has remained undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find an enrichment factor (δ34S) of 8.7 ± 0.4‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  2. An isotope view on ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-02-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism has remained undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find a δ34S value of 8.7 ± 0.4‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  3. An isotopic view of ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S. O.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-04-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism remains undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find a d34S value of 8.7 ± 0.4 ‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  4. Resveratrol and its methoxy-derivatives as modulators of DNA damage induced by ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Traversi, Gianandrea; Fiore, Mario; Leone, Stefano; Basso, Emiliano; Di Muzio, Elena; Polticelli, Fabio; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2016-07-01

    Various naturally occurring stilbene-like compounds that are related to resveratrol (RSV) possess some of the beneficial effects of the parent molecule and provide even further benefits. Therefore, a series of methoxylated analogues of RSV were prepared with the aim of increasing antitumour and proapoptotic activity. In a previous article, we studied two methoxy-derivatives, pterostilbene (PTERO) and trimethoxystilbene (TRIMETHOXY), in which the first was formed by the substitution of two hydroxyl groups with two methoxy groups (trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4'-hydroxystilbene) and the second was formed by the replacement of all three OH groups with methoxy groups (trans-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene). Both methoxy-derivatives showed stronger antioxidant activity when compared with RSV. In the present article, we focused on the analysis of the ability of RSV and its two methoxylated derivatives to protect proliferating non-tumoural cells from the damage induced by ionising radiation (IR). First we showed that the methoxy derivatives, contrary to their parental compound, are unable to affect topoisomerase enzyme and consequently are not clastogenic per se Second we showed that both PTERO and TRIMETHOXY more efficiently reduce the chromosome damage induced by IR. Furthermore, TRIMETHOXY, but not PTERO, causes a delay in cell proliferation, particularly in mitosis progression increasing the number of cells in metaphase at the expense of prophases and ana/telophases. PMID:26819346

  5. Xpg limits the expansion of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells after ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Avila, Alush I; Illing, Anett; Becker, Friedrich; Maerz, Lars D; Morita, Yohei; Philipp, Melanie; Burkhalter, Martin D

    2016-07-27

    Reduced capacity of genome maintenance represents a problem for any organism, potentially causing premature death, carcinogenesis, or accelerated ageing. Strikingly though, loss of certain genome stability factors can be beneficial, especially for the maintenance of tissue stem cells of the intestine and the haematopoietic system. We therefore screened for genome stability factors negatively impacting maintenance of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the context of ionising radiation (IR). We found that in vivo knock down of Xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group G (Xpg) causes elevation of HSC numbers after IR treatment, while numbers of haematopoietic progenitors are elevated to a lesser extent. IR rapidly induces Xpg both on mRNA and on protein level. Prevention of this induction does not influence activation of the checkpoint cascade, yet attenuates late checkpoint steps such as induction of p21 and Noxa. This causes a leaky cell cycle arrest and lower levels of apoptosis, both contributing to increased colony formation and transformation rates. Xpg thus helps to adequately induce DNA damage responses after IR, thereby keeping the expansion of damaged cells under control. This represents a new function of Xpg in the response to IR, in addition to its well-characterized role in nucleotide excision repair. PMID:27137888

  6. The multiple stressor effect in zebrafish embryos from simultaneous exposure to ionising radiation and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Ng, C Y P; Choi, V W Y; Lam, A C L; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2013-03-01

    Living organisms are exposed to a mixture of environmental stressors, and the resultant effects are referred to as multiple stressor effects. In the present work, we studied the multiple stressor effect in embryos of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) from simultaneous exposure to ionising radiation (alpha particles) and cadmium through quantification of apoptotic signals at 24 h postfertilisation (hpf) revealed by vital dye acridine orange staining. For each set of experiments, 32-40 dechorionated embryos were deployed, which were divided into four groups each having 8-10 embryos. The four groups of embryos were referred to as (1) the control group (C), which received no further treatments after dechorionation; (2) the Cd-dosed and irradiated group (CdIr), which was exposed to 100 μM Cd from 5 to 24 hpf, and also received about 4.4 mGy from alpha particles at 5 hpf; (3) the irradiated group (Ir), which received about 4.4 mGy from alpha particles at 5 hpf; and (4) the Cd-dosed group (Cd), which was exposed to 100 μM Cd from 5 to 24 hpf. In general, the CdIr, Ir and Cd groups had more apoptotic signals than the C group. Within the 12 sets of experimental results, two showed significant synergistic effects, one showed a weakly synergistic effect and nine showed additive effects. The multiple stressor effect of 100 μM Cd with ~4.4 mGy alpha-particle radiation resulted in an additive or synergistic effect, but no antagonistic effect. The failure to identify significant synergistic effects for some sets of data, and thus their subsequent classification as additive effects, might be a result of the relatively small magnitude of the synergistic effects. The results showed that the radiation risk could be perturbed by another environmental stressor such as a heavy metal, and as such a realistic human radiation risk assessment should in general take into account the multiple stressor effects. PMID:23296360

  7. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the 2001-2002 NASA "Why?" Files Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Frank, Kari Lou; Lambert, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    This report contains the results of the evaluation conducted for the 2001-2002 NASA 'Why?' Files program that was conducted in March 2002. The analysis is based on the results of 139 surveys collected from educators registered for the program. Respondents indicated that (1) the programs in the series are aligned with the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; (2) the programs are developmentally (grade level) appropriate; and (3) the programs enhance and enrich the teaching and learning of mathematics, science, and technology.

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the 2001-2002 NASA CONNECT(tm) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Frank, Kari Lou; Lambert, Matthew A.; Williams, Amy C.

    2002-01-01

    NASA CONNECT(tm) is a research and standards-based, integrated mathematics, science, and technology series of 30-minute instructional distance learning (television and web-based) programs for students in grades 6-8. Respondents who evaluated the programs in the 2001-2002 NASA CONNECT(tm) series reported that (1) they used the programs in the series; (2) the goals and objectives for the series were met; (3) the programs were aligned with the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; (4) the program content was developmentally appropriate for grade level; and (5) the programs in the series enhanced and enriched the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology.

  9. Laser ablation and ionisation by laser plasma radiation in the atmospheric-pressure mass spectrometry of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pento, A V; Nikiforov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O; Grechnikov, A A; Alimpiev, S S

    2013-01-31

    A new method was developed for the mass spectrometric analysis of organic and bioorganic compounds, which involves laser ablation with the ionisation of its products by laser-plasma radiation and enables analysing gaseous, liquid, and solid substances at atmospheric pressure without sample preparation. The capabilities of this method were demonstrated by the examples of fast pharmaceutical composition screening, real-time atmosphere composition analysis, and construction of the mass spectrometric images of organic compound distributions in biological materials. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  10. Leaf Anatomy and Photochemical Behaviour of Solanum lycopersicum L. Plants from Seeds Irradiated with Low-LET Ionising Radiation

    PubMed Central

    De Micco, V.; Paradiso, R.; Aronne, G.; De Pascale, S.; Quarto, M.; Arena, C.

    2014-01-01

    Plants can be exposed to ionising radiation not only in Space but also on Earth, due to specific technological applications or after nuclear disasters. The response of plants to ionising radiation depends on radiation quality/quantity and/or plant characteristics. In this paper, we analyse some growth traits, leaf anatomy, and ecophysiological features of plants of Solanum lycopersicum L. “Microtom” grown from seeds irradiated with increasing doses of X-rays (0.3, 10, 20, 50, and 100 Gy). Both juvenile and compound leaves from plants developed from irradiated and control seeds were analysed through light and epifluorescence microscopy. Digital image analysis allowed quantifying anatomical parameters to detect the occurrence of signs of structural damage. Fluorescence parameters and total photosynthetic pigment content were analysed to evaluate the functioning of the photosynthetic machinery. Radiation did not affect percentage and rate of seed germination. Plants from irradiated seeds accomplished the crop cycle and showed a more compact habitus. Dose-depended tendencies of variations occurred in phenolic content, while other leaf anatomical parameters did not show distinct trends after irradiation. The sporadic perturbations of leaf structure, observed during the vegetative phase, after high levels of radiation were not so severe as to induce any significant alterations in photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:24883400

  11. Radiation in the workplace-a review of studies of the risks of occupational exposure to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Richard

    2009-06-01

    Many individuals are, or have been, exposed to ionising radiation in the course of their work and the epidemiological study of occupationally irradiated groups offers an important opportunity to complement the estimates of risks to health resulting from exposure to radiation that are obtained from other populations, such as the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Moreover, workplace exposure to radiation usually involves irradiation conditions that are of direct relevance to the principal concern of radiological protection: protracted exposure to low level radiation. Further, some workers have been exposed to radioactive material that has been inadvertently taken into the body, and the study of these groups leads to risk estimates derived directly from the experience of those irradiated by these 'internal emitters', intakes of alpha-particle-emitters being of particular interest. Workforces that have been the subject of epidemiological study include medical staff, aircrews, radium dial luminisers, underground hard-rock miners, Chernobyl clean-up workers, nuclear weapons test participants and nuclear industry workers. The first solid epidemiological evidence of the stochastic effects of irradiation came from a study of occupational exposure to medical x-rays that was reported in 1944, which demonstrated a large excess risk of leukaemia among US radiologists; but the general lack of dose records for early medical staff who tended to experience the highest exposures hampers the derivation of risks per unit dose received by medical workers. The instrument dial luminisers who inadvertently ingested large amounts of radium-based paint and underground hard-rock miners who inhaled large quantities of radon and its decay products suffered markedly raised excess risks of, respectively, bone and lung cancers; the miner studies have provided standard risk estimates for radon-induced lung cancer. The large numbers of nuclear industry

  12. Internet-based ICRP resource for healthcare providers on the risks and benefits of medical imaging that uses ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Demeter, S; Applegate, K E; Perez, M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 3 Working Party was to update the 2001 web-based module 'Radiation and your patient: a guide for medical practitioners' from ICRP. The key elements of this task were: to clearly identify the target audience (such as healthcare providers with an emphasis on primary care); to review other reputable sources of information; and to succinctly publish the contribution made by ICRP to the various topics. A 'question-and-answer' format addressing practical topics was adopted. These topics included benefits and risks of imaging using ionising radiation in common medical situations, as well as pertaining to specific populations such as pregnant, breast-feeding, and paediatric patients. In general, the benefits of medical imaging and related procedures far outweigh the potential risks associated with ionising radiation exposure. However, it is still important to ensure that the examinations are clinically justified, that the procedure is optimised to deliver the lowest dose commensurate with the medical purpose, and that consideration is given to diagnostic reference levels for particular classes of examinations. PMID:27012846

  13. Mortality and ionising radiation exposures among workers employed at the Fernald Feed Materials Production Center (1951–1985)

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Sharon R; Bertke, Stephen J; Hein, Misty Jena; Daniels, Robert D; Fleming, Donald A; Anderson, Jeri L; Pinney, Susan M; Hornung, Richard W; Tseng, Chih-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine mortality patterns and dose-response relations between ionising radiation and mortality outcomes of a priori interest in 6409 uranium workers employed for at least 30 days (1951–1985), and followed through 2004. Methods Cohort mortality was evaluated through standardised mortality ratios (SMR). Linear excess relative risk (ERR) regression models examined associations between cause-specific mortality and exposures to internal ionising radiation from uranium deposition, external gamma and x-ray radiation, and radon decay products, while adjusting for non-radiologic covariates. Results Person-years at risk totalled 236 568 (mean follow-up 37 years), and 43% of the cohort had died. All-cause mortality was below expectation only in salaried workers. Cancer mortality was significantly elevated in hourly males, primarily from excess lung cancer (SMR=1.25, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.42). Cancer mortality in salaried males was near expectation, but lymphohaematopoietic malignancies were significantly elevated (SMR=1.52, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.12). A positive dose-response relation was observed for intestinal cancer, with a significant elevation in the highest internal organ dose category and a significant dose-response with organ dose from internal uranium deposition (ERR=1.5 per 100 µGy, 95% CI 0.12 to 4.1). Conclusions A healthy worker effect was observed only in salaried workers. Hourly workers had excess cancer mortality compared with the US population, although there was little evidence of a dose-response trend for any cancer evaluated except intestinal cancer. The association between non-malignant respiratory disease and radiation dose observed in previous studies was not apparent, possibly due to improved exposure assessment, different outcome groupings, and extended follow-up. PMID:23322915

  14. 7 CFR 929.251 - Marketable quantity and allotment percentage for the 2001-2002 crop year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marketable quantity and allotment percentage for the 2001-2002 crop year. 929.251 Section 929.251 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES...

  15. Nonfatal motor-vehicle animal crash-related injuries--United States, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    2004-08-01

    In 2000, an estimated 6.1 million light-vehicle (e.g., passenger cars, sport utility vehicles, vans, and pickup trucks) crashes on U.S. roadways were reported to police. Of these reported crashes, 247,000 (4.0%) involved incidents in which the motor vehicle (MV) directly hit an animal on the roadway. Each year, an estimated 200 human deaths result from crashes involving animals (i.e., deaths from a direct MV animal collision or from a crash in which a driver tried to avoid an animal and ran off the roadway). To characterize nonfatal injuries from these incidents, CDC analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that, during 2001-2002, an estimated 26,647 MV occupants per year were involved in crashes from encounters with animals (predominantly deer) in a roadway and treated for nonfatal injuries in U.S. hospital emergency departments (EDs). Cost-effective measures targeting both drivers (e.g., speed reduction and early warnings) and animals (e.g., fencing and underpasses) are needed to reduce injuries associated with MV collisions involving animals. PMID:15295310

  16. Thermoluminescent properties of Ni and Co doped synthetic, high pressure, high temperature diamonds: application to ionising radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Benabdesselam, M; Iacconi, P; Gheeraert, E; Kanda, H; Lapraz, D; Briand, D

    2002-01-01

    An investigation of the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) synthetic diamond crystals grown under diluted nickel or cobalt as solvent catalysts is reported. After a study of TL properties of 6 different samples, it is shown that a crystal grown with Ni+2%Ti and annealed at 2100 K presents an intense glow peak at around 490 K. This peak is characterised by a broad emission band centred at 530 nm (2.34 eV). This crystal presents a significant, reproducible and linear TL response relative to the absorbed dose up to an X ray air kerma of 10 Gy. All these features make this material suitable for ionising radiation dosimetry. A similar study is made on another crystal grown from pure Co, and a comparative review of the results does show that for dosimetry work, Ni-containing diamonds are more appropriate than those grown from Co catalyst. PMID:12382890

  17. Unrepairable DNA double-strand breaks that are generated by ionising radiation determine the fate of normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Noda, Asao; Hirai, Yuko; Hamasaki, Kanya; Mitani, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Nori; Kodama, Yoshiaki

    2012-11-15

    After an exposure to ionising radiation, cells can quickly repair damage to their genomes; however, a few unrepairable DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) emerge in the nucleus in a prolonged culture and perpetuate as long as the culture continues. These DSBs may be retained forever in cells such as non-dividing ageing tissues, which are resistant to apoptosis. We show that such unrepairable DSBs, which had been advocated by the classical target theory as the 'radiation hit', could account for permanent growth arrest and premature senescence. The unrepairable DSBs build up with repeated irradiation, which accounts for an accumulated dose. Because these DSBs tend to be paired, we propose that the untethered and 'torn-off' molecular structures at the broken ends of the DNA result in an alteration of chromatin structure, which protects the ends of the DNA from genomic catastrophe. Such biochemical responses are important for cell survival but may cause gradual tissue malfunction, which could lead to the late effects of radiation exposure. Thus, understanding the biology of unrepairable damage will provide new insights into the long-term effects of radiation. PMID:22899723

  18. Nonradioactive Ambient Air Monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2001--2002

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gladney; J.Dewart, C.Eberhart; J.Lochamy

    2004-09-01

    During the spring of 2000, the Cerro Grande forest fire reached Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and ignited both above-ground vegetation and disposed materials in several landfills. During and after the fire, there was concern about the potential human health impacts from chemicals emitted by the combustion of these Laboratory materials. Consequently, short-term, intensive air-monitoring studies were performed during and shortly after the fire. Unlike the radiological data from many years of AIRNET sampling, LANL did not have an adequate database of nonradiological species under baseline conditions with which to compare data collected during the fire. Therefore, during 2001 the Meteorology and Air Quality Group designed and implemented a new air-monitoring program, entitled NonRadNET, to provide nonradiological background data under normal conditions. The objectives of NonRadNET were to: (1) develop the capability for collecting nonradiological air-monitoring data, (2) conduct monitoring to develop a database of typical background levels of selected nonradiological species in the communities nearest the Laboratory, and (3) determine LANL's potential contribution to nonradiological air pollution in the surrounding communities. NonRadNET ended in late December 2002 with five quarters of data. The purpose of this paper is to organize and describe the NonRadNET data collected over 2001-2002 to use as baseline data, either for monitoring during a fire, some other abnormal event, or routine use. To achieve that purpose, in this paper we will: (1) document the NonRadNET program procedures, methods, and quality management, (2) describe the usual origins and uses of the species measured, (3) compare the species measured to LANL and other area emissions, (4) present the five quarters of data, (5) compare the data to known typical environmental values, and (6) evaluate the data against exposure standards.

  19. [Low dose ionising radiation and cancer: findings and methods. Report of a meeting and consequences for Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Schüler, G; Gutzwiller, F

    1991-01-01

    Today's society is concerned about the dangers of ionising radiation, especially in the aftermath of Chernobyl. On the other hand, there exists a widespread lack of understanding radiation biology and radioepidemiology--the very sciences which provide the data from which today's risk estimates have been derived. The papers in this issue of the Journal were presented at a workshop on "Low level radiation and cancer: data and methods" held on 10th-11th December in Feuisberg, near Zurich. The meeting was organised by the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine of the University of Zurich under the auspices of the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health. Its aims were threefold. First, to give an introduction to some basic facts and methodological issues in radiation physics, biology and epidemiology. Secondly, to give an overview of the availability of data for radioepidemiological research in Switzerland and, thirdly, to evaluate possible research strategies in this country. A list of some notions and units commonly used in the radiation sciences serves an an introduction to the field (G. Schüler et al.). In using units and notions it is important to distinguish the description of biological experiments and epidemiological observations from definitions and risk projections proposed by international reports and consensus bodies for radioprotection purposes. The next papers deal more specifically with selected aspects of the basic sciences. Dosimetry means quantifying the physical effects of ionizing radiation in human tissue; this is not a straight-forward procedure (I. Cordt). The foundations of general radiation biology are succinctly summarised by C. Michel. An account of our present knowledge and theories of radiation carcinogenesis is provided by W. Burkart. W Lutz compares dose-response models of chemical carcinogenesis with those used in radiation carcinogenesis. During the last decade the epidemiological foundations of radioprotection have changed

  20. Considerations concerning the use of counting active personal dosimeters in pulsed fields of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Peter; Borowski, Markus; Iwatschenko, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Active personal electronic dosimeters (APDs) exhibit limitations in pulsed radiation fields, which cannot be overcome without the use of new detection technology. As an interim solution, this paper proposes a method by which some conventional dosimeters can be operated in a way such that, based on the basic knowledge about the pulsed radiation field, any dosimetric failure of the dosimeter is signalised by the instrument itself. This method is not applicable to all combinations of APD and pulsed radiation field. The necessary requirements for the APD and for the parameters of the pulsed radiation field are given in the paper. Up to now, all such requirements for APDs have not been tested or verified in a type test. The suitability of the method is verified for the use of one APD used in two clinical pulsed fields. PMID:20083488

  1. Association between Perchlorate and indirect indicators of thyroid dysfunction in NHANES 2001-2002, a Cross-Sectional, Hypothesis-Generating Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: A previous study observed associations of urinary perchlorate with thyroid hormones based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002. Increased levels of urinary perchlorate were associated with increased levels of thyroid stimulating h...

  2. NOVEL ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN URINARY PERCHLORATE AND POTENTIALLY RELEVANT EFFECTS ON RISK FACTORS FOR HEART DISEASE BASED ON NHANES 2001-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental pollutant, and is a thyroid hormone disruptor. A previous population study based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002 database showed that urinary perchlorate concentrations were associated with signi...

  3. Study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Avila, R; Beresford, N A; Agüero, A; Broed, R; Brown, J; Iospje, M; Robles, B; Suañez, A

    2004-12-01

    Uncertainty in estimations of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation may arise from a number of sources including values of the model parameters, empirical data, measurement errors and biases in the sampling. The significance of the overall uncertainty of an exposure assessment will depend on how the estimated dose compares with reference doses used for risk characterisation. In this paper, we present the results of a study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota using some of the models and parameters recommended in the FASSET methodology. The study was carried out for semi-natural terrestrial, agricultural and marine ecosystems, and for four radionuclides (137Cs, 239Pu, 129I and 237Np). The parameters of the radionuclide transfer models showed the highest sensitivity and contributed the most to the uncertainty in the predictions of doses to biota. The most important ones were related to the bioavailability and mobility of radionuclides in the environment, for example soil-to-plant transfer factors, the bioaccumulation factors for marine biota and the gut uptake fraction for terrestrial mammals. In contrast, the dose conversion coefficients showed low sensitivity and contributed little to the overall uncertainty. Radiobiological effectiveness contributed to the overall uncertainty of the dose estimations for alpha emitters although to a lesser degree than a number of transfer model parameters. PMID:15700701

  4. Nucleoplasmic bridges and acrocentric chromosome associations as early markers of exposure to low levels of ionising radiation in occupationally exposed hospital workers.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    Ionising radiation, with the contribution of telomere shortening, induces DNA double-strand breaks that result in chromosome end fusion, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and chromosome aberrations (ChAbs) as well as dicentric chromosomes. In order to investigate the chromosomal damage induced by occupational ionising radiation at low exposure levels, and to find early markers of health hazard, peripheral lymphocytes of occupationally exposed hospital workers were cytogenetically analysed. Results showed a significant difference in the frequency of ChAbs in exposed subjects relative to controls. A significant number of NPBs between nuclei of binucleated cultured lymphocytes from exposed subjects were also observed, as well as a consistent amount of acrocentric chromosomes with associations of their short arms. Excluding confounding factors, the frequencies of all these three biological endpoints differed significantly in exposed subjects from those in controls. Because the absence of telomeres and/or their short length could be a common root for both the findings, we utilised fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique with telomeric repeat as probe to demonstrate that, in exposed subjects, chromatin of short arms of involved acrocentric chromosomes did not exhibit a telomeric shortening but appeared strongly decondensed. This finding suggests that NPBs and telomeric acrocentric association should be regarded as early markers of exposure to low levels of ionising radiation and their increase should be seen as an early warning for the health of the involved workers. PMID:25381312

  5. Yakima Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity : Progress Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Gayeski, Nick

    2002-09-30

    Sample collections in project-years two and three (2001 & 2002) proceeded as planned. Twenty-eight (28) sites were sampled in 2001 between August 14 and September 12. Sites included two (2) mainstem Yakima River sites between Selah Gap and Union Gap, three (3) Yakima river sites upstream of Roza Dam, and three (3) mainstem Naches River sites between Cliffdell and the Wapatox Canal. The other twenty sites were tributary sites, including the Cle Elum River below Cle Elum Lake, lower Bumping river, and the American River at Pleasant Valley. Six (6) tributaries of second to fourth order were sampled at or near the same location at which they were sampled in 2000, as were two sites on the upper mainstem Yakima and one on the mainstem Naches. Thirty-three (33) sites were sampled in 2002 between August 12 and September 13. These included one (1) mainstem Yakima River site between Selah Gap and Union Gap, four (4) sites in the mainstem Yakima upstream of Roza Dam, and two (2) sites on the mainstem Naches between Naches and Cliffdell. The other twenty-six (26) sites were tributary sites, including one (1) site on the lower Tieton river, three (3) sites on the Bumping River (two downstream of Bumping Reservoir and one upstream), and two sites on the American River. Four (4) other sites were on smaller tributaries to the mainstem Naches, three (3) of which had been sampled in one (1) of the two preceding years, and one (1) (upper Rattlesnake Creek) that has been sampled in all three (3) years. Two (2) tributary sites in the upper Ahtanum subbasin were sampled, one (1) of which was sampled in 2000 and the other of which has been sampled in all three (3) years. One tributary (lower Wenas Creek) to the mainstem Yakima upstream of Selah Gap and downstream of Roza Dam was sampled. This was also sampled in 2001. Thirteen (13) sites were sampled in tributaries to the upper Yakima River, including two in the Teanaway subbasin one of which was sampled in 2000 and the other of which

  6. Pre-Service Teachers' Subject Knowledge of and Attitudes about Radioactivity and Ionising Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colclough, Nicholas Denys; Lock, Roger; Soares, Allan

    2011-01-01

    This study focussed on secondary school (11-18 years) pre-service teachers' (n = 73) knowledge of and attitudes towards risks associated with alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. A multi-method approach was used with physics, chemistry, biology, and history graduates undertaking the one-year initial teacher training, Post Graduate Certificate in…

  7. Propagation of the 2001-2002 silent earthquake and interplate coupling in the Oaxaca subduction zone, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, S. I.; Kostoglodov, V.; Larson, K. M.; Manea, V. C.; Manea, M.; Santiago, J. A.

    2005-10-01

    The aseismic slow slip event of 2001-2002 in Guerrero, Mexico, with an equivalent magnitude MW ~ 7.5, is the largest silent earthquake (SQ) among many recently recorded by GPS in different subduction zones (i.e. Japan, Alaska, Cascadia, New Zealand). The sub-horizontal and shallow plate interface in Central Mexico is responsible for specific conditions for the ~100 km long extended transient zone where the SQs develop from ~80 to ~190 km inland from the trench. This wide transient zone and relatively large slow slips of 10 to 20 cm displacements on the subduction fault result in noticeable surface displacements of 5-6 cm during the SQs. Continuous GPS stations allow one to trace the propagation of SQs, and to estimate their arrival time, duration and geometric attenuation. These propagation parameters must be accounted in order to locate source of slow slips events and to understand the triggering effect that they have on large subduction earthquakes. We use long-baseline tiltmeter data to define new time limits (onset and duration) for the SQs and continuous records from 8 GPS stations to determine the propagation of the 2001-2002 SQ in Central Mexico. Data from the CAYA and IGUA GPS stations, separated by ~170 km and located along the profile perpendicular to the trench, are used to determine that the surface deformation from the 2001-2002 SQ started almost instantaneously. It propagated parallel to the coast at ~2 km/day with an exponential attenuation of the horizontal surface displacement and a linear decrease of its duration with distance. Campaign data obtained yearly from 2001 to 2005 at the Oaxaca GPS network have been modeled according to a propagation of the 2001-2002 SQ step-like displacement anomaly. This modeling shows that the SQ ceased gradually in the central part of the Oaxaca segment of the subduction zone (west of Puerto Angel, PUAN) and then it apparently triggered another SQ in SE Oaxaca (between PUAN and Salina Cruz, SACR). The estimated

  8. Inter-comparison of safety culture within selected practices in Ghana utilising ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Faanu, A; Schandorf, C; Darko, E O; Boadu, M; Emi-Reynolds, G; Awudu, A R; Gyekye, P K; Kpeglo, D O

    2010-12-01

    The safety culture of selected practices and facilities in Ghana utilising radiation sources or radiation emitting devices has been assessed using a performance indicator, which provided status information on management and operating staff commitment to safety. The questionnaire was based on the following broad areas: general safety considerations, safety policy at the facility level, safety practices at the facility level, definition of responsibility, staff training, safety of the physical structure of the facility and the emergency plans. The analysis showed that the percentage levels of commitment to safety for the respective practices are as follows: conventional radiography, 23.3-90.0%; research reactor, 73.3%; gamma irradiation facility, 53.3%; radiotherapy, 76.7%; X-ray scanner, 80.0%; gamma scanner, 76.7%; industrial radiography 86.7% and nuclear density practice, 78%. None of the practices or facilities was able to satisfy all the requirements that will ensure a 100% level of safety culture. PMID:20699247

  9. A radiotelemetry pill for the measurement of ionising radiation using a mercuric iodide detector.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M A; Pearce, G; Edwards, J P

    1978-03-01

    A small radiation measuring pill is briefly described which utilises the principles of radiotelemetry and the properties of a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector such as mercuric iodide. By transmitting a radio signal to a remote receiver the pill could be an effective tool in localising bleeding sites along the gastrointestinal tract and also possibly in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal carcinoma. Other uses of the radiopill are suggested. The size of the pill is 27 mm x 10 mm diameter and consists of a mercuric iodide crystal, an amplifier, a frequency modulated transmitter and one battery. The radiotransmitter operates at about 106 MHz and has a range of about 10m, and the sensitivity of the pill has been found for 99Tcm, 131I and 32P. PMID:306112

  10. Non-fluoroscopic navigation systems for radiofrequency catheter ablation for supraventricular tachycardia reduce ionising radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    See, Jason; Amora, Jonah L; Lee, Sheldon; Lim, Paul; Teo, Wee Siong; Tan, Boon Yew; Ho, Kah Leng; Lee, Chee Wan; Ching, Chi Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The use of non-fluoroscopic systems (NFS) to guide radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is associated with lower radiation exposure. This study aimed to determine if NFS reduces fluoroscopy time, radiation dose and procedure time. METHODS We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing RFCA for SVT. NFS included EnSite™ NavX™ or CARTO® mapping. We compared procedure and fluoroscopy times, and radiation exposure between NFS and conventional fluoroscopy (CF) cohorts. Procedural success, complications and one-year success rates were reported. RESULTS A total of 200 patients over 27 months were included and RFCA was guided by NFS for 79 patients; those with atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT), left-sided atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT) and right-sided AVRT were included (n = 101, 63 and 36, respectively). Fluoroscopy times were significantly lower with NFS than with CF (10.8 ± 11.1 minutes vs. 32.0 ± 27.5 minutes; p < 0.001). The mean fluoroscopic dose area product was also significantly reduced with NFS (NSF: 5,382 ± 5,768 mGy*cm2 vs. CF: 21,070 ± 23,311 mGy*cm2; p < 0.001); for all SVT subtypes. There was no significant reduction in procedure time, except for left-sided AVRT ablation (NFS: 79.2 minutes vs. CF: 116.4 minutes; p = 0.001). Procedural success rates were comparable (NFS: 97.5% vs. CF: 98.3%) and at one-year follow-up, there was no significant difference in the recurrence rates (NFS: 5.2% vs. CF: 4.2%). No clinically significant complications were observed in both groups. CONCLUSION The use of NFS for RFCA for SVT is safe, with significantly reduced radiation dose and fluoroscopy time. PMID:26805664

  11. Modelling chromosomal aberration induction by ionising radiation: The influence of interphase chromosome architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottolenghi, A.; Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.

    Several advances have been achieved in the knowledge of nuclear architecture and functions during the last decade, thus allowing the identification of interphase chromosome territories and sub-chromosomal domains (e.g. arm and band domains). This is an important step in the study of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations; indeed, the coupling between track-structure simulations and reliable descriptions of the geometrical properties of the target is one of the main tasks in modelling aberration induction by radiation, since it allows one to clarify the role of the initial positioning of two DNA lesions in determining their interaction probability. In the present paper, the main recent findings on nuclear and chromosomal architecture are summarised. A few examples of models based on different descriptions of interphase chromosome organisation (random-walk models, domain models and static models) are presented, focussing on how the approach adopted in modelling the target nuclei and chromosomes can influence the simulation of chromosomal aberration yields. Each model is discussed by taking into account available experimental data on chromosome aberration induction and/or interphase chromatin organisation. Preliminary results from a mechanistic model based on a coupling between radiation track-structure features and explicitly-modelled, non-overlapping chromosome territories are presented.

  12. Follow-up of children exposed to ionising radiation from cardiac catheterisation: the Coccinelle study.

    PubMed

    Baysson, H; Nkoumazok, B; Barnaoui, S; Réhel, J L; Girodon, B; Milani, G; Boudjemline, Y; Bonnet, D; Laurier, D; Bernier, M O

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac catheterisation has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and treatment of children with a wide variety of congenital and acquired forms of cardiovascular disease. Despite the clear clinical benefit to the patient, radiation exposure from paediatric cardiac catheterisation procedures (CCPs) may be substantial. Given children's greater sensitivity to radiation and the longer life span during which radiation health effects can develop, an epidemiological cohort study, named Coccinelle or 'Ladybird' (French acronym for 'Cohorte sur le risque de cancer après cardiologie interventionnelle pédiatrique'), is carried out in France to evaluate the risks of leukaemia and solid cancers in this population. A total number of 8000 included children are expected. Individual CCP-related doses will be assessed for each child included in the cohort. For each CCP performed, dosimetric parameters (dose-area product, fluoroscopy time and total number of cine frames) are retrieved retrospectively. Organ doses, especially to the lung, the oesophagus and the thyroid, are calculated with PCXMC software. The cohort will be followed up through linkage with French paediatric cancer registries. PMID:25833897

  13. Follow-up of children exposed to ionising radiation from cardiac catheterisation: the Coccinelle study

    PubMed Central

    Baysson, H.; Nkoumazok, B.; Barnaoui, S.; Réhel, J. L.; Girodon, B.; Milani, G.; Boudjemline, Y.; Bonnet, D.; Laurier, D.; Bernier, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterisation has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and treatment of children with a wide variety of congenital and acquired forms of cardiovascular disease. Despite the clear clinical benefit to the patient, radiation exposure from paediatric cardiac catheterisation procedures (CCPs) may be substantial. Given children's greater sensitivity to radiation and the longer life span during which radiation health effects can develop, an epidemiological cohort study, named Coccinelle or ‘Ladybird’ (French acronym for ‘Cohorte sur le risque de cancer après cardiologie interventionnelle pédiatrique’), is carried out in France to evaluate the risks of leukaemia and solid cancers in this population. A total number of 8000 included children are expected. Individual CCP-related doses will be assessed for each child included in the cohort. For each CCP performed, dosimetric parameters (dose–area product, fluoroscopy time and total number of cine frames) are retrieved retrospectively. Organ doses, especially to the lung, the oesophagus and the thyroid, are calculated with PCXMC software. The cohort will be followed up through linkage with French paediatric cancer registries. PMID:25833897

  14. Deterministic effect of lens at leukergy of patients who received low doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Yeltokova, M; Zharliganova, D; Shaidarov, M; Bakhtin, M; Kazymbet, P; Tel, L; Dossakhanov, A; Kozhakbayeva, M; Hoshi, M

    2015-09-01

    To explore the possibility to use the lens extract as an in vitro stimulator to conduct a test of stimulated leukergy in liquidators of the accident consequences (LAC) on Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) with a cataract in the long-term period. The study sample included 72 men-LAC on CNPP, at the age from 42 to 65 y, who have a cataract. The comparison group consisted of 60 men, with a cataract, of the same age, and who were not exposed to radiation. The control group was composed of 60 men, at the age of 42-58 y without lens pathology. Phenomenon of the stimulated leukergy was revealed in persons who had been exposed to radiation in the dose of 18.2 ± 0.58 cGy and was observed in 5.7-8.05 % (P < 0.001), suggesting a continued high auto-aggression to the lens antigens, and the strength of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25969524

  15. Population exposure to ionising radiation from CT examinations in Aosta Valley between 2001 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    Catuzzo, P; Aimonetto, S; Zenone, F; Fanelli, G; Marchisio, P; Meloni, T; Pasquino, M; Tofani, S

    2010-01-01

    Recent and continuous advances in CT, such as the development of multislice CT, have promoted a rapid increase in its clinical application. Today, CT accounts for approximately 10% of the total number of medical radiographic procedures worldwide. However, the growing performance of the new CT generations have increased not only the diagnostic opportunities, but also the radiation dose to the patient. The relative contribution to the collective radiation dose is now estimated to be approximately 50%. Several papers have been published concerning the intensive use of CT and its contribution to the collective dose. However, most of the literature concerns the years 1997–2003 and the dosimetric evaluations are generally limited to the main standard protocols (chest, head and abdomen), deriving the effective dose by the simple application of the diagnostic reference levels. Only specific dosimetric analyses of single and innovative procedures have been published recently. Moreover, few data comes from Italian radiology departments. This paper aims to bridge these gaps. Firstly, it characterises in terms of measured CT dose index (CTDI) two last-generation scanners of the Radiological Department of Aosta Hospital. Secondly, it evaluates the effective dose from most of the CT examinations performed from 2001 to 2008 to compare protocols and technologies in line with the suggestions of the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, Publication 103. Finally, it estimates the collective dose to the population. PMID:21088089

  16. Genotoxicity Induced by Foetal and Infant Exposure to Magnetic Fields and Modulation of Ionising Radiation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Udroiu, Ion; Antoccia, Antonio; Tanzarella, Caterina; Giuliani, Livio; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Cordelli, Eugenia; Eleuteri, Patrizia; Villani, Paola; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the toxicity and genotoxicity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) during prenatal and neonatal development. These phases of life are characterized by cell proliferation and differentiation, which might make them sensitive to environmental stressors. Although in vitro evidences suggest that ELF-MF may modify the effects of ionizing radiation, no research has been conducted so far in vivo on the genotoxic effects of ELF-MF combined with X-rays. Aim and methods Aim of this study was to investigate in somatic and germ cells the effects of chronic ELF-MF exposure from mid gestation until weaning, and any possible modulation produced by ELF-MF exposure on ionizing radiation-induced damage. Mice were exposed to 50 Hz, 65 μT magnetic field, 24 hours/day, for a total of 30 days, starting from 12 days post-conception. Another group was irradiated with 1 Gy X-rays immediately before ELF-MF exposure, other groups were only X-irradiated or sham-exposed. Micronucleus test on blood erythrocytes was performed at multiple times from 1 to 140 days after birth. Additionally, 42 days after birth, genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on male germ cells were assessed by comet assay and flow cytometric analysis. Results ELF-MF exposure had no teratogenic effect and did not affect survival, growth and development. The micronucleus test indicated that ELF-MF induced a slight genotoxic damage only after the maximum exposure time and that this effect faded away in the months following the end of exposure. ELF-MF had no effects on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced genotoxicity in erythrocytes. Differently, ELF–MF appeared to modulate the response of male germ cells to X-rays with an impact on proliferation/differentiation processes. These results point to the importance of tissue specificity and development on the impact of ELF-MF on the early stages of life and indicate the need of further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying

  17. Protection against ionising radiation and synergism with thiols by zinc aspartate.

    PubMed

    Floersheim, G L; Floersheim, P

    1986-06-01

    Pre-treatment with zinc aspartate protected mice against the lethal effects of radiation and raised the LD50 from 8 Gy to 12.2 Gy. Zinc chloride and zinc sulphate were clearly less active. The radioprotective effect of zinc aspartate was equivalent to cysteamine and slightly inferior to S,2-aminoethylisothiourea (AET). Zinc aspartate displayed a similar therapeutic index to the thiols but could be applied at an earlier time before irradiation. Synergistic effects occurred with the combined administration of zinc aspartate and thiols. By giving zinc aspartate with cysteamine, the LD50 was increased to 13.25 Gy and, by combining it in the optimal protocol with AET, to 17.3 Gy. The radioprotection by zinc and its synergism with thiols is explained by the stabilisation of thiols through the formation of zinc complexes. PMID:3518853

  18. The long-term effects of acute exposure to ionising radiation on survival and fertility in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Sarapultseva, Elena I; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2016-10-01

    The results of recent studies have provided strong evidence for the transgenerational effects of parental exposure to ionising radiation and chemical mutagens. However, the transgenerational effects of parental exposure on survival and fertility remain poorly understood. To establish whether parental irradiation can affect the survival and fertility of directly exposed organisms and their offspring, crustacean Daphnia magna were given 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000mGy of acute γ-rays. Exposure to 1000 and 10,000mGy significantly compromised the viability of irradiated Daphnia and their first-generation progeny, but did not affect the second-generation progeny. The fertility of F0 and F1Daphnia gradually declined with the dose of parental exposure and significantly decreased at dose of 100mGy and at higher doses. The effects of parental irradiation on the number of broods were only observed among the F0Daphnia exposed to 1000 and 10,000mGy, whereas the brood size was equally affected in the two consecutive generations. In contrast, the F2 total fertility was compromised only among progeny of parents that received the highest dose of 10,000mGy. We propose that the decreased fertility observed among the F2 progeny of parents exposed to 10,000mGy is attributed to transgenerational effects of parental irradiation. Our results also indicate a substantial recovery of the F2 progeny of irradiated F0Daphnia exposed to the lower doses of acute γ-rays. PMID:27288911

  19. Pre-service Teachers' Subject Knowledge of and Attitudes about Radioactivity and Ionising Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denys Colclough, Nicholas; Lock, Roger; Soares, Allan

    2011-02-01

    This study focussed on secondary school (11-18 years) pre-service teachers' (n = 73) knowledge of and attitudes towards risks associated with alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. A multi-method approach was used with physics, chemistry, biology, and history graduates undertaking the one-year initial teacher training, Post Graduate Certificate in Education course at a university in central England. A novel research tool, involving interviews about real concrete contexts and first-hand data collection with radioactive sources, was employed to gain insights into a sub-set of the sample (n = 12) of pre-service teachers' subject knowledge of and attitudes towards risk. The subject knowledge of all the pre-service teachers was also measured using a Certainty of Response Index instrument; multiple-choice questions with associated confidence indicators. Although the physicists displayed the higher levels of knowledge, they also demonstrated limitations in their knowledge and held misconceptions such as irradiation being confused with contamination. Physics graduates hold more rational attitudes and a greater willingness to accept risk while the attitudes of graduates in the other subject disciplines are more disparate. These findings raise questions about the extent to which pre-service science and history teachers have the knowledge necessary to teach this topic. The article concludes with discussion of the implications these findings have for initial teacher training, continuing professional development needs for teachers already in the profession, and curriculum developers.

  20. Chromosome instability of HPRT-mutant subclones induced by ionising radiation of various LET.

    PubMed

    Govorun, R D; Koshlan, I V; Koshlan, N A; Krasavin, E A; Shmakova, N L

    2002-01-01

    The induction of HPRT-mutations and survival of Chinese hamster cells (line B11ii-FAF28, clone 431) were studied after irradiation by 4He and 12C-ions of various LET (20-360 keV/micrometers), produced by the U-200 heavy ion accelerator. The RBE increases with LET up to the maximum at 100-200 keV/micrometers and then decreases. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on the HPRT-mutant subclones selected from unirradiated Chinese hamster V-79 cells and from HPRT-mutant subclones that arose after exposure to gamma-rays, 1 GeV protons and 14N-ions (LET-77 keV/micrometers), produced by the synchrophasotron and the U-400M heavy ion accelerator. Slow growing mutant subclones were observed. The cytogenetic properties of individual clones were highly heterogeneous and chromosome instability was observed in both spontaneous and radiation-induced mutants. Chromosome instability was highest among spontaneous mutants and decreased with increasing LET. PMID:12539752

  1. Measurement of occupational doses of ionising radiation to the lens of the eyes of interventional radiologists.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Currently, there exists no standardised method for monitoring radiation doses to the eye lens. This investigation aimed to determine the optimum method for monitoring the eye doses for interventional radiologists. Three interventional radiologists were issued with a series of dosimeters to wear during their routine work. These dosimeters were worn at defined positions on the body and the absorbed dose to each position was measured. It was confirmed that the dose received to the thyroid collar followed an apparently well-defined relationship to the dose recorded on the forehead, which is representative of the dose to the lens of the eye. It was also confirmed that, as hypothesised, the dose to the left eye was universally greater than to the right, although by varying factors. It was concluded that the use of dosimeters attached to the inside arms of protective eyewear is the optimum solution for eye lens dosimetry. It was also concluded that, when used with a dose conversion factor which corroborates existing literature, dosimeters attached to the outside of a thyroid collar yield sufficiently accurate results for use in routine dosimetry programmes. PMID:26643204

  2. Determination of methemoglobin in human blood after ionising radiation by EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polakovs, M.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Pavlenko, A.; Aboltins, A.

    2015-03-01

    In the present work presents results of investigations of radiation influence on blood of patients examined by radio-isotopes diagnosis (Tc99m), blood of Chernobyl clean-up workers and human blood irradiated by LINAC using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The EPR spectroscopy reveals information on electronic states of transition metal ions, particularly Fe3+ in different spin states. It is shown that EPR spectra of blood of patients before examination has signal from metal-protein transferrin (g=4.3) and after administration of radioisotope proves signal of Fe3+ (methemaglobin) in the high spin state (g=6.0). The EPR spectra of Chernobyl liquidator display number of signals including low and high state of ion Fe3+ (g = 2.0 and g=6.0), and transferrin (g=4.3). The EPR spectra of irradiated human blood by LINAC (linear accelerator) have only signal Fe3+ (methemaglobin) in low-spin state with g = 2.0.

  3. Risk of cancer from occupational exposure to ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study of workers in France, the United Kingdom, and the United States (INWORKS)

    PubMed Central

    Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; Gillies, Michael; O’Hagan, Jacqueline A; Hamra, Ghassan B; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; Moissonnier, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is protracted exposure to low doses of ionising radiation associated with an increased risk of solid cancer? Methods In this cohort study, 308 297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66 632 known deaths by the end of follow-up, 17 957 were due to solid cancers. Study answer and limitations Results suggest a linear increase in the rate of cancer with increasing radiation exposure. The average cumulative colon dose estimated among exposed workers was 20.9 mGy (median 4.1 mGy). The estimated rate of mortality from all cancers excluding leukaemia increased with cumulative dose by 48% per Gy (90% confidence interval 20% to 79%), lagged by 10 years. Similar associations were seen for mortality from all solid cancers (47% (18% to 79%)), and within each country. The estimated association over the dose range of 0-100 mGy was similar in magnitude to that obtained over the entire dose range but less precise. Smoking and occupational asbestos exposure are potential confounders; however, exclusion of deaths from lung cancer and pleural cancer did not affect the estimated association. Despite substantial efforts to characterise the performance of the radiation dosimeters used, the possibility of measurement error remains. What this study adds The study provides a direct estimate of the association between protracted low dose exposure to ionising radiation and solid cancer mortality. Although high dose rate exposures are thought to be more dangerous than low dose rate exposures, the risk per unit of radiation dose for cancer among radiation workers was similar to estimates derived from studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Quantifying the cancer risks associated

  4. Ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS): an international cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Leuraud, Klervi; Richardson, David B; Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; Gillies, Michael; O'Hagan, Jacqueline A; Hamra, Ghassan B; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Moissonnier, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background There is much uncertainty about the risks of leukaemia and lymphoma after repeated or protracted low-dose radiation exposure typical of occupational, environmental, and diagnostic medical settings. We quantified associations between protracted low-dose radiation exposures and leukaemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma mortality among radiation-monitored adults employed in France, the UK, and the USA. Methods We assembled a cohort of 308 297 radiation-monitored workers employed for at least 1 year by the Atomic Energy Commission, AREVA Nuclear Cycle, or the National Electricity Company in France, the Departments of Energy and Defence in the USA, and nuclear industry employers included in the National Registry for Radiation Workers in the UK. The cohort was followed up for a total of 8·22 million person-years. We ascertained deaths caused by leukaemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. We used Poisson regression to quantify associations between estimated red bone marrow absorbed dose and leukaemia and lymphoma mortality. Findings Doses were accrued at very low rates (mean 1·1 mGy per year, SD 2·6). The excess relative risk of leukaemia mortality (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia) was 2·96 per Gy (90% CI 1·17–5·21; lagged 2 years), most notably because of an association between radiation dose and mortality from chronic myeloid leukaemia (excess relative risk per Gy 10·45, 90% CI 4·48–19·65). Interpretation This study provides strong evidence of positive associations between protracted low-dose radiation exposure and leukaemia. Funding Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, AREVA, Electricité de France, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, US Department of Energy, US Department of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina, Public Health England. PMID:26436129

  5. Phytosanitation with Ionising Radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter by Neil Heather and Guy Hallman, in “Pest Management and Phytosanitary Trade Barriers,” CABI Press, covers ionizing irradiation phytosanitary treatments. Although irradiation as an idea and research object has as long a phytosanitary history an any other phytosanitary treatment, c...

  6. Evaluation of the Impact of the Webster-Stratton Parent-Child Videotape Series on Participants in a Midlands Town in 2001-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manby, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Small groups of parents experiencing problems in managing the behaviour of young children took part in parenting programmes in a Midlands city in 2001-2002 based on the Webster Stratton Parent-Child Videotape Series. Programmes were evaluated using standardised measures and qualitative data. Most participants who completed the programme (N = 29)…

  7. Trends in Food Habits and Their Relation to Socioeconomic Status among Nordic Adolescents 2001/2002-2009/2010

    PubMed Central

    Fismen, Anne-Siri; Smith, Otto Robert Frans; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Rasmussen, Mette; Pedersen Pagh, Trine; Augustine, Lilly; Ojala, Kristiina; Samdal, Oddrun

    2016-01-01

    Background In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have been highlighted. However, few internationally published studies have evaluated how trends in adolescents' food habits develop in the context of Nordic nutrition policy, or have compared differences between the Nordic countries. Methods The study was based on Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish cross-sectional data from the international Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, collected via three nationally representative and comparable questionnaire surveys in 2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. Food habits were identified by students' consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweets and sugar sweetened soft drink. Socioeconomic status (SES) was measured with the Family Affluence Scale (FAS). Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the data. Results Trends in fruit consumption developed differently across countries, characterized by an increase in Denmark and Norway and more stable trends in Sweden and Finland. Vegetable consumption increased particularly in Denmark and to a lesser extent in Norway, whereas Sweden and Finland displayed stable trends. Decreased trends were observed for sweet and soft drink consumption and were similar in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Sweet consumption decreased across all survey years, whereas soft drink consumption decreased between 2001/2002–2005/2006 and was stable thereafter. Denmark displayed an increase between 2001/2002–2005/2006 followed by a similar decrease between 2005/2006–2009/2010 for both sweet and soft

  8. Ionising Radiation Immediately Impairs Synaptic Plasticity-Associated Cytoskeletal Signalling Pathways in HT22 Cells and in Mouse Brain: An In Vitro/In Vivo Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Stefan J.; Buratovic, Sonja; von Toerne, Christine; Moertl, Simone; Stenerlöw, Bo; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Atkinson, Michael J.; Eriksson, Per; Tapio, Soile

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from brain malignancies are treated with high-dose ionising radiation. However, this may lead to severe learning and memory impairment. Preventive treatments to minimise these side effects have not been possible due to the lack of knowledge of the involved signalling pathways and molecular targets. Mouse hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells were irradiated with acute gamma doses of 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy and 4.0 Gy. Changes in the cellular proteome were investigated by isotope-coded protein label technology and tandem mass spectrometry after 4 and 24 hours. To compare the findings with the in vivo response, male NMRI mice were irradiated on postnatal day 10 with a gamma dose of 1.0 Gy, followed by evaluation of the cellular proteome of hippocampus and cortex 24 hours post-irradiation. Analysis of the in vitro proteome showed that signalling pathways related to synaptic actin-remodelling were significantly affected at 1.0 Gy and 4.0 Gy but not at 0.5 Gy after 4 and 24 hours. We observed radiation-induced reduction of the miR-132 and Rac1 levels; miR-132 is known to regulate Rac1 activity by blocking the GTPase-activating protein p250GAP. In the irradiated hippocampus and cortex we observed alterations in the signalling pathways similar to those in vitro. The decreased expression of miR-132 and Rac1 was associated with an increase in hippocampal cofilin and phospho-cofilin. The Rac1-Cofilin pathway is involved in the modulation of synaptic actin filament formation that is necessary for correct spine and synapse morphology to enable processes of learning and memory. We suggest that acute radiation exposure leads to rapid dendritic spine and synapse morphology alterations via aberrant cytoskeletal signalling and processing and that this is associated with the immediate neurocognitive side effects observed in patients treated with ionising radiation. PMID:25329592

  9. 2001-2002 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300, Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W; Woollett, J

    2004-11-16

    Condor County Consulting on behalf of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has performed wet season surveys for listed branchiopods at Site 300, located in eastern Alameda County and western San Joaquin County. LLNL is collecting information for the preparation of an EIS covering ongoing explosives testing and related activities on Site 300. Related activities include maintenance of fire roads and annual control burns of approximately 607 hectares (1500 acres). Control burns typically take place on the northern portion of the site. Because natural branchiopod habitat is sparse on Site 300, it is not surprising that listed branchiopods were not observed during this 2001-2002 wet season survey. Although the site is large, a majority of it has topography and geology that precludes the formation of static seasonal pools. Even the relatively gentle topography of the northern half of the site contains few areas where water pools for more than two weeks. The rock outcrops found on the site did not provide suitable habitat for listed branchiopods. Most of the habitat available to branchiopods on the site is puddles that form in roadbeds and dry quickly. The one persistent pool on the site, the larger of the two modified vernal pools and the only one to fill this season, is occupied by two branchiopod species that require long-lived pools to reach maturity. In short, there is little habitat available on the site for branchiopods and most of the habitat present is generally too short-lived to support the branchiopod species that do occur at Site 300.

  10. What Caused the 2001-2002 Unrest at Cotopaxi Volcano, Ecuador? Insights from a Finite Element Based Geodetic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, J.; Gottsmann, J.; Mothes, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    A general inflation of the edifice and increased long-period/very-long-period seismicity define the 2001-2002 period of non-eruptive unrest at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador. This study focuses on the observed deformation - simultaneous contraction of seven baselines recorded by an electronic distance meter (EDM) network. To determine the cause of this deformation we model the system using Finite Element analysis with COMSOL Multiphysics. Our models incorporate subsurface heterogeneity, real topography and represent the source as a spheroidal cavity. This set up allows the EDM baselines to be modelled in three dimensions and account for the steep relief of the iconic stratovolcano, as opposed to analytical models that are either restricted to two dimensional EDM calculations and/or a flat Earth surface. To further assess the importance of topography, subsurface mechanics, and the 2-or-3D approach, we conduct a sensitivity analysis using both Finite Element and analytical techniques. We solve the Finite Element inverse problem with a least-squares approach, searching for the optimum location (longitude, latitude, depth) and over-pressure of the source to fit the EDM deformation data within its error. This optimization procedure was repeated for each source shape, orientation, size and aspect ratio using a series of nested parameter constraint grids. All source shapes converge on a location beneath the south to south-west of the edifice at a central depth of 0.5 - 2.0 km above sea level (summit at 5897 m). High-eccentricity oblate spheroids generally provide the best-fit to the observed data and may be interpreted as a sill-like intrusion as the cause of the deformation. Finally, additional forward Finite Element models are used to assess the implications of inelastic rheology, failure locations and gravity anomalies associated with the intrusion.

  11. Preliminary Results of Aster Imagery Application To The Glaciated Regions of Russia (2001-2002) In Frame of Glims Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, G.; Glazovsky, A.; Kotlyakov, V.

    GLIMS project (Global Land Ice Measurement from Space) aims to apply the space images for glacier monitoring for 6-year period of ASTER (scanning radiometer) op- eration installed on the STerraT orbital platform. One of the Regional Center (RC16) & cedil;of the GLIMS has been established in the Institute of Geography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, and it is responsible for the glaciated areas in Russian Arctic, the Urals, the Caucasus, Siberian mountains, Kamchatka, Altay (including Mongolian part), mountains in southern Kazakhstan. Wide variety of geographical environment and glacial types allows to assess the applicability of ASTER data for different geo- graphical settings and glaciological tasks. The first object of the project is to create a base digital maps of current glacier state and first of all glacier margins, therefore the problem of extraction of these features from ASTER images is of prime impor- tance. Our study concerns with the following topics: assessment of image coverage of different glacier regions in Russia for different seasons, cloudiness, and illumina- tion conditions; analysis of spatial and spectral resolution to interpret the margins and surface morphology of glaciers of different types in various regions. ASTER mission for the period 2001-2002 covered practically all glaciated regions of Russia. However unfavorable cloudiness conditions are rather common and increase northward. That re- duces greatly the number of suitable images. In addition the number of images made in optimal season limits the total useful coverage. Finally some glaciated areas such as the Urals, Suntar-Khayata and some other mountains are not yet available. Use- ful amount of images makes ca. 5 per cent from total. Multi-band option of ASTER data improves the interpretation of glacial features, such as snow line and glacier sur- face topography. High spatial resolution allows to extract the margins of different-type glaciers, and, first of all of polar and

  12. Assessment of Fish Habitat, Water Quality, and Selected Contaminants in Streambed Sediments in Noyes Slough, Fairbanks, Alaska, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Ben W.; Whitman, Matthew S.; Burrows, Robert L.; Richmond, Sharon A.

    2004-01-01

    During 2001-2002, the U.S. Geological Survey sampled streambed sediment at 23 sites, measured water quality at 26 sites, and assessed fish habitat for the entire length of Noyes Slough, a 5.5-mile slough of the Chena River in Fairbanks, Alaska. These studies were undertaken to document the environmental condition of the slough and to provide information to the public for consideration in plans to improve environmental conditions of the waterway. The availability of physical habitat for fish in the slough does not appear to be limited, although some beaver dams and shallow water may restrict movement, particularly during low flow. Elevated water temperatures in summer and low dissolved-oxygen concentrations are the principle factors adversely affecting water quality in Noyes Slough. Increased flow mitigated poor water-quality conditions and reduced the number of possible fish barriers. Flow appears to be the most prominent mechanism shaping water quality and fish habitat in Noyes Slough. Streambed sediment samples collected at 23 sites in 2001 were analyzed for 24 trace elements. Arsenic, lead, and zinc were the only trace elements detected in concentrations that exceed probable effect levels for the protection of aquatic life. The background concentration for arsenic in Noyes Slough is naturally elevated because of significant concentrations of arsenic in local bedrock and ground water. Sources of the zinc and lead contamination are uncertain, however both lead and zinc are common urban contaminants. Streambed-sediment samples from 12 sites in 2002 were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs). The concentration of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate of 2,600 micrograms per kilogram (?g/kg) for one sample from the site above Aurora Drive approached the aquatic-life criterion of 2,650 ?g/kg. Low concentrations of p-cresol, chrysene, and fluoranthene were detected in most of the sediment samples. The

  13. How do monomeric components of a polymer gel dosimeter respond to ionising radiation: A steady-state radiolysis towards preparation of a 3D polymer gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek

    2011-12-01

    Ionising radiation-induced reactions of aqueous single monomer solutions and mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in a steady-state condition are presented below and above gelation doses in order to highlight reactions in irradiated 3D polymer gel dosimeters, which are assigned for radiotherapy dosimetry. Both monomers are shown to undergo radical polymerisation and cross-linking, which result in the measured increase in molecular weight and radius of gyration of the formed polydisperse polymer coils. The formation of nanogels was also observed for Bis solutions at a low concentration. In the case of PEGDA-Bis mixtures, co-polymerisation is suggested as well. At a sufficiently high radiation dose, the formation of a polymer network was observed for both monomers and their mixture. For this reason a sol-gel analysis for PEGDA and Bis was performed gravimetrically and a proposition of an alternative to this method employing a nuclear magnetic resonance technique is made. The two monomers were used for preparation of 3D polymer gel dosimeters having the acronyms PABIG and PABIG nx. The latter is presented for the first time in this work and is a type of the formerly established PABIG polymer gel dosimeter. The elementary characteristics of the new composition are presented, underlining the ease of its preparation, low dose threshold, and slightly increased sensitivity but lower quasi-linear range of dose response in comparison to PABIG.

  14. Co-mutation of histone H2AX S139A with Y142A rescues Y142A-induced ionising radiation sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James A.L.; Eykelenboom, John K.; Lowndes, Noel F.

    2012-01-01

    Under normal conditions histone H2AX is constitutively phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y) 142 by Williams–Beuren syndrome transcription factor kinase (WSTF). Following DNA double strand breaks (DSB), Y142 is de-phosphorylated and serine (S) 139 is phosphorylated. Here we explored DSB-dependent cross talk between H2AX residues S139 and Y142. H2axY142A mutation resulted in increased sensitivity to ionising radiation (IR), compared to H2axS139A. Interestingly, co-mutation of S139A and Y142A rescued IR sensitivity. The DSB response proteins 53Bp1 and Rad51 were recruited to IR-induced foci (IRIF) in H2axS139A, H2axY142A and H2axS139A/Y142A cells. Our results suggest that H2axY142A IR sensitivity is dependent upon the C-terminal residue, S139. PMID:23772364

  15. A new approach to studying the effects of ionising radiation on single cells using FTIR synchrotron microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiec, E.; Birarda, G.; Kowalska, J.; Lekki, J.; Vaccari, L.; Wiecheć, A.; Wood, B. R.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on single cells using a proton source was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy. The prostate cancer cells (DU-145) were irradiated by a specific number (50, 200, 400, 2000 and 4000) of protons per cell. Next after fixing the cells with 70% ethanol micro-FTIR spectra were obtained using both: (a) the synchrotron radiation source with a Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) detector and (b) a globar source with a focal plane array (FPA) detector. FTIR spectra obtained from both instrumental configurations were analyzed independently to investigate the changes in the DNA phosphodiester region (1150-950 cm-1) of irradiated and control (untreated by ionizing radiation) cells. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) scores plot revealed distinct clusters for all groups of irradiated cells, even for those irradiated by the smallest dose of protons. The dose-dependent changes in the relative intensities of DNA peak at 970 cm-1 (ribose-phosphate skeletal motions), along with a shift of the O-P-O band corresponding to the symmetric phosphodiester stretching mode at 1090 cm-1 were observed. The results demonstrate that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool to investigate DNA damage in single cells and may become an important tool in assessing cell damage following radiotherapy.

  16. An evaluation of the shielding effectiveness of lead aprons used in clinics for protection against ionising radiation from novel radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Deb, Pradip; Jamison, Robert; Mong, Lisa; U, Paul

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of personal radiation shields currently worn in hospital and other diagnostic environments. This study was performed with four different radioisotopes; (18)F, (99m)Tc, (124)I and (131)I. (18)F results showed a decrease in dose with 0.5-mm Pb shielding but the reduction provided does not warrant its use clinically. (124)I testing demonstrated that dose enhancement can occur in greater shield thicknesses. PET isotope (124)I can be adequately shielded using 0.25-mm Pb equivalent aprons but any higher thickness increase the wearer's dose. As a result more shielding does not always equal more protection. The (131)I test showed that no dose reduction occurred, even when tested with up to 1.25-mm Pb equivalent shielding. Novel radioisotopes being used in the laboratory and clinic should be individually tested as each requires specific shielding testing. PMID:25848112

  17. Assessing the performance under ionising radiation of lead tungstate scintillators for EM calorimetry in the CLAS12 Forward Tagger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegan, S.; Auffray, E.; Battaglieri, M.; Buchanan, E.; Caiffi, B.; Celentano, A.; Colaneri, L.; D`Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Dormenev, V.; Fanchini, E.; Lanza, L.; Novotny, R. W.; Parodi, F.; Rizzo, A.; Sokhan, D.; Tarasov, I.; Zonta, I.

    2015-07-01

    The well-established technology of electromagnetic calorimetry using Lead Tungstate crystals has recently seen an upheaval, with the closure of one of the most experienced large-scale suppliers of such crystals, the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP), which was instrumental in the development of mass production procedures for PWO-II, the current benchmark for this scintillator. Obtaining alternative supplies of Lead Tungstate crystals matching the demanding specifications of contemporary calorimeter devices now presents a significant challenge to detector research and development programmes. In this paper we describe a programme of assessment carried out for the selection, based upon the performance under irradiation, of Lead Tungstate crystals for use in the Forward Tagger device, part of the CLAS12 detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The crystals tested were acquired from SICCAS, the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tests performed are intended to maximise the performance of the detector within the practicalities of the crystal manufacturing process. Results of light transmission, before and after gamma ray irradiation, are presented and used to calculate dk, the induced radiation absorption coefficient, at 420 nm, the peak of the Lead Tungstate emission spectrum. Results for the SICCAS crystals are compared with identical measurements carried out on Bogoroditsk samples, which were acquired for the Forward Tagger development program before the closure of the facility. Also presented are a series of tests performed to determine the feasibility of recovering radiation damage to the crystals using illumination from an LED, with such illumination available in the Forward Tagger from a light monitoring system integral to the detector.

  18. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage-associated biomarkers of ionising radiation: current status and future relevance for radiology and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rothkamm, K

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic radiation technology has developed dramatically in recent years, and its use has increased significantly, bringing clinical benefit. The use of diagnostic radiology has become widespread in modern society, particularly in paediatrics where the clinical benefit needs to be balanced with the risk of leukaemia and brain cancer increasing after exposure to low doses of radiation. With improving long-term survival rates of radiotherapy patients and the ever-increasing use of diagnostic and interventional radiology procedures, concern has risen over the long-term risks and side effects from such treatments. Biomarker development in radiology and radiotherapy has progressed significantly in recent years to investigate the effects of such use and optimise treatment. Recent biomarker development has focused on improving the limitations of established techniques by the use of automation, increasing sensitivity and developing novel biomarkers capable of quicker results. The effect of low-dose exposure (0–100 mGy) used in radiology, which is increasingly linked to cancer incidences, is being investigated, as some recent research challenges the linear-no-threshold model. Radiotherapy biomarkers are focused on identifying radiosensitive patients, determining the treatment-associated risk and allowing for a tailored and more successful treatment of cancer patients. For biomarkers in any of these areas to be successfully developed, stringent criteria must be applied in techniques and analysis of data to reduce variation among reports and allow data sets to be accurately compared. Newly developed biomarkers can then be used in combination with the established techniques to better understand and quantify the individual biological response to exposures associated with radiology tests and to personalise treatment plans for patients. PMID:23659923

  19. Recombination processes in ionised plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastin, Robert

    The observational analysis of astrophysical plasmas relies on accurate calculations of the atomic processes involved. The recombination spectra of singly ionised oxygen (O il) and carbon (C il) present excellent tools for investigating regions such as planetary nebulae and H II regions. In this thesis, detailed treatments of the recombination processes of both O II and C II are presented. Using the R-matrix solution to the close coupling equations, I present the results of accurate photoionisation calculations. Bound state energy levels are determined and oscillator strengths calculated for both species. Recombination coefficients were evalu ated for low n and 1, for C II in LS-coupling, and 0 II in intermediate coupling, taking particular care to treat resonances effectively. Sample photoionisation cross-sections are presented for both species, and compared to previous work. A complete radiative-cascade model is treated for both species, in order to determine line emissivities under nebular conditions at a wide range of temperatures and densities. Collisional effects are treated for C II, along with, for the first time, the effects of high temperature dielectronic recombination, allowing the modelling of regions of much higher electron temperature than previous work. The O II calculations were performed under intermediate coupling for the first time, allowing the effects of non-statistical popula tions of the parent ion fine-structure levels and dielectronic recombination onto bound states within this fine-structure to be taken into account in line emissivities. Detailed comparison with previous theoretical work was made for both species. The application of the C II and 0 n recombination spectra to determining tempera ture and densities from the observed spectra of a number of ionised nebulae is considered. The potential for using the new recombination spectra as diagnostic tools to solve some of the key problems in the study of ionised nebulae is demonstrated.

  20. Post-wildfire recovery of water yield in the Sydney Basin water supply catchments: An assessment of the 2001/2002 wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. T.; Chafer, C. J.; van Ogtrop, F. F.; Bishop, T. F. A.

    2014-11-01

    Wildfire is a recurring event which has been acknowledged by the literature to impact the hydrological cycle of a catchment. Hence, wildfire may have a significant impact on water yield levels within a catchment. In Australia, studies of the effect of fire on water yield have been limited to obligate seeder vegetation communities. These communities regenerate from seed banks in the ground or within woody fruits and are generally activated by fire. In contrast, the Sydney Basin is dominated by obligate resprouter communities. These communities regenerate from fire resistant buds found on the plant and are generally found in regions where wildfire is a regular occurrence. The 2001/2002 wildfires in the Sydney Basin provided an opportunity to investigate the impacts of wildfire on water yield in a number of catchments dominated by obligate resprouting communities. The overall aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a difference in water yield post-wildfire. Four burnt subcatchments and 3 control subcatchments were assessed. A general additive model was calibrated using pre-wildfire data and then used to predict post-wildfire water yield using post-wildfire data. The model errors were analysed and it was found that the errors for all subcatchments showed similar trends for the post-wildfire period. This finding demonstrates that wildfires within the Sydney Basin have no significant medium-term impact on water yield.

  1. Aseismic magma supply inferred from geodetic Finite Element inversions: the case of the 2001-2002 non-eruptive unrest at Cotopaxi volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Jo; Mothes, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    The complex interplay between magma supply, storage and transportation, and how these processes interact with the host rock dictate the unrest signals we observe at the surface. Mechanical modelling allows us to link our recorded geophysical signals to subsurface processes and constrain a causative mechanism. We carry out this analysis for the 2001-2002 non-eruptive unrest episode at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador. During this period the volcano underwent a general inflation of its iconic edifice, recorded by an Electronic Distance Meter (EDM) network, and was accompanied by increased seismicity beneath the north-east flank. To solve for the optimum deformation source parameters we use an inverse Finite Element method accounting for subsurface material heterogeneity and surface topography. The model solutions favour a shallow source beneath the south-west flank, in contradiction to the seismicity locations in the north-east. The best-fit deformation model is a small, oblate shaped source approximately 1 km above sea level with a 20 x 106 m3 volume increase. To reconcile the deformation and seismicity simultaneously further Finite Element models were employed, incorporating an additional temperature-dependent rheology. These were used to assess the viscosity of the host rock surrounding the source. By comparing the elastic and viscous timescales associated with a small magma intrusion (implied by the best-fit deformation source in the south-west), we can infer this process occurred aseismically. To explain the recorded seismicity in the north-east we propose a mechanism of fluid migration from the south-west to the north-east along fault systems. Our analysis further shows that if future unrest crises are accompanied by measurable seismicity around the deformation source, this could indicate a higher magma supply rate and a critical level of unrest with increased likelihood of a forthcoming eruption. This research received funding through the EC FP7 "VUELCO" (#282759

  2. Strong ionisation in carbon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaymak, V.; Pukhov, A.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Rocca, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Surfaces covered with nanostructures, such as nanowire arrays, are shown to facilitate a significantly higher absorption of laser energy as compared to flat surfaces. Due to the efficient coupling of the laser energy, highly energetic electrons are produced, which in turn can emit intense ultrafast X-ray pulses. Full three dimensional PIC simulations are used to analyse the behaviour of arrays of carbon nanowires 400 nm in diameter, irradiated by a 400-nm laser pulse of 60-fs duration at FWHM and a vector potential of α0 = 18. We analyse the ionisation dynamics of the nanowires. The difference of the ionisation strength and structure between linearly and circularly polarised laser beam is investigated. The nanowires are found to be fully ionised after about 30 laser cycles. Circularly polarised light reveals a slightly stronger ionisation effect.

  3. Epidemiological studies of Fukushima residents exposed to ionising radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant prefecture--a preliminary review of current plans.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Suminori

    2012-03-01

    It is now more than six months since the beginning of the accident on 11 March 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. The Japanese government and local health authorities have started to collect the information necessary to estimate radiation doses received by those living in the area around the plant, drafted plans for the health care of residents, and started to implement some of them. This paper reviews and discusses the studies necessary for risk evaluation of cancer and non-cancer diseases, including those already planned, mainly from the view point of evaluating health risk using epidemiological approaches. In the long run, it is important to establish a cohort with a control group. Even if the cumulative doses are estimated to be so low that it is difficult to evaluate the risk of cancer and non-cancer diseases, it is necessary to conduct such a study to reassure residents. The health care programme of the Fukushima Prefecture government, including health check-ups of residents, will help to assess indirect effects of radiation exposure, including psychological problems. The success of any studies of radiation epidemiology depends on the collection of accurate information on radiation doses received by the study subjects. However, some of the dosimetry surveys were not conducted in a timely manner. (It should be recognised, though, that such a problem might have been inevitable, considering the chaotic condition after the nuclear accident.) Accurate estimation of the radiation dose received by each resident is not only important for scientific risk evaluation but also to inform each resident about his or her potential risk. Otherwise, residents will bear an undue psychological burden from uncertainties regarding their radiation exposure and its health consequences. One of other important tasks in Fukushima is the improvement of the quality of the regional cancer registry in this prefecture. It is also important to start thyroid cancer

  4. Monitoring radiation belt particle precipitation - automatic detection of enhanced transient ionisation in the lower plasmasphere using subionospheric narrow band VLF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, P.; Lichtenberger, J.; Ferencz, Cs.

    2009-04-01

    Signals of naval VLF transmitters, propagating long distances along the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (EIWG) have been widely applied as effective tools for monitoring transient ionization at mesospheric altitudes. Perturbations in recorded amplitude and/or phase data series of stable frequency signals may refer to the effect of transient enhanced ionization in the EIWG, due to e.g. loss-cone precipitation of trapped energetic electrons (Carpenter et al., 1984, Dowden and Adams, 1990), burst of solar plasma particles (Clilverd et al., 2001). The contribution of precipitating particles are thought to be substantial in certain Sun-to-Earth energy flow processes in the upper atmosphere (Rodger et al., 2005). Narrow band VLF measuring network has been set up, developed and operated in Hungary, running in the last decade almost continuously, dedicated to monitor ionization enhancement regions along numerous transmitter-receiver paths. This setup is based on Omnipal and Ultra-MSK equipment, logging amplitude and phase data of received signals, sampled at frequencies of selected VLF transmitters. Signal trajectories, selected for recording represent proper configuration to survey transient ionization caused by energetic particles in the sub-polar region, such as effect of scattered particles of the inner radiation belt. Reprocessing of the mass archived recordings has been started using a newly developed signal processing code, detecting and classifying different sort of perturbations automatically on narrow band VLF series. Occurrence rates, daily and seasonal variation, statistics of transient ionization enhancements, their geographic distribution within the surveyed range and time period, and correlation with intense geomagnetic and/or Solar event is yielded by this analysis. References: Carpenter, D.L., Inan, U.S., Trimpi, M.L., Helliwell, R.A., and Katsufrakis, J.P.: Perturbations of subionospheric LF and MF signals due to whistler-induced electron precipitation burst

  5. Ionisation Equilibrium for the Non-Maxwellian Electron n-Distributions in Solar Flares: Updated Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifčáková, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-12-01

    We use the latest available atomic data to calculate the ionisation and recombination rates for the non-Maxwellian n-distributions, which were shown previously to provide a good fit to the enhanced intensities of dielectronic satellite lines during solar flares. The ionisation and recombination coefficients are subsequently used to derive the ionisation equilibrium. To do so, we consider odd values of n ranging from 1 to 19, i.e., from Maxwellian to strongly non-Maxwellian cases. These calculations involve all elements with proton number up to 30, i.e., H to Zn. The n-distributions modify both the ionisation and the recombination rates. The ionisation rates decrease more steeply at lower pseudo-temperatures, while the radiative recombination rate is reduced due to a lower number of low-energy electrons. The peaks of the dielectronic recombination rates become narrower. These changes are reflected in the ionisation equilibrium. Ion abundance peaks become narrower and can also be shifted, mostly towards higher temperatures. The He-like ions are an important exception, as they are formed in a larger temperature range than that for the Maxwellian distribution. The ions Si xiii - xiv used previously for the diagnostics of the n-distributions are affected only weakly, confirming the determination of n. The ionisation equilibria are available as the electronic supplementary material in a format compatible with the CHIANTI database.

  6. Experimental investigation of ionisation track structure of carbon ions at HIL Warsaw.

    PubMed

    Bantsar, A; Hilgers, G; Pszona, S; Rabus, H; Szeflinski, Z

    2015-09-01

    In view of the upcoming radiation therapy with carbon ions, the ionisation structure of the carbon ion track at the nanometre scale is of particular interest. Two different nanodosimeters capable of measuring track structure of ionising particles in a gas target equivalent to a nanometric site in condensed matter were involved in the presented experimental investigation, namely the NCBJ Jet Counter and the PTB Ion Counter. At the accelerator facility of the HIL in Warsaw, simulated nanometric volumes were irradiated with carbon ions of 45 and 76 MeV of kinetic energy, corresponding to a range in the tissue of ∼85 µm and ∼190 µm, respectively. The filling gas of both nanodosimeters' ionisation volume was molecular nitrogen N2, and the ionisation cluster size distributions, i.e. the statistical distribution of the number of ionizations produced by one single primary carbon ion in the filling gas, were measured for the two primary particle energies. PMID:25897141

  7. Ionisation of C60: is it temperature dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, M. Sai; Narasimhan, T. S. Lakshmi; Balasubramanian, R.; Mathews, C. K.

    1994-01-01

    In a recent paper, Drewello [T. Drewello, W. Kratschmer, M. Fieber-Erdmann and A. Ding, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Processes, 124 (1993) R1] reported a temperature dependent ionisation cross section for the formation of C2+60 in their photoionisation dynamic studies on C60 using synchrotron radiation. To check this, the ratio of ion intensities of C2+60 to that of C60 was determined as a function of temperature of C60 samples using a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer. Our results indicate the absence of any temperature dependence of cross section for the formation of C2+60 in the temperature range of measurement (600-800 K) using electron impact ionisation.

  8. Ionised outflows in z ~ 2.4 quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Risaliti, G.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: Outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are invoked by galaxy evolutionary models to quench star formation and to explain the origin of the relations observed locally between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies. We here aim to detect extended ionised outflows in luminous quasars, where we expect the highest activity both in star formation and in black-hole accretion. Currently, there are only a few studies based on spatially resolved observations of outflows at high redshift, z > 2. Methods: We analysed a sample of six luminous (L > 1047 erg/s) quasars at z ~ 2.4, observed in H-band using the near-IR integral field spectrometer SINFONI at the VLT. We performed a kinematic analysis of the [Oiii] emission line at λ = 5007 Å. Results: We detect fast, spatially extended outflows in five out of six targets. [Oiii]λ5007 has a complex gas kinematic, with blue-shifted velocities of a few hundreds of km s-1 and line widths up to 1500 km s-1. Using the spectroastrometric method, we infer a size of the ionised outflows of up to ~2 kpc. The properties of the ionised outflows, mass outflow rate, momentum rate, and kinetic power, are correlated with the AGN luminosity. The increase in outflow rate with increasing AGN luminosity is consistent with the idea that a luminous AGN pushes away the surrounding gas through fast outflows that are driven by radiation pressure, which depends on the emitted luminosity. Conclusions: We derive mass outflow rates of about 6-700 M⊙ yr-1 for our sample, which are lower than those observed in molecular outflows. The physical properties of ionised outflows show dependences on AGN luminosity that are similar to those of molecular outflows, but indicate that the mass of ionised gas is lower than that of molecular outflows. Alternatively, this discrepancy between ionised and molecular outflows could be explained with different acceleration mechanisms. Based on Observations collected at the European Organisation for

  9. The President's Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Mary

    This report is a summary of the state of Los Angeles City College (California) in 2002. It examines past goals and demonstrates completion of each, summarizes the state of the college, and looks ahead to the next 5 years by defining 8 priorities for the future. Los Angeles City College (LACC) President Mary Spangler describes how the College has…

  10. Academic Annual Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Red River Coll., Winnipeg (Manitoba).

    Red River College, Manitoba, Canada, is the largest and most comprehensive institute of applied learning in the province. It provides education and training to 32,000 full- and part-time enrollees per year, and offers more than 110 diploma, certificate, and apprenticeship programs. The 2000/2001 annual employment and satisfaction survey of College…

  11. Deaf-Blind Perspectives, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Peggy, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    Three issues of this newsletter on deaf-blind issues include announcements, reviews, news items, and the following articles: "'What's My Role?' A Comparison of the Responsibilities of Interpreters, Interveners, and Support Service Providers" (Susanne Morgan); "A Support Service Provider Program in Utah" (Cordie Weed); "Valued Outcomes for Students…

  12. Focus on Basics, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This volume of newsletters focuses on connecting research and practice in adult literacy programs. Issue A of August 2001 includes: "Techniques for Teaching Beginning-Level Reading to Adults" (Ashley Hager); "Beginning ESOL Learners' Advice to Their Teachers" (MaryAnn Cunningham Florez); "The Neurobiology of Reading and Dyslexia" (Sally E.…

  13. English Leadership Quarterly, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiernan, Henry, Ed.; Wilcox, Bonita L., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This 24th volume of "English Leadership Quarterly" contains articles on topics of interest to those in positions of leadership in departments (elementary, secondary, or college) where English is taught. Each issue focuses on a different theme. Articles in Volume 24 Number 1 focus on matters of thinking and are: "A New Way of Thinking: Beginning…

  14. PTAGIS Annual Progress Report, 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission.

    2002-05-01

    This is the annual report for the PTAGIS project. February 28, 2002 marked the end of the 2001/02 PTAGIS fiscal year. All critical project activities progressed on schedule. However, a number of activities that have been traditionally performed by PTAGIS have been curtailed due to lack of resources. These reduced activities include production and distribution of the ''PTAGIS Newsletter'', development of a robust Web-based interface to PTAGIS data, curtailment efforts to upgrade critical database server hardware systems and processes and other activities. The main reasons for the lack of resources are: (1) In June, 2001, the region made a decision to expedite the installation of PIT tag detection at Bonneville and McNary dams. BPA issued contract 7422 to PSMFC to provide labor and material to install these systems. Nearly every PTAGIS resource was dedicated to this effort; (2) The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Northwest Power Planning Council and Bonneville Power Administration have not solicited project proposals and budgets for over two years. Project requirements (represented in increasing scope, scale and complexity) have increased, but funding has not.

  15. FY 2001-2002 Mission Resource Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, Columbia.

    This document describes the performance funding mission resource requirements for public institutions of higher education in South Carolina. It opens with sections of the state code, as amended in 1993, that define the annual budget requests of higher education institutions and outline the requirements for performance funding. The guiding…

  16. EDExpress Packaging Training, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Student Financial Assistance (ED), Washington, DC.

    Packaging is the process of finding the best combination of aid to meet a student's financial need for college, given limited resources and the institutional constraints that vary from school to school. This guide to packaging under the EDExpress software system outlines three steps to packaging. The first is determining the student's need for…

  17. Dengue fever, Hawaii, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    Effler, Paul V; Pang, Lorrin; Kitsutani, Paul; Vorndam, Vance; Nakata, Michele; Ayers, Tracy; Elm, Joe; Tom, Tammy; Reiter, Paul; Rigau-Perez, José G; Hayes, John M; Mills, Kristin; Napier, Mike; Clark, Gary G; Gubler, Duane J

    2005-05-01

    Autochthonous dengue infections were last reported in Hawaii in 1944. In September 2001, the Hawaii Department of Health was notified of an unusual febrile illness in a resident with no travel history; dengue fever was confirmed. During the investigation, 1,644 persons with locally acquired denguelike illness were evaluated, and 122 (7%) laboratory-positive dengue infections were identified; dengue virus serotype 1 was isolated from 15 patients. No cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome were reported. In 3 instances autochthonous infections were linked to a person who reported denguelike illness after travel to French Polynesia. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Hawaiian isolates were closely associated with contemporaneous isolates from Tahiti. Aedes albopictus was present in all communities surveyed on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and Kauai; no Ae. aegypti were found. This outbreak underscores the importance of maintaining surveillance and control of potential disease vectors even in the absence of an imminent disease threat. PMID:15890132

  18. Breakfast in America, 2001-2002

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to identify the demographic characteristics of American breakfast eaters, examine nutrient contributions of breakfast to the average U.S. diet, and identify top reported breakfast foods and beverages. Data were from individuals 2 years of age and older (n=9,033) from t...

  19. Nitric acid measurements at Eureka obtained in winter 2001-2002 using solar and lunar Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy: Comparisons with observations at Thule and Kiruna and with results from three-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Elham; Fast, H.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Makino, Y.; Strong, K.; McLandress, C.; Shepherd, T. G.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Hannigan, J. W.; Coffey, M. T.; Mikuteit, S.; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.; Raffalski, U.

    2007-01-01

    For the first time, vertical column measurements of nitric acid (HNO3) above Eureka (80.1°N, 86.4°W), Canada, have been made during polar night using lunar spectra recorded with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, from October 2001 to March 2002. This site is part of the primary Arctic station of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change. These measurements were compared with FTIR measurements at two other Arctic sites: Thule, Greenland (76.5°N, 68.8°W), and Kiruna, Sweden (67.8°N, 20.4°E). Eureka lunar measurements are in good agreement with solar ones made with the same instrument. Eureka and Thule HNO3 columns are consistent within measurement error. Differences between HNO3 columns at Kiruna and those at Eureka and Thule can be explained on the basis of available sunlight hours and location of the polar vortex. The measurements were also compared with results from a chemistry-climate model, the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM), and from a three-dimensional chemical transport model, SLIMCAT. This is the first time that CMAM HNO3 columns have been compared with observations in the Arctic. The comparison of CMAM HNO3 columns with Eureka and Kiruna data shows good agreement. The warm 2001-2002 winter with almost no polar stratospheric clouds makes the comparison with this version of CMAM, which has a known warm bias, a good test for CMAM under these conditions. SLIMCAT captures the magnitude of HNO3 columns at Eureka, and the day-to-day variability, but generally reports higher values than were measured at Thule and Kiruna.

  20. No evidence for large-scale outflows in the extended ionised halo of ULIRG Mrk273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, R. A. W.; Zaurín, J. Rodríguez; Tadhunter, C. N.; Rose, M.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Spoon, H.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present deep new GTC/OSIRIS narrow-band images and optical WHT/ISIS long-slit spectroscopy of the merging system Mrk273 that show a spectacular extended halo of warm ionised gas out to a radius of ˜45 kpc from the system nucleus. Outside of the immediate nuclear regions (r > 6 kpc), there is no evidence for kinematic disturbance in the ionised gas: in the extended regions covered by our spectroscopic slits the emission lines are relatively narrow (FWHM ≲ 350 kms^{-1}) and velocity shifts small (|ΔV| ≲250 kms^{-1}). This is despite the presence of powerful near-nuclear outflows (FWHM > 1000 kms^{-1}; |ΔV| > 400 kms^{-1}; r < 6 kpc). Diagnostic ratio plots are fully consistent with Seyfert 2 photo-ionisation to the NE of the nuclear region, however to the SW the plots are more consistent with low-velocity radiative shock models. The kinematics of the ionised gas, combined with the fact that the main structures are aligned with low-surface-brightness tidal continuum features, are consistent with the idea that the ionised halo represents tidal debris left over from a possible triple-merger event, rather than a reservoir of outflowing gas.

  1. Ionisation as indicator for cosmic ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuppan, F.; Röken, C.; Fedrau, N.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2014-06-01

    Astrospheres and wind bubbles of massive stars are believed to be sources of cosmic rays with energies E ≲ 1 TeV. These particles are not directly detectable, but their impact on surrounding matter, in particular ionisation of atomic and molecular hydrogen, can lead to observable signatures. A correlation study of both gamma ray emission, induced by proton-proton interactions of cosmic ray protons with kinetic energies Ep ≥ 280 MeV with ambient hydrogen, and ionisation induced by cosmic ray protons of kinetic energies Ep < 280 MeV can be performed in order to study potential sources of (sub)TeV cosmic rays.

  2. Changes in time-use and drug use by young adults in poor neighbourhoods of Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina, after the political transitions of 2001-2002: Results of a survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In some countries, "Big Events" like crises and transitions have been followed by large increases in drug use, drug injection and HIV/AIDS. Argentina experienced an economic crisis and political transition in 2001/2002 that affected how people use their time. This paper studies how time use changes between years 2001 and 2004, subsequent to these events, were associated with drug consumption in poor neighbourhoods of Greater Buenos Aires. Methods In 2003-2004, 68 current injecting drug users (IDUs) and 235 young non-IDUs, aged 21-35, who lived in impoverished drug-impacted neighbourhoods in Greater Buenos Aires, were asked about time use then and in 2001. Data on weekly hours spent working or looking for work, doing housework/childcare, consuming drugs, being with friends, and hanging out in the neighbourhood, were studied in relation to time spent using drugs. Field observations and focus groups were also conducted. Results After 2001, among both IDUs and non-IDUs, mean weekly time spent working declined significantly (especially among IDUs); time spent looking for work increased, and time spent with friends and hanging out in the neighbourhood decreased. We found no increase in injecting or non-injecting drug consumption after 2001. Subjects most affected by the way the crises led to decreased work time and/or to increased time looking for work--and by the associated increase in time spent in one's neighbourhood--were most likely to increase their time using drugs. Conclusions Time use methods are useful to study changes in drug use and their relationships to every day life activities. In these previously-drug-impacted neighbourhoods, the Argentinean crisis did not lead to an increase in drug use, which somewhat contradicts our initial expectations. Nevertheless, those for whom the crises led to decreased work time, increased time looking for work, and increased time spent in indoor or outdoor neighbourhood environments, were likely to spend more time

  3. EDDIX--a database of ionisation double differential cross sections.

    PubMed

    MacGibbon, J H; Emerson, S; Liamsuwan, T; Nikjoo, H

    2011-02-01

    The use of Monte Carlo track structure is a choice method in biophysical modelling and calculations. To precisely model 3D and 4D tracks, the cross section for the ionisation by an incoming ion, double differential in the outgoing electron energy and angle, is required. However, the double differential cross section cannot be theoretically modelled over the full range of parameters. To address this issue, a database of all available experimental data has been constructed. Currently, the database of Experimental Double Differential Ionisation Cross sections (EDDIX) contains over 1200 digitalised experimentally measured datasets from the 1960s to present date, covering all available ion species (hydrogen to uranium) and all available target species. Double differential cross sections are also presented with the aid of an eight parameter functions fitted to the cross sections. The parameters include projectile species and charge, target nuclear charge and atomic mass, projectile atomic mass and energy, electron energy and deflection angle. It is planned to freely distribute EDDIX and make it available to the radiation research community for use in the analytical and numerical modelling of track structure. PMID:21113060

  4. The ionisation energy of cyclopentadienone: a photoelectron-photoion coincidence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormond, Thomas K.; Hemberger, Patrick; Troy, Tyler P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Stanton, John F.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2015-08-01

    Imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence (iPEPICO) spectra of cyclopentadienone (C5H4=O and C5D4=O) have been measured at the Swiss Light Source Synchrotron (Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland) at the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Beamline. Complementary to the photoelectron spectra, photoionisation efficiency curves were measured with tunable VUV radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline at the Advanced Light Source Synchrotron (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA). For both experiments, molecular beams diluted in argon and helium were generated from the vacuum flash pyrolysis of o-phenylene sulphite in a resistively heated microtubular SiC flow reactor. The Franck-Condon profiles and ionisation energies were calculated at the CCSD(T) level of theory, and are in excellent agreement with the observed iPEPICO spectra. The ionisation energies of both cyclopentadienone-d0, IE(C5H4=O), and cyclopentadienone-d4, IE(C5D4=O), were observed to be the same: 9.41 ± 0.01 eV. The mass-selected threshold photoelectron spectrum (ms-TPES) of cyclopentadienone reveals that the C=C stretch in the ground state of the cation is excited upon ionisation, supporting computational evidence that the ground state of the cation is ? 2A2, and is in agreement with previous studies. However, the previously reported ionisation potential has been improved considerably in this work. In addition, since o-benzoquinone (o-O=C6H4=O and o-O=C6D4=O) is also produced in this process, its ms-TPES has been recorded. From the iPEPICO and photoionisation efficiency spectra, we infer an adiabatic ionisation energy of IE(o-O=C6H4=O) = 9.3 ± 0.1 eV, but the rather structureless spectrum indicates a strong change in geometry upon ionisation making this value less reliable.

  5. Cosmic ray induced ionisation of a molecular cloud shocked by the W28 supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupré, S.; Hily-Blant, P.; Ceccarelli, C.; Dubus, G.; Gabici, S.; Montmerle, T.

    2014-08-01

    Cosmic rays are an essential ingredient in the evolution of the interstellar medium, as they dominate the ionisation of the dense molecular gas, where stars and planets form. However, since they are efficiently scattered by the galactic magnetic fields, many questions remain open, such as where exactly they are accelerated, what is their original energy spectrum, and how they propagate into molecular clouds. In this work we present new observations and discuss in detail a method that allows us to measure the cosmic ray ionisation rate towards the molecular clouds close to the W28 supernova remnant. To perform these measurements, we use CO, HCO+, and DCO+ millimetre line observations and compare them with the predictions of radiative transfer and chemical models away from thermodynamical equilibrium. The CO observations allow us to constrain the density, temperature, and column density towards each observed position, while the DCO+/HCO+ abundance ratios provide us with constraints on the electron fraction and, consequently, on the cosmic ray ionisation rate. Towards positions located close to the supernova remnant, we find cosmic ray ionisation rates much larger (≳100) than those in standard galactic clouds. Conversely, towards one position situated at a larger distance, we derive a standard cosmic ray ionisation rate. Overall, these observations support the hypothesis that the γ rays observed in the region have a hadronic origin. In addition, based on CR diffusion estimates, we find that the ionisation of the gas is likely due to 0.1-1 GeV cosmic rays. Finally, these observations are also in agreement with the global picture of cosmic ray diffusion, in which the low-energy tail of the cosmic ray population diffuses at smaller distances than the high-energy counterpart.

  6. Nanodosimetry, from radiation physics to radiation biology.

    PubMed

    Grosswendt, B

    2005-01-01

    In view of the fact that early damage to genes and cells by ionising radiation starts with the early damage to segments of the DNA, it is a great challenge to radiation research to describe the general behaviour of ionising radiation in nanometric target volumes (nanodosimetry). After summarising basic aspects of nanodosimetry, an overview is given about its present state. As far as experimental procedures are concerned, main emphasis is laid on single-ion counting and single-electron counting methods, which use millimetric target volumes filled with a low-pressure gas to simulate nanometric target volumes at unit density. Afterwards, physical principles are discussed, which can be used to convert experimental ionisation cluster-size distributions into those caused by ionising radiation in liquid water. In the final section, possibilities are analysed of how to relate parameters derived from the probability of cluster-size formation in liquid water to parameters derived from radiobiological experiments. PMID:16381675

  7. Ayuda economica: Guia para estudiantes, 2001-2002 (Financial Aid: Student Guide, 2001-2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Student Financial Assistance (ED), Washington, DC.

    This guide, written in Spanish, describes federal student aid programs for postsecondary education and how to apply for them. It begins by outlining sources for learning about student aid, such as school financial aid administrators, state higher education agencies, foundations, organizations related to particular fields of interest and toll-free…

  8. The Indigenous World, 2001-2002 = El Mundo Indigena, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinding, Diana, Ed.; Wessendorff, Kathrin, Ed.; Parellada, Alejandro, Ed.; Erni, Christian, Ed.; Jensen, Marianne, Ed.; Garcia-Alix, Lola, Ed.

    This document contains the English and Spanish texts of an annual publication which examines political, social, environmental, and educational issues concerning indigenous peoples around the world in 2001-02. Part 1 describes current situations and events in 11 world regions: the Arctic; North America; Mexico and Central America; South America;…

  9. Gain Calculations for Inner-Shell Lasing by Electron Collisional Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upcraft, L. M.

    2002-11-01

    Current high power femtosecond lasers have been shown to produce electron pulses which may be appropriate for the pumping of X-Ray lasers through collisional ionisation. Non-radiative Coster-Kronig type decay processes may be fast enough to form an inverted state and allow X-ray lasing within the biologically interesting "water window". Calculations of the atomic processes in metallic Ti, Mn and Cu are presented that potentially useable gains on the M1 - L3 transition.

  10. Determination of structure parameters in molecular tunnelling ionisation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in a molecular tunnelling ionisation model (the so-called MO-ADK model) for 23 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behaviour are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model. We show that the orientation-dependent ionisation rate reflects the shape of the ionising orbitals in general. The influences of the Stark shifts of the energy levels on the orientation-dependent ionisation rates of the polar molecules are studied. We also examine the angle-dependent ionisation rates (or probabilities) based on the MO-ADK model by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation calculations and with recent experimental measurements.

  11. The nature of the ionised nebula surrounding the red supergiant W26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant W26 in the massive star cluster Westerlund 1 is surrounded by a compact ionised nebula. This is unique among RSGs, and the excitation mechanism of the nebula is not yet known - it may be ionised by an unseen compact companion, or by a nearby blue supergiant. We present new observations of the nebula: high resolution spatially resolved spectra taken with FLAMES at the VLT show that the nebula is a ring, with velocities consistent with that expected for red supergiant ejecta, and ruling out the possibility of a Luminous Blue Variable-type eruption preceding the RSG phase as the origin of the nebula. A triangular patch of nebulosity outside the ring appears to be associated with W26, and may be material stripped from the expanding ring by the cumulative cluster wind and radiation field.

  12. Theoretical investigation of the ultrafast dissociation of ionised biomolecules immersed in water: direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Gaigeot, M-P; Lopez-Tarifa, P; Martin, F; Alcami, M; Vuilleumier, R; Tavernelli, I; Hervé du Penhoat, M-A; Politis, M-F

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical simulations are particularly well suited to investigate, at a molecular level, direct and indirect effects of ionising radiations in DNA, as in the particular case of irradiation by swift heavy ions such as those used in hadron therapy. In the past recent years, we have developed the modeling at the microscopic level of the early stages of the Coulomb explosion of DNA molecules immersed in liquid water that follows the irradiation by swift heavy ions. To that end, Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory molecular dynamics simulations (TD-DFT MD) have been developed where localised Wannier orbitals are propagated. This latter enables to separate molecular orbitals of each water molecule from the molecular orbitals of the biomolecule. Our main objective is to demonstrate that the double ionisation of one molecule of the liquid sample, either one water molecule from the solvent or the biomolecule, may be in some cases responsible for the formation of an atomic oxygen as a direct consequence of the molecule Coulomb explosion. Our hypothesis is that the molecular double ionisation arising from irradiation by swift heavy ions (about 10% of ionisation events by ions whose velocity is about the third of speed of light), as a primary event, though maybe less probable than other events resulting from the electronic cascading (for instance, electronic excitations, electron attachments), may be systematically more damageable (and more lethal), as supported by experiments that have been carried out in our group in the 1990s (in studies of damages created by K holes in DNA). The chemical reactivity of the produced atomic oxygen with other radicals present in the medium will ultimately lead to chemical products that are harmful to DNA. In the present paper, we review our theoretical methodology in an attempt that the community be familiar with our new approach. Results on the production of atomic oxygen as a result of the double ionisation of water or as a result of

  13. Ionisation and discharge in cloud-forming atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helling, Ch; Rimmer, P. B.; Rodriguez-Barrera, I. M.; Wood, Kenneth; Robertson, G. B.; Stark, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Brown dwarfs and giant gas extrasolar planets have cold atmospheres with rich chemical compositions from which mineral cloud particles form. Their properties, like particle sizes and material composition, vary with height, and the mineral cloud particles are charged due to triboelectric processes in such dynamic atmospheres. The dynamics of the atmospheric gas is driven by the irradiating host star and/or by the rotation of the objects that changes during its lifetime. Thermal gas ionisation in these ultra-cool but dense atmospheres allows electrostatic interactions and magnetic coupling of a substantial atmosphere volume. Combined with a strong magnetic field \\gg {{B}\\text{Earth}} , a chromosphere and aurorae might form as suggested by radio and x-ray observations of brown dwarfs. Non-equilibrium processes like cosmic ray ionisation and discharge processes in clouds will increase the local pool of free electrons in the gas. Cosmic rays and lighting discharges also alter the composition of the local atmospheric gas such that tracer molecules might be identified. Cosmic rays affect the atmosphere through air showers in a certain volume which was modelled with a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to be able to visualise their spacial extent. Given a certain degree of thermal ionisation of the atmospheric gas, we suggest that electron attachment to charge mineral cloud particles is too inefficient to cause an electrostatic disruption of the cloud particles. Cloud particles will therefore not be destroyed by Coulomb explosion for the local temperature in the collisional dominated brown dwarf and giant gas planet atmospheres. However, the cloud particles are destroyed electrostatically in regions with strong gas ionisation. The potential size of such cloud holes would, however, be too small and might occur too far inside the cloud to mimic the effect of, e.g. magnetic field induced star spots.

  14. Single site double core level ionisation of OCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, L.; Tashiro, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ehara, M.; Ueda, K.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Feifel, R.

    2014-08-01

    Single site O1s, C1s and S2p double ionisation of the OCS molecule has been investigated using a magnetic bottle multi-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer. Photon energies of 1300, 750 and 520 eV, respectively, were used for the ionisation, and spectra were obtained from which the double core ionisation energies could be determined. The energies measured for 1s double ionisation are 1172 eV (O1s-2) and 659 eV (C1s-2). For the S2p double ionisation three dicationic states are expected, 3P, 1D and 1S. The ionisation energies obtained for these states are 373 eV (3P), 380 eV (1D) and 388 eV (1S). The ratio between the double and single core ionisation energies are in all cases equal or close to 2.20. Auger spectra of OCS, associated with the O1s-2, C1s-2 and S2p-2 dicationic states, were also recorded incorporating both electrons emitted as a result of the filling of the two core vacancies. As for other small molecules, the spectra show an atomic-like character with Auger bands located in the range 480-560 eV for oxygen, 235-295 eV for carbon and 100-160 eV for sulphur. The interpretation of the spectra is supported by CASSCF and CASCI calculations. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 3.7 × 10-4 for oxygen at 1300 eV, 3.7 × 10-4 for carbon at 750 eV and as 2.2 × 10-3 for sulphur at 520 eV.

  15. Improvements in extremity dose assessment for ionising radiation medical applications.

    PubMed

    Ginjaume, M; Pérez, S; Ortega, X

    2007-01-01

    This study aims at testing the INTE ring dosemeter based on MCP-Ns and TLD-100 detectors on users from the field of medical applications, namely radiopharmacists, personnel at a cyclotron facility with corresponding FDG synthesis cells, interventional radiology technologists and radiologists. These users were chosen due to the fact that they have a significantly high risk of exposure to their hands. Following previous results, MCP-Ns TL thin material was used for radiology measurements, whereas TLD-100 was preferred for other applications. The dosemeters were tested to make sure that they were waterproof and that they could be sterilised properly prior to use. Results confirm the need to implement finger dosimetry, mainly for interventional radiologists as finger dose can be >50 times higher than whole-body dose and 3 times higher than wrist dose. PMID:17277325

  16. Hand exposure to ionising radiation of nuclear medicine workers.

    PubMed

    Wrzesień, M; Olszewski, J; Jankowski, J

    2008-01-01

    The specific nature of work in nuclear medicine departments involves the use of isotopes and handling procedures, which contribute to the considerable value of an equivalent dose received, in particular, by the fingertips. Standard nuclear medicine department uses ring dosemeters placed usually at the base of the middle finger. The main aim of the study was to find out whether a relationship exists between the doses recorded by thermoluminescent detectors placed at various locations on the radiopharmacists' hands and the doses recorded by the ring detectors, and to determine the character of that relationship. The correction factor represents a correction value to be used to calculate the doses which might be received by locations on the hand from the dose recorded by the ring dosemeter. The dose recorded by the ring dosemeter is on the average five times lower than that received by the fingertips of thumb, index and middle fingers. PMID:18310609

  17. Cosmic-ray ionisation of dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupre, Solenn

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) are of tremendous importance in the dynamical and chemical evolution of interstellar molecular clouds, where stars and planets form. CRs are likely accelerated in the shells of supernova remnants (SNR), thus molecular clouds nearby can be irradiated by intense fluxes of CRs. CR protons have two major effects on dense molecular clouds: 1) when they encounter the dense medium, high-energy protons (>280 MeV) create pions that decay into gamma-rays. This process makes SNR-molecular cloud associations intense GeV and/or TeV sources whose spectra mimic the CR spectrum. 2) at lower energies, CRs penetrate the cloud and ionise the gas, leading to the formation of molecular species characteristic of the presence of CRs, called tracers of the ionisation. Studying these tracers gives information on low-energy CRs that are unaccessible to any other observations. I studied the CR ionisation of molecular clouds next to three SNRs: W28, W51C and W44. These SNRs are known to be interacting with the nearby clouds, from the presence of shocked gas, OH masers and pion-decay induced gamma-ray emission. My work includes millimeter observations and chemical modeling of tracers of the ionisation in these dense molecular clouds. In these three regions, we determined an enhanced CR ionisation rate, supporting the hypothesis of an origin of the CRs in the SNR nearby. The evolution of the CR ionisation rate with the distance to the SNR brings valuable constraints on the propagation properties of low-energy CRs. The method used relies on observations of the molecular ions HCO+ and DCO+, which shows crucial limitations at high ionisation. Therefore, I investigated, both through modeling and observations, the chemical abundances of several other species to try and identity alternative tracers of the ionisation. In particular, in the W44 region, observations of N2H+ bring additional constraints on the physical conditions, volatile abundances in the cloud, and the ionisation

  18. Skin dose measurements using radiochromic films, TLDS and ionisation chamber and comparison with Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Alashrah, Saleh; Kandaiya, Sivamany; Maalej, Nabil; El-Taher, A

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the surface dose is very important for patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose at the surface of a water phantom at a depth of 0.007 cm as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement with radiochromic films (RFs), thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionisation chamber in a 6-MV photon beam. The results were compared with the theoretical calculation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software (MCNP5, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc). The RF was calibrated by placing the films at a depth of maximum dose (d(max)) in a solid water phantom and exposing it to doses from 0 to 500 cGy. The films were scanned using a transmission high-resolution HP scanner. The optical density of the film was obtained from the red component of the RGB images using ImageJ software. The per cent surface dose (PSD) and percentage depth dose (PDD) curve were obtained by placing film pieces at the surface and at different depths in the solid water phantom. TLDs were placed at a depth of 10 cm in a solid water phantom for calibration. Then the TLDs were placed at different depths in the water phantom and were exposed to obtain the PDD. The obtained PSD and PDD values were compared with those obtained using a cylindrical ionisation chamber. The PSD was also determined using Monte Carlo simulation of a LINAC 6-MV photon beam. The extrapolation method was used to determine the PSD for all measurements. The PSD was 15.0±3.6% for RF. The TLD measurement of the PSD was 16.0±5.0%. The (0.6 cm(3)) cylindrical ionisation chamber measurement of the PSD was 50.0±3.0%. The theoretical calculation using MCNP5 and DOSXYZnrc yielded a PSD of 15.0±2.0% and 15.7±2.2%. In this study, good agreement between PSD measurements was observed using RF and TLDs with the Monte Carlo calculation. However, the cylindrical chamber measurement yielded an overestimate of the PSD

  19. The effectiveness of photocatalytic ionisation disinfection of filter materials.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Katarzyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of photocatalytic ionisation as a disinfection method for filter materials contaminated by microorganisms, and to assess how air relative humidity (RH), time and microbe type influence the effectiveness of this disinfection. In the quantitative analysis of a used car air filter, bacterial contamination equalled 1.2 x 10(5) cfu/cm2, fungal contamination was 3.8 x 10(6) cfu/cm2, and the isolated microorganisms were Aspergillus niger, Bacillus megaterium, Cladosporium herbarum, Cryptococcus laurenti, Micrococcus sp., Rhodotorula glutinis and Staphylococcus cohnii. In the model experiment, three isolates (C. herbarum, R. glutinis, S. cohnii) and 3 ATCC species (A. niger, E. coli, S. aureus) were used for photocatalytic ionisation disinfection. The conditions of effective photocatalytic ionisation disinfection (R > or = 99.9%) were established as 2-3 h at RH = 77% (bacteria) and 6-24 h at RH = 53% (fungi). RH has an influence on the effectiveness of the photocatalytic disinfection process; the highest effectiveness was obtained for bacteria at RH = 77%, with results 5% higher than for RH = 49%. The studies show that the sensitivity of microorganisms to photocatalytic ionisation disinfection is ordered as follows: Gram-positive bacteria (S. cohnii, S. aureus), Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli), yeasts (R. glutinis), and moulds (C. herbarum, A. niger). Of all the mathematical models used for the description of death dynamics after photocatalytic ionisation disinfection, the Chick-Watson model is the most useful, but for more resistant microorganisms, the delayed Chick-Watson model is highly recommended. It therefore seems, that the presented disinfection method of photocatalytic ionisation can be successfully used to clean filtration materials. PMID:24053016

  20. Development of a RILIS ionisation scheme for gold at ISOLDE, CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. A.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Kosuri, P.

    2006-07-01

    At the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility, the resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) can be used to ionise reaction products as they effuse from the target. The RILIS process of laser step-wise resonance ionisation of atoms in a hot metal cavity provides a highly element selective stage in the preparation of the radioactive ion beam. As a result, the ISOLDE mass separators can provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. With the addition of a new three-step ionisation scheme for gold, the RILIS is now capable of ionising 26 of the elements. The optimal scheme was determined during an extensive study of the atomic energy levels and auto-ionising states of gold, carried out by means of in-source resonance ionisation spectroscopy. Details of the ionisation scheme and a summary of the spectroscopy study are presented.

  1. Development of a RILIS ionisation scheme for gold at ISOLDE, CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. A.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Kosuri, P.

    At the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility, the resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) can be used to ionise reaction products as they effuse from the target. The RILIS process of laser step-wise resonance ionisation of atoms in a hot metal cavity provides a highly element selective stage in the preparation of the radioactive ion beam. As a result, the ISOLDE mass separators can provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. With the addition of a new three-step ionisation scheme for gold, the RILIS is now capable of ionising 26 of the elements. The optimal scheme was determined during an extensive study of the atomic energy levels and auto-ionising states of gold, carried out by means of in-source resonance ionisation spectroscopy. Details of the ionisation scheme and a summary of the spectroscopy study are presented.

  2. Analysis of intact bacteria using rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Jones, Emrys A; Veselkov, Kirill A; Rebec, Monica; Bundy, Jacob G; Takats, Zoltan

    2013-07-14

    An identification system for microorganisms based on recently developed rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry (REIMS) is presented. Nine bacterial species cultured on various growth media were correctly identified to family-, genus-, and species-level based on their different mass spectral fingerprints using a cross-validated maximum margin criterion model. PMID:23736664

  3. Western Iowa Tech Community College Fact Book 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Iowa Tech, Sioux City.

    Western Iowa Tech Community College (WITCC) is a publicly supported comprehensive college serving the Iowa counties of Cherokee, Crawford, Ida, Monona, Plymouth, and Woodbury, which have a combined population of about 170,000. This fact book presents statistics, such as the following: (1) 7,113 WITCC students earned over 89,311 credit hours during…

  4. Research Funding at Alberta Universities. 2001/2002 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Innovation and Science, Edmonton. University Research and Strategic Investments Branch.

    This report summarizes sponsored research revenues at Alberta Universities. Sponsored research revenues are those that are received outside of regular university operating grant and include both research grants and research contracts. Research at Alberta universities is supported in part by the provincial government through a number of programs.…

  5. Project Achieve Evaluation Report: Year One, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speas, Carol

    This report is an evaluation of the pilot year of Project Achieve, a major local instructional initiative at six elementary schools and two middle schools in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS), North Carolina, that was designed to help reach the WCPSS goal of 95% of students at or above grade level. Participating schools had a higher…

  6. Implementing Career Academies Schoolwide: 2001-2002 Developments, Promising Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, David; Dayton, Charles; Lenz, Robert; Tidyman, Susan

    This document, which is based on the findings of case studies of how four high schools from across the country have successfully implemented the schoolwide career academy model, presents recent developments and best practices in schoolwide career academies. The document consists of a brief introduction describing the case studies and one chapter…

  7. JASON XIII: Frozen Worlds (2001-2002). Teacher Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JASON Foundation for Education, Needham Heights, MA.

    This teacher's guide and accompanying videotape present the JASON Project. The guide features a workbook format using an interdisciplinary approach to include geography, climate, biology, history, geology, culture, and literature. The JASON Project targets grades 4-9 and involves real life science with the inquiry approach and multimedia…

  8. Student Aid Audio Guide, 2001-2002. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Student Financial Assistance.

    This CD-ROM contains a simulated conversation between a counselor at the Department of Education's Federal Student Aid Information Center and a student inquiring about financial assistance. Following an introductory track providing contents information, each track contains a section answering a different question about federal student loans. The…

  9. District Mathematics Plan Evaluation: 2001-2002 Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ai, Xiaoxia

    An evaluation was conducted to examine the extent to which the District Mathematics Plan (DMP) initiatives of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), California, such as adopting standards-based textbooks and professional development opportunities, have led to improvement in classroom practices and student outcomes. The evaluation…

  10. Yakima Side Channels : Progress Report for 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolai, Scott

    2003-03-01

    The project objectives include habitat protection and restoration in the most productive reaches of the Yakima Subbasin. The geographic focus includes four reaches in the Yakima, and one in the lower Naches. These areas were identified through studies conducted by WDFW, Yakama Nation, Central Washington University and University of Montana. Research on fish populations and densities, water quality, hyporheic and benthic macro invertebrates suggests that the geographic priorities the most important areas for fish production. Physical characteristics include broad floodplains with multiple channels that flow through extensive riparian/wetland complexes. Geologic characteristics are similar among the reaches, in that they all lie upstream of a ridge that acts to delimit groundwater flow down the stream gradient. Groundwater reemerges in the channel, charging the stream with nutrient-rich and thermally stable water. Many areas have lost key habitat features through various human actions. However strongholds of productivity remain, and in many cases restoration can be undertaken to reconnect the features that made these areas productive. Active habitat restoration actions include reconnecting structurally diverse alcoves and side channels, introducing large woody debris, fencing and revegetation of riparian areas. Priority reaches include Easton, Ellensburg, Selah, Union Gap and on the Naches, the Gleed reach.

  11. South Carolina State Library Annual Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Library, Columbia.

    The current strategic plan of the South Carolina State Library contains five goals: provide information resources and services to meet the needs of the people of South Carolina; provide statewide programs to support local library services; serve as the advocate for libraries in South Carolina; encourage cooperation among libraries of all types;…

  12. The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixson, Adalyn, Ed.

    This document consists of all 25 issues of Volume 12 of "The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education," a biweekly journal that addresses issues in higher education for Hispanic Americans. Each issue contains several feature articles, a policy update column called "Outlook on Washington," a description of an exemplary program, and a sample student…

  13. New Jersey Journal of Professional Counseling, 2001/2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westburg, Nancy G., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This journal volume focuses on three areas: technology and the appropriate use of the internet for support groups; diversity issues that affect clients and counselors-in-training; and the clinical issues section that provides an integrated view of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and an overview of Dissociative Identity Disorder. It…

  14. Academics 2000: Cycle VIII Evaluation Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huskey, Barton

    This report presents evaluation findings regarding the implementation and effectiveness of the Academics 2000, Cycle VIII grant in the Austin Independent School District (AISD), Texas. The purpose of Academics 2000 was to raise the level of academic achievement of all Texas students by ensuring that each child achieves early mastery of the…

  15. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    Parents are vital partners in the educational system. This handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 8 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Junior High Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to demonstrate upon completion…

  16. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    Parents are vital partners in the educational system. This handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 7 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Junior High Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to demonstrate upon completion…

  17. NovaNet Student Outcomes, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Kristin; Baenen, Nancy

    NovaNet is an individualized, computer-based instruction program that is used in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS), North Carolina, for high school course credit, remediation, and enrichment. NovaNet was first used in WCPSS in 1996, and in 1999 WCPSS received a 3-year federal grant to expand the use of NovaNET to all high schools. In…

  18. The University School Enaction Curriculum, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Patricia L., Ed.

    This document presents the curriculum of the University School at the University of Tulsa (Oklahoma), an early childhood and elementary school for academically gifted students. The curriculum is based on enaction theory, which emphasizes active, interdisciplinary learning involving three steps: (1) concept introduction through active and…

  19. American Dental Education Association Annual Proceedings, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Reports activities of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) from the end of the 2001 Annual Session and Exposition (March 9, 2001) through the 2002 Annual Session and Exposition (March 7, 2002). Consists of: president's annual report, president-elect's address, executive director's report, proceedings of the 2002 House of Delegates,…

  20. Fifth Annual Report on School Performance, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edison Project, New York, NY.

    This report provides a consolidated public record of the performance of Edison-run schools. Edison agrees to provide annually to each local partner comprehensive information about the operation and outcomes of its local partnership schools. Edison is also required by charter-school laws to report on its partnership schools. This report includes…

  1. Forrest Ranch Acquisition, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Brent

    2003-08-01

    Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The contract period was the first year of the program with December 2001 through July 2nd 2002 being previous to acquisition of the property. The majority of the activities conducted under the contract period were spent on O&M and pre acquisition activities.

  2. Placement Criteria for Academic Year 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL. Office of Institutional Research.

    This report states that since July 1995, the State of Florida has required each public college and university to obtain scores on one of the following test batteries for degree-seeking students prior to registration: Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT), American College Testing (ACT), or the Florida College Entry-Level Placement Test (CPT). A…

  3. Graduate Assessment Survey Report Summary, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL. Office of Institutional Research and Planning.

    This 2001-02 report from Santa Fe Community College (SFCC), Florida, rates student perceptions and opinions of SFCCs classrooms, courses, instructors, academic resources, student services, overall college atmosphere, and cultural atmosphere. Results of the research include the following: (1) of the 2,499 students who responded, 2,229 (89.2%) rated…

  4. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

  5. WDS Annual Report to the General Assembly, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Community Coll. System, Richmond.

    This document discusses the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) and how it has become the lead agency in workforce development for Virginia as well as advancing Virginia's workforce through non-credit training, retaining courses and programs to meet the needs of business and industry. This document contains a summary of activities and…

  6. High-Demand Enrollment Reports, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    This document provides an overview of issues pertaining to high-demand enrollments and summarizes the reports public colleges and universities in Washington state submitted about how they used new enrollments to respond to high demand program needs. Each institution is required to report annually on their responses to high-demand program needs.…

  7. Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Barry

    2003-06-09

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the interconnected Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of potential mitigation strategies. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-6.

  8. High ionisation absorption in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; De, K.; Fender, R.; Merloni, A.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.

  9. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  10. Ionisation of a quantum dot by electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P A; Gordeeva, S V

    2012-08-31

    We have derived analytical formulas for differential and total ionisation probabilities of a two-dimensional quantum dot by a constant electric field. In the adiabatic approximation, we have calculated the probability of this process in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave and in a superposition of constant and alternating electric fields. The imaginary-time method is used to obtain the momentum distribution of the ionisation probability of a bound system by an intense field generated by a superposition of parallel constant and alternating electric fields. The total probability of the process per unit time is calculated with exponential accuracy. The dependence of the results obtained on the characteristic parameters of the problem is investigated. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  11. Wedge Absorber Design for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.; Snopok, P.; Coney, L.; Jansson, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    In the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE), muons are cooled by ionisation cooling. Muons are passed through material, reducing the total momentum of the beam. This results in a decrease in transverse emittance and a slight increase in longitudinal emittance, but overall reduction of 6d beam emittance. In emittance exchange, a dispersive beam is passed through wedge-shaped absorbers. Muons with higher energy pass through more material, resulting in a reduction in longitudinal emittance as well as transverse emittance. We consider the cooling performance of different wedge materials and geometries and propose a set of measurements that would be made in MICE.We outline the resources these measurements would require and detail some constraints that guide the choice of wedge parameters.

  12. Erich Regener and the ionisation maximum of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, P.; Watson, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the 1930s the German physicist Erich Regener (1881-1955) did important work on the measurement of the rate of production of ionisation deep under water and in the atmosphere. Along with one of his students, Georg Pfotzer, he discovered the altitude at which the production of ionisation in the atmosphere reaches a maximum, often, but misleadingly, called the Pfotzer maximum. Regener was one of the first to estimate the energy density of cosmic rays, an estimate that was used by Baade and Zwicky to bolster their postulate that supernovae might be their source. Yet Regener's name is less recognised by present-day cosmic ray physicists than it should be, largely because in 1937 he was forced to take early retirement by the National Socialists as his wife had Jewish ancestors. In this paper we briefly review his work on cosmic rays and recommend an alternative naming of the ionisation maximum. The influence that Regener had on the field through his son, his son-in-law, his grandsons and his students, and through his links with Rutherford's group in Cambridge, is discussed in an appendix. Regener was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physics by Schrödinger in 1938. He died in 1955 at the age of 73.

  13. Electron impact ionisation cross sections for atomic and molecular allotropes of phosphorous and arsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhutadia, Harshad; Chaudhari, Ashok; Vinodkumar, Minaxi

    2015-12-01

    We report electron impact total ionisation cross sections for phosphorous (P), arsenic (As), diphosphorous (P2), diarsenic (As2), tetra phosphorous (P4) and tetra arsenic (As4) from the threshold of the target to 2000 eV. We employed spherical complex optical potential to compute total inelastic cross sections (Qinel). The total ionisation cross section is extracted from the total inelastic cross section using the complex scattering potential-ionisation contribution method. The results of most of the targets studied here compare well with the measurements and the theoretical data wherever available. The correlation between the peak of ionisation cross sections with the number of target electrons and polarisability is also reported. It is observed that the maximum ionisation cross sections depend linearly on the number of target electrons and polarisability of the target. This linear correlation is used to predict the maximum ionisation cross sections for the targets (I2, HI and PF3) where no experimental data are available.

  14. NICIL: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James

    2016-08-01

    NICIL (Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library) calculates the ionization values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Written as a standalone Fortran90 module that can be implemented in existing codes, NICIL is fully parameterizable, allowing the user to choose which processes to include and decide the values of the free parameters. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionization; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionized.

  15. Threshold law for positron-atom impact ionisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.

    1982-01-01

    The threshold law for ionisation of atoms by positron impact is adduced in analogy with our approach to the electron-atom ionization. It is concluded the Coulomb-dipole region of the potential gives the essential part of the interaction in both cases and leads to the same kind of result: a modulated linear law. An additional process which enters positron ionization is positronium formation in the continuum, but that will not dominate the threshold yield. The result is in sharp contrast to the positron threshold law as recently derived by Klar on the basis of a Wannier-type analysis.

  16. Photoionisation of ions with synchrotron radiation: from ions in space to atoms in cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, Stefan; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Phaneuf, Ronald A.; Müller, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    The photon-ion merged-beams technique for the photoionisation of mass/charge selected ionised atoms, molecules and clusters by x-rays from synchrotron radiation sources is introduced. Examples for photoionisation of atomic ions are discussed by going from outer shell ionisation of simple few electron systems to inner shell ionisation of complex many electron ions. Fundamental ionisation mechanisms are elucidated and the importance of the results for applications in astrophysics and plasma physics is pointed out. Finally, the unique capabilities of the photon-ion merged-beams technique for the study of photoabsorption by nanoparticles are demonstrated by the example of endohedral fullerene ions.

  17. Nanodosimetry, the metrological tool for connecting radiation physics with radiation biology.

    PubMed

    Grosswendt, B

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the early damage to genes or cells by ionising radiation starts with the early damage to segments of the DNA, at least, to the greater part. This damage is the result of the spatial distribution of inelastic interactions of single ionising particles within the DNA or in its neighbourhood and is, in consequence, determined by the stochastics of particle interactions in volumes a few nanometre in size. Due to the latter fact radiation damage strongly depends on radiation quality and cannot be described satisfactorily in detail by macroscopic quantities like absorbed dose or linear energy transfer (LET). It can, however, be described approximately by the probability distribution of ionisation cluster-size formation in nanometric target volumes of liquid water (nanodosimetry). One aim of nanodosimetry is, therefore, to measure the radiation induced frequency distribution of ionisation cluster-size formation in liquid water, as a substitute for sub-cellular material, in volumes which are comparable in size with those of the most probable radio-sensitive volumes of biological systems. After a short description of the main aspects of cluster-size formation by ionising particles, an overview is given about the measuring principles applied in present-day nanodosimetric measurements. Afterwards, physical principles are discussed which can be used to convert ionisation cluster-size distributions measured in gases into those caused by ionising radiation in liquid water. In a final section, the probability distribution of ionisation cluster-size formation in liquid water is discussed from the point of view of damage formation to segments of the DNA. PMID:17169948

  18. Les neuropeptides gastro-intestinaux cibles des effets des rayonnements ionisants : altérations fonctionnelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linard, C.; Esposito, V.; Wysocki, J.; Griffiths, N. M.

    1998-04-01

    The symptoms associated with exposure to ionizing radiation are nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea. The response of the gut is complex involving modifications of motility and fluid and electrolyte transport. Gastrointestinal regulatory peptides have an important role in these functions. This study showed that radiation-induced tissue variations of neuropeptides have some repercussions on intestinal biological activity of these peptides soon after irradiation. In addition such modifications are also seen a few years after irradiation. Les symptômes associés à l'exposition aux rayonnements ionisants sont des nausées, vomissements et diarrhées. La réponse du système digestif est complexe, impliquant des modifications de la motilité et du transport d'eau et d'électrolytes. les neuropeptides gastro-intestinaux ont un rôle important dans ces fonctions. Cette étude montre que les variations tissulaires de ces neuropeptides induites par l'irradiation ont des répercussions sur l'activité biologique intestinale pour des temps précoces mais que ces perturbations sont encore visibles quelques années après l'irradiation.

  19. Sensitivity of LHC experiments to exotic highly ionising particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roeck, A.; Katre, A.; Mermod, P.; Milstead, D.; Sloan, T.

    2012-04-01

    The experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are able to discover or set limits on the production of exotic particles with TeV-scale masses possessing values of electric and/or magnetic charge such that they behave as highly ionising particles (HIPs). In this paper the sensitivity of the LHC experiments to HIP production is discussed in detail. It is shown that a number of different detection methods are required to investigate as fully as possible the charge-mass range. These include direct detection as the HIPs pass through either passive or active detectors and, in the case of magnetically charged objects, the so-called induction method with which magnetic monopoles which stop in accelerator and detector material could be observed. The benefit of using complementary approaches to HIP detection is discussed.

  20. Ionisation effect on the electron localisation in the subcycle waveform shaping scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Feng, Zhengpeng; Long, Hua

    2015-03-01

    We have theoretically studied the ionisation effect on the asymmetric dissociation of H+2 exposed to the synthesised multicycle infrared pulses of different wavelengths by solving the time-dependent Schr?dinger equation without using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. It has been demonstrated that the ionisation does slightly influence the electron localisation for the relatively low pulse intensity (less than 1014 W/cm2). However, our further results show that the ionisation effect becomes much more significant when increasing the pulse intensity, leading to a distinctly different mechanism responsible for the enhancement of the electron localisation.

  1. Photo-ionisation mass spectrometry as detection method for gas chromatography. Optical selectivity and multidimensional comprehensive separations.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Welthagen, Werner; Gröger, Thomas

    2008-03-14

    Mass spectrometry (MS) with soft ionisation techniques (i.e. ionisation without fragmentation of the analyte molecules) for gaseous samples exhibits interesting analytical properties for direct analysis applications (i.e. direct inlet mass spectrometric on-line monitoring) as well as mass spectrometric detection method for gas chromatography (GC-MS). Commonly either chemical ionisation (CI) or field ionisation (FI) is applied as soft ionisation technology for GC-MS. An interesting alternative to the CI and FI technologies methods are photo-ionisation (PI) methods. PI overcomes some of the limitations of CI and FI and furthermore add some unique analytical properties. The resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) method uses intense UV-laser pulses (wavelength range approximately 350-193 nm) for highly selective, sensitive and soft ionisation of predominately aromatic compounds. The single photon ionisation (SPI) method utilises VUV light (from lamps or laser sources, wavelengths range approximately 150-110 nm) can be used for a universal soft ionisation of organic molecules. In this article the historical development as well as the current status and concepts of gas chromatography hyphenated to photo-ionisation mass spectrometry are reviewed. PMID:17915237

  2. Investigating the degradation of the sympathomimetic drug phenylephrine by electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trommer, Hagen; Raith, Klaus; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2010-06-01

    The frequently used sympathomimetic drug phenylephrine has been studied by electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry. The stability of the adrenoceptor agonist was examined by investigations of the pharmaceutically used salts phenylephrine hydrochloride and phenylephrine bitartrate. Photostability has been studied by use of an irradiation equipment emitting a solar radiation spectrum. The experiments were carried out by analysis of aqueous drug solutions before and after irradiation treatment. The phenylephrine derivative with unsaturated side chain originating from the drug by loss of one water molecule has been detected as the major degradation product of both phenylephrine salts the hydrochloride and the bitartrate. Further degradation and oxidation products were detectable already in the full scan mode demonstrating a low stability of the drug. Tandem mass spectrometry and multiple stage mass spectrometry experiments enabled the establishment of fragmentation schemes of both salts for the first time. Irradiation treatment indicated that phenylephrine bitartrate is more prone to degradation than the hydrochloride because of an additional decomposition sensitivity of the tartaric acid counter ion. An interaction between phenylephrine and its counter ion degradation products via a nucleophilic addition mechanism is suggested to be the explanation for the detected ion signals after irradiation treatment of phenylephrine bitartrate. PMID:20122809

  3. A gas ionisation Direct-STIM detector for MeV ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norarat, Rattanaporn; Guibert, Edouard; Jeanneret, Patrick; Dellea, Mario; Jenni, Josef; Roux, Adrien; Stoppini, Luc; Whitlow, Harry J.

    2015-04-01

    Direct-Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (Direct-STIM) is a powerful technique that yields structural information in sub-cellular whole cell imaging. Usually, a Si p-i-n diode is used in Direct-STIM measurements as a detector. In order to overcome the detrimental effects of radiation damage which appears as a broadening in the energy resolution, we have developed a gas ionisation detector for use with a focused ion beam. The design is based on the ETH Frisch grid-less off-axis Geiger-Müller geometry. It is developed for use in a MeV ion microscope with a standard Oxford Microbeams triplet lens and scanning system. The design has a large available solid angle for other detectors (e.g. proton induced fluorescence). Here we report the performance for imaging ReNcells VM with μm resolution where energy resolutions of <24 keV fwhm could be achieved for 1 MeV protons using isobutane gas.

  4. Secondary ionisations in a wall-less ion-counting nanodosimeter: quantitative analysis and the effect on the comparison of measured and simulated track structure parameters in nanometric volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgers, Gerhard; Bug, Marion U.; Gargioni, Elisabetta; Rabus, Hans

    2015-10-01

    The object of investigation in nanodosimetry is the physical characteristics of the microscopic structure of ionising particle tracks, i.e. the sequence of the interaction types and interaction sites of a primary particle and all its secondaries, which reflects the stochastic nature of the radiation interaction. In view of the upcoming radiation therapy with protons and carbon ions, the ionisation structure of the ion track is of particular interest. Owing to limitations in current detector technology, the only way to determine the ionisation cluster size distribution in a DNA segment is to simulate the particle track structure in condensed matter. This is done using dedicated computer programs based on Monte Carlo procedures simulating the interaction of the primary ions with the target. Hence, there is a need to benchmark these computer codes using suitable experimental data. Ionisation cluster size distributions produced in the nanodosimeter's sensitive volume by monoenergetic protons and alpha particles (with energies between 0.1 MeV and 20 MeV) were measured at the PTB ion accelerator facilities. C3H8 and N2 were alternately used as the working gas. The measured data were compared with the simulation results obtained with the PTB Monte-Carlo code PTra [B. Grosswendt, Radiat. Environ. Biophys. 41, 103 (2002); M.U. Bug, E. Gargioni, H. Nettelbeck, W.Y. Baek, G. Hilgers, A.B. Rosenfeld, H. Rabus, Phys. Rev. E 88, 043308 (2013)]. Measured and simulated characteristics of the particle track structure are generally in good agreement for protons over the entire energy range investigated. For alpha particles with energies higher than the Bragg peak energy, a good agreement can also be seen, whereas for energies lower than the Bragg peak energy differences of as much as 25% occur. Significant deviations are only observed for large ionisation cluster sizes. These deviations can be explained by a background consisting of secondary ions. These ions are produced in the

  5. Spectroscopy of acetylene Rydberg states studied by VUV absorption and (3+1)-Resonantly Enhanced Multiphoton Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyé, Séverine; Campos, Andrea; Fillion, Jean-Hugues; Douin, Stéphane; Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Gauyacq, Dolores

    2004-03-01

    The ungerade ns+ nd Rydberg states of C 2H 2 converging to the ground state of the C 2H 2+ cation have been investigated in the energy range 74 000- 88 000 cm-1 by (3+1)-multiphoton ionisation (REMPI) and by VUV absorption spectroscopy at the Super-ACO synchrotron radiation facility. Both methods have allowed the selective analysis of the Rydberg transitions with rotational resolution. Mulliken's semi-united atom model, in which predissociation has been taken into account, was used to understand the relative three-photon intensities among the different electronic transitions within the same Rydberg supercomplex. Lifetimes have been evaluated and illustrate very different behaviours towards predissociation for the observed Rydberg states. To cite this article: S. Boyé et al., C. R. Physique 5 (2004).

  6. Ionisation Chambers and Secondary Emission Monitors at the PROSCAN Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, Rudolf

    2006-11-20

    PROSCAN, the dedicated new medical facility at PSI using proton beams for the treatment of deep seated tumours and eye melanoma, is now in the commissioning phase. Air filled ionisation chambers in several configurations are used as current monitors, profile monitors, halo, position and loss monitors at the PROSCAN beam lines. Similar monitors based on secondary emission are used for profile and current measurements in the regime where saturation deteriorates the accuracy of the ionisation chambers.

  7. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  8. Current state of radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikaev, Alexei K.

    1995-06-01

    A review of common trends in the development of modern radiation processing is presented. The sources of ionising radiation and the most important processes practically induced under the influence of this radiation are discussed. It is shown that radiation methods can be used successfully for the modification of materials, for the sterilisation of medical articles, for the solution of ecological problems, for treatment of food products, in radiation engineering, etc. Special attention is paid to processes at the pilot plant and industrial scales. The bibliography includes 548 references.

  9. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal low temperature plasmas are widely used for technological applications. Increased demands on plasma technology have resulted in the development of various discharge concepts based on different power coupling mechanisms. Despite this, power dissipation mechanisms in these discharges are not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are low pressure radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The limited understanding of these discharges is predominantly due to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and difficult diagnostic access to important parameters. Optical measurements are a powerful diagnostic tool offering high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides non-intrusive access, to the physics of the plasma, with comparatively simple experimental requirements. Improved advances in technology and modern diagnostics now allow deeper insight into fundamental mechanisms. In low pressure rf discharges insight into the electron dynamics within the rf cycle can yield vital information. This requires high temporal resolution on a nano-second time scale. The optical emission from rf discharges exhibits temporal variations within the rf cycle. These variations are particularly strong, in for example capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), but also easily observable in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), and can be exploited for insight into power dissipation. Interesting kinetic and non-linear coupling effects are revealed in capacitive systems. The electron dynamics exhibits a complex spatio-temporal structure. Excitation and ionisation, and, therefore, plasma sustainment is dominated through directed energetic electrons created through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. In the relatively simple case of an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf plasma the complexity of the power dissipation is exposed and various mode transitions can be clearly observed and investigated. At higher pressure secondary electrons dominate the

  10. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  11. A VLT VIMOS IFU study of the ionisation nebula surrounding the supersoft X-ray source CAL 83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruyters, P.; Exter, K.; Roberts, T. P.; Rappaport, S.

    2012-08-01

    Context. CAL 83 is a prototype of the class of Super Soft X-ray Sources (SXS). It is a binary consisting of a low mass secondary that is transferring mass onto a white dwarf primary and is the only known SXS surrounded by an ionisation nebula, made up of the interstellar medium (ISM) ionised by the source itself. We study this nebula using integral field spectroscopy. Aims: The study of ionised material can inform us about the source that is responsible for the ionisation, in a way that is complementary to studying the source directly. Since CAL 83 is the only SXS known with an ionisation nebula, we have an opportunity to see if such studies are as useful for SXSs as they have been for other X-ray ionised nebulae. We can use these data to compare to models of how CAL 83 should ionise its surroundings, based on what we know about the source emission spectrum and the physical conditions of the surrounding ISM. Methods: With the VIMOS integral field spectrograph we obtained spectra over a 25 × 25'' field of view, encompassing one quarter of the nebula. Emission line maps - H i, He II λ4686, [OIII] λλ4959,5007, [NII] λλ6548,5683, and [SII] λλ6716,6731 - are produced in order to study the morphology of the ionised gas. We include CAL 83 on diagrams of various diagnostic ion ratios to compare it to other X-ray ionised sources. Finally we computed some simple models of the ionised gas around CAL 83 and compare the predicted to the observed spectra. Results: CAL 83 appears to have a fairly standard ionisation nebula as far as the morphology goes: the edges where H is recombining are strong in the low stage ionisation lines and the central, clumpy regions are stronger in the higher stage ionisation lines. But the He ii emission is unusual in being confined to one side of CAL 83 rather than being homogeneously distributed as with the other ions. We model the CAL 83 nebula with cloudy using model parameters for SXSs found in the literature. The He ii emission does not

  12. Development of a new ionisation chamber, for HP(10) measurement, using Monte-Carlo simulation and experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Silva, H; Cardoso, J; Oliveira, C

    2011-03-01

    An ionisation chamber that directly measures the quantity personal dose equivalent, H(p)(10), is used as a secondary standard in some metrology laboratories. An ionisation chamber of this type was first developed by Ankerhold. Using the Monte-Carlo simulation, the dose in the sensitive volume as a function of the IC dimensions and the effects of the several components of the ionising chamber have been investigated. Based on these results, a new ionising chamber, lighter than the previous ones, is constructed and experimentally tested. PMID:21208934

  13. Radiographer Delivered Fluoroscopy Reduces Radiation Exposure During Endoscopic Urological Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hennessey, DB; Young, M; Pahuja, A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The 1999 Ionising Radiation Regulations recommend that medical professionals using ionising radiation should aim to keep exposure as ‘low as reasonably practicable’. Urologists regularly use fluoroscopy during endoscopic surgical procedures. In some institutions, this is delivered by a radiographer whereas in others, it is delivered by the urological surgeon. Objectives To determine if radiographer-delivered fluoroscopy can reduce the exposure to ionising radiation during urological procedures. Methods An analysis of 395 consecutive patients, who underwent endoscopic urological procedures requiring fluoroscopy, was performed simultaneously across two institutions, over a 4 month period. 321 patients were matched and included in the analysis. Results Radiographer delivered fluoroscopy was associated with reduced ionising radiation exposure for retrograde pyelography procedures ED 0.09626 vs. 1.323 mSev, p= 0.0003, and endoscopic stone surgeries ED 0.3066 Vs. 0.5416 mSev, p=0.0039, but not for ureterorenoscopic stone surgeries 0.4880 vs. 0.2213 mSev, p=0.8292. Conclusion Radiographer delivered fluoroscopy could reduce the patient’s exposure to ionising radiation for some urological procedures. PMID:27158158

  14. Bayesian analysis of nanodosimetric ionisation distributions due to alpha particles and protons.

    PubMed

    De Nardo, L; Ferretti, A; Colautti, P; Grosswendt, B

    2011-02-01

    Track-nanodosimetry has the objective to investigate the stochastic aspect of ionisation events in particle tracks, by evaluating the probability distribution of the number of ionisations produced in a nanometric target volume positioned at distance d from a particle track. Such kind of measurements makes use of electron (or ion) gas detectors with detecting efficiencies non-uniformly distributed inside the target volume. This fact makes the reconstruction of true ionisation distributions, which correspond to an ideal efficiency of 100%, non-trivial. Bayesian unfolding has been applied to ionisation distributions produced by 5.4 MeV alpha particles and 20 MeV protons in cylindrical volumes of propane of 20 nm equivalent size, positioned at different impact parameters with respect to the primary beam. It will be shown that a Bayesian analysis performed by subdividing the target volume in sub-regions of different detection efficiencies is able to provide a good reconstruction of the true nanodosimetric ionisation distributions. PMID:21112893

  15. Multiphoton ionisation and dissociation of NO 2 by 50 fs laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, R. P.; Kilic, H. S.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Kosmidis, C.; McCanny, T.; Langley, A. J.; Shaikh, W.

    1996-04-01

    Multiphoton ionisation and dissociation of NO 2 has been studied experimentally at 375 nm for laser pulse widths of 10 ns and 50 fs. The parent NO 2 ion peak is not seen in the ns data. In all spectra, the main peak observed is due to the ionisation of the NO molecule which results from the dissociation of excited NO 2 formed after absorbing a 375 nm photon. The intensity dependencies of both NO and NO 2 ion peaks have also been measured. The data has been analysed within the context of a rate equation model using published cross-sections and dissociation rates except for the two-photon ionisation cross-section for NO 2 which was chosen to reproduce the NO 2/NO ion signal ratios at 50 fs. The rate equation model provides a good description of the complete set of data. Indirectly, it may be concluded that coherence effects do not play an important role in the multiphoton excitation/ionisation of NO 2. The data also rules out the importance of above-ionisation dissociation in NO 2 — a conclusion which is consistent with previous data at 496 and 248 nm for laser pulse widths ⩾ 300 fs.

  16. Single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon-interference identification and positive-ionisation characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.; Xu, S.; Dougans, A.

    2013-01-01

    A single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) is a good alternative to conventional spectrometers based on tandem electrostatic acceleration for radiocarbon measurement and permits experimentation with both negative and positive carbon ions. However, such 14C AMS of either polarity ions is limited by an interference. In the case of anion acceleration we have newly determined this to be summed 13C and 16O by improvising an additional Wien filter on our SSAMS deck. Also, 14C AMS might be improved by removing its dependency on negative-ionisation in a sputter ion source. This requires negative-ionisation of sample atoms elsewhere to suppress the 14N interference, which we accomplish by transmitting initially positive ions through a thin membrane. The ionisation dependence on ion-energy is found to be consistent with previous experimentation with vapours and thicker foils.

  17. [Nonionizing radiation and electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, J H

    1991-01-01

    Nonionising radiation comprises all kinds of radiation and fields of the electromagnetic spectrum where biological matter is not ionised, as well as mechanical waves such as infrasound and ultrasound. The electromagnetic spectrum is subdivided into individual sections and includes: Static and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields including technical applications of energy with mains frequency, radio frequency fields, microwaves and optic radiation (infrared, visible light, ultraviolet radiation including laser). The following categories of persons can be affected by emissions by non-ionising radiation: Persons in the environment and in the household, workers, patients undergoing medical diagnosis or treatment. If the radiation is sufficiently intense, or if the fields are of appropriate strength, a multitude of effects can occur (depending on the type of radiation), such as heat and stimulating or irritating action, inflammations of the skin or eyes, changes in the blood picture, burns or in some cases cancer as a late sequel. The ability of radiation to penetrate into the human body, as well as the types of interaction with biological tissue, with organs and organisms, differs significantly for the various kinds of nonionising radiation. The following aspects of nonionising radiation are discussed: protection of humans against excessive sunlight rays when sunbathing and when exposed to UV radiation (e.g. in solaria); health risks of radio and microwaves (safety of microwave cookers and mobile radio units); effects on human health by electric and magnetic fields in everyday life. PMID:1837859

  18. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge. PMID:24324250

  19. Dynamics of ionisation and entanglement in the 'atom + quantum electromagnetic field' system

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapova, P R; Tikhonova, O V

    2012-03-31

    The dynamics of a model Rydberg atom in a strong nonclassical electromagnetic field is investigated. The field-induced transitions to the continuum involving different numbers of photons (with intermediate states in the discrete spectrum) are taken into account and the specific features of ionisation in 'squeezed' field states are considered in comparison with the case of classical light. A significant decrease in the ionisation rate is found, which is caused by the interference stabilisation of the atomic system. The entanglement of the atomic and field subsystems, the temporal dynamics of the correlations found, and the possibility of measuring them are analysed.

  20. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advances in detection and treatment of cancer, there is an increasing emphasis on the efficacy and safety aspects of cancer therapy. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for a wide variety of cancers, either alone or in combination with other treatments. Ionising radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent side effect of radiation therapy and a considerable proportion of patients suffer acute or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms as a result. These side effects often cause morbidity and may in some cases lower the efficacy of radiotherapy treatment. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract can be minimised by either of two strategies: technical strategies which aim to physically shift radiation dose away from the normal intestinal tissues, and biological strategies which aim to modulate the normal tissue response to ionising radiation or to increase its resistance to it. Although considerable improvement in the safety of radiotherapy treatment has been achieved through the use of modern optimised planning and delivery techniques, biological techniques may offer additional further promise. Different agents have been used to prevent or minimize the severity of gastrointestinal injury induced by ionising radiation exposure, including biological, chemical and pharmacological agents. In this review we aim to discuss various technical strategies to prevent gastrointestinal injury during cancer radiotherapy, examine the different therapeutic options for acute and chronic gastrointestinal radiation injury and outline some examples of research directions and considerations for prevention at a pre-clinical level. PMID:23345942

  1. Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Atomic Models in Explaining Subsequent Ionisation Energy Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeldon, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Chemistry students' explanations of ionisation energy phenomena often involve a number of non-scientific or inappropriate ideas being used to form causality arguments. Research has attributed this to many science teachers using these ideas themselves (Tan and Taber, in "J Chem Educ" 86(5):623-629, 2009). This research extends this work by…

  2. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  3. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  4. Genetic and epigenetic features in radiation sensitivity. Part II: implications for clinical practice and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Michel H; Gisone, Pablo A; Perez, Maria R; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Giorgio, Marina Di; Carosella, Edgardo D

    2005-03-01

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression has attracted greater attention to the genetic and epigenetic susceptibility to cancer, possibly enhanced by ionising radiation. This issue is especially important for radiation therapists since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following standard radiation therapy, while normally sensitive patients could receive higher doses of radiation, offering a better likelihood of cure for malignant tumours. Although only a small percentage of individuals are "hypersensitive" to radiation effects, all medical specialists using ionising radiation should be aware of the aforementioned progress in medical knowledge. The present paper, the second of two parts, reviews human disorders known or strongly suspected to be associated with hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. The main tests capable of detecting such pathologies in advance are analysed, and ethical issues regarding genetic testing are considered. The implications for radiation protection of possible hypersensitivity to radiation in a part of the population are discussed, and some guidelines for nuclear medicine professionals are proposed. PMID:15692806

  5. Mysteries of LiF TLD response following high ionisation density irradiation: nanodosimetry and track structure theory, dose response and glow curve shapes

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Y.; Fuks, E.; Datz, H.; Oster, L.; Livingstone, J.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three outstanding effects of ionisation density on the thermoluminescence (TL) mechanisms giving rise to the glow peaks of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) are currently under investigation: (1) the dependence of the heavy charged particle (HCP) relative efficiency with increasing ionisation density and the effectiveness of its modelling by track structure theory (TST), (2) the behaviour of the TL efficiency, f(D), as a function of photon energy and dose. These studies are intended to promote the development of a firm theoretical basis for the evaluation of relative TL efficiencies to assist in their application in mixed radiation fields. And (3) the shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve for various HCP types and energies and following high-dose electron irradiation, i.e. the ratio of the intensity of peak 5a to peak 5. Peak 5a is a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from electron-hole capture in a spatially correlated trapping centre/luminescent centre (TC/LC) complex that has been suggested to possess a potential as a solid-state nanodosemeter due to the preferential electron/hole population of the TC/LC at high ionisation density. It is concluded that (1) the predictions of TST are very strongly dependent on the choice of photon energy used in the determination of f(D); (2) modified TST employing calculated values of f(D) at 2 keV is in agreement with 5-MeV alpha particle experimental results for composite peak 5 but underestimates the 1.5-MeV proton relative efficiencies. Both the proton and alpha particle relative TL efficiencies of the high-temperature TL (HTTL) peaks 7 and 8 are underestimated by an order of magnitude suggesting that the HTTL efficiencies are affected by other factors in addition to radial electron dose; (3) the dose–response supralinearity of peaks 7 and 8 change rapidly with photon energy: this behaviour is explained in the framework of the unified interaction model as due to a very strong dependence on photon energy of the relative

  6. Mysteries of LiF TLD response following high ionisation density irradiation: nanodosimetry and track structure theory, dose response and glow curve shapes.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y; Fuks, E; Datz, H; Oster, L; Livingstone, J; Rosenfeld, A

    2011-06-01

    Three outstanding effects of ionisation density on the thermoluminescence (TL) mechanisms giving rise to the glow peaks of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) are currently under investigation: (1) the dependence of the heavy charged particle (HCP) relative efficiency with increasing ionisation density and the effectiveness of its modelling by track structure theory (TST), (2) the behaviour of the TL efficiency, f(D), as a function of photon energy and dose. These studies are intended to promote the development of a firm theoretical basis for the evaluation of relative TL efficiencies to assist in their application in mixed radiation fields. And (3) the shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve for various HCP types and energies and following high-dose electron irradiation, i.e. the ratio of the intensity of peak 5a to peak 5. Peak 5a is a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from electron-hole capture in a spatially correlated trapping centre/luminescent centre (TC/LC) complex that has been suggested to possess a potential as a solid-state nanodosemeter due to the preferential electron/hole population of the TC/LC at high ionisation density. It is concluded that (1) the predictions of TST are very strongly dependent on the choice of photon energy used in the determination of f(D); (2) modified TST employing calculated values of f(D) at 2 keV is in agreement with 5-MeV alpha particle experimental results for composite peak 5 but underestimates the 1.5-MeV proton relative efficiencies. Both the proton and alpha particle relative TL efficiencies of the high-temperature TL (HTTL) peaks 7 and 8 are underestimated by an order of magnitude suggesting that the HTTL efficiencies are affected by other factors in addition to radial electron dose; (3) the dose-response supralinearity of peaks 7 and 8 change rapidly with photon energy: this behaviour is explained in the framework of the unified interaction model as due to a very strong dependence on photon energy of the relative

  7. Modelling the martian cosmic radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartnell, L. R.; Desorgher, L.; Ward, J. M.; Coates, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    The martian surface is no longer protected by a global magnetic field or substantial atmosphere and so is essentially unshielded to the flux of cosmic rays. This creates an ionising radiation field on the surface and subsurface that is hazardous to life and the operation of spacecraft instruments. Here we report the modelling approach used to characterise this complex and time-variable radiation environment and discuss the wider applications of the results generated.

  8. Study of the mechanism of direct laser desorption/ionisation for some small organic molecules (M < 400 Daltons).

    PubMed

    Benazouz; Hakim; Debrun; Strivay; Weber

    1999-12-15

    Aspects of direct laser desorption/ionisation have been studied for three molecules, aminotriazole (positive ion), dinoterb and ioxynil (negative ion). The samples are deposited on metallic substrates, and a nitrogen laser is used for desorption/ionisation; ion yields are measured with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Previous work had shown that ion yields can strongly vary from one substrate to another, and that this variation does not reflect the (calculated) metal surface temperatures. New results obtained in this work indicate that the desorption/ionisation mechanism is linked to the physical state of the substrate surface. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10567927

  9. Suppression of the contribution of short trajectories into above-threshold ionisation spectra by a two-colour laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Zheltukhin, A. N.; Silaev, A. A.; Knyazeva, D. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Flegel', A. V.; Frolov, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied spectra of above-threshold ionisation of atoms by a two-colour laser field with collinear linearly polarised components. We have found a sharp (gap-like) dependence of the length of the high-energy plateau in above-threshold ionisation spectra on the relative phase of the two-colour field at comparable intensities of the field components. Using the quasi-classical analysis we have shown that this effect results from the suppression of partial above-threshold ionisation amplitudes, associated with closed classical trajectories of an electron in the laser field, within a certain range of relative phase values.

  10. Analysis of minor and trace elements in gallstones by induction of characteristic ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Kinani, A T; Harris, I A; Watt, D E

    1984-02-01

    In an investigation of the role of trace elements in gallstone formation and of minor and trace elements in gallstone and bile, samples from five patients were analysed using three different techniques for cross-verification: NAA, PIXE, and XRF. In addition, certified standards of bovine liver and oyster tissue from the NBS, Washington, were re-analysed using the different techniques to confirm the accuracy of the experimental procedures. NAA of five gallstones was used for the quantitative analysis of 19 elements with Z greater than 11. The concentrations of Cl, K + Ca, Mn, Fe and Cu + Zn were determined by PIXE and those of Mg, P, S, K and Ca by XRF. In most cases the concentrations were in the range of a few PPB to a few hundred PPM. The spatial distribution of the component elements was obtained using XRF with a scanning electron microscope and the results demonstrated that calcium was present centrally in all the stones. The analysis of gallbladder bile from four patients showed that the calcium concentration was much greater than normal, indicating that calcium and other elements play an important role in stone formation. Infrared spectroscopy showed that the calcium salts were present in gallstones in three compound forms: calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate and calcium bilirubinate. Reasons for the cause of calcium precipitation are discussed. PMID:6701197

  11. Kinetics of the nitrogen first negative system excitation by ionising radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Khasenov, M U

    2005-12-31

    The rate constants of N{sub 2}{sup +}(B) quenching by nitrogen and helium and of two- and three-body charge exchange of He{sub 2}{sup +} on H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and Kr are measured from luminescence at the 0-0 transition of the first negative system of nitrogen in mixtures of helium and nitrogen with hydrogen, krypton or deuterium excited by alpha particles emitted by {sup 210}Po . (active media)

  12. Combined effects of depleted uranium and ionising radiation on zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Ng, C Y P; Pereira, S; Cheng, S H; Adam-Guillermin, C; Garnier-Laplace, J; Yu, K N

    2015-11-01

    In the environment, living organisms are exposed to a mixture of stressors, and the combined effects are deemed as multiple stressor effects. In the present work, the authors studied the multiple stressor effect in embryos of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) from simultaneous exposure to alpha particles and depleted uranium (DU) through quantification of apoptotic signals at 24 h post-fertilisation (hpf) revealed by vital dye acridine orange staining. In each set of experiments, dechorionated zebrafish embryos were divided into 4 groups, each having 10 embryos: Group (C) in which the embryos did not receive any further treatment; Group (IU) in which the embryos received an alpha-particle dose of 0.44 mGy at 5 hpf and were then exposed to 100 µg l(-1) of DU from 5 to 6 hpf; Group (I) in which the embryos received an alpha-particle dose of 0.44 mGy at 5 hpf and Group (U) in which the dechorionated embryos were exposed to 100 µg l(-1) of DU from 5 to 6 hpf. The authors confirmed that an alpha-particle dose of 0.44 mGy and a DU exposure for 1 h separately led to hormetic and toxic effects assessed by counting apoptotic signals, respectively, in the zebrafish. Interestingly, the combined exposure led to an effect more toxic than that caused by the DU exposure alone, so effectively DU changed the beneficial effect (hormesis) brought about by alpha-particle irradiation into an apparently toxic effect. This could be explained in terms of the promotion of early death of cells predisposed to spontaneous transformation by the small alpha-particle dose (i.e. hormetic effect) and the postponement of cell death upon DU exposure. PMID:25948823

  13. Non-ionising electromagnetic environments on manned spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J R

    1989-08-01

    Future space travellers and settlers will be exposed to a variety of electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Extrinsic sources will include solar and stellar fluxes, planetary fluxes, and supernovae. Intrinsic sources may include fusion and ion engines, EMFs from electrical equipment, radar, lighting, superconduction energy storage systems, magnetic bearings on gyroscopic control and orientation systems, and magnetic rail microprobe launch systems. Communication sources may include radio and microwave frequencies, and laser generating systems. Magnetic fields may also be used for deflection of radiation. There is also a loss of the normal Geomagnetic field (GMF) which includes static, alternating, and time-varying components. This paper reviews exposure limits and the biological effects of EMFs, and evidence for an electromagnetic sense organ and a relationship between man and the Geomagnetic field. PMID:11540234

  14. Basic radiation protection training for nurses and paramedical personnel: Belgian experience and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Clarijs, T; Coeck, M; Van Bladel, Lodewijk; Fremout, An

    2015-07-01

    When using ionising radiation for medical diagnosis or treatment of patients, understanding of relevant radiation protection principles and issues is indispensable. In Belgium, nurses and paramedical staff are required to acquire knowledge for protecting the patient against the detrimental effects of ionising radiation by means of a vocational training course. The experience with and challenges for this training course are presented here from a lecturer's point of view, together with a proposal for a future approach that harmonises the training content, its level and quality, according to European recommended standards. PMID:25821209

  15. Exploring the Powerful Ionised Wind in the Seyfert Galaxy PG1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, Ken

    2013-10-01

    Highly-ionised high-speed winds in AGN (UFOs) were first detected with XMM-Newton a decade ago, and are now established as a key factor in the study of SMBH accretion, and in the growth and metal enrichment of their host galaxies. However, information on the ionisation and dynamical structure, and the ultimate fate of UFOs remains very limited. We request a 600ks extended XMM-Newton study of the prototype UFO PG1211+143 in AO-13, to obtain high quality EPIC and RGS spectra, to map the flow structure and variability, while seeking evidence for the anticipated interaction with the ISM and possible conversion of the energetic wind to a momentum-driven flow.

  16. Classification of the Spectra of Highly Ionised Atoms During the Last Seven Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, B. C.

    1981-10-01

    This review of recent contributions to the classification of the spectra of highly ionised atoms emphasises how major research projects have influenced progress. These projects include experiments on board orbiting space satellites and SKYLAB, those of fusion research (notably involving TOKAMAK devices), studies with giant pulse laser-produced-plasmas and beam-foil spectroscopy. In addition, the large volume of data gathered through the application of traditional methods and the impact of theoretical calculations are discussed. A comprehensive reference list of papers reporting emission line identifications for elements lighter than nickel and ionisation stages higher than the fourth is included, along with references to other bibliographies and compilations of energy levels, or wavelengths and identifications.

  17. The effect of highly ionising particles on the CMS silicon strip tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Hrubec, J.; Krammer, M.; Pernicka, M.; Waltenberger, W.; Beaumont, W.; de Langhe, E.; de Wolf, E.; Tasevsky, M.; Bouhali, O.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Neuckermans, L.; Vander-Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Goorens, R.; Heyninck, J.; Lowette, S.; Tavernier, S.; Van Lancker, L.; Yu, C.; Assouak, S.; Bonnet, J.-L.; Bruno, G.; De-Callatay, B.; De-Favereau-de-Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; De-Visscher, S.; Favart, D.; Gregoire, G.; Keutgen, Th.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Michotte, D.; Militaru, O.; Ninane, A.; Ovyn, S.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Roberfroid, V.; Rouby, X.; Van-der-Aa, O.; Vander-Donckt, M.; Boulogne, I.; Daubie, E.; Defontaines, F.; Herquet, P.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Katajisto, H.; Linden, T.; Luukka, P.; Lampen, T.; Mäenpää, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuuva, T.; Ageron, M.; Chabanat, E.; Contardo, D.; Estre, N.; Haroutunian, R.; Lumb, N.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Trocme, B.; Blaes, R.; Charles, F.; Drouhin, F.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Fontaine, J. C.; Berst, J. D.; Brom, J. M.; Didierjean, F.; Goerlach, U.; Gross, L.; Juillot, P.; Lounis, A.; Maazouzi, C.; Olivetto, C.; Strub, R.; Vanhove, P.; Vintache, D.; Adolphi, R.; Brauer, R.; Braunschweig, W.; Esser, H.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; König, S.; Kukulies, C.; Olzem, J.; Ostaptchouk, A.; Pandoulas, D.; Pierschel, G.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Siedling, R.; Thomas, M.; Wlochal, M.; Beissel, F.; Boffin, K.-D.; Duda, M.; Flossdorf, A.; Flugge, G.; Franke, T.; Hangarter, K.; Hegner, B.; Hermanns, Th.; Kasselmann, S.; Kress, Th.; Linn, A.; Mnich, J.; Nowack, A.; Poettgens, M.; Pooth, O.; Reinhold, B.; Bleyl, M.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Pein, U.; Schleper, P.; Schirm, N.; Steinbrück, G.; Stoye, M.; Tesch, S.; van Staa, R.; Wick, K.; Atz, B.; Barvich, T.; Blum, P.; de Boer, W.; Boegelspacher, F.; Dirkes, G.; Fahrer, M.; Fernandez, J.; Frey, M.; Furgeri, A.; Grigoriev, E.; Hartmann, F.; Heier, S.; Muller, T.; Ortega-Gomez, T.; Simonis, H.-J.; Steck, P.; Theel, A.; Weiler, T.; Zhukov, V.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; De Robertis, G.; Fiore, L.; Giordano, D.; Maggi, G.; Mennea, M.; My, S.; Radicci, V.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Albergo, S.; Bellini, V.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Sutera, C.; Tricomi, A.; Tuvè, C.; Bocci, A.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Landi, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Magini, N.; Mersi, S.; Marchettini, C.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Parrini, G.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Candelori, A.; Dorigo, T.; Giubilato, P.; Kaminsky, A.; Loreti, M.; Nigro, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Rando, R.; Angarano, M. M.; Babucci, E.; Benedetti, D.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Brunetti, M. T.; Checcucci, B.; Dinu, N.; Fanò, L.; Giorgi, M.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Postolache, V.; Puscalau, M.; Ricci, D.; Santinelli, R.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L.; Zucchetti, C.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Borrello, L.; Bosi, F.; Castaldi, R.; D'Alfonso, M.; Dell'Orso, R.; Dutta, S.; Foa, L.; Gennai, S.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Lomtadze, T.; Mangano, B.; Messineo, A.; Moggi, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzi, A.; Rizzi, D.; Segneri, G.; Sentenac, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tonelli, G.; Verdini, P. G.; Biino, C.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Favro, G.; Trapani, P.; Peroni, C.; Romero, A.; Migliore, E.; Abbaneo, D.; Ahmed, F.; Bartalini, P.; Bernardino-Rodriguez, N.; Breuker, H.; Buchmuller, O.; Carrone, E.; Cattai, A.; Chierici, R.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dierlamm, A.; Eppard, M.; Frey, A.; Gill, K.; Grabit, R.; Honma, A.; Huhtinen, M.; Magazzu, G.; Mannelli, M.; Marchioro, A.; Onnela, A.; Perea-Solano, B.; Petagna, P.; Postema, H.; Risoldi, M.; Rolandi, G.; Siegrist, P.; Troska, I.; Tsirou, A.; Vasey, F.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Bertl, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Kästli, H.-Ch.; Kotlinski, D.; MacPherson, A.; Rohe, T.; Freudenreich, K.; Lustermann, W.; Pauss, F.; Eichler, R.; Erdmann, W.; Grab, C.; Schoning, A.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; Dorokhov, A.; Hörmann, C.; Pruys, H.; Prokofiev, K.; Regenfus, C.; Robmann, P.; Speer, T.; Bell, K. W.; Coughlan, J.; French, M.; Halsall, R.; Jones, L.; Pearson, M.; Rogers, G.; Tomalin, I.; Bainbridge, R.; Barrillon, P.; Colling, D.; Dris, S.; Foudas, C.; Fulcher, J.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Macevoy, B. C.; Noy, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Takahashi, M.; Zorba, O.; Barnett, B.; Chien, C.-Y.; Kim, D. W.; Liang, G.; Swartz, M.; Atac, M.; Demarteau, M.; Joshi, U.; Kwan, S.; Spiegel, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Gerber, C. E.; Shabalina, E.; Ten, T.; Lander, R.; Pellett, D.; Gobbi, B.; Kubantsev, M.; Malik, S.; Tilden, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Christofek, L.; Coppage, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Demina, R.; Kahl, W. E.; Khanov, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Pukhaeva, N.; Reay, N. W.; Rizatdinova, F.; Sidwell, R. A.; Stanton, N. R.; Cremaldi, L.; Sanders, D.; Bartz, E.; Doroshenko, J.; Koeth, T.; Perera, L.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Worm, S.; Gartung, P.; Hanson, G. G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Páztor, G.; Eusebi, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hocker, A.; Tipton, P.; Affolder, A.; Campagnari, C.; Hale, D.; Incandela, J.; Kyre, S.; Lamb, J.; Taylor, R.; White, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Garfinkel, A.; Rott, C.; Roy, A.

    2005-05-01

    Inelastic nuclear collisions of hadrons incident on silicon sensors can generate secondary highly ionising particles (HIPs) and deposit as much energy within the sensor bulk as several hundred minimum ionising particles. The large signals generated by these 'HIP events' can momentarily saturate the APV25 front-end readout chip for the silicon strip tracker (SST) sub-detector of the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment, resulting in deadtime in the detector readout system. This paper presents studies of this phenomenon through simulation, laboratory measurements and dedicated beam tests. A proposed change to a front-end component to reduce the APV25 sensitivity to HIP events is also examined. The results are used to infer the expected effect on the performance of the CMS SST at the future large hadron collider. The induced inefficiencies are at the percent level and will have a negligible effect on the physics performance of the SST.

  18. The Interplay Between Molecular and Ionised Gas Surrounding the Massive Embedded Star AFGL 4176

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Katharine G.; Beuther, Henrik; Linz, Hendrik; Boley, P.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Keto, E.; Wood, K.; van Boekel, R.

    In order to investigate whether the feedback produced by photo-ionisation has an important effect on the geometry of the circumstellar dust and gas around forming massive stars, we have observed the luminous southern embedded star AFGL 4176 in transitions of NH3 and the hydrogen recombination line H68α. We present our preliminary results, which show a compact HII region embedded in a parsec-scale (radius ˜ 0.7 pc) rotating envelope/torus. In addition, the HII region is found to be offset from the centre of the envelope, and the velocity gradient in the ionised gas is not aligned with the rotation axis of the envelope, suggesting complex dynamics and multiplicity.

  19. The effect of electrospray solvent composition on desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) efficiency and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Green, F M; Salter, T L; Gilmore, I S; Stokes, P; O'Connor, G

    2010-04-01

    In desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) the interaction between the electrospray and the surface is key to two important analytical parameters, the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. We evaluate the effect of the electrospray solvent type, organic solvent fraction with water, analyte solubility and substrate wettability on DESI erosion diameter and material transferral into useful ion signal. To do this five amino acids, glycine, alanine, valine, leucine and phenylalanine are prepared as thin films on three substrates, UV/ozone treated glass, glass and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Four different solvents, acetonitrile (ACN), methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and propan-2-ol (IPA), are used with organic solvent fractions with water varying from 0.1 to 1. These model systems allow the solubility or wettability to be kept constant as other parameters are varied. Additionally, comparison with electrospray ionisation (ESI) allows effects of ionisation efficiency to be determined. It is shown that the DESI efficiency is linearly dependent on the solubility (for these materials at least) and for analytes with solubilities below 1.5 g kg(-1), additional strategies may be required for DESI to be effective. We show that the DESI erosion diameter improves linearly with organic solvent fraction, with an organic solvent fraction of 0.9 instead of 0.5 leading to a 2 fold improvement. Furthermore, this leads to a 35 fold increase in DESI efficiency, defined as the molecular ion yield per unit area. It is shown that these improvements correlate with smaller droplet sizes rather than surface wetting or ionisation. PMID:20349538

  20. Analysis of oak tannins by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mämmelä, P; Savolainen, H; Lindroos, L; Kangas, J; Vartiainen, T

    2000-09-01

    Extractable tannins were analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry in two oak species, North American white oak (Quercus alba) and European red oak (Quercus robur). They mainly included various glucose gallic and ellagic acid esters. The structures were partially determined, and they included grandinin/roburin E, castalagin/vescalagin, gallic acid, valoneic acid bilactone, monogalloyl glucose, digalloyl glucose, trigalloyl glucose, ellagic acid rhamnose, quercitrin and ellagic acid. PMID:10999626

  1. A Carbon Nano Tube electron impact ionisation source for low-power, compact spacecraft mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, S.; Bardwell, M. W.; Morse, A. D.; Morgan, G. H.

    2012-04-01

    A novel ionisation source which uses commercially available Carbon Nano Tube devices is demonstrated as a replacement for a filament based ionisation source in an ion trap mass spectrometer. The carbon nanotube ion source electron emission was characterised and exhibited typical emission of 30 ± 1.7 μA with an applied voltage differential of 300 V between the carbon nanotube tips and the extraction grid. The ion source was tested for longevity and operated under a condition of continuous emission for a period of 44 h; there was an observed reduction in emission current of 26.5% during operation. Spectra were generated by installing the ion source into a Finnigan Mat ITD700 ion trap mass spectrometer; the spectra recorded showed all of the characteristic m/z peaks from m/z 69 to m/z 219. Perfluorotributylamine spectra were collected and averaged contiguously for a period of 48 h with no significant signal loss or peak mass allocation shift. The low power requirements and low mass of this novel ionisation source are considered be of great value to future space missions where mass spectrometric technology will be employed.

  2. Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Atomic Models in Explaining Subsequent Ionisation Energy Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeldon, Ruth

    2012-06-01

    Chemistry students' explanations of ionisation energy phenomena often involve a number of non-scientific or inappropriate ideas being used to form causality arguments. Research has attributed this to many science teachers using these ideas themselves (Tan and Taber, in J Chem Educ 86(5):623-629, 2009). This research extends this work by considering which atomic models are used in pre-service teachers' explanations and how that relates to the causality ideas expressed. Thirty-one pre-service teachers were interviewed. Each was asked to describe and explain four different atomic representations (Rutherford, Electron cloud micrograph, Bohr and Schrödinger types) in as much detail as they could. They also provided an explanation for the subsequent ionisation energy values for an oxygen atom and identified which representations were helpful in explaining the values. Significantly, when pre-service teachers only used Bohr type representations, they did not use repelling electron ideas in their explanations. However, arguments that were based on electron-electron repulsion used features from Schrödinger type atoms. These findings suggest that many pre-service teachers need to develop their atomic modelling skills so that they select and use models more expertly and that subsequent ionisation explanations offer a context in which to explore different atomic models' limitations and their deployment as explanatory resources.

  3. A liquid ionisation detector for digital radiography of therapeutic megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Meertens, H; van Herk, M; Weeda, J

    1985-04-01

    Experiments with an ionisation detector were performed in order to determine whether it was possible to obtain high energy photon beam images for radiotherapy treatment verification. A small prototype detector with a field of view of 78 mm X 78 mm and constructed from printed circuit boards was used. The imaging area was a matrix ionisation chamber, filled with air or liquid (2,2,4-trimethylpentane). A minicomputer was used to control the data acquisition electronics and to reconstruct and restore the images. The images were displayed on a viewing console for computed tomography images. The liquid filled detector with a front-rear board separation of 1.0 mm gave the best results. The spatial resolution was about 3.8 mm with a density resolution of 0.5% for a data acquisition time of 120 s. Comparison of the liquid detector images with corresponding metal screen-film detector images showed that the image qualities were the same. An important advantage of the ionisation detector image is that grey scale modification, sharpening and smoothing by digital processing can easily be performed. PMID:3923505

  4. The radiation burden of radiological investigations

    PubMed Central

    Mazrani, W; McHugh, K; Marsden, P J

    2007-01-01

    The harmful effects of ionising radiation are widely acknowledged. It has been reported that young children, particularly girls, have a higher sensitivity to radiation than adults. However, the exact detrimental effects of radiation, particularly at the low doses used in routine diagnostic radiography, are unknown and the subject of much controversy. Computed tomography (CT) accounts for about 9% of all radiological examinations but is responsible for 47% of medical radiation dose. Approximately 11% of CT examinations performed are in the paediatric population, but the long‐term hazards of CT are unknown. PMID:18032642

  5. Born total ionisation cross sections: An algebraic computing program using Maple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.

    2003-08-01

    The software described in this paper uses the Maple algebraic computing environment to calculate an analytic form for the matrix element of the plane-wave Born approximation of the electron-impact ionisation of an atomic orbital, with arbitrary orbital and angular momentum quantum numbers. The atomic orbitals are approximated by Hartree-Fock Slater functions, and the ejected electron is modelled by a hydrogenic Coulomb wave, made orthogonal to all occupied orbitals of the target atom. Clenshaw-Curtis integration techniques are then used to calculate the total ionisation cross-section. For improved performance, the numerical integrations are performed using FORTRAN by automatically converting the analytic matrix element for each orbital into a FORTRAN subroutine. The results compare favourably with experimental data for a wide range of elements, including the transition metals, with excellent convergence at high energies. Program summaryTitle of program: BIX Catalogue identifier:ADRZ Program summary URL:http://www.cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/cpc/summaries/ADRZ Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: Platform independent Operating systems: Tested on DEC Alpha Unix, Windows NT 4.0 and Windows XP Professional Edition Programming language used: Maple V Release 5.1 and FORTRAN 90 Memory required: 256 MB No. of processors used: 1 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:61754 Distributed format:tar gzip file Keywords: Born approximation, electron-impact ionisation cross-section, Maple, Hartree-Fock Nature of physical problem: Calculates the total electron impact ionisation cross-section for neutral and ionised atomic species using the first-Born approximation. The scattered electron is modelled by a plane wave, and the ejected electron is modelled by a hydrogenic Coulomb wave, which is made orthogonal to all occupied atomic orbitals, and the atomic orbitals are approximated by Hartree-Fock Slater

  6. 76 FR 7590 - Distribution of 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003 Cable Royalty Funds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... regarding the Phase I ] distribution of the 2000-2003 cable royalties on May 12, 2010. 75 FR 26798. Thus... royalties are divided among the representatives of the major categories of copyrightable content...

  7. The Perfect Tens: The Top Twenty Books Reviewed in "Voice of Youth Advocates" 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Explains the review procedures and rating system for teen books in "Voice of Youth Advocates" and provides annotated bibliographies for the twenty best books in 2001-2202, including fiction, nonfiction, and science fiction and fantasy. (LRW)

  8. High Resolution Doppler Imager FY 2001,2002,2003 Operations and Algorithm Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Wilbert

    2004-01-01

    During the performance period of this grant HRDI (High Resolution Doppler Imager) operations remained nominal. The instrument has suffered no loss of scientific capability and operates whenever sufficient power is available. Generally, there are approximately 5-7 days per month when the power level is too low to permit observations. The daily latitude coverage for HRDI measurements in the mesosphere, lower thermosphere (MLT) region are shown.It shows that during the time of this grant, HRDI operations collected data at a rate comparable to that achieved during the UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) prime mission (1991 -1995). Data collection emphasized MLT wind to support the validation efforts of the TIDI instrument on TIMED, therefore fulfilling one of the primary objectives of this phase of the UARS mission. Skinner et al., (2003) present a summary of the instrument performance during this period.

  9. Iowa Community Colleges Tuition and Fees Report, Academic Year 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Community Colleges.

    The document provides information on revenue generated from tuition, fees, and other related financial sources relating to Iowa community college. Findings include: (1) the average annual full-time Iowa community college tuition increased $714 (49%) from fiscal year 1993 to 2002; (2) the average annual full-time Iowa community college tuition for…

  10. Alternative Schools Accountability Model: 2001-2002 Indicator Selection and Reporting Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    California has developed an alternative accountability system for schools with fewer than 100 students, alternative schools of various kinds, community day schools, and other schools under the jurisdiction of a county board of education or a county superintendent of schools. This document is a guide to assist local administrators in completing the…

  11. QED's School Market Trends: Internet Usage in Teaching, 2001-2002. QED Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quality Education Data, Inc., Denver, CO.

    This report presents results of a survey of curriculum subject (language arts, math, science, and/or social studies) teachers of grades 1-12 on Internet usage. The sample was public schools in Quality Education Data's National Education Database. A total of 350 surveys were completed in March through May 2001. Findings are reported in the…

  12. Utilization of substance abuse treatment services under Medicare, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    Vandivort, Rita; Teich, Judith L; Cowell, Alexander J; Chen, Hong

    2009-06-01

    In 2006, the Medicare program covered 37 million elderly persons and 7 million persons younger than 65 years, but little is known about substance abuse (SA) service utilization. Using the 5% Sample of Medicare claims data, the study examines individuals who used SA detoxification ("detox") and/or rehabilitation ("rehab") services under Medicare in 2001 and 2002. SA claimants less than 65 years of age (disabled) were compared to claimants more than 65 years of age (elderly). The disabled were more likely to have a co-occurring mental disorder than elderly claimants (50% vs. 14%) and more likely to have serious mental illness (21% vs. 2.3%). Disabled claimants were more than three times as likely to receive any detox service as elderly claimants (17% vs. 6%). The rate of claimants receiving rehab services within 30 days of detox is about one third for disabled claimants and one quarter for elderly claimants. PMID:18835680

  13. 78 FR 64984 - Distribution of the 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003 Cable Royalty Funds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... proceedings relating to cable retransmission royalties for royalty years 2000 through 2003. 76 FR 7590 (Feb... FR 26798 (May 12, 2010). IPG challenged the category definitions; the Judges rejected IPG's challenge..., Order, in Docket No. 2000-2 CARP CD 93-97, 66 FR 66433, 66444 (Dec. 26, 2001) (quoting H.R. Rep....

  14. Book Review: Distant wanderers / Copernicus Books/Springer , 2001/2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, H. C.

    2002-06-01

    Are we alone in the Universe? The Earth, teeming with life, as we know it, is only one amongst the nine planets (wanderers) that wander around the Sun in more or less circular orbits. Do distant stars also have planets circling them? Are some of them similar to Earth and support life? These questions have long occupied the human mind. However, until the closing years of the twentieth century, the idea that there are stars, other than the Sun, that have planets orbiting them, remained a subject of speculation and controversy because the astronomical observing techniques used for the detection of planetary companions of stars did not have the necessary precision. During the past several years, advances in technology and dedicated efforts of planet-hunting astronomers have made it possible to detect Jupiter-like or more massive planets around nearby stars. So far about 70 such extra-solar planets have been discovered indicating that our solar system is not unique and distant wanderers are not uncommon. Distant Wanderers narrates the story of the search for extra-solar planets, even as the search is becoming more vigorous with newer instruments pushing the limits of sensitivity that has often resulted in the detection of planetary systems with totally unexpected characteristics. The book is primarily aimed at non specialists, but practicing scientists, including astronomers, will find the narrative very interesting and sometimes offering a perspective that is unfamiliar to professionals. The book begins with an introduction to some basic astronomical facts about the Universe, evolution of stars, supernovae and formation of pulsars. The first extra-solar planets were discovered in 1992 around a radio pulsar (PSR 1257+12) by measuring the oscillatory perturbations in the pulse arrival times from the pulsar caused by the presence of orbiting earth-sized planets as their gravity forces the pulsar also to move in orbit around the system barycenter. Such planetary systems are, however, very rare and only one other planet around a pulsar has so far been found. The first extra-solar planet around a sun-like star was discovered in 1995 by M. Mayor and D. Queloz circling the star 51 Pegasi by the method of Doppler spectroscopy. Since then about 70 extra-solar planets have been discovered. Most of these have been detected by Doppler spectroscopy, but now newer methods like occultation and gravitational lensing have also begun to reveal extra-solar planets and candidate extra-solar planets. Distant Wanderers gives a brief description of current theories of planet formation in dusty disks around stars as they form by gravitational collapse of rotating interstellar clouds. Various techniques used by astronomers for the detection of extra-solar planets are discussed. Important astrophysical concepts relevant to planet formation and their detection are also explained. The reader is taken to observatories on mountain tops, laboratories where instruments are built and conferences where astronomers announce their discoveries, debate the results and discuss future strategies for the search for distant wanderers. The extra-solar planets discovered so far, around sun-like stars, are similar in mass to Jupiter or more massive. Their orbits show a great variety. Some are in very close orbits (orbital periods of a few days) about the parent star, and are therefore very hot (hot Jupiters), while others are in wider orbits and cold. Some have nearly circular orbits, while many of them have highly eccentric orbits. There are extra-solar planets with masses as large as about 10 times the mass of Jupiter, close to being brown dwarfs. The existence of such planetary systems was never predicted by the standard theories of planet and star formation. As the hunt for extra-solar planets continues with more sophisticated instruments using innovative ideas, astronomers can be sure to be rewarded with more surprises. In Distant Wanderers, these discoveries and technological developments, currently taking place and being planned for the future, in the search for extra-solar planets, are narrated by the author, Bruce Dorminey, in simple language and lucid style. There are a few technical errors in the book. For example, on page 4, the angular momentum , which must always be conserved, is said to be created. In the discussion of the proper motion (which is measured on the plane of the sky) of Barnard's star, on page 111, it is incorrect to say that the star is moving toward the Sun. The book is, otherwise, well written and succeeds in communicating the excitement of the hunt for the distant wanderers.

  15. SURVEILLANCE FOR DRINKING WATER-ASSOCIATED OUTBREAKS-UNITED STATES, 2001-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1971, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency (EPA), and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists CSTE) have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for collecting and periodically reporting data related to occurrences and cau...

  16. National Association of Child Advocates 2001/2002 Annual Report from the President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Tamara Lucas

    This annual report details the activities of the National Association of Child Advocates (NACA) from June 2001 to June 2002. The report discusses the efforts of NACA to help members protect funding levels for programs supporting children and their families during the nation's economic downturn, including conducting focus groups to test specific…

  17. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Management, Data and Habitat, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, Melvin R.

    2002-03-01

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP or Project) is an all stock initiative that is responding to the need for scientific knowledge for rebuilding and maintaining naturally spawning anadromous fish stocks in both basins. The Yakama Nation, as the Lead Agency, in coordination with the co-managers, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration, the funding agency, is pursuing this. We are testing the principles of supplementation as a means to rebuild fish populations through the use of locally adapted broodstock in an artificial production program. This concept is being utilized on the Spring Chinook within the Yakima River Basin. The coho and fall chinook programs were approved and implemented in the Yakima Basin. The coho programs principle objective is to determine if naturally spawning coho populations can be reintroduced throughout their biological range in the basin. The objective of the fall chinook program is to determine if supplementation is a viable strategy to increase fall chinook populations in the Yakima subbasin. The coho and fall chinook programs are under the three step process that was established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. The Klickitat subbasin management program is combined with the Yakima subbasin program. This contract includes the Klickitat Basin Coordinator and operational costs for the basin. The Klickitat Subbasin has separate contracts for Monitoring & Evaluation, Construction, and ultimately, Operation and Maintenance. In the Klickitat subbasin, we propose to use supplementation to increase populations of spring chinook and steelhead. This program is still in the developmental stages consistent with the three step process.

  18. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay

    2003-06-01

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

  19. Classroom Notes Plus: A Quarterly of Teaching Ideas, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Notes Plus, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This 19th issue of "Notes Plus" contains descriptions of original, unpublished teaching practices, and of adapted ideas. Under the Ideas from the Classroom section, the August 2001 issue contains the following materials: "Imitation: The Sincerest Form of Flattery" (Anna M. Parks); "Stories That Make Us Who We Are" (Therese M. Willis and Kathleen…

  20. Duck Valley Habitat Enhancement and Protection, 2001-2002 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Mattie H.; Sellman, Jake

    2003-03-01

    The Duck Valley Indian Reservation's Habitat Enhancement project is an ongoing project designed to enhance and protect critical riparian areas, natural springs, the Owhyee River and its tributaries, and native fish spawning areas on the Reservation. The project commenced in 1997 and addresses the Northwest Power Planning Council's measures 10.8C.2, 10.8C.3, and 10.8C.5 of the 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The performance period covers dates from April 2001 through August 2002.

  1. Hillsborough Community College, Ybor Campus Developmental Learning Community Program 2001-2002 Fall Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaspar, Richard F.

    This report outlines the program structures and faculty/staff roles of a developmental learning community (LC) initiative at Hillsborough Community College, Ybor Campus (Florida). The program consists of educational structures that link existing developmental courses and curriculum materials to a central theme: the importance of technology…

  2. McKenzie River Watershed Coordination, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Thrailkil, Jim

    2003-11-01

    BPA funding, in conjunction with contributions from numerous partners organizations and grant funds supports the McKenzie Watershed Council's (MWC) efforts to coordinate restoration and monitoring programs of federal, state, local government, and residents within the watershed. Primary goals of the MWC are to improve resource stewardship and conserve fish, wildlife, and water quality resources. Underpinning the goals is the MWC's baseline program centered on relationship building and information sharing. Objectives for FY02 included: (1) Continue to coordinate McKenzie Watershed activities among diverse groups to restore fish and wildlife habitat in the watershed, with a focus on the middle to lower McKenzie, including private lands and the McKenzie-Willamette confluence area; (2) Influence behavior of watershed residents to benefit watershed function though an outreach and education program, utilizing (BPA funded) Assessment and Conservation Strategy information to provide a context for prioritized action; (3) Continue to maintain and sustain a highly functional watershed council; (4) Maintain and improve water quality concerns through the continuation of Council-sponsored monitoring and evaluation programs; and (5) Continue to secure other funding for watershed restoration and protection projects and Council operations.

  3. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2001-2002 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, T P; Kersting, A B; Harris, L J; Hudson, G B; Smith, D K; Williams, R W; Loewen, D R; Nelson, E J; Allen, P G; Ryerson, F J; Pawloski, G A; Laue, C A; Moran, J E

    2003-08-15

    This report contains highlights of FY 2001 and 2002 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work emphasizes the Defense Programs goal of responsible management of natural resources at the NTS, while UGTA-funded work focuses on defining the extent of radionuclide contamination in NTS groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing. The report is organized on a topical basis, and contains eight chapters that reflect the range of technical work performed by LLNL-ANCD in support of HRMP and UGTA. Chapter 1 describes recent hot well sampling efforts at the NTS, and presents the results of chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples from six near-field wells. These include the Cambric (UE-5n), Bilby (U-3cn PS No.2), Bourbon (UE-7nS), Nash (UE-2ce), Tybo/Benham (ER-20-5 No.3), and Almendro (U-19v PS No.1ds) sites. The data generated by the hot well program is vital to the development and validation of contaminant transport models at the NTS. Chapter 2 discusses the results of xenon isotope measurements of groundwater samples from the six near-field wells described in Chapter 1. This work demonstrates that fission xenon is present in the water at levels that are readily measurable and highlights the significant differences in xenon concentrations and isotopic abundances at different sites. These differences provide insight into the early cooling history of nuclear test cavities, and may assist in predicting the distribution of the source term in the near-field environment. Chapter 3 is an investigation of the distribution and abundance of actinides in a nuclear test cavity and chimney. This work demonstrates that early-time processes can widely disperse actinides at low concentrations outside the melt glass, implying that melt glass dissolution may not be the sole mechanism for the release of actinides to groundwater. The study also provides evidence for the isotopic fractionation of plutonium under the extreme conditions accompanying nuclear explosions. In Chapter 4, X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements were used to determine the redox state of Fe and U in nuclear melt glass samples from the NTS. Both elements were found to occur in mixed valence states (Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} and U{sup 5+}/U{sup 6+}) in all samples. Comparison of the Fe and U redox states with published redox studies of synthetic glasses suggests that plutonium is predominantly in the Pu{sup 4+} oxidation state in the melt glasses. In Chapter 5, alpha autoradiography is used in a NTS field study to investigate the spatial distribution and transport of actinides in soils, and to help identify the size distribution and morphology of the actinide particles. It was found that {alpha}-emitting radionuclides have moved to at least 39 cm depth in the soil profile, far deeper than expected. The methodology that was developed could easily be applied to other field locations where actinides are dispersed in the soil zone. Chapter 6 summarizes the development of a method for measuring environmental levels of {sup 241}Am on the multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The method detection limit of 0.017 pCi/L is about two times lower than the best analyses possible by alpha spectrometry. Chapter 7 describes a chlorine-36 study of vertical groundwater transport processes in Frenchman Flat. Mass balance calculations developed from a {sup 36}Cl mixing model at well ER-5-3 No.2 are used to estimate vertical transport fluxes and average vertical flow velocities through the thick volcanic section underlying the basin. The study also documents the variations in {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios within the three principal hydrostratigraphic units in Frenchman Flat. Chapter 8 discusses an ongoing stable isotope investigation of precipitation and recharge processes in central Nevada. Precipitation, spring water, and shallow infiltration samples have been collected at four locations on a biannual basis since 1999. The results show that winter precipitation accounts for >90% of the recharge at these sites. Lysimeter data suggest that most of the evaporation occurring during recharge is due to water vapor loss through the soil zone during periods of slow infiltration. In addition to the topical investigations described above, LLNL-ANCD contributed to several other major collaborative technical products during FY 2001 and 2002.

  4. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Catholic School Version, Grade 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton.

    Parents are vital partners in the educational system. This handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 7 curriculum in Catholic schools in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Junior High Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes Catholic school students in Alberta are…

  5. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Catholic School Version, Grade 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton.

    Parents are vital partners in the educational system. This handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 9 curriculum in Catholic schools in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Junior High Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes Catholic school students in Alberta are…

  6. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Catholic School Version, Grade 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton.

    Parents are vital partners in the educational system. This handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 8 curriculum in Catholic schools in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Junior High Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes Catholic school students in Alberta are…

  7. Concentration and dry deposition of mercury species in arid south central New Mexico (2001-2002)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, Colleen A.; Swartzendruber, Philip; Prestbo, Eric

    2006-01-01

    This research was initiated to characterize atmospheric deposition of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM), particulate mercury (HgP; <2.5 μm), and gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) in the arid lands of south central New Mexico. Two methods were field-tested to estimate dry deposition of three mercury species. A manual speciation sampling train consisting of a KCl-coated denuder, 2.5 μm quartz fiber filters, and gold-coated quartz traps and an ion-exchange membrane (as a passive surrogate surface) were deployed concurrently over 24-h intervals for an entire year. The mean 24-h atmospheric concentration for RGM was 6.8 pg m-3 with an estimated deposition of 0.10 ng m-2h-1. The estimated deposition of mercury to the passive surrogate surface was much greater (4.0 ng m-2h-1) but demonstrated a diurnal pattern with elevated deposition from late afternoon to late evening (1400−2200; 8.0 ng m-2h-1) and lowest deposition during the night just prior to sunrise (2200−0600; 1.7 ng m-2h-1). The mean 24-h atmospheric concentrations for HgP and Hg0 were 1.52 pg m-3 and 1.59 ng m-3, respectively. Diurnal patterns were observed for RGM with atmospheric levels lowest during the night prior to sunrise (3.8 pg m-3) and greater during the afternoon and early evening (8.9 pg m-3). Discernible diurnal patterns were not observed for either HgP or Hg0. The total dry deposition of Hg was 5.9 μg m-2 year-1 with the contribution from the three species as follows:  RGM (0.88 μg m-2 year-1), HgP (0.025 μg m-2 year-1), and Hg0 (5.0 μg m-2 year-1). The annual wet deposition for total mercury throughout the same collection duration was 4.2 μg m-2 year-1, resulting in an estimated total deposition of 10.1 μg m-2 year-1 for Hg. On one sampling date, enhanced HgP (12 pg m-3) was observed due to emissions from a wildfire approximately 250 km to the east.

  8. Prekindergarten District Report, 2001-2002: Report of the Detroit Public Schools. A Condensed Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Joyce A.

    This report of the Detroit Public Schools compiles data analysis of prekindergarten children's entry level skills, a 1-month follow-up assessment, and an end-of-the-year skills evaluation. The report contains information on the growth and development of 3- and 4-year-old prekindergarten students in the Michigan School Readiness Program and Head…

  9. Student Financial Aid Handbook, 2001-2002. Volume 4: Campus-Based Common Provisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Student Financial Assistance.

    The Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), and Federal Work-Study (FWS) programs are called "campus-based" programs because each school is responsible for administering them on its own campus. A school applies for and receives funds direct from the U.S. Department of Education, and the school's financial…

  10. Imagine...Opportunities and Resources for Academically Talented Youth, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Melissa, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This collection of 5 issues of Imagine cover the time period from November/December 2001 through May/June 2002. Designed for gifted youth, the issues focus on dramatic arts, physics and astronomy, communications, law and politics, and robotics, and contain the following featured articles: (1) The Story of a Play (Gemma Cooper-Novack); (2)…

  11. Book Review: Distant wanderers / Copernicus Books/Springer , 2001/2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, H. C.

    2002-06-01

    Are we alone in the Universe? The Earth, teeming with life, as we know it, is only one amongst the nine planets (wanderers) that wander around the Sun in more or less circular orbits. Do distant stars also have planets circling them? Are some of them similar to Earth and support life? These questions have long occupied the human mind. However, until the closing years of the twentieth century, the idea that there are stars, other than the Sun, that have planets orbiting them, remained a subject of speculation and controversy because the astronomical observing techniques used for the detection of planetary companions of stars did not have the necessary precision. During the past several years, advances in technology and dedicated efforts of planet-hunting astronomers have made it possible to detect Jupiter-like or more massive planets around nearby stars. So far about 70 such extra-solar planets have been discovered indicating that our solar system is not unique and distant wanderers are not uncommon. Distant Wanderers narrates the story of the search for extra-solar planets, even as the search is becoming more vigorous with newer instruments pushing the limits of sensitivity that has often resulted in the detection of planetary systems with totally unexpected characteristics. The book is primarily aimed at non specialists, but practicing scientists, including astronomers, will find the narrative very interesting and sometimes offering a perspective that is unfamiliar to professionals. The book begins with an introduction to some basic astronomical facts about the Universe, evolution of stars, supernovae and formation of pulsars. The first extra-solar planets were discovered in 1992 around a radio pulsar (PSR 1257+12) by measuring the oscillatory perturbations in the pulse arrival times from the pulsar caused by the presence of orbiting earth-sized planets as their gravity forces the pulsar also to move in orbit around the system barycenter. Such planetary systems are, however, very rare and only one other planet around a pulsar has so far been found. The first extra-solar planet around a sun-like star was discovered in 1995 by M. Mayor and D. Queloz circling the star 51 Pegasi by the method of Doppler spectroscopy. Since then about 70 extra-solar planets have been discovered. Most of these have been detected by Doppler spectroscopy, but now newer methods like occultation and gravitational lensing have also begun to reveal extra-solar planets and candidate extra-solar planets. Distant Wanderers gives a brief description of current theories of planet formation in dusty disks around stars as they form by gravitational collapse of rotating interstellar clouds. Various techniques used by astronomers for the detection of extra-solar planets are discussed. Important astrophysical concepts relevant to planet formation and their detection are also explained. The reader is taken to observatories on mountain tops, laboratories where instruments are built and conferences where astronomers announce their discoveries, debate the results and discuss future strategies for the search for distant wanderers. The extra-solar planets discovered so far, around sun-like stars, are similar in mass to Jupiter or more massive. Their orbits show a great variety. Some are in very close orbits (orbital periods of a few days) about the parent star, and are therefore very hot (hot Jupiters), while others are in wider orbits and cold. Some have nearly circular orbits, while many of them have highly eccentric orbits. There are extra-solar planets with masses as large as about 10 times the mass of Jupiter, close to being brown dwarfs. The existence of such planetary systems was never predicted by the standard theories of planet and star formation. As the hunt for extra-solar planets continues with more sophisticated instruments using innovative ideas, astronomers can be sure to be rewarded with more surprises. In Distant Wanderers, these discoveries and technological developments, currently taking place and being planned for the future, in the search for

  12. 2001-2002 NATIONAL SURVEY OF MENTAL HEALTH MUTUAL SUPPORT GROUPS AND SELF HELP ORGANIZATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of the Mutual Support/Self-Help Survey are to provide a national estimate of the number of mutual support groups, self-help organizations, and businesses and services run by and for consumers and/or their family members and to describe their structure, types of activiti...

  13. Still "A Reasonably Equal Share." Update on Educational Equity in Vermont, Year 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimerson, Lorna

    Vermont's Equal Educational Opportunity Act of 1997, "Act 60," was designed to rectify inequities in the state's funding of public education, as determined by the Vermont Supreme Court. This report examines the degree to which Act 60 has improved conditions over the last 5 years, focusing on the 3 main equity goals of Act 60 and the court's…

  14. Description of Seismicity at Volcan de Colima, MEXICO, in the Period 2001-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Davila, G. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Ramirez-Vazquez, C. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2002-12-01

    After the february 2001 explosive activity at Volcan de Colima, Mexico, the seismic activity decreased to its lowest level since november 1997 when the actual period of activity started. However, a few months later several researchers reported important morphologic changes inside of the crater formed by the explosive activity, which did not have related seismic activity. During the rainy season it was not possible to follow the development of the changes inside the crater and no significative seismicity was detected. Starting october 2001, a seismic swarm started to develop consisting mainly by high frecuency, very low amplitude seismic events usually detected by the closest seismic station to the summit, at about 1 km. By the end of the month the seismicity almost disappeared, but then it was possible to view again the volcano and for the first time it was possible to observe a huge spine extrusion. From november and until february 2002 it was possible to visually follow, by flying in helicopter, the process. Asismically, new lava was extruded until it filled the crater and a new lava dome was emplaced on the volcano. On february 5, 2002 the new material started to flow down the slopes of the volcano forming lava fronts mainly toward the southwest sector. Apparently the lava extrusion rate was almost constant. Beginning april, short periods of tremor started to appear sporadically and later it begun increasing continuosly in duration, amplitude and spectral content to levels not previously seen at Volcan de Colima. Such situation prompted a preventive evacuation of the people living close to the volcano and at greater risk. However, ending may, 2002 the seismic activity suddenly decreased in a stepwise way and later slowly decreased until a new minimum was reached by the end of june. However, starting july, seismicity started to increased again until a stable level was reached and continues until now. During the whole process, low level, small explosive type events have been detected.A detailed discussion is presented in that presentation.

  15. A Profile of the Student Support Services Program, 1998-1999 through 2001-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yu; Chan, Tsze; Hale, Margaret; Kirshstein, Rita

    2005-01-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports that present a national profile of the Student Support Services (SSS) Program. It presents grantee data from 2000-01 and 2001-02 for the first time and includes data from earlier years for comparison purposes. The following are appended: (1) Response Rates and Data Issues; (2) Risk Factors of 1995-96…

  16. FACCCTS: Journal of the Faculty Association of California Community Colleges, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Katherine, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of four Faculty Association of California Community Colleges (FACCC) newsletters. The September 2001 issue is entitled "Many Voices, One Goal," and contains the following articles: "Growing Pains, Faculty's Role in Governance," and "AB 1725 and Other War Stories," among others. The issue focuses largely on the many…

  17. Learning Languages: The Journal of the National Network for Early Language Learning, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbusch, Marcia H., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    These three journal issues contain the following articles: "Japanese at Mimosa Elementary School" (Azusa Uchihara); "A Successful Keypal Project Using Varied Technologies" (Jean L. Pacheco); "Promoting a Language-Proficient Society: What You Can Do" (Kathleen M. Marcos and Joy Kreeft Peyton); "Journal Reflections of a First-Year Teacher" (Sarah…

  18. Second-Tier Database for Ecosystem Focus, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Holmes, Chris; Muongchanh, Christine; Anderson, James J.

    2002-11-01

    The Second-Tier Database for Ecosystem Focus (Contract 00004124) provides direct and timely public access to Columbia Basin environmental, operational, fishery and riverine data resources for federal, state, public and private entities. The Second-Tier Database known as Data Access in Realtime (DART) integrates public data for effective access, consideration and application. DART also provides analysis tools and performance measures helpful in evaluating the condition of Columbia Basin salmonid stocks.

  19. Evaluation of New Canal Point Clones: 2001-2002 Harvest Season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty replicated experiments were conducted on 9 farms (representing 7 muck and 2 sand soils) to evaluate 48 new Canal Point (CP) clones of sugarcane from the CP 94, CP 95, CP 96, and CP 97 series. Experiments compared the cane and sugar yields of the new clones, complex hybrids of Saccharum spp., ...

  20. Charting New Paths: Rural Development in the South. 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State.

    The Southern Rural Development Center (SRDC) seeks to strengthen the capacity of the region's 29 land-grant institutions to address critical, contemporary rural development issues impacting the well-being of people and communities in the rural South. Work force development, education, leadership training, food security, civic engagement, urban…

  1. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Shaun; Smith, Brent; Cochran, Brian

    2003-04-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Middle Fork Oxbow Ranch. Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. This report is to be provided to the BPA by 30 April of each year. This is the first annual report filed for the Oxbow Ranch property.

  2. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2003-06-01

    We collected, radio-tagged, and PIT-tagged 41 bull trout at the Tucannon River Hatchery trap from May 17, through June 14, 2002. An additional 65 bull trout were also collected and PIT tagged by June 24, at which time we ceased PIT tagging operations because water temperatures were reaching 16.0 C or higher on a regular basis. Six radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 35 remained in the river through November 30, 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon Subbasin. We began to observe some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. These movements appeared to be associated with post spawning migrations. As of November 30, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 11.3, near Pataha Creek. None of the radio-tagged bull trout left the Tucannon Subbasin and entered the federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. We conducted some initial transmission tests of submerged radio tags at depths of 25, 35, 45, and 55 ft. in Lower Monumental Pool to test our capability of detection at these depths. Equipment used included Lotek model MCFT-3A transmitters, an SRX 400 receiver, a 4 element Yagi antenna, and a Lotek ''H'' antenna. Test results indicated that depth transmission of these tags was poor; only the transmitter placed at 25 ft. was audibly detectable.

  3. Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, Will

    2003-10-01

    This project focuses on the lower Klickitat River and its tributaries that provide or affect salmonid habitat. The overall goal is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of watersheds supporting anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss) which are listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU. Restoration activities are aimed at restoring stream processes by removing or mitigating watershed perturbances and improving habitat conditions and water quality. In addition to steelhead, habitat improvements benefit Chinook (O. tshawytscha) and coho (O. kisutch) salmon, resident rainbow trout, and enhance habitat for many terrestrial and amphibian wildlife species. Protection activities compliment restoration efforts within the subbasin by securing refugia and preventing degradation. Since 90% of the project area is in private ownership, maximum effectiveness will be accomplished via cooperation with state, federal, tribal, and private entities. The project addresses goals and objectives presented in the Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the 1994 NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. Feedback from the 2000 Provincial Review process indicated a need for better information management to aid development of geographic priorities. Thus, an emphasis has been placed on database development and a review of existing information prior to pursuing more extensive implementation. Planning and design was initiated on several restoration projects. These priorities will be refined in future reports as the additional data is collected and analyzed. Tasks listed are for the April 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 contract cycle, for which work was delayed during the summer of 2001 because the contract was not finalized until mid-August 2001. Accomplishments are provided for the September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 reporting period. During this reporting period, significant progress was made on acquisition and development of spatial data, monitoring of steelhead spawning, riparian revegetation, streamflow monitoring, completion of maintenance and repair work, completion of a working version of a habitat database, and completion of the Swale Creek assessment.

  4. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Jed; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-04-01

    In 2001, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled six properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and one property on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Since 1997, approximately 7 miles of critical salmonid habitat has been secured for restoration and protection under this project. Major accomplishments to date include the following: Secured approximately $250,000 in cost share; Secured 7 easements; Planted 30,000+ native plants; Installed 50,000+ cuttings; and Seeded 18 acres to native grass. Pre and post-project monitoring efforts were included for all projects, incorporating methodologies from CTUIR's Draft Monitoring Plan. Basin-wide monitoring also included the deployment of 6 thermographs to collect summer stream temperatures.

  5. Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Deborah; McAuley, W.; Maynard, Desmond

    2003-04-01

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Northwest Fisheries Science Center, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the Bonneville Power Administration, has established captive broodstock programs to aid recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). Captive broodstock and captive rearing programs are a form of artificial propagation that are emerging as an important component of restoration efforts for ESA-listed salmon populations that are at critically low numbers. Captive broodstocks, reared in captivity for the entire life cycle, couple the salmon's high fecundity with potentially high survival in protective culture to produce large numbers of juveniles in a single generation for supplementation of natural populations. The captive broodstocks discussed in this report were intended to protect the last known remnants of sockeye salmon that return to Redfish Lake in the Sawtooth Basin of Idaho at the headwaters of the Salmon River. This report addresses NMFS activities from 1 September 2001 to 31 August 2002 on the Redfish Lake sockeye salmon captive broodstock and captive rearing program. NMFS currently has broodstocks in culture from year classes 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001 in both the captive breeding and captive rearing programs. Offspring from these programs are being returned to Idaho to aid recovery efforts for the species.

  6. QED's School Market Trends: Teacher Buying Behavior & Attitudes, 2001-2002. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quality Education Data, Inc., Denver, CO.

    This study examined teachers' classroom material buying behaviors and trends. Data came from Quality Education Data's National Education Database, which includes U.S. K-12 public, private, and Catholic schools and districts. Researchers surveyed K-8 teachers randomly selected from QED's National Education Database. Results show that teachers spend…

  7. Asotin Creek ISCO Water Sample Data Summary: Water Year 2002, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Stacia

    2003-08-01

    The Pomeroy Ranger District operates 3 automated water samplers (ISCOs) in the Asotin Creek drainage in cooperation with the Asotin Model Watershed. The samplers are located on Asotin Creek: Asotin Creek at the mouth, Asotin Creek at Koch site, and South Fork Asotin Creek above the forks. At the end of Water Year (WY) 2001 we decided to sample from Oct. 1 through June 30 of each water year. This decision was based on the difficulty of obtaining good low flow samples, since the shallow depth of water often meant that instrument intakes were on the bed of the river and samples were contaminated with bed sediments. The greatest portion of suspended sediment is transported during the higher flows of fall and especially during the spring snow runoff period, and sampling the shorter season should allow characterization of the sediment load of the river. The ISCO water samplers collected a daily composite sample of 4 samples per day into one bottle at 6-hour intervals until late March when they were reprogrammed to collect 3 samples per day at 8-hour intervals. This was done to reduce battery use since battery failure had become an ongoing problem. The water is picked up on 24-day cycles and brought to the Forest Service Water Lab in Pendleton, OR. The samples are analyzed for total suspended solids (TSS), conductivity, and turbidity. A total dissolved solids value is estimated based on conductivity. The USGS gage, Asotin Creek at the mouth, No.13335050 has been discontinued and there are no discharge records available for this period.

  8. Econ Ed & the Fed: Resources and Information for Educators, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strahm, Sharon, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This Fall 2001-Spring 2002 newsletter provides resources and information to educators, particularly economics, history, social studies, and business educators, throughout the western district of the Federal Reserve System. The goal of the newsletter is to highlight new Federal Reserve teaching materials and resources, including Web sites,…

  9. NHEERL'S PEER-REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES, 2001-2002, TOTAL = 188 (LIST D)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report contains an attachment in Field 14 listing the citations for all of NHEERL's journal articles published during the period June 2001 through May 2002. The report is broken down by NHEERL Division, and it includes manuscripts that have undergone clearance (but have not...

  10. Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Brian C.; Duke, Bill B.

    2003-02-01

    Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, Oregon is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from August 22, 2001 to September 12, 2002. A total of 5,519 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,146 adult, 1,158 jack, and 970 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawytscha); 22,792 adult and 80 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 5,058 adult and 188 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 261 adult and 14 jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam for release. There were 5,359 summer steelhead; 622 adult, 1,041 jack and 867 subjack fall chinook; 22,513 adult and 76 jack coho; and 4,061 adult and 123 jack spring chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. In addition, 110 summer steelhead; 462 adult and 24 jack fall chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring chinook were collected for brood. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at rivermile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 141 days between February 22 and July 12, 2002. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 134 days and were trapped 5 days. An estimated 200 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from Westland. Approximately 90% of the juveniles transported were salmonids. No steelhead kelts were hauled from Westland this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened August 16, 2002. The bypass was run until October 31, 2001 with the exception of the period from August 29 to September 16. The bypass was reopened March 7, 2002 and ran until July 8. The juvenile trap was operated from July 8 to July 12 by the Umatilla Passage Evaluation project.

  11. Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Bunn, Paul; Johnson, June

    2002-06-01

    This report covers the following 3 chapters: Part 1--Improve wild steelhead trout smolt-to-adult survival rate information by PIT tagging additional wild steelhead trout juveniles. Part 2--Estimating the stock-recruitment relationship for Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon and forecasting wild/natural smolt production. Part 3--Monitoring age composition of wild adult spring and summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River basin.

  12. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berejikian, Barry A.; Tezak, E.P.; Endicott, Rick

    2002-08-01

    In the 2000 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion, NMFS identified six populations of steelhead and several salmon populations that had dropped to critically low levels and continue to decline. Following thorough risk-benefit analyses, captive propagation programs for some or all of the steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations may be required to reduce the risk of extinction, and more programs may be required in the future. Thus, captive propagation programs designed to maintain or rebuild steelhead populations require intensive and rigorous scientific evaluation, much like the other objectives of BPA Project 1993-056-00 currently underway for chinook (O. tshawytscha) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka). Pacific salmon reared to the adult stage in captivity exhibit poor reproductive performance when released to spawn naturally. Poor fin quality and swimming performance, incomplete development of secondary sex characteristics, changes in maturation timing, and other factors may contribute to reduced spawning success. Improving natural reproductive performance is critical for the success of captive broodstock programs in which adult-release is a primary reintroduction strategy for maintaining ESA-listed populations.

  13. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berejikian, Barry; Tezak, E.; Endicott, Rick

    2002-08-01

    The efficacy of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival and the fitness of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. The following summarizes some of the work performed and results from the FY 2001 performance period: (1) The incidence of male maturation of age-1 chinook salmon was significantly reduced by reducing growth in the first year of rearing. (2) Experimentally manipulated growth rates of captively-reared coho salmon had significant effects on female maturation rate, egg size, and fecundity, and the effects were stage-specific (i.e., pre-smolt vs. post-smolt). (3) A combination of Renogen and MT239 vaccination of yearling chinook salmon given an acute R. salmoninarum challenge had a significantly longer survival time than the mock-vaccinated group. The survival time was marginally higher than was seen in acutely challenged fish vaccinated with either Renogen or MT239 alone and suggests that a combination vaccine of Renogen and MT239 may be useful as both a prophylactic and therapeutic agent against BKD. (4) Full-sib (inbred) groups of chinook salmon have thus far exhibited lower ocean survival than half-sib and non-related groups. Effects of inbreeding on fluctuating asymmetry did not follow expected patterns. (5) Sockeye salmon were exposed to specific odorants at either the alevin/emergent fry stage or the smolt stage to determine the relative importance of odorant exposure during key developmental periods and the importance of exposure duration. (6) Experimental studies to determine the effects of exercise conditioning on steelhead reproductive behavior and the effects of male body size on chinook salmon fertilization success during natural spawning were completed.

  14. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided project funding support and program integration assistance. A stock of redband rainbow trout, were discovered in 2001 in an isolated section of Bridge Creek above a set of waterfalls. DNA microsatellite analysis was conducted at the University of Idaho and indicated that very little if any hybridization. The targeted species in the genetic analysis was red band/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss spp.). The sub-contract is with Madison Powell and Joyce Faler at the Center for Salmonid and Freshwater Species at Risk at the University of Idaho/HFCES. DNA analysis used mitochondrial and nuclear RFLP markers along with two microsatellite loci. Sample populations were screened for detectable levels of introgressive hybridization arising from possible admixtures of hatchery rainbow trout with native red band trout.

  15. Design and performance of an ionisation chamber for the measurement of low alpha-activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, A.; Hutsch, J.; Krüger, F.; Sobiella, M.; Wilsenach, H.; Zuber, K.

    2016-04-01

    A new ionisation chamber for alpha-spectroscopy has been built from radio-pure materials for the purpose of investigating long lived alpha-decays. The measurement makes use of pulse shape analysis to discriminate between signal and background events. The design and performance of the chamber is described in this paper. A background rate of (10.9 ± 0.6) counts per day in the energy region of 1-9 MeV was achieved with a run period of 30.8 days. The background is dominantly produced by radon daughters.

  16. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  17. Forensic applications of desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Morelato, Marie; Beavis, Alison; Kirkbride, Paul; Roux, Claude

    2013-03-10

    Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an emerging analytical technique that enables in situ mass spectrometric analysis of specimens under ambient conditions. It has been successfully applied to a large range of forensically relevant materials. This review assesses and highlights forensic applications of DESI-MS including the analysis and detection of illicit drugs, explosives, chemical warfare agents, inks and documents, fingermarks, gunshot residues and drugs of abuse in urine and plasma specimens. The minimal specimen preparation required for analysis and the sensitivity of detection achieved offer great advantages, especially in the field of forensic science. PMID:23498998

  18. Estimation of useful yield in surface analysis using single photon ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B. V.; Pellin, M. J.; Moore, J. F.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Savina, M. R.; Tripa, C. E.

    2003-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and laser desorption photoionisation (LDPI) have been used to investigate the desorption of molecules from self-assembled monolayers of phenylsulphides. LDPI, using an F 2 excimer laser to single photon ionise gave the lowest fragmentation. A useful yield greater than 0.5% was found for analysis of diphenyldisulphide self-assembled monolayers. It is shown that using a free electron laser to postionise will lead, in the future, to analysis of many atoms and molecules with useful yields approaching 30%.

  19. Investigating ionisation cluster size distribution due to sub-1 keV electrons in view of Heisenberg's Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Palmans, H.; Hao, L.; Nisbet, A.

    2015-09-01

    As the wavelengths of low energy electrons become comparable with the length scale of the mean ionisation step size, each event particle should be treated with care as the condition outlined in Heisenberg's uncertainty principle (HUP) should also be satisfied. Within this quantum-classical regime, spatial delocalisations of individual ionisation event sites that are generated outside the target region are calculated, and particular attention is given to the validity of using classical transport methods in simulations of nanodosimetric parameters such as mean cluster size, first and second moments, variance and cumulative frequency of ionisation cluster-size probability distributions. This paper presents the comparison between conventionally calculated nanodosimetric quantities and the ones where interacting particles are treated semi-classically with spatial uncertainties satisfied by HUP. The simulated primary charged particles are electrons of energies between 100 eV and 1 keV in DNA equivalent target aqueous water volumes using GEANT4-DNA.

  20. Variable filtered photographic film as a radiation detector for environmental radiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Zafri Azran Abdul; Junet, Laila Kalidah; Hazali, Norazlanshah; Abdullah, Abdul Adam; Hanafiah, Megat Ahmad Kamal Megat

    2013-05-01

    Environmental radiation is an ionising radiation that present in the natural environment which mostly originates from cosmic rays and radionuclide agents in the environment. This may lead the population to be exposed to the radiation. Therefore, the environmental radiation needs to be observed cautiously to minimize the impact of radiation. However, there is no specific or proper monitoring device that provides an outdoor environmental radiation monitoring. Hence, a new outdoor environmental radiation monitoring device was developed. A photographic film has been chosen as a dosimeter. The purpose of this study was to prove the covered photographic film attached with variable filter can be used to develop environmental radiation monitoring device to detect the ionising radiation. The filter used was variable thickness of plastic, aluminium (Al) and lead (Pb). The result from the study showed that the mean optical density (OD) values for medium speed film are in the range 0.41 to 0.73, and for fast speed film the OD values are in the range 0.51 to 1.35. The OD values decreased when the filter was attached. This has proven that the photographic film can be used to detect radiation and fast speed film was more sensitive compared to medium speed film.

  1. Ionisation effects on the permeation of pharmaceutical compounds through silicone membrane.

    PubMed

    Waters, L J; Bhuiyan, A K M M H

    2016-05-01

    Silicone membrane is frequently used as an in vitro skin mimic whereby experiments incorporate a range of buffered media which may vary in pH. As a consequence of such variability in pH there is a corresponding variability in the degree of ionisation which in turn, could influence permeation through the mainly hydrophobic-rich membrane structure. This study reports the effect of pH on the permeation of five model compounds (benzoic acid, benzotriazole, ibuprofen, ketoprofen and lidocaine). For the five compounds analysed, each at three distinct percentages of ionisation, it was found that the greater extent of permeation was always for the more 'neutral', i.e. more greatly unionised, species rather than the anionic or cationic species. These findings fit with the theory that the hydrophobic membrane encourages permeation of 'lipid-like' structures, i.e. the more unionised form of compounds. However, results obtained with an Inverse Gas Chromatography Surface Energy Analyser (iGC SEA) indicate the membrane surface to be an electron dense environment. In the knowledge that unionised forms of compounds permeate (rather than the charged species) this negatively charged surface was not anticipated, i.e. the basic membrane surface did not appear to affect permeation. PMID:26896663

  2. High throughput volatile fatty acid skin metabolite profiling by thermal desorption secondary electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Helen J; Reynolds, James C; Riazanskaia, Svetlana; Thomas, C L Paul

    2014-09-01

    The non-invasive nature of volatile organic compound (VOC) sampling from skin makes this a priority in the development of new screening and diagnostic assays. Evaluation of recent literature highlights the tension between the analytical utility of ambient ionisation approaches for skin profiling and the practicality of undertaking larger campaigns (higher statistical power), or undertaking research in remote locations. This study describes how VOC may be sampled from skin and recovered from a polydimethylsilicone sampling coupon and analysed by thermal desorption (TD) interfaced to secondary electrospray ionisation (SESI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) for the high throughput screening of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from human skin. Analysis times were reduced by 79% compared to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods (GC-MS) and limits of detection in the range 300 to 900 pg cm(-2) for VFA skin concentrations were obtained. Using body odour as a surrogate model for clinical testing 10 Filipino participants, 5 high and 5 low odour, were sampled in Manilla and the samples returned to the UK and screened by TD-SESI-MS and TD-GC-MS for malodour precursors with greater than >95% agreement between the two analytical techniques. Eight additional VFAs were also identified by both techniques with chains 4 to 15 carbons long being observed. TD-SESI-MS appears to have significant potential for the high throughput targeted screening of volatile biomarkers in human skin. PMID:24992564

  3. [Radiation-induced cancers].

    PubMed

    Dutrillaux, B

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low dose range i.e., population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations of tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. PMID:9868399

  4. High-resolution laser spectroscopy with the Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Day Goodacre, T.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heylen, H.; Kron, T.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Smith, A. J.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2016-06-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN has achieved high-resolution resonance ionisation laser spectroscopy with a full width at half maximum linewidth of 20(1) MHz for 219,221 Fr, and has measured isotopes as short lived as 5 ms with 214 Fr. This development allows for greater precision in the study of hyperfine structures and isotope shifts, as well as a higher selectivity of single-isotope, even single-isomer, beams. These achievements are linked with the development of a new laser laboratory and new data-acquisition systems.

  5. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordienko, A V; Mavritskii, O B; Egorov, A N; Pechenkin, A A; Savchenkov, D V

    2014-12-31

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Effects of ionised or chelated water-soluble mineral mixture supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood characteristics, meat quality and intestinal microbiota in broilers.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, S D; Lee, B R; Kim, I H

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of dietary supplementation of water-soluble ionised or chelated mineral mixture on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood characteristics, relative organ weight, meat quality and excreta microflora in broilers. A total of 408 Arbor Acres broilers (17 birds in 8 replicate pens) were randomly allocated into one of the following three treatments: (1) Control/basal diet (CON), (2) T1 (basal diet + 0.5% ionised mineral mixture solution, pH 3.0) and (3) T2 (basal diet + 0.5% chelated mineral mixture solution, pH 3.0). The body weight gain was greater and feed conversion ratio was lower in broilers supplemented with ionised or chelated mineral liquid complex compared to CON during the grower and overall phase of the experiment. No significant effect in the concentration of Ca and P in the blood was observed in birds supplemented with ionised or chelated mineral mixture solution. No adverse effects were observed in organ weight and meat quality with ionised or chelated mineral mixture supplementation. Regarding intestinal microbiota counts there was a reduction of Escherichia coli counts in the small intestine in ionised mineral supplemented birds. In the large intestine, E. coli as well as Salmonella populations were reduced in ionised mineral supplemented birds. In conclusion, ionised or chelated minerals have partial positive effects in improving growth performance and reducing pathogenic bacteria load in the gastro-intestinal tract. PMID:27088481

  7. Cosmic radiation in commercial aviation.

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, Michael

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge of cosmic radiation and its applicability to commercial aviation. Galactic cosmic radiation emanates from outside the solar system, while occasionally a disturbance in the suns' atmosphere leads to a surge in radiation particles. Protection is provided by the suns' magnetic field, the earths' magnetic field, and the earths' atmosphere. Dose rates are dependent on the altitude, the geomagnetic latitude and the solar cycle. For occupational exposure to ionising radiation, which includes aircrew, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends maximum mean body effective dose limits of 20mSv/yr (averaged over 5 years, with a maximum in any 1 year of 50mSv). Radiation doses can be measured during flight or may be calculated using a computer-modelling program such as CARI, EPCARD, SIEVERT or PCAIRE. Mean ambient equivalent dose rates are consistently reported in the region of 4-5microSv/h for long-haul pilots and 1-3microSv/h for short-haul, giving an annual mean effective exposure of the order 2-3mSv for long-haul and 1-2mSv for short-haul pilots. Epidemiological studies of flight crew have not shown conclusive evidence for any increase in cancer mortality or cancer incidence directly attributable to ionising radiation exposure. Whilst there is no level of radiation exposure below which effects do not occur, current evidence indicates that the probability of airline crew or passengers suffering adverse health effects as a result of exposure to cosmic radiation is very low. PMID:18486066

  8. Evidence For The Tongue of Ionisation In The Winter Dayside Ionosphere Over Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryse, S. E.; Sims, R. W.; Moen, J.

    Results are presented from a multi-instrument investigation of the dayside ionosphere at high latitudes, under conditions of Bz<0, that provide evidence for the tongue- of-ionisation (TOI) in winter over Svalbard. The TOI, transporting photoionisation from sub-auroral latitudes into the polar cap, has been identified in three successive tomography images at latitudes on the equatorward edge of the auroral region in the post-noon sector. Simultaneous observations by the ESR incoherent scatter radar re- veal cold plasma of increased density in the vicinity of the throat region where the TOI enters the polar cap. Supporting evidence for the feature is provided by optical emissions measured by meridian scanning photometers, together with plasma drift and particle observations from DMSP satellites. The observations are discussed in light of earlier modelling studies of the TOI.

  9. Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of low molecular weight synthetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anthony T; Williams, Jonathan P; Scrivens, James H

    2006-01-01

    A range of low molecular weight synthetic polymers has been characterised by means of desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) combined with both mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Accurate mass experiments were used to aid the structural determination of some of the oligomeric materials. The polymers analysed were poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(alpha-methyl styrene). An application of the technique for characterisation of a polymer used as part of an active ingredient in a pharmaceutical tablet is described. The mass spectra and tandem mass spectra of all of the polymers were obtained in seconds, indicating the sensitivity of the technique. PMID:16912984

  10. Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry: Sensitive and Quantitative Chemical Depth Profiling of Solid Materials.

    PubMed

    Riedo, Andreas; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Direct quantitative and sensitive chemical analysis of solid materials with high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction is of high importance in various fields of analytical research, ranging from in situ space research to the semiconductor industry. Accurate knowledge of the chemical composition of solid materials allows a better understanding of physical and chemical processes that formed/altered the material and allows e.g. to further improve these processes. So far, state-of-the-art techniques such as SIMS, LA-ICP-MS or GD-MS have been applied for chemical analyses in these fields of research. In this report we review the current measurement capability and the applicability of our Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (instrument name LMS) for the chemical analysis of solids with high spatial resolution. The most recent chemical analyses conducted on various solid materials, including e.g. alloys, fossils and meteorites are discussed. PMID:27131112

  11. Chemical profile of mango (Mangifera indica L.) using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Bruno G; Costa, Helber B; Ventura, José A; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Barroso, Maria E S; Correia, Radigya M; Pimentel, Elisângela F; Pinto, Fernanda E; Endringer, Denise C; Romão, Wanderson

    2016-08-01

    Mangifera indica L., mango fruit, is consumed as a dietary supplement with purported health benefits; it is widely used in the food industry. Herein, the chemical profile of the Ubá mango at four distinct maturation stages was evaluated during the process of growth and maturity using negative-ion mode electrospray ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI(-)FT-ICR MS) and physicochemical characterisation analysis (total titratable acidity (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), TSS/TA ratio, and total polyphenolic content). Primary (organic acids and sugars) and secondary metabolites (polyphenolic compounds) were mostly identified in the third maturation stage, thus indicating the best stage for harvesting and consuming the fruit. In addition, the potential cancer chemoprevention of the secondary metabolites (phenolic extracts obtained from mango samples) was evaluated using the induction of quinone reductase activity, concluding that fruit polyphenols have the potential for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26988473

  12. Carrier-envelope phase effects in few-cycle ionisation of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielpinski, David; Wallace, W. C.; Pullen, M. G.; Ghafur, O.; Laban, D. E.; Palmer, A. J.; Hanne, G. F.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Bartschat, K.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.; Tong, X.-M.; Quiney, H. M.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.

    2012-06-01

    The control of strong-field photoionization with laser carrier-envelope phase (CEP) is the key enabling technique for attosecond science. Currently, quantitatively accurate ab initio simulations of this process can only be carried out for atomic hydrogen. We have observed CEP effects in the above-threshold ionisation of atomic hydrogen for the first time. The modulation due to CEP is mapped over a wide range of laser intensity and electron energy. The data is compared with ab initio simulations for the time dependent Schr"odinger equation carried out using three separate methodologies, as well as a semi-ab initio simulation method. We find reasonable agreement between experiment and all simulations over the entire sampled parameter space. Our results point the way toward accurate calibration of absolute laser CEP by means of the uniquely calculable hydrogen system.

  13. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, T.; Booth, M.; Benyezzar, M.; Bacak, A.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Topping, D. O.; Percival, C.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  14. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  15. Simultaneous determination of volatile and non-volatile nitrosamines in processed meat products by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation and electrospray ionisation.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, S S; Duedahl-Olesen, L; Granby, K

    2014-02-21

    A sensitive, selective and generic method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the contents (μgkg(-1) range) of both volatile nitrosamines (VNA) and non-volatile nitrosamines (NVNA) in processed meat products. The extraction procedure only requires basic laboratory equipment and a small volume of organic solvent. Separation and quantification were performed by the developed LC-(APCI/ESI)MS/MS method. The method was validated using spiked samples of three different processed meat products. Satisfactory recoveries (50-130%) and precisions (2-23%) were obtained for eight VNA and six NVNAs with LODs generally between 0.2 and 1μgkg(-1), though for a few analyte/matrix combinations higher LODs were obtained (3 to 18μgkg(-1)). The validation results show that results obtained for one meat product is not always valid for other meat products. We were not able to obtain satisfactory results for N-nitrosohydroxyproline (NHPRO), N-nitrosodibenzylamine (NDBzA) and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA). Application of the APCI interface improved the sensitivity of the method, because of less matrix interference, and gave the method a wider scope, as some NAs were ionisable only by APCI. However, it was only possible to ionize N-nitroso-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NTCA) and N-nitroso-2-methyl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NMTCA) by ESI. The validated method was applied for the analysis of processed meat products and contents of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), N-nitrosomethylaniline (NMA), N-nitrosoproline (NPRO), NTCA, and NMTCA were found in one or several nitrite cured meat products, whereas none were detected in non-nitrite cured bacon. PMID:24468241

  16. Dose measurements in pulsed radiation fields with commercially available measuring components.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Sabrina; Hupe, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    Dose measurements in pulsed radiation fields with dosemeters using the counting technique are known to be inappropriate. Therefore, there is a demand for a portable device able to measure the dose in pulsed radiation fields. As a detector, ionisation chambers seem to be a good alternative. In particular, using a secondary standard ionisation chamber in combination with a reliable charge-measuring system would be a good solution. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) uses secondary standard ionisation chambers in combination with PTB-made measuring electronics for dose measurements at its reference fields. However, for general use, this equipment is too complex. For measurements on-site, a mobile special electronic system [Hupe, O. and Ankerhold, U. Determination of ambient and personal dose equivalent for personnel and cargo security screening. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 121: (4), 429-437 (2006)] has been used successfully. Still, for general use, there is a need for a much simpler but a just as good solution. A measuring instrument with very good energy dependence for H*(10) is the secondary standard ionisation chamber HS01. An easy-to-use and commercially available electrometer for measuring the generated charges is the UNIDOS by PTW Freiburg. Depending on the expected dose values, the ionisation chamber used can be selected. In addition, measurements have been performed by using commercially available area dosemeters, e.g. the Mini SmartION 2120S by Thermo Scientific, using an ionisation chamber and the Szintomat 6134 A/H by Automess, using a scintillation detector. PMID:26056377

  17. Probing Radiation Damage at the Molecular Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, N. J.; Smialek, M. A.; Moore, S. A.; Folkard, M.; Hoffmann, S. V.

    2006-12-01

    Radiation damage of DNA and other cellular components has traditionally been attributed to ionisation via direct impact of high-energy quanta or by complex radical chemistry. However recent research has shown that strand breaks in DNA may be initiated by secondary electrons and is strongly dependent upon the target DNA base identity. Such research provides the fascinating perspective that it is possible that radiation damage may be described and understood at an individual molecular level introducing new possibilites for therapy and perhaps providing an insight into the origins of life.

  18. The features of radiation dose variations onboard ISS and Mir space station: comparative study.

    PubMed

    Tverskaya, L V; Panasyuk, M I; Reizman, S Ya; Sosnovets, E N; Teltsov, M V; Tsetlin, V V

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of the ISS-measured radiation dose variations since August 2000 is studied. Use is made of the data obtained with the R-16 instrument, which consists of two ionization chambers behind different shielding thicknesses. The doses recorded during solar energetic particle (SEP) events are compared with the data obtained also by R-16 on Mir space station. The SEP events in the solar maximum of the current cycle make a much smaller contribution to the radiation dose compared with the October 1989 event recorded on Mir space station. In the latter event, the proton intensity was peaking during a strong magnetic storm. The storm-time effect of solar proton geomagnetic cutoff decreases on dose variations is estimated. The dose variations on Mir space stations due to formation of a new radiation belt of high-energy protons and electrons during a sudden commencement of March 24, 1991 storm are also studied. It was for the first time throughout the ISS and Mir dose measurement period that the counting rates recorded by both R-16 channels on ISS in 2001-2002 were nearly the same during some time intervals. This effect may arise from the decreases of relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. PMID:15881786

  19. Plasma formation on a metal surface under combined action of laser and microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, A P; Shaparev, N Ya

    2013-10-31

    By means of numerical modelling of the combined effect of laser (1.06 mm) and microwave (10{sup 10} – 10{sup 13} s{sup -1}) radiation on the aluminium surface in vacuum it is shown that the additional action of microwave radiation with the frequency 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} provides complete ionisation of the metal vapour (for the values of laser radiation duration and intensity used in the calculations), while in the absence of microwave radiation the vapour remains weakly ionised. The mathematical model used accounts for the processes, occurring in the condensed phase (heat conduction, melting), the evaporation and the kinetic processes in the resulting vapour. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. The use of particle beam mass spectrometry for the measurement of impurities in a nabumetone drug substance, not easily amenable to atmospheric pressure ionisation techniques.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J C; Hawtin, P N; Monté, S; Balogh, M; Jones, T

    2001-01-01

    Liquid chromatography/particle beam mass spectrometry (LC/PB-MS) was used for the structural elucidation of some impurities in nabumetone as this compound poorly ionises by atmospheric pressure ionisation (API) techniques. PB-MS was optimised for nabumetone and a sensitivity study was carried out. To obtain full scan electron ionisation spectra a minimum of 100 ng of compound on column was needed. By using 20 mg/mL solutions of nabumetone, impurities at levels of about 250 ppm mass fraction relative to nabumetone could be detected. Results were compared with LC/API-MS and previous GC/MS. PMID:11223957

  1. Radiation-MHD Simulations of Pillars and Globules in HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, J.

    2012-07-01

    Implicit and explicit raytracing-photoionisation algorithms have been implemented in the author's radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code. The algorithms are described briefly and their efficiency and parallel scaling are investigated. The implicit algorithm is more efficient for calculations where ionisation fronts have very supersonic velocities, and the explicit algorithm is favoured in the opposite limit because of its better parallel scaling. The implicit method is used to investigate the effects of initially uniform magnetic fields on the formation and evolution of dense pillars and cometary globules at the boundaries of HII regions. It is shown that for weak and medium field strengths an initially perpendicular field is swept into alignment with the pillar during its dynamical evolution, matching magnetic field observations of the ‘Pillars of Creation’ in M16. A strong perpendicular magnetic field remains in its initial configuration and also confines the photoevaporation flow into a bar-shaped, dense, ionised ribbon which partially shields the ionisation front.

  2. A miniaturised laser ablation/ionisation analyser for investigation of elemental/isotopic composition with the sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    analysis of solid materials on the planetary surfaces (Rohner et al., 2003). Initial laboratory tests that were conducted with an IR laser radiation for the ablation, atomisation and ionisation of the material, indicated a high performance of the instrument in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range and mass resolution (Tulej et al., 2011). After some technical improvements and implementation of a computer-controlled performance optimiser we have achieved further improvements of both, the instrumental sensitivity down to sub-ppm level and reproducibility of the measurements. We will demonstrate the potential of the mass analyser to perform the quantitative elemental analysis of solids with a spatial (vertical, lateral) resolution commensurate with typical grain sizes, and its capabilities for investigation of isotopic patterns with accuracy and precision comparable to that of large analytical laboratory instruments, e.g., TIMS, SIMS, LA-ICP-MS. The results can be of considerable interest for in situ dating or investigation of other fine isotopic fractionation effects including studies of bio-markers.

  3. High-performance liquid chromatographic, capillary electrophoretic and capillary electrophoretic-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometric analysis of selected alkaloid groups.

    PubMed

    Stöckigt, Joachim; Sheludk, Yuri; Unger, Matthias; Gerasimenko, Irina; Warzecha, Heribert; Stöckigt, Detlef

    2002-08-16

    Systems for efficient separation of selected alkaloid groups by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE) and capillary electrophoresis coupled with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS) are described. The optimized HPLC system was applied for the separation of 23 standard indole alkaloids as well as for qualitative and quantitative analyses of crude alkaloid extracts of Rauvolfia serpentina X Rhazya stricta hybrid cell cultures. The developed conditions for CE analysis proved to be efficient for separation of mixtures of standard indole and beta-carboline alkaloids. The described buffer system is also applicable in the combination of CE with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. This analytical technique allowed the separation and identification of components of standard indole alkaloid mixture as well as crude extracts of R. serpentina roots, R. serpentina cell suspension cultures and cortex of Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco. The influence of buffer composition and analyte structures on separation is discussed. PMID:12219932

  4. Investigation of the ionisation density dependence of the glow curve characteristics of LIF:MG,TI (TLD-100)

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Horowitz, A.; Oster, L.; Marino, S.; Datz, H.; Margaliot, M.

    2008-01-01

    The dependence of the shape of the glow curve of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) on ionisation density was investigated using irradiation with 90Sr/90Y beta rays, 60 and 250 kVp X rays, various heavy-charged particles and 0.2 and 14 MeV neutrons. Special attention is focused on the properties of high-temperature thermoluminescence; specifically, the behaviour of the high-temperature ratio (HTR) of Peaks 7 and 8 as a function of batch and annealing protocol. The correlation of Peaks 7 and 8 with average linear-energy-transfer (LET) is also investigated. The HTR of Peak 7 is found to be independent of LET for values of LET approximately >30 keV µm−1. The behaviour of the HTR of Peak 8 with LET is observed to be erratic, which suggests that applications using the HTR should separate the contributions of Peaks 7 and 8 using computerised glow curve deconvolution. The behaviour of the HTR following neutron irradiation is complex and not fully understood. The shape of composite Peak 5 is observed to be broader following high ionisation alpha particle irradiation, suggesting that the combined use of the HTR and the shape of Peak 5 could lead to improved ionisation density discrimination for particles of high LET. PMID:18667402

  5. Matrix-free mass spectrometric imaging using laser desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Richard J A; Pitt, Andrew R; Harrison, David; Weidt, Stefan K; Langridge-Smith, Pat R R; Barrett, Michael P; Logan Mackay, C

    2011-04-15

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool in metabolomics and proteomics for the spatial localization and identification of pharmaceuticals, metabolites, lipids, peptides and proteins in biological tissues. However, sample preparation remains a crucial variable in obtaining the most accurate distributions. Common washing steps used to remove salts, and solvent-based matrix application, allow analyte spreading to occur. Solvent-free matrix applications can reduce this risk, but increase the possibility of ionisation bias due to matrix adhesion to tissue sections. We report here the use of matrix-free MSI using laser desorption ionisation performed on a 12 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. We used unprocessed tissue with no post-processing following thaw-mounting on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI) indium-tin oxide (ITO) target plates. The identification and distribution of a range of phospholipids in mouse brain and kidney sections are presented and compared with previously published MALDI time-of-flight (TOF) MSI distributions. PMID:21416534

  6. Formation of 2-propanol in condensed molecular films of acetaldehyde following electron impact ionisation-induced proton transfer*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrmann, Tobias; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies on thin condensed layers of acetaldehyde have previously revealed that electron exposure at an energy above the ionisation threshold leads to formation of 2-propanol. However, the mechanism of this reaction remained unclear. Therefore, a computational approach is used to explore the electron-induced reactions of acetaldehyde yielding 2-propanol. Starting from hydrogen-bonded dimers of acetaldehyde we show that the initial ionisation event triggers proton transfer between the two acetaldehyde moieties resulting in a hydrogen-bonded complex of a [OCCH3] radical and a protonated acetaldehyde cation. Given an excess energy of up to 0.75 eV and a favourable arrangement, a methyl radical released upon dissociation of the CC bond within the [OCCH3] radical can migrate to the carbonyl carbon of the protonated acetaldehyde cation. This produces a 2-propanol radical cation and CO. Neutral 2-propanol is then obtained by recombination with a second electron. A mechanism involving ionisation-driven proton transfer is thus proposed as pathway to the formation of 2-propanol during electron exposure of condensed layers of acetaldehyde.

  7. Resolving Ionisation and Metallicity on Parsec Scales Across Primordial Analogues with HST-WFC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B. L.; Auger, M.; Calzetti, D.; Kewley, L.; Aloisi, A.; Pettini, M.; Trussler, J.

    2016-06-01

    Nearby Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies are excellent laboratories for conducting detailed spatially resolved spectroscopic analyses of star-formation (SF), feedback, and chemical evolution in relatively pristine, low-metallicity environments analogous to those thought to exist in the early Universe. In this talk I will show a new, extensive dataset of narrow-band HST-WFC3 imaging where I essentially use HST as a high-spatial-resolution IFU to map six major emission lines in unprecedented detail, including HeII emission from WR stars. In this pioneering study, I spatially resolve diagnostic line ratios on sub-pc scales in two BCDs and deduce which ionisation mechanisms (e.g. shocks and/or photoionisation) are at work and assess their role in shaping the global galaxy properties. Moreover, I will present the first 'metallicity image' of a star-forming galaxy, revealing inhomogeneities on scales as small as <50~pc. This work not only demonstrates the benefits of high-resolution spatially-resolved observations in assessing the effects of feedback mechanisms and accurate chemical abundances, but also the limitations of emission line diagnostic tools which can break down on scales smaller than a H II region. Both aspects are especially relevant as we enter the era of extremely large telescopes, when observing structure on ˜~10~pc scales will no longer be limited to the local universe.

  8. 100 years of Cosmic Rays - from the ionisation of air to beyond the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Alan

    2012-03-01

    The study of cosmic rays has impacted on many disciplines, including astrophysics, particle physics, carbon dating and radio astronomy: it has thus had scientific and societal impact. They were discovered in 1912 as a result of the efforts by some of the most distinguished scientists of that era, puzzled by their inability to explain the discharge of ionisation chambers. I will describe some of the early work that led, inter alia, to the discovery of the positron, the muon and the first strange particles and thus to the birth of particle physics. In 1938 it was found that showers of particles that arrive at the earth simultaneously are produced by primary cosmic rays of ˜10^15 eV, about 10^5 times more energetic than any particles that had been contemplated before. I will discuss how study of these showers has led to the discovery of cosmic rays of energies as great as 3 x 10^20 eV, challenging our understanding of where and how they are created. Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, the largest cosmic-ray detector ever built, is now being used for astrophysical studies and to give glimpses of some hadronic physics at centre-of-mass energies more than 4 times greater than are accessible at the LHC.

  9. Artificially-aged cachaça samples characterised by direct infusion electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Patterson P; Resende, Ana M M; Augusti, Daniella V; Badotti, Fernanda; Gomes, Fátima de Cássia O; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Eberlin, Marcos N; Augusti, Rodinei

    2014-01-15

    Direct infusion electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode [ESI(-)-MS] was employed to evaluate the authenticity of aged cachaças, a traditional and valuable Brazilian alcoholic beverage prepared from the distillation of brewed sugarcane juice and aged in barrels made of common woods. Counterfeit samples were prepared by adding dyes, sawdust or essences to a freshly-distiled, much less valuable sample (white cachaça) to simulate the 1-2years long natural ageing in wooden barrels. A simple visual inspection revealed remarkable differences between the ESI(-)-MS of the authentic samples (aged in oak or amburana casks) and the artificially-aged counterfeit samples. A set of diagnostic ions were detectable in the ESI(-)-MS of the authentic samples aged in oak (m/z 197, 241, 301 and 307) and amburana (m/z 271 and 377/379). This fast and direct methodology seems useful as a routine procedure to monitor this highly profitable and common counterfeit practice. PMID:24054215

  10. Application of positive mode atmospheric chemical ionisation to distinguish epimeric oleanolic and ursolic acids.

    PubMed

    Townley, Chloe; Brettell, Rhea C; Bowen, Richard D; Gallagher, Richard T; Martin, William H C

    2015-01-01

    A new and more reliable method is reported for distinguishing the equatorial and axial epimers of oleanolic and ursolic acids and related triterpenoids based primarily on the relative abundance of the [M+H](+) and [M+-H(2)O](+) signals in their positive mode atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectra. The rate of elimination of water, which is the principal primary fragmentation of protonated oleanolic and ursolic acids, depends systematically on the stereochemistry of the hydroxyl group in the 3 position. For the b-epimer, in which the 3-hydroxyl substituent is in an equatorial position,[M+-H(2)O](+) is the base peak. In contrast, for the α-epimer, where the 3-hydroxyl group is axial, [M + H](+) is the base peak. This trend, which is general for a range of derivatives of oleanolic and ursolic acids, including the corresponding methyl esters, allows epimeric triterpenoids in these series to be securely differentiated. Confirmatory information is available from the collision-induced dissociation of the [M+-H(2)O](+) primary fragment ions, which follow different pathways for the species derived from axial and equatorial epimers of oleanolic and ursolic acids. These two pieces of independent spectral information permit the stereochemistry of epimeric oleanolic and ursolic acids (and selected derivatives) to be assigned with confidence without relying either on chromatographic retention times or referring to the spectra or other properties of authentic samples of these triterpenoids. PMID:26307724

  11. Beer fingerprinting by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Márová, Ivana; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2012-11-15

    A method allowing parallel fingerprinting of proteins and maltooligosaccharides directly from untreated beer samples is presented. These two classes of compounds were detected by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of beer mixed with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid solution. The maltooligosaccharide profiles acquired from the MALDI sample spot center were not found characteristic for beers of different source and technology. On the other hand, according to profiles containing protein signals acquired from crystals formed on the border of the MALDI sample spot, we were able to distinguish beer samples of the same brand produced by different breweries. The discriminatory abilities of the method were further examined on a set of 17 lager beers, where the fingerprints containing protein signals enabled resolution of majority of examined brands. We propose MALDI-TOF-MS profiling as a rapid tool for beer brewing technology process monitoring, quality control, and determination of beer authenticity. PMID:22868116

  12. Radiosensitization of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum using basil essential oil and ionizing radiation for food decontamination.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of basil oil, was determined for two pathogenic fungi of rice, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. The antifungal activity of the basil oil in combination with ionising radiation was then investigated to determine if basil oil caused radiosensit...

  13. Assessment of radiation protection practices among radiographers in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eze, Cletus Uche; Abonyi, Livinus Chibuzo; Njoku, Jerome; Irurhe, Nicholas Kayode; Olowu, Oluwabola

    2013-01-01

    Background: Use of ionising radiation in diagnostic radiography could lead to hazards such as somatic and genetic damages. Compliance to safe work and radiation protection practices could mitigate such risks. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and radiation protection practices among radiographers in Lagos, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The study was a prospective cross sectional survey. Convenience sampling technique was used to select four x-ray diagnostic centres in four tertiary hospitals in Lagos metropolis. Data were analysed with Epi- info software, version 3.5.1. Results: Average score on assessment of knowledge was 73%. Most modern radiation protection instruments were lacking in all the centres studied. Application of shielding devices such as gonad shield for protection was neglected mostly in government hospitals. Most x-ray machines were quite old and evidence of quality assurance tests performed on such machines were lacking. Conclusion: Radiographers within Lagos metropolis showed an excellent knowledge of radiation protection within the study period. Adherence to radiation protection practices among radiographers in Lagos metropolis during the period studied was, however, poor. Radiographers in Lagos, Nigeria should embrace current trends in radiation protection and make more concerted efforts to apply their knowledge in protecting themselves and patients from harmful effects of ionising radiation. PMID:24665152

  14. The Vertical Structure of Warm Ionised Gas in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaensler, B. M.; Madsen, G. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Mao, S. A.

    2008-11-01

    We present a new joint analysis of pulsar dispersion measures and diffuse Hα emission in the Milky Way, which we use to derive the density, pressure and filling factor of the thick disk component of the warm ionised medium (WIM) as a function of height above the Galactic disk. By excluding sightlines at low Galactic latitude that are contaminated by Hii regions and spiral arms, we find that the exponential scale-height of free electrons in the diffuse WIM is 1830-250+120 pc, a factor of two larger than has been derived in previous studies. The corresponding inconsistent scale heights for dispersion measure and emission measure imply that the vertical profiles of mass and pressure in the WIM are decoupled, and that the filling factor of WIM clouds is a geometric response to the competing environmental influences of thermal and non-thermal processes. Extrapolating the properties of the thick-disk WIM to mid-plane, we infer a volume-averaged electron density 0.014 +/- 0.001 cm-3, produced by clouds of typical electron density 0.34 +/- 0.06 cm-3 with a volume filling factor 0.04 +/- 0.01. As one moves off the plane, the filling factor increases to a maximum of ~30% at a height of ~1-1.5 kpc, before then declining to accommodate the increasing presence of hot, coronal gas. Since models for the WIM with a ~1 kpc scale-height have been widely used to estimate distances to radio pulsars, our revised parameters suggest that the distances to many high-latitude pulsars have been substantially underestimated.

  15. Ionised concentrations in calcium and magnesium buffers: Standards and precise measurement are mandatory.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, John A S; Kay, James W; Elder, Hugh Y

    2016-09-01

    In Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) buffer solutions the ionised concentrations ([X(2+)]) are either calculated or measured. Calculated values vary by up to a factor of seven due to the following four problems: 1) There is no agreement amongst the tabulated constants in the literature. These constants have usually to be corrected for ionic strength and temperature. 2) The ionic strength correction entails the calculation of the single ion activity coefficient, which involves non-thermodynamic assumptions; the data for temperature correction is not always available. 3) Measured pH is in terms of activity i.e. pHa. pHa measurements are complicated by the change in the liquid junction potentials at the reference electrode making an accurate conversion from H(+) activity to H(+) concentration uncertain. 4) Ligands such as EGTA bind water and are not 100% pure. Ligand purity has to be measured, even when the [X(2+)] are calculated. The calculated [X(2+)] in buffers are so inconsistent that calculation is not an option. Until standards are available, the [X(2+)] in the buffers must be measured. The Ligand Optimisation Method is an accurate and independently verified method of doing this (McGuigan & Stumpff, Anal. Biochem. 436, 29, 2013). Lack of standards means it is not possible to compare the published [Ca(2+)] in the nmolar range, and the apparent constant (K(/)) values for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding to intracellular ligands amongst different laboratories. Standardisation of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) buffers is now essential. The parameters to achieve this are proposed. PMID:26975789

  16. Detection of ultraviolet radiation using tissue equivalent radiochromic gel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bero, M. A.; Abukassem, I.

    2009-05-01

    Ferrous Xylenol-orange Gelatin gel (FXG) is known to be sensitive to ionising radiation such as γ and X-rays. The effect of ionising radiation is to produce an increase in the absorption over a wide region of the visible spectrum, which is proportional to the absorbed dose. This study demonstrates that FXG gel is sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and therefore it could functions as UV detector. Short exposure to UV radiation produces linear increase in absorption measured at 550nm, however high doses of UV cause the ion indicator colour to fad away in a manner proportional to the incident UV energy. Light absorbance increase at the rate of 1.1% per minute of irradiation was monitored. The exposure level at which the detector has linear response is comparable to the natural summer UV radiation. Evaluating the UV ability to pass through tissue equivalent gel materials shows that most of the UV gets absorbed in the first 5mm of the gel materials, which demonstrate the damaging effects of this radiation type on human skin and eyes. It was concluded that FXG gel dosimeter has the potential to offer a simple, passive ultraviolet radiation detector with sensitivity suitable to measure and visualises the natural sunlight UV exposure directly by watching the materials colour changes.

  17. An evaluation of radiation damage to solid state components flown in low earth orbit satellites.

    PubMed

    Shin, Myung-Won; Kim, Myung-Hyun

    2004-01-01

    The effects of total ionising radiation dose upon commercial off-the-shelf semiconductors fitted to satellites operating in low Earth orbit (LEO) conditions was evaluated. The evaluation was performed for the Korea Institute of Technology SATellite-1, (KITSAT-1) which was equipped with commercial solid state components. Two approximate calculation models for space radiation shielding were developed. Verification was performed by comparing the results with detailed three-dimensional calculations using the Monte-Carlo method and measured data from KITSAT-1. It was confirmed that the developed approximate models were reliable for satellite shielding calculations. It was also found that commercial semiconductor devices, which were not radiation hardened, could be damaged within their lifetime due to the total ionising dose they are subject to in the LEO environment. To conclude, an intensive shielding analysis should be considered when commercial devices are used. PMID:15103058

  18. Capillary electrophoresis with electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry for the characterisation of degradation products in aged papers.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Anne-Laurence; Seemann, Agathe; Lavédrine, Bertrand

    2012-01-30

    A methodology for capillary electrophoresis/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (CE/ESI-MS) was developed for the simultaneous analysis of degradation products from paper among two families of compounds: low molar mass aliphatic organic acids, and aromatic (phenolic and furanic) compounds. The work comprises the optimisation of the CE separation and the ESI-MS parameters for improved sensitivity with model compounds using two successive designs of experiments. The method was applied to the analysis of lignocellulosic paper at different stages of accelerated hygrothermal ageing. The compounds of interest were identified. Most of them could be quantified and several additional analytes were separated. PMID:22284496

  19. Ionisation and fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by femtosecond laser pulses at wavelengths resonant with cation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, L.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Tasker, A. D.; McKenna, P.; McCanny, T.; Kosmidis, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Jones, D. R.; Issac, R. C.; Jamieson, S.

    2002-07-01

    When femtosecond laser pulses irradiate hydrocarbon molecules, then many fragmentation channels evident in nanosecond irradiation are bypassed, providing a strong analytically useful parent ion. However a number of molecules show only a very small or indeed no parent ions and recent papers suggest that those that do not produce parent peaks have cation transitions in resonance with the femtosecond laser wavelength. This Letter shows that this resonance effect is not universal and some aromatic molecules not only show strong parent peaks but also doubly and triply ionised entities when their cation absorption spectrum is strongly resonant at either the 800 or 400 nm or indeed both.

  20. Chemotaxonomy of bacteria by comprehensive GC and GC-MS in electron impact and chemical ionisation mode.

    PubMed

    David, Frank; Tienpont, Bart; Sandra, Pat

    2008-10-01

    The analysis of the cellular lipidic fraction of bacteria is described. After hydrolysis and methylation, the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) are determined by 1-D GC using the Sherlock MIDI bacteria identification system, by comprehensive GC (GC x GC) and by GC-MS in electron impact (EI) and positive chemical ionisation (PCI) mode. With GC x GC, the enhanced selectivity and group type separation provides a more complete elucidation of the fatty acids in microorganisms. GC-EI-MS and GC-PCI-MS were helpful for confirmation. The bacteria selected in this study are Brevundimonas diminuta, Chryseobacterium gleum and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. PMID:18792008

  1. Some characteristics and effects of natural radiation.

    PubMed

    Mc Laughlin, J P

    2015-11-01

    Since life first appeared on the Earth, it has, in all its subsequent evolved forms including human, been exposed to natural radiation in the environment both from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources. Being an environmental mutagen, ionising natural radiation may have played a role of some significance in the evolution of early life forms on Earth. It has been estimated by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation that at the present time, exposure to natural radiation globally results in an annual average individual effective dose of about 2.4 mSv. This represents about 80 % of the total dose from all sources. The three most important components of natural radiation exposure are cosmic radiation, terrestrial radioactivity and indoor radon. Each of these components exhibits both geographical and temporal variabilities with indoor radon exposure being the most variable and also the largest contributor to dose for most people. In this account, an overview is given of the characteristics of the main components of the natural radiation environment and some of their effects on humans. In the case of cosmic radiation, these range from radiation doses to aircrew and astronauts to the controversial topic of its possible effect on climate change. In the case of terrestrial natural radiation, accounts are given of a number of human exposure scenarios. PMID:25904693

  2. New laboratory atomic data for neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements for astrophysics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Juliet C.; Nave, Gillian; Liggins, Florence; Clear, Christian; Ruffoni, Matthew; Sansonetti, Craig

    2015-08-01

    We present new laboratory spectroscopic measurements to produce atomic data for astrophysically important species: neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements.We use high resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometry (FTS) (resolving power up to 2x106 at 200nm) to measure atomic spectra, giving accurate line wavelengths (to a few parts in 108), atomic energy levels, hyperfine structure splitting and log gfs (accurate to a few %) (Ruffoni et al this meeting). These data are vital for astrophysical spectral analyses for: line identification, spectrum synthesis, elemental abundance determinations [eg 1], and disentangling of blends etc. It is not possible to theoretically calculate these atomic data to the accuracy needed for modern astrophysics applications.At Imperial College we have a unique visible-VUV FT spectrometer with short wavelength cut-off of 135nm. We supplement FTS data at shorter wavelengths with spectra recorded on the NIST 10.7m grating spectrograph (with phosphor image or photographic plates) and at longer wavelengths in the IR we use the NIST IR FT spectrometer.An elemental spectrum may contain thousands of spectral lines from the IR to VUV. We use these wavelengths to correct known atomic energy levels, and search for new atomic levels. The result is a classified linelist and accurate atomic energy levels.We present progress on iron group element atomic energy levels and wavelengths for V I and V II [2,3], Co III [4], Cr I, Mn I and Mn II, and Ni II.This work is supported by STFC(UK), The Leverhulme Trust, The Royal Society and NASA.References[1] Bergemann M, Pickering JC & Gehren T,“NLTE analysis of Co I/Co II lines in spectra of cool stars with new laboratory hyperfine splitting constants",MNRAS 401(2) 1334 (2010)[2] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V II”, ApJS 207,13 (2013)[3] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V I",ApJS 192,11 (2011)[4] Smillie DG

  3. Determination of chlorinated paraffins in sediments from the Firth of Clyde by gas chromatography with electron capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry and carbon skeleton analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection.

    PubMed

    Hussy, Ines; Webster, Lynda; Russell, Marie; Moffat, Colin

    2012-07-01

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are a group of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) of increasing concern, but are to date not widely investigated in the environment, largely due to the challenges involved in their quantification. Here, SCCPs were quantified in marine sediments from the Firth of Clyde, Scotland, by gas chromatography with electron capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-ECNIMS) and through carbon skeleton analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID), and the analytical challenges encountered are discussed. Concentrations in the sediments ranged from 0.4 to 69 μg kg(-1) when determined by GC-ECNIMS, and from 5.6 to 379 μg kg(-1) when determined by GC-FID. For 8 out of 11 samples, analysis by GC-FID gave higher results than analysis by GC-ECNIMS. Unexpected aspects of the analysis, such as the presence of high concentrations of longer chain chlorinated paraffins in the samples, are also presented. PMID:22417782

  4. Letter: characterisation and identification of spermine and spermidine derivatives in Microdesmis keayana and Microdesmis puberula roots by electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roumy, Vincent; Hennebelle, Thierry; Zamblé, Alexis; Zamblé Yao, Jacques; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

    2008-01-01

    Three new N(1),N(5),N(14)-tris(4- hydroxycinnamoyl)spermines were identified in hydromethanolic root extracts of Microdesmis keayana J. Léonard and Microdesmis puberula Hook f. The electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) technique with specific nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of hydrolysed products made it possible to identify N(1),N(5),N(14)-tris(p-coumaroyl)spermine, N(1)-feruloyl,N(5),N(14)-di(p-coumaroyl)spermine and N(1),N(5),N(14)-tris(feruloyl)spermine, named keayanines B, C and D, respectively. ESI-MS/MS analysis most effectively provided structural data although high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry was also used to characterise four other compounds from Microdesmis puberula-keayanidines A, B, C and keayanine A-which had already been identified in M. keayana. This chemical data is the first to be published for M. puberula which is a commonly used plant in Central African traditional medicine. PMID:18493101

  5. IAEA experience in communicating radiation risks through the RPOP website.

    PubMed

    Rehani, M M; Holmberg, O

    2015-07-01

    The authors report here their successful experience of communicating information to health professionals, patients and the public on benefits and risks of ionising radiation in medical applications. The approaches used have been based on giving importance to clinical benefits against risks, as well as safety in use against risk of use. Communicating brief messages against catchy questions with positive and pragmatic approach resulted in making website on radiation protection of patients (RPOP) as the top website of the world in this area. Credibility of information has been maintained. The results show immense outreach in 213 countries/territories. PMID:25813478

  6. Thermally annealed gold nanoparticles for surface-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry of low molecular weight analytes.

    PubMed

    Pilolli, Rosa; Ditaranto, Nicoletta; Di Franco, Cinzia; Palmisano, Francesco; Cioffi, Nicola

    2012-10-01

    Metal nanomaterials have an emerging role in surface-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) providing a useful tool to overcome some limitations intrinsically related to the use of conventional organic matrices in matrix-assisted LDI-MS. In this contribution, the possibility to use a stainless-steel-supported gold nanoparticle (AuNP) film as a versatile platform for SALDI-MS was assessed. A sacrificial anode electrosynthetic route was chosen in order to obtain morphologically controlled core-shell AuNPs; the colloidal AuNPs were, thereafter, drop cast onto a stainless-steel sample plate and the resulting AuNP film was thermally annealed in order to improve its effectiveness as LDI-MS promoter. Spectroscopic characterization of the nanostructured film by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was crucial for understanding how annealing induced changes in the surface chemistry and influenced the performance of AuNPs as desorption/ionisation promoter. In particular, it was demonstrated that the post-deposition treatments were essential to enhance the AuNP core/analyte interaction, thus resulting in SALDI-MS spectra of significantly improved quality. The AuNP films were applied to the detection of three different classes of low molecular weight (LMW) analytes, i.e. amino acids, peptides and LMW polymers, in order to demonstrate the versatility of this nanostructured material. PMID:22825677

  7. Vertical ionisation potentials of a number of crown ethers from charge transfer bands of their EDA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Sharma, Anubha; Nayak, Sandip K.; Mukherjee, Asok K.

    2002-11-01

    Vertical ionisation potentials ( IDv) of a number of crown ethers, viz. dibenzo-30-crown-10 (Crown 1), benzo-15-crown-5 (Crown 2), dibenzo-24-crown-8 (Crown 3), dicyclohexano-24-crown-8 (Crown 4) and 4'-nitrobenzo-15-crown-5 (Crown 5) are being reported for the first time from a study of EDA interaction of these crown ethers with a number of electron acceptors like C 60, C 70, o-chloranil, p-chloranil, 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ) and pyromellitic diimide (PMD). The study has been carried out in CCl 4 medium by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Charge transfer (CT) absorption bands in the 360-900 nm range have been found in each case (excepting the 60 fullerene-Crown 4 system). The vertical ionisation potentials ( IDv) of all the crown ethers thus determined show a good correlation with those calculated by the semiempirical AM1 method. Of the six acceptors under study the vertical electron affinity of PMD was not found in the literature. This has also been determined from an analysis of the present hνCT data.

  8. Solvent Separating Secondary Metabolites Directly from Biosynthetic Tissue for Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioactive metabolites are often heterogeneously expressed in tissues both spatially and over time. Therefore, traditional solvent extraction methods benefit from an understanding of the in situ sites of biosynthesis and storage to deal with heterogeneity and maximize yield. Recently, surface-assisted mass spectrometry (MS) methods namely nanostructure-assisted laser desorption ionisation (NALDI) and desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) surfaces have been developed to enable the direct detection of low molecular weight metabolites. Since direct tissue NALDI-MS or DIOS-MS produce complex spectra due to the wide variety of other metabolites and fragments present in the low mass range, we report here the use of “on surface” solvent separation directly from mollusc tissue onto nanostructured surfaces for MS analysis, as a mechanism for simplifying data annotation and detecting possible artefacts from compound delocalization during the preparative steps. Water, ethanol, chloroform and hexane selectively extracted a range of choline esters, brominated indoles and lipids from Dicathais orbita hypobranchial tissue imprints. These compounds could be quantified on the nanostructured surfaces by comparison to standard curves generated from the pure compounds. Surface-assisted MS could have broad utility for detecting a broad range of secondary metabolites in complex marine tissue samples. PMID:25786067

  9. Airborne hydrogen cyanide measurements using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer for the plume identification of biomass burning forest fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, M.; Bacak, A.; Muller, J. B. A.; O'Shea, S. J.; Xiao, P.; Ashfold, M. N. R.; Cooke, M. C.; Batt, R.; Shallcross, D. E.; Oram, D. E.; Forster, G.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Percival, C. J.

    2013-09-01

    A chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS) was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN) from biomass burning events in Canada using I- reagent ions on board the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the BORTAS campaign in 2011. The ionisation scheme enabled highly sensitive measurements at 1 Hz frequency through biomass burning plumes in the troposphere. A strong correlation between the HCN, carbon monoxide (CO) and acetonitrile (CH3CN) was observed, indicating the potential of HCN as a biomass burning (BB) marker. A plume was defined as being 6 standard deviations above background for the flights. This method was compared with a number of alternative plume-defining techniques employing CO and CH3CN measurements. The 6-sigma technique produced the highest R2 values for correlations with CO. A normalised excess mixing ratio (NEMR) of 3.68 ± 0.149 pptv ppbv-1 was calculated, which is within the range quoted in previous research (Hornbrook et al., 2011). The global tropospheric model STOCHEM-CRI incorporated both the observed ratio and extreme ratios derived from other studies to generate global emission totals of HCN via biomass burning. Using the ratio derived from this work, the emission total for HCN from BB was 0.92 Tg (N) yr-1.

  10. Airborne hydrogen cyanide measurements using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer for the plume identification of biomass burning forest fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, M.; Bacak, A.; Muller, J. B. A.; O'Shea, S. J.; Xiao, P.; Ashfold, M. N. R.; Cooke, M. C.; Batt, R.; Shallcross, D. E.; Oram, D. E.; Forster, G.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Percival, C. J.

    2013-02-01

    A Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN) from biomass burning events in Canada using I- reagent ions on board the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the BORTAS campaign in 2011. The ionisation scheme enabled highly sensitive measurements at 1 Hz frequency through biomass burning plumes in the troposphere. A strong correlation between the HCN, carbon monoxide (CO) and acetonitrile (CH3CN) was observed, indicating the potential of HCN as a biomass burning (BB) marker. A plume was defined as being 6 standard deviations above background for the flights. This method was compared with a number of alternative plume defining techniques employing CO and CH3CN measurements. The 6 sigma technique produced the highest R2 values for correlations with CO. A Normalised Excess Mixing Ratio (NEMR) of 3.76 ± 0.022 pptv ppbv-1 was calculated which is within the range quoted in previous research (Hornbrook et al., 2011). The global tropospheric model STOCHEM-CRI incorporated both the observed ratio and extreme ratios derived from other studies to generate global emission totals of HCN via biomass burning. Using the ratio derived from this work the emission total for HCN from BB was 0.92 Tg (N) yr-1.

  11. Study on the influence of the B4C layer thickness on the neutron flux and energy distribution shape in multi-electrode ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tymińska, K; Maciak, M; Ośko, J; Tulik, P; Zielczyński, M; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A model of a multi-electrode ionisation chamber, with polypropylene electrodes coated with a thin layer of B4C was created within Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNPX) and Fluktuierende Kaskade (FLUKA) codes. The influence of the layer thickness on neutron absorption in B4C and on the neutron spectra in the consecutive intra-electrode gas volumes has been studied using the MCNPX and FLUKA codes. The results will be used for designing the new type of the ionisation chamber. PMID:24729596

  12. Overview of ICRP Committee 1: radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Morgan, W F

    2016-06-01

    This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The author passed away on 13 November 2015.Committee 1 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) addresses issues pertinent to tissue reactions, risks of cancer and heritable diseases, radiation dose responses, effects of dose rate, and radiation quality. In addition, it reviews data on the effects of radiation on the embryo/fetus, genetic factors in radiation response, and uncertainties in providing judgements on radiation-induced health effects. Committee 1 advises the Main Commission on the biological basis of radiation-induced health effects, and how epidemiological, experimental, and theoretical data can be combined to make quantitative judgements on health risks to humans. The emphasis is on low radiation doses, in the form of detriment-adjusted nominal risk coefficients, where there are considerable uncertainties in terms of the biology and the epidemiology. Furthermore, Committee 1 reviews data from radiation epidemiology studies and publications on the molecular and cellular effects of ionising radiation relevant to updating the basis of the 2007 Recommendations published in ICRP Publication 103 This paper will provide an overview of the activities of Committee 1, the updated work of the Task Groups and Working Parties, and the future activities being pursued. PMID:26635336

  13. Ce que mon enfant apprend a l'ecole. Manuel a l'intention des parents, 2001-2002: Quatrieme annee (What My Child Learns in School. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Direction de l'education francaise.

    Noting that parents are vital partners in the educational system, this French-language handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 4 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Elementary Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to…

  14. Ce que mon enfant apprend a l'ecole. Manuel a l'intention des parents, 2001-2002: Septieme annee (What My Child Learns in School. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 7).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Direction de l'education francaise.

    Noting that parents are vital partners in the educational system, this French-language handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 7 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Junior High Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to…

  15. Ce que mon enfant apprend a l'ecole. Manuel a l'intention des parents, 2001-2002: Huitieme annee (What My Child Learns in School. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 8).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Direction de l'education francaise.

    Noting that parents are vital partners in the educational system, this French-language handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 8 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Junior High Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to…

  16. Ce que mon enfant apprend a l'ecole. Manuel a l'intention des parents, 2001-2002: Sixieme annee (What My Child Learns in School. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Direction de l'education francaise.

    Noting that parents are vital partners in the educational system, this French-language handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 6 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Elementary Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to…

  17. Ce que mon enfant apprend a l'ecole. Manuel a l'intention des parents, 2001-2002: Deuxieme annee (What My Child Learns in School. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Direction de l'education francaise.

    Noting that parents are vital partners in the educational system, this French-language handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 2 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Elementary Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to…

  18. Ce que mon enfant apprend a l'ecole. Manuel a l'intention des parents, 2001-2002: Troisieme annee (What My Child Learns in School. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 3).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Direction de l'education francaise.

    Noting that parents are vital partners in the educational system, this French-language handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 3 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Elementary Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to…

  19. Ce que mon enfant apprend a l'ecole. Manuel a l'intention des parents, 2001-2002: Premiere annee (What My Child Learns in School. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 1).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Direction de l'education francaise.

    Noting that parents are vital partners in the educational system, this French-language handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 1 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Elementary Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to…

  20. Ce que mon enfant apprend a l'ecole. Manuel a l'intention des parents, 2001-2002: Cinquieme annee (What My Child Learns in School. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 5).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Direction de l'education francaise.

    Noting that parents are vital partners in the educational system, this French-language handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 5 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Elementary Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to…

  1. Ce que mon enfant apprend a l'ecole. Manuel a l'intention des parents, 2001-2002: Neuvieme annee (What My Child Learns in School. Curriculum Handbook for Parents, 2001-2002: Grade 9).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Direction de l'education francaise.

    Noting that parents are vital partners in the educational system, this French-language handbook provides parents with information about the Grade 9 curriculum in Alberta, Canada. Based on the Alberta Learning "Program of Studies: Junior High Schools," the handbook describes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes students in Alberta are expected to…

  2. Multi-directional radiation detector using photographic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junet, L. K.; Majid, Z. A. Abdul; Sapuan, A. H.; Sayed, I. S.; Pauzi, N. F.

    2014-11-01

    Ionising radiation has always been part of our surrounding and people are continuously exposed to it. Ionising radiation is harmful to human health, thus it is vital to monitor the radiation. To monitor radiation, there are three main points that should be observed cautiously, which are energy, quantity, and direction of the radiation sources. A three dimensional (3D) dosimeter is an example of a radiation detector that provide these three main points. This dosimeter is able to record the radiation dose distribution in 3D. Applying the concept of dose detection distribution, study has been done to design a multi-directional radiation detector of different filter thicknesses. This is obtained by designing a cylinder shaped aluminum filter with several layers of different thickness. Black and white photographic material is used as a radiation-sensitive material and a PVC material has been used as the enclosure. The device is then exposed to a radiation source with different exposure factors. For exposure factor 70 kVp, 16 mAs; the results have shown that optical density (OD) value at 135° is 1.86 higher compared with an OD value at 315° which is 0.71 as the 135° area received more radiation compare to 315° region. Furthermore, with an evidence of different angle of film give different value of OD shows that this device has a multidirectional ability. Materials used to develop this device are widely available in the market, thus reducing the cost of development and making it suitable for commercialisation.

  3. In situ analysis of Titan's tholins by Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilan, Y.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Gazeau, M.; Mahjoub, A.; Szopa, C.; Schwell, M.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of the whole project developed in collaboration (LISA/LATMOS) is to provide a better understanding of the chemical composition of Titan aerosols laboratory analogs, called tholins, and thereby of their formation pathways. The tholins are produced in the PAMPRE reactor (French acronyme for Aerosols Microgravity Production by Reactives Plasmas) developed at LATMOS. These tholins are generated in levitation (wall effects are thus limited) in a low pressure radiofrequency plasma. Up to now, the determination of the physical and chemical properties of these tholins was achieved after their collection and ex-situ analysis by several methods. Their bulk composition was then determined but their insoluble part is still unknown. Other studies were performed after the transfer of the soluble part of the aerosols to different analytical instruments. Therefore, possible artifacts could have influenced the results. We present the SMARD (a French acronym for Mass Spectrometry of Aerosols by InfraRed Laser Desorption) program. A challenging issue of our work is to perform the soluble and unsoluble parts of PAMPRE tholins' analysis in real time and in situ. The coupling of the PAMPRE reactor to a unique instrument (Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry) developed at LISA should allow determining in real time and in situ the characteristics (chemical composition together with granulometry) of the nanometric aerosols. The later are introduced in the analytical instrument using an aerodynamic lens device. Their detection and aerodynamic diameter are determined using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Then, the L2DI (Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation) technique is used in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles: they are vaporized using a 10 μm CO2 pulsed laser and the gas produced is then ionized by a 248 nm KrF Excimer laser. Finally, the molecular ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass

  4. Courses and Study Programmes in English. Study in the Netherlands, Your Gateway to Europe. Edition 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in Higher Education, The Hague.

    In addition to regular degree programs, the Netherlands has been offering another form of higher education for almost 45 years. Advanced courses are conducted in English in what is known as International Education (IE). These advanced courses have traditionally been offered at special IE institutes, but now traditional universities and…

  5. Aquifer characteristics, water availability, and water quality of the Quaternary aquifer, Osage County, northeastern Oklahoma, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mashburn, Shana L.; Cope, Caleb C.; Abbott, Marvin M.

    2003-01-01

    Additional sources of water are needed on the Osage Reservation for future growth and development. The Quaternary aquifer along the Arkansas River in the Osage Reservation may represent a substantial water resource, but limited amounts of hydrogeologic data were available for the aquifer. The study area is about 116 square miles of the Quaternary aquifer in the Arkansas River valley and the nearby upland areas along the Osage Reservation. The study area included the Arkansas River reach downstream from Kaw Lake near Ponca City, Oklahoma to upstream from Keystone Lake near Cleveland, Oklahoma. Electrical conductivity logs were produced for 103 test holes. Water levels were determined for 49 test holes, and 105 water samples were collected for water-quality field analyses at 46 test holes. Water-quality data included field measurements of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nitrate (nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen). Sediment cores were extracted from 20 of the 103 test holes. The Quaternary aquifer consists of alluvial and terrace deposits of sand, silt, clay, and gravel. The measured thickness of the alluvium ranged from 13.7 to 49.8 feet. The measured thickness of the terrace sediments ranged from 7 to 93.8 feet. The saturated thickness of all sediments ranged from 0 to 38.2 feet with a median of 24.8 feet. The weighted-mean grain size for cores from the alluvium ranged from 3.69 to 0.64 f, (0.08- 0.64 millimeter), and ranged from 4.02 to 2.01 f (0.06-0.25 millimeter) for the cores from terrace deposits. The mean of the weighted-mean grain sizes for cores from the alluvium was 1.67 f (0.31 millimeter), and the terrace deposits was 2.73 f (0.15 millimeter). The hydraulic conductivity calculated from grain size of the alluvium ranged from 2.9 to 6,000 feet per day and of the terrace deposits ranged from 2.9 to 430 feet per day. The calculated transmissivity of the alluvium ranged from 2,000 to 26,000 feet squared per day with a median of 5,100 feet squared per day. Water in storage in the alluvium was estimated to be approximately 200,000 acre-feet. The amount of water annually recharging the aquifer was estimated to be approximately 4,800 acre-feet. Specific conductance for all water samples ranged from 161 to 6,650 microsiemens per centimeter. Median specific conductance for the alluvium was 683 microsiemens per centimeter and for the terrace deposits was 263 microsiemens per centimeter. Dissolved-solids concentrations, estimated from specific conductance, for water samples from the aquifer ranged from 88 to 3,658 milligrams per liter. Estimated median dissolved- solids concentration for the alluvium was 376 milligrams per liter and for the terrace deposits was 145 milligrams per liter. More than half of the samples from the Quaternary aquifer were estimated to contain less than 500 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Field-screened nitrate concentrations for the sampling in December 2001-August 2002 ranged from 0 to 15 milligrams per liter. The field-screened nitrate concentrations for the second sampling in September 2002 were less than corresponding laboratory reported values.

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

  7. Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Achond, Stephen; Hockersmith, Eric E.; Sandford, Benjamin P.

    2003-07-01

    This report details the 2002 results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior of wild spring/summer chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin. The report also discusses trends in the cumulative data collected for this project from Oregon and Idaho streams since 1989. The project was initiated after detection data from passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) had shown distinct differences in migration patterns between wild and hatchery fish for three consecutive years. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) investigators first observed these differences in 1989. The data originated from tagging and interrogation operations begun in 1988 to evaluate smolt transportation for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In 1991, the Bonneville Power Administration began a cooperative effort with NMFS to expand tagging and interrogation of wild fish. Project goals were to characterize the outmigration timing of these fish, to determine whether consistent migration patterns would emerge, and to investigate the influence of environmental factors on the timing and distribution of these migrations. In 1992, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) began an independent program of PIT tagging wild chinook salmon parr in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River Basins in northeast Oregon. Since then, ODFW has reported all tagging, detection, and timing information on fish from these streams. However, with ODFW concurrence, NMFS will continue to report arrival timing of these fish at Lower Granite Dam.

  8. Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and inorganic constituents in ambient surface soils, Chicago, Illinois: 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, R.T.; Arnold, T.L.; Cannon, W.F.; Graham, D.

    2008-01-01

    Samples of ambient surface soils were collected from 56 locations in Chicago, Illinois, using stratified random sampling techniques and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds and inorganic constituents. PAHs appear to be derived primarily from combustion of fossil fuels and may be affected by proximity to industrial operations, but do not appear to be substantially affected by the organic carbon content of the soil, proximity to nonindustrial land uses, or proximity to a roadway. Atmospheric settling of particulate matter appears to be an important mechanism for the placement of PAH compounds into soils. Concentrations of most inorganic constituents are affected primarily by soil-forming processes. Concentrations of lead, arsenic, mercury, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, molybdenum, zinc, and selenium are elevated in ambient surface soils in Chicago in comparison to the surrounding area, indicating anthropogenic sources for these elements in Chicago soils. Concentrations of calcium and magnesium in Chicago soils appear to reflect the influence of the carbonate bedrock parent material on the chemical composition of the soil, although the effects of concrete and road fill cannot be discounted. Concentrations of inorganic constituents appear to be largely unaffected by the type of nearby land use. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  9. 78 FR 50114 - Distribution of 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 Satellite...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... Notice Requesting Comments, 70 FR 46193 (Aug. 9, 2005), Docket 2005-2 CRB SD 2001-2003; Notice Requesting Comments, 73 FR 5597 (Jan. 30, 2008), Docket 2008-5 CRB SD 1999-2000; Notice Requesting Comments, 75 FR 4423 (Jan. 27, 2010) Docket 2010-2 CRB SD 2004-2007; Notice Requesting Comments, 75 FR 66799 (Oct....

  10. Managing the Junior Science & Humanities Symposium: Management and Operation of the Pacific Region Junior Science & Humanities Symposium, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This publication provides administrative, management, supervisory guidance, and other information necessary for successful conduct and support of grades 7-12 science symposia. Originally the text was developed as the operations manual for the Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (PJSHS). It contains information necessary to…

  11. Hands-On English: A Periodical for Teachers and Tutors of Adult English as a Second Language, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silliman, Anna, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    These six issues of the periodical offer teachers and tutors practical ideas for teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) to adults. The publications include such teaching activities as multilevel crossword puzzles, multilevel dictation, a grammar grab-bag, role play games, an ESL board game, and a newspaper search activity. They also offer…

  12. Estimating volcanic deformation source parameters with a finite element inversion: The 2001-2002 unrest at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Jo; Mothes, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    Deformation at Cotopaxi was observed between 2001 and 2002 along with recorded seismicity beneath the northeast (NE) flank, despite the fact that the last eruption occurred in 1942. We use electronic distance meter deformation data along with the patterns of recorded seismicity to constrain the cause of this unrest episode. To solve for the optimum deformation source parameters we employ inverse finite element (FE) models that account for material heterogeneities and surface topography. For a range of source shapes the models converge on a shallow reservoir beneath the southwest (SW) flank. The individual best fit model is a small oblate-shaped source, approximately 4-5 km beneath the summit, with a volume increase of roughly 20 × 106 m3. This SW source location contrasts with the NE seismicity locations. Subsequently, further FE models that additionally account for temperature-dependent viscoelasticity are used to reconcile the deformation and seismicity simultaneously. Comparisons of elastic and viscous timescales allude to aseismic pressurization of a small magma reservoir in the SW. Seismicity in the NE is then explained through a mechanism of fluid migration from the SW to the NE along fault systems. We extend our analyses to further show that if future unrest crises are accompanied by measurable seismicity around the deformation source, this could indicate a higher magma supply rate and increased likelihood of a forthcoming eruption.

  13. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Loxterman, Janet

    2003-05-01

    In chapter 1 we report on studies of the population genetic structure, using DNA microsatellites, of steelhead collected from different locations in the Yakima River basin (Roza Dam, Ahtanum Creek, Toppenish Creek, and Satus Creek) in 2000 and 2001. Of 28 pairwise tests of genotypic differentiation, only the 2000 and 2001 Roza Dam collections and the 2000 and 2001 Satus Creek collections did not exhibit significant differences. Similarly, pairwise tests of genetic differentiation (FST) were significant for all comparisons except the between-years comparisons of Roza Dam, Toppenish Creek, and Satus Creek collections. All tests between populations sampled from different localities were significant, indicating that these collections represent genetically differentiated stocks. In chapter 2 we report on genetic comparisons, again using microsatellites, of the three spring chinook populations in the Yakima basin (Upper Yakima, Naches, and American) with respect to our ability to be able to estimate the proportions of the three populations in mixed smolt samples collected at Chandler. We evaluated this both in terms of mixed fishery analysis, where proportions are estimated, but the likely provenance of any particular fish is unknown, and classification, where an attempt is made to assign individual fish to their population of origin. Simulations were done over the entire ranged of stock proportions observed in the Yakima basin in the last 20+ years. Stock proportions can be estimated very accurately by either method. Chapter 3 reports on our ongoing effort at cryopreserving semen from wild Upper Yakima spring chinook. In 2002, semen from 91 males, more than 50% of those spawned, was cryopreserved. Representation over the spawning season was excellent. Chapters 4,5, and 6 all relate to the continuing development of the domestication study design. Chapter 4 details the ISRP consultations and evolution of the design from last year's preferred alternative to the current plan of using the Naches population as a wild control, and maintaining a hatchery-only control line alongside the supplemented line. During discussions this year a major issue was the possible impact to the research and to the supplementation effort, of gene flow from precocious males from the hatchery control line into the supplemented line. At the end of the contracting period, this issue still had not been resolved. Along with the discussion of development of the domestication research design, chapter 4 presents the current monitoring plan document, with discussion of the approach to the various traits to be analyzed. Chapters 5 and 6 deal with experimental power of the domestication monitoring design. There is still much work to be done on power, but in chapter 5 we explore our power to detect differences among the three lines for traits measured on individual adults. Power was found to be quite good for effects of 5% per generation over three generations for traits having a coefficient of variation (CV) of 10-20%, but low if the CV was 50%. Power is higher for comparisons between the hatchery control line and supplemented line than between the supplemented line and the wild control, a consequence of trying to avoid heavy impacts to the Naches population. Power could be improved considerably improved by sampling more Naches fish in years of high abundance. Chapter 6 presents the same power analysis, but attempts to explore the effect of precocious males from the hatchery control line spawning in the wild. It is clear that if gene flow from precocious males is more than one or two percent that the between line comparisons will be biased, making the supplemented line appear to be more similar to the hatchery control line than it should and more different from the wild control line than it should. However, it was also clear that more analysis is desirable, as the heightened or diminished power is really just an enhancement or reduction of a real difference. A more straightforward analysis of the proportion of observed differences that can be attributed to precocious gene flow needs to be done.

  14. Re-Introduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hillson, Todd D.

    2002-10-01

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River chum as threatened under the auspices of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March of 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than half a million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 spawners present day (Johnson et al. 1997). Harvest, loss of habitat, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for the decline in this species in the Columbia River. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of chum salmon (Johnson et al. 1997). This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. The recovery strategy for Lower Columbia River chum as outlined in the Hatchery Genetic Management Plan (HGMP) for the Grays River project has four main tasks. First, determine if remnant populations of Lower Columbia River chum salmon exist in Lower Columbia River tributaries. Second, if such populations exist, develop stock-specific recovery plans that would involve habitat restoration including the creation of spawning refugias, supplementation if necessary and a habitat and fish monitoring and evaluation plan. If chum have been extirpated from previously utilized streams, develop re-introduction plans that utilize appropriate genetic donor stock(s) of Lower Columbia River chum salmon and integrate habitat improvement and fry-to-adult survival evaluations. Third, reduce the extinction risk to Grays River chum salmon population by randomly capturing adults in the basin for use in a supplementation program and reintroduction of Lower Columbia River chum salmon into the Chinook River basin. The Duncan Creek project has two goals: (1) re-introduction of chum into Duncan Creek by providing off channel high quality spawning and incubation areas and (2) to simultaneously evaluate natural re-colonization and a supplementation strategy where adults are collected and spawned artificially at a hatchery. The eggs from these artificial crossings are then either incubated at Duncan Creek or incubated and the fry reared at the hatchery to be released back into Duncan Creek. Tasks associated with the first goal include: (1) removing mud, sand and organics present in four of the creek branches and replace with gravels expected to provide maximum egg-to-fry survival rates to a depth of at least two feet; (2) armoring the sides of these channels to reduce importation of sediment by fish spawning on the margins; (3) planting native vegetation adjacent to these channels to stabilize the banks, trap silt and provide shade; (4) annual sampling of gravel in the spawning channels to detect changes in gravel composition and sedimentation levels.

  15. Data Analysis Measurement: Having a Solar Blast! NASA Connect: Program 7 in the 2001-2002 Video Series. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    NASA Connect is an interdisciplinary, instructional distance learning program targeting students in grades 6-8. This videotape explains how engineers and researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) use data analysis and measurement to predict solar storms, anticipate how they will affect the Earth, and improve…

  16. Characterization of winter foraging locations of Adélie penguins along the Western Antarctic Peninsula, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erdmann, Eric S.; Ribic, Christine A.; Patterson-Fraser, Donna L.; Fraser, William R.

    2011-01-01

    In accord with the hypotheses driving the Southern Ocean Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (SO GLOBEC) program, we tested the hypothesis that the winter foraging ecology of a major top predator in waters off the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP), the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae), is constrained by oceanographic features related to the physiography of the region. This hypothesis grew from the supposition that breeding colonies in the WAP during summer are located adjacent to areas of complex bathymetry where circulation and upwelling processes appear to ensure predictable food resources. Therefore, we tested the additional hypothesis that these areas continue to contribute to the foraging strategy of this species throughout the non-breeding winter season. We used satellite telemetry data collected as part of the SO GLOBEC program during the austral winters of 2001 and 2002 to characterize individual penguin foraging locations in relation to bathymetry, sea ice variability within the pack ice, and wind velocity and divergence (as a proxy for potential areas with cracks and leads). We also explored differences between males and females in core foraging area overlap. Ocean depth was the most influential variable in the determination of foraging location, with most birds focusing their effort on shallow (<200 m) waters near land and on mixed-layer (200–500 m) waters near the edge of deep troughs. Within-ice variability and wind (as a proxy for potential areas with cracks and leads) were not found to be influential variables, which is likely because of the low resolution satellite imagery and model outputs that were available. Throughout the study period, all individuals maintained a core foraging area separated from other individuals with very little overlap. However, from a year with light sea ice to one with heavy ice cover (2001–2002), we observed an increase in the overlap of individual female foraging areas with those of other birds, likely due to restricted access to the water column, reduced prey abundance, or higher prey concentration. Male birds maintained separate core foraging areas with the same small amount of overlap, showing no difference in overlap between the years. While complex bathymetry was an important physical variable influencing the Adélie penguin's foraging, the analysis of sea ice data of a higher resolution than was available for this study may help elucidate the role of sea ice in affecting Adélie penguin winter foraging behavior within the pack ice.

  17. Determing Lamprey Species Composition, Larval Distribution, and Adult Abundance in the Deschutes River, Oregon, Subbasin; 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Jennifer C.; Brun, Christopher V.

    2003-05-01

    Information about lamprey species composition, distribution, life history, abundance, habitat requirements and exploitation in lower Deschutes River tributaries is extremely limited. To assess the status of lampreys in the Deschutes River subbasin, baseline information is needed. We operated to rotary screw traps in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek to gain an understanding of species composition, migration time and production. We identified Pacific lampreys in two life stages, ammocoete and macropthalmia. It appears that Pacific lamprey macropthalmia out-migrate during winter in the Warm Springs River. We saw peak movements by ammocoetes in the spring in Shitike Creek and winter in the Warm Springs River. We found no relationship between stream discharge and the number of lamprey collected. Very few macropthalmia were collected in Shitike Creek. Ammocoete size in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek were different. The ammocoetes in the Shitike Creek trap were close in size to the macropthalmia collected in the Warm Springs River trap. We also completed planning and preparation for larval and associated habitat data collection. This preparation included purchasing necessary field equipment, selecting and marking sampling areas and attending training with US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Because lamprey identification is difficult we met with US Geological Survey (USGS) to assist us with larval lamprey identification techniques. We have also been working in coordination with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) to prepare and implement creel surveys and a mark-recapture study at Sherar's Falls to estimate adult lamprey escapement.

  18. Student Health Partnership Annual Report Guidelines for 2000/2001 and 2001/2002. Student Health Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton.

    This document provides guidelines for fulfilling the requirements of the annual report for 2000-01 and 2001-02 of the Student Health Partnership, a program in Alberta, Canada, designed to provide health services to students with special health needs. The guidelines explain each of the annual report's required components, including: (1) a statement…

  19. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part I of II, 2001-2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, Rollin H.

    2002-12-01

    Turbulence in gravel bed rivers plays a critical role in most stream processes including contaminant and nutrient transport, aquatic habitat selection, and natural channel design. While most hydraulic designs and fluid models are based on bulk velocity, migrating juvenile salmon experience and react to the temporally varied turbulent fluctuations. Without properly understanding and accounting for the continuous turbulent motions proper fishway design and guidance are impossible. Matching temporally varied flow to fish reactions is the key to guiding juvenile salmonids to safe passageways. While the ideal solution to fish guidance design would be to use specific fluid action-fish reaction mechanisms, such concrete cause and effect relations have not been established. One way to approach the problem of guidance is to hypothesize that in an environment lacking obvious bulk flow cues (like the reservoir environment), turbulent flow conditions similar to those experienced by juvenile salmonids in natural migration corridors will be attractive to juvenile salmonids. Proof of this hypothesis requires three steps: (1) gathering data on turbulence characteristics in natural migration corridors, (2) reproduction of the turbulence parameters in a controlled environment, and (3) testing the reproduced turbulence on actively migrating juvenile salmonids for increased passage efficiencies. The results from the third step have not been finalized, therefore this report will focus on understanding turbulent processes in gravel bed rivers and reproduction of turbulence in controlled environments for use in fish passage technologies. The purposes of this report are to (1) present data collected in natural gravel bed rivers, (2) present a simple method for reproduction of appropriate turbulence levels in a controlled environment, (3) compare these results to those from one prototype surface collector (PSC), and (4) discuss the implications on fish passage design.

  20. The NASA "Why?" Files: The Case of the Phenomenal Weather. Program 7 in 2001-2002 Video Series. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has produced a distance learning series of four 60-minute video programs with an accompanying Web site and companion teacher guides designed for students in grades 3-5. The story lines of each program or episode involve six inquisitive school children who meet in a treehouse. They seek the…

  1. Smolt Monitoring Program Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS); Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Jonasson, Brian; Carmichael, Richard

    2003-05-01

    We PIT-tagged juvenile spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery in October 2001 as part of the Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) for migratory year (MY) 2002. We tagged 20,998 Imnaha stock spring chinook salmon, and after mortality and tag loss, we allowed the remaining 20,920 fish to leave the acclimation pond at our Imnaha River satellite facility beginning 21 March 2002 to begin their seaward migration. The fish remaining in the pond were forced out on 17 April 2002. We tagged 20,973 Catherine Creek stock captive brood progeny spring chinook salmon, and after mortality and tag loss, we allowed the remaining 20,796 fish to leave the acclimation ponds at our Catherine Creek satellite facility beginning 1 April 2001 to begin their seaward migration. The fish remaining in the ponds were forced out on 15 April 2001. We estimated survival rates, from release to Lower Granite Dam in MY 2002, for three stocks of hatchery spring chinook salmon tagged at Lookingglass Hatchery to determine their relative migration performance. Imnaha River stock and Lostine River stock survival rates were similar and were higher than the survival rate of Catherine Creek stock. We PIT-tagged 20,950 BY 2001 Imnaha River stock and 20,820 BY 2001 Catherine Creek stock captive brood progeny in October 2002 as part of the CSS for MY 2003. At the time the fish were transferred from Lookingglass Hatchery to the acclimation site, the rates of mortality and tag loss for Imnaha River stock were 0.14% and 0.06%, respectively. Catherine Creek stock, during the same period, had rates of mortality and tag loss of 0.57% and 0.31%, respectively. There was slightly elevated mortality, primarily from BKD, in one raceway of Catherine Creek stock at Lookingglass Hatchery for BY 2001.

  2. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities that occurred over Fiscal Year 2002 (FY 02). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 02. A description of the progress during FY 02 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are given. OBJECTIVE 1--Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administration oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts and personnel was provided. OBJECTIVE 2--Develop, coordinate, and implement the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document is utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan, ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document was updated and revised to reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River basin based upon other documents and actions taken in the basin. OBJECTIVE 3--Assist Middle Fork Irrigation District in developing an alternative irrigation water source on Evans Creek (Hutson pond and Evans Creek diversion), eliminating the need for irrigation diversion dams which happen to be partial fish barriers. Upon completion, this project will restore 2.5 miles of access for winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat. This objective was revised and included in the FY 03 Statement of Work for Project No. 1998-021-00. During FY 02 the final engineering was completed on this project. However, due to a lengthy permitting process and NMFS consultation, this project was inadvertently delayed. Project completion is expected in July 2003. OBJECTIVE 4--Assist the Farmers Irrigation District (FID) in construction and installation of a new fish screen and bypass system on the mainstem Hood River (Farmers Canal). Final engineering and design for the horizontal screen was completed during the winter of 2001. In December 2001 and January 2002, the concrete work was completed and the head gates were mounted. During the spring the secondary head level control gates were installed. In September 2002, the jersey barriers and vortex tubes were installed. These are located upstream of the old drum screen, and are the primary means of dealing with bedload and suspended load from the diversion. The screen surface was also installed in September 2002 and the system accommodated water soon after. Monitoring of these structures in regards to efficiency and possible effects to fish migration is scheduled to occur in spring 2003. The transition from the old canal to the new screen is smooth and currently does not present any problems. The old drum screen is going to remain in place until all the biological and hydrological monitoring is complete to ensure compliance and satisfaction of all agencies involved. OBJECTIVE 5--Assist the East Fork Irrigation District (EFID) in final engineering design and construction of the Central Lateral Canal upgrade and invert siphon. This objective was revised and included in the FY 03 Statement of Work for Project No. 1998-021-00. During FY 02, a significant portion of the engineering and design work was completed on the EFID Central Lateral Canal upgrade and invert siphon. There were some changes in canal alignment that required further design work and easement acquisition. Time was also spent looking for matching funds and securing a loan by the EFID. Construction initiation is now scheduled for summer 2003. OBJECTIVE 6--Modify and/or eliminate five culverts, three on Baldwin Creek, one on Graham Creek, and one on Evans Creek, which function as barriers to upstream and downstream fish migration. This objective was revised and included in the FY 03 Statement of Work for Project No. 1998-021-00. There are only two culverts on Baldwin Creek that will be eliminated or modified. Work was initiated on the removal of one of these culverts, and the replacement of the other. The landowner was agreeable and NEPA was initiated. The modification/elimination of these culverts is scheduled for FY 04. The culvert on Graham Creek is a county road, and will be addressed as a fish passage barrier by Hood River County. The Evans Creek culvert was prepared for modification in FY 02, however due to a lengthy permitting process the instream work period was missed. This project is on the schedule for the instream work period of 2003. OBJECTIVE 7--Construct riparian fence to stabilize and improve the riparian zone along the East Fork Hood River and tributaries. Two riparian fencing projects were completed on East Fork Hood River tributaries. The first was on Baldwin Creek, and the second was on Shelly Creek.

  3. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tara C.; Hanson, Josh T.; Jewett, Shannon M.

    2004-01-01

    The year of 2002 represented the eighth year of a multi-year project, monitoring the outmigration and survival of juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River. This project both supplements and complements various ongoing and completed work within the Umatilla River basin. Knowledge gained on juvenile outmigration and survival assists researchers and managers in adapting hatchery practices, flow enhancement strategies, canal and fish ladder operations, and supplementation and enhancement efforts of natural and restored fish populations. Findings from this study also assist in assessment of the success of upriver habitat improvement projects and provide an overall evaluation of the Umatilla River fisheries restoration program. General project objectives include: Evaluation of the outmigration and survival of natural and hatchery juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River, in an effort to enhance the understanding of migration characteristics, survival bottlenecks, species interactions and effects of management strategies. Specific objectives for 2002 included: (1) Operation of the remote interrogation system at Three Mile Falls Dam, West Extension Canal; (2) Design of improved PIT tag detection capabilities at Three Mile Falls Dam east bank adult fish ladder; (3) Estimates of migrant abundance, migration timing and in-basin survival of tagged juvenile salmonids representing various hatchery, rearing, acclimation and release strategies; (4) Monitoring of abundance and trends in natural production of salmon, steelhead and pacific lamprey; (5) Continuation of transport evaluation studies to evaluate the relative survival between transported and nontransported fish; (6) Assessment of the condition, health, size, growth and smolt status of hatchery and natural migrants; (7) Investigation of the effects of canal and fishway operations and environmental conditions on fish migration and survival; (8) Documentation of temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species; and (9) Participation in planning and coordination activities within the basin and dissemination of results. Key findings for 2002 revealed: (1) Migrant abundance of natural fish was roughly 10% that of hatchery produced fish; (2) An undetermined number of hatchery summer steelhead are residualizing in the upper Umatilla basin and potentially overwintering and migrating out as 2 year old smolts; (3) Transported fish may have a survival advantage over non-transported fish; (4) The later release of hatchery summer steelhead resulted in emigration timing that differed from that of naturally-produced fish; (5) Large-grade summer steelhead released lower in the river displayed improved survival over fish released higher; (6) Extended reared steelhead did not exhibit a survival advantage over standard reared fish; (7) Second year evaluation following reduction in the subyearling fall chinook program revealed survival to be similar to pre-reduction estimates; (8) Migration success was not improved nor in-river residence time reduced by acclimation of coho salmon at RM 56; (9) Early released spring chinook salmon migration and survival was unable to be evaluated due downstream monitoring facilities being in-operable during the early migration.

  4. Dissolved Pesticide and Organic Carbon Concentrations Detected in Surface Waters, Northern Central Valley, California, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, James L.; Jacobson, Lisa A.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2004-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of pesticide mixtures on Chinook salmon under various environmental conditions in surface waters of the northern Central Valley of California. This project was a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of California. The project focused on understanding the environmental factors that influence the toxicity of pesticides to juvenile salmon and their prey. During the periods January through March 2001 and January through May 2002, water samples were collected at eight surface water sites in the northern Central Valley of California and analyzed by the USGS for dissolved pesticide and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Water samples were also collected by the USGS at the same sites for aquatic toxicity testing by the Aquatic Toxicity Laboratory at the University of California Davis; however, presentation of the results of these toxicity tests is beyond the scope of this report. Samples were collected to characterize dissolved pesticide and dissolved organic carbon concentrations, and aquatic toxicity, associated with winter storm runoff concurrent with winter run Chinook salmon out-migration. Sites were selected that represented the primary habitat of juvenile Chinook salmon and included major tributaries within the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins and the Sacramento?San Joaquin Delta. Water samples were collected daily for a period of seven days during two winter storm events in each year. Additional samples were collected weekly during January through April or May in both years. Concentrations of 31 currently used pesticides were measured in filtered water samples using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey's organic chemistry laboratory in Sacramento, California. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations were analyzed in filtered water samples using a Shimadzu TOC-5000A total organic carbon analyzer.

  5. Influences of Stocking Salmon Carcass Analogs on Salmonids in Yakima River Tributaries, 2001-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.

    2003-04-01

    The benefits that marine derived nutrients from adult salmon carcasses provide to juvenile salmonids are increasingly being recognized. Current estimates suggest that only 6-7% of marine-derived nitrogen and phosphorus that were historically available to salmonids in the Pacific Northwest are currently available. Food limitation may be a major constraint limiting the restoration of salmonids. A variety of methods have been proposed to offset this nutrient deficit including: allowing greater salmon spawning escapement, stocking hatchery salmon carcasses, and stocking inorganic nutrients. Unfortunately, each of these methods has some ecological or socio-economic shortcoming. We intend to overcome many of these shortcomings by making and evaluating a pathogen free product that simulates a salmon carcass (analog). Abundant sources of marine derived nutrients are available such as fish offal from commercial fishing and salmon carcasses from hatcheries. However, a method for recycling these nutrients into a pathogen free analog that degrades at a similar rate as a natural salmon carcass has never been developed. We endeavored to (1) develop a salmon carcass analog that will increase the food available to salmonids, (2) determine the pathways that salmonids use to acquire food from analogs, and (3) determine the benefits to salmonids and the potential for application to salmonid restoration. We used a before-after-control-impact-paired design in six tributaries of the upper Yakima basin to determine the utility of stocking carcass analogs. Our preliminary results suggest that the introduction of carcass analogs into food-limited streams can be used to restore food pathways previously provided by anadromous salmon. The analogs probably reproduced both of the major food pathways that salmon carcasses produce: direct consumption and food chain enhancement. Trout and salmon fed directly on the carcass analogs during the late summer and presumably benefited from the increased invertebrate biomass later in the year. Future reports will analyze whether any benefits are statistically detectable. The risks of using carcass analogs also appear to be low. Pathogens appear to be killed in the manufacturing process of the analogs. In addition, preliminary results suggest that fish exposed to the analogs did not have higher incidences of pathogens. The water quality was also not degraded by the analog additions with the exception of a temporary surface film. Finally, our anecdotal observations, suggested that there was not an increase in the number of predators during the first year of analog distribution. In summary, the risks of analog placement appear to be low but the benefits appear to be high. All results should be considered preliminary until further analyses and field work are conducted.

  6. Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

    2003-07-01

    Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

  7. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

    2003-12-01

    We report on our progress from April 2001 through March 2002 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  8. Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation; Creston National Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Maskill, Mark

    2003-03-01

    Mitigation Objective 1: Produce Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout at Creston NFH--Task: Acquire eggs and rear up to 100,000 Westslope Cutthroat trout annually for offsite mitigation stocking. Accomplishments: A total of 150,000 westslope cutthroat eggs (M012 strain) were acquired from the State of Montana Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in July 2001 for this objective. Another 120,000 westslope cutthroat eggs were taken from feral fish at Rogers Lake in May of 2001 by the Creston Hatchery crew. The fish were reared using approved fish culture techniques as defined in the U.S. Department of the Interior Fish Hatchery Management guidelines. Post release survival and angler success is monitored annually by Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT). Stocking numbers and locations may vary yearly based on results of biological monitoring. Mitigation Objective 2: Produce Rainbow Trout at Creston NFH--Task: Acquire and rear up to 100,000 Rainbow trout annually for offsite mitigation in closed basin waters. Accomplishments: A total of 50,500 rainbow trout eggs (Arlee strain) were acquired from the State of Montana Arlee State Fish Hatchery in December 2001 for this objective. The fish were reared using approved fish culture techniques as defined in the U.S. Department of the Interior Fish Hatchery Management guidelines. Arlee rainbow trout are being used for this objective because the stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs and habitat conditions and returns to creel are unsuitable for native cutthroat. Post release survival and angler success is monitored annually by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT). Stocking numbers and locations may vary yearly based on results of biological monitoring.

  9. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  10. Radiation safety: what can happen in an accident.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; de Almeida, O P

    1992-04-11

    Radiation hazards in dental practice have long been recognized, and the dangers from ionising radiation during dental radiography are discussed elsewhere. Continuing legislation will undoubtedly help reduce the risk of over-exposure and accidents. Nevertheless, it is of some concern that radiation safety is still ignored by some: for example, one recent survey in the UK showed that not all radiography sets conformed to modern safety standards. However, the profession also has reason to be concerned about more public radiation hazards that may affect them, and their families and others, and may, without denying the importance of dental radiation protection, have far greater effects on health. Well-known examples of domestic radon exposure occurred in the UK, particularly in the Lake District and the South West, and the nuclear reactor accidents--notably at Chernobyl in 1986. PMID:1576019

  11. Neutral and ionised gas around the post-red supergiant IRC +10 420 at AU size scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudmaijer, R. D.; de Wit, W. J.

    2013-03-01

    Context. IRC +10 420 is one of the few known massive stars in rapid transition from the red supergiant phase to the Wolf-Rayet or luminous blue variable phase. Aims: The star has an ionised wind and using the Brγ line we assess the mass-loss on spatial scales of ~1 AU. Methods: We present new VLT Interferometer AMBER data which are combined with all other AMBER data present in the literature. The final dataset covers a position angle range of ~180° and baselines up to 110 m. The spectrally dispersed visibilities, differential phases and line flux are conjointly analysed and modelled. We also present the first AMBER/FINITO observations which cover a larger wavelength range and allow us to observe the Na i doublet at 2.2 μm. The data are complemented by X-Shooter data, which provide a higher spectral resolution view. Results: The Brγ emission line and the Na i doublet are both spatially resolved. After correcting the AMBER data for the fact that the lines are not spectrally resolved, we find that Brγ traces a ring with a diameter of 4.18 mas, in agreement with higher spectral resolution data. We consider a geometric model in which the Brγ emission emerges from the top and bottom rings of an hour-glass shaped structure, viewed almost pole-on. It provides satisfactory fits to most visibilities and differential phases. The fact that we detect line emission from a neutral metal like Na i within the ionised region, a very unusual occurrence, suggests the presence of a dense pseudo-photosphere. Conclusions: The ionised wind can be reproduced with a polar wind, which could well have the shape of an hour-glass. Closer in, the resolved Na i emission is found to occur on scales barely larger than the continuum. This fact and that many yellow hypergiants exhibit this comparatively rare emission hints at the presence of a "Yellow" or even "White Wall" in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, preventing them from visibly evolving to the blue. Based on observations at ESO, and in

  12. Rapid and simultaneous determination of polychlorinated biphenyls and their main metabolites (hydroxylated and methyl sulfonyl) by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry: comparison of different ionisation modes.

    PubMed

    Castro-Puyana, M; Herrero, L; González, M J; Gómara, B

    2013-07-17

    Instrumental methods based on gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have been developed and compared using two different MS ionisation modes, electron impact (EI) and electron capture negative ionisation (ECNI), for the fast, quantitative and simultaneous determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and their main metabolites (hydroxylated PCBs, OH-PCBs, and methyl sulfone PCBs, MeSO2-PCBs). Parameters affecting chromatographic separation and MS detection were evaluated in order to achieve the highest selectivity and sensitivity for both operation modes. The analytical characteristics of the developed methods were studied and compared in terms of linear range, limits of detection (LODs), limits of quantification (LOQs), and instrumental precision (repeatability and intermediate precision). Both ionisation methods showed similar precision, being relative standard deviations (RSD, %) lower than 9% and 14% for repeatability and intermediate precision, respectively. However, better LODs (from 0.01 to 0.14 pg injected for the three families of congeners studied) were achieved using ECNI-MS as ionisation mode. The suitability of the developed method was demonstrated through their application to fish liver oil samples. PMID:23830433

  13. Investigation of colloidal graphite as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry of low molecular weight analytes.

    PubMed

    Warren, Alexander D; Conway, Ulric; Arthur, Christopher J; Gates, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of low molecular weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry is problematic due to the interference and suppression of analyte ionisation by the matrices typically employed - which are themselves low molecular weight compounds. The application of colloidal graphite is demonstrated here as an easy to use matrix that can promote the ionisation of a wide range of analytes including low molecular weight organic compounds, complex natural products and inorganic complexes. Analyte ionisation with colloidal graphite is compared with traditional organic matrices along with various other sources of graphite (e.g. graphite rods and charcoal pencils). Factors such as ease of application, spectra reproducibility, spot longevity, spot-to-spot reproducibility and spot homogeneity (through single spot imaging) are explored. For some analytes, considerable matrix suppression effects are observed resulting in spectra completely devoid of matrix ions. We also report the observation of radical molecular ions [M(-●) ] in the negative ion mode, particularly with some aromatic analytes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27434807

  14. Further considerations of cosmic ray modulation of infra-red radiation in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Lockwood, M.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding effects of ionisation in the lower atmosphere is a new interdisciplinary area, crossing the traditionally distinct scientific boundaries between astro-particle and atmospheric physics and also requiring understanding of both heliospheric and magnetospheric influences on cosmic rays. Following the paper of Erlykin et al. (2014) we develop further the interpretation of our observed changes in long-wave (LW) radiation, Aplin and Lockwood (2013) by taking account of both cosmic ray ionisation yields and atmospheric radiative transfer. To demonstrate this, we show that the thermal structure of the whole atmosphere needs to be considered along with the vertical profile of ionisation. Allowing for, in particular, ionisation by all components of a cosmic ray shower and not just by the muons, reveals that the effect we have detected is certainly not inconsistent with laboratory observations of the LW absorption cross section. The analysis presented here, although very different from that of Erlykin et al., does come to the same conclusion that the events detected by AL were not caused by individual cosmic ray primaries - not because it is impossible on energetic grounds, but because events of the required energy are too infrequent for the 12 h-1 rate at which they were seen by the AL experiment. The present paper numerically models the effect of three different scenario changes to the primary GCR spectrum which all reproduce the required magnitude of the effect observed by AL. However, they cannot solely explain the observed delay in the peak effect which, if confirmed, would appear to open up a whole new and interesting area in the study of water oligomers and their effects on LW radiation. We argue that a technical artefact in the AL experiment is highly unlikely and that our initial observations merit both a wide-ranging follow-up experiment and more rigorous, self-consistent, three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling.

  15. Current status of medical radiation exposure in Korea - recent efforts to develop a radiation exposure control system focussed on justification and optimisation.

    PubMed

    Do, K-H; Jung, S E

    2016-06-01

    Radiation exposure from diagnostic medical imaging has increased in Korea. Radiological societies play a key role in radiation safety issues in Korea, including guidelines, accreditation, advocacy, scientific activity, and education. Any medical radiation exposure must be justified, and examinations using ionising radiation must be optimised. Education of referring physicians and radiologists is also important for justification. Medical physicists and radiographers have an important role to play in quality management and optimisation. Regulations are essential to control medical radiation exposure. Therefore, national organisations have made a significant effort to regulate and monitor medical radiation exposure using guidelines, accreditation, and even the law. Medical radiation exposure must be controlled, and this could be achieved by continuous interest from health professionals and organisations. PMID:27026586

  16. Role of the resistivity of insulating field emitters on the energy of field-ionised and field-evaporated atoms.

    PubMed

    Arnoldi, L; Silaeva, E P; Vurpillot, F; Deconihout, B; Cadel, E; Blum, I; Vella, A

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of laser atom probe analyses, it is important to understand all the physical processes induced by the combination of the high electrical field and the femtosecond laser beam during field evaporation. New information can be accessed from the energy of evaporated surface atoms or field-ionised atoms of an imaging gas. In order to study the ions energy, we combine La-APT and FIM analyses in a new experimental setup equipped with electrostatic lenses. We report measurements for semiconductors and oxides and we study the influence of the illumination conditions (laser power and wavelength), the evaporation rate, the sample geometry and the tip preparation processes. The results are discussed taking into account the resistive properties of non-metallic samples and the photo-stimulated conductivity. This work clarifies the role of the laser and DC field in the energy deficit of field evaporated ions. PMID:25484362

  17. Direct atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry for aroma analysis: Speed, sensitivity and resolution of isobaric compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jublot, Lionel; Linforth, Robert S. T.; Taylor, Andrew J.

    2005-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) sources were developed for real time analysis of volatile release from foods using an ion trap (IT) mass spectrometer (MS). Key objectives were spectral simplicity (minimal fragmentation), response time and signal to noise ratio. The benefits of APCI-IT-MS were assessed by comparing the performance for in vivo and headspace analyses with that obtained using APCI coupled to a quadrupole mass analyser. Using MS-MS, direct APCI-IT-MS was able to differentiate mixtures of some C6 and terpene isobaric aroma compounds. Resolution could be achieved for some compounds by monitoring specific secondary ions. Direct resolution was also achieved with two of the three isobaric compounds released from chocolate with time as the sample was eaten.

  18. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging and its development for plant protein imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) uses the power of high mass resolution time of flight (ToF) mass spectrometry coupled to the raster of lasers shots across the cut surface of tissues to provide new insights into the spatial distribution of biomolecules within biological tissues. The history of this technique in animals and plants is considered and the potential for analysis of proteins by this technique in plants is discussed. Protein biomarker identification from MALDI-MSI is a challenge and a number of different approaches to address this bottleneck are discussed. The technical considerations needed for MALDI-MSI are reviewed and these are presented alongside examples from our own work and a protocol for MALDI-MSI of proteins in plant samples. PMID:21726462

  19. Excitation of low-frequency residual currents at combination frequencies of an ionising two-colour laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Kostin, V. A.; Laryushin, I. D.; Silaev, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the processes of excitation of low-frequency residual currents in a plasma produced through ionisation of gases by two-colour laser pulses in laser-plasma schemes for THz generation. We have developed an analytical approach that allows one to find residual currents in the case when one of the components of a two-colour pulse is weak enough. The derived analytical expressions show that the effective generation of the residual current (and hence the effective THz generation) is possible if the ratio of the frequencies in the two-colour laser pulse is close to a rational fraction with a not very big odd sum of the numerator and denominator. The results of numerical calculations (including those based on the solution of the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation) agree well with the analytical results.

  20. Surface analysis using a new plasma assisted desorption/ionisation source for mass spectrometry in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowfield, A.; Barrett, D. A.; Alexander, M. R.; Ortori, C. A.; Rutten, F. M.; Salter, T. L.; Gilmore, I. S.; Bradley, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The authors report on a modified micro-plasma assisted desorption/ionisation (PADI) device which creates plasma through the breakdown of ambient air rather than utilising an independent noble gas flow. This new micro-PADI device is used as an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry to analyse species released from the surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene, and generic ibuprofen and paracetamol tablets through remote activation of the surface by the plasma. The mass spectra from these surfaces compare favourably to those produced by a PADI device constructed using an earlier design and confirm that the new ion source is an effective device which can be used to achieve ambient mass spectrometry with improved spatial resolution.

  1. Rapid screening of illicit additives in weight loss dietary supplements with desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wu, Y; Zhao, Y; Sun, W; Ding, L; Guo, B; Chen, B

    2012-08-01

    Desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI), the relatively novel ambient mass spectrometry (MS) technique, was utilised to screen for illicit additives in weight-loss food. The five usually abused chemicals - fenfluramine, N-di-desmethyl sibutramine, N-mono-desmethyl sibutramine, sibutramine and phenolphthalein - were detected with the proposed DCBI-MS method. Fast single-sample and high-throughput analysis was demonstrated. Semi-quantification was accomplished based on peak areas in the ion chromatograms. Four illicit additives were identified and semi-quantified in commercial samples. As there was no tedious sample pre-treatment compared with conventional HPLC methods, high-throughput analysis was achieved with DCBI. The results proved that DCBI-MS is a powerful tool for the rapid screening of illicit additives in weight-loss dietary supplements. PMID:22784191

  2. Radiation burden from secondary doses to patients undergoing radiation therapy with photons and light ions and radiation doses from imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Gudowska, I; Ardenfors, O; Toma-Dasu, I; Dasu, A

    2014-10-01

    Ionising radiation is increasingly used for the treatment of cancer, being the source of a considerable fraction of the medical irradiation to patients. With the increasing success rate of cancer treatments and longer life expectancy of the treated patients, the issue of secondary cancer incidence is of growing concern, especially for paediatric patients who may live long after the treatment and be more susceptible to carcinogenesis. Also, additional imaging procedures like computed tomography, kilovoltage and megavoltage imaging and positron emission tomography, alone or in conjunction with radiation therapy, may add to the radiation burden associated with the risk of occurrence of secondary cancers. This work has been based on literature studies and is focussed on the assessment of secondary doses to healthy tissues that are delivered by the use of modern radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging modalities in the clinical environment. PMID:24353029

  3. Pelvic radiation therapy: Between delight and disaster

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kirsten AL; Haboubi, Najib Y

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades radiotherapy was established as one of the best and most widely used treatment modalities for certain tumours. Unfortunately that came with a price. As more people with cancer survive longer an ever increasing number of patients are living with the complications of radiotherapy and have become, in certain cases, difficult to manage. Pelvic radiation disease (PRD) can result from ionising radiation-induced damage to surrounding non-cancerous tissues resulting in disruption of normal physiological functions and symptoms such as diarrhoea, tenesmus, incontinence and rectal bleeding. The burden of PRD-related symptoms, which impact on a patient’s quality of life, has been under appreciated and sub-optimally managed. This article serves to promote awareness of PRD and the vast potential there is to improve current service provision and research activities. PMID:26649150

  4. A reassessment of Galileo radiation exposures in the Jupiter magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Atwell, William; Townsend, Lawrence; Miller, Thomas; Campbell, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Earlier particle experiments in the 1970s on Pioneer-10 and -11 and Voyager-1 and -2 provided Jupiter flyby particle data, which were used by Divine and Garrett to develop the first Jupiter trapped radiation environment model. This model was used to establish a baseline radiation effects design limit for the Galileo onboard electronics. Recently, Garrett et al. have developed an updated Galileo Interim Radiation Environment (GIRE) model based on Galileo electron data. In this paper, we have used the GIRE model to reassess the computed radiation exposures and dose effects for Galileo. The 34-orbit 'as flown' Galileo trajectory data and the updated GIRE model were used to compute the electron and proton spectra for each of the 34 orbits. The total ionisation doses of electrons and protons have been computed based on a parametric shielding configuration, and these results are compared with previously published results. PMID:16604631

  5. Radiation-chemical degradation of cellulose and other polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, Boris G.

    1998-04-01

    Results of studies on the radiation-chemical transformations of cellulose, its ethers, and some other polysaccharides (xylan, starch, dextran, chitin, chitosan, and heparin) are discussed. Ionising radiation causes the degradation of these compounds accompanied by decomposition of the pyranose ring and formation of compounds with carbonyl and carboxy groups, as well as formation of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The efficiency of degradation increases considerably with temperature and depends on the structure of the polysaccharide and the nature of its substituents. A mechanism of the radiation-chemical transformations of cellulose and other polysaccharides is suggested. The prospects of using radiation-chemical methods for processing of cellulose and other polysaccharides in industry and agriculture are considered. The bibliography includes 213 references.

  6. Occupational exposure to natural radiation.

    PubMed

    Dixon, D W

    1985-10-01

    Natural sources of radiation can make an important contribution to the exposures of people at work. Two areas of interest are work with minerals having elevated concentrations of activity and work in buildings where radon daughter concentrations are elevated. The Euratom Directive on ionising radiation requires that the handling of radioactive substances be reported to national authorities. National authorities may waive this requirement where the activity per unit mass is below 100 Bq g-1, or for solid natural radioactive substances, 500 Bq g-1. An investigation was undertaken in five factories to determine whether work with minerals having levels of natural activity below these might lead to significant doses. Models based on the data collected were used to relate the activity in the minerals to the effective dose equivalent arising from gamma radiation, inhalation of radon daughters, and intake of long-lived activity. These assessments show that the activity concentration at which exposures to airborne dust could lead to doses equal to one-tenth of the dose limit for workers are 0.3 Bq g-1 for thorium-232 and 1 Bq g-1 for uranium-238. Above these values, radiological supervision may be necessary. In a separate study, measurements of radon daughter concentrations were made in seventy workplaces. Concentrations in some premises approached or exceeded the derived air concentration for occupational exposure. The highest concentrations were found in premises with low ventilation rates. PMID:4081708

  7. Optimal per cent by weight of elements in diagnostic quality radiation shielding materials.

    PubMed

    Ashayer, Sahar; Askari, Mansur; Afarideh, Hossein

    2012-04-01

    By increasing the usage of radiation in all aspects of lives, the human body is becoming more exposed to ionising radiation. The purpose of this study is to find the optimal radiation shielding materials to protect humans from the radiation hazards of radiation. Some elements and compounds such as Ag, Bi, Pb, W, BaSO(4) were chosen on the basis of their attenuation coefficients and other characteristics to produce optimised radiation shielding compounds. Multi-objective non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II was used to optimise the weight fraction of the elements in compounds based on the dose equivalent rate, shield weight and cost. Consequently, sets of suitable compounds were obtained depending on various applications for energy 0.06 and 0.15 MeV. In addition, optimised lead free compounds were obtained. The results presented in a series of graphs should enable radiation shield designers to choose an appropriate combination according to their requirements. PMID:21705365

  8. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for additional occupational and environmental studies published between 2005 and 2009. Study selection We selected 23 studies that: (1) examined the association between protracted exposures to ionising radiation and leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic subtype; (2) were a cohort or nested case–control design without major bias; (3) reported quantitative estimates of exposure; and (4) conducted exposure–response analyses using relative or excess RR per unit exposure. Methods Studies were further screened to reduce information overlap. Random effects models were developed to summarise between-study variance and obtain an aggregate estimate of the excess RR at 100 mGy. Publication bias was assessed by trim and fill and Rosenthal's file drawer methods. Results We found an ERR at 100 mGy of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.32) by modelling results from 10 studies and adjusting for publication bias. Between-study variance was not evident (p=0.99). Conclusions Protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation is significantly associated with leukaemia. Our estimate agreed well with the leukaemia risk observed among exposed adults in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors, providing increased confidence in the current understanding of leukaemia risk from ionising radiation. However, unlike the estimates obtained from the LSS, our model provides a precise, quantitative summary of the direct estimates of excess risk from studies of

  9. Radiation environment at aviation altitudes and in space.

    PubMed

    Sihver, L; Ploc, O; Puchalska, M; Ambrožová, I; Kubančák, J; Kyselová, D; Shurshakov, V

    2015-06-01

    On the Earth, protection from cosmic radiation is provided by the magnetosphere and the atmosphere, but the radiation exposure increases with increasing altitude. Aircrew and especially space crew members are therefore exposed to an increased level of ionising radiation. Dosimetry onboard aircraft and spacecraft is however complicated by the presence of neutrons and high linear energy transfer particles. Film and thermoluminescent dosimeters, routinely used for ground-based personnel, do not reliably cover the range of particle types and energies found in cosmic radiation. Further, the radiation field onboard aircraft and spacecraft is not constant; its intensity and composition change mainly with altitude, geomagnetic position and solar activity (marginally also with the aircraft/spacecraft type, number of people aboard, amount of fuel etc.). The European Union Council directive 96/29/Euroatom of 1996 specifies that aircrews that could receive dose of >1 mSv y(-1) must be evaluated. The dose evaluation is routinely performed by computer programs, e.g. CARI-6, EPCARD, SIEVERT, PCAire, JISCARD and AVIDOS. Such calculations should however be carefully verified and validated. Measurements of the radiation field in aircraft are thus of a great importance. A promising option is the long-term deployment of active detectors, e.g. silicon spectrometer Liulin, TEPC Hawk and pixel detector Timepix. Outside the Earth's protective atmosphere and magnetosphere, the environment is much harsher than at aviation altitudes. In addition to the exposure to high energetic ionising cosmic radiation, there are microgravity, lack of atmosphere, psychological and psychosocial components etc. The milieu is therefore very unfriendly for any living organism. In case of solar flares, exposures of spacecraft crews may even be lethal. In this paper, long-term measurements of the radiation environment onboard Czech aircraft performed with the Liulin since 2001, as well as measurements and

  10. Effect of Irrigation to Winter Wheat on the Radiation Use Efficiency and Yield of Summer Maize in a Double Cropping System

    PubMed Central

    Quanqi, Li; Yuhai, Chen; Xunbo, Zhou; Songlie, Yu; Changcheng, Guo

    2012-01-01

    In north China, double cropping of winter wheat and summer maize is a widely adopted agricultural practice, and irrigation is required to obtain a high yield from winter wheat, which results in rapid aquifer depletion. In this experiment conducted in 2001-2002, 2002-2003, and 2004-2005, we studied the effects of irrigation regimes during specific winter wheat growing stage with winter wheat and summer maize double cropping systems; we measured soil moisture before sowing (SMBS), the photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) capture ratio, grain yield, and the radiation use efficiency (RUE) of summer maize. During the winter wheat growing season, irrigation was applied at the jointing, heading, or milking stage, respectively. The results showed that increased amounts of irrigation and irrigation later in the winter wheat growing season improved SMBS for summer maize. The PAR capture ratio significantly (LSD, P < 0.05) increased with increased SMBS, primarily in the 3 spikes leaves. With improved SMBS, both the grain yield and RUE increased in all the treatments. These results indicate that winter wheat should be irrigated in later stages to achieve reasonable grain yield for both crops. PMID:22654613

  11. Minimization of Radiation Exposure due to Computed Tomography in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mc Laughlin, Patrick D.; O'Connor, Owen J.; O'Neill, Siobhán B.; Shanahan, Fergus; Maher, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Patient awareness and concern regarding the potential health risks from ionizing radiation have peaked recently (Coakley et al., 2011) following widespread press and media coverage of the projected cancer risks from the increasing use of computed tomography (CT) (Berrington et al., 2007). The typical young and educated patient with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may in particular be conscious of his/her exposure to ionising radiation as a result of diagnostic imaging. Cumulative effective doses (CEDs) in patients with IBD have been reported as being high and are rising, primarily due to the more widespread and repeated use of CT (Desmond et al., 2008). Radiologists, technologists, and referring physicians have a responsibility to firstly counsel their patients accurately regarding the actual risks of ionizing radiation exposure; secondly to limit the use of those imaging modalities which involve ionising radiation to clinical situations where they are likely to change management; thirdly to ensure that a diagnostic quality imaging examination is acquired with lowest possible radiation exposure. In this paper, we synopsize available evidence related to radiation exposure and risk and we report advances in low-dose CT technology and examine the role for alternative imaging modalities such as ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging which avoid radiation exposure. PMID:22577571

  12. [Ionizing radiation in the aeronautics industry. Non-destructive testing].

    PubMed

    La Verde, R; Travaglini, C

    1983-08-25

    The constant increase in the non-military use of nuclear energy in various fields induced this study of one particular field: the aero industry. Alitalia has been using gammagraphy and industrial metallography for nondestructive testing for over 20 years. Workers exposed to ionising radiations at work are protected by precisely detailed standards based on extremely rigorous national and international legislation. The health and protection of these workers is entrusted to a Company Doctor and a Qualified Specialist. The latter is thought to be indispensable since he is responsible for primary preventions as well as prompt diagnosis. PMID:6866316

  13. Capacitor-based isolation amplifiers for harsh radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Francisco J.; Zong, Yi; de Agapito, Juan A.

    2010-01-01

    Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) capacitor-based isolation amplifiers were irradiated at the Portuguese Research Reactor (PRR) in order to determine its tolerance to the displacement damage and total ionising dose (TID). The set of experimental data shows that some of these devices are suitable for zones inside future nuclear facilities where the expected total radiation damage would be below 2.2×1013 1-MeV neutron/cm2 and 230 Gy (Si). However, some drawbacks must be taken into account by the electronic designers such as the increase of the output offset voltage and the slight modification of the transmission gain.

  14. Evidence for a Circum-Nuclear and Ionised Absorber in the X-ray Obscured Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Sambruna, R. M.; Gofford, J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Suzaku observation of the Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445. We confirm the results obtained with the previous X-ray observations which unveiled the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines and an overall X-ray emission which strongly resembles a typical Seyfert 2 despite of the optical classification as an unobscured AGN. The broad band spectrum allowed us to measure for the first time the amount of reflection (R approximately 0.9) which together with the relatively strong neutral Fe Ka emission line (EW approximately 100 eV) strongly supports a scenario where a Compton-thick mirror is present. The primary X ray continuum is strongly obscured by an absorber with a column density of NH = 2 - 3 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter. Two possible scenarios are proposed for the absorber: a neutral partial covering or a mildly ionised absorber with an ionisation parameter log xi approximately 1.0 erg centimeter per second. A comparison with the past and more recent X-ray observations of 3C 445 performed with XMM-Newton and Chandra is presented, which provided tentative evidence that the ionised and outflowing absorber varied. We argue that the absorber is probably associated with an equatorial diskwind located within the parsec scale molecular torus.

  15. Kinematic alignment of non-interacting CALIFA galaxies. Quantifying the impact of bars on stellar and ionised gas velocity field orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; García-Lorenzo, B.; van de Ven, G.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Spekkens, K.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Husemann, B.; Mast, D.; García-Benito, R.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Del Olmo, A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Kehrig, C.; Marino, R. A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Ziegler, B.; McIntosh, D. H.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Walcher, C. J.; Califa Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We present 80 stellar and ionised gas velocity maps from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey in order to characterise the kinematic orientation of non-interacting galaxies. The study of galaxies in isolation is a key step towards understanding how fast-external processes, such as major mergers, affect kinematic properties in galaxies. We derived the global and individual (projected approaching and receding sides) kinematic position angles (PAs) for both the stellar and ionised gas line-of-sight velocity distributions. When compared to the photometric PA, we find that morpho-kinematic differences are smaller than 22 degrees in 90% of the sample for both stellar and nebular components and that internal kinematic misalignments are generally smaller than 16 degrees. We find a tight relation between the global stellar and ionised gas kinematic PA consistent with circular-flow pattern motions in both components (~90% of the sample has differences smaller than 16 degrees). This relation also holds, generally in barred galaxies across the bar and galaxy disc scales. Our findings suggest that even in the presence of strong bars, both the stellar and the gaseous components tend to follow the gravitational potential of the disc. As a result, kinematic orientation can be used to assess the degree of external distortions in interacting galaxies. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Up-Dating Of Atomic Data Needed For Ionisation Balance Evaluations of Krypton and Molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Mattioli, M; Mazzitelli, G; Fournier, K B; Finkenthal, M; Carraro, L

    2006-06-01

    Atomic data for both ionization and recombination of Kr and Mo ions are reviewed, since the rate coefficients for these processes need to be regularly up-dated following the publication of new theoretical calculations and new experimental data. Kr is used in magnetic-confinement-fusion devices to produce a peripheral radiating mantle meant to spread the heat confinement-load on the plasma-facing components. In a few tokamaks Mo tiles cover the plasma-facing surfaces, acting in most cases as a plasma-column limiter. The collected atomic data represent the state of the art on the ionization and recombination data for the two considered elements. Samples of rates are proposed for both ionization and recombination along with tables of the fractional abundances at ionization equilibrium. The proposed rates should be included in codes that simulate the impurity behavior in magnetic-confinement-fusion devices, i.e., when radial transport is added to ionization and recombination to predict spatially resolved charge-state distributions that are to be compared with experimental results.

  17. Determination of agrochemical compounds in soya plants by imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Alexander K; Clench, Malcolm R; Crosland, Susan; Sharples, Kate R

    2005-01-01

    Detection and imaging of the herbicide mesotrione (2-(4-mesyl-2-nitrobenzoyl)cyclohexane-1,3-dione) and the fungicide azoxystrobin (methyl (E)-2-{2-[6-(2-cyanophenoxy)pyrimidin-4-yloxy]phenyl}-3-methoxyacrylate), on the surface of the soya leaf, and the detection and imaging of azoxystrobin inside the stem of the soya plant, have been achieved using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In leaf analysis experiments, the two pesticides were deposited onto the surface of individual soya leaves on growing plants. The soya leaves were removed and prepared for direct and indirect (following blotting onto matrix-coated cellulose membranes) imaging analysis at different periods after initial pesticide application. In stem analysis experiments, azoxystrobin was added to the nutrient solution of a soya plant growing in a hydroponics system. The plant was left for 48 h, and then horizontal and vertical stem sections were prepared for direct imaging analysis. The images obtained demonstrate the applicability of MALDI imaging to the detection and imaging of small organic compounds in plant tissue and further extend the analytical repertoire of the versatile MALDI technique. PMID:16106343

  18. Determination of sulfonamides by packed column supercritical fluid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Dost, K; Jones, D C; Davidson, G

    2000-07-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics are widely used to prevent bacterial infections in livestock, and residues are commonly found in milk and meat. Packed column supercritical fluid chromatography (pSFC) with detection using ultra violet (UV) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) provides a versatile method for the detection and quantification of six major sulfonamides. The APCI mass spectra for all the sulfonamides consisted of protonated molecules at low cone voltages. Increasing the cone voltage led to informative fragmentation patterns, which provided structural information for identification purposes. The pSFC-APCI-MS technique was shown to be linear (r2 > or = 0.999) over the concentration range 0.1-50 micrograms ml-1 using total ion current. The precision and the accuracy of the system and validation of sample preparation are acceptable, with RSD < 2% and relative error 8%. Selected ion monitoring gave detection limits as follows: sulfadiazine 41, sulfamethoxazole 45, sulfamerazine 47, sulfamethizole 59, sulfamethazine 181 and sulfadimethoxine 96 micrograms l-1, which are lower than the amounts permitted in milk products. The APCI pSFC-MS system was shown to have a high degree of reproducibility. The technique was then applied to determine the above sulfonamides in milk. The results obtained show that there are no matrix effects from the milk and that the detection limits remained as stated for the standard solutions. PMID:10984919

  19. Identification of synthetic dyes in early colour photographs using capillary electrophoresis and electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-Montes, Ana Ma; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; Desmazières, Bernard; Lavédrine, Bertrand

    2013-09-30

    Capillary electrophoresis with photodiode array detection (CE-PDA) and with electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS) was used for the separation and the identification of 23 synthetic organic dyes, among those used in early 20th century colour photographs such as autochromes. Both cationic and anionic dyes could be separated within 15min using a single CE-PDA method. The method was used as the basis to develop a CE-ESI-MS methodology through the optimisation of the relevant ESI and MS parameters. Sheath liquid composition, nebulising gas pressure, drying gas flow rate and drying gas temperature were found to influence the sensitivity of the detection. These parameters were optimised in positive and negative ion modes for cationic dyes and anionic dyes, respectively. The two analyses could be carried out successively on a single sample. In view of the application to cultural heritage objects, the CE-ESI-MS analytical procedure was applied to identify the dyes in a Filmcolor artefact, late version of the autochrome. The results complemented and enhanced current knowledge as four cationic dyes and three anionic dyes were identified. Four additional dyes are proposed as possibly present as traces. PMID:23953463

  20. Observations of a groove in the interplanetary Lyman alpha pattern as the signature of enhanced ionisation in the neutral sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaux, J. L.; Quemerais, E.; Lallement, R.; Summanen, T.; Kyrola, E.

    1995-06-01

    We report several observations of the Lyman alpha interplanetary emission recorded by a photometer flown in 1976-1977 on board the Soviet spacecraft Prognoz-5 and Prognoz-6. Several scans made in a plane perpendicular to the sun were cutting through the maximum emission region. where the interstellar hydrogen is approaching nearest to the sun (upwind region). On each of these scans is observed a dip in the intensity curve near the ecliptic plane. about 30 deg wide and approximately equals 10% deep. They reveal the presence of a new feature of the interplanetary emission. a 'groove' aligned approximately with the ecliptic plane. This groove is present only near the upwind direction, and is interpreted as the result of enhanced ionisation of interstellar H by charge-exchange with the solar wind in a sheet of approximately 30 deg around the average position of the neutral sheet at this time of solar this Lyman alpha groove is a prime target for future observations with SWAN experiment on SOHO.

  1. Observations of a groove in the interplanetary Lyman alpha pattern as the signature of enhanced ionisation in the neutral sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertaux, J. L.; Quemerais, E.; Lallement, R.; Summanen, T.; Kyrola, E.

    1995-01-01

    We report several observations of the Lyman alpha interplanetary emission recorded by a photometer flown in 1976-1977 on board the Soviet spacecraft Prognoz-5 and Prognoz-6. Several scans made in a plane perpendicular to the sun were cutting through the maximum emission region. where the interstellar hydrogen is approaching nearest to the sun (upwind region). On each of these scans is observed a dip in the intensity curve near the ecliptic plane. about 30 deg wide and approximately equals 10% deep. They reveal the presence of a new feature of the interplanetary emission. a 'groove' aligned approximately with the ecliptic plane. This groove is present only near the upwind direction, and is interpreted as the result of enhanced ionisation of interstellar H by charge-exchange with the solar wind in a sheet of approximately 30 deg around the average position of the neutral sheet at this time of solar this Lyman alpha groove is a prime target for future observations with SWAN experiment on SOHO.

  2. Thin-layer chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry using particle suspension matrices.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anna; Clench, Malcolm R; Richards, Don S; Parr, Vic

    2002-06-01

    Particle suspension matrices have been successfully utilized for the analysis of tetracycline antibiotics by thin-layer chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS). Particles of different materials and sizes have been investigated (Co-UFP, TiN, TiO2, Graphite and Silicon) by applying particle suspensions to eluted TLC plates. Mass spectra and mass chromatograms have been recorded directly from the TLC plates. Strong cationization by sodium and potassium was obtained in the positive ion mode, with [M+Na-NH3]+ ions being the predominant signals. The TLC-MALDI mass spectra recorded from graphite suspensions showed the lowest background noise and the highest peak intensities from the range of suspension matrices studied. The mass accuracy from graphite films was improved by adding the peptide Phe-Phe to the graphite suspensions. This allowed internal recalibration of the TLC-MALDI mass spectra acquired during a run. One major potential advantage of TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS has been demonstrated in the analysis of chlortetracycline and tetracycline in a mixture of oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, tetracycline and minocycline. Examination of the TLC plate prior to MALDI analysis showed only an unresolved spot for chlortetracycline and tetracycline. However by investigation of the MALDI mass spectra and plotting of single ion chromatograms separate peaks for chlortetracycline and tetracycline could be obtained. PMID:12134822

  3. Analysis of organophosphate flame retardants and plasticisers in water by isotope dilution gas chromatography-electron ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teo, Tiffany L L; McDonald, James A; Coleman, Heather M; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-10-01

    The widespread use of organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) in commercial products have led to their increased presence in the environment. In this study, a rapid and reliable analytical method was developed for the analysis of five PFRs in water using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) with electron ionisation (EI) and a run time of 13 min. The PFRs investigated were tributyl phosphate (TBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP). Solid phase extraction (SPE) was undertaken to extract and concentrate target analytes from aqueous matrices. All water samples were extracted from a volume of 500 mL. Isotopically labelled compounds were used to account for analytical variability and for accurate quantification by isotope dilution. Method recoveries for all compounds were above 80% in all tested water samples. Method detection limits for all target analytes ranged from 0.3 to 24 ng/L in ultrapure water, tap water, seawater, surface water, secondary effluent and swimming pool water. Validation of this method confirmed satisfactory method stability with less than 1% coefficients of variation, verifying that this approach produced good reproducibility. PMID:26078137

  4. Characterisation of a proposed internet synthesis of N,N-dimethyltryptamine using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martins, Cláudia P B; Freeman, Sally; Alder, John F; Brandt, Simon D

    2009-08-14

    The psychoactive properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) are known to induce altered states of consciousness in humans. These properties attract great interest from clinical, neuroscientific, clandestine and forensic communities. The Breath of Hope Synthesis was reported on an internet website as a convenient two-step methodology for the preparation of DMT. The analytical characterisation of the first stage was the subject of previous publications by the authors and involved the thermal decarboxylation of tryptophan and the formation of tryptamine. The present study reports on the characterisation of the second step of this procedure which was based on the methylation of tryptamine. This employed methyl iodide and benzyltriethylammonium chloride/sodium hydroxide as a phase transfer catalyst. The reaction product was characterised by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry and orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Quantitative evaluation was carried out in positive multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM), which included synthesis of the identified reaction products. MRM screening of the product did not lead to the detection of DMT. Instead, 11.1% tryptamine starting material, 21.0% N,N,N-trimethyltryptammonium iodide (TMT) and 47.4% 1-N-methyl-TMT were detected. A 0.5% trace of the monomethylated N-methyltryptamine was also detected. This study demonstrated the impact on product purity of doubtful synthetic methodologies discussed on the internet. PMID:19592003

  5. Rapid assignment of malting barley varieties by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation - Time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Kořán, Michal; Jakešová, Michaela; Mikulíková, Renata; Boháč, Michal; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2016-09-01

    A method for discriminating malting barley varieties based on direct matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation - time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) fingerprinting of proteins was developed. Signals corresponding to hordeins were obtained by simple mixing of powdered barley grain with a MALDI matrix solution containing 12.5mgmL(-1) of ferulic acid in an acetonitrile:water:formic acid 50:33:17 v/v/v mixture. Compared to previous attempts at MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of barley proteins, the extraction and fractionation steps were practically omitted, resulting in a significant reduction in analytical time and costs. The discriminatory power was examined on twenty malting barley varieties and the practicability of the method was tested on sixty barley samples acquired from Pilsner Urquell Brewery. The method is proposed as a rapid tool for variety assignment and purity determination of malting barley that may replace gel electrophoresis currently used for this purpose. PMID:27041307

  6. Characterisation of an inexpensive sonic spray ionisation source using laser-induced fluorescence imaging and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stindt, Arne; Warschat, Carsten; Bierstedt, Andreas; Panne, Ulrich; Riedel, Jens

    2014-01-01

    A commercially available airbrush gun as a new source for spray ionisation is presented. It is best operated employing moderate stagnation pressures, resulting in a sonic gas flow. A mass spectrometric investigation on the amino acid Lysine and several peptides reveals that this inexpensive approach results in reproducible mass spectra. The ion patterns strongly resemble the results from other studies obtained with custom-made sonic spray vaporisers. The patterns also resemble the mass spectra recorded with electrospray devices. For a better understanding of the vaporisation process, the mass spectrometry experiments are accompanied by laser-induced fluorescence experiments. Inverse Abel Transform of the obtained fluorescence maps allows the determination of the full three-dimensional distribution of the spray cone. Furthermore, via exploitation of the solvatochromism of the used dye the solvation-state distribution can be visualised. In addition, expansion parameters, such as droplet size and velocity, are obtained by laser stroboscopy. The experiments demonstrate that the analyte hardly desolvates throughout the expansion. This indicates a subsequent vaporisation of the residual solvent in the intermediate pressure region of the mass spectrometer. PMID:24881452

  7. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A. V.; Gusarov, A. I.; Mégret, P.; Wuilpart, M.; Kinet, D.; Zhukov, A. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ~100 kGy, the shift is ~20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing.

  8. The Photoevaporation of a Neutral Structure by an EUV+FUV Radiation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, Veronica; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Raga, A. C.; Cerqueira, A. H.; Esquivel, A.

    The expansion of an HII region into a surrounding inhomogeneous molecular cloud, leads to the formation of elongated "elephant trunk" structures. The EUV photo-ionising radiation and FUV dissociating radiation from newly born stars photo-evaporate their parental neutral cloud, leading to the formation of dense clumps in the tips of elephant trunks, that could in principle eventually form stars. We study th effects of including a photo-dissociating FUV flux in models of fragmentation of a photo-evaporating, self-gravitating molecular cloud.

  9. Radiation sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine the amount of radiation exposure from nuclear accidents, the best signs of the severity of the ... doses of radiation, such as radiation from a nuclear power plant accident Exposure to excessive radiation for medical treatments

  10. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  11. Radiation a new paradigm...Societal impacts.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Jill

    2010-05-01

    Latency is associated with the time lag it takes for the health effects resulting from exposure to ionising radiation to show up. However, the term latency can also be applied to the time it takes for a policy to be implemented. This length of time has been suggested as broadly 40-year process. Given that radioactivity was identified and named in 1896, three paradigms are identified and examined from 1896 to 2016 and the criteria for a 4th paradigm suggested for the period 2017-2056. The review examines the changes that have taken place in scientific understanding and in public trust, a few key developments and the associated establishment of the related organisational infrastructure designed to collate and assess the evidence. PMID:20100500

  12. Evaluation of Awareness on Radiation Protection and Knowledge About Radiological Examinations in Healthcare Professionals Who Use Ionized Radiation at Work

    PubMed Central

    Yurt, Ayşegül; Çavuşoğlu, Berrin; Günay, Türkan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we evaluated the knowledge and perception and mitigation of hazards involved in radiological examinations, focusing on healthcare personnel who are not in radiation-related occupations, but who use ionising radiation as a part of their work. Methods: A questionnaire was applied to physicians, nurses, technicians and other staff working in different clinics that use radiation in their work, in order to evaluate their knowledge levels about ionizing radiation and their awareness about radiation doses resulting from radiological examinations. The statistical comparisons between the groups were analyzed with the Kruskal Wallis test using the SPSS program. Results: Ninety two participants took part in the study. Their level of knowledge about ionizing radiation and doses in radiological examinations were found to be very weak. The number of correct answers of physicians, nurses, medical technicians and other personnel groups were 15.7±3.7, 13.0±4.0, 10.1±2.9 and 11.8±4.0, respectively. In the statistical comparison between the groups, the level of knowledge of physicians was found to be significantly higher than the level of the other groups (p=0.005). Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that general knowledge in relation to radiation, radiation protection, health risks and doses used for radiological applications are insufficient among health professions using with ionizing radiation in their work. PMID:24963445

  13. A derivatisation and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation multistage mass spectrometry method for the characterisation of naphthenic acids.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E; Rowland, S J

    2008-12-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are partially uncharacterised complex mixtures of carboxylic acids, resulting from the microbial oxidation of petroleum hydrocarbons. They are associated with the fouling of pipelines and process equipment in oil production and with corrosion in oil refineries. As by-products of the rapidly expanding oil (tar) sands industries, NAs are also pollutants and have proved to be toxic to a range of organisms. They also have important beneficial uses as fungicides, tyre additives and, paradoxically, also in the manufacture of corrosion inhibitors. These features make the characterisation of NAs an important goal for analytical chemists. Here we describe the synthesis of amide derivatives of NAs for characterisation by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation multistage mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS(n)). The method was applied to commercially available carboxylic acids, novel synthetic NAs, commercial NAs refined from crude oils, crude oil NAs and Athabasca oil sands NAs. In addition to confirming the number of alicyclic rings and length of alkyl side chain substituents (confirming information from existing methods), the MS(n) results provided further structural information. Most important of these was the finding that bi- to polycyclic acids containing ethanoate side chains, in addition to alkyl substituents, were widespread amongst the oil and oil sands NAs. The latter NAs are known end members of the beta-oxidation of NAs with even carbon number alkanoate chains. Since such NA mixtures are toxic, they should be targets for bioremediation. Bioremediation of NAs can also be monitored better by application of the methods described herein. PMID:18988206

  14. The formation and evolution of reconnection-driven, slow-mode shocks in a partially ionised plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, A.; Takasao, S.; Nakamura, N.

    2016-06-01

    The role of slow-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in magnetic reconnection is of great importance for energy conversion and transport, but in many astrophysical plasmas the plasma is not fully ionised. In this paper, we use numerical simulations to investigate the role of collisional coupling between a proton-electron, charge-neutral fluid and a neutral hydrogen fluid for the one-dimensional (1D) Riemann problem initiated in a constant pressure and density background state by a discontinuity in the magnetic field. This system, in the MHD limit, is characterised by two waves. The first is a fast-mode rarefaction wave that drives a flow towards a slow-mode MHD shock wave. The system evolves through four stages: initiation, weak coupling, intermediate coupling, and a quasi-steady state. The initial stages are characterised by an over-pressured neutral region that expands with characteristics of a blast wave. In the later stages, the system tends towards a self-similar solution where the main drift velocity is concentrated in the thin region of the shock front. Because of the nature of the system, the neutral fluid is overpressured by the shock when compared to a purely hydrodynamic shock, which results in the neutral fluid expanding to form the shock precursor. Once it has formed, the thickness of the shock front is proportional to ξ i-1.2 , which is a smaller exponent than would be naively expected from simple scaling arguments. One interesting result is that the shock front is a continuous transition of the physical variables of subsonic velocity upstream of the shock front (a c-shock) to a sharp jump in the physical variables followed by a relaxation to the downstream values for supersonic upstream velocity (a j-shock). The frictional heating that results from the velocity drift across the shock front can amount to ~2 per cent of the reference magnetic energy.

  15. Considerations on the modelling and optimisation of resolution of ionisable compounds in extended pH-range columns.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lapasió, J R; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C; Bosch, E; Rosés, M

    2005-09-30

    The problems associated to the modelling and optimisation of the chromatographic resolution of mixtures involving ionisable solutes at varying pH and acetonitrile content are discussed. Several retention models that separate the contributions of solute, column and stationary phase, were used. The retention was predicted with low errors in large pH domains (2-12), which was an essential requirement to face the optimisation of resolution. The selected mixture was particularly problematic under the viewpoint of resolution, owing to the excessively diverse acid-base behaviour of solutes. This variety led to sudden drops in retention at different pH for each solute, yielding numerous peak crossing, which made finding shared regions of high resolution especially difficult. Conventional resolution diagrams for these situations are scarcely informative, since both the overall and the worst elementary resolutions drop to zero if at least two compounds remain overlapped, even when all the others are baseline resolved. A new chromatographic objective function is proposed to address this drawback. This function, called "limiting peak count", is based on the limiting peak purity concept, and measures the success in the resolution focusing on the resolved solutes, in contrast to conventional resolution assessments that attend mainly to the least resolved solutes. Limiting peak count yields the same result as conventional assessments when full resolution is possible, but it is also able to discriminate the maximal resolving power in low-resolution situations. It offers a different perspective to that given by the complementary mobile phases approach, and the computation is far simpler. PMID:16130785

  16. Determination of pharmaceutical compounds in skin by imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Josephine; Clench, Malcolm R; Richards, Don S

    2004-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOFMS) has been used to detect and image the distribution of a xenobiotic substance in skin. Porcine epidermal tissue was treated with 'Nizoral', a medicated shampoo containing ketoconazole (+/-)-1-acetyl-4-[p-[[(2R,4S)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl]methoxy]phenyl]piperazine) as active ingredient. Following incubation for 1 h at 37 degrees C all excess formulation was washed from the surface. A cross-section of the drug-treated tissue was then blotted onto a cellulose membrane, precoated in matrix (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA)), by airspray deposition. In separate experiments the tissue surface was treated with Nizoral within a triangular former, and subsequently blotted onto a matrix-coated membrane. Sample membranes were then mounted into the recess of specialised MALDI targets with adhesive tape. All samples were analysed by MALDI-TOFMS using an Applied Biosystem 'Q-star Pulsar i' hybrid Q-TOF mass spectrometer fitted with an orthagonal MALDI ion source and imaging software. Detection of the protonated molecule was readily achievable by this technique. Treatment of the tissue within a template gave rise to images depicting the expected distribution of the drug, demonstrating that this technique is capable of producing spatially useful data. Ion images demonstrating the permeation of the applied compound into the skin were achieved by imaging a cross-sectional imprint of treated tissue. A calibration graph for the determination of ketoconazole was prepared using the sodium adduct of the matrix ion as an internal standard. This enabled construction of a quantitative profile of drug in skin. Conventional haematoxylin and eosin staining and microscopy methods were employed to obtain a histological image of the porcine epidermal tissue. Superimposing the mass spectrometric and histological images appeared to indicate drug

  17. Quantitative analysis of surfactant deposits on human skin by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Massey, Karen A; Snelling, Anna M; Nicolaou, Anna

    2010-05-15

    Surfactants are commonly used as cleansing agents and yet there are concerns that they may also have a role in skin irritation. The lack of suitable methods for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of surfactant deposition on skin has hindered the in-depth investigation of such effects. Here, we report the application of reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) assays for two surfactants commonly used in consumer products, namely sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) and laurylamidopropyl betaine (LAPB), to a baseline study aiming to assess deposition levels on human skin. The linearity of the assays was established at 3-20 ng, with coefficient of variation below 5%. The detection limits were 100 pg for LAPB and 1 ng for SLES; quantitation limits were 500 pg for LAPB and 2.5 ng for SLES. The baseline study was conducted using a panel of 40 healthy volunteers. Skin extract samples were taken in triplicate from forearms, using ethanol. SLES was detected on most volunteers, with 75% of them having SLES deposits in the range of 100-600 ng/cm(2). LAPB was detected on the skin of all volunteers with 85% of them having deposit levels within the concentration range of 1-100 ng/cm(2). These results demonstrate the extent to which commonly used surfactants remain on the skin during the day. The analytical methods reported here can be applied to the investigation of surfactants in relation to general skin condition and to the development and optimisation of new consumer wash products. PMID:20391611

  18. Multi-residue analysis of pesticides in traditional Chinese medicines using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing; Miao, Shui; Lehotay, Steven J; Li, Wen-Ting; Zhou, Heng; Mao, Xiu-Hong; Lu, Ji-Wei; Lan, Lan; Ji, Shen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a residue analysis method for the simultaneous determination of 107 pesticides in traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), Angelica sinensis, A. dahurica, Leonurus heterophyllus Sweet, Pogostemon cablin and Lonicera japonica Thunb., was developed using gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionisation mode (GC-NCI-MS/MS). NCI has advantages of high sensitivity and selectivity to chemicals with electron-withdrawing groups, and yields low background interference. For sample preparation, QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) was applied. Due to the unique characteristics of TCMs, the clean-up step was optimised by adjusting amounts of primary secondary amine, C18, graphitised carbon black and silica sorbents. Validation was mainly performed by determining analyte recoveries at four different spiking concentrations of 10, 50, 100 and 200 ng g(-1), with seven replicates at each concentration. Method trueness, precision, linearity of calibration curves, lowest calibrated levels (LCLs) and matrix effects were determined to demonstrate method and instrument performance. Among the 107 pesticides tested, approximately 80% gave recoveries from 80% to 110% and < 10% relative standard deviation (RSD). The LCLs for nearly all pesticides were 5 ng g(-1), and as low as 0.1 ng g(-1) for dichlofenthion, endosulfan sulphate, flumetralin, isofenphos-methyl, methyl-pentachlorophenyl sulphide and trifluralin. The results indicate that GC-NCI-MS/MS is an excellent technique for quantitative and qualitative analysis of targeted GC-amenable pesticides at ultra-trace levels, especially in complex matrices such as TCMs. PMID:26125677

  19. Diagnostic imaging and radiation exposure in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Nekisa; Pollok, Richard C G

    2016-02-21

    Diagnostic imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However due to the relapsing nature of IBD, there is growing concern that IBD patients may be exposed to potentially harmful cumulative levels of ionising radiation in their lifetime, increasing malignant potential in a population already at risk. In this review we explore the proportion of IBD patients exposed to high cumulative radiation doses, the risk factors associated with higher radiation exposures, and we compare conventional diagnostic imaging with newer radiation-free imaging techniques used in the evaluation of patients with IBD. While computed tomography (CT) performs well as an imaging modality for IBD, the effective radiation dose is considerably higher than other abdominal imaging modalities. It is increasingly recognised that CT imaging remains responsible for the majority of diagnostic medical radiation to which IBD patients are exposed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and small intestine contrast enhanced ultrasonography (SICUS) have now emerged as suitable radiation-free alternatives to CT imaging, with comparable diagnostic accuracy. The routine use of MRI and SICUS for the clinical evaluation of patients with known or suspected small bowel Crohn's disease is to be encouraged wherever possible. More provision is needed for out-of-hours radiation-free imaging modalities to reduce the need for CT. PMID:26900282

  20. Diagnostic imaging and radiation exposure in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Nekisa; Pollok, Richard CG

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However due to the relapsing nature of IBD, there is growing concern that IBD patients may be exposed to potentially harmful cumulative levels of ionising radiation in their lifetime, increasing malignant potential in a population already at risk. In this review we explore the proportion of IBD patients exposed to high cumulative radiation doses, the risk factors associated with higher radiation exposures, and we compare conventional diagnostic imaging with newer radiation-free imaging techniques used in the evaluation of patients with IBD. While computed tomography (CT) performs well as an imaging modality for IBD, the effective radiation dose is considerably higher than other abdominal imaging modalities. It is increasingly recognised that CT imaging remains responsible for the majority of diagnostic medical radiation to which IBD patients are exposed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and small intestine contrast enhanced ultrasonography (SICUS) have now emerged as suitable radiation-free alternatives to CT imaging, with comparable diagnostic accuracy. The routine use of MRI and SICUS for the clinical evaluation of patients with known or suspected small bowel Crohn’s disease is to be encouraged wherever possible. More provision is needed for out-of-hours radiation-free imaging modalities to reduce the need for CT. PMID:26900282

  1. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  2. Fragmentation, auto-modification and post ionisation proton bound dimer ion formation: the differential mobility spectrometry of low molecular weight alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, D M; Thomas, C L P; Eiceman, G A

    2016-08-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is currently being used for environmental monitoring of space craft atmospheres and has been proposed for the rapid assessment of patients at accident and emergency receptions. Three studies investigated hitherto undescribed complexity in the DMS spectra of methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol product ions formed from a (63)Ni ionisation source. 54 000 DMS spectra obtained over a concentration range of 0.01 mg m(-3)(g) to 1.80 g m(-3)(g) revealed the phenomenon of auto-modification of the product ions. This occurred when the neutral vapour concentration exceeded the level required to induce a neutral-ion collision during the low field portion of the dispersion field waveform. Further, post-ionisation cluster-ion formation or protonated monomer/proton bound dimer inter-conversion within the ion-filter was indicated by apparent shifts in the values of the protonated monomer compensation field maximum; indicative of post-ionisation conversion of the protonated monomer to a proton-bound dimer. APCI-DMS-quadrupole mass spectrometry studies enabled the ion dissociation products from dispersion-field heating to be monitored and product ion fragmentation relationships to be proposed. Methanol was not observed to dissociate, while propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol underwent dissociation reactions consistent with dehydration processes that led ultimately to the generation of what is tentatively assigned as a cyclo-C3H3(+) ion (m/z 39) and hydrated protons. Studies of the interaction of ion filter temperature with dispersion-field heating of product ions isolated dissociation/fragmentation product ions that have not been previously described in DMS. The implications of these combined findings with regard to data sharing and data interpretation were highlighted. PMID:27227997

  3. Resveratrol Inhibits Ionising Irradiation-Induced Inflammation in MSCs by Activating SIRT1 and Limiting NLRP-3 Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Du, Liqing; Xu, Chang; Cao, Jia; Fan, Tiqiang; Liu, Jianxiang; Su, Xu; Fan, Saijun; Liu, Qiang; Fan, Feiyue

    2013-01-01

    IL-1β, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, has been shown to contribute to radiation injury. Sirt1, an NAD+-dependent class III protein deacetylase, plays an important role in the regulation of the proinflammatory cytokines involved in inflammation-associated diseases. The relationship between Sirt1 and IL-1β, however, has remained elusive. The present study was designed to explore the potential effect of Sirt1 on IL-1β expression induced by radiation and to provide a new target for the development of radiation protection drugs. Our results showed that radiation significantly increased IL-1β mRNA and protein expression and that pretreatment with resveratrol, a Sirt1 activator, inhibited the radiation-induced IL-1β expression in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the knockdown or inhibition of Sirt1 by nicotinamide significantly enhanced radiation-induced IL-1β expression. This effect can likely be attributed to Sirt1-mediated inhibition of NLRP-3 inflammasome activation because Sirt1 inhibits the transactivation potential of NF-κb by deacetylation, which then suppresses NLRP3 transcription. Taken together, the results demonstrate that Sirt1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects by regulating NLRP3 expression partially through the NF-κb pathway in mesenchymal stem cells. More importantly, our findings suggest that resveratrol is an effective agent in protecting against radiation injury, and we provide a theoretical basis for developing a drug to protect against radiation injury by targeting Sirt1. PMID:23880858

  4. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  5. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. ... faster than normal cells in the body. Because radiation is most harmful to quickly growing cells, radiation ...

  6. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them ... places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  7. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have radiation therapy may feel more tired than usual, not feel hungry, or lose their ... of radiation therapy include: Fatigue. Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common side effect of radiation ...

  8. Radiation Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... day from sources such as sunlight. A radiation emergency would involve larger amounts of radiation and could ... are no guarantees of safety during a radiation emergency, you can take actions to protect yourself. You ...

  9. Identification of main corticosteroids as illegal feed additives in milk replacers by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fiori, M; Pierdominici, E; Longo, F; Brambilla, G

    1998-05-22

    Corticosteroids were proposed as growth promoting agents to improve commercial quality of meat. We developed a liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) method able to identify the presence in milk replacers, when given by mouth, of dexamethasone, betamethasone, flumethasone, triamcinolone, predinisotone, prednisolone, methylprednisolone, fludrocortisone and beclomethasone, at levels in the range of 20-100 ppb. C18 solid-phase extraction, LC-RP C8 column separation, data acquisition (positive ions) in the scan range m/z 200-550 allowed us to differentiate and identify compounds by protonated molecules, their methanolic adducts and fragmentation patterns. PMID:9646497

  10. Haemopoietic cell renewal in radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Fliedner, T M; Nothdurft, W; Tibken, B; Hofer, E; Weiss, M; Kindler, H

    1994-10-01

    Space flight activities are inevitably associated with a chronic exposure of astronauts to a complex mixture of ionising radiation. Although no acute radiation consequences are to be expected as a rule, the possibility of Solar Particle Events (SPE) associated with relatively high doses of radiation (1 or more Gray) cannot be excluded. It is the responsibility of physicians in charge of the health of astronauts to evaluate before, during and after space flight activities the functional status of haemopoietic cell renewal. Chronic low level exposure of dogs indicate that daily gamma-exposure doses below about 2 cGy are tolerated for several years as far as blood cell concentrations are concerned. However, the stem cell pool may be severely affected. The maintenance of sufficient blood cell counts is possible only through increased cell production to compensate for the radiation inflicted excess cell loss. This behaviour of haemopoietic cell renewal during chronic low level exposure can be simulated by bioengineering models of granulocytopoiesis. It is possible to define a "turbulence region" for cell loss rates, below which an prolonged adaptation to increased radiation fields can be expected to be tolerated. On the basis of these experimental results, it is recommended to develop new biological indicators to monitor haemopoietic cell renewal at the level of the stem cell pool using blood stem cells in addition to the determination of cytokine concentrations in the serum (and other novel approaches). To prepare for unexpected haemopoietic effects during prolonged space missions, research should be increased to modify the radiation sensitivity of haemopoietic stem cells (for instance by the application of certain regulatory molecules). In addition, a "blood stem cell bank" might be established for the autologous storage of stem cells and for use in space activities keeping them in a radiation protected container. PMID:11539991

  11. Haemopoietic cell renewal in radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliedner, T. M.; Nothdurft, W.; Tibken, B.; Hofer, E.; Weiss, M.; Kindler, H.

    1994-10-01

    Space flight activities are inevitably associated with a chronic exposure of astronauts to a complex mixture of ionising radiation. Although no acute radiation consequences are to be expected as a rule, the possibility of Solar Particle Events (SPE) associated with relatively high doses of radiation (1 or more Gray) cannot be excluded. It is the responsibility of physicians in charge of the health of astronauts to evaluate before, during and after space flight activities the functional status of haemopoietic cell renewal. Chronic low level exposure of dogs indicate that daily gamma-exposure doses below about 2 cGy are tolerated for several years as far as blood cell concentrations are concerned. However, the stem cell pool may be severely affected. The maintenance of sufficient blood cell counts is possible only through increased cell production to compensate for the radiation inflicted excess cell loss. This behaviour of haemopoietic cell renewal during chronic low level exposure can be simulated by bioengineering models of granulocytopoiesis. It is possible to define a ``turbulence region'' for cell loss rates, below which an prolonged adaptation to increased radiation fields can be expected to be tolerated. On the basis of these experimental results, it is recommended to develop new biological indicators to monitor haemopoietic cell renewal at the level of the stem cell pool using blood stem cells in addition to the determination of cytokine concentrations in the serum (and other novel approaches). To prepare for unexpected haemopoietic effects during prolonged space missions, research should be increased to modify the radiation sensitivity of haemopoietic stem cells (for instance by the application of certain regulatory molecules). In addition, a ``blood stem cell bank'' might be established for the autologous storage of stem cells and for use in space activities keeping them in a radiation protected container.

  12. Atmospheric radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harshvardhan, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric radiative processes are summarized for the period 1987-1990. Topics discussed include radiation modeling; clouds and radiation; radiative effects in dynamics and climate; radiation budget and aerosol effects; and gaseous absorption, particulate scattering and surface reflection. It is concluded that the key developments of the period are a defining of the radiative forcing to the climate system by trace gases and clouds, the recognition that cloud microphysics and morphology need to be incorporated not only into radiation models but also climate models, and the isolation of a few important unsolved theoretical problems in atmospheric radiation.

  13. Analysis of organophosphate flame retardant diester metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van den Eede, Nele; Neels, Hugo; Jorens, Philippe G; Covaci, Adrian

    2013-08-16

    A new analytical method was developed for the determination of dialkyl and diaryl phosphates (DAPs), which are metabolites of organophosphate triesters (PFRs), in human urine. Target DAPs included dibutyl phosphate (DBP), diphenyl phosphate (DPHP), bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (BBOEP), bis(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (BCEP), bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BCPP), and bis(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BDCIPP). Sample preparation was based on solid phase extraction using a weak anion exchange sorbent (Oasis WAX). Although several instrumental techniques have been tested, best results were obtained with reversed phase liquid chromatography-negative electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) taking the total analysis time into account. Method accuracy at 3ng/mL in pooled urine ranged between 69 and 119% (recovery), while inter-day imprecision (as relative standard deviation) was <31%. The performance of the LC-MS/MS method was compared to a method based on gas chromatography-electron impact tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) and a good correlation (Pearson r=0.82, p<0.01) between the results of these two methods was obtained for DPHP. LC-MS/MS analysis was more suitable for DPHP and BBOEP with respective method limits of quantification (mLOQ) of 0.3 and 0.15ng/mL. In contrast, GC-MS/MS had a better sensitivity for BCEP, BCIPP, and BDCIPP, their respective mLOQs being 0.1, 0.06, 0.02ng/mL, compared to 1.2, 3.7, and 0.5ng/mL by LC-MS/MS. A set of urine samples from volunteers was analysed, in which DPHP was the major DAP metabolite. A significant increase of DPHP levels was observed in the group of smokers (geometric mean of 1.55ng/mL) compared to the non-smokers (geometric mean of 0.88ng/mL). Metabolic transformation of triphenyl phosphate to DPHP by metabolic enzymes induced in smokers could be an explanation for this observation. PMID:23849782

  14. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalas, Dimitri

    Basic Radiation Theory Specific Intensity Photon Number Density Photon Distribution Function Mean Intensity Radiation Energy Density Radiation Energy Flux Radiation Momentum Density Radiation Stress Tensor (Radiation Pressure Tensor) Thermal Radiation Thermodynamics of Thermal Radiation and a Perfect Gas The Transfer Equation Absorption, Emission, and Scattering The Equation of Transfer Moments of the Transfer Equation Lorentz Transformation of the Transfer Equation Lorentz Transformation of the Photon 4-Momentum Lorentz Transformation of the Specific Intensity, Opacity, and - Emissivity Lorentz Transformation of the Radiation Stress Energy Tensor The Radiation 4-Force Density Vector Covariant Form of the Transfer Equation Inertial-Frame Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Inertial-Frame Radiation Equations Inertial-Frame Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Comoving-Frame Equation of Transfer Special Relativistic Derivation (D. Mihalas) Consistency Between Comoving-Frame and Inertial-Frame Equations Noninertial Frame Derivation (J. I. Castor) Analysis of O (v/c) Terms Lagrangian Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Momentum Equation Gas Energy Equation First Law of Thermodynamics for the Radiation Field First Law of Thermodynamics for the Radiating Fluid Mechanical Energy Equation Total Energy Equation Consistency of Different Forms of the Radiating-Fluid Energy - and Momentum Equations Consistency of Inertial-Frame and Comoving-Frame Radiation Energy - and Momentum Equations Radiation Diffusion Radiation Diffusion Nonequilibrium Diffusion The Problem of Flux Limiting Shock Propagation: Numerical Methods Acoustic Waves Numerical Stability Systems of Equations Implications of Shock Development Implications of Diffusive Energy Transport Illustrative Example Numerical Radiation Hydrodynamics Radiating Fluid Energy and Momentum Equations Computational Strategy Energy Conservation Formal Solution Multigroup Equations An Astrophysical Example Adaptive-Grid Radiation

  15. Pelvic radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation of the pelvis - discharge; Cancer treatment - pelvic radiation; Prostate cancer - pelvic radiation; Ovarian cancer - pelvic radiation; Cervical cancer - pelvic radiation; Uterine cancer - pelvic radiation; Rectal cancer - ...

  16. Identification of N-glycans from Ebola virus glycoproteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight and negative ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Gayle; Harvey, David J.; Stroeher, Ute; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Royle, Louise; Dwek, Raymond A.; Rudd, Pauline M.

    2012-01-01

    The larger fragment of the transmembrane glycoprotein (GP1) and the soluble glycoprotein (sGP) of Ebola virus were expressed in human embryonic kidney cells and the secreted products were purified from the supernatant for carbohydrate analysis. The N-glycans were released with PNGase F from within sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels. Identification of the glycans was made with normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, negative ion electrospray ionisation fragmentation mass spectrometry and exoglycosidase digestion. Most glycans were complex bi-, tri-and tetra-antennary compounds with reduced amounts of galactose. No bisected compounds were detected. Triantennary glycans were branched on the 6-antenna; fucose was attached to the core GlcNAc residue. Sialylated glycans were present on sGP but were largely absent from GP1, the larger fragment of the transmembrane glycoprotein. Consistent with this was the generally higher level of processing of carbohydrates found on sGP as evidenced by a higher percentage of galactose and lower levels of high-mannose glycans than were found on GP1. These results confirm and expand previous findings on partial characterisation of the Ebola virus transmembrane glycoprotein. They represent the first detailed data on carbohydrate structures of the Ebola virus sGP. PMID:20131323

  17. Determination of ionisation chamber collection efficiency in a swept electron beam by means of thermoluminescent detectors and the "two-voltage" method.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, J; Rijnders, A; Ang, K K; Mellaerts, M; Grobet, P

    1985-06-01

    Two methods for determining the collection efficiency of a 0.6 cm3 thimble ionisation chamber exposed to the swept electron beam of a linear accelerator Therac 20 Saturne (CGR MeV) have been compared. In one method the chamber signal has been compared to that of simultaneously exposed thermoluminescent LiF dosemeters (TLD), in the other the "two-voltage" method of Boag, adapted for swept beams, has been used. By variation of the electron energy between 20 and 13 MeV, of the focus-skin-distance (FSD) between 200 and 100 cm and of the monitor rate between 400 monitor units (m.u.) and 100 m.u. per minute, different values could be produced for the peak charge density M. The collection efficiency of the chamber, operating at a standard voltage of 250 V, decreases from 0.99 to 0.84 for a charge density increasing from 0.3 X 10(-4) C/m3 to 7.5 X 10(-4) C/m3, respectively. The maximum deviation observed between the TLD and the "two-voltage" method adopted for similar M is never more than 2% and mostly smaller than 1%. It can be concluded that, under the present experimental conditions, the calculated ionisation chamber collection efficiency is confirmed by the experimental method using TL dosimetry. PMID:3925506

  18. Novel characterisation of minor α-linolenic acid isomers in linseed oil by gas chromatography and covalent adduct chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, P; Brenna, J T; Lawrence, P; de la Fuente, M A

    2016-06-01

    Discrimination between polyunsaturated fatty acid isomers with three double bonds is a great challenge, due to structural similarities and similar polarities. In this study, we report the identification of four minor geometrical isomers of α-linolenic acid (ALA) present in linseed oil samples: (9E,12Z,15E)-, (9Z,12Z,15E)-, (9Z,12E,15Z)- and (9E,12Z,15Z)-octadeca-9,12,15-trienoic acids, chromatographically resolved by gas chromatography (GC) using a new and highly polar ionic phase column (SLB-IL111). Gas chromatography-electron ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-EIMS) determined that the four unknown compounds were C18:3 n-3 isomers. The positional 9-12-15 C18:3 configuration was achieved by covalent adduct chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (CACI-MS/MS) while geometrical configuration was established with analytical standards based on relative retention. We hypothesised that these isomers are formed during linseed oil deodorisation and postulate preferred and unfavoured isomerisation pathways of ALA. PMID:26830571

  19. Non ionising radiation as a non chemical strategy in regenerative medicine: Ca(2+)-ICR "In Vitro" effect on neuronal differentiation and tumorigenicity modulation in NT2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Mario; Megiorni, Francesca; Pozzi, Deleana; Giuliani, Livio; D'Emilia, Enrico; Piccirillo, Sara; Mattei, Cristiana; Grimaldi, Settimio; Lisi, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In regenerative medicine finding a new method for cell differentiation without pharmacological treatment or gene modification and minimal cell manipulation is a challenging goal. In this work we reported a neuronal induced differentiation and consequent reduction of tumorigenicity in NT2 human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells exposed to an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), matching the cyclotron frequency corresponding to the charge/mass ratio of calcium ion (Ca(2+)-ICR). These cells, capable of differentiating into post-mitotic neurons following treatment with Retinoic Acid (RA), were placed in a solenoid and exposed for 5 weeks to Ca(2+)-ICR. The solenoid was installed in a μ-metal shielded room to avoid the effect of the geomagnetic field and obtained totally controlled and reproducible conditions. Contrast microscopy analysis reveled, in the NT2 exposed cells, an important change in shape and morphology with the outgrowth of neuritic-like structures together with a lower proliferation rate and metabolic activity alike those found in the RA treated cells. A significant up-regulation of early and late neuronal differentiation markers and a significant down-regulation of the transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) and the fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4) were also observed in the exposed cells. The decreased protein expression of the transforming gene Cripto-1 and the reduced capability of the exposed NT2 cells to form colonies in soft agar supported these last results. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Ca(2+)-ICR frequency is able to induce differentiation and reduction of tumorigenicity in NT2 exposed cells suggesting a new potential therapeutic use in regenerative medicine. PMID:23585910

  20. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Symptoms, risk factors and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    Ionising radiation therapy is a common treatment modality for different types of cancer and its use is expected to increase with advances in screening and early detection of cancer. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is important factor working against better utility of this important therapeutic modality. Cancer survivors can suffer a wide variety of acute and chronic symptoms following radiotherapy, which significantly reduces their quality of life as well as adding an extra burden to the cost of health care. The accurate diagnosis and treatment of intestinal radiation injury often represents a clinical challenge to practicing physicians in both gastroenterology and oncology. Despite the growing recognition of the problem and some advances in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation injury, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal radiation injury or any possible susceptibility factors that could aggravate its severity. The aims of this review are to examine the various clinical manifestations of post-radiation gastrointestinal symptoms, to discuss possible patient and treatment factors implicated in normal gastrointestinal tissue radiosensitivity and to outline different mechanisms of intestinal tissue injury. PMID:23345941

  1. Assessment of RF radiation levels in the vicinity of 60 GSM mobile phone base stations in Iran.

    PubMed

    Nayyeri, Vahid; Hashemi, Seyed Mohammad; Borna, Maryam; Jalilian, Hamid-Reza; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Increasing development of mobile communication infrastructure while enhancing availability of the technology raises concerns among the public, who see more cell towers erected each day, about possible health effects of electromagnetic radiations. Thereon, a survey of radio-frequency radiation from 60 GSM base stations was carried out in Tehran, Iran at several places mostly located in major medical and educational centres. Measurements were performed at 15 locations near each base station site, i.e. 900 locations in total. Since there are other RF radiation sources such as broadcasting services whose carrier frequencies are <3 GHz, the whole band of 27 MHz to 3 GHz has been assessed for hazardous exposures as well. The results were compared with the relevant guideline of International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection and that of Iran, confirming radiation exposure levels being satisfactorily below defined limits and non-detrimental. PMID:23222504

  2. Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts receive the highest occupational radiation exposure. Effective protections are needed to ensure the safety of astronauts on long duration space missions. Increased cancer morbidity or mortality risk in astronauts may be caused by occupational radiation exposure. Acute and late radiation damage to the central nervous system (CNS) may lead to changes in motor function and behavior, or neurological disorders. Radiation exposure may result in degenerative tissue diseases (non-cancer or non-CNS) such as cardiac, circulatory, or digestive diseases, as well as cataracts. Acute radiation syndromes may occur due to occupational radiation exposure.

  3. Revealing the underlying mechanism of microbeam radiation therapy with low energy Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, A. L.; Oelfke, U.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new experimental oncological modality, intended for the treatment of inoperable brain tumours, particularly in difficult cases where conventional radiation therapy can cause irreversible damage. MRT consists of an array of highly collimated, quasi-parallel x-ray microbeams aimed at the tumour tissue, delivering high dose within the beam path and low doses in regions between the beams. For reasons still not fully understood, healthy tissue exposed to the microbeam array is able to regenerate while tumour volumes are significantly reduced. Low energy Monte Carlo radiative transport simulations provide new insight into understanding the underlying mechanisms of MRT. In particular, predicting the ionisation cluster distribution, which is a significant cause of lethal damage to cells, would provide insight into the biological responses. Geant4-DNA was used to model an x-ray microbeam of width 20 μm in liquid water. Secondary electrons, predominately responsible for ionisation clustering, were tracked to predict damage to cells within and adjacent to the beams. We find that higher energy beams (100 keV) produce less secondary electrons in the regions outside the beam than low energy beams (30-50 keV).

  4. Biophysical modelling of early and delayed radiation damage at chromosome level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, S.; Eidelman, Y.

    Exposure by ionising radiation increases cancer risk in human population Cancer is thought to originate from an altered expression of certain number of specific genes It is now widely recognised that chromosome aberrations CA are involved in stable change in expression of genes by gain or loss of their functions Thus CA can contribute to initiation or progression of cancer Therefore understanding mechanisms of CA formation in the course of cancer development might be valuable tool for quantification and prognosis of different stages of radiation carcinogenesis Early CA are defined as aberrations induced in first post-irradiation mitotic cycle The present work describes the original biophysical technique for early CA modelling It includes the following simulation steps the ionising particle track structure the structural organisation of all chromosomes in G 0 G 1 cell nucleus spatial distribution of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks dsb within chromosomes dsb rejoining and misrejoining modelling cell cycle taking into account mitotic delay which results in complex time dependence of aberrant cells in first mitosis The results on prediction of dose-response curves for simple and complex CA measured in cells undergoing first division cycle are presented in comparison with recent experimental data There is increasing evidence that CA are also observed in descendents of irradiated cells many generations after direct DNA damage These delayed CA or chromosome instability CI are thought to be a manifestation of genome

  5. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001918.htm Radiation therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or ...

  6. The Insidious Nature of "Hard-Core" Alternative Conceptions: Implications for the Constructivist Research Programme of Patterns in High School Students' and Pre-Service Teachers' Thinking about Ionisation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The present study contributes to the constructivist research programme (RP) into learning science by comparing patterns in responses from two groups of learners--senior high school students and pre-service teachers--in the same educational context (Singapore), to a diagnostic instrument relating to the topic of ionisation energies. This topic is…

  7. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Herson, Marisa Roma; Mathor, Monica Beatriz; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2009-05-01

    Until 2000, efforts into organising tissue banks in Brazil had not progressed far beyond small "in house" tissue storage repositories, usually annexed to Orthopaedic Surgery Services. Despite the professional entrepreneurship of those working as part time tissue bankers in such operations, best practices in tissue banking were not always followed due to the lack of regulatory standards, specialised training, adequate facilities and dedicated personnel. The Skin Bank of the Plastic Surgery Department of the Hospital das Clinicas of Sao Paulo, the single skin bank in Brazil, was not an exception. Since 1956, restricted and unpredictable amounts of skin allografts were stored under refrigeration for short periods under very limited quality controls. As in most "tissue banks" at that time in Brazil, medical and nursing staff worked on a volunteer and informal basis undergoing no specific training. IAEA supported the implementation of the tissue banking program in Brazil through the regional project RLA/7/009 "Quality system for the production of irradiated sterilised grafts" (1998-2000) and through two interregional projects INT/6/049 "Interregional Centre of Excellence in Tissue Banking", during the period 2002-2004 and INT/6/052 "Improving the Quality of Production and Uses of Radiation Sterilised Tissue Grafts", during the period 2002-2004. In 2001-2002, the first two years of operation of the HC-Tissue Bank, 53 skin transplants were carried out instead of the previous 4-5 a year. During this period, 75 individuals donated skin tissue, generating approximately 90,000 cm(2) of skin graft. The IAEA program were of great benefit to Brazilian tissue banking which has evolved from scattered make shift small operations to a well-established, high quality tissue banking scenario. PMID:18618294

  8. Radiation Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation is energy that travels in the form of waves or high-speed particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment. If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a ...

  9. Identification of phenolic constituents in red chicory salads (Cichorium intybus) by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carazzone, Chiara; Mascherpa, Dora; Gazzani, Gabriella; Papetti, Adele

    2013-06-01

    Phenolic acids and flavonoids extracted from several types of Cichorium intybus var. silvestre salads ("Chioggia", "Treviso", "Treviso tardivo", and "Verona") were characterised by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation/mass spectrometry. Among the 64 compounds detected, several hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including 8 mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acids, 3 tartaric acid derivatives, 31 flavonol and 2 flavone glycosides, as well as 10 anthocyanins were characterised based on UV spectra and MS(n) fragmentation patterns. Furthermore, several isomers of caffeic acid derivatives were distinguished for the first time by their specific mass spectral data. This is the first study reporting the glycosylation type and position of mono- and diglycosylated flavonoids in red salads. PMID:23411215

  10. Structural elucidation of monoterpene oxidation products by ion trap fragmentation using on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode.

    PubMed

    Warscheid, B; Hoffmann, T

    2001-01-01

    Based on ion trap mass spectrometry, an on-line method is described which provides valuable information on the molecular composition of structurally complex organic aerosols. The investigated aerosols were generated from the gas-phase ozonolysis of various C(10)H(16)-terpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, sabinene, limonene), and directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. Negative ion chemical ionisation at atmospheric pressure (APCI(-)) enabled the detection of multifunctional carboxylic acid products by combining inherent sensitivity and molecular weight information. Sequential low-energy collision-induced product ion fragmentation experiments (MS(n)) were performed in order to elucidate characteristic decomposition pathways of the compounds. Dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and hydroxyketocarboxylic acid products could be clearly distinguished by multistage on-line MS. Furthermore, sabinonic acid and two C(9)-ether compounds were tentatively identified for the first time by applying on-line APCI(-)-MS(n). PMID:11746892

  11. Rapid identification of vinca alkaloids by direct-injection electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry and confirmation by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Tai, Yuanpo; Sun, Cuirong; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2005-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the identification of Vinca alkaloids from a crude extract of Catharanthus roseus G. Don (Apocynaceae) by direct-injection electrospray ionisation (ESI) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed. The alkaloids vindoline, vindolidine, vincristine and vinblastine were evaluated in a commercial extract of C. roseus using this method. Catharanthine and its isomers 19S-vindolinine and vindolinine were detected in the commercial product by direct injection ESI/MS/MS and confirmed by preparation and by HPLC-ESI/MS. For the characterisation of different fragment fingerprints, ESI/MS/MS is a sensitive, rapid and convenient technique by which to identify some constituents in complex and mixed plant extracts. PMID:16223089

  12. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 25th ANNIVERSARY OF THE A.M. PROKHOROV GENERAL PHYSICS INSTITUTE: Femtosecond laser optical gas breakdown microplasma: the ionisation and postionisation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukin, V. V.; Garnov, S. V.; Malyutin, A. A.; Strelkov, V. V.

    2007-10-01

    The formation and evolution dynamics of the laser plasma produced in the microvolumes of gases (air, nitrogen, argon, and helium) upon their multiple ionisation by high-intensity (4×1016 W cm-2) tightly focused (to a region 1.7 μm in diameter) 400-nm, 100-fs second-harmonic pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser is studied. The spatiotemporal distribution profiles of the refractive index and electron microplasma density were recorded by ultrahigh-speed interferometry. The postionisation of a femtosecond laser plasma, i.e. the growth of the electron density known after the end of the exciting laser pulse, is detected for the first time. A theoretical model is proposed, which describes the mechanism of plasma postionisation by hot photoelectrons. The results of electron density calculations are in good agreement with experimental data.

  13. Analysis of trace amounts of carbon dioxide, oxygen and carbon monoxide in nitrogen using dual capillary columns and a pulsed discharge helium ionisation detector.

    PubMed

    Janse van Rensburg, M; Botha, A; Rohwer, E

    2007-10-01

    Gas mixtures of trace amounts of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), dioxygen (O(2)), and carbon monoxide (CO) in dinitrogen (N(2)) were separated and quantified using parallel dual capillary columns and pulsed discharge helium ionisation detection (PDHID). The detection limits (9 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for CO(2), 7 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for O(2) and 37 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for CO) were lower than those reported previously for similar methods. Uncertainties were calculated and results were validated by comparison of the CO and CO(2) results with those obtained using conventional methods. The method was also used to analyse nitrogen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in oxygen. PMID:17765907

  14. Ionisation potential theorem in the presence of the electric field: Assessment of range-separated functional in the reproduction of orbital and excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borpuzari, Manash Protim; Boruah, Abhijit; Kar, Rahul

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the range-separated density functionals have been reported to reproduce gas phase orbital and excitation energies with good accuracy. In this article, we have revisited the ionisation potential theorem in the presence of external electric field. Numerical results on six linear molecules are presented and the performance of the range-separated density functionals in reproducing highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies, LUMO energies, HOMO-LUMO gaps in the presence of the external electric field is assessed. In addition, valence and Rydberg excitation energies in the presence of the external electric field are presented. It is found that the range-separated density functionals reproduce orbital and excitation energies accurately in the presence of the electric field. Moreover, we have performed fractional occupation calculation using cubic spline equation and tried to explain the performance of the functional.

  15. High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of natural and synthetic desulphoglucosinolates and their chemical validation by UV, NMR and chemical ionisation-MS methods.

    PubMed

    Kiddle, G; Bennett, R N; Botting, N P; Davidson, N E; Robertson, A A; Wallsgrove, R M

    2001-01-01

    Methods are described for the optimised extraction, desulphation and HPLC separation of desulphoglucosinolates. These methods provide rapid separation, identification and quantitative measurements of glucosinolates extracted from Brassica napus L and related crops, of unusual glucosinolates found in crucifer weed species, and also of synthetic alkylglucosinolates. The desulphoglucosinolates used in these studies were either chemically synthesised (at least one example from each major structural class), or purified from various plant sources. Validation of the identities of the desulphoglucosinolates was by comparison of retention times with standards, and by UV, 1H- and 13C-NMR and chemical ionisation MS analysis. A list of useful species, and the specific tissues, from which high concentrations of standards can be extracted is included. PMID:11705329

  16. Characterisation of weathered hydrocarbon wastes at contaminated sites by GC-simulated distillation and nitrous oxide chemical ionisation GC-MS, with implications for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Simon J T; Hrudey, Steve E; Rawluk, Marv; Fuhr, Bryan J

    2004-08-01

    An extended analytical characterisation of weathered hydrocarbons isolated from historically contaminated sites in Alberta is presented. The characterisation of soil extracts, chromatographically separated into component classes, by GC-simulated distillation and nitrous oxide (N2O) chemical ionisation (CI) GC-MS provides new insights into the composition of the residual oil at these sites, the principal partition medium for risk critical components. The combined polar and asphaltene content of representative soil extracts ranged from 40% w/w to 70% w/w of the oils encountered. An abundance of C14-C22 2-4 ring alicyclics, alkylbenzenes and benzocycloparaffins is prevalent within the saturate fractions of site soils. Implications for the partitioning of risk critical compounds at sites with weathered hydrocarbons and the practical application of bioremediation technologies are discussed. PMID:15292955

  17. 2B or not 2B, that is the question: further investigations into the use of pencil as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Langley, G John; Herniman, Julie M; Townell, Marc S

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of pencil as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) for the study of actinides has previously been demonstrated (Black et al., Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2006; 20: 1053). Here, the scope of the types of molecules amenable to analysis by this method has been extended, establishing that approximately 90% of a library containing 50 diverse small molecules can be successfully analysed by this technique. Further, the role played by the bulk materials present in the different pencil leads has been investigated and a simple one-step deposition of matrix and calibration materials has been achieved through the fabrication of different calibration pencils (Cali-Pens). PMID:17171774

  18. Analysis of peptides and protein digests by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry using neutral pH elution conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanzhong; Boysen, Reinhard I; Chowdhury, Jamil; Alam, Asif; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the advantages of carrying out the analysis of peptides and tryptic digests of proteins under gradient elution conditions at pH 6.5 by reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and in-line electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) are documented. For these RP separations, a double endcapped, bidentate anchored n-octadecyl wide pore silica adsorbent was employed in a capillary column format. Compared to the corresponding analysis of the same peptides and protein tryptic digests using low pH elution conditions for their RP-HPLC separation, this alternative approach provides improved selectivity and more efficient separation of these analytes, thus allowing a more sensitive identification of proteins at different abundance levels, i.e. more tryptic peptides from the same protein could be confidently identified, enabling higher sequence coverage of the protein to be obtained. This approach was further evaluated with very complex tryptic digests derived from a human plasma protein sample using an online two-dimensional (2D) strong cation-exchange (SCX)-RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system. Again, at pH 6.5, with mobile phases of different compositions, improved chromatographic selectivities were obtained, concomitant with more sensitive on-line electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometric (ESI-MS/MS) analysis. As a consequence, more plasma proteins could be confidently identified, highlighting the potential of these RP-HPLC methods with elution at pH 6.5 to extend further the scope of proteomic investigations. PMID:25892073

  19. Characterisation of legumes by enzymatic hydrolysis, microdialysis sampling, and micro-high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Okatch, Harriet; Torto, Nelson; Armateifio, Joan

    2003-04-11

    An assay based on enzymatic hydrolysisand microdialysis sampling, micro-high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (micro-HPAEC) with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the characterisation of legumes is presented. Characterisation of two bean varieties; Phaseolus mungo and P. acutifilous was based upon enzymatic hydrolysis using an endo-beta-mannanase from Aspergillus niger with subsequent analysis of the hydrolysates with HPAEC-MS. The hydrolysates were detected in the positive ionisation mode after desalting the chromatographic effluent, employing a cation-exchange membrane desalting device with water as the regenerating liquid. Mass chromatograms, acquiredafter hydrolysis of both bean samples for 12 h, showed two different profiles of hydrolysates. The P. mungo bean hydrolysate showed the presence of saccharides with a degree of polymerisation (DP) in the range of 2-6, whereas that of P. acutifilous showed only DPs of 2-5. Both bean samples had one type of DP 2, but showed different types of DPs 3, 4 and 5. Only the P. mungo sample showed the presence of DP 6. The most abundant fraction for P. mungo was DP 4, whereas that for P. acutifilous was DP 5. Tandem MS of the hydrolysates showed that the DP 2 hydrolysates observed for the samples were of the same type, having a 1,6 linkage. Also tandem MS data for DPs 3, 4, and 5 showed that similar hydrolysates were present within the same sample as well as among the two samples. The data also showed the existence of 1,6 linkages for DP 3, 4, and 5 hydrolysates. The single enzymatic hydrolysis in combination with microdialysis and HPAEC with ESI-MS proved to be sufficient and reproducible for profiling and showing the difference between the two bean samples. PMID:12735463

  20. (Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors)

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the apple of the high energy physicist's eye.'' Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference.

  1. Scatter radiation intensities around full-field digital mammography units.

    PubMed

    Judge, M A; Keavey, E; Phelan, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the scatter radiation intensity around digital mammography systems and apply these data to standard shielding calculations to reveal whether shielding design of existing breast screening rooms is adequate for the use of digital mammography systems. Three digital mammography systems from GE Healthcare, Hologic and Philips were employed in the study. A breast-equivalent phantom was imaged under clinical workload conditions and scatter radiation intensities around the digital mammography systems were measured for a range of angles in three planes using an ionisation chamber. The results were compared with those from previous studies of film-screen systems. It may be deduced from the results that scattering in the backward direction is significant for all three systems, while scattering in the forward direction can be significant for some planes around the GE and Hologic systems. Measurements at typical clinical settings on each system revealed the Philips system to have markedly lower scatter radiation intensities than the other systems. Substituting the measured scattered radiation intensity into shielding calculations yielded barrier requirements similar to those already in place at the screening centres operating these systems. Current radiation protection requirements based on film-screen technology remain sufficient when applied to rooms with digital mammography installations and no alteration is required to the structural shielding. PMID:23239693

  2. Radiation proctopathy.

    PubMed

    Grodsky, Marc B; Sidani, Shafik M

    2015-06-01

    Radiation therapy is a widely utilized treatment modality for pelvic malignancies, including prostate cancer, rectal cancer, and cervical cancer. Given its fixed position in the pelvis, the rectum is at a high risk for injury secondary to ionizing radiation. Despite advances made in radiation science, up to 75% of the patients will suffer from acute radiation proctitis and up to 20% may experience chronic symptoms. Symptoms can be variable and include diarrhea, bleeding, incontinence, and fistulization. A multitude of treatment options exist. This article summarizes the latest knowledge relating to radiation proctopathy focusing on the vast array of treatment options. PMID:26034407

  3. Measurement of small ion beams by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry using new 10(13) Ohm resistors.

    PubMed

    Koornneef, J M; Bouman, C; Schwieters, J B; Davies, G R

    2014-03-28

    We tested 5 newly manufactured - prototype - 10(13)Ohm resistors in the feedback loop of Faraday cup amplifiers to measure small ion beams by Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS). The high Ohmic resistors installed in the TRITON Plus at the VU University Amsterdam theoretically have 10 times lower noise levels relative to the default 10(11)Ohm resistors. To investigate the precision and accuracy of analyses using these new amplifiers we measured Sr and Nd isotopes of reference standards at a range of ion currents (3.2×10(-16) to 1×10(-12) A, corresponding to intensities of 32 μV to 100 mV on a default 10(11)Ohm amplifier) and on small amounts of material (100 and 10 pg). Internal precision and external reproducibility for Sr and Nd isotope ratios are both better when collected on 10(13) compared 10(12)Ohm resistors and to the default 10(11)Ohm resistors. At an (87)Sr ion current of 3×10(-14) A (3 mV on a 10(11)Ohm amplifier) the internal precision (2 SE) of (87)Sr/(86)Sr is 5 times better for 10(13)Ohm resistors compared to 10(11)Ohm resistors. The external reproducibility (2 SD) at this beam intensity is 9 times better. Multiple 100 and 10 pg Sr standards, ran to exhaustion, yielded low (87)Sr/(86)Sr compared to the long term average (e.g. 10 pg average=0.710083±164 (n=11) instead of 0.710244±12, n=73). The average off-set for 10 pg standards can be explained by a loading blank contribution of 1.3 pg. In contrast, Nd data on 100 pg and 10 pg samples are accurate suggesting that Nd loading blanks do not compromise the data. The external reproducibility of (143)Nd/(144)Nd on 100 pg samples is 125 ppm and 3.3‰ on 10 pg samples (2 RSD=relative standard deviation, n=10). Thus, variability in Nd and Sr isotope ratios in the 4th decimal place, e.g. (143)Nd/(144)Nd 0.5110-0.5119 or (87)Sr/(86)Sr 0.7100-0.7109, can be resolved in 10 to 100 pg samples provided that the procedural blanks and chemical separation are optimal. For measurements in the beam

  4. Radiation hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1982-12-31

    This course was intended to provide the participant with an introduction to the theory of radiative transfer, and an understanding of the coupling of radiative processes to the equations describing compressible flow. At moderate temperatures (thousands of degrees), the role of the radiation is primarily one of transporting energy by radiative processes. At higher temperatures (millions of degrees), the energy and momentum densities of the radiation field may become comparable to or even dominate the corresponding fluid quantities. In this case, the radiation field significantly affects the dynamics of the fluid, and it is the description of this regime which is generally the charter of radiation hydrodynamics. The course provided a discussion of the relevant physics and a derivation of the corresponding equations, as well as an examination of several simplified models. Practical applications include astrophysics and nuclear weapons effects phenomena.

  5. Radiation epidemiology: a perspective on Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Boice, John D

    2012-03-01

    For nearly 100 years, epidemiologic studies of human populations exposed to ionising radiation have provided quantitative information on health risks. High dose deterministic (tissue reaction) effects result when sufficient numbers of functioning cells are killed, such as in bone marrow depression that can lead to death. Lower dose stochastic effects are probabilistic in nature and include an increased risk of cancer later in life and heritable genetic defects, although genetic conditions in the children of irradiated parents have yet to be convincingly demonstrated. Radiation studies are of diverse populations and include not only the Japanese atomic bomb survivors, but also patients treated with radiation for malignant and non-malignant disease; patients exposed for diagnostic purposes; persons with intakes of radionuclides; workers occupationally exposed; and communities exposed to environmental and accidentally released sources of radiation. Much is known about radiation and its risks. The major unanswered question in radiation epidemiology, however, is not whether radiation causes cancer, but what the level of risk is following low dose (<100 mSv) or low dose rate exposures. Paracelsus is credited with first articulating that the 'poison is in the dose', which for radiation epidemiology translates as 'the lower the dose, the lower the risk' and, an important corollary, the lower the dose, the greater the difficulty in detecting any increase in the number of cancers possibly attributable to radiation. In contrast to the Chernobyl reactor accident, the Fukushima reactor accident has to date resulted in no deterministic effects and no worker deaths. Estimates to date of population doses suggest very low uptakes of radioactive iodine which was a major determinant of the epidemic of thyroid cancer following childhood exposures around Chernobyl. The estimates to date of population doses are also much lower (and the distribution much narrower) than the doses for

  6. Ultrashort relativistic electron bunches and spatio-temporal radiation biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauduel, Y. A.; Faure, J.; Malka, V.

    2008-08-01

    The intensive developments of terawatt Ti:Sa lasers permit to extend laser-plasma interactions into the relativistic regime, providing very-short electron or proton bunches. Experimental researches developed at the interface of laser physics and radiation biology, using the combination of sub-picosecond electron beams in the energy range 2-15 MeV with femtosecond near-IR optical pulses might conjecture the real-time investigation of penetrating radiation effects. A perfect synchronization between the particle beam (pump) and optical beam at 820 nm (probe) allows subpicosecond time resolution. This emerging domain involves high-energy radiation femtochemistry (HERF) for which the early spatial energy deposition is decisive for the prediction of cellular and tissular radiation damages. With vacuum-focused intensities of 2.7 x 1019 W cm-2 and a high energy electron total charge of 2.5 nC, radiation events have been investigated in the temporal range 10-13 - 10-10s. The early radiation effects of secondary electron on biomolecular sensors may be investigated inside sub-micrometric ionisation, considering the radial direction of Gaussian electron bunches. It is shown that short range electron-biosensor interactions lower than 10 A take place in nascent track structures triggered by penetrating radiation bunches. The very high dose delivery 1013 Gy s-1 performed with laser plasma accelerator may challenge our understanding of nanodosimetry on the time scale of molecular target motions. High-quality ultrashort penetrating radiation beams open promising opportunities for the development of spatio-temporal radiation biology, a crucial domain of cancer therapy, and would favor novating applications in nanomedicine such as highly-selective shortrange pro-drug activation.

  7. Are passive smoking, air pollution and obesity a greater mortality risk than major radiation incidents?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jim T

    2007-01-01

    Background Following a nuclear incident, the communication and perception of radiation risk becomes a (perhaps the) major public health issue. In response to such incidents it is therefore crucial to communicate radiation health risks in the context of other more common environmental and lifestyle risk factors. This study compares the risk of mortality from past radiation exposures (to people who survived the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs and those exposed after the Chernobyl accident) with risks arising from air pollution, obesity and passive and active smoking. Methods A comparative assessment of mortality risks from ionising radiation was carried out by estimating radiation risks for realistic exposure scenarios and assessing those risks in comparison with risks from air pollution, obesity and passive and active smoking. Results The mortality risk to populations exposed to radiation from the Chernobyl accident may be no higher than that for other more common risk factors such as air pollution or passive smoking. Radiation exposures experienced by the most exposed group of survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to an average loss of life expectancy significantly lower than that caused by severe obesity or active smoking. Conclusion Population-averaged risks from exposures following major radiation incidents are clearly significant, but may be no greater than those from other much more common environmental and lifestyle factors. This comparative analysis, whilst highlighting inevitable uncertainties in risk quantification and comparison, helps place the potential consequences of radiation exposures in the context of other public health risks. PMID:17407581

  8. Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  9. Radiation esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Murro, Diana; Jakate, Shriram

    2015-06-01

    The esophagus is frequently exposed to radiation during treatment of advanced stages of common cancers such as lung, breast, and esophagus. However, symptomatic radiation esophagitis requiring endoscopic and histologic evaluation occurs quite rarely, affecting less than 1% of patients receiving radiation treatment. Symptoms occur acutely, generally within the first 2 months. Patients typically present with nonspecific symptoms such as dysphagia and odynophagia. Endoscopic changes such as erythema and ulceration are also nonspecific and nondiagnostic. Biopsies from affected areas show variable inflammatory changes and radiation-related atypia of endothelial and stromal cells. Such atypia mimics cytomegalovirus cytopathic changes, which are ruled out through absence of immunostaining. Radiation esophagitis is thus clinically unsuspected and endoscopically and histologically quite different from the more common and familiar radiation proctitis for which angioectasia is the predominant finding. PMID:26030254

  10. Training and Retaining Early Care and Education Staff. Bay Area Child-Care Retention Incentive Programs: Evaluation. Year One Progress Report, 2001-2002. PACE Policy Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Margaret; Carlat, Jennifer

    Over half of this nation's children 5 years and under are in nonparental care while their parents work. Research indicates that children benefit from being with well-trained, consistent early care and education staff. Staff retention is crucial because frequent turnover impedes the formation of positive nurturing relationships between caregivers…

  11. Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, Steven L.; Knudsen, Curtis M.; Watson, Bruce D.

    2003-05-01

    In 2001 hatchery- and wild-origin spring chinook were placed into an observation stream located at the Cle Elum Supplementation Research Facility to compare their reproductive success. Two groups containing both wild- and hatchery fish of both sexes were brought into the stream and allowed to spawn. Their longevity, spawning participation, and reproductive success were assessed. In addition, wild- and hatchery-origin precocious males were also introduced into one of the sections and allowed to spawn. We found that hatchery and wild males generally lived longer than females. In one group hatchery and wild females lived for similar periods of time while in the other wild females lived longer than hatchery fish. Wild females were also more successful at burying their eggs and the eggs they buried had higher survival rates. This result occurred in both groups of fish. Spawning participation in males was estimated by using two statistics referred to as percent gonad depletion (PGD) and percent testes retention (PRT). Both of these measures assumed that loss of testes weight in males would reflect their spawning participation and therefore could be used to estimate reproductive success. Hatchery and wild males had similar PGD and PRT values. One of these measures, PRT, was negatively associated with male reproductive success, confirming the idea that reduction in testes weight can be used as a surrogate measure of a male's ability to produce offspring Fry from the observation stream were collected throughout the emergence period that ran from January through May. Proportionate sub-samples of these fish were removed and microsatellite DNA was extracted from them. Pedigree analyses were performed to ascertain which adult fish had produced them. These analyses disclosed that wild males were more successful at producing progeny in one of the groups. No difference occurred in the other group. Precocial males and jacks fathered fewer progeny than did fish maturing at ages 4 and 5. In addition, male reproductive success was more than twice as variable as that seen in females. Some males apparently never spawned and others produced more than 7,000 offspring an amount that was more than double the quantity generated by the most successful female. Behavioral observations showed that a number of factors besides male origin influenced their reproductive success. One was relative body size; larger males tended to dominate smaller opponents and therefore had greater access to females. However, male dominance was not always related to relative size. The ability to attack and chase opponents was, however, positively related to reproductive success. We also discovered that the reproductive status of females and the social status of males were often reflected by their nuptial coloration. Territorial females typically had a single broad purple black stripe, light green or brown backs and white or gray ventral surfaces. Dominate males on the other hand, were generally a uniform dark brown or black color. The percentage of time that a male possessed a dark color pattern was positively linked to his reproductive success, as was the percentage of time he was observed courting or defending a female. The number of times a male was chased or attacked by a female also affected his reproductive success, in this situation the greater the frequency of such attacks the lower the reproductive success of the male. The pedigree analyses also disclosed that both hatchery and wild precocious males were able to fertilize eggs and produce offspring under natural spawning conditions. In conclusion we found differences in the reproductive competency of hatchery- and wild origin spring chinook. Wild females were better at depositing their eggs and having those eggs produce fry. In one study group wild males were more successful at producing offspring than hatchery males. Additional replications of such evaluations are being carried out to determine if the differences seen can be replicated. A repeat of the work done in 2001, for example, was performed in 2002 and additional studies will take place this coming year.

  12. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Curtis M.

    2003-05-01

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2003. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2002) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. Each chapter of this report deals with monitoring phenotypic and demographic traits of Yakima River basin spring chinook comparing hatchery and wild returns in 2002; the second year of adult hatchery returns. The first chapter deals specifically with adult traits of American River, Naches basin (excluding the American River), and upper Yakima River spring chinook, excluding gametes. The second chapter examines the gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish. In the third chapter, we describe work begun initially in 2002 to characterize and compare redds of naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River.

  13. Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the Intermountain Province of the Columbia Basin, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wielgus, Robert B.; Shipley, Lisa

    2002-07-01

    Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the subbasins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are not ranked as target species and are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated ''press'' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM subbasins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

  14. Hydrologic and Water-Quality Characteristics for Calf Creek Near Silber Hill, Arkansas and Selected Buffalo River Sites, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.; Green, W. Reed

    2004-01-01

    The Buffalo River and its tributary, Calf Creek, are in the White River Basin in the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province in north-central Arkansas. A better understanding of the hydrology and water quality of Calf Creek is of interest to many, including the National Park Service, which administers the Buffalo National River, to evaluate its effect on the hydrology and water quality of the Buffalo River. The streamflow and water-quality characteristics of Calf Creek near Silver Hill, Arkansas, were compared to two sites on the Buffalo River upstream (near Boxley, Arkansas) and downstream (near St. Joe, Arkansas) from the confluence of Calf Creek for calendar years 2001 and 2002. Annual and seasonal loads were estimated for Calf Creek for nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, and suspended sediment and compared with loads at sites on the Buffalo River. Flow-weighted concentrations and yields were computed from estimated annual loads for comparison with other developed and undeveloped basins. Streamflow varied annually and seasonally at the three sites. The Buffalo River near St. Joe had the largest annual mean streamflow (805 to 1,360 cubic feet per second for 2001 and 2002) compared to the Buffalo River near Boxley (106 and 152 cubic feet per second for 2001 and 2002) and Calf Creek (39 and 80 cubic feet per second for 2001 and 2002). Concentrations of nutrients, suspended sediment, and fecal indicator bacteria generally were greater in samples from Calf Creek than in samples collected from both Buffalo River sites. Bacteria and suspended-sediment concentrations were greater in samples collected during high-flow events at all three sites. The Buffalo River near Boxley had the lowest concentrations for nutrients, suspended sediment, and fecal indicator bacteria. Estimated annual loads of the nutrients, suspended sediment, and organic carbon for 2001 and 2002 demonstrated substantial variability between the three sites and through time. Estimated loads for nutrients at the Buffalo River near St. Joe were 7 to 27 times the median loads estimated for Calf Creek and suspended sediment loads were as much as 120 times greater. Dissolved organic carbon loads were 16 to 20 times greater at the Buffalo River near St. Joe than for Calf Creek. The Buffalo River near Boxley had the smallest annual loads for all constituents except for suspended sediment, which were slightly greater than suspended sediment loads estimated for Calf Creek. Higher loads would be expected at the Buffalo River near St. Joe because of the larger basin area and larger volume of streamflow. Likewise, estimated loads for all three sites were greater during seasons that had greater streamflow than during seasons with more frequent periods of base-flow conditions. The highest daily loads occurred in the fall and winter of 2001 and the winter and spring of 2002.Flow-weighted concentrations generally were higher for Calf Creek than concentrations for the two sites on the Buffalo River and for typical flow-weighted concentrations found in undeveloped basins. However, the flow-weighted concentrations were lower than concentrations in a developed basin. Annual yields calculated for Calf Creek were higher than the two sites on the Buffalo River and sites that are representative of undeveloped basins but lower than a site representative of a developed basin. The Buffalo River near Boxley had yields that were less than the yields typical of undeveloped basins.

  15. Stream habitat and water-quality information for sites in the Buffalo River Basin and nearby basins of Arkansas, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, James C.

    2004-01-01

    The Buffalo River lies in north-central Arkansas and is a tributary of the White River. Stream-habitat and water-quality information are presented for 52 sites in the Buffalo River Basin and adjacent areas of the White River Basin. The information was collected during the summers of 2001 and 2002 to supplement fish community sampling during the same time period.

  16. PCB body burdens in U.S. women of childbearing age 2001-2002: An evaluation of alternate summary metrics of NHANES data

    EPA Science Inventory

    An extensive body of epidemiologic data associates prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with neurodevelopmental deficits and other childhood health effects. Neurological effects and other adverse health effects may also result from exposure during infancy, childh...

  17. Biomarkers of Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Cognitive Function among Elderly in the United States (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: 2001-2002)

    PubMed Central

    Best, Elizabeth A.; Juarez-Colunga, Elizabeth; James, Katherine; LeBlanc, William G.; Serdar, Berrin

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies report a link between common environmental exposures, such as particulate matter air pollution and tobacco smoke, and decline in cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a selected group of chemicals present in particulate matter and tobacco smoke, and measures of cognitive performance among elderly in the general population. This cross-sectional analysis involved data from 454 individuals aged 60 years and older from the 2001–2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The association between PAH exposures (as measured by urinary biomarkers) and cognitive function (digit symbol substitution test (DSST)) was assessed using multiple linear regression analyses. After adjusting for age, socio-economic status and diabetes we observed a negative association between urinary 1-hydroxypyrene, the gold standard of PAH exposure biomarkers, and DSST score. A one percent increase in urinary 1-hydroxypyrene resulted in approximately a 1.8 percent poorer performance on the digit symbol substitution test. Our findings are consistent with previous publications and further suggest that PAHs, at least in part may be responsible for the adverse cognitive effects linked to tobacco smoke and particulate matter air pollution. PMID:26849365

  18. Methodology and User Guide for the Food Intakes Converted to Retail Commodities Databases: CSFII 1994-1996 and 1998; NHANES 1999-2000; WWEIA, NHANES 2001-2002

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose for developing the Food Intakes Converted to Retail Commodities Database (FICRCD) is to convert foods consumed in the national dietary surveys, 1994-2002, to respective amounts of retail-level food commodities. Food commodities are defined as those available for purchase in retail store...

  19. Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day, and McNary Dams; 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Spellman, Bryant

    2003-04-01

    In 2001 a total of 309 adult fall chinook and 264 chum were sampled in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 48. The peak redd count for chum was 181. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 16 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 26 November. There were estimated to be a total of 721 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2001. The 2001 chum population below Bonneville Dam was estimated to be 532 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2001 brood chinook emergence began on 11 March 2002 and ended 18 May 2002, with peak emergence occurring 26 April. 2001 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 29 January and continued through 31 March 2002. Peak chum emergence took place 25 February. A total of 5,487 juvenile chinook and 678 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 22 January and 30 July 2002 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place from mid June through early July 2002 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2001 and 2002 the majority of fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning bright stock of fall chinook. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

  20. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2003-03-01

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.