Science.gov

Sample records for 222-radon concentrations variability

  1. Dry deposition of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN): Determination of its deposition velocity at night from measurements of the atmospheric PAN and 222Radon concentration gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrimpf, Wolfram; Lienaerts, Karlheinz; Müller, Klaus Peter; Rudolph, Jochen; Neubert, Rolf; Schüßler, Wolfram; Levin, Ingeborg

    During the field campaign POPCORN (Photooxidant Formation by Plant Emitted Compounds and OH-Radicals in North-Eastern Germany) in August 1994 we measured the nighttime deposition velocities of PAN above a corn field. These are the first absolute measurements of PAN deposition velocities in the field. The deposition velocities were derived using a novel method, which uses measurements of the gradients of PAN and 222Rn and of the emission rates of 222Rn from the soil. A unique data set of about 250 field measurements of the PAN deposition velocity at night was thus obtained. The deposition velocity at night proved to be highly variable with an average of 0.54 cm/s and a standard deviation of 0.94 cm/s. Recent presumptions by Shepson et al. [1992] that the PAN deposition velocity is strongly reduced with increasing relative humidity could not be confirmed by our measurements.

  2. Carbon dioxide and methane in continental Europe: a climatology, and 222Radon-based emission estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Martina; Graul, Rolf.; Sartorius, Hartmut; Levin, Ingeborg

    1996-09-01

    4-year records of gas chromatographic carbon dioxide and methane observations from the continental mountain station Schauinsland in the Black Forest (Germany) are presented. These data are supplemented by continuous atmospheric 222Radon observations. The raw data of CO2 concentration show a large seasonal cycle of about 16ppm with monthly mean wintertime enhancements up to 10ppm higher and summer minima up to 5ppm lower than the maritime background level in this latitude. These offsets are caused by regional and continental scale CO2 sources and sinks. The mean CH4 concentration at Schauinsland is 31ppb higher than over the Atlantic ocean, due to the European continent acting as a net source of atmospheric CH4 throughout the year. No significant seasonal cycle of methane has been observed. The long term CO2 and CH4 increase rates at Schauinsland are found to be similar to background stations in the northern hemisphere, namely 1.5ppm CO2yr-1 and 8ppb CH4yr-1. On the time scale of hours and days, the wintertime concentrations of all three trace gases are highly correlated, the mean ratio of CH4/CO2 is 7.8±1.0ppb/ppm. The wintertime monthly mean concentration offsets relative to the maritime background level show a CH4/CO2 ratio of 6.5±1.1ppb/ppm, thus, not significantly different from the short term ratio. Using the wintertime regressions of CO2 and 222Radon respectively CH4 and 222Radon we estimate winter time CO2flux densities of 10.4±4.3mmol CO2 m-2h-1 (from monthly mean offsets) and 6.4±2.5mmol CO2 m-2h

  3. City scale pollen concentration variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, Michiel; van Vliet, Arnold; Krol, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Pollen are emitted in the atmosphere both in the country-side and in cities. Yet the majority of the population is exposed to pollen in cities. Allergic reactions may be induced by short-term exposure to pollen. This raises the question how variable pollen concentration in cities are in temporally and spatially, and how much of the pollen in cities are actually produced in the urban region itself. We built a high resolution (1 × 1 km) pollen dispersion model based on WRF-Chem to study a city's pollen budget and the spatial and temporal variability in concentration. It shows that the concentrations are highly variable, as a result of source distribution, wind direction and boundary layer mixing, as well as the release rate as a function of temperature, turbulence intensity and humidity. Hay Fever Forecasts based on such high resolution emission and physical dispersion modelling surpass traditional hay fever warning methods based on temperature sum methods. The model gives new insights in concentration variability, personal and community level exposure and prevention. The model will be developped into a new forecast tool to serve allergic people to minimize their exposure and reduce nuisance, coast of medication and sick leave. This is an innovative approach in hay fever warning systems.

  4. Variable-shape solar-energy concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Phol, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Proposed low cost three dimensional tracking solar concentrator fabricated from lightweight, flexible polymeric film membrane is controlled in shape by differential pressure loading. Fine adjustments to shape could be made by mounting electrets or magnets on membrane or applying electric or magnetic field.

  5. A detailed examination of the chemical, hydrological, and geological properties influencing the mobility of {sup 222}radon and parent radionuclides in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Sexsmith, K.S.

    1996-12-31

    This study examines hydrological, geological and geochemical controls on {sup 222}Rn variability in groundwater in the Front Range of Colorado. Specific objectives of the study are: (1) to determine if there are any correlations or spatial relationships between {sup 222}Rn and the geological, geochemical and hydrogeological data; and (2) to determine whether it is geochemically reasonable for observed {sup 222}Rn levels to be the result of U and {sup 226}Ra accumulation by fracture filling minerals. Domestic-water wells were sampled and tested to determine the local aquifer characteristics and aqueous geochemistry. A multivariate and staged approach was used in the data analyses. Analysis of variance tests were used to test for relationships between {sup 222}Rn and the lithology of the study wells. The effects of rock-type were then removed from the chemical and hydrological variables by subtracting the mean value for each rock-type from each of the measured values within that rock-type (a residual transformation). Linear and linear multiple regression techniques were used to test for expected relationships between residual {sup 222}Rn levels and these variables, and stepwise linear regressions were used to test for any unforeseen multivariate relationships in the data. Correlograms, distance-weighted average and inverse-distance-weighted average predictions were used to look for spatial relationships in the data.

  6. Annual variability of PAH concentrations in the Potomac River watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, I.L.; Foster, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Dynamics of organic contaminant transport in a large river system is influenced by annual variability in organic contaminant concentrations. Surface runoff and groundwater input control the flow of river waters. They are also the two major inputs of contaminants to river waters. The annual variability of contaminant concentrations in rivers may or may not represent similar trends to the flow changes of river waters. The purpose of the research is to define the annual variability in concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in riverine environment. To accomplish this, from March 1992 to March 1995 samples of Potomac River water were collected monthly or bimonthly downstream of the Chesapeake Bay fall line (Chain Bridge) during base flow and main storm flow hydrologic conditions. Concentrations of selected PAHs were measured in the dissolved phase and the particulate phase via GC/MS. The study of the annual variability of PAH concentrations will be performed through comparisons of PAH concentrations seasonally, annually, and through study of PAH concentration river discharge dependency and rainfall dependency. For selected PAHs monthly and annual loadings will be estimated based on their measured concentrations and average daily river discharge. The monthly loadings of selected PAHs will be compared by seasons and annually.

  7. Immunoglobulin G concentration in canine colostrum: Evaluation and variability.

    PubMed

    Mila, Hanna; Feugier, Alexandre; Grellet, Aurélien; Anne, Jennifer; Gonnier, Milène; Martin, Maelys; Rossig, Lisa; Chastant-Maillard, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Canine neonates are born hypogammaglobulinemic, and colostrum is their main source of immunoglobulins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immune quality of canine colostrum and its variability both among bitches and among mammary glands. The immune quality was estimated from immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration (ELISA test). The correlation of IgG concentration with refractometry was evaluated. From a total of 44 bitches from 13 different breeds from a single breeding kennel, samples of colostrum and blood were collected one day after the parturition onset. Colostrum was collected separately from each pair of mammary glands (180 pairs). The mean colostrum IgG concentration in our population was 20.8 ± 8.1g/L (ranging from 8.0 to 41.7 g/L) with no influence of breed size, litter size, age of dam or serum IgG concentration. Colostrum IgG concentration varied widely among pairs of mammary glands within one bitch (variation coefficient: 42 ± 32.1%). Nevertheless, no single pair of mammary glands was found to produce regularly a secretion of higher quality. No difference in IgG concentration was recorded between anterior and posterior pairs either. The BRIX index and the refractive index were significantly, but moderately correlated with colostrum IgG concentration (r=0.53 and 0.42, respectively). This study demonstrates a great variability in immune quality of colostrum among bitches and among mammary glands within one bitch. Further studies on the suckling behavior of puppies and on determination of the minimal immune quality of colostrum are required to evaluate their impact of this high variability on neonatal mortality in dogs. PMID:26186389

  8. Concentration dependence of variability in growth rates of microtubules.

    PubMed Central

    Pedigo, Susan; Williams, Robley C

    2002-01-01

    Growth and shortening of microtubules in the course of their polymerization and depolymerization have previously been observed to occur at variable rates. To gain insight into the meaning of this prominent variability, we studied the way in which its magnitude depends on the growth rate of experimentally observed and computer-simulated microtubules. The dynamic properties of plus-ended microtubules nucleated by pieces of Chlamydomonas flagellar axonemes were observed in real time by video-enhanced differential interference contrast light microscopy at differing tubulin concentrations. By means of a Monte Carlo algorithm, populations of microtubules were simulated that had similar growth and dynamic properties to the experimentally observed microtubules. By comparison of the experimentally observed and computer-simulated populations of microtubules, we found that 1) individual microtubules displayed an intrinsic variability that did not change as the rate of growth for a population increased, and 2) the variability was approximately fivefold greater than predicted by a simple model of subunit addition and loss. The model used to simulate microtubule growth has no provision for incorporation of lattice defects of any type, nor sophisticated geometry of the growing end. Thus, these as well as uncontrolled experimental variables were eliminated as causes for the prominent variability. PMID:12324403

  9. Variability of ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations in rainwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieber, R. J.; Tatum, S.; Willey, J. D.; Avery, G. B.; Mead, R. N.

    2014-02-01

    Ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations were measured in 52 rain events collected between January 25, 2011 and March 4, 2012 in Wilmington, North Carolina, USA. Ethanol concentrations ranged from 23 nM to 908 nM with a volume weighted average concentration of 192 ± 20 nM while acetaldehyde ranged from 23 nM to 909 nM with a volume weighted average concentration of 193 ± 25 nM. There was a great deal of variability in the abundance of ethanol and acetaldehyde between rain events driven primarily by temporal and air mass back trajectory influences. The ratio of ethanol to acetaldehyde was at a minimum during periods of peak solar intensity underscoring the importance of alcohol oxidation by a photochemically generated oxidant such as hydroxyl radical in the gas and/or aqueous phase. Ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations were not strongly correlated with rain amount suggesting that gas-phase concentrations were not significantly depleted during the storm or that they were resupplied during the course of the rain event. The concentration of ethanol and acetaldehyde were correlated with nitrate and non-sea salt sulfate suggesting the importance of terrestrial and anthropogenic inputs at this location. Comparison of future ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations in rainwater to the data presented in this study will help delineate potential consequences of these labile oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) on the chemistry of the troposphere as the United States transitions to more ethanol blended fuels. Aqueous phase impacts of increasing ethanol concentrations will be particularly significant to the oxidizing capacity of atmospheric waters because of its reactivity with OH and HO2 radicals in solution. Increased rainwater concentrations could also have significant ramifications on receiving watersheds because of the biogeochemical lability of the alcohol.

  10. Intraspecific genotypic variability determines concentrations of key truffle volatiles.

    PubMed

    Splivallo, Richard; Valdez, Nayuf; Kirchhoff, Nina; Ona, Marta Castiella; Schmidt, Jean-Pierre; Feussner, Ivo; Karlovsky, Petr

    2012-05-01

    • Aroma variability in truffles has been attributed to maturation (Tuber borchii), linked to environmental factors (Tuber magnatum), but the involvement of genetic factors has been ignored. We investigated aroma variability in Tuber uncinatum, a species with wide distribution. Our aim was to assess aroma variability at different spatial scales (i.e. trees, countries) and to quantify how aroma was affected by genotype, fruiting body maturity, and geographical origin. • A volatile fingerprinting method was used to analyze the aroma of 223 T. uncinatum fruiting bodies from seven European countries. Maturity was estimated from spore melanization. Genotypic fingerprinting was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). • Discriminant analysis revealed that, regardless of the geographical origin of the truffles, most of the aroma variability was caused by eight-carbon-containing volatiles (C8-VOCs). In an orchard of T. uncinatum, truffles producing different concentrations of C8-VOCs clustered around distinct host trees. This clustering was not associated with maturity, but was associated with fungal genotype. • These results indicate that the variation in C8-VOCs in truffles is most likely under genetic control. They exemplify that understanding the factors behind aroma variability requires a holistic approach. Furthermore, they also raise new questions regarding the ecological role of 1-octen-3-ol in truffles. PMID:22394027

  11. Intraspecific genotypic variability determines concentrations of key truffle volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Splivallo, Richard; Valdez, Nayuf; Kirchhoff, Nina; Ona, Marta Castiella; Schmidt, Jean-Pierre; Feussner, Ivo; Karlovsky, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Aroma variability in truffles has been attributed to maturation (Tuber borchii), linked to environmental factors (Tuber magnatum), but the involvement of genetic factors has been ignored. We investigated aroma variability in Tuber uncinatum, a species with wide distribution. Our aim was to assess aroma variability at different spatial scales (i.e. trees, countries) and to quantify how aroma was affected by genotype, fruiting body maturity, and geographical origin. A volatile fingerprinting method was used to analyze the aroma of 223 T. uncinatum fruiting bodies from seven European countries. Maturity was estimated from spore melanization. Genotypic fingerprinting was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Discriminant analysis revealed that, regardless of the geographical origin of the truffles, most of the aroma variability was caused by eight-carbon-containing volatiles (C8-VOCs). In an orchard of T. uncinatum, truffles producing different concentrations of C8-VOCs clustered around distinct host trees. This clustering was not associated with maturity, but was associated with fungal genotype. These results indicate that the variation in C8-VOCs in truffles is most likely under genetic control. They exemplify that understanding the factors behind aroma variability requires a holistic approach. Furthermore, they also raise new questions regarding the ecological role of 1-octen-3-ol in truffles. PMID:22394027

  12. Influence of variable stress on underground radon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kies, A.; Massen, F.; Tosheva, Z.

    2003-04-01

    Stress applied to rocks causes local deformation of the Earth's crust. These last years increasing efforts have been done in order to relate crustal deformation and radon emanation signals. In order to study the influence of a changing pressure field on radon concentrations, we use galleries located under the water reservoir of the Vianden (Luxembourg) pumping storage power plant. Depending on energy demands, the reservoir experiences daily variations in water levels up to 16 metres, thus exerting a variable stress on the underlying rocks. The reservoir consists of two artificial basins occupying an area of 50 ha. The underlying rocks are of Lower Devonian age: mainly Lower Emsian clayey-sandy schist with good cleavage for basin 1, Upper Siegenian sandy clayey schist with nearly no cleavage for basin 2. Radon concentrations are continuously measured in the air of 1m deep boreholes drilled through the concrete bottom of the accessible galleries into the underlying bedrock. We observe partly very strong variations in transient radon concentrations induced by variations of the reservoir water levels. The observed radon patterns depend on the location of the boreholes under the reservoir and are different if both basins are working together, or if one or the other is empty. The draining effect of the concrete cover of the overlying reservoir and the geologic features of the Devonian schist under the reservoir are proposed for the interpretation of the influence of variable volumetric strain on the radon concentrations. Depending on the distribution of the loads over the measuring point, the resulting effects are different. In the case of an extended pressure field (both basins are working), a strong direct correlation of the water load on radon concentrations is observed. Long-scale interactions through a macro scale network of clustered cracks and fractures, together with percolation defects, are thought to be responsible for these observations. In the case of

  13. Enterococci concentrations in diverse coastal environments exhibit extreme variability.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Alexandria B

    2007-12-15

    Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations in a single grab sample of water are used to notify the public about the safety of swimming in coastal waters. If concentrations are over a single-sample standard, waters are closed or placed under an advisory. Previous work has shown that notification errors occur often because FIB vary more quickly than monitoring results can be obtained (typically 24 h). Rapid detection technologies (such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction) that allow FIB quantification in hours have been suggested as a solution to notification errors. In the present study, I explore variability of enterococci (ENT) over time scales less than a day that might affect interpretation of FIB concentrations from a single grab sample, even if obtained rapidly. Five new data sets of ENT collected at 10 and 1 min periodicities for 24 and 1 h, respectively, are presented. Data sets are collected in diverse marine environments from a turbulent surf zone to a quiescent bay. ENT vary with solar and tidal cycles, as has been observed in previous studies. Over short time scales, ENT are extremely variable in each environment even the quiescent bay. Changes in ENT concentrations between consecutive samples (1 or 10 min apart) greater than the single-sample standard (104 most probable number per 100 mL) are not unusual. Variability, defined as the change in concentration between consecutive samples, is not distinct between environments. ENT change by 60% on average between consecutive samples, and by as much as 700%. Spectral analyses reveal no spectral peaks, but power-law decline of spectral density with frequency. Power-law exponents are close to 1 suggesting ENT time series share properties with 1/f noise and are fractal in nature. Since fractal time series have no characteristic time scale associated with them, it is not obvious how the fractal nature of ENT can be exploited for adaptive sampling or management. Policy makers, as well as scientists

  14. Variability of surface pigment concentrations in the South Atlantic Bight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Charles R.; Yoder, James A.; Blanton, J. O.; Atkinson, L. P.; Lee, T. N.

    1988-01-01

    A time sequence of surface pigment images of the South Atlantic Bight (SAB), derived from the Nimbus 7 CZCS for the period between November 1978 and October 1979, was correlated with in situ observations of hydrographic parameters, fresh-water discharge, sea level, coastal winds, and currents in order to couple physical processes and the spatial and temporal variability of the surface pigment fields. A definite seasonal modulation of the surface pigment fields was found, with the concentrations in the Georgia Bight being highest in summer, and those north of Cape Romain highest in winter. This phase difference was found to be the result of variations in wind fields, Gulf Stream-shelf interactions, and fresh-water discharge patterns. At some locations (e.g., near Charleston) the alongshore band of high pigment concentrations increased in width throughout the year; at other locations (near Jacksonville), the alongsore band exhibited a minimum width in the summer and a maximum width in the fall of 1979.

  15. Variability of air ion concentrations in urban Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, V. N.; Herrmann, E.; Manninen, H. E.; Hussein, T.; Hakala, J.; Nieminen, T.; Aalto, P. P.; Merkel, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Hämeri, K.

    2015-12-01

    Air ion concentrations influence new particle formation and consequently the global aerosol as potential cloud condensation nuclei. We aimed to evaluate air ion concentrations and characteristics of new particle formation events (NPF) in the megacity of Paris, France, within the MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric Pollution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) project. We measured air ion number size distributions (0.8-42 nm) with an air ion spectrometer and fine particle number concentrations (> 6 nm) with a twin differential mobility particle sizer in an urban site of Paris between 26 June 2009 and 4 October 2010. Air ions were size classified as small (0.8-2 nm), intermediate (2-7 nm), and large (7-20 nm). The median concentrations of small and large ions were 670 and 680 cm-3, respectively, (sum of positive and negative polarities), whereas the median concentration of intermediate ions was only 20 cm-3, as these ions were mostly present during new particle formation bursts, i.e. when gas-to-particle conversion produced fresh aerosol particles from gas phase precursors. During peaks in traffic-related particle number, the concentrations of small and intermediate ions decreased, whereas the concentrations of large ions increased. Seasonal variations affected the ion population differently, with respect to their size and polarity. NPF was observed in 13 % of the days, being most frequent in spring and late summer (April, May, July, and August). The results also suggest that NPF was favoured on the weekends in comparison to workdays, likely due to the lower levels of condensation sinks in the mornings of weekends (CS weekdays 09:00: 18 × 10-3 s-1; CS weekend 09:00: 8 × 10-3 s-1). The median growth rates (GR) of ions during the NPF events varied between 3 and 7 nm h-1, increasing with the ion size and being higher on workdays than on weekends for intermediate and large ions. The median GR of

  16. Spatial variability of fine particle concentrations in three European areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, Gerard; Meliefste, Kees; Cyrys, Josef; Lewné, Marie; Bellander, Tom; Brauer, Mike; Fischer, Paul; Gehring, Ulrike; Heinrich, Joachim; van Vliet, Patricia; Brunekreef, Bert

    Epidemiological studies of long-term air pollution effects have been hampered by difficulties in characterizing the spatial variation in air pollution. We conducted a study to assess the risk of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution for the development of inhalant allergy and asthma in children in Stockholm county, Munich and the Netherlands. Exposure to traffic-related air pollution was assessed through a 1-year monitoring program and regression modeling using exposure indicators. This paper documents the performance of the exposure monitoring strategy and the spatial variation of ambient particle concentrations. We measured the ambient concentration of PM2.5 and the reflectance of PM2.5 filters ('soot') at 40-42 sites representative of different exposure conditions of the three study populations. Each site was measured during four 14-day average sampling periods spread over one year (spring 1999 to summer 2000). In each study area, a continuous measurement site was operated to remove potential bias due to temporal variation. The selected approach was an efficient method to characterize spatial differences in annual average concentration between a large number of sites in each study area. Adjustment with data from the continuous measurement site improved the precision of the calculated annual averages, especially for PM2.5. Annual average PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 11 to 20 μg/m 3 in Munich, from 8 to 16 μg/m 3 in Stockholm and from 14 to 26 μg/m 3 in the Netherlands. Larger spatial contrasts were found for the absorption coefficient of PM2.5. PM2.5 concentrations were on average 17-18% higher at traffic sites than at urban background sites, but PM2.5 absorption coefficients at traffic sites were between 31% and 55% increased above background. This suggests that spatial variation of traffic-related air pollution may be underestimated if PM2.5 only is measured.

  17. Pertinence of indicator organisms and sampling variables to Vibrio concentrations.

    PubMed

    Koh, E G; Huyn, J H; LaRock, P A

    1994-10-01

    Vibrio-indicator relationships and effects of day, depth, and tidal levels on the density of vibrios enumerated by the most probable number technique were investigated. Counts of vibrios taken monthly from Apalachicola Bay, Fla., were either negatively correlated or showed no correlation with counts of indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, enterococci, fecal coliforms, and total coliforms). Water samples collected on two days from the surface and bottom over a complete tidal cycle on each day were analyzed for differences in vibrio concentrations. Concentrations of vibrios in samples taken on different days, in those taken at different depths, and in those taken at different tidal levels were significantly different, indicating that these factors need to be taken into account in health-related studies. PMID:7986059

  18. Variability of inspired oxygen concentration with nasal cannulas.

    PubMed Central

    Bazuaye, E A; Stone, T N; Corris, P A; Gibson, G J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The likely values of inspired oxygen concentration (FIO2) of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease breathing via nasal cannulas have not been assessed previously. METHODS: Seven patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and seven healthy subjects were studied while breathing oxygen via nasal cannulas or fixed performance (Venturi) or uncontrolled (MC) oxygen masks. Breath to breath values of FIO2 were calculated by extrapolation from expired oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations on the basis of the oxygen-carbon dioxide relationship and on the assumption of a respiratory exchange ratio (R) of 0.8. RESULTS: In both groups of subjects the average values of FIO2 with nasal cannulas at 1 and 2 l min-1 were of a similar order to those achieved with 24.5% and 28% Venturi masks, but variations within and between subjects in both groups breathing via nasal cannulas were considerable and similar to those found with MC masks. In the seven patients with chronic obstructive lung disease breathing via nasal cannulas at 2 l min-1 the average FIO2 varied from 23.7% to 34.9%. CONCLUSIONS: "Typical" values of FIO2 quoted with nasal cannulas can mislead. The results confirm that this mode of oxygen delivery is unsatisfactory if precise control of inspired oxygen is desired. PMID:1412117

  19. Correlations between cadmium concentration in urine and exposure variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Elmar; Chutsch, Martina; Krause, Christian M.; Schulz, Christine; Thefeld, Wolfgang

    1993-03-01

    As part of the study 'UMWELT und GESUNDHEIT 1985/86', a representative samples of the population of the Federal Republic of Germany was examined for urinary Cd. A log-linear prediction model based on 2109 cases led to an explained variance portion of R2 equals .32. Strong associations were revealed between urinary cadmium and the smoking history and age of the subjects. This is evidence of the function urinary cadmium has as an indicator of the Cd body burden. However, there are also clear connections with physiological parameters (urinary creatinine and serum urea), which are taken to be a modification of Cd excretion by renal function. The association between urinary Cd and serum urea can also be interpreted as a cadmium-induced renal dysfunction. Urinary Cd concentrations tend to be lower in regions with low industrial nitrogen oxide emissions and high economic dynamics, as well as in non- urban residential structures.

  20. The influence of environmental variables on platelet concentration in horse platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Rinnovati, Riccardo; Romagnoli, Noemi; Gentilini, Fabio; Lambertini, Carlotta; Spadari, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) commonly refers to blood products which contain a higher platelet (PLT) concentration as compared to normal plasma. Autologous PRP has been shown to be safe and effective in promoting the natural processes of soft tissue healing or reconstruction in humans and horses. Variability in PLT concentration has been observed in practice between PRP preparations from different patients or from the same individual under different conditions. A change in PLT concentration could modify PRP efficacy in routine applications. The aim of this study was to test the influence of environmental, individual and agonistic variables on the PLT concentration of PRP in horses. Six healthy Standardbred mares were exposed to six different variables with a one-week washout period between variables, and PRP was subsequently obtained from each horse. The variables were time of withdrawal during the day (morning/evening), hydration status (overhydration/dehydration) treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs and training periods on a treadmill. The platelet concentration was significantly higher in horses treated with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (P = 0.03). The leukocyte concentration increased 2-9 fold with respect to whole blood in the PRP which was obtained after exposure to all the variable considered. Environmental variation in platelet concentration should be taken into consideration during PRP preparation. PMID:27377748

  1. Interannual Variability of Ammonia Concentrations over the United States: Sources and Implications for Inorganic Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiferl, L. D.; Heald, C. L.; Van Damme, M.; Pierre-Francois, C.; Clerbaux, C.

    2015-12-01

    Modern agricultural practices have greatly increased the emission of ammonia (NH3) to the atmosphere. Recent controls to reduce the emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides (SOX and NOX) have increased the importance of understanding the role ammonia plays in the formation of surface fine inorganic particulate matter (PM2.5) in the United States. In this study, we identify the interannual variability in ammonia concentration, explore the sources of this variability and determine their contribution to the variability in surface PM2.5 concentration. Over the summers of 2008-2012, measurements from the Ammonia Monitoring Network (AMoN) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) satellite instrument show considerable variability in both surface and column ammonia concentrations (+/- 29% and 28% of the mean), respectively. This observed variability is larger than that simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, where meteorology dominates the variability in ammonia and PM2.5 concentrations compared to the changes caused by SOX and NOX reductions. Our initial simulation does not include year-to-year changes in ammonia agricultural emissions. We use county-wide information on fertilizer sales and livestock populations, as well as meteorological variations to account for the interannual variability in agricultural activity and ammonia volatilization. These sources of ammonia emission variability are important for replicating observed variations in ammonia and PM2.5, highlighting how accurate ammonia emissions characterization is central to PM air quality prediction.

  2. Hormone Concentrations and Variability: Associations with Self-Reported Moods and Energy in Early Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Christy Miller

    Examined were relations between concentrations and variability of hormones (testosterone, estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone, and leutenizing hormone) and mood intensity, mood variability (within and across days), energy, and restlessness in early adolescent girls. The study also considered the issue of whether hormones have effects on mood…

  3. Observational study on variability between biobanks in the estimation of DNA concentration

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jay; Donev, Alexander N; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Bracegirdle, Pippa; Dixon, Katherine P; Foedinger, Manuela; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hardy, Matthew; Illig, Thomas; Ke, Xiayi; Krinka, Dagni; Lagerberg, Camilla; Laiho, Päivi; Lewis, David H; McArdle, Wendy; Patton, Simon; Ring, Susan M; Schmitz, Gerd; Stevens, Helen; Tybring, Gunnel; Wichmann, H Erich; Ollier, William ER; Yuille, Martin A

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little confidence in the consistency of estimation of DNA concentrations when samples move between laboratories. Evidence on this consistency is largely anecdotal. Therefore there is a need first to measure this consistency among different laboratories and then identify and implement remedies. A pilot experiment to test logistics and provide initial data on consistency was therefore conceived. Methods DNA aliquots at nominal concentrations between 10 and 300 ng/μl were dispensed into the wells of 96-well plates by one participant - the coordinating centre. Participants estimated the concentration in each well and returned estimates to the coordinating centre. Results Considerable overall variability was observed among estimates. There were statistically significant differences between participants' measurements and between fluorescence emission and absorption spectroscopy. Conclusion Anecdotal evidence of variability in DNA concentration estimation has been substantiated. Reduction in variability between participants will require the identification of major sources of variation, specification of effective remedies and their implementation. PMID:19825187

  4. Robustness of the large-scale modes of variability of winter Arctic sea ice concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Sally; Houssais, Marie-Noëlle; Herbaut, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The dominant mode of variability of Arctic winter sea ice concentration has previously been suggested to be represented by a double-dipole structure, with the loading pattern of the first empirical orthogonal mode having phase of one sign in the Sea of Okhotsk and Barents Sea and opposing sign in the Labrador and Bering Seas. In this study, we build on this previous work, examining the robustness of the primary modes of large-scale variability of the winter sea ice concentration in the Arctic based on the satellite data record. We find that the double-dipole structure does not emerge as a robust mode of variability: rather, the primary mode can be considered as a tripole, explaining significant variability only in the Sea of Okhotsk, Barents and Bering Seas. In contrast, the Labrador Sea emerges in isolation in the second empirical orthogonal mode. The relative magnitude of the poles of variability in the empirical orthogonal function loading patterns are sensitive to the detrending of the data; however, the isolation of the variability of the Labrador Sea ice remains a robust feature. We find that there is no significant interannual-scale co-variability amongst the sea ice areas of the four seas comprising the double-dipole after low-frequency variability has been removed.

  5. Seasonal and interannual variability of pigment concentrations across a California Current frontal zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. C.; Strub, P. T.

    1990-01-01

    The seasonal and interannual variability of the latitudinal position of the California Current frontal zone was investigated by examining satellite images of phytoplankton pigment from the coastal-zone color scanner for the periods 1979-1983 and 1986. The pigment concentrations associated with the zonal front were also determined. A general seasonal cycle of pigment concentrations is was established. It was found that variations in the frontal structure are controlled primarily by changes in pigment concentration north of the front. Seasonal variations were found to be minimal south of the front, where pigment concentrations remain low throughout the spring, summer, and fall.

  6. Variability in the recovery of a virus concentration procedure in water: Implications for QMRA.

    PubMed

    Petterson, Susan; Grøndahl-Rosado, Ricardo; Nilsen, Vegard; Myrmel, Mette; Robertson, Lucy J

    2015-12-15

    Methods for analysing water for viruses are known to have variable and relatively poor recovery efficiencies. Quantitative method recovery data are needed to correct virus enumeration results so that estimates of virus concentrations in surface waters for QMRA are not too low. Obtaining quantitative data representing method recoveries for different pathogenic viruses is a significant challenge. In this study, we investigated the use of mengovirus process control data for quantifying recovery efficiency of human adenovirus (AdV) and noroviruses GI (NoVGI) and GII (NoVGII) from surface waters. Samples were collected from the inlet to a drinking water treatment plant on the Glomma River, Norway. Performance of the sample concentration procedure was quantified by comparing the virus concentrations found in concentrated and unconcentrated samples. The mean recovery of viruses (1.2%, 0.31%, 0.15% and 0.053% for mengovirus (n = 86), AdV (n = 20), NoVGI (n = 33) and NoVGII (n = 21) respectively) estimated in this study were lower than expected, and the between sample variability in estimated recovery was very high, spanning around 6 orders of magnitude for mengovirus. Within-sample correlation between the estimated recovery of mengovirus and human viruses was poor, and therefore sample specific mengovirus data could not be used to correct all human virus concentrations. Instead beta distributions were fitted to human virus-specific recovery estimates. The magnitude and variability of virus concentration when corrected for the variable recovery efficiency was orders of magnitude higher than the uncorrected concentration. Better estimates of virus concentration could be achieved if a sample-specific spiking control could be developed that mimicked closely the behaviour of human viruses in environmental samples. PMID:26383122

  7. Spatiotemporal variability of light-absorbing carbon concentration in a residential area impacted by woodsmoke.

    PubMed

    Krecl, Patricia; Johansson, Christer; Ström, Johan

    2010-03-01

    Residential wood combustion (RWC) is responsible for 33% of the total carbon mass emitted in Europe. With the new European targets to increase the use of renewable energy, there is a growing concern that the population exposure to woodsmoke will also increase. This study investigates observed and simulated light-absorbing carbon mass (MLAC) concentrations in a residential neighborhood (Lycksele, Sweden) where RWC is a major air pollution source during winter. The measurement analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient, coefficient of divergence, linear regression, concentration roses, diurnal pattern, and weekend versus weekday concentration ratios. Hourly RWC and road traffic contributions to MLAC were simulated with a Gaussian dispersion model to assess whether the model was able to mimic the observations. Hourly mean and standard deviation concentrations measured at six sites ranged from 0.58 to 0.74 microg m(-3) and from 0.59 to 0.79 microg m(-3), respectively. The temporal and spatial variability decreased with increasing averaging time. Low-wind periods with relatively high MLAC concentrations correlated more strongly than high-wind periods with low concentrations. On average, the model overestimated the observations by 3- to 5-fold and explained less than 10% of the measured hourly variability at all sites. Large residual concentrations were associated with weak winds and relatively high MLAC loadings. The explanation of the observed variability increased to 31-45% when daily mean concentrations were compared. When the contribution from the boilers within the neighborhood was excluded from the simulations, the model overestimation decreased to 16-71%. When assessing the exposure to light-absorbing carbon particles using this type of model, the authors suggest using a longer averaging period (i.e., daily concentrations) in a larger area with an updated and very detailed emission inventory. PMID:20397565

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SPATIOTEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF NON-URBAN OZONE CONCENTRATIONS OVER THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spatial and temporal variability of the maximum 24 hourly 03 concentrations over non-urban areas of the eastern United States was examined for the period 1985-1990 using principal component analysis. tilization of Kaiser's Varimax orthogonal rotation led to the delineation of...

  9. INVESTIGATION AND IMPLICATIONS OF SUB GRID VARIABILITY OF CMAQ MODELED CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster introduces a method called SGV adjusted concentrations (SAC) for introducing sub-grid variability (inherent in air quality grid models) into CMAQ for various applications C MAQ was run at 36-, 12-, 4-, and 1 km-grid sizes for July 2001 for the Delaware domain. The S...

  10. High variability of indoor radon concentrations in uraniferous bedrock areas in the Balkan region.

    PubMed

    Zunić, Z S; Ujić, P; Nađđerđ, L; Yarmoshenko, I V; Radanović, S B; Komatina Petrović, S; Celiković, I; Komatina, M; Bossew, P

    2014-12-01

    In this work the strong influence of geological factors on the variability of indoor radon is found in two of three geologically very different regions of South-Eastern Europe. A method to estimate the annual mean concentration when one seasonal measurement is missing is proposed. Large differences of radon concentrations in different rooms of the same house and significant difference in radon concentrations in one season comparing it to the others are noted in certain cases. Geological factors that can lead to such behavior are discussed. PMID:25305525

  11. Variability of mineral dust concentrations over West Africa monitored by the Sahelian Dust Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaly, F.; Marticorena, B.; Chatenet, B.; Rajot, J. L.; Janicot, S.; Niang, A.; Yahi, H.; Thiria, S.; Maman, A.; Zakou, A.; Coulibaly, B. S.; Coulibaly, M.; Koné, I.; Traoré, S.; Diallo, A.; Ndiaye, T.

    2015-10-01

    The "Sahelian belt" is known as a region where mineral dust content is among the highest in the world. In the framework of the AMMA international Program, a transect of three ground based stations, the "Sahelian Dust Transect" (SDT), has been deployed in order to obtain quantitative information on the mineral dust content over the Sahel. These three stations: Banizoumbou (Niger), Cinzana (Mali) and M'Bour (Senegal) are aligned at 13°N along the east-west main pathway of the Saharan and Sahelian dust toward the Atlantic Ocean. The SDT provides a set of aerosol measurements and local meteorological parameters to describe and understand the mechanisms that control the temporal and regional variability of mineral dust content in these regions. In this work we analyze the seasonal and diurnal variability of the dust concentrations over the period 2006-2010. The analysis of the dust concentrations measured between 2006 and 2010 confirmed a regional seasonal cycle characterized by a maximum in the dry season, with median concentration ranging from 205 μg m- 3 at Banizoumbou to 144 μg m- 3 at M'Bour, and a minimum (11-32 μg m- 3) in the wet season. The five year data set allowed the quantification of the variability of the monthly concentrations. The range between the percentiles 75 and 25 varies linearly with the median concentration: it is of the same order than the median value in M'Bour, 17% slightly higher in Cinzana and 50% higher in Banizoumbou. The range between the accepted maximum and minimum is also correlated with the median value, with slopes ranging from 14 in Banizoumbou to 7 in M'Bour. Part of the variability of the concentration at the monthly scale is due to interannual variability. Extremely high or low monthly concentration can be recorded that significantly impacts the five year median concentration and its range. Compared to the 3-year data set analyzed by Marticorena et al. (2010), the two additional years used in this work appear as the less

  12. Daily variability of suspended particulate concentrations and yields and their effect on river particulates chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meybeck, M.; Moatar, F.

    2015-03-01

    Daily total suspended solids concentrations (TSS, mg L-1), yields (Y, kg day-1 km-2) and runoff (q, L s-1 km-2) in world rivers are described by the median (C50), the upper percentile (C99), the discharge-weighted average concentrations (C*), and by their corresponding yields (Y50, Y99, Y*) and runoff (q*, q50, q99). These intra-station descriptors range over two to six orders of magnitude at a given station. Inter-station variability is considered through three sets of dimensionless metrics: (i) q*/q50, C*/C50 and Y*/Y50, defining the general temporal variability indicators, and q99/q50, C99/C50 and Y99/Y50, defining the extreme variability indicators; (ii) river flow duration (W2) and flux duration (M2) in 2% of time; and (iii) the truncated rating curve exponent (b50sup) of the C vs q relationship for the upper flows. The TSS and Y variability, measured on US, French and world rivers, are first explained by hydrological variability through the b50sup metric, the variability amplifier, then by basin size, erodibility, relief and lake occurrence. Yield variability is the product of runoff variability × TSS variability. All metrics are considerably modified after river damming. The control of river particulate matter (RPM) composition by TSS or yields depends on the targeted component. For major elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Ti, Si, Ca, Mg, Na, K), the average RPM chemistry is not dependent on C* and Y* in most world hydroregions, except in the tropical hydrobelt where it is controlled by basin relief. By contrast, the particulate organic carbon content (POC, as a percentage of RPM) is inversely correlated to TSS concentrations for (i) intra-station measurements in any hydroregion, and (ii) inter-station average POC and TSS figures in world rivers. TSS controls heavy metal content (ppm) in highly contaminated basins (e.g. Cd in the Seine vs the Rhone), and total metal concentration (ng/L) in all cases. Relations between RPM composition and TSS should be taken into account

  13. Sequential Measurement of Intermodal Variability in Public Transportation PM2.5 and CO Exposure Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Che, W W; Frey, H Christopher; Lau, Alexis K H

    2016-08-16

    A sequential measurement method is demonstrated for quantifying the variability in exposure concentration during public transportation. This method was applied in Hong Kong by measuring PM2.5 and CO concentrations along a route connecting 13 transportation-related microenvironments within 3-4 h. The study design takes into account ventilation, proximity to local sources, area-wide air quality, and meteorological conditions. Portable instruments were compacted into a backpack to facilitate measurement under crowded transportation conditions and to quantify personal exposure by sampling at nose level. The route included stops next to three roadside monitors to enable comparison of fixed site and exposure concentrations. PM2.5 exposure concentrations were correlated with the roadside monitors, despite differences in averaging time, detection method, and sampling location. Although highly correlated in temporal trend, PM2.5 concentrations varied significantly among microenvironments, with mean concentration ratios versus roadside monitor ranging from 0.5 for MTR train to 1.3 for bus terminal. Measured inter-run variability provides insight regarding the sample size needed to discriminate between microenvironments with increased statistical significance. The study results illustrate the utility of sequential measurement of microenvironments and policy-relevant insights for exposure mitigation and management. PMID:27182735

  14. Causes of variability in concentrations and diastereomer patterns of hexabromocyclododecanes in indoor dust.

    PubMed

    Harrad, Stuart; Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Covaci, Adrian

    2009-04-01

    The temporal evolution of concentrations of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), and pentabromocyclododecenes (PBCDs--degradation products of HBCDs) was studied in separate aliquots of a well-homogenized indoor dust sample. These were: (a) exposed to natural light, and (b) kept in the dark. Results revealed a rapid photolytically-mediated shift from gamma-HBCD to alpha-HBCD that was complete after 1 week of exposure, and a slower degradative loss of HBCDs via elimination of HBr. Under the specific conditions studied in this experiment, calculated half-lives (t(1/2)) showed the decay in SigmaHBCDs concentration was faster in light-exposed samples (t(1/2)=12 weeks), than in light-shielded dust (t(1/2)=26 weeks). Within-room spatial and temporal variability in concentrations and diastereomer patterns were studied in six and three rooms respectively. While in some rooms, little variability was detected, in others it was substantial. In one room, concentrations of SigmaHBCDs and the relative abundance of gamma-HBCD declined dramatically with increasing distance from a TV. The same TV appears to have influenced strongly the temporal variation in that room; with higher concentrations observed in its presence and when the TV was moved closer to the area sampled. Significant negative correlation was observed in one room between concentrations of SigmaHBCDs and dust loading (g dust m(-2) floor), implying "dilution" occurs at higher dust loadings. PMID:19062095

  15. Determination of water quality variables, endotoxin concentration, and Enterobacteriaceae concentration and identification in southern High Plains dairy lagoons.

    PubMed

    Purdy, C W; Clark, R N; Straus, D C

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the concentration of endotoxin, determine 20 water quality variables, and identify and enumerate fungal and bacterial pathogens from United States southern High Plains dairy lagoons and control lakes during summer and winter. Water samples were collected in triplicate from the north, south, east, and west quadrants of each body of water. The mean (+/- SEM) winter dairy lagoon endotoxin concentration was significantly higher (9,678+/-1,834 ng/mL) than the summer concentration (3,220+/-810 ng/mL). The mean endotoxin concentration of the 2 control lakes (summer: 58.1+/-8.8 ng/mL; winter: 38.6+/-4.2 ng/mL) was significantly less than that of the dairy lagoons. Two hundred-one Salmonella enterica spp. isolates were identified, 7 serovars were recovered from the dairy lagoons, and 259 Salmonella ssp. were identified from 5 other dairy locations (milk barn, ditch effluent, settling basin, feed alley pad flush, and center pivots). Twenty-eight Salmonella spp. were identified from center pivot water. Escherichia coli O157:H7 pathogens were isolated from other dairy locations but not from lagoons. Neither Salmonella spp. nor E. coli O157:H7 were identified from control lakes. Enterobacteriaceae opportunistic pathogens were isolated from both dairies and control lakes. Important mesophilic and thermophilic catabolic (to manure biosolids) fungal isolates were identified from dairy effluent locations, but no thermophilic fungal isolates were cultured from the control lakes. Adequate curing of green forage following center pivot irrigation is important to kill lagoon water enteric pathogens, even though the lagoon water is mixed with fresh water. Recirculating lagoon water to flush the feed alley pad, where cows stand while eating, to remove manure and using lagoon water to abate dairy dust in loafing pens and unimproved dairy roads is inconsistent with good environmental practice management. PMID:20338428

  16. Geostatistical analysis of the temporal variability of ozone concentrations. Comparison between CHIMERE model and surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fouquet, Chantal; Malherbe, Laure; Ung, Anthony

    2011-07-01

    Deterministic models have become essential tools to forecast and map concentration fields of atmospheric pollutants like ozone. Those models are regularly updated and improved by incorporating recent theoretical developments and using more precise input data. Unavoidable differences with in situ measurements still remain, which need to be better understood. This study investigates those discrepancies in a geostatistical framework by comparing the temporal variability of ozone hourly surface concentrations simulated by a chemistry-transport model, CHIMERE, and measured across France. More than 200 rural and urban background monitoring sites are considered. The relationship between modelled and observed data is complex. Ozone concentrations evolve according to various time scales. CHIMERE correctly accounts for those different scales of variability but is usually unable to reproduce the exact magnitude of each temporal component. Such difficulty cannot be entirely attributed to the difference in spatial support between grid cell averages and punctual observations. As a result of this exploratory analysis, the common multivariate geostatistical model, known as the linear model of coregionalization, is used to describe the temporal variability of ozone hourly concentrations and the relationship between simulated and observed values at each observation point. The fitted parameters of the model can then be interpreted. Their distribution in space provides objective criteria to delimitate the areas where the chemistry-transport model is more or less reliable.

  17. Effect of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on high-speed slip flow between concentric cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T C; Street, R E

    1954-01-01

    Schamberg was the first to solve the differential equations of slip flow, including the Burnett terms, for concentric circular cylinders assuming constant coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity. The problem is solved for variable coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity in this paper by applying a transformation which leads to an iteration method. Starting with the solution for constant coefficients, this method enables one to approximate the solution for variable coefficients very closely after one or two steps. Satisfactory results are shown to follow from Schamberg's solution by using his values of constant coefficients multiplied by a constant factor, leading to what are denoted as the effective coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  18. Usual variables and odour concentration to evaluate composting process and odour impact.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M C; Martín, M A; Chica, A F

    2014-01-01

    Organic waste management by means of composting produces unpleasant odours. The odour emissions of composting piles composed of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge were monitored and controlled by means of dynamic olfactometry. This technique is used to determine the odour concentration expressed in European odour units per cubic metres (ou(E)/m3). To validate the technique, we analysed both respirometric variables and traditional variables such as total organic carbon and pH during composting. Finally, a dispersion model was used to evaluate the impact of the odour emissions of the wastes on neighbouring areas, not finding any differences in the cases evaluated. PMID:24645451

  19. Patterns, Variability, and Predictors of Urinary Bisphenol A Concentrations during Childhood.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Shaina L; Eliot, Melissa; Calafat, Antonia M; Chen, Aimin; Lanphear, Bruce P; Hauser, Russ; Papandonatos, George D; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Ye, Xiaoyun; Yolton, Kimberly; Braun, Joseph M

    2016-06-01

    We examined the patterns, variability, and predictors of urinary bisphenol A (BPA) concentrations in 337 children from the Cincinnati, Ohio HOME Study. From 2003 to 2014, we collected two urine samples from women at 16 and 26 weeks of pregnancy and six urine samples from children at 1-5 and 8 years of age. We used linear mixed models to calculate intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) as a measure of within-person BPA variability and to identify sociodemographic and environmental predictors. For the 8-year visit, we used multivariable linear regression to explore associations between urinary BPA concentrations and exposure-related factors. We calculated daily intakes using equations estimating creatinine excretion rates and creatinine-standardized BPA concentrations. Urinary BPA concentrations, which decreased over childhood, had a low degree of reproducibility (ICC < 0.2). Estimated daily intakes decreased with age and were below the reference dose of 50 μg/kg body weight/day. BPA concentrations were positively associated with consuming food stored or heated in plastic, consuming canned food and beverages, and handling cash register receipts. Our results suggest that there are multiple sources of BPA exposure in young children. Etiological studies should collect serial urine samples to accurately classify BPA exposure and consider sociodemographic and environmental factors as possible confounders. PMID:27152530

  20. The effect of dietary energy concentrations on production variables of ostrich chicks (Struthio camelus var. domesticus).

    PubMed

    Brand, T S; Carstens, P D; Hoffman, L C

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different dietary energy concentrations on ostrich production variables were examined in two separate trials. The first trial tracked changes in production variables from the pre-starter phase through the starter phase and grower phase. The second trial was based on the finisher phase per se. In both trials, the influence of dietary energy on feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR) and growth variables was investigated. Additionally, basic abattoir weights were recorded, and measurements of the feathers and skin were performed. In both trials, three diets with different concentrations of dietary energy were given during each phase where the low-, medium- and high-energy concentrations for each phase were as follows: 13.5, 14.5 and 15.5 MJ ME/kg feed pre-starter; 12.5, 13.5 and 14.5 MJ ME/kg feed starter; 10.5, 11.5 and 12.5 MJ ME/kg feed grower and 9.5, 10.5 and 11.5 MJ ME/kg feed finisher. Feed and water were available ad libitum in both trials. Overall, it was found that the best performance for growth, FCR, skin size and grade, live weight, carcass weight and thigh weight were obtained on the medium-energy diet during the pre-starter, starter and grower phases. During the finisher phase, improved growth rate and tanned skin size was found in birds given the diet with the highest energy concentration (11.5 MJ ME/kg feed). Carcass weight, growth rate and certain feather variables were also significantly influenced by gender. PMID:25266635

  1. Spatial variability of soil gas concentration and methane oxidation capacity in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Röwer, Inga Ute; Geck, Christoph; Gebert, Julia; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    In order to devise design criteria for biocovers intended to enhance the microbial oxidation of landfill methane it is critical to understand the factors influencing gas migration and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. On an old municipal solid waste landfill in north-western Germany soil gas concentrations (10, 40, 90 cm depth), topsoil methane oxidation capacity and soil properties were surveyed at 40 locations along a 16 m grid. As soil properties determine gas flow patterns it was hypothesized that the variability in soil gas composition and the subsequent methanotrophic activity would correspond to the variability of soil properties. Methanotrophic activity was found to be subject to high spatial variability, with values ranging between 0.17 and 9.80 g CH(4)m(-2)h(-1)(.) Considering the current gas production rate of 0.03 g CH(4)m(-2)h(-1), the oxidation capacity at all sampled locations clearly exceeded the flux to the cover, and can be regarded as an effective instrument for mitigating methane fluxes. The methane concentration in the cover showed a high spatial heterogeneity with values between 0.01 and 0.32 vol.% (10 cm depth), 22.52 vol.% (40 cm), and 36.85 vol.% (90 cm). The exposure to methane raised the oxidation capacity, suggested by a statistical correlation to an increase in methane concentration at 90 cm depth. Methane oxidation capacity was further affected by the methanotroph bacteria pH optimum and nutrient availability, and increased with decreasing pH towards neutrality, and increased with soluble ion concentration). Soil methane and carbon dioxide concentration increased with lower flow resistance of the cover, as represented by the soil properties of a reduced bulk density, increase in air capacity and in relative ground level. PMID:20943363

  2. Spatio-Temporal Variability in Fecal Indicator Bacteria Concentrations at Huntington Beach: Connections to Physical Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rippy, M. A.; Feddersen, F.; Leichter, J.; Omand, M.; Moore, D. F.; McGee, C.; Franks, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    Two major factors determine the spatial and temporal distributions of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) at a given beach: local circulation & mixing patterns, and bacterial inactivation rates. High frequency and spatial resolution bacterial sampling combined with measurements of physical processes can be used to infer inactivation rates, enabling differentiation between dilution & mortality as factors driving variability in nearshore FIB abundance. A FIB sampling experiment (HB06) took place on 16 October 2006, at Huntington State Beach, a site selected due to its persistent problems with FIB pollution. Water samples were taken at 20-minute intervals (from 6:50am to 11:50am) at ten locations; four in an alongshore transect spanning 1 km at the shoreline, and the remainder in a 300-m long cross-shore transect. All samples were analyzed for FIB concentration (Total Coliforms, E. coli & Enterococci) and, for a subset, species level Enterococcus composition was determined. As part of the HB06 experiment, currents, temperature, waves, and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured simultaneously in the cross-shore direction with rapid CTD casts 300 m offshore. Results indicate that E. coli and Enterococcus concentrations exhibit exponential decreases with time, with smaller decay rates associated with depth and with sites in the Talbert Marsh and Santa Ana River. FIB concentrations are also noticeably lower farther offshore (300 m). Spatio-temporal patterns in FIB concentration will be presented in conjunction with the nearshore physical data allowing the relationship between physical dynamics and biological variability to be addressed.

  3. Quantitative Imaging and In Situ Concentration Measurements of Quantum Dot Nanomaterials in Variably Saturated Porous Media

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uyuşur, Burcu; Snee, Preston T.; Li, Chunyan; Darnault, Christophe J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the fate and transport of nanoparticles in the subsurface environment is limited, as techniques to monitor and visualize the transport and distribution of nanoparticles in porous media and measure their in situ concentrations are lacking. To address these issues, we have developed a light transmission and fluorescence method to visualize and measure in situ concentrations of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in variably saturated environments. Calibration cells filled with sand as porous medium and various known water saturation levels and QD concentrations were prepared. By measuring the intensity of the light transmitted through porous media exposed to fluorescent lightmore » and by measuring the hue of the light emitted by the QDs under UV light exposure, we obtained simultaneously in situ measurements of water saturation and QD nanoparticle concentrations with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Water saturation was directly proportional to the light intensity. A linear relationship was observed between hue-intensity ratio values and QD concentrations for constant water saturation levels. The advantages and limitations of the light transmission and fluorescence method as well as its implications for visualizing and measuring in situ concentrations of QDs nanoparticles in the subsurface environment are discussed.« less

  4. Variability of mercury concentrations in domestic well water, New Jersey Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, Zoltan; Barringer, Julia L.; Jacobsen, Eric; Smith, Nicholas P; Gallagher, Robert A; Sites, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of total (unfiltered) mercury (Hg) exceed the Maximum Contaminant Level (2 µg/L) in the acidic water withdrawn by more than 700 domestic wells from the areally extensive unconfined Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. Background concentrations of Hg generally are <0.01 µg/L. The source of the Hg contamination has been hypothesized to arise from Hg of pesticide-application, atmospheric, and geologic origin being mobilized by some component(s) of septic-system effluent or urban leachates in unsewered residential areas. Initial results at many affected wells were not reproducible upon later resampling despite rigorous quality assurance, prompting concerns that duration of well flushing could affect the Hg concentrations. A cooperative study by the U.S. Geological Survey and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection examined variability in Hg results during the flushing of domestic wells. Samples were collected at regular intervals (about 10 minutes) during flushing for eight domestic wells, until stabilization criteria was met for field-measured parameters; the Hg concentrations in the final samples ranged from about 0.0005 to 11 µg/L. Unfiltered Hg concentrations in samples collected during purging varied slightly, but particulate Hg concentration (unfiltered – filtered (0.45 micron capsule) concentration) typically was highly variable for each well, with no consistent pattern of increase or decrease in concentration. Surges of particulates probably were associated with pump cycling. Pre-pumping samples from the holding tanks generally had the lowest Hg concentrations among the samples collected at the well that day. Comparing the newly obtained results at each well to results from previous sampling indicated that Hg concentrations in water from the Hg-contaminated areas were generally greater among samples collected on different dates (long-term variations, months to years) than among samples collected on the same day (short

  5. Temporal changes in the variability of respirable mineral dust exposure concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kromhout, Hans; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Jongen, Richard; Houba, Remko

    2009-02-01

    In the last decade a lot of evidence with regard to temporal trends in exposure concentrations in predominantly Western industrial countries has become available. In a recent literature review (Creely et al. 2007) overall percentage of yearly declines up to 32% were presented. To what extent these temporal declines also affect the variability in exposure concentrations is unknown. The main reason is lack of longitudinal data including repeated measurements that would allow evaluating trends in personal and temporal components of exposure variability. The recently elaborated exposure database from the Industrial Minerals Association Dust Monitoring Programme provided an opportunity to study these trends for exposure to respirable mineral dust. This database currently contains more than 11,000 measurements from more than 20 companies and 80 sites throughout Europe. About one-third of the measurement data comprised repeated measurements within a specific site-job-survey combination. Linear mixed models were used to estimate variance components. Variance components were consequently plotted against year of measurements. For 377 groups of workers (with number of workers>2, total number of observations >5 and repeats >1.25) the fold range of the total variability (tR.95) appeared to go down significantly with 3% per campaign (half year): from 34 in summer 2002 to 20 in winter 2005/2006. When the variability was teased apart the fold range for the temporal variability (wwR.95) appeared to decrease significantly as well with 3% per campaign (half year): from 17 in summer 2002 to 10 in winter 2005/2006. The between-worker variability did not show a temporal trend and stayed constant with on average a fold-range (bwR.95) of approximately 4. Downward temporal trends in exposure level of respirable (crystalline silica) dust seem to coincide with downward trends in the size of temporal variability. Fold-ranges of average exposure of individual workers within a job at a

  6. Variability of CO2 concentrations and fluxes in and above an urban street canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietzke, Björn; Vogt, Roland

    2013-08-01

    The variability of CO2 concentrations and fluxes in dense urban environments is high due to the inherent heterogeneity of these complex areas and their spatio-temporally variable anthropogenic sources. With a focus on micro- to local-scale CO2-exchange processes, measurements were conducted in a street canyon in the city of Basel, Switzerland in 2010. CO2 fluxes were sampled at the top of the canyon (19 m) and at 39 m while vertical CO2 concentration profiles were measured in the center and at a wall of the canyon. CO2 concentration distributions in the street canyon and exchange processes with the layers above show, apart from expected general diurnal patterns due mixing layer heights, a strong dependence on wind direction relative to the canyon. As a consequence of the resulting corkscrew-like canyon vortex, accumulation of CO2 inside the canyon is modulated with distinct distribution patterns. The evaluation of diurnal traffic data provides good explanations for the vertical and horizontal differences in CO2-distribution inside the canyon. Diurnal flux characteristics at the top of the canyon can almost solely be explained with traffic density expressed by the strong linear dependence. Even the diurnal course of the flux at 39 m shows a remarkable relationship to traffic density for east wind conditions while, for west wind situations, a change toward source areas with lower emissions leads to a reduced flux.

  7. Temporal variability in urinary concentrations of perchlorate, nitrate, thiocyanate and iodide among children

    PubMed Central

    MERVISH, NANCY; BLOUNT, BEN; VALENTIN-BLASINI, LIZA; BRENNER, BARBARA; GALVEZ, MAIDA P.; WOLFF, MARY S.; TEITELBAUM, SUSAN L.

    2012-01-01

    Perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate are ubiquitous in the environment, and human exposure to these chemicals is accurately measured in urine. Biomarkers of these chemicals represent a person's recent exposure, however, little is known on the temporal variability of the use of a single measurement of these biomarkers. Healthy Hispanic and Black children (6–10-year-old) donated urine samples over 6 months. To assess temporal variability, we used three statistical methods (n = 29; 153 urine samples): intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Spearman's correlation coefficient between concentrations measured at different timepoints and surrogate category analysis to assess how well tertile ranking by a single biomarker measurement represented the average concentration over 6 months. The ICC measure of reproducibility was poor (0.10–0.12) for perchlorate, nitrate and iodide; and fair for thiocyanate (0.36). The correlations for each biomarker across multiple sampling times ranged from 0.01–0.57. Surrogate analysis showed consistent results for almost every surrogate tertile. Results demonstrate fair temporal reliability in the spot urine concentrations of the three NIS inhibitors and iodide. Surrogate analysis show that single-spot urine samples reliably categorize participant's exposure providing support for the use of a single sample as an exposure measure in epidemiological studies that use relative ranking of exposure. PMID:22166811

  8. Occurrence and variability of iodinated trihalomethanes concentrations within two drinking-water distribution networks.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Panagiotis; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C

    2016-02-01

    Non-iodo-containing trihalomethanes (TTHM) are frequently detected in chlorinated tap water and currently regulated against their carcinogenic potential. Iodinated THM (ITHM) may also form in disinfected with chlorine waters that are high in iodine content, but little is known about their magnitude and variability within the drinking-water pipe distribution network of urban areas. The main objective of this study was to determine the magnitude and variability of ITHM and TTHM levels and their corresponding daily intake estimates within the drinking water distribution systems of Limassol and Nicosia cities of Cyprus, using tap samples collected from individual households (n=37). In Limassol, mean household tap water ITHM and TTHM levels was 0.58 and 38 μg L(-1), respectively. Dichloroiodomethane (DCIM) was the dominant species of the two measured ITHM compounds accounting for 77% of total ITHM and in the range of 0.032 and 1.65 μg L(-1). The range of DCIM concentrations in Nicosia tap water samples was narrower (0.032 - 0.848 μg L(-1)). Mean total iodine concentration in tap water samples from the seaside city of Limassol was 15 μg L(-1) and approximately twice to those observed in samples from the mainland Nicosia city. However, iodine concentrations did not correlate with the ITHM levels. The calculated chronic daily intake rates of ITHM were low when compared with those of TTHM, but because of their widespread occurrence in tap water and their enhanced mammalian cell toxicity, additional research is warranted to assess the magnitude and variability of human ITHM exposures. PMID:26599150

  9. Multi-scale variability and long-range memory in indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Reik V.; Potirakis, Stelios; Barbosa, Susana

    2014-05-01

    The presence or absence of long-range correlations in the variations of indoor Radon concentrations has recently attracted considerable interest. As a radioactive gas naturally emitted from the ground in certain geological settings, understanding environmental factors controlling Radon concentrations and their dynamics is important for estimating its effect on human health and the efficiency of possible measures for reducing the corresponding exposition. In this work, we re-analyze two high-resolution records of indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal, each of which spans several months of continuous measurements. In order to evaluate the presence of long-range correlations and fractal scaling, we utilize a multiplicity of complementary methods, including power spectral analysis, ARFIMA modeling, classical and multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis, and two different estimators of the signals' fractal dimensions. Power spectra and fluctuation functions reveal some complex behavior with qualitatively different properties on different time-scales: white noise in the high-frequency part, indications of some long-range correlated process dominating time scales of several hours to days, and pronounced low-frequency variability associated with tidal and/or meteorological forcing. In order to further decompose these different scales of variability, we apply two different approaches. On the one hand, applying multi-resolution analysis based on the discrete wavelet transform allows separately studying contributions on different time scales and characterize their specific correlation and scaling properties. On the other hand, singular system analysis (SSA) provides a reconstruction of the essential modes of variability. Specifically, by considering only the first leading SSA modes, we achieve an efficient de-noising of our environmental signals, highlighting the low-frequency variations together with some distinct scaling on sub-daily time-scales resembling

  10. Satellite observations of seasonal and regional variability of particulate organic carbon concentration in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Białogrodzka, Jagoda

    2016-04-01

    The Nordic and Barents Seas are of special interest for research on climate change, since they are located on the main pathway of the heat transported from low to high latitudes. Barents Sea is known to be an important area for formation of deep water and significant uptake from the atmosphere and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This region is characterized by supreme phytoplankton blooms and large amount of carbon is sequestered here due to biological processes. It is important to monitor the biological variability in this region in order to derive in depth understanding whether the size of carbon reservoirs and fluxes may vary as a result of climate change. In this presentation we analyze the 17 years (1998-2014) of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration derived from remotely sensed ocean color. POC concentrations in the Barents Sea are among the highest observed in the global ocean with monthly mean concentrations in May exceeding 300 mg m‑3. The seasonal amplitude of POC concentration in this region is larger when compared to other regions in the global ocean. Our results indicate that the seasonal increase in POC concentration is observed earlier in the year and higher concentrations are reached in the southeastern part of the Barents Sea in comparison to the southwestern part. Satellite data indicate that POC concentrations in the southern part of the Barents Sea tend to decrease in recent years, but longer time series of data are needed to confirm this observation. This work was funded by the Norway Grants (NCBR contract No. 201985, project NORDFLUX). Partial support for MS comes from the Institute of Oceanology (IO PAN).

  11. Variability of local PM10 mass concentrations in connection with blocking air circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ştefan, Sabina; Roman, Iuliana

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the temporal variability of Particulate Matter mass concentrations in connection with air circulation, for eight rural sites situated in the Central and Eastern parts of Europe. The stations from Poland, Hungary and Romania are rural stations without sources of pollutants. The analysis covers four winters, between December 2004 and February 2008. The pollution episodes were selected to explain air circulation influence. The results show that the causes of pollution were local, due to high mean sea level pressure and the blocking, as air circulation on large scale, was dominant in the cases of enhanced pollution in the selected area.

  12. Cloud-encounter and particle-concentration variabilities from GASP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastrom, G. D.; Holdeman, J. D.; Davis, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Summary statistics, tabulations, and variability studies are presented for cloud encounter and particle concentration data taken as part of the NASA global atmospheric sampling program. Cloud encounter was experienced in about 15 percent of the data samples; however, the percentage varies with season, latitude, and altitude (particularly distance from the tropopause). In agreement with classical storm models, the data show more clouds in the upper troposphere in anticyclones than in cyclones. The concentration of particles with a diameter greater than 3 micron also varies with time and location, depending primarily on the horizontal extent of cloudiness. Some examples of the application of the statistical data to the estimation of the frequency of cloud encounter and laminar flow loss to be expected on long range airline routes are also presented.

  13. Seasonal and nonseasonal variability of satellite-derived surface pigment concentration in the California Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strub, P. Ted; James, Corinne; Thomas, Andrew C.; Abbott, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The large-scale patterns of satellite-derived surface pigment concentration off the west coast of North America are presented and are averaged into monthly mean surface wind fields over the California Current system (CCS) for the July 1979 to June 1986 period. The patterns are discussed in terms of both seasonal and nonseasonal variability for the indicated time period. The large-scale seasonal characteristics of the California Current are summarized. The data and methods used are described, and the problems known to affect the satellite-derived pigment concentrations and the wind data used in the study are discussed. The statistical analysis results are then presented and discussed in light of past observations and theory. Details of the CZCS data processing are described, and details of the principal estimator pattern methodology used here are given.

  14. Analysis of the influence of rainfall variables on urban effluents concentrations and fluxes in wet weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooré Bi, Eustache; Monette, Frédéric; Gasperi, Johnny

    2015-04-01

    Urban rainfall runoff has been a topic of increasing importance over the past years, a result of both the increase in impervious land area arising from constant urban growth and the effects of climate change on urban drainage. The main goal of the present study is to assess and analyze the correlations between rainfall variables and common indicators of urban water quality, namely event mean concentrations (EMCs) and event fluxes (EFs), in order to identify and explain the impacts of each of the main rainfall variables on the generation process of urban pollutants during wet periods. To perform this analysis, runoff from eight summer rainfall events that resulted in combined sewer overflow (CSO) was sampled simultaneously from two distinct catchment areas in order to quantify discharges at the respective outfalls. Pearson statistical analysis of total suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand at 5 days (CBOD5), total phosphorus (Ptot) and total kedjal nitrogen (N-TKN) showed significant correlations (ρ = 0.05) between dry antecedent time (DAT) and EMCs on one hand, and between total rainfall (TR) and the volume discharged (VD) during EFs, on the other. These results show that individual rainfall variables strongly affect either EMCs or EFs and are good predictors to consider when selecting variables for statistical modeling of urban runoff quality. The results also show that in a combined sewer network, there is a linear relationship between TSS event fluxes and COD, CBOD5, Ptot, and N-TKN event fluxes; this explains 97% of the variability of these pollutants which adsorb onto TSS during wet weather, which therefore act as tracers. Consequently, the technological solution selected for TSS removal will also lead to a reduction of these pollutants. Given the huge volumes involved, urban runoffs contribute substantially to pollutant levels in receiving water bodies, a situation which, in a climate change context, may

  15. Factors controlling spatial variability of DOC concentrations in soil solution at European level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino Serrano, Marta; Janssens, Ivan; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Gielen, Bert; Guenet, Bertrand; De Vos, Bruno; Ciais, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    The lateral transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important and not well-understood process linking terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Up to day very few Earth System Models (ESMs) represent explicitly this process despite its crucial role in the global carbon cycle. However, to be able to integrate DOC leaching in ESMs, more accurate information is needed in order to better understand and predict DOC dynamics. DOC concentrations mainly vary by geographical location, soil and vegetation types, topography, season and climate. Within this framework, a database was designed to compile data on DOC in soil solution at different depths in different ecosystems around the world, with special focus on European sites. The database contains information on 349 sites, with 304 being forest, gathered from published literature and datasets accessible on the internet. A substantial dataset was provided by International Co-operative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP Forests). The database also includes other meta-data related to the sites, such as land cover, soil properties, climate, annual water balance and other soil solution parameters. The analysis of the database has been focused on: 1) the study of the environmental and physical factors that are acting as drivers of DOC concentrations changes in soil solution across sites at European level , and 2) the DOC distribution through the soil profile and how this varies with different vegetation types and soil properties. The preliminary results show that variables related to biological processes (Dry weight of the organic layer, for example) are the most important in explaining the spatial distribution of the DOC concentration in soil solution at the European scale. However, the interactions between variables are complex and we will need further analysis in order to draw more robust conclusions. With regards to the vertical profile of DOC, we found that there is a

  16. Temporal Variability of Stemflow Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) Concentrations and Quality from Morphologically Contrasting Deciduous Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stan, J. T.; Levia, D. F.; Inamdar, S. P.; Mitchell, M. J.; Mage, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) inputs from canopy-derived hydrologic fluxes play a significant role in the terrestrial carbon budgets of forested ecosystems. However, no studies known to the authors have examined the variability of both DOC concentrations and quality for stemflow across time scales, nor has any study to date evaluated the effects of canopy structure on stemflow DOC characteristics. This investigation seeks to rectify this knowledge gap by examining the variability of stemflow DOC concentrations and quality across contrasting canopy morphologies and time scales (seasonal, storm and intrastorm). Bulk and intrastorm stemflow samples from a less dense, rough-barked, more plagiophile (Liriodendron tulipifera L. (tulip poplar)) and a denser, thin-barked, more erectophile (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech)) canopy were collected and analyzed for DOC quality using metrics derived from UV-vis spectroscopy (E2:E3 ratio, SUVA254, select spectral slope (S), and spectral slope ratios (SR)). Our results suggest that stemflow DOC concentrations and quality change as crown architectural traits enhance or diminish hydrologic retention time within the canopy. The architecture of L. tulipifera canopies likely retards the flow of intercepted water, increasing chemical exchange with bark and foliar surfaces. UV-vis metrics indicated that this increased chemical exchange, particularly with bark surfaces, generally enhanced aromatic hydrocarbon content and increased molecular weight. Because leaf presence influenced DOC quality, stemflow DOC characteristics also varied seasonally in response to canopy condition. At the inter- and intrastorm scale, stemflow DOC concentration and quality varied with meteorological and antecedent canopy conditions. Since recent studies have linked stemflow production to preferential subsurface transport of dissolved chemistries, trends in DOC speciation and fluxes described in this study may impact soil environments within wooded

  17. Exceedance of PM10 and ozone concentration limits in Germany - Spatial variability and influence of climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Majana; Bernhofer, Christian

    2014-05-01

    High concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and ground-level ozone (O3) have negative impacts on human health, e.g., increased risk of respiratory disease, and the environment. European Union (EU) air policy and air quality standards led to continuously reduced air pollution problems in recent decades. Nevertheless, the limit values for PM10 (particles with diameter of 10 micrometers or less) and ozone - defined by the directive 2008/50/EC of the European Parliament - are still exceeded frequently. Poor air quality and the exceedance of limits result mainly from the combination of high emissions and unfavourable weather conditions. Datasets from German monitoring stations are used to describe the spatial and temporal variability of the exceedance of concentration limits for PM10 and ozone for the federal states of Germany. Time series are analysed for the period 2000-2012 for PM10 and for the period 1990-2012 for ozone. Furthermore, the influence of weather patterns on the exceedance of concentration limits on a regional scale was investigated. Here, the "objective weather types" of the German Weather Service were used. As expected, for most regions anticyclonic weather types (with a negative cyclonality index for the two levels 950 and 500 hPa) show a high frequency on exeedance days, both for PM10 and ozone. The results could contribute to estimate the future exceedance frequency of concentration limits and to develop possible countermeasures.

  18. Altered heart-rate variability in asthmatic and healthy volunteers exposed to concentrated ambient coarse particles.

    PubMed

    Gong, Henry; Linn, William S; Terrell, Sheryl L; Clark, Kenneth W; Geller, Michael D; Anderson, Karen R; Cascio, Wayne E; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2004-06-01

    Twelve mildly asthmatic and four healthy adults were exposed to filtered air (FA) and concentrated ambient coarse particles (CCP) supplied to a whole-body exposure chamber via a coarse particle concentrator with 15 parallel virtual impactors. Exposures were conducted in a Los Angeles suburb with high levels of motor-vehicle pollution and lasted 2 h with intermittent exercise. Mean CCP concentration was 157 microg/m(3) (range: 56-218 microg/m(3)) measured by continuous monitoring with a tapered-element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). On average, 80% of mass was coarse (2.5-10 microm aerodynamic diameter) and the rest <2.5 microm. Relative to FA, CCP exposure did not significantly alter respiratory symptoms, spirometry, arterial oxygen saturation, or airway inflammation according to exhaled nitric oxide and total and differential cell counts of induced sputum. After CCP exposure, Holter electrocardiograms showed small (p <.05) increases in heart rate and decreases in heart-rate variability, which were larger in healthy than in asthmatic subjects. Cardiac ectopy did not increase. In conclusion, acute exposure to elevated concentrations of ambient coarse particles elicited no obvious pulmonary effects but appeared to alter the autonomic nervous system of the heart in adult volunteers. PMID:15204749

  19. Improving the Accuracy of Laplacian Estimation with Novel Variable Inter-Ring Distances Concentric Ring Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Besio, Walter G

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive concentric ring electrodes are a promising alternative to conventional disc electrodes. Currently, the superiority of tripolar concentric ring electrodes over disc electrodes, in particular, in accuracy of Laplacian estimation, has been demonstrated in a range of applications. In our recent work, we have shown that accuracy of Laplacian estimation can be improved with multipolar concentric ring electrodes using a general approach to estimation of the Laplacian for an (n + 1)-polar electrode with n rings using the (4n + 1)-point method for n ≥ 2. This paper takes the next step toward further improving the Laplacian estimate by proposing novel variable inter-ring distances concentric ring electrodes. Derived using a modified (4n + 1)-point method, linearly increasing and decreasing inter-ring distances tripolar (n = 2) and quadripolar (n = 3) electrode configurations are compared to their constant inter-ring distances counterparts. Finite element method modeling and analytic results are consistent and suggest that increasing inter-ring distances electrode configurations may decrease the truncation error resulting in more accurate Laplacian estimates compared to respective constant inter-ring distances configurations. For currently used tripolar electrode configuration, the truncation error may be decreased more than two-fold, while for the quadripolar configuration more than a six-fold decrease is expected. PMID:27294933

  20. Improving the Accuracy of Laplacian Estimation with Novel Variable Inter-Ring Distances Concentric Ring Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Besio, Walter G.

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive concentric ring electrodes are a promising alternative to conventional disc electrodes. Currently, the superiority of tripolar concentric ring electrodes over disc electrodes, in particular, in accuracy of Laplacian estimation, has been demonstrated in a range of applications. In our recent work, we have shown that accuracy of Laplacian estimation can be improved with multipolar concentric ring electrodes using a general approach to estimation of the Laplacian for an (n + 1)-polar electrode with n rings using the (4n + 1)-point method for n ≥ 2. This paper takes the next step toward further improving the Laplacian estimate by proposing novel variable inter-ring distances concentric ring electrodes. Derived using a modified (4n + 1)-point method, linearly increasing and decreasing inter-ring distances tripolar (n = 2) and quadripolar (n = 3) electrode configurations are compared to their constant inter-ring distances counterparts. Finite element method modeling and analytic results are consistent and suggest that increasing inter-ring distances electrode configurations may decrease the truncation error resulting in more accurate Laplacian estimates compared to respective constant inter-ring distances configurations. For currently used tripolar electrode configuration, the truncation error may be decreased more than two-fold, while for the quadripolar configuration more than a six-fold decrease is expected. PMID:27294933

  1. Bisphenol A and phthalate metabolite urinary concentrations: Daily and across pregnancy variability

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Mandy; Arbuckle, Tye E; Mallick, Ranjeeta; LeBlanc, Alain; Hauser, Russ; Feeley, Mark; Koniecki, Diane; Ramsay, Tim; Provencher, Gilles; Bérubé, René; Walker, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) are high production volume and ubiquitous chemicals that are quickly metabolized in the body. Traditionally, studies have relied on single spot urine analyses to assess exposure; ignoring variability in concentrations throughout a day or over a longer period of time. We compared BPA and phthalate metabolite results from urine samples collected at five different time points. Participants (n=80) were asked to collect all voids in a 24 h period on a weekday and then again on a weekend before 20 weeks of pregnancy. During the second and third trimesters and in the postpartum period, single spot urines were collected. Variability over time in urinary concentrations was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the sensitivity to correctly classify a single sample as high or low versus the geometric mean (GM) of all samples was calculated. We found low reproducibility and sensitivity of BPA and all phthalate metabolites throughout pregnancy and into the postpartum period but much higher reproducibility within a day. Time of day when the urine was collected was a significant predictor of specific gravity adjusted exposure levels. We concluded that, if the interest is in average exposures across pregnancy, maternal/fetal exposure estimation may be more accurate if multiple measurements, collected across the course of the entire pregnancy, rather than a single spot measure, are performed. PMID:25248937

  2. Variability of aerosol particle number concentrations observed over the western Pacific in the spring of 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegawa, N.; Moteki, N.; Oshima, N.; Koike, M.; Kita, K.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Kondo, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosols were conducted over the western Pacific in the spring of 2009 during the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) aircraft campaign. The A-FORCE flights intensively covered an important vertical-latitudinal range in the outflow region of East Asia (0-9 km altitude; 27°N-38°N). This paper presents the variability of aerosol particle number concentrations obtained by condensation particle counters and a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), with the focus on those in the free troposphere. The number concentration data include total condensation nuclei with particle diameters (dp) larger than 10 nm (total CN10), PM0.17-CN10 (dp ~10-130 nm), and SP2 black carbon (NBC; dp ~75-850 nm). Large increases in total CN10 that were not associated with NBC were observed in the free troposphere, suggesting influences from new particle formation (NPF). Statistical characteristics of total CN10, PM0.17-CN10, and NBC in the lower troposphere (LT; 0-3 km), middle troposphere (MT; 3-6 km), and upper troposphere (UT; 6-9 km) are investigated. The correlation between total CN10 and NBC, along with the ratio of PM0.17 to total CN10 and carbon monoxide mixing ratio (CO), is used to interpret the observed variability. The median concentrations of total CN10 and PM0.17-CN10 in the UT were higher than those in the MT by a factor of ~1.4 and ~1.6, respectively. We attribute the enhancements of CN10 in the UT to NPF. Possible mechanisms affecting NPF in the free troposphere are discussed.

  3. Cadmium concentrations in new zealand pastures: relationships to soil and climate variables.

    PubMed

    Reiser, René; Simmler, Michael; Portmann, Denise; Clucas, Lynne; Schulin, Rainer; Robinson, Brett

    2014-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a nonessential element that occurs at above-background concentrations in many New Zealand (NZ) soils. Most of this Cd is due to the historical application of single superphosphate that was made from Nauru phosphate rock containing between 400 and 600 mg Cd kg P. Pasture Cd uptake exacerbates the entry of Cd into animal products. We sought to determine the critical environmental factors affecting Cd uptake in NZ pastures and to calculate the likely Cd intake of sheep and cattle. We tested 69 pastures throughout NZ for a range of variables, including Cd. Soil Cd and pasture Cd were positively correlated with soil P and soil concentrations of other elements found in phosphate fertilizers. We found that no single environmental variable adequately predicted pasture Cd uptake. Nevertheless, pseudo-total soil Cd and Cd extracted using a 0.05 mol L Ca(NO) solution were positively correlated with pasture Cd. Although soil pH, soil Fe, and soil Cd provided an excellent predictor of the Ca(NO)-extractable soil Cd fraction, regression models explained just 38% of the variation of the Cd concentration in pasture grasses. Incorporating the effect of pasture species composition is a crucial next step in improving these models. A calculation of the likely exposure to Cd of sheep and cattle revealed that no pastures tested resulted in sheep and cattle ingesting Cd at a rate that would result in breaching muscle-tissue food standards. For offal products, which the NZ meat industry does not sell for human consumption, food safety standards exceedence was calculated in a few cases. PMID:25602820

  4. Point source pollution and variability of nitrate concentrations in water from shallow aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemčić-Jurec, Jasna; Jazbec, Anamarija

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the several major sources of nitrate pollution, and therefore the EU Nitrate Directive, designed to decrease pollution, has been implemented. Point sources like septic systems and broken sewage systems also contribute to water pollution. Pollution of groundwater by nitrate from 19 shallow wells was studied in a typical agricultural region, middle Podravina, in northwest Croatia. The concentration of nitrate ranged from <0.1 to 367 mg/l in water from wells, and 29.8 % of 253 total samples were above maximum acceptable value of 50 mg/l (MAV). Among regions R1-R6, there was no statistically significant difference in nitrate concentrations (F = 1.98; p = 0.15) during the years 2002-2007. Average concentrations of nitrate in all 19 wells for all the analyzed years were between recommended limit value of 25 mg/l (RLV) and MAV except in 2002 (concentration was under RLV). The results of the repeated measures ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between the wells at the point source distance (proximity) of <10 m, compared to the wells at the point source distance of >20 m (F = 10.6; p < 0.001). Average annual concentrations of nitrate during the years studied are not statistically different, but interaction between proximity and years is statistically significant (F = 2.07; p = 0.04). Results of k-means clustering confirmed division into four clusters according to the pollution. Principal component analysis showed that there is only one significant factor, proximity, which explains 91.6 % of the total variability of nitrate. Differences in water quality were found as a result of different environmental factors. These results will contribute to the implementation of the Nitrate Directive in Croatia and the EU.

  5. Variability and Predictors of Urinary Concentrations of Phthalate Metabolites during Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The variability and predictors of urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites in preschool-aged children have not been thoroughly examined. Additionally, the impact of temporal changes in the use and restriction of phthalates in children’s products has not been assessed. Our objective was to identify demographic, behavioral, and temporal predictors of urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations in young children. Between 2004 and 2011, we collected up to five urine samples from each of 296 children participating in a prospective birth cohort during annual study visits at ages 1–5 years. We used linear mixed models to calculate intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), a measure of within-individual reproducibility, and identify demographic predictors of urinary phthalate metabolites. We used multivariable linear regression to examine cross-sectional relationships between food packaging or personal care product use and phthalate metabolites measured at age 5 years. Across annual measurements, monoethyl phthalate exhibited the least variation (ICC = 0.38), while di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (ΣDEHP) metabolites exhibited the most variation (ICC = 0.09). Concentrations changed with age, suggesting age-related changes in phthalate exposure and perhaps metabolism. Our findings suggest that fast food consumption may be a source of butylbenzyl phthalate and di-isononyl phthalate (DiNP) exposure, and some personal care products may be sources of diethyl phthalate exposure. Concentrations of ΣDEHP metabolites decreased over the study period; however, concentrations of DiNP metabolites increased. This finding suggests that manufacturer practices and regulations, like the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, may decrease DEHP exposure, but additional work characterizing the nature and toxicity of replacements is critically needed. PMID:24977926

  6. Temporal variability of nutrient concentrations in the northwestern Mediterranean sea (DYFAMED time-series station)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqueron de Fommervault, Orens; Migon, Christophe; D`Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Ribera d'Alcalà, Maurizio; Coppola, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    Nitrate, phosphate, and silicate concentration profiles were measured at monthly frequency at the DYFAMED time-series station (central Ligurian Sea) between 1991 and 2011. The resulting data set, which constitutes the longest open-ocean time-series in the Mediterranean Sea, underwent quality control. A reproducible climatological pattern was observed with an unprecedented resolution, confirming the typical seasonal cycle of mid-latitudes. In summer and autumn, when the water mass is well stratified, i.e. the mixed layer depth (MLD) is shallow, nutrient concentrations in surface are very low or under the detection limit. In winter, as a result of the MLD extent, nutrients are supplied to the surface layer. Then, nutrient concentrations progressively decrease during spring. MLD appears to play a key role in controlling nutrient availability in the surface layer, but a direct, quantitative relationship between MLD and nutrient concentrations is difficult to establish due to undersampling. Regarding nutrient molar ratios (N:P, Si:N, and Si:P), results show anomalous values compared to those of other oceanic regions, presumably due to strong influence of external sources. As a consequence, nutrient molar ratios exhibit a seasonal pattern, with, in particular, an increase of the N:P ratio in condition of stratification. Over the period 1991-2011, the DYFAMED data set reveals decadal trends in nitrate and phosphate concentrations in deep waters (+0.23% and -0.62%, respectively) resulting in increasing N:P and Si:P ratios (+1.14% and +0.85% per year, respectively). Such a long-term variability is presumably related to changes in water mass and/or changes in external sources, even if it is difficult to assess due to not enough concomitant data from atmospheric and riverine inputs.

  7. Variability of concentration and composition of hydrocarbons in frontal zones of the Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    The distribution and composition of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HC) in dissolved and particulate forms, as well as in bottom sediments, was studied along the route of a vessel and at stations. It was found that the widest variability of HC concentrations in surface waters was characteristic for the frontal zones of the Yenisei River mouth (4.8-69 µg/L) and for the western branch of the St. Anna Trough (5.5-80.4 µg/L). The increased concentrations of aliphatic HC coincide with those of chlorophyll and particulate matter, as well as with the growth of the intensity of fluorescence, and are caused by natural processes. This is confirmed by HC composition. Bottom sediments are characterized by low HC concentrations, both in terms of dry mass (14 µg/g on average, with the maximum of 36.8 µg/g at station 5018 in the layer of 3-17 cm) and within Corg compositions (0.88%). Natural terrigenous homologues are prevailing in alkane composition of the sediments. The marginal filters of the Ob and Yenisei rivers were compared. It is shown that oil HC transferred by the rivers are deposited in the zone of marginal filters without reaching the open waters of the Kara Sea.

  8. Variability in Saponin Content, Cancer Antiproliferative Activity and Physicochemical Properties of Concentrated Agave Sap.

    PubMed

    Santos-Zea, Liliana; Rosas-Pérez, Aratza Mireya; Leal-Díaz, Ana María; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A

    2016-08-01

    Concentrated agave sap (CAS) has gained popularity as an unrefined sweetener. It is obtained by boiling "aguamiel" that contains phytochemicals with diverse bioactivities. Saponins have been the most widely studied agave phytochemicals due to their cancer antiproliferative effect but their concentration may vary due to maturity of the agave plant and collection site. In this study, 18 CAS samples produced in different states of Mexico were analyzed using multivariate methods to determine which physicochemical or phytochemical parameters were responsible for variation. Additionally, extracts with different saponin profiles were tested to determine possible correlations with antiproliferative activity. Total soluble solids, pH, and water activity were similar to those reported for other agave sweeteners. Antioxidant capacity of samples was correlated to browning index. Eleven steroidal saponins were found in CAS samples and they were the main source of variability. Magueyoside B, a kammogenin tetraglycoside, was the most abundant saponin in all samples. With respect to bioactivity, multivariate analysis indicated that magueyoside B and a gentrogenin tetraglycoside were compounds strongly related with bioactivity. CAS from Hidalgo, Puebla, and Veracruz had higher concentration of magueyoside B than from the other kamogenin tetraglycoside found in the samples from other Mexican states. These results could be used as a first approach to characterize and standardize CAS to validate the potential health benefits derived from its consumption. PMID:27376349

  9. Food safety objectives should integrate the variability of the concentration of pathogen.

    PubMed

    Rieu, Emilie; Duhem, Koenraad; Vindel, Elisabeth; Sanaa, Moez

    2007-04-01

    The World Trade Organization introduced the concept of appropriate level of protection (ALOP) as a public health target. For this public health objective to be interpretable by the actors in the food chain, the concept of food safety objective (FSO) was proposed by the International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods and adopted later by the Codex Alimentarius Food Hygiene Committee. The way to translate an ALOP into a FSO is still in debate. The purpose of this article is to develop a methodological tool to derive a FSO from an ALOP being expressed as a maximal annual marginal risk. We explore the different models relating the annual marginal risk to the parameters of the FSO depending on whether the variability in the survival probability and in the concentration of the pathogen are considered or not. If they are not, determination of the FSO is straightforward. If they are, we propose to use stochastic Monte Carlo simulation models and logistic discriminant analysis in order to determine which sets of parameters are compatible with the ALOP. The logistic discriminant function was chosen such that the kappa coefficient is maximized. We illustrate this method by the example of the risks of listeriosis and salmonellosis in one type of soft cheese. We conclude that the definition of the FSO should integrate three dimensions: the prevalence of contamination, the average concentration per contaminated typical serving, and the dispersion of the concentration among those servings. PMID:17511704

  10. Long-term variability of surface nutrient concentrations in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunaka, S.; Ono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Whitney, F. A.; Wada, C.; Murata, A.; Nakaoka, S.; Hosoda, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present the spatial distributions and temporal changes of the long-term variability of surface nutrient concentrations in the North Pacific by using nutrient samples collected by volunteer ships and research vessels from 1961 to 2012. Nutrient samples are optimally interpolated onto 1° × 1° monthly grid boxes. When the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is in its positive phase, nutrient concentrations in the western North Pacific are significantly higher than the climatological means, and those in the eastern North Pacific are significantly lower. When the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation is in its positive phase, nutrient concentrations in the subarctic are significantly higher than the climatological means. The trends of phosphate and silicate averaged over the North Pacific are -0.012 ± 0.005 µmol l-1 decade-1 and -0.38 ± 0.13 µmol l-1 decade-1, whereas the nitrate trend is not significant (0.01 ± 0.13 µmol l-1 decade-1).

  11. Tetrodotoxin Concentrations in Pleurobranchaea maculata: Temporal, Spatial and Individual Variability from New Zealand Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Susanna A.; Taylor, David I.; McNabb, Paul; Walker, Jarrod; Adamson, Janet; Cary, Stephen Craig

    2012-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin that has been identified in a range of phylogenetically unrelated marine and terrestrial organisms. Tetrodotoxin was recently detected in New Zealand in Pleurobranchaea maculata (the grey side-gilled sea slug). From June 2010 to June 2011 wild specimens were collected from 10 locations around New Zealand. At one site (Narrow Neck Beach, Auckland) up to 10 individuals were collected monthly for 6 months. Attempts were also made to rear P. maculata in captivity. Tetrodotoxin was detected in samples from eight of the ten sites. The highest average (368.7 mg kg−1) and maximum (1414.0 mg kg−1) concentrations were measured in samples from Illiomama Rock (Auckland). Of the toxic populations tested there was significant variability in TTX concentrations among individuals, with the highest difference (62 fold) measured at Illiomama Rock. Tetrodotoxin concentrations in samples from Narrow Neck Beach varied temporally, ranging from an average of 184 mg kg−1 in June 2010 to 17.5 mg kg−1 by December 2010. There was no correlation between TTX levels and mass. The highest levels correspond with the egg laying season (June–August) and this, in concert with the detection of high levels of TTX in eggs and early larval stages, suggests that TTX may have a defensive function in P. maculata. Only one larva was successfully reared to full maturation and no TTX was detected. PMID:22363228

  12. Estimating spatiotemporal variability of ambient air pollutant concentrations with a hierarchical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianfa; Wu, Jun; Ghosh, Jo Kay; Ritz, Beate

    2013-06-01

    Studies have linked exposure to air pollutants to short-term and sub-chronic health outcomes. However, individual-level air pollution exposure is difficult to measure at a high spatial and temporal resolution and for larger populations due to limitations in sampling techniques. We presented a hierarchical model to capture spatiotemporal variability of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) concentrations in Southern California by combining high temporal resolution data from routine monitoring stations with high spatial resolution data from investigator-initiated episodic measurements. In this model, the spatiotemporal field of concentrations was first decomposed into a mean and residual and the mean representing the seasonal trend was further decomposed into a constant and varying temporal basis functions. The mean of the spatially varying coefficients of temporal basis functions were modeled by local covariates using non-linear generalized additive model and least square fitting using measurements from both routine monitoring and additional episodic sampling locations, while the spatially-correlated residuals of the coefficients were co-kriged. We found traffic, land-use and wind accounted for a large portion of the variance (beyond 35%) for the long-term average trend of concentrations. Spatial residuals accounted for a large portion of the variance of the temporal components (about 30% for NO2 and 20% for NOx). Leave-one-out cross validation produced an R2 of 0.84 for NO2 and 0.81 for NOx when comparing the modeled weekly concentration with the observed trends at all routine monitoring stations.

  13. Methane and Nitrous Oxide Temporal and Spatial Variability in Midwestern Streams Containing High Nitrate Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. L.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Interest in greenhouse gases in fluvial environments, e.g. CH4 and N2O, is increasing in relation to atmospheric gas budgets and the relative contribution of streams to drivers of global climate change. Typically these gases are examined individually in environments in which each is expected to be dominant; however their co-occurrence and potential interactions may be important. Spatial and temporal variability of CH4 and N2O concentrations were measured in 2 nitrate-rich (40-1200 μM) streams draining >90% agricultural land use in the Midwestern USA and that differed ~12-fold in flow. Long-term (biweekly), short-term (hourly), and transport-oriented (Lagrangian) sampling approaches were compared. Dissolved gas concentrations exceeded atmospheric equilibrium values up to 700x and 16x, for CH4 and N2O, respectively. Mean concentrations were higher in the larger stream than in the smaller stream. In both streams, CH4 was negatively correlated with flow and nitrate while N2O was positively correlated. N2O was generally constant with transport (21 km) in the small stream, with variation in localized reaches, and increased somewhat in May/June in the larger stream (38 km), but not during September base flow. Base flow transport trends for CH4 were similar to N2O in both streams. In the small stream, substantial diel fluctuations were evident in CH4 concentrations and N2O δ18O values, with more subtle fluctuations in CH4 isotopes (δ2H & δ13C), N2O concentrations, and N2O δ15N values. Seasonal mean total (CH4 + N2O) areal emission rates, expressed as CO2 warming potential equivalents, were similar for the two streams, but the total reach-scale emission rate for the larger stream was about 2x that of the smaller stream (15.4 vs 8.3 kg CO2 km-1 day-1, respectively). The CH4 contribution to this flux was 12-30%, despite the relatively high nitrate and oxygen concentrations in the streams, indicating contributions from groundwater or subsurface sediment reactions.

  14. Tropospheric carbon monoxide concentrations and variability on Venus from Venus Express/VIRTIS-M observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Constantine C. C.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Wilson, Colin F.; Taylor, Fredric W.; Lee, Chris; de Kok, Remco; Drossart, Pierre; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Bezard, Bruno; Calcutt, Simon

    2008-10-01

    We present nightside observations of tropospheric carbon monoxide in the southern hemisphere near the 35 km height level, the first from Venus Express/Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS)-M-IR. VIRTIS-M data from 2.18 to 2.50 μm, with a spectral resolution of 10 nm, were used in the analysis. Spectra were binned, with widths ranging from 5 to 30 spatial pixels, to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, while at the same time reducing the total number of retrievals required for complete spatial coverage. We calculate the mean abundance for carbon monoxide at the equator to be 23 +/- 2 ppm. The CO concentration increases toward the poles, peaking at a latitude of approximately 60°S, with a mean value of 32 +/- 2 ppm. This 40% equator-to-pole increase is consistent with the values found by Collard et al. (1993) from Galileo/NIMS observations. Observations suggest an overturning in this CO gradient past 60°S, declining to abundances seen in the midlatitudes. Zonal variability in this peak value has also been measured, varying on the order of 10% (~3 ppm) at different longitudes on a latitude circle. The zonal variability of the CO abundance has possible implications for the lifetime of CO and its dynamics in the troposphere. This work has definitively established a distribution of tropospheric CO, which is consistent with a Hadley cell circulation, and placed limits on the latitudinal extent of the cell.

  15. The Influence of Atmospheric CO2 Concentration and Climate Variability on Amazon Tropical Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanho, A. D. D. A.; Galbraith, D.; Zhang, K.; Coe, M. T.; Costa, M. H.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical forests are important regulators of atmospheric CO2 concentration and any change in tropical forest C balance will directly affect global climate. Long term studies from undisturbed old-growth forest monitoring sites distributed across Amazonia have presented an overall increase in aboveground biomass in the last decades, and the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations is considered the main driver for this observed carbon sink. The main goal of this work was to use simulations from dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM) to explore how much of the observed historical (1970-2008) increase in biomass in undisturbed tropical forest in Amazonia could be attributed to the CO2 fertilization effect or associated to climate change. We compared simulated biomass and productivity from three DGVMs (IBIS, ED2 and JULES) with observations from forest plots (RAINFOR). The analyses helped clarify the variability of historical and potential future simulations.The analyses showed that models shared similar results and deficiencies. The three models represented the two major model types: conventional dynamic global vegetation models that simulate community dynamics and competition between plant functional types (PFTs) using an aggregated 'big-leaf' representation (IBIS and Jules), and a size-and-age structured terrestrial ecosystem model that captures individual scale dynamics and competition (ED2). In general, the ED2 model results were more sensitive to climate, but all models greatly underestimate the impact of extreme climatic events (e.g. drought) compared to field data.All the DGVM's studied tend to simulate the average biomass well and to overestimate productivity of vegetation under current conditions. All the models presented very low spatial variability compared to field observation. The lack of spatial variability of biomass and productivity is attributed to the lack of nutrient and residence time spatial heterogeneity. All of the DGVMs results suggest that

  16. Effects of the interannual variability in chlorophyll concentrations on sea surface temperatures in the east tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinfeng; Liu, Hailong; Lin, Pengfei; Zhan, Haigang

    2015-10-01

    The effects of interannual variability in chlorophyll concentrations on sea surface temperatures in the east tropical Indian Ocean (ETIO) during two positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events (in the boreal fall of 1997 and 2006) are investigated; this is done through two ocean model experiments, one with and one without the interannual variability of chlorophyll concentrations. A comparison of the two chlorophyll perturbation experiments reveals that, in contrast to the cooling effects at the seasonal time scale, increased chlorophyll concentrations during positive IOD events lead to an increase in the sea surface temperatures within the ETIO. Although upward velocity is enhanced (with a cooling effect), this does not counterbalance the increase in solar heating caused by the increased chlorophyll concentrations. This interannual variability of chlorophyll concentrations in the ETIO could reduce the amplitude of the IOD by about 6%.

  17. Effect of anionic surfactant concentration on the variable range hopping conduction in polypyrrole nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawal, Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of charge transport in polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles prepared with different concentrations (5 to 30 mM) of anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) is reported. Transmission electron microscopy technique confirms the formation of PPy nanoparticles of sizes ˜52 to 28 nm under surfactant directed approach. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the prepared nanoparticles found to increase from 3 to 22 S/cm with surfactant concentration. The temperature dependent activation energy rules out the possibility of band conduction mechanism in the prepared PPy nanoparticles and thus the synthesized nanoparticles are analyzed under variable range hopping (VRH) model for conduction mechanism. The PPy nanoparticles, reduced with liquid ammonia, hold 3D VRH conduction mechanism for the charge transport. However, in the doped samples, some deviation from 3D VRH conduction behavior at higher temperatures (>150 K) has been observed. This may be attributed to the presence of anionic surfactant in these samples. The doping of anionic surfactant causes rise in conducting islands, which may lead to the change in the shape/distribution of density of states governed by Gaussian or exponential type near Fermi level.

  18. Temporal Variability of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (PBDE) Serum Concentrations over One Year

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardant chemicals used in consumer products. They are common contaminants in human serum and associated with adverse health effects. Our objectives were to characterize PBDE serum concentrations in a New England cohort and assess temporal variability of this exposure biomarker over a one-year period. We collected three repeated measurements at six-month intervals from 52 office workers from the greater Boston (MA, United States) area from 2010 to 2011. The intraclass correlation coefficient for BDEs 28, 47, 99, 100, and 153 ranged from 0.87 to 0.99, indicating that a single serum measurement can reliably estimate exposure over a one-year period. This was true for both lipid adjusted and nonlipid adjusted concentrations. The kappa statistics, quantifying the level of agreement of categorical exposure classification, based on medians, tertiles, or quartiles ranged from 0.67 to 0.90. Some congeners showed nonsignificant increases from sampling round 1 (winter) to round 2 (summer) and significant decreases from round 2 to round 3 (winter). This study highlights the high reliability of a single serum PBDE measurement for use in human epidemiologic studies. PMID:25383963

  19. Temporal variability of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) serum concentrations over one year.

    PubMed

    Makey, Colleen M; McClean, Michael D; Sjödin, Andreas; Weinberg, Janice; Carignan, Courtney C; Webster, Thomas F

    2014-12-16

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardant chemicals used in consumer products. They are common contaminants in human serum and associated with adverse health effects. Our objectives were to characterize PBDE serum concentrations in a New England cohort and assess temporal variability of this exposure biomarker over a one-year period. We collected three repeated measurements at six-month intervals from 52 office workers from the greater Boston (MA, United States) area from 2010 to 2011. The intraclass correlation coefficient for BDEs 28, 47, 99, 100, and 153 ranged from 0.87 to 0.99, indicating that a single serum measurement can reliably estimate exposure over a one-year period. This was true for both lipid adjusted and nonlipid adjusted concentrations. The kappa statistics, quantifying the level of agreement of categorical exposure classification, based on medians, tertiles, or quartiles ranged from 0.67 to 0.90. Some congeners showed nonsignificant increases from sampling round 1 (winter) to round 2 (summer) and significant decreases from round 2 to round 3 (winter). This study highlights the high reliability of a single serum PBDE measurement for use in human epidemiologic studies. PMID:25383963

  20. Seasonal variability of soil-gas radon concentration in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.; Minissale, A.

    1994-01-01

    Radon concentrations in soil gas were measured by the track-etch method in 60 shallow holes, each 70 cm deep and supported by a capped plastic tube, along several major faults in central California during 1975-1985. This set of data was analyzed to investigate the seasonal variability of soil-gas radon concentration in an area which has various geological conditions but similar climate. The results show several different patterns of seasonal variations, but all of which can be largely attributed to the water-saturation and moisture-retention characteristics of the shallow part of the soil. During the rainy winter and spring seasons, radon tended to be confined underground by the water-saturated surface soil which had much reduced gas permeability, while during the sunny summer and autumn seasons, it exhaled more readily as the soil became drier and more permeable. At several sites located on creeping faults, the radon-variation patterns changed with time, possibly because of disturbance of site condition by fault movement. ?? 1994.

  1. Effect of anionic surfactant concentration on the variable range hopping conduction in polypyrrole nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2014-01-28

    The mechanism of charge transport in polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles prepared with different concentrations (5 to 30 mM) of anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) is reported. Transmission electron microscopy technique confirms the formation of PPy nanoparticles of sizes ∼52 to 28 nm under surfactant directed approach. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the prepared nanoparticles found to increase from 3 to 22 S/cm with surfactant concentration. The temperature dependent activation energy rules out the possibility of band conduction mechanism in the prepared PPy nanoparticles and thus the synthesized nanoparticles are analyzed under variable range hopping (VRH) model for conduction mechanism. The PPy nanoparticles, reduced with liquid ammonia, hold 3D VRH conduction mechanism for the charge transport. However, in the doped samples, some deviation from 3D VRH conduction behavior at higher temperatures (>150 K) has been observed. This may be attributed to the presence of anionic surfactant in these samples. The doping of anionic surfactant causes rise in conducting islands, which may lead to the change in the shape/distribution of density of states governed by Gaussian or exponential type near Fermi level.

  2. Urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations among pregnant women in Northern Puerto Rico: Distribution, temporal variability, and predictors

    PubMed Central

    Cantonwine, David E.; Cordero, José F.; Rivera-González, Luis O.; Del Toro, Liza V. Anzalota; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Calafat, Antonia M.; Crespo, Noe; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio; Padilla, Ingrid Y.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.; Meeker, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Phthalate contamination exists in the North coast karst aquifer system in Puerto Rico. In light of potential health impacts associated with phthalate exposure, targeted action for elimination of exposure sources may be warranted, especially for sensitive populations such as pregnant women. However, information on exposure to phthalates from a variety of sources in Puerto Rico is lacking. The objective of this study was to determine concentrations and predictors of urinary phthalate biomarkers measured at multiple times during pregnancy among women living in the Northern karst area of Puerto Rico. Methods We recruited 139 pregnant women in Northern Puerto Rico and collected urine samples and questionnaire data at three separate visits (18±2 weeks, 22±2 weeks, and 26±2 weeks of gestation). Urine samples were analyzed for eleven phthalate metabolites: mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate, mono-2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl phthalate, mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate, mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-n-butyl phthalate, mono-benzyl phthalate, mono-isobutyl phthalate, mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP), mono carboxyisononyl phthalate (MCNP), and mono carboxyisooctyl phthalate (MCOP). Results Detectable concentrations of phthalate metabolites among pregnant women living in Puerto Rico was prevalent, and metabolite concentrations tended to be higher than or similar to those measured in women of reproductive age from the general US population. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from very weak (MCNP; 0.05) to moderate (MEP; 0.44) reproducibility among all phthalate metabolites. We observed significant or suggestive positive associations between urinary phthalate metabolites concentrations and water usage/storage habits (MEP, MCNP, MCOP), use of personal care products (MEP), and consumption of certain food items (MCPP, MCNP, and MCOP). Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first study to report concentrations

  3. What has driven the interannual variability of atmospheric methane concentrations over the last three decades?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulon, A.; Stenke, A.; Peter, T.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most anthropogenic greenhouse gas (IPCC, 2013). Observations of methane concentrations at the surface from the last three decades show puzzling fluctuations; from the early 1980s they indicate a nearly constant increase of 8.7 ppbv/year until 2000, including a slowdown after 1990. After a period of about eight years with near zero growh rates, methane concentrations have again been rising since 2007 (Sussmann et al., 2012). Simulations forced with prescribed meteorological fields have been performed for the 1980-2010 period using the chemistry-climate model (CCM) SOCOL. 48 methane tracers have been included in SOCOL and used together with flux boundary conditions for CH4 to allow the tracking of methane emissions from different source categories, such as wetlands, rice paddies, ruminants, industry…, as well as geographical regions. These new simulations provide an innovative way to better understand methane variability, both in terms of emission changes and changes in tropospheric OH, which is investigated with a tracer based on methyl chloroform emissions. An analysis of the tracers elucidates the impact of different emission source categories for different time periods. For 1980-1990, positive gobal methane growth rates result from increasing anthropogenic emissions over Europe, India, and China. A decrease of anthropogenic emissions over Europe after 1990 is consistent with the slow down in the global methane growth rate for 1990-2000. During this period short-lived events such as the eruption of Mount Pinatubo and the strong 1997-1998 El-Niño also affect global methane concentrations, largely by a decrease in wetlands emissions during 1992 and high levels of biomass burning in tropical Asia, respectively. The near-zero trend is maintained after 2000 because of reduced natural emissions, again from wetlands. After 2005, our simulations show a positive global methane growth rate, in agreement with the observations, due

  4. Spatial and temporal variability of daily precipitation concentration in the Lancang River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wanli; Yu, Xuezhong; Liao, Wengen; Wang, Ying; Jia, Baozhen

    2013-07-01

    The Lorenz Curve, a concept used in economic theory, is used to quantify spatial-temporal variability in the daily time series of precipitation concentrations. The Lorenz Curve provides a graphical view of the cumulative percentage of total yearly precipitation. In addition, further extraction of the data using the Gini coefficient and Lorenz asymmetry coefficient provides a two-parameter measure of precipitation concentration and an explanation of the basis for the underlying inequalities in precipitation distribution. Based on the calculation of the precipitation concentration index (CI) and the Lorenz asymmetry coefficient (S) values from 1960 to 2010, variations in the trends and periodic temporal-spatial patterns of precipitation at 31 stations across the Lancang River basin are discussed. The results are as follows: (1) highest precipitation CI values occurred in the southern Lancang River basin, whereas the lowest precipitation CI values were mainly observed in the upper reaches of the Lancang River basin, which features a more homogeneous temporal distribution of rainfall. S values throughout the entire basin were less than one, indicating that minor precipitation events have the highest contribution to overall precipitation inequality. (2) Application of the Mann-Kendall test revealed that a significant, decreasing trend in precipitation CI that exceeding the 95th percentile was detected in the upper and middle reaches of the Lancang River basin. However, there was only one significant (0.05) S value trend throughout the river. (3) Climate jumps in annual CI occurred during the early 1960s, 1970s and 1980s at Jinghong, Deqin and Zaduo stations, respectively. (4) Dominant periodic variations in precipitation CI, with periods of 4-17 years, were found. These results allow for an improved understanding of extreme climate events and improved river basin water resource management.

  5. Temporal Variability of Pesticide Concentrations in Homes and Implications for Attenuation Bias in Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Mary H.; Bell, Erin M.; Whitehead, Todd P.; Gunier, Robert B.; Friesen, Melissa C.; Nuckols, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Residential pesticide exposure has been linked to adverse health outcomes in adults and children. High-quality exposure estimates are critical for confirming these associations. Past epidemiologic studies have used one measurement of pesticide concentrations in carpet dust to characterize an individual’s average long-term exposure. If concentrations vary over time, this approach could substantially misclassify exposure and attenuate risk estimates. Objectives: We assessed the repeatability of pesticide concentrations in carpet dust samples and the potential attenuation bias in epidemiologic studies relying on one sample. Methods: We collected repeated carpet dust samples (median = 3; range, 1–7) from 21 homes in Fresno County, California, during 2003–2005. Dust was analyzed for 13 pesticides using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. We used mixed-effects models to estimate between- and within-home variance. For each pesticide, we computed intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the estimated attenuation of regression coefficients in a hypothetical case–control study collecting a single dust sample. Results: The median ICC was 0.73 (range, 0.37–0.95), demonstrating higher between-home than within-home variability for most pesticides. The expected magnitude of attenuation bias associated with using a single dust sample was estimated to be ≤ 30% for 7 of the 13 compounds evaluated. Conclusions: For several pesticides studied, use of one dust sample to represent an exposure period of approximately 2 years would not be expected to substantially attenuate odds ratios. Further study is needed to determine if our findings hold for longer exposure periods and for other pesticides. PMID:23462689

  6. Airborne black carbon concentrations over an urban region in western India-temporal variability, effects of meteorology, and source regions.

    PubMed

    Bapna, Mukund; Sunder Raman, Ramya; Ramachandran, S; Rajesh, T A

    2013-03-01

    This study characterizes over 5 years of high time resolution (5 min), airborne black carbon (BC) concentrations (July 2003 to December 2008) measured over Ahmedabad, an urban region in western India. The data were used to obtain different time averages of BC concentrations, and these averages were then used to assess the diurnal, seasonal, and annual variability of BC over the study region. Assessment of diurnal variations revealed a strong association between BC concentrations and vehicular traffic. Peaks in BC concentration were co-incident with the morning (0730 to 0830, LST) and late evening (1930 to 2030, LST) rush hour traffic. Additionally, diurnal variability in BC concentrations during major festivals (Diwali and Dushera during the months of October/November) revealed an increase in BC concentrations due to fireworks displays. Maximum half hourly BC concentrations during the festival days were as high as 79.8 μg m(-3). However, the high concentrations rapidly decayed suggesting that local meteorology during the festive season was favorable for aerosol dispersion. A multiple linear regression (MLR) model with BC as the dependent variable and meteorological parameters as independent variables was fitted. The variability in temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction accounted for about 49% of the variability in measured BC concentrations. Conditional probability function (CPF) analysis was used to identify the geographical location of local source regions contributing to the effective BC measured (at 880 nm) at the receptor site. The east north-east (ENE) direction to the receptor was identified as a major source region. National highway (NH8) and two coal-fired thermal power stations (at Gandhinagar and Sabarmati) were located in the identified direction, suggesting that local traffic and power plant emissions were likely contributors to the measured BC. PMID:22777610

  7. Spatial and Temporal Variability of the Concentration Field from Localized Releases in a Regular Building Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, E. V.; Coceal, O.; Branford, S.; Thomas, T. G.; Belcher, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    Spatial and temporal fluctuations in the concentration field from an ensemble of continuous point-source releases in a regular building array are analyzed from data generated by direct numerical simulations. The release is of a passive scalar under conditions of neutral stability. Results are related to the underlying flow structure by contrasting data for an imposed wind direction of 0° and 45° relative to the buildings. Furthermore, the effects of distance from the source and vicinity to the plume centreline on the spatial and temporal variability are documented. The general picture that emerges is that this particular geometry splits the flow domain into segments (e.g., "streets" and "intersections") in each of which the air is, to a first approximation, well mixed. Notable exceptions to this general rule include regions close to the source, near the plume edge, and in unobstructed channels to which the flow is aligned. In the oblique (45°) case the strongly three-dimensional nature of the flow enhances mixing of a scalar within the canopy leading to reduced temporal and spatial concentration fluctuations within the plume core. These fluctuations are in general larger for the parallel flow (0°) case, especially so in the long unobstructed channels. Due to the more complex flow structure in the canyon-type streets behind buildings, fluctuations are lower than in the open channels, though still substantially larger than for oblique flow. These results are relevant to the formulation of simple models for dispersion in urban areas and to the quantification of the uncertainties in their predictions.

  8. Variability of trace gas concentrations over Asian region: satellite observations vs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheel, Varun; Richter, Andreas; Srivastava, Shuchita; Lal, Shyam

    2012-07-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO_2) and Carbon Monoxide (CO) play a key role in the chemistry of the tropospheric ozone and are emitted mainly by anthropogenic processes. These emissions have been increasing over Asia over the past few years due to rapid economic growth and yet there are very few systematic ground based observations of these species over this region. We have analysed ten years of data from space borne instruments: Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), which have been measuring the tropospheric abundance of these trace gases. We have examined trends over the period 1996-2008 in NO_2 and CO over a few Indian regions where high economic growth in the present decade is likely to see increased emissions for these species. However, even the highest growth rate of these species seen in the present study, is less when compared with similar polluted regions of China, where a much more rapid increase has been observed. In order to understand the trends and variability in atmospheric trace gas concentrations, one must take into account changes in emissions and transport. Only by assessing the relevance of each of these factors will it be possible to predict future changes with reasonable confidence. To this effect we have used a global chemical transport model, MOZART, to simulate concentrations of NO_2 and CO using the POET (European) and REAS (Asian) emission inventories. These are compared with satellite measurements to study seasonal variations and the discrepancies are discussed. The combined uncertainties of the emission inventory and retrieval of the satellite data could be contributing factors to the discrepancies. It may be thus worthwhile to develop emission inventories for India at a higher resolution to include local level activity data.

  9. What drove Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) concentration variability in the River Thames (UK) between 1884 and 2014?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noacco, Valentina; Wagener, Thorsten; Howden, Nicholas; Duffy, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Climate and atmospheric circulation patterns influence the variability of basin hydrochemistry, therefore understanding their influence is essential to put short-term water quality trends into the right context and to predict future hydrochemistry responses in the face of climate change. We investigate the drivers of DOC concentration variability in the Thames basin over 130 years. Our previous work has shown that increased urbanization since the 1880s in the Thames basin was the major driver for the increase in riverine DOC, but it does not explain DOC variability. Our current work investigates the links between hydro-climatic variability (temperature, precipitation and runoff) and teleconnections (ENSO and NAO), and the variability in DOC concentration. Moreover we compare the impact of hydro-climatic variability on riverine DOC, to the impact of land-use change and population increase. We use singular spectrum analysis to identify and then compare the dominant oscillatory components of hydro-climatic and hydro-biogeochemical variables. We use phase-plane trajectories of the noise-free, intra-annual to inter-annual reconstructed components to elucidate the biogeochemical and hydro-climatic dynamics of the system. This allows us to elucidate the links between the variability of hydro-climatic variables and DOC. Moreover they enable the identification of points in time where the dynamics of the system have changed, e.g. due to anthropogenic influences. Further, lag-correlations between teleconnections, DOC and flow are explored, to consider the hydrological memory of the catchment due to the permeable geology present. We show that the high seasonal to inter-annual variability in DOC concentration is linked to the variability of precipitation and runoff, rather than temperature. The dominant inter-annual modes of variability in DOC are connected to the ENSO oscillatory components. During strong El Niño and La Niña years there is statistically significant positive

  10. Using deconvolution to understand the mechanism for variable plasma concentration-time profiles after intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Adnan H; Liu, Xin; Grice, Jeffrey E; Medley, Gregory A; Roberts, Michael S

    2015-03-15

    To introduce better antibiotics for the treatment of some infectious diseases in sheep and to expand the range of antibiotics available for veterinary medicine, pharmacokinetics of two antibiotics marbofloxacin (MBX) and trovafloxacin (TVX) were investigated in sheep after intramuscular injection. Variable and irregular plasma concentration-time profiles were observed for TVX but not for MBX. To understand the mechanism of this phenomenon, intravenous studies were performed for both drugs and data were analyzed using a population approach. Deconvolution was then performed using various approaches to obtain absorption profiles of both drugs in sheep after intramuscular injection. The Loo-Riegelman and staircase deconvolution function methods were found to provide more reliable estimates of absorption rate than the Spath-spline and B-spline constraining break points deconvolution methods. The absorption profiles resulting from deconvolution indicated a zero-order absorption process for TVX and a first-order process for MBX. Precipitation of TVX at the injection site was suspected to cause the pseudo zero-order absorption. This hypothesis was supported by the observation of crystalline deposits of TVX in sheep meat after direct injection, using reflectance confocal microscopy. PMID:25636300

  11. Photo-physiological variability in phytoplankton chlorophyll fluorescence and assessment of chlorophyll concentration.

    PubMed

    Chekalyuk, Alexander; Hafez, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Photo-physiological variability of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) per unit of chlorophyll concentration (CC) is analyzed using a biophysical model to improve the accuracy of CC assessments. Field measurements of CF and photosystem II (PSII) photochemical yield (PY) with the Advanced Laser Fluorometer (ALF) in the Delaware and Chesapeake Bays are analyzed vs. high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) CC retrievals. It is shown that isolation from ambient light, PSII saturating excitation, optimized phytoplankton exposure to excitation, and phytoplankton dark adaptation may provide accurate in vivo CC fluorescence measurements (R2 = 0.90-0.95 vs. HPLC retrievals). For in situ or flow-through measurements that do not allow for dark adaptation, concurrent PY measurements can be used to adjust for CF non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and improve the accuracy of CC fluorescence assessments. Field evaluation has shown the NPQ-invariance of CF/PY and CF(PY-1-1) parameters and their high correlation with HPLC CC retrievals (R2 = 0.74-0.96), while the NPQ-affected CF measurements correlated poorly with CC (R2 = -0.22). PMID:22109145

  12. 3-years Occurrence Variability of Concentric Gravity Waves in the Mesopause Observed by IMAP/VISI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perwitasari, S.; Sakanoi, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Yamazaki, A.; Miyoshi, Y.; Hozumi, Y.; Saito, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report a study of 3-years occurrence variability of concentric gravity waves (CGWs) in the mesopause observed by IMAP/VISI instrument. CGWs are fascinating to be studied because of its unique characteristic that shows the direct coupling between lower and upper atmosphere. The Visible and near-Infrared Spectral Imager (VISI) of the IMAP mission was launched successfully on July 21, 2012 with H-IIB/HTV-3 and installed onto the International Space Station (ISS). IMAP/VISI is now operated in the night side hemisphere with a range of +/- 51 deg. in geographic latitude and measuring three airglow emissions of OI (630 nm), OH Meinel (730 nm) and O2 (762 nm) with a typical spatial resolution of 16 - 50 km in the nadir direction. In this study, we analyzed 3 years data taken by IMAP/VISI from October 2012 to June 2015. We found total 172 CGWs events in the O2 (762nm) airglow emissions out of 4853 data paths in 2013, 92 events out of 4809 data paths in 2014 and 46 events from 2112 data paths in 2015. The monthly occurrence probability shows a similar trend for each year, a clear seasonal dependence with the peak around March-April and August-September. The weak background winds in the middle atmosphere during the equinoxes are likely responsible for the seasonal dependence. We calculated the horizontal wavelength and radius maximum by fitting the circular wavefronts to a circle. The source of CGWs then identified from meteorological satellite data around the estimated center. The horizontal wavelength was found varying from 44-300 km and radius maximum up to 3000 km, showing that CGWs can affect large area in mesopause. In most cases, the CGWs appeared as arc-like shape instead of full circle. It indicates that the background wind filter allows the wave to propagate in a particular direction and filter out the other directions. The detailed discussion on horizontal wavelength distribution, the sources and background profiles influence on the variability of the CGWs

  13. Variability of Surface pollutants and aerosol concentration over Abu Dhabi, UAE - sources, transport and current levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanikumar, Devulapalli V.; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-04-01

    In the view of recent economic, industrial, and rapid development, Abu Dhabi (24.4oN; 54.4oE; 27m msl) has become one of the most populated regions in the world despite of extreme heat, frequent dust storms, and with distinctive topography. The major sources of air pollution are from the dust and sand storms, greenhouse gas emissions, and to some extent from industrial pollution. In order to realize the accurate and comprehensive understanding of air quality and plausible sources over this region, we have made a detailed analysis of three years simultaneous measurements during 2011-13 of pollutants such as O3, SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 concentrations. Diurnal variation of meteorological parameters such as temperature and wind speed/relative humidity clearly shows daytime maximum/minimum in summer followed by pre-monsoon, post-monsoon and winter. The prevailing winds over this region are mostly from northwesterly direction (Shamal wind). Diurnal wind pattern showed a clear contrast with the majority of the wind pattern during nighttime and early morning is from the westerly/northwesterly and daytime is from southwesterly/southeasterly directions. The diurnal pattern of O3 shows minimum during 08 LT and increases thereafter reaching maximum at 17 LT and decreases during nighttime. However, the diurnal pattern of SO2 and NO2 show a peak at ~ 08 LT and dip at ~ 14 LT during all the seasons with some variability in each season. On the other hand, the diurnal pattern of CO shows a peculiar picture of elevated levels during daytime peaking at ~ 10 LT (prominent in summer and post-monsoon) followed by a sharp decrease and minimum is ~14 LT. PM10 concentration has an early morning peak at ~ 02 LT and then decreases to a minimum value at ~11 LT and again increases in the afternoon hours (maximum at ~17 LT) depicting a forenoon-afternoon asymmetry. Monthly variation of PM10 shows maximum in pre-monsoon season and minimum in winter. Our observations show the diurnal pattern of

  14. The association of particulate air metal concentrations with heart rate variability.

    PubMed Central

    Magari, Shannon R; Schwartz, Joel; Williams, Paige L; Hauser, Russ; Smith, Thomas J; Christiani, David C

    2002-01-01

    Numerous studies show an association between particulate air pollution and adverse health effects. Particulate matter is a complex mixture of elemental carbon, ammonium, sulfates, nitrates, organic components, and metals. The mechanisms of action of particulate matter less than or equal to 2.5 micro m in mean aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)), as well as the constituents responsible for the observed cardiopulmonary health effects, have not been identified. In this study we focused on the association between the metallic component of PM(2.5) and cardiac autonomic function based on standard heart rate variability (HRV) measures in an epidemiologic study of boilermakers. Thirty-nine male boilermakers were monitored throughout a work shift. Each subject wore an ambulatory electrocardiogram (Holter) monitor and a personal monitor to measure PM(2.5). We used mixed-effects models to regress heart rate and SDNN index (standard deviation of the normal-to-normal) on PM(2.5) and six metals (vanadium, nickel, chromium, lead, copper, and manganese). There were statistically significant mean increases in the SDNN index of 11.30 msec and 3.98 msec for every 1 micro g/m(3) increase in the lead and vanadium concentrations, respectively, after adjusting for mean heart rate, age, and smoking status. Small changes in mean heart rate were seen with all exposure metrics. The results of this study suggest an association between exposure to airborne metals and significant alterations in cardiac autonomic function. These results extend our understanding of the adverse health effects of the metals component of ambient PM(2.5). PMID:12204821

  15. Spatial variability of suspended sediment concentration within a tidal marsh in San Francisco Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, K.; Drexler, J. Z.; Schoellhamer, D. H.; Buffington, K.; Takekawa, J.

    2012-12-01

    The sustainability of existing marshes and feasibility of future marsh restoration projects in San Francisco Estuary and elsewhere are threatened by a potential imbalance between accelerating sea-level rise and tidal marsh accretion rates. Marsh accretion is, in large part, dependent upon the availability of suspended sediment supplied from adjacent waterways. As water and sediment move across a marsh plain, suspended sediment settles and is trapped by vegetation near the source, resulting in less suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and deposition in the interior of the marsh. Measurements of deposition and limited observations of SSC within marshes have confirmed a decrease in sediment supply and accumulation from the marsh edge to the marsh interiors, but the spatial variability of SSC has not been quantified in a manner that allows for comparison to a theoretical sediment transport model. For this study, transects of SSC were collected within a marsh at China Camp State Park in the San Francisco Estuary which demonstrate that a dominant pattern of settling can be quantified and generally matches the exponentially decreasing pattern of SSC predicted by a simple advection-settling model. The observed pattern suggests that sediment settling and marsh flow characteristics are consistent both spatially (between transects) and temporally (between monthly sampling events). However, deviations from the predicted pattern occurred systematically at some locations and are likely related to resuspension of sediment from the marsh surface or small, unmapped creek channels that supply sediment to the marsh. Despite these deviations, our data show this simple 1-D model of advection and settling can be used to generalize within-marsh sediment transport as a function of distance from the nearest sediment source.

  16. Relation of pH and other soil variables to concentrations of Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Se in earthworms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.; Hensler, G.L.; Moore, J.

    1987-01-01

    Various soil treatments (clay, composted peat, superphosphate, sulfur, calcium carbonate, calcium chloride, zinc chloride, selenous acid) were added to experimental field plots to test the effect of different soil variables on the concentrations of 5 elements in earthworms (Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, Se). Concentrations of the 5 elements were related to 9 soil variables (soil Pb, soil Cu, soil Zn, pH, organic matter, P, K, Mg, and Ca) with linear multiple regression. Lead concentrations in earthworms were positively correlated with soil Pb and soil organic matter, and negatively correlated with soil pH and soil Mg, with an R2 of 64%. Se concentrations were higher in earthworms from plots amended with Se, and Zn concentrations were higher in earthworms from plots amended with Zn. However, none of the other soil variables had important effects on the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd and Se in earthworms. Although some significant statistical relations were demonstrated, the values of r2 of all relations (> 20%) were so low that they had little predictive value.

  17. Spatial and temporal variability in nutrient concentrations in surface waters of the Chattahoochee River basin near Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Buell, G.R.; Frick, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Nutrient concentrations from the early 1970s through 1995 were evaluated at several sites along the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries near Atlanta, to determine general patterns and processes controlling nutrient concentrations in the river. A spatial analysis was conducted on data collected in 1994 and 1995 from an intensive nutrient study of the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division. The 1994-1995 data show step increases in ammonium (NH4-N), nitrite plus nitrate (NO2 + NO3-N), and total-phosphorus (Tot-P) concentrations in the river. The step increases occur downstream of two wastewater treatment facilities (WWTFs) and Peachtree Creek, a small tributary inflow with degraded water quality draining a predominantly urban and industrial area. Median NO2 + NO3-N and Tot-P concentrations in the mainstem increase downstream of these inputs from 0.5 to 1 mg 1-1 and from 0.04 to 0.13 mg 1-1, respectively. NH4-N concentrations were typically low with 95% of the 2575 observations less than 0.2 mg 1-1 throughout the river system, except some high values (>1 mg 1-1) in some tributaries, particularly near the central part of Atlanta. High NH4-N concentrations are attributed to sewage discharge as they also are associated with high biological oxygen demand and faecal coliform bacteria concentrations. Nutrient concentrations vary temporally. An assessment of four sites, two mainstem and two tributaries, from 1970 to 1995 indicates a progressive increase and variability in NO2 + NO3-N concentrations during the period. The progressive increase in NO2 + NO3-N concentrations and their variability is similar to that reported for surface waters throughout the world and for which increased fertilizer usage has been attributed. Tot-P concentrations increase at mainstem sites through the middle to late 1980s and decrease markedly thereafter, due to improvements to WWTFs and a 1990 phosphate

  18. Modeling the temporal variability of zinc concentrations in zinc roof runoff-experimental study and uncertainty analysis.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jérémie; El Oreibi, Elissar; Saad, Mohamed; Gromaire, Marie-Christine

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the temporal variability of zinc concentrations from zinc roof runoff. The influence of rainfall characteristics and dry period duration is evaluated by combining laboratory experiment on small zinc sheets and in situ measurements under real weather conditions from a 1.6-m(2) zinc panel. A reformulation of a commonly used conceptual runoff quality model is introduced and its ability to simulate the evolution of zinc concentrations is evaluated. A systematic and sharp decrease from initially high to relatively low and stable zinc concentrations after 0.5 to 2 mm of rainfall is observed for both experiments, suggesting that highly soluble corrosion products are removed at early stages of runoff. A moderate dependence between antecedent dry period duration and the magnitude of zinc concentrations at the beginning of a rain event is evidenced. Contrariwise, results indicate that concentrations are not significantly influenced by rainfall intensities. Simulated rainfall experiment nonetheless suggests that a slight effect of rainfall intensities may be expected after the initial decrease of concentrations. Finally, this study shows that relatively simple conceptual runoff quality models may be adopted to simulate the variability of zinc concentrations during a rain event and from a rain event to another. PMID:27172984

  19. Variability of Urinary Concentrations of Bisphenol A in Spot Samples, First Morning Voids, and 24-Hour Collections

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lee-Yang; Bishop, Amber M.; Calafat, Antonia M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) is widespread. After exposure, BPA is rapidly metabolized and eliminated in urine. Therefore, there is considerable within-person and between-person variability of BPA concentrations in spot urine samples. However, no information exists on the within-day variability of urinary BPA concentrations. Objectives: We examined the between-person and within-person and between-day and within-day variability in the urinary BPA concentrations of eight adults who collected all voids for 1 week to investigate the impact of sampling strategy in the exposure assessment of BPA using spot, first morning, or 24-hr urine collections. Methods: We determined the urinary concentrations of BPA using on-line solid-phase extraction coupled to isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Results: The between-day and within-person variability was the primary contributor to the total variance both for first morning voids (77%) and 24-hr urine collections (88%). For the spot collections, we observed considerable within-day variance (70%), which outweighed the between-person (9%) and between-day and within-person (21%) variances. Conclusions: Regardless of the type of void (spot, first morning, 24-hr collection), urinary BPA concentrations for a given adult changed considerably—both within a day and for the 7 days of the study period. Single 24-hr urine collections accurately reflect daily exposure but can misrepresent variability in daily exposures over time. Of interest, when the population investigated is sufficiently large and samples are randomly collected relative to meal ingestion times and bladder emptying times, the single spot–sampling approach may adequately reflect the average exposure of the population to BPA. PMID:21406337

  20. DETERMINANTS OF TEMPORAL VARIABILITY IN NHEXAS-MARYLAND ENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS, EXPOSURES, AND BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The longitudinal NHEXAS-Maryland study measured metals, PAHs, and pesticides in several media to capture temporal variability. Questionnaires were concurrently administered to identify factors that influenced changes in contaminant levels over time. We constructed mixed-effects...

  1. Detecting the spatial and temporal variability of chlorophylla concentration and total suspended solids in Apalachicola Bay, Florida using MODIS imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongfang; Hladik, C.M.; Huang, W.; Milla, K.; Edmiston, L.; Harwell, M.A.; Schalles, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Apalachicola Bay, Florida, accounts for 90% of Florida's and 10% of the nation's eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) harvesting. Chlorophyll-a concentration and total suspended solids (TSS) are two important water quality variables, among other environmental factors such as salinity, for eastern oyster production in Apalachicola Bay. In this research, we developed regression models of the relationships between the reflectance of the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra 250 m data and the two water quality variables based on the Bay-wide field data collected during 14-17 October 2002, a relatively dry period, and 3-5 April 2006, a relatively wet period, respectively. Then we selected the best regression models (highest coefficient of determination, R2) to derive Bay-wide maps of chlorophylla concentration and TSS for the two periods. The MODIS-derived maps revealed large spatial and temporal variations in chlorophylla concentration and TSS across the entire Apalachicola Bay. ?? 2010 Taylor & Francis.

  2. Exploring factors controlling the variability of pesticide concentrations in the Willamette River Basin using tree-based models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qian, S.S.; Anderson, C.W.

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed available concentration data of five commonly used herbicides and three pesticides collected from small streams in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon to identify factors that affect the variation of their concentrations in the area. The emphasis of this paper is the innovative use of classification and regression tree models for exploratory data analysis as well as analyzing data with a substantial amount of left-censored values. Among variables included in this analysis, land-use pattern in the watershed is the most important for all but one (simazine) of the eight pesticides studied, followed by geographic location, intensity of agriculture activities in the watershed (represented by nutrient concentrations in the stream), and the size of the watershed. The significant difference between urban sites and agriculture sites is the variability of stream concentrations. While all 16 nonurban watersheds have significantly higher variation than urban sites, the same is not necessarily true for the mean concentrations. Seasonal variation accounts for only a small fraction of the total variance in all eight pesticides.We analyzed available concentration data of five commonly used herbicides and three pesticides collected from small streams in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon to identify factors that affect the variation of their concentrations in the area. The emphasis of this paper is the innovative use of classification and regression tree models for exploratory data analysis as well as analyzing data with a substantial amount of left-censored values. Among variables included in this analysis, land-use pattern in the watershed is the most important for all but one (simazine) of the eight pesticides studied, followed by geographic location, intensity of agriculture activities in the watershed (represented by nutrient concentrations in the stream), and the size of the watershed. The significant difference between urban sites and agriculture sites is the

  3. Concentrated flow erodibility for physically-based erosion models: temporal variability in disturbed and undisturbed rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current physically based overland flow erosion models for rangeland application do not separate disturbed and undisturbed conditions in modeling concentrated flow erosion. In this study, concentrated flow simulations on disturbed and undisturbed rangelands were used to estimate the erodibility and t...

  4. Spatial Variability of Nitrate Concentrations under Diverse Conditions in Tributaries to a Lake Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations in stream water often respond uniquely to changes in inter-annual (e.g., biological N uptake, precipitation) conditions in individual catchments. In this paper, we assess (1) how the spatial distribution of NO3-N concentrations varies acro...

  5. Spatial variability in dissolved organic matter and inorganic nitrogen concentrations in a semiarid stream, San Pedro River, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Paul D.; Lemon, Michelle M.

    2007-09-01

    We performed synoptic sampling of a 95-km reach of the San Pedro River, Arizona, to identify the effects of regional hydrology and land use on dissolved carbon and nitrogen concentrations. Six synoptic surveys, two before, two during, and two after the 2002 monsoon season, encompassed periods of both low and high stream discharge. Chloride concentrations and δ18O values during low-flow periods indicated the river was divided into three hydrologically distinct reaches each roughly 30 km long. Upper and lower reaches were characterized by areas of localized groundwater input followed by downstream evapo-concentration gradients, limited downstream solute transport, and highly variable carbon and nitrogen concentrations. In contrast, the middle reach was characterized by widespread groundwater input, continuous downstream hydrologic connectivity, and less variable carbon and nitrogen concentrations. During the monsoon season, base flow discharge increased five- to ten-fold, dissolved organic matter and inorganic N increased two- to ten-fold, Fluorescence Index (FI) values indicated a large input of terrestrial solutes, and both chloride concentrations and δ18O values indicated that stream water and alluvial groundwater were well mixed along the entire 95 km reach. Concurrently, the middle reach that exhibited continuous hydrologic connectivity during the nonmonsoon season was a net sink for N, while the reaches characterized by limited hydrologic connectivity during the low-flow season exhibited net N export. Our data suggest that instream biogeochemical cycling during the monsoon season is influenced by antecedent conditions, specifically hydrologic connectivity, during the dry season.

  6. Effect of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on high-speed slip flow between concentric cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T C; Street, R E

    1953-01-01

    The differential equations of slip flow, including the Burnett terms, were first solved by Schamberg assuming that the coefficients of viscosity and heat conduction of the gas were constants. The problem is solved herein for variable coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity by applying a transformation leading to an iteration method. The method, starting with the solution for constant coefficients, enables one to approximate the solution for variable coefficients very closely after one or two steps. Satisfactory results are shown to follow from Schamberg's solution by using his values of the constant coefficients multiplied by a constant factor 'N', leading to what are denoted as the effective coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  7. Impact of atmospheric boundary layer depth variability and wind reversal on the diurnal variability of aerosol concentration at a valley site.

    PubMed

    Pal, S; Lee, T R; Phelps, S; De Wekker, S F J

    2014-10-15

    The development of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) plays a key role in affecting the variability of atmospheric constituents such as aerosols, greenhouse gases, water vapor, and ozone. In general, the concentration of any tracers within the ABL varies due to the changes in the mixing volume (i.e. ABL depth). In this study, we investigate the impact on the near-surface aerosol concentration in a valley site of 1) the boundary layer dilution due to vertical mixing and 2) changes in the wind patterns. We use a data set obtained during a 10-day field campaign in which a number of remote sensing and in-situ instruments were deployed, including a ground-based aerosol lidar system for monitoring of the ABL top height (zi), a particle counter to determine the number concentration of aerosol particles at eight different size ranges, and tower-based standard meteorological instruments. Results show a clearly visible decreasing trend of the mean daytime zi from 2900 m AGL (above ground level) to 2200 m AGL during a three-day period which resulted in increased near-surface pollutant concentrations. An inverse relationship exists between the zi and the fine fraction (0.3-0.7 μm) accumulation mode particles (AMP) on some days due to the dilution effect in a well-mixed ABL. These days are characterized by the absence of daytime upvalley winds and the presence of northwesterly synoptic-driven winds. In contrast, on the days with an onset of an upvalley wind circulation after the morning transition, the wind-driven local transport mechanism outweighs the ABL-dilution effect in determining the variability of AMP concentration. The interplay between the ABL depth evolution and the onset of the upvalley wind during the morning transition period significantly governs the air quality in a valley and could be an important component in the studies of mountain meteorology and air quality. PMID:25105753

  8. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES IN DETROIT ALTERS HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevations in airborne particulate matter (PM) are linked to increased mortality and morbidity in humans with cardiopulmonary disease. Clinical studies show that PM is associated with altered heart rate variability (HRV) and suggests that loss of autonomic control may underlie ca...

  9. Modeling Geographic and Demographic Variability in Residential Concentrations of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Using National Data Sets

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite substantial attention toward environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure, previous studies have not provided adequate information to apply broadly within community-scale risk assessments. We aim to estimate residential concentrations of particulate matter (PM) from ETS in ...

  10. Spatial variability of dissolved phosphorous concentrations and alkaline phosphatase activity in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Chang, J.; Ho, T.; Gong, G.

    2010-12-01

    The concentrations of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) have been determined at about 25 sampling stations in the East China Sea since 2003. The stations are mainly distributed from the Changjiang river mouth to northern Taiwan and east to the shelf break. In addition to the Changjiang discharge, we have found a specific nutrient source around a coastal site (122° 2’30’’ E, 28° 40’ N). Elevated DIP and nitrate concentrations have been constantly observed around the sampling station for 8 years, where the surface DIP concentrations are generally around 0.3 µM. The nutrient source may either originate from ground water discharge or coastal upwelling, where lower temperature has been observed in the water column around the station. In general, APA has been negatively correlated with DIP concentrations in the studies sites, with lowest APA around the high DIP station and the Changjiang river mouth.

  11. Statistical evaluation of biogeochemical variables affecting spatiotemporal distributions of multiple free metal ion concentrations in an urban estuary.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhao; Lewis, Christopher G; Burgess, Robert M; Coull, Brent; Shine, James P

    2016-05-01

    Free metal ion concentrations have been recognized as a better indicator of metal bioavailability in aquatic environments than total dissolved metal concentrations. However, our understanding of the determinants of free ion concentrations, especially in a metal mixture, is limited, due to underexplored techniques for measuring multiple free metal ions simultaneously. In this work, we performed statistical analyses on a large dataset containing repeated measurements of free ion concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, and Cd, the most commonly measured metals in seawater, at five inshore locations in Boston Harbor, previously collected using an in-situ equilibrium-based multi-metal free ion sampler, the 'Gellyfish'. We examined correlations among these five metals by season, and evaluated effects of 10 biogeochemical variables on free ion concentrations over time and location through multivariate regressions. We also explored potential clustering among the five metals through a principal component analysis. We found significant correlations among metals, with varying patterns over season. Our regression results suggest that instead of dissolved metals, pH, salinity, temperature and rainfall were the most significant determinants of free metal ion concentrations. For example, a one-unit decrease in pH was associated with a 2.2 (Cd) to 99 (Cu) times increase in free ion concentrations. This work is among the first to reveal key contributors to spatiotemporal variations in free ion concentrations, and demonstrated the usefulness of the Gellyfish sampler in routine sampling of free ions within metal mixtures and in generating data for statistical analyses. PMID:26901477

  12. Temperature and precipitation drive temporal variability in aquatic carbon and GHG concentrations and fluxes in a peatland catchment.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, K J; Billett, M F; Dyson, K E

    2013-07-01

    The aquatic pathway is increasingly being recognized as an important component of catchment carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) budgets, particularly in peatland systems due to their large carbon store and strong hydrological connectivity. In this study, we present a complete 5-year data set of all aquatic carbon and GHG species from an ombrotrophic Scottish peatland. Measured species include particulate and dissolved forms of organic carbon (POC, DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), CO2 , CH4 and N2 O. We show that short-term variability in concentrations exists across all species and this is strongly linked to discharge. Seasonal cyclicity was only evident in DOC, CO2 and CH4 concentration; however, temperature correlated with monthly means in all species except DIC. Although the temperature correlation with monthly DOC and POC concentrations appeared to be related to biological productivity in the terrestrial system, we suggest the temperature correlation with CO2 and CH4 was primarily due to in-stream temperature-dependent solubility. Interannual variability in total aquatic carbon concentration was strongly correlated with catchment gross primary productivity (GPP) indicating a strong potential terrestrial aquatic linkage. DOC represented the largest aquatic carbon flux term (19.3 ± 4.59 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) ), followed by CO2 evasion (10.0 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) ). Despite an estimated contribution to the total aquatic carbon flux of between 8 and 48%, evasion estimates had the greatest uncertainty. Interannual variability in total aquatic carbon export was low in comparison with variability in terrestrial biosphere-atmosphere exchange, and could be explained primarily by temperature and precipitation. Our results therefore suggest that climatic change is likely to have a significant impact on annual carbon losses through the aquatic pathway, and as such, aquatic exports are fundamental to the understanding of whole catchment responses to climate change. PMID

  13. In situ formation and spatial variability of particle number concentration in a European megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikridas, M.; Sciare, J.; Freutel, F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Borbon, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Merkel, M.; Crippa, M.; Kostenidou, E.; Psichoudaki, M.; Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Petäjä, T.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Drewnick, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Beekmann, M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-09-01

    Ambient particle number size distributions were measured in Paris, France, during summer (1-31 July 2009) and winter (15 January to 15 February 2010) at three fixed ground sites and using two mobile laboratories and one airplane. The campaigns were part of the Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation (MEGAPOLI) project. New particle formation (NPF) was observed only during summer on approximately 50 % of the campaign days, assisted by the low condensation sink (about 10.7 ± 5.9 × 10-3 s-1). NPF events inside the Paris plume were also observed at 600 m altitude onboard an aircraft simultaneously with regional events identified on the ground. Increased particle number concentrations were measured aloft also outside of the Paris plume at the same altitude, and were attributed to NPF. The Paris plume was identified, based on increased particle number and black carbon concentration, up to 200 km away from the Paris center during summer. The number concentration of particles with diameters exceeding 2.5 nm measured on the surface at the Paris center was on average 6.9 ± 8.7 × 104 and 12.1 ± 8.6 × 104 cm-3 during summer and winter, respectively, and was found to decrease exponentially with distance from Paris. However, further than 30 km from the city center, the particle number concentration at the surface was similar during both campaigns. During summer, one suburban site in the NE was not significantly affected by Paris emissions due to higher background number concentrations, while the particle number concentration at the second suburban site in the SW increased by a factor of 3 when it was downwind of Paris.

  14. Effect of variable cerium concentration on photoluminescence behaviour in ZrO2 phosphor synthesized by combustion synthesis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Vikas; Kaur, Jagjeet

    2016-05-01

    Present paper reports synthesis and characterization of trivalent cerium (Ce3+) doped zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) phosphors. Effect of variable concentration of cerium on photoluminescence (PL) is studied. Samples were prepared by combustion synthesis technique which is suitable for less time taking techniques also for large scale production for phosphors. Starting material used for sample preparation are Zr(NO3)3 and Ce(NO3)3 and urea used as a fuel. All prepared phosphor with variable concentration of Ce3+ (0.1 to 2mol%) was studied by photoluminescence analysis it is found that the excitation spectra of prepared phosphor shows broad excitation centred at 390nm. The excitation spectra with variable concentration of Ce3+ show strong peaks at 447nm. Spectrophotometric determinations of peaks are evaluated by Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage technique. Using this phosphor, the desired CIE values including emissions throughout the violet (390 nm) and blue (427 nm) of the spectra were achieved. Efficient blue light emitting diodes were fabricated using Ce3+ doped phosphor based on near ultraviolet (NUV) excited LED lights.

  15. Some Factors Causing Variability in 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane Concentrations in Soil

    PubMed Central

    McKenry, M. V.; Naylor, P.

    1979-01-01

    Relative to nematicides with greater fuming capabilities, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) moved nonuniformly through soil. DBCP concentrations in soil were reduced by low soil temperature and the presence of lime or roots within the soil profile, Applications by either water or chisel injection provided DBCP movement to 120 cm and below. Concentrations were least persistent in the upper 15 cm of the field surface and in one situation where application was not followed by irrigation. Values for Henry's Constant are reported for DBCP at a range of solution temperatures. Certain advantages and disadvantages of soil atmosphere sampling of DBCP are discussed. PMID:19300644

  16. Diurnal variability of polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) concentrations: Relationship with meteorological conditions and inferred sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohammed S.; Keyte, Ian J.; Yin, Jianxin; Stark, Christopher; Jones, Alan M.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2015-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitro and oxy derivatives have been sampled every three hours over one week in winter at two sites in Birmingham UK. One site is heavily influenced by road traffic and is close to residential dwellings, while the other site is a background urban location at some distance from both sources of emission. The time series of concentrations has been examined along with the ratio of concentrations between the two sampling sites. A comparison of averaged diurnal profiles has shown different patterns of behaviour which has been investigated through calculating ratios of concentration at 18:00-21:00 h relative to that at 06:00-09:00 h. This allows identification of those compounds with a strong contribution to a traffic-related maximum at 06:00-09:00 h which are predominantly the low molecular weight PAHs, together with a substantial group of quinones and nitro-PAHs. Changes in partitioning between vapour and particulate forms are unlikely to influence the ratio as the mean temperature at both times was almost identical. Most compounds show an appreciable increase in concentrations in the evening which is attributed to residential heating emissions. Compounds dominated by this source show high ratios of 18:00-21:00 concentrations relative to 06:00-09:00 concentrations and include higher molecular weight PAH and a substantial group of both quinones and nitro-PAH. The behaviour of retene, normally taken as an indicator of biomass burning, is suggestive of wood smoke only being one contributor to the evening peak in PAH and their derivatives, with coal combustion presumably being the other main contributor. Variations of PAH concentrations with wind speed show a dilution behaviour consistent with other primary pollutants, and high concentrations of a range of air pollutants were observed in an episode of low temperatures and low wind speeds towards the end of the overall sampling period consistent with poor local dispersion

  17. Variable rsponses of mesophyll conductance to substomatal carbon dioxide concentration in common bean and soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some reports indicate that mesophyll conductance to carbon dioxide varies greatly with the sub-stomatal carbon dioxide concentration during the measurement, while other reports indicate little or no change. I used the oxygen sensitivity of photosynthesis to determine the response of mesophyll condu...

  18. Constant-concentration boundary condition: Lessons from the HYDROCOIN variable-density groundwater benchmark problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Sanford, W.E.; Campbell, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    In a solute-transport model, if a constant-concentration boundary condition is applied at a node in an active flow field, a solute flux can occur by both advective and dispersive processes. The potential for advective release is demonstrated by reexamining the Hydrologic Code Intercomparison (HYDROCOIN) project case 5 problem, which represents a salt dome overlain by a shallow groundwater system. The resulting flow field includes significant salinity and fluid density variations. Several independent teams simulated this problem using finite difference or finite element numerical models. We applied a method-of-characteristics model (MOCDENSE). The previous numerical implementations by HYDROCOIN teams of a constant-concentration boundary to represent salt release by lateral dispersion only (as stipulated in the original problem definition) was flawed because this boundary condition allows the release of salt into the flow field by both dispersion and advection. When the constant-concentration boundary is modified to allow salt release by dispersion only, significantly less salt is released into the flow field. The calculated brine distribution for case 5 depends very little on which numerical model is used, as long as the selected model is solving the proper equations. Instead, the accuracy of the solution depends strongly on the proper conceptualization of the problem, including the detailed design of the constant-concentration boundary condition. The importance and sensitivity to the manner of specification of this boundary does not appear to have been recognized previously in the analysis of this problem.

  19. Variability in concentrations of potentially toxic elements in urban parks from six European cities.

    PubMed

    Madrid, L; Diaz-Barrientos, E; Ruiz-Cortés, E; Reinoso, R; Biasioli, M; Davidson, C M; Duarte, A C; Grcman, H; Hossack, I; Hursthouse, A S; Kralj, T; Ljung, K; Otabbong, E; Rodrigues, S; Urquhart, G J; Ajmone-Marsan, F

    2006-11-01

    Use of a harmonised sampling regime has allowed comparison of concentrations of copper, chromium, nickel, lead and zinc in six urban parks located in different European cities differing markedly in their climate and industrial history. Wide concentrations ranges were found for copper, lead and zinc at most sites, but for chromium and nickel a wide range was only seen in the Italian park, where levels were also considerably greater than in other soils. As might be expected, the soils from older cities with a legacy of heavy manufacturing industry (Glasgow, Torino) were richest in potentially toxic elements (PTEs); soils from Ljubljana, Sevilla and Uppsala had intermediate metal contents, and soils from the most recently established park, in the least industrialised city (Aveiro), displayed lowest concentrations. When principal component analysis was applied to the data, associations were revealed between pH and organic carbon content; and between all five PTEs. When pH and organic carbon content were excluded from the PCA, a distinction became clear between copper, lead and zinc (the "urban" metals) on the one hand, and chromium and nickel on the other. Similar results were obtained for the surface (0-10 cm depth) and sub-surface (10-20 cm depth) samples. Comparisons with target or limit concentrations were limited by the existence of different legislation in different countries and the fact that few guidelines deal specifically with public-access urban soils intended for recreational use. PMID:17075623

  20. Age-related Effects of Varying Ammonia Concentrations on Hematophysiological Variables in Broiler Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the response of different aged birds of the same genetic strain exposed to ammonia (NH3) at set concentrations on blood gases, electrolytes, and acid-base balance under environmentally controlled conditions. The experiment consisted of a 4 × 4 factorial with a randomized design. ...

  1. Observation of vertical variability of black carbon concentration in lower troposphere on campaigns in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilinski, M. T.; Markowicz, K. M.; Markowicz, J.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents two methods for observation of black carbon (BC) vertical profiles in lower troposphere based on the micro-aethalometer AE-51. In the first method micro-aethalometer was carried by observer along trail on slope of mountain valley. Second method uses unmanned aerial vehicle as a platform for collecting data up to 1500 m above ground. Our study presents vertical profiles collected in and above Subcarphatian Wislok valley. Profiles measured on trial on slopes of Wislok valley, were collected during strong smog conditions during autumn/winter season, when BC concentration reached values above 60 μg/m3. The smog intensive layer is usually close to the surface (up to 100 m) as a results of surface inversion and the mountain breeze circulation, which during the night transports air pollution emitted from houses toward the valley's bottom. Usually the vertical profiles of BC concentration show significant reduction with the altitude, however, some multilayered structures are also observed during night time inversion conditions. It has found that smog condition can develop in clean air mass, and in those cases local pollution has significant impact on the columnar aerosol properties. During such conditions the aerosol optical depth shows diurnal cycle which is rather not observed in the long-term data. UAV flights in the lower troposphere were conducted during two sessions, one with clean polar air masses (BC concentration < 1 μg/m3) and second with moderate aerosol conditions (BC concentration 1-5 μg/m3). Profile of BC concentration shows stratification of absorbing aerosols in a shape of multi-layer structures similarly to the lidar/ceilometer signals.

  2. Spatio-temporal variability of groundwater nitrate concentration in Texas: 1960 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Sriroop; Ale, Srinivasulu; Delaune, Paul; Rajan, Nithya

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate (NO) is a major contaminant and threat to groundwater quality in Texas. High-NO groundwater used for irrigation and domestic purposes has serious environmental and health implications. The objective of this study was to evaluate spatio-temporal trends in groundwater NO concentrations in Texas on a county basis from 1960 to 2010 with special emphasis on the Texas Rolling Plains (TRP) using the Texas Water Development Board's groundwater quality database. Results indicated that groundwater NO concentrations have significantly increased in several counties since the 1960s. In 25 counties, >30% of the observations exceeded the maximum contamination level (MCL) for NO (44 mg L NO) in the 2000s as compared with eight counties in the 1960s. In Haskell and Knox Counties of the TRP, all observations exceeded the NO MCL in the 2000s. A distinct spatial clustering of high-NO counties has become increasingly apparent with time in the TRP, as indicated by different spatial indices. County median NO concentrations in the TRP region were positively correlated with county-based area estimates of crop lands, fertilized croplands, and irrigated croplands, suggesting a negative impact of agricultural practices on groundwater NO concentrations. The highly transmissive geologic and soil media in the TRP have likely facilitated NO movement and groundwater contamination in this region. A major hindrance in evaluating groundwater NO concentrations was the lack of adequate recent observations. Overall, the results indicated a substantial deterioration of groundwater quality by NO across the state due to agricultural activities, emphasizing the need for a more frequent and spatially intensive groundwater sampling. PMID:23128738

  3. Effects of environmental and physiological variables on the accumulated concentrations of trace metals in the New Zealand cockle Austrovenus stutchburyi.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Islay D; Smith, Brian D; Rainbow, Phillip S

    2014-02-01

    We examined potential causes of variation in trace element accumulation in an estuarine bivalve Austrovenus stutchburyi from two estuarine systems in South Island, New Zealand which differed in their metal contamination and salinity regimes. Concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti, V and Zn were measured (ICP-OES) in whole body tissues of bivalves collected from 10 sites, seston collected at high tide (a potential food resource) and in the sediment at the sites. All 13 elements showed a relationship between log bioaccumulated trace element concentration (mgkg(-1) dry weight tissue) and log shell length (mm), either in the whole data set or at least one site (ANCOVA). Growth rates of cockles varied significantly amongst sites. Accumulated soft tissue concentrations of Ag, As, Co and Cr increased with age of cockle, those of Pb and Zn decreased, with no clear age-related trend for the remaining metals (ANCOVA). Shell length was generally a good proxy for age when allowing for any size effect in metal accumulation by the cockle. There was no consistent pattern between the estuarine systems, probably reflecting unidentified contaminant inputs. Following depuration, tissue concentrations decreased significantly for some elements (Fe, Mn, Ti and V), indicating high concentrations of these metals in the gut contents. Trace element concentrations in the seston generally did not correlate with the bivalve tissue concentrations. There were few (Spearman's Rank) correlations between environmental variables at the time of sampling and cockle tissue trace element concentrations. The main sources of variation in bioaccumulated trace metal concentrations in the whole tissues of the cockle are location, shell length and age. PMID:24144937

  4. Predictive Models for Escherichia coli Concentrations at Inland Lake Beaches and Relationship of Model Variables to Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Duris, Joseph W.; Brady, Amie M. G.; Harrison, John H.; Johnson, Heather E.; Ware, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Predictive models, based on environmental and water quality variables, have been used to improve the timeliness and accuracy of recreational water quality assessments, but their effectiveness has not been studied in inland waters. Sampling at eight inland recreational lakes in Ohio was done in order to investigate using predictive models for Escherichia coli and to understand the links between E. coli concentrations, predictive variables, and pathogens. Based upon results from 21 beach sites, models were developed for 13 sites, and the most predictive variables were rainfall, wind direction and speed, turbidity, and water temperature. Models were not developed at sites where the E. coli standard was seldom exceeded. Models were validated at nine sites during an independent year. At three sites, the model resulted in increased correct responses, sensitivities, and specificities compared to use of the previous day's E. coli concentration (the current method). Drought conditions during the validation year precluded being able to adequately assess model performance at most of the other sites. Cryptosporidium, adenovirus, eaeA (E. coli), ipaH (Shigella), and spvC (Salmonella) were found in at least 20% of samples collected for pathogens at five sites. The presence or absence of the three bacterial genes was related to some of the model variables but was not consistently related to E. coli concentrations. Predictive models were not effective at all inland lake sites; however, their use at two lakes with high swimmer densities will provide better estimates of public health risk than current methods and will be a valuable resource for beach managers and the public. PMID:23291550

  5. Predictive models for Escherichia coli concentrations at inland lake beaches and relationship of model variables to pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Francy, Donna S; Stelzer, Erin A; Duris, Joseph W; Brady, Amie M G; Harrison, John H; Johnson, Heather E; Ware, Michael W

    2013-03-01

    Predictive models, based on environmental and water quality variables, have been used to improve the timeliness and accuracy of recreational water quality assessments, but their effectiveness has not been studied in inland waters. Sampling at eight inland recreational lakes in Ohio was done in order to investigate using predictive models for Escherichia coli and to understand the links between E. coli concentrations, predictive variables, and pathogens. Based upon results from 21 beach sites, models were developed for 13 sites, and the most predictive variables were rainfall, wind direction and speed, turbidity, and water temperature. Models were not developed at sites where the E. coli standard was seldom exceeded. Models were validated at nine sites during an independent year. At three sites, the model resulted in increased correct responses, sensitivities, and specificities compared to use of the previous day's E. coli concentration (the current method). Drought conditions during the validation year precluded being able to adequately assess model performance at most of the other sites. Cryptosporidium, adenovirus, eaeA (E. coli), ipaH (Shigella), and spvC (Salmonella) were found in at least 20% of samples collected for pathogens at five sites. The presence or absence of the three bacterial genes was related to some of the model variables but was not consistently related to E. coli concentrations. Predictive models were not effective at all inland lake sites; however, their use at two lakes with high swimmer densities will provide better estimates of public health risk than current methods and will be a valuable resource for beach managers and the public. PMID:23291550

  6. Predictive models for Escherichia coli concentrations at inland lake beaches and relationship of model variables to pathogen detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Duris, Joseph W.; Brady, Amie M.G.; Harrison, John H.; Johnson, Heather E.; Ware, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Predictive models, based on environmental and water quality variables, have been used to improve the timeliness and accuracy of recreational water quality assessments, but their effectiveness has not been studied in inland waters. Sampling at eight inland recreational lakes in Ohio was done in order to investigate using predictive models for Escherichia coli and to understand the links between E. coli concentrations, predictive variables, and pathogens. Based upon results from 21 beach sites, models were developed for 13 sites, and the most predictive variables were rainfall, wind direction and speed, turbidity, and water temperature. Models were not developed at sites where the E. coli standard was seldom exceeded. Models were validated at nine sites during an independent year. At three sites, the model resulted in increased correct responses, sensitivities, and specificities compared to use of the previous day's E. coli concentration (the current method). Drought conditions during the validation year precluded being able to adequately assess model performance at most of the other sites. Cryptosporidium, adenovirus, eaeA (E. coli), ipaH (Shigella), and spvC (Salmonella) were found in at least 20% of samples collected for pathogens at five sites. The presence or absence of the three bacterial genes was related to some of the model variables but was not consistently related to E. coli concentrations. Predictive models were not effective at all inland lake sites; however, their use at two lakes with high swimmer densities will provide better estimates of public health risk than current methods and will be a valuable resource for beach managers and the public.

  7. Variability in Deep Subarctic Pacific Oxygen Concentration Over the Past 150 ka.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaccard, S.; Haug, G. H.; Sigman, D. M.; Pedersen, T. F.; Francois, R.; Dulski, P.; Thierstein, H. R.

    2005-12-01

    The subarctic North Pacific represents the end of the global deep ocean circulation pathway, where deep water rises to the subsurface to complete the global thermohaline circulation. Subsurface waters upwelling into the euphotic zone are depleted in oxygen and enriched in dissolved carbon dioxide and macronutrients as a result of constant respiration and remineralization of organic carbon along the routes of abyssal circulation. The subarctic Pacific thus represents a sensitive region to investigate variations in sedimentary redox conditions as a consequence of climate change. Here we present Th-normalized sedimentary redox-sensitive trace metal (Mn, Mo, U) accumulation rates from ODP Site 882 to infer changes in deep North Pacific ventilation across terminations I & II. We couple these observations with submillennial-scale biogenic barium measurements as a proxy for carbon export to separate the influences of deep water oxygen concentration and sedimentary organic carbon respiration on the redox state of the sediment. Our results suggest that the deep subarctic Pacific water column was close to suboxic conditions during glacial intervals. Authigenic uranium concentrations are significantly higher during cold periods, despite a significant decrease of primary productivity due to a more severe water-column stratification, leaving changes in bottom water oxygenation as the only plausible explanation to account for trace metal enrichment. Molybdenum concentrations in the sediment are not significantly higher than average crustal values, indicating that the water-sediment interface never reached anoxic (i.e. sulfidic) conditions. Simple calculations suggest that glacial oxygen concentration might have been as low as 20-40 μ mol. Ventilation resumed rapidly during deglaciation and remained efficient throughout warm intervals, as indicated by the occurrence of lower authigenic uranium concentrations in the face of higher productivity and carbon flux to the sediment. We

  8. Variability of atmospheric pesticide concentrations between urban and rural areas during intensive pesticide application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheyer, Anne; Morville, Stéphane; Mirabel, Philippe; Millet, Maurice

    Intensive pesticide use leads to the contamination of water, soil and atmosphere. Atmospheric transport is responsible for pesticide dispersal over long distances. In this study, we evaluate the local dispersal of pesticides from agricultural to urban areas. For this purpose, three high-volume samplers, each equipped with a glass fiber filter and XAD-2 resin for the sampling of particulate and gas phase have been placed in a south-west transect (predominant wind direction) characteristic of rural and urban areas. The urban site (Strasbourg centre) is situated in the middle of two rural sites. Samples were taken simultaneously at three sites during pesticide treatments in autumn and spring 2002-2003. Sampling took place for 24 h at a flow rate of 10-15 m 3 h -1. The pesticides studied were those commonly used in the Alsace region for all crops (maize, cereal, vines …). Many of the pesticides analysed in atmospheric samples were not detected or observed very episodically at very low concentrations. For metolachlor, alachlor, trifluralin, atrazine and diflufenican, higher concentrations were observed, essentially during the application of these compounds. Moreover, some "spraying peaks" were observed for alachlor in the south rural site (near crops) at a level of 31 ng m -3 on 16-17 May 2003. These results show site and time dependence of atmospheric contamination by pesticides. A limited dispersal was also observed especially in the urban area during the application periods of pesticides.

  9. Site-to-site variability of drug concentrations in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Williams, K R; Pounder, D J

    1997-09-01

    The homogeneity of drug concentrations in skeletal muscle was assessed in eight fatal overdoses. Ten to 30 random samples were taken from leg muscle weighing 1,650 to 7,985 g. For cases involving paracetamol the mean muscle-to-blood ratio ranged from 0.1 to 1.1 (n = 4) for amitriptyline 1.1 to 3.6 (n = 3), and for dothiepin 0.8 to 2.1 (n = 2). The coefficient of variance was large for all drugs, ranging from 10.5 (carbamazepine) to 50 (thioridazine). Skeletal muscle is not homogeneous with respect to drug concentrations in fatal overdose cases. Of 16 instances of drug detection in blood 2 (nortriptyline and promethazine) were not detected in muscle. Muscle-to-blood drug ratios varied significantly among cases, possibly influenced by survival time after drug ingestion. Quantitative interpretations of muscle drug levels present significant difficulties. However, skeletal muscle can be used for qualitative corroboration of blood analyses and is a suitable specimen for drug detection where none other is available. PMID:9290870

  10. Biological variables and health status affecting inorganic element concentrations in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) from Portugal (western Iberian Peninsula).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marisa; Monteiro, Silvia S; Torres, Jordi; Oliveira, Isabel; Sequeira, Marina; López, Alfredo; Vingada, José; Eira, Catarina

    2016-03-01

    The coastal preferences of harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) intensify their exposure to human activities. The harbour porpoise Iberian population is presently very small and information about the threats it endures is vital for the conservation efforts that are being implemented to avoid local extinction. The present study explored the possible relation between the accumulation of trace elements by porpoises and their sex, body length, nutritional state, presence of parasites and gross pathologies. The concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se) were evaluated in 42 porpoises stranded in Portugal between 2005 and 2013. Considering European waters, porpoises stranded in Portugal present the highest Hg concentrations and the lowest Cd concentrations, which may reflect dietary preferences and the geographic availability of these pollutants. While no effect of sex on trace element concentrations was detected, there was a positive relationship between porpoise body length and the concentration of Cd, Hg and Pb. Animals in worse nutritional condition showed higher levels of Zn. Harbour porpoises with high parasite burdens showed lower levels of Zn and As in all analysed tissues and also lower levels of renal Ni, while those showing gross pathologies presented higher Zn and Hg levels. This is the first data on the relationship between trace elements and health-related variables in porpoises from southern European Atlantic waters, providing valuable baseline information about the contamination status of this vulnerable population. PMID:26803785

  11. Using Shoulder Straps Decreases Heart Rate Variability and Salivary Cortisol Concentration in Swedish Ambulance Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Kåre J.; Niemelä, Patrik H.; Jonsson, Anders R.; Törnhage, Carl-Johan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown that paramedics are exposed to risks in the form of injuries to the musculoskeletal system. In addition, there are studies showing that they are also at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and psychiatric diseases, which can partly be explained by their constant exposure to stress. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the use of shoulder straps decreases physical effort in the form of decreased heart rate and cortisol concentration. Methods A stretcher with a dummy was carried by 20 participants for 400 m on two occasions, one with and one without the shoulder straps. Heart rate was monitored continuously and cortisol samples were taken at intervals of 0 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, and 60 minutes. Each participant was her or his own control. Results A significant decrease in heart rate and cortisol concentration was seen when shoulder straps were used. The median values for men (with shoulder straps) at 0 minutes was 78 bpm/21.1 nmol/L (heart rate/cortisol concentration), at 15 minutes was 85 bpm/16.9 nmol/L, and at 60 minutes was 76 bpm/15.7 nmol/L; for men without shoulder straps, these values were 78 bpm/21.9 nmol/L, 93 bpm/21.9 nmol/L, and 73 bpm/20.5 nmol/L. For women, the values were 85 bpm/23.3 nmol/L, 92 bpm/20.8 nmol/L, and 70 bpm/18.4 nmol/L and 84 bpm/32.4 nmol/L, 100 bpm/32.5 nmol/L, and 75 bpm/25.2 nmol/L, respectively. Conclusion The use of shoulder straps decreases measurable physical stress and should therefore be implemented when heavy equipment or a stretcher needs to be carried. An easy way to ensure that staff use these or similar lifting aids is to provide them with personalized, well-adapted shoulder straps. Another better option would be to routinely sewn these straps into the staff's personal alarm jackets so they are always in place and ready to be used. PMID:27014488

  12. Variable Source Watershed Model for Reducing Dissolved Phosphorus Concentrations in Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenhuis, T. S.; Hoang, L.; Schneiderman, E. M.; Pacenka, S.; Vermeulen, P. J.; Moore, K. E.; Owens, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Although established procedures for treatment of point sources have been available for the last fifty years, effective and efficient management procedures for reducing non-point source pollution are still being developed. One of the reasons for the slow development is that the various management practices need to be tailored to the landscape in order to be optimal. Water quality simulation models for watersheds would be ideal for designing these effective practices but in many cases are only validated at the watershed outlet where the monitored data are available which does not guarantee that the spatial distribution of runoff and pollution sources inside the watershed are simulated correctly. Especially, in rural, humid regions where runoff is associated with saturation-excess processes from variable source areas our modeling of the hydrology and water quality is limiting. Recently, we adapted successfully a watershed model El-SWAT that realistically can simulate saturation excess surface runoff and interflow by introducing a perched water table reservoir that can transfer water via the subsurface to the wet areas in the watershed and thereby overcomes one of the major limitation of the SWAT model. For this presentation, we have combined El-SWAT with a set of spatially dependent phosphorus sub routines developed by us for simulating spatially dependent phosphorus losses in upstate New York State. In this presentation we will show its application in designing effective best management practices in the New York City Source Watersheds in the Catskill Mountains.

  13. Multi-variable operational characteristic studies of on-column oxidative protein refolding at high loading concentrations.

    PubMed

    Saremirad, Pegah; Wood, Jeffery A; Zhang, Yan; Ray, Ajay K

    2014-09-12

    Chromatographic-based protein refolding techniques have proven to be superior to conventional dilution refolding methods, due to the higher loading concentration and simultaneous purification. Among these techniques, Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) has in particular been demonstrated as an effective method for refolding of variety of proteins. To date existing studies of protein refolding at high concentrations (>1mg/mL) in SEC have primarily been conducted as single factor studies, in which a single parameter is varied to assess impact on operating performance, which does not allow for determination of the interactions of different operating parameters and optimized operating conditions. In this work a multi-variable investigation of size exclusion protein refolding at high protein concentration using lysozyme as a model protein was performed, in order to quantify the interaction of factors and optimize performance. It was observed when l-arginine is used as an additive the refolding yield becomes independent of the protein concentration and refolding buffer pH, providing that a redox couple is used to assist the reformation of disulfide bridges. Furthermore, the pore accessibility for small molecules was reduced at the presence of this additive particularly at higher protein concentrations indicating slower removal of these molecules and a possible additional mechanism of aggregation prevention. Using the subsequent optimized refolding buffer, a refolding yield of more than 90% was obtained for up to 40mg/mL loading concentration of lysozyme which has only been reported for a urea gradient SEC (8-2M) with lower equilibration and elution flow rates due to high viscosity of buffer containing high concentrations of urea. PMID:25092593

  14. Exposure Classification and Temporal Variability in Urinary Bisphenol A Concentrations among Couples in Utah—The HOPE Study

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kyley J.; Porucznik, Christina A.; Anderson, David J.; Brozek, Eric M.; Szczotka, Kathryn M.; Bailey, Nicole M.; Wilkins, Diana G.; Stanford, Joseph B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor and potential reproductive toxicant, but results of epidemiologic studies have been mixed and have been criticized for inadequate exposure assessment that often relies on a single measurement. Objective: Our goal was to describe the distribution of BPA concentrations in serial urinary specimens, assess temporal variability, and provide estimates of exposure classification when randomly selected samples are used to predict average exposure. Methods: We collected and analyzed 2,614 urine specimens from 83 Utah couples beginning in 2012. Female participants collected daily first-morning urine specimens during one to two menstrual cycles and male partners collected specimens during the woman’s fertile window for each cycle. We measured urinary BPA concentrations and calculated geometric means (GM) for each cycle, characterized the distribution of observed values and temporal variability using intraclass correlation coefficients, and performed surrogate category analyses to determine how well repeat samples could classify exposure. Results: The GM urine BPA concentration was 2.78 ng/mL among males and 2.44 ng/mL among females. BPA had a high degree of variability among both males (ICC = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.11, 0.26) and females (ICC = 0.11; 95% CI: 0.08, 0.16). Based on our more stringent surrogate category analysis, to reach proportions ≥ 0.80 for sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) among females, 6 and 10 repeat samples for the high and low tertiles, respectively, were required. For the medium tertile, specificity reached 0.87 with 10 repeat samples, but even with 11 samples, sensitivity and PPV did not exceed 0.36. Five repeat samples, among males, yielded sensitivity and PPV values ≥ 0.75 for the high and low tertiles, but, similar to females, classification for the medium tertile was less accurate. Conclusion: Repeated urinary specimens are required to characterize typical BPA

  15. Comparison of the seasonal and interannual variability of phytoplankton pigment concentrations in the Peru and California Current systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. C.; Huang, F.; Strub, P. T.; James, C.

    1994-01-01

    Monthly composite images from the global coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) data set are used to provide an initial illustration and comparison of seasonal and interannual variability of phytoplankton pigment concentration along the western coasts of South and North America in the Peru Current system (PCS) and California Current system (CCS). The analysis utilizes the entire time series of available data (November 1978 to June 1986) to form a mean annual cycle and an index of interannual variability for a series of both latitudinal and cross-shelf regions within each current system. Within 100 km of the coast, the strongest seasonal cycles in the CCS are in two regions, one between 34 deg and 45 deg N and the second between 24 deg and 29 deg N, each with maximum concentrations (greater than 3.0 mg m(exp-3)) in May-June. Weaker seasonal variability is present north of 45 deg N and in the Southern California Bight region (32 deg N). Within the PCS, in the same 100-km-wide coastal region, highest (greater than 45 deg S) and lowest (less than 20 deg S) latitude regions have a similar seasonal cycle with maximum concentrations (greater than 1.5 mg m(exp -3)) during the austral spring, summer, and fall, matching that evident throughout the CCS. Between these regions, off northern and central Chile, the seasonal maximum occurs during July-August (austral winter), contrary to the influence of upwelling favorable winds. Within the CCS, the dominant feature of interannual variability in the 8-year time series is a strong negative concentration anomaly in 1983, an El Nino year. The relative value of this negative anomaly is strongest off central California and is followed by an even stronger negative anomaly is strongest off central California and is followed by an even stronger negative anomaly in 1984 off Baja, California. In the PCS, strong negative anomalies during the 1982-1983 El Nino period are evident only off the Peruvian coast and are evident there only in the

  16. Long-term trend and variability of atmospheric PM10 concentration in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, A.; Ghermandi, G.

    2014-05-01

    The limits to atmospheric pollutant concentration set by the European Commission provide a challenging target for the municipalities in the Po Valley, because of the characteristic climatic conditions and high population density of this region. In order to assess climatology and trends in the concentration of atmospheric particles in the Po Valley, a data set of PM10 data from 41 sites across the Po Valley have been analysed, including both traffic and background sites (either urban, suburban or rural). Of these 41 sites, 18 with 10 yr or longer record have been analysed for long-term trend in deseasonalized monthly means, in annual quantiles and in monthly frequency distribution. A widespread significant decreasing trend has been observed at most sites, up to a few percent per year, by a generalized least squares and Theil-Sen method. All 41 sites have been tested for significant weekly periodicity by Kruskal-Wallis test for mean anomalies and by Wilcoxon test for weekend effect magnitude. A significant weekly periodicity has been observed for most PM10 series, particularly in summer and ascribed mainly to anthropic particulate emissions. A cluster analysis has been applied in order to highlight stations sharing similar pollution conditions over the reference period. Five clusters have been found, two encompassing the metropolitan areas of Turin and Milan and their respective nearby sites and the other three clusters gathering northeast, northwest and central Po Valley sites respectively. Finally, the observed trends in atmospheric PM10 have been compared to trends in provincial emissions of particulates and PM precursors, and analysed along with data on vehicular fleet age, composition and fuel sales. A significant basin-wide drop in emissions occurred for gaseous pollutants, contrarily to emissions of PM10 and PM2.5, whose drop was low and restricted to a few provinces. It is not clear whether the decrease for only gaseous emissions is sufficient to explain the

  17. Modeling Reduction of Uranium U(VI) under Variable Sulfate Concentrations by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spear, John R.; Figueroa, Linda A.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics for the reduction of sulfate alone and for concurrent uranium [U(VI)] and sulfate reduction, by mixed and pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at 21 ± 3°C were studied. The mixed culture contained the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris along with a Clostridium sp. determined via 16S ribosomal DNA analysis. The pure culture was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 7757). A zero-order model best fit the data for the reduction of sulfate from 0.1 to 10 mM. A lag time occurred below cell concentrations of 0.1 mg (dry weight) of cells/ml. For the mixed culture, average values for the maximum specific reaction rate, Vmax, ranged from 2.4 ± 0.2 μmol of sulfate/mg (dry weight) of SRB · h−1) at 0.25 mM sulfate to 5.0 ± 1.1 μmol of sulfate/mg (dry weight) of SRB · h−1 at 10 mM sulfate (average cell concentration, 0.52 mg [dry weight]/ml). For the pure culture, Vmax was 1.6 ± 0.2 μmol of sulfate/mg (dry weight) of SRB · h−1 at 1 mM sulfate (0.29 mg [dry weight] of cells/ml). When both electron acceptors were present, sulfate reduction remained zero order for both cultures, while uranium reduction was first order, with rate constants of 0.071 ± 0.003 mg (dry weight) of cells/ml · min−1 for the mixed culture and 0.137 ± 0.016 mg (dry weight) of cells/ml · min−1 (U0 = 1 mM) for the D. desulfuricans culture. Both cultures exhibited a faster rate of uranium reduction in the presence of sulfate and no lag time until the onset of U reduction in contrast to U alone. This kinetics information can be used to design an SRB-dominated biotreatment scheme for the removal of U(VI) from an aqueous source. PMID:10966381

  18. Monitoring the internal structure of poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) microgels with variable cross-link concentration.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Florian; Balaceanu, Andreea; Feoktystov, Artem; Pipich, Vitaliy; Wu, Yaodong; Allgaier, Jürgen; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Pich, Andrij; Schneider, Gerald J

    2014-12-23

    The combination of a set of complementary techniques allows us to construct an unprecedented and comprehensive picture of the internal structure, temperature dependent swelling behavior, and the dependence of these properties on the cross-linker concentration of microgel particles based on N-vinylcaprolactam (VCL). The microgels were synthesized by precipitation polymerization using different amounts of cross-linking agent. Characterization was performed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) using two complementary neutron instruments to cover a uniquely broad Q-range with one probe. Additionally we used dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Previously obtained nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) results on the same PVCL particles are utilized to round the picture off. Our study shows that both the particle radius and the cross-link density and therefore also the stiffness of the microgels rises with increasing cross-linker content. Hence, more cross-linker reduces the swelling capability distinctly. These findings are supported by SANS and AFM measurements. Independent DLS experiments also found the increase in particle size but suggest an unchanged cross-link density. The reason for the apparent contradiction is the indirect extraction of the parameters via a model in the evaluation of DLS measurements. The more direct approach in AFM by evaluating the cross section profiles of observed microgel particles gives evidence of significantly softer and more deformable particles at lower cross-linker concentrations and therefore verifies the change in cross-link density. DSC data indicate a minor but unexpected shift of the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) to higher temperatures and exposes a more heterogeneous internal structure of the microgels with increasing cross-link density. Moreover, a change in the total energy transfer during the VPT gives evidence that the strength

  19. Effect of Variable Carbonate Concentration on the Solidus of Mantle Peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, M. M.; Dasgupta, R.

    2005-12-01

    Experiments show that the carbonated lherzolite solidus intersects the oceanic geotherm at ~300 km beneath ridges1, so CO2 may incite the deepest melting in basalt source regions2. However, experimental solidus detection requires an order of magnitude more CO2 than that (< ~0.1-0.4 wt.%) present in mantle source regions, which may bias solidus determinations. To explore the effect of CO2 concentration on the solidus of natural carbonated peridotite, we performed near solidus phase equilibria experiments in a multi-anvil for compositions with 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 wt% CO2 at 6.6 GPa, using Pt-graphite capsules. Solidi were bracketed using textural criteria and verified by tracking shifts in Na2O in cpx with temperature. With increasing bulk CO2, solidi are located in the intervals 1190-1220, 1250-1275, and 1300-1330 °C respectively and magnesitess is consumed within ≤25, ≤50, and ~60 °C of the solidus. Drops in Na2O in cpx across the solidus indicate preferential partitioning of Na to carbonate melt, the effect of which diminishes with decreasing bulk CO2, corresponding to decreasing near-solidus melt fraction. Reconstructed melt compositions also suggest that Na-enrichments in carbonate melts diminish with increasing bulk CO2 (7.2 wt.% Na2O for 1 wt.% CO2; 2.7 wt.% Na2O for 2.5 wt.% CO2; 1.7 wt.% Na2O for 5 wt.% CO2) owing to dilution of Na in larger melt fractions, causing the solidus to rise. This suggests that the 6.6 GPa solidus of natural peridotite with 10s to 1000s of ppm CO2 is ~1150-1190 °C, ~600 °C lower than that of volatile-free peridotite solidus. This solidus is applicable provided magnesite is present at the solidus. If concentrations are very low, up to ~5 ppm CO2 may be incorporated as a trace point defect in nominally C-free silicates3. Cryoscopic approximation for decarbonation melting of nominally carbon-free silicate minerals with up to 5 ppm CO2 indicates negligible (<5 °C) depression of the solidus. Thus, carbon dissolved in peridotite

  20. Persistence of Hydrologic Variables and Reactive Stream Solute Concentrations in an East Tennessee Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Koirala, Shesh R; Gentry, Randall W; Mulholland, Patrick J; Perfect, Edmund; Schwartz, John S; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2011-01-01

    Time and frequency domain analyses were conducted on weekly time series of water chemistry (nitrate, sulfate and calcium concentrations) collected from November 1995 to December 2005 at the West Fork of Walker Branch in Oak Ridge, Tennessee to evaluate the extent of their persistence and the relationship of this persistence to discharge and rainfall. In this study, spectral and wavelet analyses provided a theoretical basis for insights into long-term water chemistry behavior. All water chemistry parameters showed some level of persistence that was influenced by rainfall and/or discharge. Short-term persistence (less than a year) was related to the persistence of rainfall and discharge, whereas long-term persistence (more than a year) was related to the persistence of discharge. The Walker Branch conceptual hydrology model is augmented by these results that relate characteristic periodicities with flowpaths through different zones: the vadose zone (< 20 week period), saturated zone (20-50 week period) and bedrock zone (> 50 week period) with implications for reactive chemistries within the watershed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Diurnal variability of pharmaceutical, personal care product, estrogen and alkylphenol concentrations in effluent from a tertiary wastewater treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Eric D; Do, Huy; Lewis, Roger S; Carr, Steve A

    2011-02-15

    Hourly samples of tertiary wastewater effluent were analyzed for 30 pharmaceuticals, personal care products, estrogenic steroids, and alkylphenols in order to better understand the rate at which these compounds enter the environment. Several distinct patterns of daily cycling were observed, and were characterized as three separate categories. The concentrations of compounds such as trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, naproxen, estrone, and triclosan varied greatly during a daily cycle, with relative standard deviations exceeding 100% of their daily mean. Less extreme daily cycles were seen for other compounds such as azithromycin, atenolol, tert-octylphenol, iopromide and gemfibrozil. Peak concentrations for most compounds occurred in the early evening (5-8 pm). However, some compounds including carbamazepine, primidone, fluoxetine, and triclocarban exhibited little or no variability. PMID:21189012

  2. Trends and variability in blood lead concentrations among US children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ram B

    2016-04-01

    Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the period 2003-2012, the objective of this study was to evaluate trends in blood lead levels (BLL) among children aged 1-5 and 6-11 years and smoker and nonsmoker adolescents aged 12-19 years. Regression models with log10 transformed values of BLLs as dependent variable were fitted to evaluate how gender, race/ethnicity, smoking, and exposure to secondhand smoke at home affect BLLs. Irrespective of age, gender, and race/ethnicity, BLLs declined over the study period (p ≤ 0.01). Overall, adjusted BLLs declined by 0.00114 μg/dL for every 2 years. Children aged 1-5 years had about 50 % higher BLLs than smoker adolescents, about 75 % higher BLLs than nonsmoker adolescents, and about 45 % higher BLLs than children aged 6-11 years. While overall, children aged 1-5 years with BLL ≥ 5 μg/dL made up 3.24 %, 7.8 % non-Hispanic Black children aged 1-5 years had BLL ≥ 5 μg/dL. Males were found to have higher adjusted BLLs than females, and non-Hispanic Blacks were found to have higher adjusted BLLs than non-Hispanic Whites. Higher poverty income ratio was associated with lower adjusted BLLs (β = -0.02916, p < 0.01). Children living in owner-occupied homes had lower adjusted BLLs than children living in renter-occupied homes. BLLs increased with increase in number of smokers smoking inside the home (β = 0.02496, p = 0.02). In conclusion, while BLLs have declined for all age groups, genders, and races/ethnicities, certain races/ethnicities like non-Hispanic Blacks continue to have substantially higher BLLs than non-Hispanic Whites. PMID:26758308

  3. Linking particle number concentration (PNC), meteorology and traffic variables in a UK street canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Heather D.; Arthur, Robert; BéruBé, Kelly A.; Jones, Tim P.

    2014-10-01

    Ambient particle number concentration (PNC) has been linked with adverse health outcomes such as asthma, reduced lung function and cardiovascular disease. To investigate the relationship between PNC, meteorology and traffic we measured size segregated respirable particles in a busy commuter street in Swansea, UK for ten months using a Dekati Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI). The ELPI segregates particles into 12 size fractions between 7 nm and 10 μm. The median PNC for the sampling period was 31,545 cm- 3. For the ultrafine particles (7-93 nm), the highest PNC was found in winter (46,615 cm- 3; 15 minute average) and the lowest for that size fraction in summer (29,696 cm- 3). For the particles below 93 nm there was a trimodal distribution to weekdays (particularly Monday to Wednesday), with PNC peaks at 09:00, 16:00 and 23:00. Wind direction had a significant influence on PNC and differed between particles in the fine range (below 2.5 μm) and more coarse particles (up to 10 μm). For fine particles, winds parallel to the canyon were associated with higher PNCs which were attributed to the replenishment of traffic particles. For coarse particles, PNCs were higher from winds perpendicular to the canyon and this was linked to source distribution around the sampling site and the recirculation of pollutants within the canyon. During times when vehicle volumes were high and vehicles were exhibiting stop-start behaviour, if this was combined with low wind speeds, ultrafine PNC was highest. This effect was generally observed during the morning rush hour. Current mass-based legislation does not take into account exposure to the number of particles or the change in population exposure diurnally.

  4. The role of sample preparation in interpretation of trace element concentration variability in moss bioindication studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Lamothe, P.J.; Crock, J.G.; Galuszka, A.; Dolegowska, S.

    2011-01-01

    Trace element concentrations in plant bioindicators are often determined to assess the quality of the environment. Instrumental methods used for trace element determination require digestion of samples. There are different methods of sample preparation for trace element analysis, and the selection of the best method should be fitted for the purpose of a study. Our hypothesis is that the method of sample preparation is important for interpretation of the results. Here we compare the results of 36 element determinations performed by ICP-MS on ashed and on acid-digested (HNO3, H2O2) samples of two moss species (Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi) collected in Alaska and in south-central Poland. We found that dry ashing of the moss samples prior to analysis resulted in considerably lower detection limits of all the elements examined. We also show that this sample preparation technique facilitated the determination of interregional and interspecies differences in the chemistry of trace elements. Compared to the Polish mosses, the Alaskan mosses displayed more positive correlations of the major rock-forming elements with ash content, reflecting those elements' geogenic origin. Of the two moss species, P. schreberi from both Alaska and Poland was also highlighted by a larger number of positive element pair correlations. The cluster analysis suggests that the more uniform element distribution pattern of the Polish mosses primarily reflects regional air pollution sources. Our study has shown that the method of sample preparation is an important factor in statistical interpretation of the results of trace element determinations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Modeling reactive geochemical transport of concentrated aqueous solutions in variably saturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Zheng, Zuoping; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-01-28

    Concentrated aqueous solutions (CAS) have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. Chemical components in CAS are incompletely dissociated, especially those containing divalent or polyvalent ions. The problem is further complicated by the interaction between CAS flow processes and the naturally heterogeneous sediments. As the CAS migrates through the porous media, the composition may be altered subject to fluid-rock interactions. To effectively model reactive transport of CAS, we must take into account ion-interaction. A combination of the Pitzer ion-interaction and the ion-association model would be an appropriate way to deal with multiple-component systems if the Pitzer' parameters and thermodynamic data of dissolved components and the related minerals are available. To quantify the complicated coupling of CAS flow and transport, as well as the involved chemical reactions in natural and engineered systems, we have substantially extended an existing reactive biogeochemical transport code, BIO-CORE{sup 2D}{copyright}, by incorporating a comprehensive Pitzer ion-interaction model. In the present paper, the model, and two test cases against measured data were briefly introduced. Finally we present an application to simulate a laboratory column experiment studying the leakage of the high alkaline waste fluid stored in Hanford (a site of the U.S. Department of Energy, located in Washington State, USA). With the Pitzer ion-interaction ionic activity model, our simulation captures measured pH evolution. The simulation indicates that all the reactions controlling the pH evolution, including cation exchanges, mineral precipitation and dissolution, are coupled.

  6. Estimating Regional Spatial and Temporal Variability of PM2.5 Concentrations Using Satellite Data, Meteorology, and Land Use Information

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Koutrakis, Petros

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies of chronic health effects due to exposures to particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) are often limited by sparse measurements. Satellite aerosol remote sensing data may be used to extend PM2.5 ground networks to cover a much larger area. Objectives In this study we examined the benefits of using aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) in conjunction with land use and meteorologic information to estimate ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. Methods We developed a two-stage generalized additive model (GAM) for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency PM2.5 concentrations in a domain centered in Massachusetts. The AOD model represents conditions when AOD retrieval is successful; the non-AOD model represents conditions when AOD is missing in the domain. Results The AOD model has a higher predicting power judged by adjusted R2 (0.79) than does the non-AOD model (0.48). The predicted PM2.5 concentrations by the AOD model are, on average, 0.8–0.9 μg/m3 higher than the non-AOD model predictions, with a more smooth spatial distribution, higher concentrations in rural areas, and the highest concentrations in areas other than major urban centers. Although AOD is a highly significant predictor of PM2.5, meteorologic parameters are major contributors to the better performance of the AOD model. Conclusions GOES aerosol/smoke product (GASP) AOD is able to summarize a set of weather and land use conditions that stratify PM2.5 concentrations into two different spatial patterns. Even if land use regression models do not include AOD as a predictor variable, two separate models should be fitted to account for different PM2.5 spatial patterns related to AOD availability. PMID:19590678

  7. Variable Water Concentrations in the Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Mantle Underneath the Eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soles, B.; Brennan, G. W.; Johnson, E. A.; Mazza, S. E.; Gazel, E.

    2014-12-01

    An Eocene (47-48 Ma) volcanic swarm in NW Virginia represents the youngest episode of volcanism in the Eastern US, possibly initiated by delamination of lithospheric mantle (Mazza 2014). The Eocene swarm is located along the MAGIC seismic array (Crampton 2013). The phenocrysts and mantle xenocrysts within these volcanic rocks are the most direct constraints on the water content of the mantle in this region and will aid interpretation of geophysical data. In this study, we measured structural hydroxyl concentrations, [OH], in clinopyroxene (cpx) and olivine (ol) xenocrysts and cpx phenocrysts from three basaltic intrusions: Mole Hill, a volcanic neck, Trimble Knob, a diatreme, and Rt.631, a dike. Polarized FTIR spectra were obtained at JMU and the Smithsonian Institution. Mineral compositions were obtained on the electron microprobe at the USGS, Reston. The cpx xenocrysts show hydration profiles, whereas cpx phenocrysts have flat or dehydration profiles. Cpx xenocryst cores contain [OH]=25-300 ppm H2O and ol xenocrysts have [OH]<2 ppm. Cpx xenocryst rims contain [OH]=160-1300 ppm, and cpx phenocrysts have [OH]=100-570 ppm, and a cpx from Trimble Knob conservatively contains 1500-3500 ppm. Magmatic water contents calculated using O'Leary (2010) range from 0.3-4.9 wt% for xenocryst rims and phenocrysts, and >6 wt% at Trimble Knob. P and T were calculated using equilibrium exchange reactions from Putirka (2008). Xenocryst rims from Mole Hill have P=13.7±1.7 kbar and T=1287±24°C, and cpx phenocrysts from the Rt.631 dike record similar conditions of P=16.1±2.8 kbar and T=1339±37°C. A cpx phenocryst from Trimble Knob has P=23.8±4.0 kbar and T=1143±124°C. We interpret our data to indicate a dry lithospheric mantle as represented by the cpx and ol xenocrysts, underplated by a wet layer at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary produced by fractional crystallization of magma generated deeper in the asthenosphere, as represented by the cpx phenocrysts.

  8. Understanding and modelling the variability in Dissolved Organic Carbon concentrations in catchment drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Martin; Waldron, Susan; Scott, Marian; Drew, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Our knowledge of dynamic natural habitats could be improved through the deployment of automated sensor technology. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations, [DOC], are of interest to water companies as purification removes this pool and currently in environmental science, due in part to rising DOC levels and also as respiration of this C pool can lead to an increased CO2 efflux. Manual sampling of catchment drainage systems has revealed seasonal patterns in DOC (Williams, P.J.L., 1995) and that hydrological events export most DOC(Raymond, P.A. and J.E. Saiers, 2010). However, manual sampling precludes detailed characterisation of the dynamic fluctuation of DOC over shorter but important time periods e.g. immediately prior to an event; the transition from base flow to a surface run-off dominated system as surface flow pathways defrost. Such insight is only gained through deployment of continuous-monitoring equipment. Since autumn 2010 we have deployed an S::CAN Spectrolyser (which from absorbance gives a measurement of [DOC]) in a 7.5 kilometre squared peaty catchment draining Europe's largest windfarm, Whitelee. Since autumn 2011, we have an almost complete time series of [DOC] every 30. Here [DOC] has ranged from 12.2 to 58.4 mg/l C and during event flow DOC had a maximum variation of 23.5 mg/l within a single day. Simultaneously with the Spectrolyser, we have logged stage height, pH and conductivity using an In-Situ Inc MD Troll 9000. Generally there is an inverse relationship between [DOC] and both pH and conductivity, but a positive relationship (albeit with seasonal differences) with [DOC] and stage height, from which we can infer hydrological changes in the source of the DOC. Here, in addition to presenting the time series of the data, and a more accurate export budget estimate, I will explore statistical methods for the handling of large datasets. Trends in the data of such large and dynamic data sets are challenging to model. Simple relationships with stage

  9. Temporal variability and spatial dynamics of CO2 and CH4 concentrations and fluxes in the Zambezi River system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoru, Cristian; Borges, Alberto; Bouillon, Steven; Nyoni, Frank; Nyambe, Imasiku

    2014-05-01

    Spanning over 2900 km in length and with a catchment of approximately 1.4 million km2, the Zambezi River is the fourth largest river in Africa and the largest flowing into the Indian Ocean from the African continent. Yet, there is surprisingly little or no information on carbon (C) cycling in this large river system. As part of a broader study on the riverine biogeochemistry in the Zambezi River basin, we present here mainstream dissolved CO2 and CH4 data collected during 2012 and 2013 over two climatic seasons (dry and wet) to constrain the interannual variability, seasonality and spatial heterogeneity of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and CH4 concentrations and fluxes along the aquatic continuum, in relation to physico-chemical parameters (temperature, conductivity, oxygen, and pH) and various carbon pools (dissolved and particulate, organic and inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, primary production, respiration and net aquatic metabolism). Both pCO2 and CH4 variability was high, ranging from minimal values of 150 ppm and 7 nM, respectively, mainly in the two large reservoirs (the Kariba and the Cabora Bassa characterized by high pH and oxygen and low DOC), up to maximum values of 12,500 ppm and 12,130 nM, CO2 and CH4, respectively, mostly below floodplains/wetlands (low pH and oxygen levels, high DOC and POC concentrations). The interannual variability was relatively large for both CO2 and CH4 (mean pCO2: 2350 ppm in 2013 vs. 3180 ppm in 2013; mean CH4: 600 nM in 2012 vs. 1000 nM in 2013) and significantly higher (up to two fold) during wet season compared to dry season closely linked to distinct seasonal hydrological characteristics. Overall, no clear pattern was observed along the longitudinal gradient as river CO2 and CH4 concentrations are largely influenced by the presence of floodplains/wetlands, anthropogenic reservoirs or natural barriers (waterfalls/ rapids). Following closely the concentration patterns, river CO2 and CH4 mean fluxes of 3440 mg C-CO2 m

  10. Characterizing the influence of anthropogenic emissions and transport variability on sulfate aerosol concentrations at Mauna Loa Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Lauren E.

    data were supplemented with observations of gaseous radon (Rn222) and carbon monoxide (CO), used as tracers of long distance continental influence. Our study applied trajectory analysis and multiple linear regression to interpret the relative roles of aerosol precursor emissions and large-scale transport characteristics on observed MLO sulfate aerosol variability. We conclude that observed sulfate aerosol at MLO likely originated from a combination of anthropogenic, volcanic, and biogenic sources that varied seasonally and from year to year. Analysis of chemical continental tracer concentrations and HYSPLIT back trajectories suggests that non-negligible long distance influence from either the Asian or North American continents can be detected at MLO during all seasons although large interannual variability was observed. Possible influence of circulation changes in the Pacific Basin related to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation were found to be both species and seasonally dependent. We further found an increasing trend in monthly mean sulfate aerosol concentrations at MLO of 4.8% (7.3 ng m-3) per year during 1995-2008, significant at the 95% confidence level. Multiple linear regression results suggest that the observed trend in sulfate concentrations at MLO cannot reasonably be explained by variations in meteorology and transport efficiency alone. An increasing sulfate trend of 5.8 ng m-3 per year, statistically significant at the 90% confidence level, was found to be associated with the variable representing East Asian SO2 emissions. The results of this study provide evidence that MLO sulfate aerosol observations during 1995-2008 reflect, in part, recent trends in anthropogenic SO2 emissions which are superimposed onto the natural meteorological variability affecting transport efficiency.

  11. Influence of Variable Environmental Conditions on Presence and Concentration of Energetic Chemicals Near Soil Surface in the Vadoze Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaya, A. A.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2008-12-01

    Many explosive-related compounds (ERCs) are found near the soil-atmospheric surface in sites containing buried explosive devices, such as landmines and unexploded ordnance, detonation-residual, and munitions residues from explosive manufacturing facilities. Accurate assessment of the fate and transport processes is essential for predicting their movement to the surface, groundwater, or any other important environmental compartment. The transport processes controlling the direction and magnitude of the movement, and chemical and physical processes controlling the fate of the chemicals vary with environmental conditions. This research addresses the effect of variable rainfall, evaporation, temperature, and solar radiation on fate and transport of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-Dinitrotoluene (DNT), and other related chemicals in partially saturated soil. Experiments have been conducted in a laboratory-scale 3D SoilBed placed inside an environmental chamber equipped with rainfall and solar radiation simulators, and temperature control settings. The SoilBed was packed with a sandy soil. Experiments have been conducted by burying a TNT/DNT source, simulating a landmine, and applying different rainfall and light radiation cycles while monitoring DNT, TNT, and other related ERCs solute concentrations temporally and spatially within the SoilBed. Experiments include different source characteristics, rainfall intensities, temperatures, and radiation cycles to evaluate their effect on the detection and movement of ERC in soils in both aqueous and vapor phases. Temporal and spatial data has been analyzed comparatively and quantitatively. Comparative analysis was developed using surfer®- and voxler®-generated images and 3D visualization models applying spatial interpolation and masking methods. Single and multi-variable statistical analysis has been employed to determine the most important factors affecting the fate, transport and detection of ERC near soil

  12. Influence of wildfires on the variability and trend of ozone concentrations in the U.S. Intermountain West

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Yuanhong; Yue, Xu

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires are important sources of ozone by emitting large amounts of NOx and NMVOC, main ozone precursors at both global and regional scales. Their influences on ozone in the U.S. Intermountain West have recently received much interest because surface ozone concentrations over that region showed an increasing trend in the past two decades likely due to increasing wildfire emissions in a warming climate. Here we use the Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART) as well as the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to estimate wildfires' contribution on summer (June, July and August; JJA) ozone concentration variations, trends, and extremely high ozone events over the US Intermountain West for the past 22 years (1989-2010). We combine the resident time estimated from the FLEXPART 5-day backward trajectories and a high-resolution fire inventory to define a fire index representing the impact of wildfires on ozone concentration at a particular site for each day of summers 1989-2010. Over 26,000 FLEXPART back-trajectories are conducted for the whole time period and for 13 CASTNet surface monitoring sites. We build a stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) model of daily ozone concentrations using fire index and other meteorological variables for each site. The SMLR models explain 53% of the ozone variations (ranging from 12% to 68% for each site). We show that ozone produced from wildfires (calculated from SMLR model) are of high variability at daily scale (ranging from 0.1 ppbv to 20.7 ppbv), but are averaged to lower values of about 0.25-3.5 ppbv for summer mean. We estimate that wildfires magnify inter-annual variations of the regional mean summer ozone for about 32%, compared to the result with wildfires impact excluded from the SMLR model. Wildfire ozone enhancements increase at a rate of 0.04 ppbv per year, accouting for about 20% of the regional summer ozone trend during 1989-2010. Removing wildfires' impact would reduce 35% (46%) of the high-ozone days with

  13. Hydroclimatic Controls on the Seasonal and Inter-Annual Variability of Dissolved Phosphorus Concentration in a Lowland Agricultural Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupas, R.; Gascuel-odoux, C.; Grimaldi, C.; Gruau, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) at the outlet of a lowland agricultural catchment (Kervidy-Naizin, France) to identify the hydroclimatic controls on the seasonal and inter-annual variability in concentrations. Six years of stream data have been used, including a regular 6-daily sampling and high-frequency monitoring of 52 floods. Both on an annual basis and during flood events, distinct export dynamics for SRP and particulate phosphorus (PP) revealed that SRP transport mechanism was independent from PP (Dupas et al., submitted). During most flood events, discharge-SRP hystereses were anticlockwise, which suggests that SRP was transferred to the stream via subsurface flow. Groundwater rise in wetland soils was likely the cause of this transfer, through the hydrological connectivity it created between the stream and P-rich soil horizons. SRP concentrations were highest in the beginning of the hydrological year (period A), when the stream started to flow again after the dry summer season and water table fluctuated in the wetland domain. Thus, wetland soils seemed to be a major source of SRP. Concentrations during period A were higher after a long summer period than after a short one, which suggest that a pool of labile P was constituted in soils during the dry summer period. During winter (period B), SRP concentration generally decreased compared to period A, both during floods and interflood. This could be due to depletion of a soil P pool in the wetland domain and/or dilution by deep groundwater with low P concentration from the upland domain. Concentration during period B barely decreased compared to A during wet years, probably due to increased connectivity with soils from the upland domain in wet conditions. During spring (period C), SRP concentration increased during baseflow periods. The possible mechanisms causing the release of SRP could involve reduction of Fe oxide-hydroxides in wetland soils or in-stream processes. At the same time, SRP

  14. Variability of DOM concentration and quality in a peatland and forest headwater stream: seasonal and event characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broder, Tanja; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Biester, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Export of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils to aquatic systems plays a fundamental role in surface water chemistry. In many catchments, main sources are peatlands and peaty riparian zones. However, not only total DOM concentration is of great interest for e.g. the carbon cycle or drinking water generation. Also the quality of DOM strongly affects function and fate of DOM in aquatic systems. Moreover, changes in DOM quality can help to elucidate sources of DOM and underlying controls of mobilization. Therefore, this study focused on changes of DOM concentration and quality in a peatland and forest headwater stream considering seasonal patterns and hydrological dynamics. The study was conducted at the Odersprung bog, in a small headwater catchment characterized by an ombrotrophic peatland with adjacent, peaty forest soils in the Harz Mountains in northwestern Germany. During a one-year campaign, sampling of the headwater stream was conducted in biweekly intervals and in high resolution during selected high discharge events. DOM was characterized by spectrofluorometric indices, such as SUVA254nm, SR, HIX and FI, as well as by PARAFAC modelling of fluorescence spectra. Results showed major changes in DOM concentration, as well as in DOM quality during the sampling period. DOM concentrations ranged between 5 to 45 mg C L-1 and were mainly controlled by season with low concentrations during snowmelt and spring and higher concentrations in late summer and fall. Highest concentrations occurred at a fall high discharge event. Compared to the peatland, the forested site with a peaty riparian zone exhibited higher DOM concentrations and a stronger variability induced by hydrologic conditions. DOM quality changes as indicated by spectrofluorometric indices and modelled PARAFAC components were mainly induced by hydrology and showed no clear seasonal pattern. An increasing water level at the bog site caused hydrological connection of fresh DOM pools and a

  15. Use of a pre-analysis osmolality normalisation method to correct for variable urine concentrations and for improved metabolomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Chetwynd, Andrew J; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Holt, Stephen G; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-29

    Metabolomics analyses of urine have the potential to provide new information on the detection and progression of many disease processes. However, urine samples can vary significantly in total solute concentration and this presents a challenge to achieve high quality metabolomic datasets and the detection of biomarkers of disease or environmental exposures. This study investigated the efficacy of pre- and post-analysis normalisation methods to analyse metabolomic datasets obtained from neat and diluted urine samples from five individuals. Urine samples were extracted by solid phase extraction (SPE) prior to metabolomic analyses using a sensitive nanoflow/nanospray LC-MS technique and the data analysed by principal component analyses (PCA). Post-analysis normalisation of the datasets to either creatinine or osmolality concentration, or to mass spectrum total signal (MSTS), revealed that sample discrimination was driven by the dilution factor of urine rather than the individual providing the sample. Normalisation of urine samples to equal osmolality concentration prior to LC-MS analysis resulted in clustering of the PCA scores plot according to sample source and significant improvements in the number of peaks common to samples of all three dilutions from each individual. In addition, the ability to identify discriminating markers, using orthogonal partial least squared-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), was greatly improved when pre-analysis normalisation to osmolality was compared with post-analysis normalisation to osmolality and non-normalised datasets. Further improvements for peak area repeatability were observed in some samples when the pre-analysis normalisation to osmolality was combined with a post-analysis mass spectrum total useful signal (MSTUS) or MSTS normalisation. Future adoption of such normalisation methods may reduce the variability in metabolomics analyses due to differing urine concentrations and improve the discovery of discriminating metabolites

  16. Individual variability in verbal fluency correlates with γ-aminobutyric acid concentration in the left inferior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Tomoya; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    A particular feature of the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), which is considered a central region for language processing, is leftward functional/anatomical asymmetry. However, previous studies have not clearly shown lateralization of neurotransmitters in the cortical regions. Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we measured γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations in the bilateral IFG. To evaluate individual variability in linguistic performance, we further used a verbal fluency test. Although GABA+/creatine (Cr) values were not different between the left and the right IFG, we found a significant correlation between category fluency scores and GABA+/Cr values in the left IFG. No correlation was found between letter fluency scores and GABA+/Cr values. We also confirmed that the result was independent of the references used (Cr and H2O). Our results show a new physiological basis of linguistic performance as well as leftward asymmetry of the IFG. PMID:27454241

  17. Changes in intracellular calcium concentration influence beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration in canine ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kistamas, K; Szentandrassy, N; Hegyi, B; Vaczi, K; Ruzsnavszky, F; Horvath, B; Banyasz, T; Nanasi, P P; Magyar, J

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the influence of changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) on beat-to-beat variability (short term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes. Series of action potentials were recorded from enzymatically isolated canine ventricular cells using conventional microelectrode technique. Drug effects on SV were evaluated as relative SV changes determined by plotting the drug-induced changes in SV against corresponding changes in APD and comparing these data to the exponential SV-APD function obtained with inward and outward current injections. Exposure of myocytes to the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM (5 μM) decreased, while Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 (1 μM) increased the magnitude of relative SV. Both effects were primarily due to the concomitant changes in APD. Relative SV was reduced by BAPTA-AM under various experimental conditions including pretreatment with veratridine, BAY K8644, dofetilide or E-4031. Contribution of transient changes of [Ca(2+)]i due to Ca(2+) released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied using 10 μM ryanodine and 1 μM cyclopiazonic acid: relative SV was reduced by both agents. Inhibition of the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger by 1 μM SEA0400 increased relative SV. It is concluded that elevation of [Ca(2+)]i increases relative SV significantly. More importantly, Ca(2+) released from the SR is an important component of this effect. PMID:25716967

  18. Anaesthesia with sevoflurane in pigeons: minimal anaesthetic concentration (MAC) determination and investigation of cardiorespiratory variables at 1 MAC.

    PubMed

    Botman, J; Gabriel, F; Dugdale, A H A; Vandeweerd, J-M

    2016-05-28

    The objective of the study was to determine the minimal anaesthetic concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane (SEVO) in pigeons and investigate the effects of 1 MAC SEVO anaesthesia on cardiovascular and respiratory variables compared with the awake state. This is a prospective, experimental study. Animals were seven healthy adult pigeons. After acclimatisation to handling, heart rate (HR), heart rhythm, respiratory rate (fR), end-expired carbon dioxide tension (PE'CO2), inspired CO2 tension, indirect systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) and cloacal temperature were measured to determine baseline, 'awake' values. Pigeons were then anaesthetised with SEVO and MAC was determined by the 'bracketing' method. The same variables were monitored during a 40 minute period at 1.0 MAC SEVO for each bird. Mean MAC was 3.0±0.6 per cent for SEVO. During maintenance of anaesthesia at 1.0 MAC, SAP decreased significantly (P<0.001) without any significant change in HR. Although PE'CO2 increased significantly (P=0.001) despite an increase in fR, awake PE'CO2 values were unexpectedly low. Sinus arrhythmias were detected in two birds under SEVO anaesthesia. The times to tracheal intubation and to recovery were 2.5±0.7 and 6.4±1.7 minutes, respectively. Recovery was rapid and uneventful in all birds. In conclusion, SEVO is suitable for anaesthesia in pigeons. PMID:27083873

  19. Variability of pesticide detections and concentrations in field replicate water samples collected for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 1992-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Jeffrey D.

    2002-01-01

    Correlation analysis indicates that for most pesticides and concentrations, pooled estimates of relative standard deviation rather than pooled estimates of standard deviation should be used to estimate variability because pooled estimates of relative standard deviation are less affected by heteroscedasticity. The 2 Variability of Pesticide Detections and Concentrations in Field Replicate Water Samples, 1992–97 median pooled relative standard deviation was calculated for all pesticides to summarize the typical variability for pesticide data collected for the NAWQA Program. The median pooled relative standard deviation was 15 percent at concentrations less than 0.01 micrograms per liter (µg/L), 13 percent at concentrations near 0.01 µg/L, 12 percent at concentrations near 0.1 µg/L, 7.9 percent at concentrations near 1 µg/L, and 2.7 percent at concentrations greater than 5 µg/L. Pooled estimates of standard deviation or relative standard deviation presented in this report are larger than estimates based on averages, medians, smooths, or regression of the individual measurements of standard deviation or relative standard deviation from field replicates. Pooled estimates, however, are the preferred method for characterizing variability because they provide unbiased estimates of the variability of the population. Assessments of variability based on standard deviation (rather than variance) underestimate the true variability of the population. Because pooled estimates of variability are larger than estimates based on other approaches, users of estimates of variability must be cognizant of the approach used to obtain the estimate and must use caution in the comparison of estimates based on different approaches.

  20. Variability in the Correlation between Asian Dust Storms and Chlorophyll a Concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Hui-Wang; Shi, Guang-Yu; Yue, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997–2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the <50 m China seas because atmospheric deposition is commonly believed to exert less impact on coastal seas. Significant correlations existed between dust sources and many sea areas, suggesting a link between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in those seas. However, the correlation coefficients were highly variable. In general, the correlation coefficients (0.54–0.63) for the Sea of Japan were highest, except for that between the subarctic Pacific and the Taklimakan Desert, where it was as high as 0.7. For the >50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32–0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (<0.36). These correlation coefficients were further interpreted in terms of the geographical distributions of dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas. PMID:23460892

  1. Variability in the correlation between Asian dust storms and chlorophyll a concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Hui-Wang; Shi, Guang-Yu; Yue, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997-2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the <50 m China seas because atmospheric deposition is commonly believed to exert less impact on coastal seas. Significant correlations existed between dust sources and many sea areas, suggesting a link between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in those seas. However, the correlation coefficients were highly variable. In general, the correlation coefficients (0.54-0.63) for the Sea of Japan were highest, except for that between the subarctic Pacific and the Taklimakan Desert, where it was as high as 0.7. For the >50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32-0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (<0.36). These correlation coefficients were further interpreted in terms of the geographical distributions of dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas. PMID:23460892

  2. Genetic and Lifestyle Variables Associated with Homocysteine Concentrations and the Distribution of Folate Derivatives in Healthy Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Carolyn M.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Stanislawska-Sachadyn, Anna; Baido, Shirley F.; Blair, Ian A.; Von Feldt, Joan M.; Whitehead, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Low folate and high homocysteine (Hcy) concentrations are associated with pregnancy-related pathologies such as spina bifida. Polymorphisms in folate/Hcy metabolic enzymes may contribute to this potentially pathogenic biochemical phenotype. Methods The study comprised 26 Caucasian and 23 African-American premenopausal women. Subjects gave fasting blood samples for biochemical phenotyping and genotyping. Total Hcy (tHcy) and both plasma and red blood cell (RBC) folate derivatives [i.e. tetrahydrofolate (THF), 5-methylTHF (5-MTHF), and 5,10-methenylTHF (5,10-MTHF)] were measured using stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography, multiple reaction monitoring, mass spectrometry. Eleven polymorphisms from nine folate/Hcy pathway genes were genotyped. Tests of association between genetic, lifestyle, and biochemical variables were applied. Results In African American women, tHcy concentrations were associated (p<0.05) with total RBC folate, RBC 5-MTHF, B12, and polymorphisms in methionine synthase (MTR) and thymidylate synthase (TYMS). In Caucasian women, tHcy concentrations were not associated with total folate levels, but were associated (p<0.05) with RBC THF, ratios of RBC 5-MTHF: THF, and polymorphisms in 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and MTR . In African Americans, folate derivative levels were associated with smoking, B12, and polymorphisms in MTR, TYMS, methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), and reduced folate carrier1 (RFC1). In Caucasians, folate derivative levels were associated with vitamin use, B12, and polymorphisms in MTHFR, TYMS, and RFC1. Conclusions Polymorphisms in the folate/Hcy pathway are associated with tHcy and folate derivative levels. In African American and Caucasian women, different factors are associated with folate/Hcy phenotypes and may contribute to race-specific differences in the risks of a range of pregnancy-related pathologies. PMID:20544798

  3. Within-Person Variability in Urinary Bisphenol A Concentrations: Measurements from Specimens after Long-Term Frozen Storage

    PubMed Central

    Nepomnaschy, Pablo A.; Baird, Donna Day; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Longnecker, Matthew P.; Wilcox, Allen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic contaminant of food and water associated with adverse developmental effects in laboratory animals. BPA has recently been linked to morbidity in adult humans, but studies of developmental effects in humans are methodologically more difficult. The ability to measure BPA in urine samples after long-term storage could aid in such studies. Because the half-life of BPA is <6 hours, a single measurement would be useful only if the environmental exposure is relatively constant over weeks or months. Our aim was to measure within-person temporal variability in urinary BPA after 22–24 years of specimen storage, given that measurements suggested stability of BPA in the stored urine samples. Methods We measured total BPA concentration by mass spectrometry in first-morning urine samples from 60 premenopausal women. We selected from each woman’s stored daily collections three urine samples approximately two and four weeks apart. Samples were selected from both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle to assess cycle effects. Temporal variability was assessed with mixed model regression and correlations. Results BPA levels had an inter-quartile range from 1.1 to 3.1 ng/mg creatinine, slightly higher than levels in specimens from NHANES collected 3–11 years later. The Spearman correlation was approximately 0.5 for samples two weeks apart, and 0.3 for samples 4 weeks apart. Menstrual cycle phase did not influence levels. BPA tended to increase during the three-year collection period, but not significantly. Conclusions The similar distribution to NHANES samples and correlation of BPA levels taken at 2-week intervals provide indirect evidence that BPA is relatively stable during long-term freezer storage. The correlations indicate generally stable exposures over periods of weeks. These findings suggest that developmental effects of BPA exposure could be investigated with measurements from stored urine. PMID:19463991

  4. Temporal Variability of the Bioaerosol Background at a Subway Station: Concentration Level, Size Distribution, and Diversity of Airborne Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dybwad, Marius; Skogan, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring bioaerosol environments may present a challenge to biological detection-identification-monitoring (BIODIM) systems aiming at rapid and reliable warning of bioterrorism incidents. One way to improve the operational performance of BIODIM systems is to increase our understanding of relevant bioaerosol backgrounds. Subway stations are enclosed public environments which may be regarded as potential bioterrorism targets. This study provides novel information concerning the temporal variability of the concentration level, size distribution, and diversity of airborne bacteria in a Norwegian subway station. Three different air samplers were used during a 72-h sampling campaign in February 2011. The results suggested that the airborne bacterial environment was stable between days and seasons, while the intraday variability was found to be substantial, although often following a consistent diurnal pattern. The bacterial levels ranged from not detected to 103 CFU m−3 and generally showed increased levels during the daytime compared to the nighttime levels, as well as during rush hours compared to non-rush hours. The airborne bacterial levels showed rapid temporal variation (up to 270-fold) on some occasions, both consistent and inconsistent with the diurnal profile. Airborne bacterium-containing particles were distributed between different sizes for particles of >1.1 μm, although ∼50% were between 1.1 and 3.3 μm. Anthropogenic activities (mainly passengers) were demonstrated as major sources of airborne bacteria and predominantly contributed 1.1- to 3.3-μm bacterium-containing particles. Our findings contribute to the development of realistic testing and evaluation schemes for BIODIM equipment by providing information that may be used to simulate operational bioaerosol backgrounds during controlled aerosol chamber-based challenge tests with biological threat agents. PMID:24162566

  5. Variability of pesticides and nitrates concentrations along a river transect: chemical and isotopic evidence of groundwater - surface water interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Nicole; Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Saplairoles, Maritxu

    2015-04-01

    concentration. Finally, downstream the quantified pesticides were different from those observed in the upper part of the Crieu but similar to those observed in groundwater. Sr isotopes together with major elements and Sr concentrations allow to identify 3 distinct end-members to explain the river quality evolution : 1) surface water, 2) groundwater and 3) sub-surface water. On this basis, we first demonstrate that the contribution of the different end-members to the river flow is highly variable from upstream to downstream. Secondly, we evidence water exchanges between the river and the groundwater compartment and vice-versa. The combination of the isotopic and geochemical approaches was essential to understand the complex relations and exchanges between surface and ground-waters occurring in few kilometers along the Crieu River. This understanding allows the comprehension of spatial variability of surface water quality. This is of primary importance when to help water managers to select relevant sampling points to be monitored in the framework of the WFD. Amalric L., et al. (2013). International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, 93: 1660-1675 Loos R. et al. (2010). Water Research, 44: 4115-4126 Stuart M. et al. (2012). Science of the Total Environment, 416: 1-21.

  6. Factors Affecting Spatial and Temporal Variability in Nutrient and Pesticide Concentrations in the Surficial Aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Debrewer, Linda M.; Ator, Scott W.; Denver, Judith M.

    2007-01-01

    Water quality in the unconfined, unconsolidated surficial aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula is influenced by the availability of soluble ions from natural and human sources, and by geochemical factors that affect the mobility and fate of these ions within the aquifer. Ground-water samples were collected from 60 wells completed in the surficial aquifer of the peninsula in 2001 and analyzed for major ions, nutrients, and selected pesticides and degradation products. Analytical results were compared to similar data from a subset of sampled wells in 1988, as well as to land use, soils, geology, depth, and other potential explanatory variables to demonstrate the effects of natural and human factors on water quality in the unconfined surficial aquifer. This study was conducted as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey, which is designed (in part) to describe the status and trends in ground-water quality and to provide an understanding of natural and human factors that affect ground-water chemistry in different parts of the United States. Results of this study may be useful for water-resources managers tasked with addressing water-quality issues of local and regional importance because the surficial aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula is a major source of water for domestic and public supply and provides the majority of flow in local streams. Human impacts are apparent in ground-water quality throughout the surficial aquifer. The surficial aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula is generally sandy and very permeable with well-oxygenated ground water. Dissolved constituents found throughout various depths of the unconfined aquifer are likely derived from the predominantly agricultural practices on the peninsula, although effects of road salt, mineral dissolution, and other natural and human influences are also apparent in some areas. Nitrate occurred at concentrations exceeding natural levels in many areas, and commonly exceeded 10

  7. Defining an Abrasion Index for Lunar Surface Systems as a Function of Dust Interaction Modes and Variable Concentration Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected issues were encountered during the Apollo era of lunar exploration due to detrimental abrasion of materials upon exposure to the fine-grained, irregular shaped dust on the surface of the Moon. For critical design features involving contact with the lunar surface and for astronaut safety concerns, operational concepts and dust tolerance must be considered in the early phases of mission planning. To systematically define material selection criteria, dust interaction can be characterized by two-body or three-body abrasion testing, and subcategorically by physical interactions of compression, rolling, sliding and bending representing specific applications within the system. Two-body abrasion occurs when a single particle or asperity slides across a given surface removing or displacing material. Three-body abrasion occurs when multiple particles interact with a solid surface, or in between two surfaces, allowing the abrasives to freely rotate and interact with the material(s), leading to removal or displacement of mass. Different modes of interaction are described in this paper along with corresponding types of tests that can be utilized to evaluate each configuration. In addition to differential modes of abrasion, variable concentrations of dust in different zones can also be considered for a given system design and operational protocol. These zones include: (1) outside the habitat where extensive dust exposure occurs, (2) in a transitional zone such as an airlock or suitport, and (3) inside the habitat or spacesuit with a low particle count. These zones can be used to help define dust interaction frequencies, and corresponding risks to the systems and/or crew can be addressed by appropriate mitigation strategies. An abrasion index is introduced that includes the level of risk, R, the hardness of the mineralogy, H, the severity of the abrasion mode, S, and the frequency of particle interactions, F.

  8. Defining an abrasion index for lunar surface systems as a function of dust interaction modes and variable concentration zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W.

    2011-11-01

    Unexpected issues were encountered during the Apollo era of lunar exploration due to detrimental abrasion of materials upon exposure to the fine-grained, irregular shaped dust on the surface of the Moon. For critical design features involving contact with the lunar surface and for astronaut safety concerns, operational concepts and dust tolerance must be considered in the early phases of mission planning. To systematically define material selection criteria, dust interaction can be characterized by two-body or three-body abrasion testing, and sub-categorically by physical interactions of compression, rolling, sliding, and bending representing specific applications within the system. Two-body abrasion occurs when a single particle or asperity slides across a given surface removing or displacing material. Three-body abrasion occurs when multiple particles interact with a solid surface, or in between two surfaces, allowing the abrasives to freely rotate and interact with the material(s), leading to removal or displacement of mass. Different modes of interaction are described in this paper along with corresponding types of tests that can be utilized to evaluate each configuration. In addition to differential modes of abrasion, variable concentrations of dust in different zones can also be considered for a given system design and operational protocol. These zones include (1) outside the habitat where extensive dust exposure occurs, (2) in a transitional zone such as an airlock or suitport, and (3) inside the habitat or spacesuit with a low particle count. These zones can be used to help define dust interaction frequencies, and corresponding risks to the systems and/or crew can be addressed by appropriate mitigation strategies. An abrasion index is introduced that includes the level of risk, R, the hardness of the mineralogy, H, the severity of the abrasion mode, S, and the frequency of particle interactions, F.

  9. High nutrient pulses, tidal mixing and biological response in a small California estuary: Variability in nutrient concentrations from decadal to hourly time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caffrey, J.M.; Chapin, T.P.; Jannasch, H.W.; Haskins, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Elkhorn Slough is a small estuary in Central California, where nutrient inputs are dominated by runoff from agricultural row crops, a golf course, and residential development. We examined the variability in nutrient concentrations from decadal to hourly time scales in Elkhorn Slough to compare forcing by physical and biological factors. Hourly data were collected using in situ nitrate analyzers and water quality data sondes, and two decades of monthly monitoring data were analyzed. Nutrient concentrations increased from the mid 1970s to 1990s as pastures and woodlands were converted to row crops and population increased in the watershed. Climatic variability was also a significant factor controlling interannual nutrient variability, with higher nutrient concentrations during wet than drought years. Elkhorn Slough has a Mediterranean climate with dry and rainy seasons. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations were relatively low (10-70 ??mol L-1) during the dry season and high (20-160 ??mol L-1) during the rainy season. Dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations showed the inverse pattern, with higher concentrations during the dry season. Pulsed runoff events were a consistent feature controlling nitrate concentrations during the rainy season. Peak nitrate concentrations lagged runoff events by 1 to 6 days. Tidal exchange with Monterey Bay was also an important process controlling nutrient concentrations, particularly near the mouth of the Slough. Biological processes had the greatest effect on nitrate concentrations during the dry season and were less important during the rainy season. While primary production was enhanced by nutrient pulses, chlorophyll a concentrations were not. We believe that the generally weak biological response compared to the strong physical forcing in Elkhorn Slough occurred because the short residence time and tidal mixing rapidly diluted nutrient pulses. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of interindividual variability of plasma concentrations after administrazion of high doses of intravenous amoxicillin or cloxacillin in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Verdier, M C; Tribut, O; Tattevin, P; Michelet, C; Bentué-Ferrer, D

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present retrospective observational clinical study was to assess the interindividual pharmacokinetic variability of plasma concentrations of amoxicillin or cloxacillin administered in high doses intravenously in critically ill patients, related to renal function or administration method.Four hundred and two plasma concentrations were measured at steady-state with a high performance liquid chromatography technique in 162 patients treated with 100 - 300 mg/kg/day of intravenous amoxicillin or cloxacillin.For both drugs and administration methods, plasma concentrations were significantly higher for patients with creatinine clearance below 60 ml/min, even though doses were adapted for renal impairment. the correlations calculated between plasma concentrations and creatinine level, creatinine clearance or doses were all low. There were fewer outlying drug concentrations in patients receiving continuous rather than intermittent regimens.Our results are in favor of adapting dosages of these beta-lactam antibiotics based on plasma concentrations, especially in cases of renal impairment. PMID:22005059

  11. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Nitrate Concentration below the Root Zone in an Almond Orchard and its Implications for Potential Groundwater Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Couvreur, V.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial and Temporal Variability in Nitrate Concentration below the Root Zone in an Almond Orchard and its Implications for Potential Groundwater Contamination S. Baram1, M. Read1, D. Smart2, T. Harter1, J Hopmans11Department of Land, Air & Water Resources University of California Davis 2Department of Viticulture and Enology University of California Davis Estimates of water and fertilizer losses below the root zone of nitrogen (N) intensive agricultural orchard crops are major concern in groundwater protection. However, microscopic and macroscopic heterogeneity in unsaturated soils make accurate loss estimates very challenging. In this study we aimed to examine field scale variability in nitrate (NO3-) losses below the root zone (>250cm) of a 15 years old almond orchard in Madera county California. Based on a soil variability survey, tensiometers and solution samplers were installed at 17 locations around the 40 acre orchard. The hydraulic potential and the NO3- concentrations were monitored over two growing seasons. Nitrate concentrations varied spatially and temporarily, and ranged from below to more than 30 times higher than the drinking water contamination standard of >10 mg NO3--N L-1. Principal component analysis of the relations between the NO3- concentration, presence of a hard pan in the subsurface, its depth and thickness, and the fertigation and irrigation events indicated that none of these factors explained the observed variability in pore-water NO3- concentrations, with hard pan being the most dominant factor. Throughout the irrigation season minimal leaching was observed, yet post-harvest and preseason flooding events led to deep drainage. Due to the high spatial and temporal variability in the NO3- concentration and the potential for deep drainage following a wet winter or flooding event we conclude that the most efficient way to protect ground water is by transitioning to high frequency low nitrogen fertigation which would retain NO3-in the active

  12. Variability in Hormone Concentrations and Self-Reported Menstrual Histories in Young Adolescents: Menarche as an Integral Part of a Developmental Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorn, Lorah D.; Nottelmann, Editha D.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Inoff-Germain, Gale; Cutler, Gordon B., Jr.; Chrousos, George P.

    1999-01-01

    Compared hormone concentrations in 52 pre- and postmenarcheal girls to determine if they fit a dichotomous model of pubertal development surrounding menarche and to study methodological issues of variability in self-reports of menarche. Found discrepancies in reporting the age of menarche and great overlap in hormones between pre- and…

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF VARIABLE ELIMINATION RATE AND BODY FAT MASS IN A PBPK MODEL FOR TCDD IN PREDICTING THE SERUM TCDD CONCENTRATIONS FROM VETERANS OF OPERATION RANCH HAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Influence of Variable Elimination Rate and Body Fat Mass in a PBPK Model for TCDD in Predicting the Serum TCDD Concentrations from Veterans of Operation Ranch Hand.
    C Emond1,2, LS Birnbaum2, JE Michalek3, MJ DeVito2
    1 National Research Council, National Academy of Scien...

  14. Relations of nonpoint-source nitrate and atrazine concentrations in the High Plains aquifer to selected explanatory variables in six Nebraska study areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druliner, A.D.; Chen, H.H.; McGrath, T.S.

    1996-01-01

    Statistical techniques were used to relate nonpoint-source ground-water contamination by nitrate and atrazine to a variety of explanatory variables for six study areas in Nebraska. Water samples were collected from 268 wells in 12 counties from 1984 through 1987 and were analyzed for nitrate concentrations; water samples from 210 of the wells were analyzed for atrazine. A number of hydrochemical, climatic, hydrologic, soil, and land-use explanatory variables, which were believed to affect the contamination of ground water by agricultural chemicals, were identified and quantified for each of the 268 wells. Multiple regression methods were used to determine which explanatory variables were statistically related to ground-water concentrations of nitrate and atrazine. Regression models predicting nitrate and atrazine concentrations were produced that explained from about 50 to 68 percent of the variation in the dependent variables. Geographic- information-system methods were used to produce maps predicting nitrate and atrazine concentrations in ground water for one study area using selected regression and logistic models. The results of this study indicate that multiple regression techniques coupled with geographic information systems can be an effective means of identifying areas of potential ground-water contamination by nitrate and atrazine.

  15. Seed protein percentage and mineral concentration variability and correlation with other seed quality traits in the U.S. Peanut mini-core collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein percentage and mineral concentrations were determined for 95 accessions of the U. S. peanut mini-core collection by nitrogen analysis and inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectrometry, respectively, using material collected over two field seasons. Significant variability in the ...

  16. Seasonal variability of tritium and ion concentrations in rain at Kumamoto, Japan and back-trajectory analysis of air mass

    SciTech Connect

    Momoshima, N.; Sugihara, S.; Toyoshima, T.; Nagao, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Nakamura, Y.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium and major ion concentrations in rain were analyzed in Kumamoto (Japan)) between 2001 and 2006 to examine present tritium concentration and seasonal variation. The average tritium concentration was 0.36 {+-} 0.19 Bq/L (n=104) and higher tritium concentrations were observed in spring than the other seasons. Among the ions, non-sea-salt (nss) SO{sub 4}{sup 2}'- showed higher concentration in winter while other ions did not show marked increase in winter. Based on the back-trajectory analyses of air masses, the increase in tritium concentrations in spring arises from downward movement of naturally produced tritium from stratosphere to troposphere, while the increase of the nss-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations in winter is due to long range transport of pollutants from China to Japan. (authors)

  17. An inter-laboratory study on the variability in measured concentrations of 17β-estradiol, testosterone, and 11-ketotestosterone in white sucker: implications and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Feswick, April; Ankley, Gerald T; Denslow, Nancy; Ellestad, Laura E; Fuzzen, Meghan; Jensen, Kathleen M; Kroll, Kevin; Lister, Andrea; MacLatchy, Deborah L; McMaster, Mark E; Orlando, Edward F; Servos, Mark R; Tetreault, Gerald R; Van Den Heuvel, Michael R; Munkittrick, Kelly R

    2014-04-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals are exogenous substances that can impact the reproduction of fish, potentially by altering circulating concentrations of 17β-estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). Common methods to measure steroids in plasma samples include radioimmunoassays (RIAs) and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISAs). The present study examines variability in E2, T, and 11-KT across 8 laboratories measuring reference and pulp mill effluent-exposed white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) plasma. We examine the contribution of assay type (RIA vs ELISA), standardized hormone extraction, location of values on the standard curve (upper and lower limits), and other variables on the ability to distinguish hormone levels between reference and exposed fish and the impact of these variables on quantitation of hormones in different laboratories. Of the 8 participating laboratories, 7 of 8 and 7 of 7 identified differences between sites for female E2 and female T, respectively, and 7 of 7 and 4 of 5 identified no differences between male T and male 11-KT. Notably, however, the ng/mL concentration of steroids measured across laboratories varied by factors of 10-, 6-, 14-, and 10-fold, respectively. Within laboratory intra-assay variability was generally acceptable and below 15%. Factors contributing to interlaboratory variability included calculation errors, assay type, and methodology. Based on the interlaboratory variability detected, we provide guidelines and recommendations to improve the accuracy and precision of steroid measurements in fish ecotoxicology studies. PMID:24375479

  18. Concentrations of lead, cadmium and barium in urban garden-grown vegetables: the impact of soil variables

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Murray B.; Shayler, Hannah A.; Spliethoff, Henry M.; Mitchell, Rebecca G.; Marquez-Bravo, Lydia G.; Ferenz, Gretchen S.; Russell-Anelli, Jonathan M.; Casey, Linda; Bachman, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Paired vegetable/soil samples from New York City and Buffalo, NY, gardens were analyzed for lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and barium (Ba). Vegetable aluminum (Al) was measured to assess soil adherence. Soil and vegetable metal concentrations did not correlate; vegetable concentrations varied by crop type. Pb was below health-based guidance values (EU standards) in virtually all fruits. 47% of root crops and 9% of leafy greens exceeded guidance values; over half the vegetables exceeded the 95th percentile of market-basket concentrations for Pb. Vegetable Pb correlated with Al; soil particle adherence/incorporation was more important than Pb uptake via roots. Cd was similar to market-basket concentrations and below guidance values in nearly all samples. Vegetable Ba was much higher than Pb or Cd, although soil Ba was lower than soil Pb. The poor relationship between vegetable and soil metal concentrations is attributable to particulate contamination of vegetables and soil characteristics that influence phytoavailability. PMID:25163429

  19. Concentrations of lead, cadmium and barium in urban garden-grown vegetables: the impact of soil variables.

    PubMed

    McBride, Murray B; Shayler, Hannah A; Spliethoff, Henry M; Mitchell, Rebecca G; Marquez-Bravo, Lydia G; Ferenz, Gretchen S; Russell-Anelli, Jonathan M; Casey, Linda; Bachman, Sharon

    2014-11-01

    Paired vegetable/soil samples from New York City and Buffalo, NY, gardens were analyzed for lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and barium (Ba). Vegetable aluminum (Al) was measured to assess soil adherence. Soil and vegetable metal concentrations did not correlate; vegetable concentrations varied by crop type. Pb was below health-based guidance values (EU standards) in virtually all fruits. 47% of root crops and 9% of leafy greens exceeded guidance values; over half the vegetables exceeded the 95th percentile of market-basket concentrations for Pb. Vegetable Pb correlated with Al; soil particle adherence/incorporation was more important than Pb uptake via roots. Cd was similar to market-basket concentrations and below guidance values in nearly all samples. Vegetable Ba was much higher than Pb or Cd, although soil Ba was lower than soil Pb. The poor relationship between vegetable and soil metal concentrations is attributable to particulate contamination of vegetables and soil characteristics that influence phytoavailability. PMID:25163429

  20. Influence of seasonal and inter-annual hydro-meteorological variability on surface water fecal coliform concentration under varying land-use composition.

    PubMed

    St Laurent, Jacques; Mazumder, Asit

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the influence of hydro-meteorological variability on surface source water fecal contamination is critical to the maintenance of safe drinking water. Historically, this has not been possible due to the scarcity of data on fecal indicator bacteria (FIB). We examined the relationship between hydro-meteorological variability and the most commonly measured FIB, fecal coliform (FC), concentration for 43 surface water sites within the hydro-climatologically complex region of British Columbia. The strength of relationship was highly variable among sites, but tended to be stronger in catchments with nival (snowmelt-dominated) hydro-meteorological regimes and greater land-use impacts. We observed positive relationships between inter-annual FC concentration and hydro-meteorological variability for around 50% of the 19 sites examined. These sites are likely to experience increased fecal contamination due to the projected intensification of the hydrological cycle. Seasonal FC concentration variability appeared to be driven by snowmelt and rainfall-induced runoff for around 30% of the 43 sites examined. Earlier snowmelt in nival catchments may advance the timing of peak contamination, and the projected decrease in annual snow-to-precipitation ratio is likely to increase fecal contamination levels during summer, fall, and winter among these sites. Safeguarding drinking water quality in the face of such impacts will require increased monitoring of FIB and waterborne pathogens, especially during periods of high hydro-meteorological variability. This data can then be used to develop predictive models, inform source water protection measures, and improve drinking water treatment. PMID:24095594

  1. Uranium concentrations from an aragonite speleothem as a proxy for Mesoamerican Monsoon Variability over the last 2,250 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, C.; Lachniet, M. S.; Asmerom, Y.; Polyak, V. J.; Bernal, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Trace element concentrations (Mg and U) were measured in an aragonite stalagmite (JX-6) from Juxtlahuaca Cave ("JX Cave"), in southwestern Mexico, using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). These trace element concentrations were compared to previously analyzed δ18O and δ13C values from JX-6, and to the results of previous studies comparing U concentrations in speleothems to paleoclimate. U concentrations of JX-6 correlate well with δ13C and δ18O values, and we interpret them to be a proxy for soil moisture above Juxtlahuaca Cave. This study concludes that U concentrations in JX-6 may be controlled by changes in the pCO2 of overlying soils in relation to plant respiration possibly linked to the consistency of wet season (May - November) rainfall and temperature between 240 BCE to 1800 CE. Comparison to previous studies suggests that speleothem U concentrations are controlled by local cave conditions and are best used with the support of additional trace element and stable isotope data. Anomalous spikes in trace element concentrations were also observed in JX-6 at ~1862, 1871, 1904, and 1933 CE. These spikes were interpreted to be caused by increased U mobilization in overlying soils related to multiple deforestation events in association with the clearing of land above Juxtlahuaca Cave for agricultural use.

  2. Evaluating the relationship between carisoprodol concentrations and meprobamate formation and inter-subject and intra-subject variability in urinary excretion data of pain patients.

    PubMed

    Tse, Stephanie A; Atayee, Rabia S; Best, Brookie M; Pesce, Amadeo J

    2012-05-01

    Using urinary carisoprodol data from pain patients, our objectives were to determine the relationship between carisoprodol concentration and its conversion to meprobamate, and quantify the intra-subject and inter-subject variability in carisoprodol metabolism. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantitate carisoprodol and meprobamate concentrations in urine specimens. The log creatinine-corrected carisoprodol versus log creatinine-corrected meprobamate showed a marginal positive relationship (R(2) = 0.395), with a 29.1-fold variance between subjects at the mean carisoprodol concentration. The geometric mean carisoprodol and meprobamate urine concentrations were 0.519 ± 3.38 mg and 28.2 ± 2.34 mg analyte per gram creatinine, respectively. The log metabolic ratio (MR) versus log creatinine-corrected carisoprodol displayed a marginal positive correlation. A subpopulation of outliers with higher carisoprodol and lower meprobamate levels were considered poor metabolizers and represented 0.483% (n = 21) of the study population. Using a curve-fit mathematical model, we estimated 0.318% (n = 10) to be ultra-rapid metabolizers. The inter-subject population geometric standard deviation (SD) of the MR was 3.64. The intra-subject geometric median and mean SD of the MR were 1.60 (interquartile range: 1.28, 2.07) and 1.72 ± 1.60, respectively. Inter-subject variability was 2.27 times greater than the median intra-subject variability. With a better understanding of urine carisoprodol and meprobamate concentrations and variability, urine drug testing provides a useful monitoring reference for clinicians. PMID:22511696

  3. Predictive models for Escherichia coli concentrations at inland lake beaches and relationship of model variables to pathogen detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods are needed improve the timeliness and accuracy of recreational water‐quality assessments. Traditional culture methods require 18–24 h to obtain results and may not reflect current conditions. Predictive models, based on environmental and water quality variables, have been...

  4. Variability of suspended particulate matter concentrations and organic compounds in frontal zones of the Atlantic and Southern oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Kravchishina, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and particulate forms of the organic compounds (hydrocarbons, lipids, and chlorophyll a) were determined in the surface water layers of the Atlantic and Southern oceans during February to May of 2012 and 2014. It was found that the distribution of concentrations of the studied components is mainly affected by the location of frontal zones. When ice cover forms in the Southern Ocean, the changes in water temperature and phytoplankton development at the ice-water interface result in an increase of the concentrations of SPM, chlorophyll a, and, to a lesser extent, of lipids and hydrocarbons in the surface water layer. The occasional sharp increase of hydrocarbon concentrations caused by anthropogenic pollution was registered at local parts of water areas in the east of the Atlantic Ocean, as well as in the North and Baltic seas.

  5. Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) concentrations and resulting exposure in homes in California: relationships among passive air, surface wipe and dust concentrations, and temporal variability.

    PubMed

    Bennett, D H; Moran, R E; Wu, X May; Tulve, N S; Clifton, M S; Colón, M; Weathers, W; Sjödin, A; Jones, R; Hertz-Picciotto, I

    2015-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as flame retardants in furniture foam, electronics, and other home furnishings. A field study was conducted that enrolled 139 households from California, which has had more stringent flame retardant requirements than other countries and areas. The study collected passive air, floor and indoor window surface wipes, and dust samples (investigator collected using an HVS3 and vacuum cleaner) in each home. PentaBDE and BDE209 were detected in the majority of the dust samples and many floor wipe samples, but the detection in air and window wipe samples was relatively low. Concentrations of each PBDE congener in different indoor environmental media were moderately correlated, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.42 and 0.68. Correlation coefficients with blood levels were up to 0.65 and varied between environmental media and age group. Both investigator-collected dust and floor wipes were correlated with serum levels for a wide range of congeners. These two sample types also had a relatively high fraction of samples with adequate mass for reliable quantification. In 42 homes, PBDE levels measured in the same environmental media in the same home 1 year apart were statistically correlated (correlation coefficients: 0.57-0.90), with the exception of BDE209 which was not well correlated longitudinally. PMID:24832910

  6. Combined use of remote sensing and continuous monitoring to analyse the variability of suspended-sediment concentrations in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, C.A.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Stumpf, R.P.; Lindsay, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of suspended-sediment concentration data in San Francisco Bay is complicated by spatial and temporal variability. In situ optical backscatterance sensors provide continuous suspended-sediment concentration data, but inaccessibility, vandalism, and cost limit the number of potential monitoring stations. Satellite imagery reveals the spatial distribution of surficial-suspended sediment concentrations in the Bay; however, temporal resolution is poor. Analysis of the in situ sensor data in conjunction with the satellite reflectance data shows the effects of physical processes on both the spatial and temporal distribution of suspended sediment in San Francisco Bay. Plumes can be created by large freshwater flows. Zones of high suspended-sediment concentrations in shallow subembayments are associated with wind-wave resuspension and the spring-neap cycle. Filaments of clear and turbid water are caused by different transport processes in deep channels, as opposed to adjacent shallow water.

  7. Optical variability of seawater in relation to particle concentration, composition, and size distribution in the nearshore marine environment at Imperial Beach, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woźniak, SłAwomir B.; Stramski, Dariusz; Stramska, Malgorzata; Reynolds, Rick A.; Wright, Vanessa M.; Miksic, Ezra Y.; Cichocka, Marta; Cieplak, Agnieszka M.

    2010-08-01

    We examined optical variability of seawater in relation to particle concentration, composition, and size distribution in the nearshore marine environment at Imperial Beach, California, over a period of 1.5 years. Measurements included the hyperspectral inherent optical properties (IOPs) of seawater (particulate beam attenuation, particulate and CDOM absorption coefficients within the spectral range 300-850 nm), particle size distribution (PSD) within the diameter range 2-60 μm, and the mass concentrations of suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), and chlorophyll a (Chl). The particulate assemblage spanned a wide range of concentrations and composition, from the dominance of mineral particles (POC/SPM < 0.06) with relatively steep PSDs to the high significance or dominance of organic particles (POC/SPM > 0.25) with considerably greater contribution of larger-sized particles. Large variability in the particulate characteristics produced correspondingly large variability in the IOPs; up to 100-fold variation in particulate absorption and scattering coefficients and several-fold variation in the SPM-specific and POC-specific coefficients. Analysis of these data demonstrates that knowledge of general characteristics about the particulate composition and size distribution leads to improved interpretations of the observed optical variability. We illustrate a multistep empirical approach for estimating proxies of particle concentration (SPM and POC), composition (POC/SPM), and size distribution (median diameter) from the measured IOPs in a complex coastal environment. The initial step provides information about a proxy for particle composition; other particulate characteristics are subsequently derived from relationships specific to different categories of particulate composition.

  8. Dispersion for two classes of random variables: General theory and application to inference of an external ligand concentration by a cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2015-09-01

    We derive expressions for the dispersion for two classes of random variables in Markov processes. Random variables such as current and activity pertain to the first class, which is composed of random variables that change whenever a jump in the stochastic trajectory occurs. The second class corresponds to the time the trajectory spends in a state (or cluster of states). While the expression for the first class follows straightforwardly from known results in the literature, we show that a similar formalism can be used to derive an expression for the second class. As an application, we use this formalism to analyze a cellular two-component network estimating an external ligand concentration. The uncertainty related to this external concentration is calculated by monitoring different random variables related to an internal protein. We show that, inter alia, monitoring the time spent in the phosphorylated state of the protein leads to a finite uncertainty only if there is dissipation, whereas the uncertainty obtained from the activity of the transitions of the internal protein can reach the Berg-Purcell limit even in equilibrium.

  9. Assessment of spatial variability of major-ion concentrations and del oxygen-18 values in surface snow, Upper Fremont Glacier, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    One hundred samples were collected from the surface of the Upper Fremont Glacier at equally spaced intervals defined by an 8100m2 snow grid to asesss the significance of lateral variability in major-ion concentrations and del oxygen-18 values. Comparison of the observed variability of each chemical constituent to the variability expected by measurement error indicated substantial lateral variability with the surface-snow layer. Results of the nested ANOVA indicate most of the variance for every constituent is in the values grouped at the two smaller geographic scales (between 506m2 and within 506m2 sections). The variance data from the snow grid were used to develop equations to evaluate the significance of both positive and negative concentration/value peaks of nitrate and del oxygen-18 with depth, in a 160m ice core. Values of del oxygen-18 in the section from 110-150m below the surface consistently vary outside the expected limits and possibly represents cooler temperatures during the Little Ice Age from about 1810 to 1725 A.D. -from Authors

  10. Fetal Liver Bisphenol A Concentrations and Biotransformation Gene Expression Reveal Variable Exposure and Altered Capacity for Metabolism in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Muna S.; Liao, Chunyang; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread exposure to the endocrine active compound, bisphenol A (BPA), is well documented in humans. A growing body of literature suggests adverse health outcomes associated with varying ranges of exposure to BPA. In the current study, we measured the internal dose of free BPA and conjugated BPA and evaluated gene expression of bio-transformation enzymes specific for BPA metabolism in 50 first- and second-trimester human fetal liver samples. Both free BPA and conjugated BPA concentrations varied widely, with free BPA exhibiting three times higher concentrations than conjugated BPA concentrations. As compared to gender-matched adult liver controls, UDP-glucuronyltransferase, sulfotransferase, and steroid sulfatase genes exhibited reduced expression whereas β-glucuronidase mRNA expression remained unchanged in the fetal tissues. This study provides evidence that there is considerable exposure to BPA during human pregnancy and that the capacity for BPA metabolism is altered in the human fetal liver. PMID:23208979

  11. Variability in pigment concentration in warm-core rings as determined by coastal zone color scanner satellite imagery from the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Moliner, Graciela; Yoder, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A time series of coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) derived chlorophyll (CZCS-chl) and sea surface temperature (SST) satellite imagery was developed for the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). Warm-core rings (WCR) were identified by both the warmer SST signal as well as the low pigment concentrations of their cores. The variation in pigment concentrations and SST observed in satellite imagery over the geographic range and life span of four WCRs is investigated. The hypotheses are that pigment concentration increase during the lifetime of the WCR is a response to processes such as convective overturn, upwelling, edge enhancement due to increased vertical mixing, active convergence, or lateral exchange. Empirical orthogonal function analysis (EOF) is used to investigate the relationship between SST and pigment patterns observed in the presence of a WCR. The first two EOF modes explain more than 80% of the variability observed in all four WCRs and in both (SST and pigment) data sets. The results of this study show that, at the synoptic scales of staellite data, the variability observed in the WCRs is greater at the periphery of the rings. These results show that advective entrainment, rather than processes at ring center (e.g., shoaling of the pycnocline/nutricline in response to frictional decay) or at the periphery due to other processes such as vertical mixing, is the mechanism responsible for the observed variability.

  12. Seasonal variability of mercury concentration in soils, buds and leaves of Acer platanoides and Tilia platyphyllos in central Poland.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Artur; Frankowski, Marcin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of mercury concentration in soils, buds and leaves of maple (Acer platanoides-Ap) and linden (Tilia platyphyllos-Tp) collected in four periods of the growing season of trees, i.e. in April (IV), June (VI), August (VIII) and November (IX) in 2013, from the area of Poznań city (Poland). The highest average concentration of mercury for 88 samples was determined in soils and it equaled 65.8 ± 41.7 ng g(-1) (range 14.5-238.9 ng g(-1)); lower average concentration was found in Ap samples (n = 66): 55.4 ± 18.1 ng g(-1) (range 26.5-106.9 ng g(-1)); in Tp samples 50.4 ± 15.8 ng g(-1) (range 23.1-88.7 ng g(-1)) and in 22 samples of Tp buds 40.8 ± 22.7 ng g(-1) (range 12.4-98.7 ng g(-1)) and Ap buds 28.2 ± 13.6 ng g(-1) (range 8.0-59.5 ng g(-1)). Based on the obtained results, it was observed that the highest concentration of mercury in soils occurred in the centre of Poznań city (95.5 ± 39.1 ng g(-1)), and it was two times higher than the concentration of mercury in other parts of the city. Similar dependencies were not observed for the leaf samples of Ap and Tp. It was found that mercury concentrations in the soil and leaves of maple and linden were different depending on the period of the growing season (April to November). Mercury content in the examined samples was higher in the first two research periods (April IV, June VI), and then, in the following periods, the accumulation of mercury decreased both in soil and leaf samples of the two tree species. There was no correlation found between mercury concentration in leaves and mercury concentration in soils during the four research periods (April-November). When considering the transfer coefficient, it was observed that the main source of mercury in leaves is the mercury coming from the atmosphere. PMID:26846237

  13. Regional patterns and local variability of dry and occult deposition strongly influence sulfate concentrations in Maine lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.A.; Kahl, J.S.; Brakke, D.F.; Brewer, G.F.; Haines, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    There is great uncertainty and large cost in making dry deposition measurements. The authors present evidence based on wet deposition, evapotranspiration, S storage in lake sediments, and sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams in Maine that the dry deposition flux of sulfur to drainage basins of lakes in Maine ranges from nearly 0% to more than 100% of wet deposition, even in small areas. The regional pattern of sulfate concentrations in Maine lakes is due to gradients in both wet and dry deposition and variation in evapotranspiration. Patterns are modified locally by lakes hydrologic type, elevation, vegetation, and terrestrial drainage basin aspect. (Copyright (c) 1988 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

  14. Spatial variability and temporal dynamics of greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4, N2O) concentrations and fluxes along the Zambezi River mainstem and major tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoru, C. R.; Nyoni, F. C.; Borges, A. V.; Darchambeau, F.; Nyambe, I.; Bouillon, S.

    2014-11-01

    Spanning over 3000 km in length and with a catchment of approximately 1.4 million km2, the Zambezi River is the fourth largest river in Africa and the largest flowing into the Indian Ocean from the African continent. As part of a~broader study on the riverine biogeochemistry in the Zambezi River basin, we present data on greenhouse gas (GHG, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O)) concentrations and fluxes collected along the Zambezi River, reservoirs and several of its tributaries during 2012 and 2013 and over two climatic seasons (dry and wet) to constrain the interannual variability, seasonality and spatial heterogeneity along the aquatic continuum. All GHGs concentrations showed high spatial variability (coefficient of variation: 1.01 for CO2, 2.65 for CH4 and 0.21 for N2O). Overall, there was no unidirectional pattern along the river stretch (i.e. decrease or increase towards the ocean), as the spatial heterogeneity of GHGs appeared to be determined mainly by the connectivity with floodplains and wetlands, and the presence of man-made structures (reservoirs) and natural barriers (waterfalls, rapids). Highest CO2 and CH4 concentrations in the mainstream river were found downstream of extensive floodplains/wetlands. Undersaturated CO2 conditions, in contrast, were characteristic for the surface waters of the two large reservoirs along the Zambezi mainstem. N2O concentrations showed the opposite pattern, being lowest downstream of floodplains and highest in reservoirs. Among tributaries, highest concentrations of both CO2 and CH4 were measured in the Shire River whereas low values were characteristic for more turbid systems such as the Luangwa and Mazoe rivers. The interannual variability in the Zambezi River was relatively large for both CO2 and CH4, and significantly higher concentrations (up to two fold) were measured during wet seasons compared to the dry season. Interannual variability of N2O was less pronounced but generally higher

  15. Temporal variability of mineral dust in southern Tunisia: analysis of 2 years of PM10 concentration, aerosol optical depth, and meteorology monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouet, Christel; Taieb Labiadh, Mohamed; Bergametti, Gilles; Rajot, Jean Louis; Marticorena, Béatrice; Sekrafi, Saâd; Ltifi, Mohsen; Féron, Anaïs; des Tureaux, Thierry Henry

    2016-04-01

    The south of Tunisia is a region very prone to wind erosion. During the last decades, changes in soil management have led to an increase in wind erosion. In February 2013, a ground-based station dedicated to the monitoring of mineral dust (that can be seen in this region as a proxy of the erosion of soils by wind) was installed at the Institut des Régions Arides (IRA) of Médenine (Tunisia) to document the temporal variability of mineral dust concentrations. This station allows continuous measurements of surface PM10 concentration (TEOM™), aerosol optical depth (CIMEL sunphotometer), and total atmospheric deposition of insoluble dust (CARAGA automatic sampler). The simultaneous monitoring of meteorological parameters (wind speed and direction, relative humidity, air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and precipitations) allows to analyse the factors controlling the variations of mineral dust concentration from the sub-daily to the annual scale. The results from the two first years of measurements of PM10 concentration are presented and discussed. In average on year 2014, PM10 concentration is 56 μg m‑3. However, mineral dust concentration highly varies throughout the year: very high PM10 concentrations (up to 1,000 μg m‑3 in daily mean) are frequently observed during wintertime and springtime, hardly ever in summer. These episodes of high PM10 concentration (when daily average PM10 concentration is higher than 240 μg m‑3) sometimes last several days. By combining local meteorological data, air-masses trajectories, sunphotometer measurements, and satellite imagery, the part of the high PM10concentration due to local emissions and those linked to an advection of dusty air masses by medium and long range transport from the Sahara desert is quantified.

  16. GROWTH PERFORMANCE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL VARIABLES FOR BROILER CHICKENS SUBJECTED TO SHORT-TERM ELEVATED CARBON DIOXIDE CONCENTRATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four trials were conducted to evaluate growth responses, blood chemistry and heart characteristics of broiler chicks subjected to progressive concentrations (0, 3,000, 6,000, 9,000 ppm) of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from 1 to 14 days of age, which were then discontinued throughout the remainder of th...

  17. Water administration of medium-chain fatty acid caprylic acid produced variable efficacy against cecal Campylobacter jejuni concentrations in broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter is one of the most common causes of foodborne illness, and poultry is considered a primary source of Campylobacter infections. Caprylic acid, an eight-carbon fatty acid, has been shown in previous studies to reduce enteric cecal Campylobacter concentrations in poultry when administere...

  18. Distribution, variability, and predictors of urinary concentrations of phenols and parabens among pregnant women in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Meeker, John D; Cantonwine, David E; Rivera-González, Luis O; Ferguson, Kelly K; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Calafat, Antonia M; Ye, Xiaoyun; Anzalota Del Toro, Liza V; Crespo-Hernández, Noé; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Cordero, José F

    2013-04-01

    Puerto Rico has higher rates of a range of endocrine-related diseases and disorders compared to the United States. However, little is known to date about human exposures to known or potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in Puerto Rico. We recruited 105 pregnant women in Northern Puerto Rico who provided urine samples and questionnaire data at three times (18 ± 2, 22 ± 2, and 26 ± 2 weeks) during gestation. We measured the urinary concentrations of five phenols and three parabens: 2,4-dichlorophenol (24-DCP), 2,5-dichlorophenol (25-DCP), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), bisphenol A (BPA), triclosan (TCS), butyl paraben (B-PB), methyl paraben (M-PB), and propyl paraben (P-PB). The frequent detection of these chemicals suggests that exposure is highly prevalent among these Puerto Rican pregnant women. Urinary concentrations of TCS, BP-3, and 25-DCP were higher than among women of reproductive age in the US general population, while concentrations of BPA, 24-DCP, and parabens were similar. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) varied widely between biomarkers; BPA had the lowest ICC (0.24) and BP-3 had the highest (0.62), followed by 25-DCP (0.49) and TCS (0.47). We found positive associations between biomarker concentrations with self-reported use of liquid soap (TCS), sunscreen (BP-3), lotion (BP-3 and parabens), and cosmetics (parabens). Our results can inform future epidemiology studies and strategies to reduce exposure to these chemicals or their precursors. PMID:23469879

  19. REGIONAL PATTERNS AND LOCAL VARIABILITY OF DRY AND OCCULT DEPOSITION STRONGLY INFLUENCE SULFATE CONCENTRATIONS IN MAINE LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is great uncertainty and large cost in making dry deposition measurements. e present evidence based on wet deposition, evapotranspiration, S storage in lake sediments, and sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams in Nllaine that the dry deposition flux of sulfur to drain...

  20. Variability of Residence Time tracer Concentrations at the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory during the California Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, A.; Thaw, M.; Stacy, E.; Hunsaker, C. T.; Bibby, R. K.; Deinhart, A.; Schorzman, K.; Egnatuk, C. M.; Conklin, M. H.; Esser, B.

    2015-12-01

    California water supply from high elevation snow melt is vulnerable to climate change and prolonged drought conditions. Reduced snow pack and earlier snow melt will result in a greater reliance on man-made reservoirs and subsurface catchment storage. To gain insight into the subsurface storage volume of high elevation catchments, we studied the residence time distribution of surface water leaving the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. Since October 2014, we have collected monthly samples of two residence time tracers with contrasting half-lives: sulfur-35 (87.5 days) and tritium (12.32 years). Upstream catchment area at the three nested sampling locations is 1 km2 (P301 sub-catchment), 4 km2 (Providence Creek) and ~50 km2 (Big Creek). Samples were analyzed at LLNL by low level liquid scintillation counting and noble gas mass spectrometry after helium accumulation. Variations in tracer concentrations in precipitation, both for tritium (11-24 pCi/L) and sulfur-35 (24-100 mBq/L), complicate straightforward interpretation of residence times. Sulfur-35 concentrations show that last year precipitation contributes 1% - 10% of total stream flow, even during peak snowmelt. Tritium concentrations in stream flow vary between 40% and 60% of the initial concentration in precipitation (15.5 pCi/L), indicating that water leaving the catchment has a residence time on the order of years to decades. Additional analyses of sodium-22 (2.6 year half-life) will aid in deconvoluting the residence time distribution. These low tracer concentrations can be attributed to current severe drought conditions, resulting in low discharge rates and longer residence times. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675107

  1. Ecological variables influencing trace element concentrations in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus, Montagu 1821) stranded in continental Portugal.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Sílvia S; Torres, Jordi; Ferreira, Marisa; Marçalo, Ana; Nicolau, Lídia; Vingada, José V; Eira, Catarina

    2016-02-15

    Both the conservation status of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) (Habitats Directive 92/43/CEE, Annex II) and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive demand for data on their ecology and anthropogenic threats. To evaluate the bottlenose dolphin's toxicological status in continental Portugal, several trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Zn) were determined in 25 stranded individuals. The potential effect of sex, body length and stranding location on trace element concentrations was analysed. In the present study, bottlenose dolphins presented high mercury levels, only exceeded by animals from the Mediterranean and Adriatic seas. Only essential elements were influenced by dolphin sex, whereas Cd, Hg and Pb bioaccumulated in larger dolphins, and hepatic Hg and Cd concentrations were higher in the northwest coast of continental Portugal. The location effect may relate to variations in bottlenose diet and trace element availability, according to the proximity to anthropogenic sources in the Atlantic Iberian coast. PMID:26706756

  2. Within-Vineyard, Within-Vine, and Within-Bunch Variability of the Rotundone Concentration in Berries of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pangzhen; Barlow, Snow; Krstic, Mark; Herderich, Markus; Fuentes, Sigfredo; Howell, Kate

    2015-05-01

    This study characterizes the environmental factors driving rotundone concentrations in grape berries by quantifying rotundone variability and correlating it with viticultural parameters. Dissection of the vineyard into distinct zones (on the basis of vigor, electrical soil conductivity, and slope), vine into orientations to sun (shaded/unshaded), and grape bunches into sectors (upper and lower and front and back) shows the influence of vine vigor, sunlight, and temperature. Occurrence of the highest rotundone concentration was observed in shaded bunch sectors and vines and from higher vigor vines in the southern-facing areas of the vineyard. The highest concentration of rotundone is consistently found at the top and in shaded sectors of bunches, and this correlates to lower grape surface temperatures. Modeling showed that berry temperature exceeding 25 °C negatively affects the rotundone concentration in Shiraz. Both natural and artificial shading modulated the grape surface and air temperature at the bunch zone and increased the rotundone concentration, without affecting other grape berry quality parameters. Thus, temperature and possibly sunlight interception are the main determinants of rotundone in grape berries. Vineyard topography, vine vigor, vine row, and grape bunch orientation influence the level of berry shading and can, therefore, adjust bunch surface and zone temperatures and influence the berry rotundone concentration. PMID:25891266

  3. Spatial and temporal variability of fluoride concentrations in groundwater resources of Larestan and Gerash regions in Iran from 2003 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hassan; Haghighat, Gholam Ali; Yunesian, Masud; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Dehghani, Mohammad Hadi; Davani, Rahim; Aminian, Abd-Rasool; Shamsipour, Mansour; Hassanzadeh, Naser; Faramarzi, Hossein; Mesdaghinia, Alireza

    2016-02-01

    There is discrepancy about intervals of fluoride monitoring in groundwater resources by Iranian authorities. Spatial and temporal variability of fluoride in groundwater resources of Larestan and Gerash regions in Iran were analyzed from 2003 to 2010 using a geospatial information system and the Mann-Kendall trend test. The mean concentrations of fluoride for the 8-year period in the eight cities and 31 villages were 1.6 and 2.0 mg/l, respectively; the maximum values were 2.4 and 3.8 mg/l, respectively. Spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal variability of fluoride in overall groundwater resources were relatively constant over the years. However, results of the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a monotonic trend in the time series of one city and 11 villages for the 8-year period. Specifically, one city and three villages showed positive significant Kendall's Tau values, suggesting an upward trend in fluoride concentrations over the 8-year period. In contrast, seven villages displayed negative significant Kendall's Tau values, arguing for a downward trend in fluoride concentrations over the years. From 2003 to 2010, approximately 52 % of the Larestan and Gerash areas have had fluoride concentrations above the maximum permissible Iranian drinking water standard fluoride level (1.4 mg/l), and about 116,000 people were exposed to such excess amounts. Therefore, our study supports for a close monitoring of fluoride concentrations from health authorities in monthly intervals, especially in villages and cities that showed positive trend in fluoride concentrations. Moreover, we recommend simultaneous implementation of cost-effective protective measures or interventions until a standard fluoride level is achieved. PMID:25600228

  4. Temporal variability of urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites, parabens and benzophenone-3 in a Belgian adult population.

    PubMed

    Dewalque, Lucas; Pirard, Catherine; Vandepaer, Sarah; Charlier, Corinne

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated the temporal within-person variability of the exposure biomarker for phthalates, parabens and benzophenone-3 (BP3) in 32 Belgian adults, each providing 11 urine spots during 4 months. We calculated the intraclass coefficient correlation (ICC), the sensitivity and the specificity to assess the temporal reproducibility and to investigate the predictive ability of the spot measurements for these classes of chemicals. Additionally, we explored the temporal variability of the estimation of the cumulative risk of exposure to phthalates (hazard index; HI). We observed fair ICC ranging from 0.55 to 0.68 for parabens, monoethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-iso-butyl phthalate (MiBP) and BP3, but lower ICC, from 0.20 to 0.49, for monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-oxo-hexyl phthalate (5-oxo-MEHP) and mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxy-hexyl phthalate (5-OH-MEHP). The ICC estimated for HI (0.49) reflected a moderate reproducibility. The measurements in spot samples were moderate to good predictor of the 4-month level of exposure for parabens, MEP, MnBP, MiBP, BP3 and HI (sensitivity ranging from 0.67 to 0.77), but lower predictor for MEHP, 5-oxo-MEHP, 5-OH-MEHP and MBzP (sensitivity ranging from 0.58 to 0.63). The sensitivity could be increased when several spot urinary levels were averaged to predict the long-term level of exposure. Globally, our results indicate that a single spot measurement seems to correctly represent the long-term exposure for parabens, BP3, MEP, MiBP and HI. Additional spot samples seemed to be needed for the proper exposure assessment of the other target compounds. PMID:26233661

  5. Spatial and temporal variability of nitrate and nitrous oxide concentrations in the unsaturated zone at a corn field in the US Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, C.

    2011-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in reactive nitrogen in the environment as a result of human activity. Reactive nitrogen of anthropogenic origin now equals that derived from natural terrestrial nitrogen fixation and is expected to exceed it by the end of the decade. Nitrogen is applied to crops as fertilizer and impacts the environment through water quality impairments (mostly as nitrate) and as greenhouse gas emissions (as nitrous oxide). Research on environmental impacts resulting from nitrogen application in the form of fertilizers has focused disproportionately on the degradation of water quality from agricultural non-point sources. The impacts of this degradation are registered both locally, with runoff and percolation of agrochemicals into local surface water and groundwater, and on a larger scale, such as the increase in the anoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico attributed to nitrate from the Mississippi River. Impacts to the global climate from increased production of nitrous oxide as a result of increased fertilization are equally significant. Nitrous oxide is a greenhouse gas with a warming potential that is approximately 300 times greater than carbon dioxide. Direct emissions of nitrous oxide from the soil have been expressed as 1% of the applied nitrogen. Indirect emissions due to runoff, leaching and volatilization of the nitrogen from the field have been expressed as 0.75% of the applied nitrogen. Many studies have focused on processes governing nitrogen fluxes in the soil, surface water and groundwater systems. However, research on the biogeochemical processes regulating nitrogen fluxes in the unsaturated zone and consequent impacts on nitrate and nitrous oxide concentrations in groundwater are lacking. Our study explores the spatial and temporal variability of nitrate and nitrous oxide concentrations in the vadose zone at a 15 acre corn field in the US Midwest and links it to the concentrations found in the groundwater at the field site. Results

  6. Variability of Near-stream, Sub-surface Major-ion and Tracer Concentrations in an Acid Mine Drainage Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencala, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Runkel, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    In acid mine drainage environments, tracer-injection and synoptic sampling approaches provide tools for making operational estimates of solute loading within a stream segment. Identifying sub-surface contaminant sources remains a challenge both for characterization of in-stream metal loading and hydrological process research. There is a need to quantitatively define the character and source of contaminants entering streams from ground-water pathways, as well as the potential for changes in water chemistry and contaminant concentrations along these flow paths crossing the sediment-water interface. Complicating the identification of inflows is the mixing of solute sources which may occur in the `near-stream' subsurface areas and specifically along hyporheic exchange flows (HEFs). In Mineral Creek (Silverton, Colorado), major-ion (SO42-, Cl-, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) meter-scale sampling shows that subsurface inflows and likely HEFs occur in a hydro- geochemical setting of significant, one order-of-magnitude, spatial variation in the solute concentrations. Transient Storage Models (TSMs) are a tool for interpreting the in-stream responses of solute transport in streams influenced by hyporheic exchange flows. Simulations using the USGS TSM code OTIS are interpreted as suggesting that in Mineral Creek the strong concentration `tailing' of bromide following the tracer injection occurred, at least in part, from HEFs in a hydro - solute transport setting of likely multiple, dispersed and mixed sources of water along a 64 m sub-reach of the nominally gaining stream. In acid mine drainage environments, the ability to distinguish between local and deep solute sources is critical in modeling reactive transport along the stream, as well as in identifying the geochemical evolution of dispersed, subsurface inflows thorough the catchment.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Variability of CO2 and CH4 Concentrations in the Atmospheric Surface Layer over West Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belan, Boris D.; Machida, Toshinobu; Sasakawa, Motoki; Davydov, Denis K.; Fofonov, Alexander V.; Krasnov, Oleg A.; Maksyutov, Shamil; Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.

    2015-04-01

    The investigation of greenhouse gas behavior in the atmosphere plays a key role in predicting the global changes of Earth's climate. In this connection, of particular importance is the study of the distribution of sources/sinks of trace gases in the atmospheric surface layer over the different regions of the globe. In order to fill a gap in the data on greenhouse gas concentrations in Russia, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES, Japan) and Institute of Atmospheric Optics (IAO SB RAS, Russia) established a network for GHG monitoring (JR-STATION, Japan-Russia Siberian Tall Tower Inland Observation Network). Gas analyzers and meteorological sensors were mounted at radio relay towers located in different regions of West Siberia. The checking equipment was placed in containers at the tower base. In the containers, the climatic parameters optimal for gas analyzer operation were maintained. The work on the network development started in 2001. Since at each of the sites the measurement duration could be different, in this paper we present the data of the greenhouse gas monitoring for eight sites which give the primary idea on the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of CO2 and CH4 in the atmospheric surface layer over West Siberia. The analysis of the data showed that the average increase in concentration of carbon dioxide by results of our measurements in this territory increases within 1.95 - 2.53 ppm/year, depending on the area. The analysis of long-term data testifies about existence of growth of concentration of methane within 3.2 - 7.2 ppb / year. The presence of a distributed network of the sites operating in the monitoring regime makes it possible not only to investigate the temporal dynamics of CO2 and CH4 at each site and to determine the spatial differences between the concentrations by comparing the data, but also to plot the distribution charts for different moments of time. This work was supported by the Global Environment Research

  8. Effects of an increase of regional PM2.5 concentration in East Asia on the climate variability in the North Paicific for 1985-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    lee, jong-won; yeh, sang-wook

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that atmospheric variables can be influenced to change by aerosol concentration. In spite of a wealth of studies, however, it is still remain unclear how the regional anthropogenic aerosol in East Asia affects the climate variability in the North Pacific. In this study, we examined the effect of anthropogenic aerosol forcing in East Asia (GEOS-Chem) on the climate variability in the North Pacific based on a global chemical transport model and three idealized experiments using an atmosphere model. GEOS-Chem is forced by the assimilated meteorology from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for 1985-2010. Regarding three experiments, the first set used the historical SST for 1985-2010 with the time-varying emissions in East Asia. The second set used the historical SST without the emissions and the third set included the climatological SST with the time-varying emissions in East Asia. By comparing GEOS-Chem run with atmosphere model runs, we analyze the role of regional aerosol forcing in East Asia on the climate variability in the North Pacific.

  9. Impact of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation on the decadal variability of the Gulf Stream path and regional chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Franks, A.; Zhang, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we show that the underlying physical driver for the decadal variability in the Gulf Stream (GS) path and the regional biogeochemical cycling is linked to the low frequency variability in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). There is a significant anticorrelation between AMOC variations and the meridional shifts of the GS path at decadal time scale in both observations and two Earth system models (ESMs). The chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations in the GS region are found significantly correlated with the AMOC fingerprint and anticorrelated with the GS path at decadal time scale through coherent isopycnal changes in the GS front in the ESMs. Our results illustrate how changes in the large-scale ocean circulation, such as AMOC, are teleconnected with regional decadal physical and biogeochemical variations near the North American east coast. Such linkages are useful for predicting future physical and biogeochemical variations in this region.

  10. A flow system for generation of concentration perturbation in two-dimensional correlation near-infrared spectroscopy: application to variable selection in multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Claudete Fernandes; Pasquini, Celio

    2010-05-01

    A flow system is proposed to produce a concentration perturbation in liquid samples, aiming at the generation of two-dimensional correlation near-infrared spectra. The system presents advantages in relation to batch systems employed for the same purpose: the experiments are accomplished in a closed system; application of perturbation is rapid and easy; and the experiments can be carried out with micro-scale volumes. The perturbation system has been evaluated in the investigation and selection of relevant variables for multivariate calibration models for the determination of quality parameters of gasoline, including ethanol content, MON (motor octane number), and RON (research octane number). The main advantage of this variable selection approach is the direct association between spectral features and chemical composition, allowing easy interpretation of the regression models. PMID:20482969

  11. Linking mutagenic activity to micropollutant concentrations in wastewater samples by partial least square regression and subsequent identification of variables.

    PubMed

    Hug, Christine; Sievers, Moritz; Ottermanns, Richard; Hollert, Henner; Brack, Werner; Krauss, Martin

    2015-11-01

    We deployed multivariate regression to identify compounds co-varying with the mutagenic activity of complex environmental samples. Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents with a large share of industrial input of different sampling dates were evaluated for mutagenic activity by the Ames Fluctuation Test and chemically characterized by a screening for suspected pro-mutagens and non-targeted software-based peak detection in full scan data. Areas of automatically detected peaks were used as predictor matrix for partial least squares projections to latent structures (PLS) in combination with measured mutagenic activity. Detected peaks were successively reduced by the exclusion of all peaks with lowest variable importance until the best model (high R(2) and Q(2)) was reached. Peaks in the best model co-varying with the observed mutagenicity showed increased chlorine, bromine, sulfur, and nitrogen abundance compared to original peak set indicating a preferential selection of anthropogenic compounds. The PLS regression revealed four tentatively identified compounds, newly identified 4-(dimethylamino)-pyridine, and three known micropollutants present in domestic wastewater as co-varying with the mutagenic activity. Co-variance between compounds stemming from industrial wastewater and mutagenic activity supported the application of "virtual" EDA as a statistical tool to separate toxicologically relevant from less relevant compounds. PMID:26070082

  12. Spatial distribution and seasonal variability of chlorophyll-a concentration in the Azov Sea turbid waters by means of remote sensing and continuous fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saprygin, V. V.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to apply continuous fluorometric and remote estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration (Cchl) techniques to complex turbid waters of Azov Sea and explore Cchl temporal variation and spatial pattern. Azov Sea is the shallowest sea in the world with maximum depth below 15 m. Its maximum salinity is about 14%; total suspended solids and chlorophyll-a concentrations reach 120 [tex]g m^{-3}[/tex] and 100 [tex]mg m^{-3}[/tex] respectively in Taganrog Bay, daily production varies up to 3.5 [tex]gC_{org} m^{-3}[/tex]. Chlorophyll-a concentrations were measured in 2008-2010 year-round spectrophotometrically, 446 water samples were taken to calibrate fluorometerical and remote sensing data. The highest recorded concentration was 149.3, the lowest - 0.3 [tex]mg m^{-3}[/tex]. Continuous-flow fluorometer was applied in the course of 3 expeditions to Taganrog Bay to measure chlorophyll-a fluorescence (Fchl) each 30 meters along the ship path. Two-cuvette fluorometer was used to discount the influence of dissolved organic matter. Fchl measurements were calibrated and Cchl profiles derieved to estimate Cchl spatial heterogeneity in close scale. Fchl measurements were also made during moorings each 6 seconds to estimate temporal Cchl variability. Recently published algorithm based on reflectance in the red and the near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions was applied to MERIS data for the remote estimation of Cchl. Taking in account fluorometric Cchl spatial heterogeneity estimation, the algorithm for culling the outliers in Cchl fields derived from satellite data was developed. 74 images were processed to Cchl maps and then averaged monthly. Consequently, Cchl spatial distribution and seasonal variability were studied. Spectrophotometric, flourumetric measurements and values obtained by NIR-red algorithm showed strong correlation in turbid Case II waters of Azov Sea. Fluorometric and remote measurements showed high Cchl variations in short and long terms

  13. Origin and variability of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) mass concentrations over an Eastern Mediterranean city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, N. A.; El Jam, F.; El Tayar, G.; Obeid, W.; Roumie, M.

    2010-07-01

    Being a semi-enclosed area, the Eastern Mediterranean region experiences high Particulate Matter (PM) levels that could be attributed to sources originating from the region and from long-range transported pollutants. In this study, a long-term evaluation of PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentrations reveals that averages of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations collected between 2003 and 2007 in several different sites in Beirut exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) PM10 and PM2.5 annual averages (20 and 10 µg m - 3 , respectively). When compared to other sites in the region, levels fell in general outside the usual range for most other urban sites that are not directly affected by industrial activity. The average PM2.5/PM10 ratios were about 0.42, a value that is typical of urban sites. The overall averages for different seasons were higher in fall and summer as a result of low precipitations, the increase of dust storm activities in fall and the enhancement of sea and land breezes in summer, along with the increase in traffic activities (summer is a high touristic season). Using the HYSPLIT model for about 500 sampled days in Beirut, Lebanon, it was found that 60% of the wind comes from the N, NW and NE, while the remaining 40% comes from the S, SW and SE. Comparing the sources assigned to the pre- (BH) and post- (HH) 2006-war sites, it was found that aged dust increased by 64% in total PM10 and secondary aerosols by 150% in fine PM in HH over BH. Furthermore, much higher average percentages of sulfates and nitrates were determined in fine PMs in HH, indicating increased levels of their precursors NO x, SO x and Ca generated from a higher density of gasoline, diesel vehicles and construction debris.

  14. Determination of inorganic arsenic species by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with variable sodium tetrahydroborate concentrations*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Mirna E.; Beldoménico, Horacio R.

    2004-07-01

    This work describes a study on the determination of inorganic arsenic species in ground water and synthetic experimental matrices, using a flow injection system with on-line hydride generation device coupled to an atomic absorption spectrometer with flame-heated quartz atomizer (FI HG AAS). Specific trivalent arsenic determination is based on the slow kinetics of As(V) on the hydride generation reaction using sufficiently low concentrations of sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH 4) as reductant in highly acidic conditions (pH<0). Under these conditions, the efficiency of hydride generation from As(V) is much lower than that from As(III). The pentavalent form is determined by the difference between total inorganic arsenic and As(III). As(V) interferences were studied using As(III) solutions ranging from 0% to 50% of total inorganic As. The optimized NaBH 4 concentration was 0.035% (w/v). The detection limit was 1.4 μg l -1 As(III). As(V) interferences were 6% in the case of water samples with 6 μg l -1 As(III) in the presence of 54 μg l -1 As(V) (i.e. 10% As(III)). Interferences of methylated arsenic species (MMA and DMA) were evaluated. Speciation method was satisfactorily applied to 20 field arsenical water samples from Santa Fe, Argentina, with values ranging from 30 to 308 μg l -1 total As. We found from 0% to 36% As(III) in the 20 field samples. The developed methodology constitutes an economic, simple and reliable way to evaluate inorganic arsenic distribution in underground waters or similar systems with negligible or no content of organoarsenicals.

  15. Ozone and aerosol tropospheric concentrations variability analyzed using the ADRIMED measurements and the WRF and CHIMERE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, L.; Mailler, S.; Siour, G.; Bessagnet, B.; Turquety, S.; Rea, G.; Briant, R.; Mallet, M.; Sciare, J.; Formenti, P.; Meleux, F.

    2015-06-01

    During the months of June and July 2013, over the Euro-Mediterranean area, the ADRIMED (Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) project was dedicated to characterize the ozone and aerosol concentrations in the troposphere. It is first shown that this period was not highly polluted compared to previous summers in this region, with a moderate ozone production, no significant vegetation fire events and several precipitation periods scavenging the aerosol. The period is modeled with the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) and CHIMERE models, and their ability to quantify the observed pollution transport events is presented. The CHIMERE model simulating all kinds of sources (anthropogenic, biogenic, mineral dust, vegetation fires); the aerosol speciation, not available with the measurements, is presented: during the whole period, the aerosol was mainly constituted by mineral dust, sea salt and sulfates close to the surface and mainly by mineral dust in the troposphere. Compared to the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) size distribution, it is shown that the model underestimates the coarse mode near mineral dust sources and overestimates the fine mode in the Mediterranean area, highlighting the need to improve the model representation of the aerosol size distribution both during emissions, long-range transport and deposition.

  16. Variable effects of parabrachial nucleus lesions on salt appetite in rats depending upon experimental paradigm and saline concentration

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Edward M.; Grigson, Patricia S.; Norgren, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bilateral lesions of the gustatory (medial) zone of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) in the pons eliminate the salt appetite induced in rats by treatment with the diuretic drug, furosemide. The present studies re-examined NaCl intake of rats with PBN lesions induced by ibotenic acid, using multiple models of salt appetite. The impairment of a conditioned taste aversion, an established consequence of PBN damage, was used as an initial screen with which to assess the effectiveness of the lesions. Rats with PBN lesions did not drink either 0.3 M NaCl or 0.5 M NaCl in response to daily treatment with desoxycorticosterone acetate. These findings suggest that the excitatory stimulus of salt appetite mediated by mineralocorticoids is abolished by PBN lesions. In contrast, rats with PBN lesions drank some 0.5 M NaCl, and more 0.3 M NaCl, in addition to water in response to hypovolemia induced by subcutaneous injection of 30% polyethylene glycol solution. Those findings suggest that an excitatory stimulus of salt appetite, presumably mediated by angiotensin II, is not abolished by PBN lesions. These and other observations indicate that lesions of the gustatory PBN in rats may or may not eliminate salt appetite, depending on which model is used and which concentration of NaCl solution is available. PMID:23398436

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in plastic pellets: variability in the concentration and composition at different sediment depths in a sandy beach.

    PubMed

    Fisner, Mara; Taniguchi, Satie; Moreira, Fabiana; Bícego, Márcia C; Turra, Alexander

    2013-05-15

    Plastic pellets have the ability to adsorb organic pollutants such as PAHs. This study analyzed the variability in the concentration and composition of PAHs on plastic pellets sampled up to 1m deep in the sediment of a sandy beach. The toxic potential of PAHs was analyzed, and the possible sources of contamination are discussed. The total PAHs varied, with the highest concentrations in the surface layer; the priority PAHs showed a different pattern. PAHs at greater depths did not reach toxicity levels above the PEL. The composition of PAHs differed between pellets from the shallower and from deeper sediment layers, and was suggested a mixture of sources. These results provided the first information on the depth distribution of PAHs in sandy beaches, associated with plastic pellets; and evidenced the potential environmental risk. Similarly to the abundance of pellets, the toxic potential is underestimated in surface samples. PMID:23582976

  18. Assessing the Variability of Heavy Metal Concentrations in Liquid-Solid Two-Phase and Related Environmental Risks in the Weihe River of Shaanxi Province, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinxi; Yang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Junlong; Long, Yongqing; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Taifan

    2015-07-01

    Accurate estimation of the variability of heavy metals in river water and the hyporheic zone is crucial for pollution control and environmental management. The biotoxicities and potential ecological risks of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd) in a solid-liquid two-phase system were estimated using the Geo-accumulation Index, Potential Ecological Risk Assessment and Quality Standard Index methods in the Weihe River of Shaanxi Province, China. Water and sediment samples were collected from five study sites during spring, summer and winter, 2013. The dominant species in the streambed sediments were chironomids and flutter earthworm, whose bioturbation mainly ranged from 0 to 20 cm. The concentrations of heavy metals in surface water and pore water varied obviously in spring and summer. The degrees of concentration of Cu and Cd in spring and summer were higher than the U.S. water quality Criteria Maximum Concentrations. Furthermore, the biotoxicities of Pb and Zn demonstrated season-spatial variations. The concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd in spring and winter were significantly higher than those in summer, and the pollution levels also varied obviously in different layers of the sediments. Moreover, the pollution level of Cd was the most serious, as estimated by all three assessment methods. PMID:26193293

  19. Assessing the Variability of Heavy Metal Concentrations in Liquid-Solid Two-Phase and Related Environmental Risks in the Weihe River of Shaanxi Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinxi; Yang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Junlong; Long, Yongqing; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Taifan

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of the variability of heavy metals in river water and the hyporheic zone is crucial for pollution control and environmental management. The biotoxicities and potential ecological risks of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd) in a solid-liquid two-phase system were estimated using the Geo-accumulation Index, Potential Ecological Risk Assessment and Quality Standard Index methods in the Weihe River of Shaanxi Province, China. Water and sediment samples were collected from five study sites during spring, summer and winter, 2013. The dominant species in the streambed sediments were chironomids and flutter earthworm, whose bioturbation mainly ranged from 0 to 20 cm. The concentrations of heavy metals in surface water and pore water varied obviously in spring and summer. The degrees of concentration of Cu and Cd in spring and summer were higher than the U.S. water quality Criteria Maximum Concentrations. Furthermore, the biotoxicities of Pb and Zn demonstrated season-spatial variations. The concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd in spring and winter were significantly higher than those in summer, and the pollution levels also varied obviously in different layers of the sediments. Moreover, the pollution level of Cd was the most serious, as estimated by all three assessment methods. PMID:26193293

  20. Post-earthquake relaxation evidence for laterally variable viscoelastic structure and elevated water concentration in the southwestern California mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, F. F.

    2014-12-01

    I re-examine the lower crust and mantle relaxation following two large events in the Mojave Desert: the 1992 M7.3 Landers and 1999 M7.1 Hector Mine, California, earthquakes. More than a decade of GPS time series from regional sites out to 250 km from the ruptures are used to constrain models of postseismic relaxation. Crustal motions in the Mojave Desert region are elevated for several years following each event, with perturbations from a pre-Landers background of order mm to cm per year. I consider afterslip and relaxation of the ductile lower crust and mantle to explain these motions. To account for broad scale relaxation, the Burgers body model is employed, involving Kelvin (transient) viscosity and rigidity and Maxwell (steady state) viscosity and rigidity. I use the code VISCO2.5D to perform 2.5D modeling of the postseismic relaxation (3D quasi-static motions computed on 2D, laterally heterogeneous viscoelastic structures; Pollitz, 2014 GJI). Joint afterslip / postseismic relaxation modeling of continuous GPS time series up to 10.46 years following the Hector Mine earthquake (i.e. up to the time of the 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake) reveals that a northwest-trending `southwest domain' that envelopes the San Andreas fault system and western Mojave Desert has ~4 times larger Maxwell mantle viscosity than the adjacent `northeast domain' that extends inland and envelopes the Landers and Hector Mine rupture areas in the central Mojave Desert. This pattern is counter to that expected from regional heat flow, which is higher in the northeast domain, but it is explicable by means of a non-linear rheology that includes dependence on both strain rate and water concentration. I infer that the southwest domain mantle has a relatively low steady-state viscosity because of its high strain rate and water content. The relatively low mantle water content of the northeast domain is interpreted to result from the continual extraction of water through igneous and volcanic

  1. Effect of the spatiotemporal variability of rainfall inputs in water quality integrated catchment modelling for dissolved oxygen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Ródenas, Antonio Manuel; Cecinati, Francesca; ten Veldhuis, Marie-Claire; Langeveld, Jeroen; Clemens, Francois

    2016-04-01

    Maintaining water quality standards in highly urbanised hydrological catchments is a worldwide challenge. Water management authorities struggle to cope with changing climate and an increase in pollution pressures. Water quality modelling has been used as a decision support tool for investment and regulatory developments. This approach led to the development of integrated catchment models (ICM), which account for the link between the urban/rural hydrology and the in-river pollutant dynamics. In the modelled system, rainfall triggers the drainage systems of urban areas scattered along a river. When flow exceeds the sewer infrastructure capacity, untreated wastewater enters the natural system by combined sewer overflows. This results in a degradation of the river water quality, depending on the magnitude of the emission and river conditions. Thus, being capable of representing these dynamics in the modelling process is key for a correct assessment of the water quality. In many urbanised hydrological systems the distances between draining sewer infrastructures go beyond the de-correlation length of rainfall processes, especially, for convective summer storms. Hence, spatial and temporal scales of selected rainfall inputs are expected to affect water quality dynamics. The objective of this work is to evaluate how the use of rainfall data from different sources and with different space-time characteristics affects modelled output concentrations of dissolved oxygen in a simplified ICM. The study area is located at the Dommel, a relatively small and sensitive river flowing through the city of Eindhoven (The Netherlands). This river stretch receives the discharge of the 750,000 p.e. WWTP of Eindhoven and from over 200 combined sewer overflows scattered along its length. A pseudo-distributed water quality model has been developed in WEST (mikedhi.com); this is a lumped-physically based model that accounts for urban drainage processes, WWTP and river dynamics for several

  2. Remotely sensed variability of the suspended sediment concentration and its response to decreased river discharge in the Yangtze estuary and adjacent coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fang; Zhou, Yunxuan; Li, Jiufa; He, Qing; Verhoef, Wouter

    2013-10-01

    Satellite observation is an excellent tool for exploring the variability of the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) of turbid estuarine and coastal waters. We used a recently developed semi-empirical radiative transfer model combined with a multi-wavelength switching algorithm for the SSC retrieval from MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) satellite data. This method can successfully retrieve SSC from satellite data in turbid estuarine and coastal waters with a wide range of sediment concentrations (20-2500 mg l-1) and is robust for quantifying realistic patterns of the surface sediment dynamics. The seasonal and annual variability of the MERIS-derived SSC from 2003 to 2010 were analysed in this work. Five regions-of-interest (ROIs) in the Yangtze estuary and coast are included in the analysis: the upper estuary, the lower estuary, the outer estuary, the Hangzhou Bay and the Qidong shore. The results reveal that the SSC of the upper estuary has significant seasonal and annual variations in response to seasonal cycling and annual fluctuation of the river discharge. A long-term continuing decrease of river discharge may cause an overall decline of the SSC in the entire estuary and adjacent areas. The existence of horizontal exchanges of the sediments between the Yangtze estuary and the Jiangsu coast implies that the decreased fluvial sediment loads of the estuary may partially be compensated by supplementing contributions from other origins.

  3. Seasonal and interannual variability in wetland methane emissions simulated by CLM4Me' and CAM-chem and comparisons to observations of concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L.; Paudel, R.; Hess, P. G. M.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the temporal and spatial variation of wetland methane emissions is essential to the estimation of the global methane budget. Our goal for this study is three-fold: (i) to evaluate the wetland methane fluxes simulated in two versions of the Community Land Model, the Carbon-Nitrogen (CN; i.e., CLM4.0) and the Biogeochemistry (BGC; i.e., CLM4.5) versions using the methane emission model CLM4Me' so as to determine the sensitivity of the emissions to the underlying carbon model; (ii) to compare the simulated atmospheric methane concentrations to observations, including latitudinal gradients and interannual variability so as to determine the extent to which the atmospheric observations constrain the emissions; (iii) to understand the drivers of seasonal and interannual variability in atmospheric methane concentrations. Simulations of the transport and removal of methane use the Community Atmosphere Model with chemistry (CAM-chem) model in conjunction with CLM4Me' methane emissions from both CN and BGC simulations and other methane emission sources from literature. In each case we compare model-simulated atmospheric methane concentration with observations. In addition, we simulate the atmospheric concentrations based on the TransCom wetland and rice paddy emissions derived from a different terrestrial ecosystem model, Vegetation Integrative Simulator for Trace gases (VISIT). Our analysis indicates CN wetland methane emissions are higher in the tropics and lower at high latitudes than emissions from BGC. In CN, methane emissions decrease from 1993 to 2004 while this trend does not appear in the BGC version. In the CN version, methane emission variations follow satellite-derived inundation wetlands closely. However, they are dissimilar in BGC due to its different carbon cycle. CAM-chem simulations with CLM4Me' methane emissions suggest that both prescribed anthropogenic and predicted wetlands methane emissions contribute substantially to seasonal and

  4. Spatial and Temporal Variability in the Concentration and Turnover of the Inorganic Phosphate and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate pools in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkman, Karin; Church, Matthew; Karl, David

    2015-04-01

    The microbial community's utilization of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a function of the Pi pool concentration was studied over a multi-year period at Station ALOHA (22.75˚N, 158˚W) in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Additionally, the spatial variability in these same properties was investigated along an east-west transect from California to Hawaii in the Fall of 2014. We used radiotracer techniques to determine the turnover times of the Pi or ATP pools respectively, and assessed the net production of dissolved organic phosphorus, and Pi hydrolysis rate from ATP. Pi concentrations in the upper water column at Station ALOHA are temporally highly dynamic, with periods of <10 nM-P to near 200 nM-P recorded within the top 50 m over the past decades of observations. During the California to Hawaii transect Pi concentrations showed a similarly large range (<10 to >200 nM-P), emphasizing the spatially and temporally mosaic nature of the upper ocean of this large biome. The Pi-pool turnover time ranged from a few hours to several weeks, and was strongly correlated with measured Pi pool concentrations (r2=0.8; n=30 Station ALOHA; n=15 transect). The calculated Pi uptake rates at Station ALOHA averaged 3.7±1.3 nM-P d-1 (n=30), reflecting the typically low maximum Pi uptake rates of the Prochlorococcus dominated community and the predominantly non-limiting Pi conditions. The Pi uptake rates along the transect were more variable than Station ALOHA (averaging 9.2±4.7 nM=P d-1, n=15), possibly due to a more diverse planktonic community structure, including stations with elevated concentrations of chlorophyll and primary productivity. The turnover time of the dissolved ATP pool was typically substantially shorter than for the Pi-pool (2-5 days at Station ALOHA; 0.3-2.5 days along the transect), likely reflecting its low nanomolar to picomolar ambient pool concentrations. However, at stations with the lowest SRP concentrations the

  5. A Variable Trajectory Plume Segment Model to Assess Ground-Level Air Concentrations and Depositions of Routine Effluent Releases from Nuclear Power Facilities.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1986-05-27

    Version: 00 MESODIF-II, which embodies a variable trajectory plume segment atmospheric transport model, is designed to predict normalized air concentrations and deposition of radioactive, but otherwise non-reactive, effluents released from one or two levels over the same position in an xy-plane. In such a model, calculated particle trajectories vary as synoptic scale wind varies. At all sampling times, the particles are connected to form a segmented plume centerline. The lateral and vertical dimensions of themore » plume are determined by a parameterization of turbulence scale diffusion. The impetus for the development of this model arose from the need of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess radiological effects resulting from routine nuclear power reactor operations, as outlined in U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Guide 1.111.« less

  6. Assessing multi-variable coupling effects of UV illumination, heat and oxygen on porous ZnO nanocrystalline film through electron concentration and mobility extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shasha; Xie, Changsheng; Zhang, Guozhu; Zhu, Qiang; Zhang, Shunping

    2015-07-21

    Porous ZnO nanocrystalline films have been widely used in optoelectronic and gas-sensing applications. However, the effect mechanisms of the external fields, such as light, heat and atmosphere, are still controversial. In this work, the multi-variable coupling effects of the UV light, heat and oxygen were thoroughly studied by a newly proposed method, the central idea of which was to first isolate each effect of the fields on electron concentration and mobility, and then analyze how the coupling effects were achieved. Our results revealed the important roles of oxygen adsorption-induced interface barriers and photo-assisted thermal ionization first proposed here, because of which the positive coupling effect of UV light/heat and oxygen, as well as the negative coupling effect of UV light and heat was observed. Our work provides inspiration for studies on metal oxides from both the whole idea and the detailed argument. PMID:26098623

  7. A method to assess the inter-annual weather-dependent variability in air pollution concentration and deposition based on weather typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleijel, Håkan; Grundström, Maria; Karlsson, Gunilla Pihl; Karlsson, Per Erik; Chen, Deliang

    2016-02-01

    Annual anomalies in air pollutant concentrations, and deposition (bulk and throughfall) of sulphate, nitrate and ammonium, in the Gothenburg region, south-west Sweden, were correlated with optimized linear combinations of the yearly frequency of Lamb Weather Types (LWTs) to determine the extent to which the year-to-year variation in pollution exposure can be partly explained by weather related variability. Air concentrations of urban NO2, CO, PM10, as well as O3 at both an urban and a rural monitoring site, and the deposition of sulphate, nitrate and ammonium for the period 1997-2010 were included in the analysis. Linear detrending of the time series was performed to estimate trend-independent anomalies. These estimated anomalies were subtracted from observed annual values. Then the statistical significance of temporal trends with and without LWT adjustment was tested. For the pollutants studied, the annual anomaly was well correlated with the annual LWT combination (R2 in the range 0.52-0.90). Some negative (annual average [NO2], ammonia bulk deposition) or positive (average urban [O3]) temporal trends became statistically significant (p < 0.05) when the LWT adjustment was applied. In all the cases but one (NH4 throughfall, for which no temporal trend existed) the significance of temporal trends became stronger with LWT adjustment. For nitrate and ammonium, the LWT based adjustment explained a larger fraction of the inter-annual variation for bulk deposition than for throughfall. This is probably linked to the longer time scale of canopy related dry deposition processes influencing throughfall being explained to a lesser extent by LWTs than the meteorological factors controlling bulk deposition. The proposed novel methodology can be used by authorities responsible for air pollution management, and by researchers studying temporal trends in pollution, to evaluate e.g. the relative importance of changes in emissions and weather variability in annual air pollution

  8. Temporal variations of CO2 concentration near land surface and its response to meteorological variables in Heihe River Basin, northwest China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ren-sheng; Kang, Er-si; Ji, Xi-bin; Yang, Jian-ping; Zhang, Zhi-hui; Yang, Yong

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration (CC) near land surface and meteorological variables have been measured at four sites, named Yeniugou (alpine meadow and permafrost), Xishui (mountainous forest), Linze (oasis edge) and Ejina (lower desert), respectively, in Heihe River Basin, northwest China. The results showed that, the half hourly CC at night was larger than in daytime, and the daily averaged CC was the largest in winter. The averaged CC of 932 d at the Linze was about 418 ppm, was about 366 ppm in the 762 d at the Ejina. In the same period from September 23 to November 9, 2004, the averaged CC was about 625, 334, 436 and 353 ppm, at Yeniugou, Xishui, Linze and Ejina, respectively. The linear relationship between daily averaged CC and air temperature T was negative, between CC and relative humidity (RH) was positive. The linear CC-atmospheric pressure (AP) relationship was negative at the Linze and Yeniugou, was positive at the Ejina. The relationship between CC and global radiation R was exponent, and soil temperature Ts was negative linear, and soil water content was complex. The correlation between CC and wind speed was not existent. Using meteorological variables together to simulate CC, could give good results. PMID:17078549

  9. Comparison of cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Nicole M; Hubbell, John A E; Aarnes, Turi K; Bednarski, Richard M; Lerche, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    This study compared cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine and spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal (> 90%) oxygen (O2) concentrations. Twelve healthy mares were randomly assigned to breathe 50% or maximal O2 concentrations. Horses were sedated with xylazine, induced to recumbency with ketamine-diazepam, and anesthesia was maintained with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine to effect. Heart rate, arterial blood pressures, respiratory rate, lithium dilution cardiac output (CO), inspired and expired O2 and carbon dioxide partial pressures, and tidal volume were measured. Arterial and mixed-venous blood samples were collected prior to sedation (baseline), during 30 minutes of anesthesia, 10 minutes after disconnection from O2, and 30 minutes after standing. Shunt fraction, O2 delivery, and alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressures difference [P(A-a)O2] were calculated. Recovery times were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups in cardiorespiratory parameters or in P(A-a)O2 at baseline or 30 minutes after standing. Oxygen partial pressure difference in the 50% group was significantly less than in the maximal O2 group during anesthesia. PMID:25829559

  10. Comparison of cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal oxygen concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Karrasch, Nicole M.; Hubbell, John A.E.; Aarnes, Turi K.; Bednarski, Richard M.; Lerche, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This study compared cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine and spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal (> 90%) oxygen (O2) concentrations. Twelve healthy mares were randomly assigned to breathe 50% or maximal O2 concentrations. Horses were sedated with xylazine, induced to recumbency with ketamine-diazepam, and anesthesia was maintained with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine to effect. Heart rate, arterial blood pressures, respiratory rate, lithium dilution cardiac output (CO), inspired and expired O2 and carbon dioxide partial pressures, and tidal volume were measured. Arterial and mixed-venous blood samples were collected prior to sedation (baseline), during 30 minutes of anesthesia, 10 minutes after disconnection from O2, and 30 minutes after standing. Shunt fraction, O2 delivery, and alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressures difference [P(A-a)O2] were calculated. Recovery times were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups in cardiorespiratory parameters or in P(A-a)O2 at baseline or 30 minutes after standing. Oxygen partial pressure difference in the 50% group was significantly less than in the maximal O2 group during anesthesia. PMID:25829559

  11. Synthesis, characterization and luminescence behavior of ZrO2:Eu3+, Dy3+ with variable concentration of Eu and Dy doped Phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagjeet; Parganiha, Yogita; Dubey, Vikas; Singh, Deepti; Chandrakar, Deepika

    2014-09-01

    The present paper reports thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves and photoluminescence (PL) studies of europium, dysprosium co-doped zirconia (ZrO2:Eu3+, Dy3+). The sample were prepared by the solid state method with variable concentration of Eu (0.5-2 mol%) and Dy (0.5-2 mol%); thereafter, the TL glow curves were recorded for different doses of UV exposure at a heating rate of 6.7 °C s-1. The kinetic parameters activation energy E, the order of kinetics b, and the frequency factor “s” of synthesized phosphors of ZrO2:Eu3+, Dy3+ have been calculated by using a peak shape method. The sample was characterized by XRD (X-ray diffraction), SEM (scanning electron microscope) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). Effect of Eu and Dy concentration of PL and TL studies are also interpreted. Here the photoluminescence excitation and emission spectra were found at 307 and 395 nm and 594, 612 and 627 nm range respectively. The present phosphor acts as a single host for red emission display devices as well as may be used for thermoluminescence dosimetric material under UV exposure. Commission Internationale de l'éclairage co-ordinate of this nanophosphor (0.32, 0.34) is closed to that of the ideal white light (0.33, 0.33). Correlated color temperature of the white light (5894 K) is within the range of vertical daylight.

  12. Spatio-temporal variability of phytoplankton (Chlorophyll-a) in relation to salinity, suspended sediment concentration, and light intensity in a macrotidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhikodan, Gubash; Yokoyama, Katsuhide

    2016-09-01

    The influences of environmental gradients on the spatio-temporal variability of phytoplankton (Chlorophyll-a) in the macrotidal Chikugo River Estuary were studied during a two-week period of September 2010. Vertical profiles of salinity, turbidity, and light intensity were measured at 18 stations separated by a 1-km interval. Water samples for the determination of suspended sediment concentration (SSC), concentration of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and Pheophytin-a (Pheo-a) were collected from the surface layer at all stations. The estuarine water column was vertically well mixed with high SSC (100-2000 mg L-1) during spring tide and the photic depth (zp) was less than 0.2 m. The mixing depth (zm) was more than 10 times the photic depth for the major part of the estuary. The estuary gradually changed to partially mixed with decrease in SSC (≤400 mg L-1) during the intermediate tide. The estuary became stratified with low SSC (20-50 mg L-1) during neap tide and the zp reached 4 m. The zm was less than 0.5 times the zp for the whole estuary. Light attenuation was dominated by SSC and the zp varied according to semidiurnal and semilunar tidal cycle. The zp: zm ratio did not show any relationship with Chl-a in the Chikugo river estuary. This is because the Chl-a concentration reached maximum two to three days after the neap tide. The peak concentration of Chl-a was located near the low salinity region and that of Pheo-a was located in the Estuarine Turbidity Maximum (ETM) zone. The Pheo-a concentration reached maximum during the spring tide. A good relation between zp: zm ratio and Pheo-a indicates that the increase in Pheo-a was caused by the light limitation due to suspended sediment and the responses of the Pheo-a on the light condition was instantaneous. These phenomena were remarkably found in the interface between freshwater and saltwater. Light availability driven by mixing and ETM process during semidiurnal and semilunar tidal cycle is the controlling factor of the

  13. Variability of voriconazole plasma concentrations after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: impact of cytochrome p450 polymorphisms and comedications on initial and subsequent trough levels.

    PubMed

    Gautier-Veyret, Elodie; Fonrose, Xavier; Tonini, Julia; Thiebaut-Bertrand, Anne; Bartoli, Mireille; Quesada, Jean-Louis; Bulabois, Claude-Eric; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Stanke-Labesque, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    Voriconazole (VRC) plasma trough concentrations (Cmin) are highly variable, and this could affect treatment efficacy and safety in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). We aimed to describe the intra- and interindividual variation of VRC Cmin throughout the course of VRC therapy and to identify the determinants of this variation. Clinical data, medications, and VRC Cmin (n = 308) of 33 AHSCT patients were retrospectively collected. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) genotypes of CYP2C19, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 patients were retrospectively determined before allografting, and a combined genetic score was calculated for each patient. The higher the genetic score, the faster the metabolism of the patient. The VRC Cmin inter- and intraindividual coefficients of variation were 84% and 68%, respectively. The VRC dose (D) was correlated to VRC Cmin (r = 0.412, P < 0.0001) only for oral administration. The administration route and the genetic score significantly affected the initial VRC Cmin. Considering oral therapy, patients with a genetic score of <2 had higher initial VRC Cmin/D than patients with a genetic score of >2 (P = 0.009). Subsequent VRC Cmin remained influenced by the genetic score (P = 0.004) but were also affected by pump proton inhibitor comedication (P < 0.0001). The high variability of VRC Cmin in AHSCT patients is partially explained by the route of administration, treatment with pump proton inhibitors, and the combined genetic score. This study suggests the interest in combined genetic score determination to individualize a priori the VRC dose and underlines the need for longitudinal therapeutic drug monitoring to adapt subsequent doses to maintain the VRC Cmin within the therapeutic range. PMID:25645831

  14. PAH and PCB in the Baltic -- A budget approach including fluxes, occurrence and concentration variability in air, suspended and settling particulates in water, surface sediments and river water

    SciTech Connect

    Broman, D.; Axelman, J.; Bandh, C.; Ishaq, R.; Naef, C.; Pettersen, H.; Zebuehr, Y.

    1995-12-31

    In order to study the fate and occurrence of two groups of hydrophobic compounds in the Baltic aquatic environment a large number of samples were collected from the southern Baltic proper to the northern Bothnian Bay for the analyses of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The following sample matrices were collected; bottom surface sediments (0--1 cm, collected with gravity corer), settling particulate matter (collected with sediment traps), open water samples and over water samples (suspended particulates and dissolved fraction sampled by filtration) and air samples (aerosols and vapor phase sampled by filtration). All samples (except over water and air) were collected at open sea in the Baltic. The analyses results have been used to make a model approach on the whole Baltic and to elucidate different aspects of the behavior of PAHs and PCBs in the Baltic, such as the occurrence of the compounds in water and sediment, the total content as well as the concentration variabilities over such a large geographical area, Further, the data on settling particulate matter as well as the air concentration data were used to estimate the total fluxes of PAHs and PCBs to the bottoms of the Baltic and t o the total water area of the Baltic, respectively. Further, data on the PAH and PCB content in river water from four major rivers provides rough estimates of the riverine input to the Baltic. The dynamics of PAHs and PCBs within the water mass have also been studied in terms of settling velocities and residence times in the water mass for these type of compounds in the open Baltic.

  15. The spatial variability of organic carbon concentrations, C/N ratios and δ13C in surface sediments of two high Arctic fjords (Spitsbergen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziorowska, Katarzyna; Kuliński, Karol; Pempkowiak, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean, and especially its shelf, is considered to be an important region for the global carbon cycle. This is due to the high, but concentrated in a short time, primary production, specific thermohaline circulation and physicochemical conditions of sea water. It was estimated that the Arctic shelf seas are responsible for 7-11% of total carbon dioxide uptake by the oceans. Additionally, the Arctic Ocean is considered to be one of the youngest marine ecosystems in the world. This results in less trophic links in the food web and higher efficiency of organic matter burial in sediments than it is observed in the marine ecosystems of lower latitudes. The main aim of this study was to estimate the spatial variability of organic carbon (OC) concentrations, C/N ratios and δ13C in surface sediments from two high Arctic fiords: Hornsund and Adventfjorden. Hornsund is a southernmost fiord on the western coast of Spitsbergen. It is a medium size fiord with a complex coastline including numerous bays and fourteen tidewater glaciers entering directly the fjord. Adventfjorden belongs to the largest fjord system of the west Spitsbergen - Isfjorden. The innermost part of Adventfjorden is composed of a tidal flat formed at the mouth of two braided rivers (the Adventelva and the Longyearelva) feeded by meltwater from glaciers. Both fjords are under influence of different water masses. The whole Isfjorden is affected by warm and saline Atlantic water from the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). In Hornsund the influence of WSC is less pronounced at the expense of strong pressure from cold and less saline waters of coastal Sørkapp Current coming from the northeastern Barents Sea. Surface sediments were sampled at four locations in each fiord along the fjords' axes starting from the tidal flat in Adventfjorden and the vicinity of Hornbree glacier in Hornsund. The OC concentrations in Hornsund were much lower (from 1.6% to 1.8%) than those in Adventfjorden (from 2.4% to 5

  16. Modeling the uptake of neutral organic chemicals on XAD passive air samplers under variable temperatures, external wind speeds and ambient air concentrations (PAS-SIM).

    PubMed

    Armitage, James M; Hayward, Stephen J; Wania, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and demonstrate the utility of a fugacity-based model of XAD passive air samplers (XAD-PAS) designed to simulate the uptake of neutral organic chemicals under variable temperatures, external wind speeds and ambient air concentrations. The model (PAS-SIM) simulates the transport of the chemical across the air-side boundary layer and within the sampler medium, which is segmented into a user-defined number of thin layers. Model performance was evaluated using data for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a field calibration study (i.e., active and XAD-PAS data) conducted in Egbert, Ontario, Canada. With some exceptions, modeled PAS uptake curves are in good agreement with the empirical PAS data. The results are highly encouraging, given the uncertainty in the active air sampler data used as input and other uncertainties related to model parametrization (e.g., sampler-air partition coefficients, the influence of wind speed on sampling rates). The study supports the further development and evaluation of the PAS-SIM model as a diagnostic (e.g., to aid interpretation of calibration studies and monitoring data) and prognostic (e.g., to inform design of future passive air sampling campaigns) tool. PMID:24175752

  17. Differences in growth and survival between cod Gadus morhua and herring Clupea harengus early stages co-reared at variable prey concentrations.

    PubMed

    Folkvord, A; Vollset, K W; Catalán, I A

    2015-11-01

    It was hypothesized that the survival and growth strategies of herring Clupea harengus, displaying a flexible reproductive activity, are adapted to coping with longer periods of prey deprivation (i.e. more variable prey availability), in contrast to cod Gadus morhua, which are adapted to match growth and survival at high prey concentrations. Experimental larval growth and survival data for the two naturally co-occurring species reared either in separate tanks or in combination are presented to test this hypothesis. Natural zooplankton was supplied either ad libitum or in a periodically restricted manner to mimic natural suboptimal conditions. Periodically restricted feeding significantly reduced initial growth of G. morhua larvae co-reared with C. harengus, while no such initial effect was seen for co-reared C. harengus. Overall survival of G. morhua was higher when reared together with C. harengus (32 v. 24%), while C. harengus had higher survival without the presence of G. morhua (59 v. 44%), indicating that both species were affected by higher densities of G. morhua larvae. Furthermore, the final survival in G. morhua was inversely related to average final size, while in C. harengus an opposite trend was observed. How potential behavioural interactions may drive the present results are discussed and contended that a better insight into field vital rates may be gained from further exploration of co-rearing experiments. PMID:26412336

  18. Effects of immersion in water containing high concentrations of CO2 (CO2-water) at thermoneutral on thermoregulation and heart rate variability in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Maki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Iwase, Satoshi; Nishimura, Naoki; Shimizu, Yuuki; de Chantemele, Eric Belin; Matsumoto, Takaaki; Inukai, Yoko; Taniguchi, Yumiko; Ogata, Akihiro; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2009-01-01

    Immersion in high concentrations of CO2 dissolved in freshwater (CO2-water) might induce peripheral vasodilatation in humans. In this study, we investigated whether such immersion could affect the autonomic nervous system in humans using spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Ten healthy men participated in this study. Tympanic temperature, cutaneous blood flow and electrocardiogram (ECG) were measured continuously during 20 min of immersion in CO2-water. The ECG was analyzed by spectral analysis of R-R intervals using the maximal entropy method. The decrease in tympanic temperature was significantly greater in CO2-water immersion than in freshwater immersion. Cutaneous blood flow at the immersed site was significantly increased with CO2-water immersion compared to freshwater. The high frequency component (HF: 0.15-0.40 Hz) was significantly higher in CO2-water immersion than in freshwater immersion, but the low frequency (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz) /high frequency ratio (LF/HF ratio) was significantly lower in CO2-water immersion than in freshwater immersion. The present study contributes evidence supporting the hypothesis that CO2-water immersion activates parasympathetic nerve activity in humans.

  19. How well do satellite AOD observations represent the spatial and temporal variability of PM2.5 concentration for the United States?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2015-02-01

    Due to their extensive spatial coverage, satellite Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) observations have been widely used to estimate and predict surface PM2.5 concentrations. While most previous studies have focused on establishing relationships between collocated, hourly or daily AOD and PM2.5 measurements, in this study, we instead focus on the comparison of the large-scale spatial and temporal variability between satellite AOD and PM2.5 using monthly mean measurements. A newly developed spectral analysis technique - Combined Maximum Covariance Analysis (CMCA) is applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) AOD datasets and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) PM2.5 data, in order to extract and compare the dominant modes of variability. Results indicate that AOD and PM2.5 agree well in terms of interannual variability. An overall decrease is found in both AOD and PM2.5 across the United States, with the strongest signal over the eastern US. With respect to seasonality, good agreement is found only for Eastern US, while for Central and Western US, AOD and PM2.5 seasonal cycles are largely different or even reversed. These results are verified using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) AOD observations and differences between satellite and AERONET are also examined. MODIS and MISR appear to have the best agreement with AERONET. In order to explain the disagreement between AOD and PM2.5 seasonality, we further use Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) extinction profile data to investigate the effect of two possible contributing factors, namely aerosol vertical distribution and cloud-free sampling. We find that seasonal changes in aerosol vertical distribution, due to the seasonally varying mixing height, is the primary cause for the AOD and PM2.5 seasonal discrepancy, in particular, the low AOD but high

  20. Volatile concentrations in variably vesicular pyroclasts from the Rotongaio ash (181 AD Taupo eruption): did shallow magma degassing trigger exceptionally violent phreatomagmatic activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuffen, Hugh; Houghton, Bruce F.; Dingwellp, Donald B.; Pinkerton, Harry

    2010-05-01

    Measurement of dissolved volatile concentrations in pyroclasts has formed the basis of our understanding of the links between magma degassing and the explosivity of silicic eruptions[1]. To date these studies have focussed exclusively on the densest pyroclastic obsidians, which comprise on a tiny proportion of the erupted products, in order to bypass the difficulty of analysing vesicular material. As a consequence, crucial information is missing about how degassing in the densest clasts relates to the behaviour of the bulk of the magma volume. To overcome this shortcoming, the volatile content of variably vesicular pyroclasts from the Rotongaio ash has been analysed using both micro-analytical (SIMS, synchrotron FTIR) and bulk techniques (TGA-MS). The Rotongaio ash was an exceptionally violent phase of phreatomagmatic activity during the 181 AD rhyolitic eruption of Taupo (New Zealand), the most powerful worldwide in the last 5000 years. The Rotongaio phase involved opening of new vents beneath Lake Taupo and the ash is characterised by a wide range of clast vesicularities (<10 to ~80 % by volume). Volatile measurement was challenging due to the high bubble number densities and small clast sizes. The mismatch between the water content of matrix glasses measured using bulk and micro-analytical techniques reflects pervasive post-eruption hydration of vesicle walls, which is most problematic at high vesicularities. Micron-scale maps of water concentration variations around vesicles in 30-50 vol % vesicular samples were acquired using SIMS. They indicate strong hydration within ~5 microns of vesicle walls, with pockets of unhydrated glass remaining in the thickest septa. Analysis of these unhydrated domains allowed robust measurement of water contents in pyroclasts ranging from ~1 to >50 vol % vesicles. Matrix glasses had largely degassed (0.19-0.49 wt % H2O, compared with an initial concentration in melt inclusions of ~3.6 wt %). The water contents measured using SIMS

  1. Predicted no effect concentration derivation as a significant source of variability in environmental hazard assessments of chemicals in aquatic systems: an international analysis.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Thorsten; Diamond, Jerry; Dobson, Stuart; Howe, Paul; Kielhorn, Janet; Koennecker, Gustav; Lee-Steere, Chris; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Schneider, Uwe; Sugaya, Yoshio; Taylor, Ken; Dam, Rick Van; Stauber, Jenny L

    2014-01-01

    Environmental hazard assessments for chemicals are carried out to define an environmentally "safe" level at which, theoretically, the chemical will not negatively affect any exposed biota. Despite this common goal, the methodologies in use are very diverse across different countries and jurisdictions. This becomes particularly obvious when international scientists work together on documents with global scope, e.g., in the World Health Organization (WHO) International Program on Chemical Safety. In this article, we present a study that describes the extent of such variability and analyze the reasons that lead to different outcomes in deriving a "safe level" (termed the predicted no effect concentration [PNEC] throughout this article). For this purpose, we chose 5 chemicals to represent well-known substances for which sufficient high-quality aquatic effects data were available: ethylene glycol, trichloroethylene, nonylphenol, hexachlorobenzene, and copper (Cu). From these data, 2 data sets for each chemical were compiled: the full data set, that contained all information from selected peer-review sources, and the base data set, a subsample of the full set simulating limited data. Scientists from the European Union (EU), United States, Canada, Japan, and Australia independently carried out hazard assessments for each of these chemicals using the same data sets. Their reasoning for key study selection, use of assessment factors, or use of probabilistic methods was comprehensively documented. The observed variation in the PNECs for all chemicals was up to 3 orders of magnitude, and this was not simply due to obvious factors such as the size of the data set or the methodology used. Rather, this was due to individual decisions of the assessors within the scope of the methodology used, especially key study selection, acute versus chronic definitions, and size of assessment factors. Awareness of these factors, together with transparency of the decision-making process, would

  2. Regional variability in bed-sediment concentrations of wastewater compounds, hormones and PAHs for portions of coastal New York and New Jersey impacted by hurricane Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Patrick; Gibson, Cathy A; Fisher, Shawn C.; Fisher, Irene; Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly; Romanok, Kristin; Foreman, William; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Focazio, Michael J.; Jones, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Bed sediment samples from 79 coastal New York and New Jersey, USA sites were analyzed for 75 compounds including wastewater associated contaminants, PAHs, and other organic compounds to assess the post-Hurricane Sandy distribution of organic contaminants among six regions. These results provide the first assessment of wastewater compounds, hormones, and PAHs in bed sediment for this region. Concentrations of most wastewater contaminants and PAHs were highest in the most developed region (Upper Harbor/Newark Bay, UHNB) and reflected the wastewater inputs to this area. Although the lack of pre-Hurricane Sandy data for most of these compounds make it impossible to assess the effect of the storm on wastewater contaminant concentrations, PAH concentrations in the UHNB region reflect pre-Hurricane Sandy conditions in this region. Lower hormone concentrations than predicted by the total organic carbon relation occurred in UHNB samples, suggesting that hormones are being degraded in the UHNB region.

  3. Regional variability in bed-sediment concentrations of wastewater compounds, hormones and PAHs for portions of coastal New York and New Jersey impacted by hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick J; Gibson, Catherine A; Fisher, Shawn C; Fisher, Irene J; Reilly, Timothy J; Smalling, Kelly L; Romanok, Kristin M; Foreman, William T; ReVello, Rhiannon C; Focazio, Michael J; Jones, Daniel K

    2016-06-30

    Bed sediment samples from 79 coastal New York and New Jersey, USA sites were analyzed for 75 compounds including wastewater associated contaminants, PAHs, and other organic compounds to assess the post-Hurricane Sandy distribution of organic contaminants among six regions. These results provide the first assessment of wastewater compounds, hormones, and PAHs in bed sediment for this region. Concentrations of most wastewater contaminants and PAHs were highest in the most developed region (Upper Harbor/Newark Bay, UHNB) and reflected the wastewater inputs to this area. Although the lack of pre-Hurricane Sandy data for most of these compounds make it impossible to assess the effect of the storm on wastewater contaminant concentrations, PAH concentrations in the UHNB region reflect pre-Hurricane Sandy conditions in this region. Lower hormone concentrations than predicted by the total organic carbon relation occurred in UHNB samples, suggesting that hormones are being degraded in the UHNB region. PMID:27177500

  4. Trout density and health in a stream with variable water temperatures and trace element concentrations: does a cold-water source attract trout to increased metal exposure?

    PubMed

    Harper, David D; Farag, Aïda M; Hogstrand, Christer; Macconnell, Elizabeth

    2009-04-01

    A history of hard-rock mining has resulted in elevated concentrations of heavy metals in Prickly Pear Creek (MT, USA). Remediation has improved water quality; however, dissolved zinc and cadmium concentrations still exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria. Physical habitat, salmonid density, fish health, and water quality were assessed, and metal concentrations in fish tissues, biofilm, and macroinvertebrates were determined to evaluate the existing condition in the watershed. Cadmium, zinc, and lead concentrations in fish tissues, biofilm, and invertebrates were significantly greater than those at the upstream reference site and an experimental site farther downstream of the confluence. Fish densities were greatest, and habitat quality for trout was better, downstream of the confluence, where water temperatures were relatively cool (16 degrees C). Measures of fish health (tissue metal residues, histology, metallothionein concentrations, and necropsies), however, indicate that the health of trout at this site was negatively affected. Trout were in colder but more contaminated water and were subjected to increased trace element exposures and associated health effects. Maximum water temperatures in Prickly Pear Creek were significantly lower directly below Spring Creek (16 degrees C) compared to those at an experimental site 10 km downstream (26 degrees C). Trout will avoid dissolved metals at concentrations below those measured in Prickly Pear Creek; however, our results suggest that the preference of trout to use cool water temperatures may supersede behaviors to avoid heavy metals. PMID:19391677

  5. Spatial variability of particle number concentrations and NOx in the Karlsruhe (Germany) area obtained with the mobile laboratory ‘AERO-TRAM'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Rowell; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Kottmeier, Christoph; Rinke, Rayk; Wieser, Andreas; Vogel, Bernhard

    2014-09-01

    For the first time in Germany, we obtained high-resolution spatial distributions of particle numbers and nitrogen oxides in an urban agglomeration using a tram system. In comparison to particle numbers the NOx concentration decreased much faster with a significantly steeper gradient when going from the inner city to the surrounding area. In case of NOx the decrease was 70% while for particle number concentration it was only 50%. We found an area in the rural surrounding with a second increase of particle numbers without simultaneous enhanced NOx levels. The source of the high particle numbers could be ascribed to industry emissions about 5-10 km away. The mean spatial distribution of particle number concentration depended on wind direction, wind velocity and boundary layer stability. The dependency was particularly strong in the rural area affected by industrial emissions, where individual wind directions led to concentration differences of up to 25%. The particulate concentration was 40% higher during low wind velocities (1-5 m s-1) than during high wind velocities (>5 m s-1). We observed similar findings for the impact of boundary layer stability on particle numbers concentration. Particle pollution was 40% higher for stable stratification compared to neutral or unstable cases.

  6. Trout density and health in a stream with variable water temperatures and trace element concentrations: does a cold-water source attract trout to increased metal exposure?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, D.D.; Farag, A.M.; Hogstr, C.; MacConnell, E.

    2009-01-01

    A history of hard-rock mining has resulted in elevated concentrations of heavy metals in Prickly Pear Creek (MT. USA). Remediation has improved water quality; however, dissolved zinc and cadmium concentrations still exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria. Physical habitat, salmonid density, fish health, and water quality were assessed, and metal concentrations in fish tissues, biofilm, and macroinvertebrates were determined to evaluate the existing condition in the watershed. Cadmium, zinc, and lead concentrations in fish tissues, biofilm, and invertebrates were significantly greater than those at the upstream reference site and an experimental site farther downstream of the confluence. Fish densities were greatest, and habitat quality for trout was better, downstream of the confluence, where water temperatures were relatively cool (16??C). Measures of fish health (tissue metal residues, histology, metallothionein concentrations, and necropsies), however, indicate that the health of trout at this site was negatively affected. Trout were in colder but more contaminated water and were subjected to increased trace element exposures and associated health effects. Maximum water temperatures in Prickly Pear Creek were significantly lower directly below Spring Creek (16??C) compared to those at an experimental site 10 km downstream (26??C). Trout will avoid dissolved metals at concentrations below those measured in Prickly Pear Creek; however, our results suggest that the preference of trout to use cool water temperatures may supersede behaviors to avoid heavy metals. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  7. Investigation of the winds and electron concentration variability in the D region of the ionosphere by the partial-reflection radar technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, R. M.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development and first observations of the partial-reflection drifts experiment at Urbana, Illinois (40 N) are described. The winds data from the drifts experiment are compared with electron concentration data obtained by the differential-absorption technique to study the possible meteorological causes of the winter anomaly in the mesosphere at midlatitudes. winds data obtained by the meteor-radar experiment at Urbana are also compared with electron concentration data measured at Urban. A significant correlation is shown is both cases between southward winds and increasing electron concentration measured at the same location during winter. The possibility of stratospheric/mesospheric coupling is investigated by comparing satellite-measured 0.4 mbar geopotential data with mesospheric electron concentration data. No significant coupling was observed. The winds measured at Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (52 N) are compared with the electron concentrations measured at Urban, yielding constant fixed relationship, but significant correlations for short segments of the winter. A significant coherence is observed at discrete frequencies during segments of the winter.

  8. Evaluating the temporal variability of concentrations of POPs in a glacier-fed stream food chain using a combined modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Melissa; Semplice, Matteo; Villa, Sara; Di Guardo, Antonio

    2014-09-15

    Falling snow acts as an efficient scavenger of contaminants from the atmosphere and, accumulating on the ground surface, behaves as a temporary storage reservoir; during snow aging and metamorphosis, contaminants may concentrate and be subject to pulsed release during intense snow melt events. In high-mountain areas, firn and ice play a similar role. The consequent concentration peaks in surface waters can pose a risk to high-altitude ecosystems, since snow and ice melt often coincide with periods of intense biological activity. In such situations, the role of dynamic models can be crucial when assessing environmental behavior of contaminants and their accumulation patterns in aquatic organisms. In the present work, a dynamic fate modeling approach was combined to a hydrological module capable of estimating water discharge and snow/ice melt contributions on an hourly basis, starting from hourly air temperatures. The model was applied to the case study of the Frodolfo glacier-fed stream (Italian Alps), for which concentrations of a number of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) in stream water and four macroinvertebrate groups were available. Considering the uncertainties in input data, results showed a satisfying agreement for both water and organism concentrations. This study showed the model adequacy for the estimation of pollutant concentrations in surface waters and bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms, as well as its possible role in assessing the consequences of climate change on the cycle of POPs. PMID:24982022

  9. The spatial variability of nitrogen and phosphorus concentration in a sand aquifer influenced by onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems: a case study on St. George Island, Florida.

    PubMed

    Corbet, D Reide; Dillon, Kevin; Burnett, William; Schaefer, Geoff

    2002-01-01

    Groundwater from a shallow freshwater lens on St. George Island, a barrier island located in the Panhandle of Florida, eventually discharges into Apalachicola Bay or the Gulf of Mexico. Nutrient concentrations in groundwaters were monitored downfield from three onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems (OSTDS) on the island. Estimates of natural groundwater nutrient concentrations were obtained from an adjacent uninhabited island. Silicate, which was significantly higher in the imported drinking water relative to the surficial aquifer on St. George Island (12.2+/-1.9 mg Si l(-1) and 2.9+/-0.2 mg Si l(-1), respectively), was used as a natural conservative tracer. Our observations showed that nitrogen concentrations were attenuated to a greater extent than that of phosphorus relative to the conservative tracer. At the current setback distance (23 m), both nitrogen and phosphate concentrations are still elevated above natural levels by as much as 2 and 7 times, respectively. Increasing the setback distance to 50 m and raising the drainfields 1 m above the ground surface could reduce nutrient levels to natural concentrations (1.1+/-0.1 mg N l(-1), 0.20+/-0.02 mg P l(-1)). PMID:11916049

  10. A comparison of three empirically based, spatially explicit predictive models of residential soil Pb concentrations in Baltimore, Maryland, USA: understanding the variability within cities.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Kirsten; Weathers, Kathleen C; Pickett, Steward T A; Lathrop, Richard G; Pouyat, Richard V; Cadenasso, Mary L

    2013-08-01

    In many older US cities, lead (Pb) contamination of residential soil is widespread; however, contamination is not uniform. Empirically based, spatially explicit models can assist city agencies in addressing this important public health concern by identifying areas predicted to exceed public health targets for soil Pb contamination. Sampling of 61 residential properties in Baltimore City using field portable X-ray fluorescence revealed that 53 % had soil Pb that exceeded the USEPA reportable limit of 400 ppm. These data were used as the input to three different spatially explicit models: a traditional general linear model (GLM), and two machine learning techniques: classification and regression trees (CART) and Random Forests (RF). The GLM revealed that housing age, distance to road, distance to building, and the interactions between variables explained 38 % of the variation in the data. The CART model confirmed the importance of these variables, with housing age, distance to building, and distance to major road networks determining the terminal nodes of the CART model. Using the same three predictor variables, the RF model explained 42 % of the variation in the data. The overall accuracy, which is a measure of agreement between the model and an independent dataset, was 90 % for the GLM, 83 % for the CART model, and 72 % for the RF model. A range of spatially explicit models that can be adapted to changing soil Pb guidelines allows managers to select the most appropriate model based on public health targets. PMID:23775390

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Uranium Accumulation on Sediments during Field-scale Biostimulation under Variable Bicarbonate Concentrations at the Rifle IFRC Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P. M.; Davis, J. A.; Bargar, J.; Williams, K. H.; Singer, D. M.; Long, P.

    2011-12-01

    Bioremediation of uranium in subsurface environments is an approach that has been used at numerous field sites throughout the U.S in an attempt to lower dissolved U(VI) concentrations in groundwater. At the Rifle IFRC research site in Colorado, biostimulation of the native microbial population through acetate amendment for various periods of time has been tested in order to immobilize uranium through reduction U(VI) to U(IV). While this approach has successfully decreased U(VI) concentrations in the dissolved phase, often to levels below the EPA's maximum contaminant level of 0.13 μM, little work has examined the solid-phase accumulation of U during field-scale biostimulation. The lack of information on solid-phase U accumulation is due in large part to the difficulty of obtaining comparable pre- and post-biostimulation field sediment samples. In addition, the relatively low (<10 ppm) U concentrations present in most sediments preclude the use of spectroscopic techniques such as XAS for examining solid-phase U speciation. However, a recently developed technique of performing column experiments in situ has allowed us to overcome both of these problems, obtaining sediment samples which were exposed to the same biogeochemical conditions as subsurface sediments during the course of biostimulation. During the 2010 Rifle IFRC field experiment (dubbed "Super 8"), a number of in situ columns were deployed in various wells representing regions of the aquifer affected by acetate amendment (ambient bicarbonate) and concomitant acetate and bicarbonate amendment (elevated bicarbonate). Elevated levels of bicarbonate have been shown to cause desorption of U(VI) from the solid phase at the Rifle site under non-stimulated conditions, resulting in higher dissolved U(VI) concentrations in the aquifer. The Super 8 field experiment was designed in part to test the effect of elevated bicarbonate concentrations on U sequestration during biostimulation. Results from this experiment

  12. THE SPATIOTEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF NON-URBAN OZONE CONCENTRATIONS OVER THE EASTERN UNITED STATES AND ITS POTENTIAL REPLICATION BY SATELLITE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spatial and temporal ariability of the maximum 24 hour surface zone concentrations over the eastern United States was examined for the period 1985-1990 using Rotated Principal Component Analysis (RPCA). his led to the delineation of six contiguous subregions, each of which di...

  13. An inter-laboratory study on the variability in measured concentrations of 17Beta-estradiol, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone in white sucker: implications and recommendations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances that can lead to impacts on the reproduction of fish sometimes by altering circulating concentrations of 17â-estradiol (E2), testosterone (T) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). Common methods to measure steroids in pla...

  14. Nutrient variability in phloem: examining changes in K, Mg, Zn and Fe concentration during grain loading in common wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lachlan J; Palmer, Lyndon T; Rutzke, Michael A; Graham, Robin D; Stangoulis, James C R

    2014-12-01

    In wheat, nutrients are transported to seeds via the phloem yet access to this vascular tissue for exudate collection and quantitative analysis of elemental composition is difficult. The purest phloem is collected through the use of aphid stylectomy with volumes of exudate collected normally in the range of 20-500 nl. In this work a new method using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was developed to measure the concentration of K, Mg, Zn and Fe in volumes of wheat (Triticum aestivum, genotype Samnyt 16) phloem as small as 15.5 nl. This improved method was used to observe changes in phloem nutrient concentration during the grain loading period. There were statistically significant increases in phloem Mg and Zn concentration and a significant decrease in K over the period from 1-2 days after anthesis (DAA) to 9-12 DAA. During this period, there was no statistically significant change in phloem Fe concentration. PMID:24735095

  15. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Outdoor Coarse Particulate Matter Mass Concentrations Measured with a New Coarse Particulate Sampler during the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) provided data to compare outdoor residential coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) concentrations in six different areas of Detroit with data from a central monitoring site. Daily and seasonal influences on the spa...

  16. Method of particle trajectory recognition in particle flows of high particle concentration using a candidate trajectory tree process with variable search areas

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    2013-03-12

    The application relates to particle trajectory recognition from a Centroid Population comprised of Centroids having an (x, y, t) or (x, y, f) coordinate. The method is applicable to visualization and measurement of particle flow fields of high particle. In one embodiment, the centroids are generated from particle images recorded on camera frames. The application encompasses digital computer systems and distribution mediums implementing the method disclosed and is particularly applicable to recognizing trajectories of particles in particle flows of high particle concentration. The method accomplishes trajectory recognition by forming Candidate Trajectory Trees and repeated searches at varying Search Velocities, such that initial search areas are set to a minimum size in order to recognize only the slowest, least accelerating particles which produce higher local concentrations. When a trajectory is recognized, the centroids in that trajectory are removed from consideration in future searches.

  17. Temporal variability of benzene concentration in the ambient air of Delhi: a comparative assessment of pre- and post-CNG periods.

    PubMed

    Khillare, P S; Hoque, Raza Rafiqul; Shridhar, Vijay; Agarwal, Tripti; Balachandran, S

    2008-06-15

    CNG (compressed natural gas) was fully implemented in public transport system in Delhi in December 2002. The study assesses the benzene concentration trends at two busy traffic intersections and a background site in Delhi, India. Monitoring was done for two different time periods viz; in the year 2001-2002 (pre-CNG) and two winter months (January and February) of the year 2007 (post-CNG) to assess the impact of various policy measures adopted by the government of Delhi to improve the air quality in the city. Annual average benzene concentration for the pre-CNG period was found to be 86.47+/-53.24 microg m(-3). Average benzene concentrations for the winter months (January-February) of pre- and post-CNG periods were 116.32+/-51.65 microg m(-3) and 187.49+/-22.50 microg m(-3), respectively. Enhanced values could be solely attributed to the increase in the vehicular population from 3.5 million in the year 2001-2002 to approximately 5.1 millions in the year 2007. PMID:18082950

  18. Spatiotemporal Variability of Remotely Sensed PM2.5 Concentrations in China from 1998 to 2014 Based on a Bayesian Hierarchy Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junming; Jin, Meijun; Xu, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid industrial development and urbanization in China over the past three decades, PM2.5 pollution has become a severe environmental problem that threatens public health. Due to its unbalanced development and intrinsic topography features, the distribution of PM2.5 concentrations over China is spatially heterogeneous. In this study, we explore the spatiotemporal variations of PM2.5 pollution in China and four great urban areas from 1998 to 2014. A space-time Bayesian hierarchy model is employed to analyse PM2.5 pollution. The results show that a stable “3-Clusters” spatial PM2.5 pollution pattern has formed. The mean and 90% quantile of the PM2.5 concentrations in China have increased significantly, with annual increases of 0.279 μg/m3 (95% CI: 0.083−0.475) and 0.735 μg/m3 (95% CI: 0.261−1.210), respectively. The area with a PM2.5 pollution level of more than 70 μg/m3 has increased significantly, with an annual increase of 0.26 percentage points. Two regions in particular, the North China Plain and Sichuan Basin, are experiencing the largest amounts of PM2.5 pollution. The polluted areas, with a high local magnitude of more than 1.0 relative to the overall PM2.5 concentration, affect an area with a human population of 949 million, which corresponded to 69.3% of the total population in 2010. North and south differentiation occurs in the urban areas of the Jingjinji and Yangtze Delta, and circular and radial gradient differentiation occur in the urban areas of the Cheng-Yu and Pearl Deltas. The spatial heterogeneity of the urban Jingjinji group is the strongest. Eighteen cities located in the Yangtze Delta urban group, including Shanghai and Nanjing, have experienced high PM2.5 concentrations and faster local trends of increasing PM2.5. The percentage of exposure to PM2.5 concentrations greater than 70 μg/m3 and 100 μg/m3 is increasing significantly. PMID:27490557

  19. Spatiotemporal Variability of Remotely Sensed PM2.5 Concentrations in China from 1998 to 2014 Based on a Bayesian Hierarchy Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Junming; Jin, Meijun; Xu, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid industrial development and urbanization in China over the past three decades, PM2.5 pollution has become a severe environmental problem that threatens public health. Due to its unbalanced development and intrinsic topography features, the distribution of PM2.5 concentrations over China is spatially heterogeneous. In this study, we explore the spatiotemporal variations of PM2.5 pollution in China and four great urban areas from 1998 to 2014. A space-time Bayesian hierarchy model is employed to analyse PM2.5 pollution. The results show that a stable "3-Clusters" spatial PM2.5 pollution pattern has formed. The mean and 90% quantile of the PM2.5 concentrations in China have increased significantly, with annual increases of 0.279 μg/m³ (95% CI: 0.083-0.475) and 0.735 μg/m³ (95% CI: 0.261-1.210), respectively. The area with a PM2.5 pollution level of more than 70 μg/m³ has increased significantly, with an annual increase of 0.26 percentage points. Two regions in particular, the North China Plain and Sichuan Basin, are experiencing the largest amounts of PM2.5 pollution. The polluted areas, with a high local magnitude of more than 1.0 relative to the overall PM2.5 concentration, affect an area with a human population of 949 million, which corresponded to 69.3% of the total population in 2010. North and south differentiation occurs in the urban areas of the Jingjinji and Yangtze Delta, and circular and radial gradient differentiation occur in the urban areas of the Cheng-Yu and Pearl Deltas. The spatial heterogeneity of the urban Jingjinji group is the strongest. Eighteen cities located in the Yangtze Delta urban group, including Shanghai and Nanjing, have experienced high PM2.5 concentrations and faster local trends of increasing PM2.5. The percentage of exposure to PM2.5 concentrations greater than 70 μg/m³ and 100 μg/m³ is increasing significantly. PMID:27490557

  20. Trends and variability in blood lead concentrations among US adults aged 20-64 years and senior citizens aged ≥65 years.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ram B

    2016-07-01

    Using data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the period 2003-2012, the objective of this study was to evaluate trends in blood lead levels (BLL) among adults aged 20-64 years (adults) and seniors aged ≥65 years (seniors). In addition, the contribution of other factors like gender, race/ethnicity, smoking, and exposure to secondhand smoke at home in explaining variability in BLL was also evaluated by fitting regression models with log10 transformed values of BLL as dependent variables. BLL decreased over 2003-2012 (p < 0.01). Irrespective of gender, race/ethnicity, and smoking status, seniors were found to have higher BLL than adults. Based on the magnitude of differences between the 5th and 95th percentiles, variability in the levels of blood lead was found to be substantially higher among seniors than among adults. Males had statistically significantly higher adjusted BLL than females (2.32 vs. 1.76 μg/dL for seniors, p < 0.01 and 1.66 vs. 1.13 μg/dL for adults, p < 0.01). Non-Hispanic whites had statistically significantly lower adjusted BLL than non-Hispanic blacks (1.99 vs. 2.42 μg/dL for seniors, p < 0.01 and 1.22 vs. 1.42 μg/dL for adults, p < 0.01). When compared with non-smokers, smokers had statistically significantly higher BLL (2.19 vs. 1.86 μg/dL for seniors, p < 0.01 and 1.54 vs. 1.22 μg/dL for adults, p < 0.01). Non-obese had statistically significantly higher BLL than obese individuals (2.11 vs. 1.93 μg/dL for seniors, p < 0.01 and 1.48 vs. 1.27 μg/dL for adults, p < 0.01). Exposure to secondhand smoke at home (SHS) was associated with statistically significantly higher BLL than when there was no exposure to SHS (β = 0.0683, p = 0.03 for seniors; β = 0.034, p = 0.034, p < 0.01 for adults). PMID:27044289

  1. Influence of orography on variability of a non-CO2 greenhouse gases concentrations measured at Kasprowy Wierch station, Tatra, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necki, J.; Chmura, L.; Zimnoch, M.

    2012-04-01

    Kasprowy Wierch is a mountain peak in north-western Tatra mountain ridge, where meteorological station was settled in year 1936. As the station is situated in the convergence area of three large valleys it suffers from breeze wind and from frequent katabatic winds as well. Unfortunately vertical constituent of wind is not measured at the station. Prevailing wind direction pattern in this part of Europe is western circulation. However 75-years record consistently indicate south as the predominant direction of wind at Kasprowy Wierch. Two of the valleys coming toward this mountain peak are forcing the transport of air exactly from that direction. Since 1994 trace gas analysis is performed at the station. In year 1996 automated gas chromatograph was installed at the station and data are collected till nowadays. "In situ" concentrations of CH4, N2O and SF6 are measured every 16 minutes. Since 2010 also H2 and CO are observed at the station. Especially carbon monoxide concentration may be used as a proxy for determination of cases when local emission contaminates the air coming to the station. Usually location of the station in high mountain assures large distance from sources of the observed gases. Some tracers connected with human activity like carbon monoxide or sulphur hexafluoride may indicate proximity of anthropogenic sources of N2O and CH4, which might substantially change the composition of air surrounding the station. Valley breezes occur frequently in each mountain area. It has a large influence on air composition meas-ured at the mountain stations. It can be clearly noticed in CH4 and N2O records and at much smaller rate in SF6 concentration as well. Diurnal cycle of methane and nitrous oxide concentrations reflects substantial change of its value usually shortly after the sunrise. During the summer season a valley breeze transports to the station an air enriched in CH4 and N2O from the peat lands located along the foothill of Tatra mountains. Additionally

  2. Spatial and temporal variability of organic C and N concentrations and export from 30 boreal rivers induced by land use and climate.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Tuija; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Räike, Antti; Lepistö, Ahti; Thomas, David N

    2015-03-01

    Climate change scenarios for northern boreal regions indicate that there will be increasing temperature and precipitation, and the changes are expected to be larger in winter than in summer. These precipitation and discharge patterns, coupled with shorter ice cover/soil frost periods in the future would be expected to contribute significantly to changing flow paths of organic matter over a range of land use patterns. In order to study the impact of climate change on the seasonality of organic matter export we compared total organic carbon (TOC) and total organic nitrogen (TON) concentrations and export, during different seasons and climatically different years, over 12 years for 30 Finnish rivers separated into forest, agriculture and peat dominated catchments. The mean monthly TOC concentrations were highest during autumn and there was also a peak in May during the highest flow period. The mean monthly concentrations of TON were lowest during winter, increased in spring and remaining high throughout summer and autumn. The TOC/TON ratios were lowest during summer and highest during winter, and in all seasons the ratios were lowest in catchments with a high proportion of agricultural land and highest in peat-dominated catchments. The seasonality of TOC and TON exports reflected geographical location, hydrology and land use patterns. Most of the TOC and TON were transported during the high flow following the spring snowmelt and during rainfall in autumn. In all catchments the relative importance of the spring snowmelt decreased in wet and warm years. However, in peat-dominated catchments the proportion of spring period was over 30% of the annual export even in these wet and warm years, while in other catchments the proportion was about 20%. This might be linked to the northern location of the peat-dominated catchments and the permanent snow cover and spring snowmelt, even in warm years. PMID:25555556

  3. Rapid-onset/offset, variably scheduled 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure reduces nocturnal serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments with rodents indicate that power-frequency electric field (EF) or magnetic field (MF) exposure can suppress the normal nocturnal increase in melatonin concentration in pineal gland and blood. In a separate set of three experiments conducted with nonhuman primates, the authors did not observe melatonin suppression as a result of 6 weeks of day-time exposure to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF) with regularly schedule ``slow`` E/MF onsets/offsets. The study described here used a different exposure paradigm in which two baboons were exposed to E/MF with ``rapid`` E/MF onsets/offsets accompanied by EF transients not found with slowly ramped E/MF onset/offset; profound reductions in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration were observed in this experiment. If replicated in a more extensive experiment, the observation of melatonin suppression only in the presence of E/MF transients would suggest that very specific exposure parameters determine the effects of 60 Hz E/MF on melatonin.

  4. Tracer test with As(V) under variable redox conditions controlling arsenic transport in the presence of elevated ferrous iron concentrations.

    PubMed

    Höhn, R; Isenbeck-Schröter, M; Kent, D B; Davis, J A; Jakobsen, R; Jann, S; Niedan, V; Scholz, C; Stadler, S; Tretner, A

    2006-11-20

    To study transport and reactions of arsenic under field conditions, a small-scale tracer test was performed in an anoxic, iron-reducing zone of a sandy aquifer at the USGS research site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. For four weeks, a stream of groundwater with added As(V) (6.7 muM) and bromide (1.6 mM), was injected in order to observe the reduction of As(V) to As(III). Breakthrough of bromide (Br(-)), As(V), and As(III) as well as additional parameters characterizing the geochemical conditions was observed at various locations downstream of the injection well over a period of 104 days. After a short lag period, nitrate and dissolved oxygen from the injectate oxidized ferrous iron and As(V) became bound to the freshly formed hydrous iron oxides. Approximately one week after terminating the injection, anoxic conditions had been reestablished and increases in As(III) concentrations were observed within 1 m of the injection. During the observation period, As(III) and As(V) were transported to a distance of 4.5 m downgradient indicating significant retardation by sorption processes for both species. Sediment assays as well as elevated concentrations of hydrogen reflected the presence of As(V) reducing microorganisms. Thus, microbial As(V) reduction was thought to be one major process driving the release of As(III) during the tracer test in the Cape Cod aquifer. PMID:16945450

  5. Effects of Acute Bleeding Followed by Hydroxyethyl Starch 130/0.4 or a Crystalloid on Propofol Concentrations, Cerebral Oxygenation, and Electroencephalographic and Haemodynamic Variables in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Venâncio, Carlos; Souza, Almir P.; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Branco, Paula Sério; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Amorim, Pedro; Ferreira, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding changes the haemodynamics, compromising organ perfusion. In this study, the effects of bleeding followed by replacement with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) or lactated Ringer's (LR) on cerebral oxygenation and electroencephalogram-derived parameters were investigated. Twelve young pigs under propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia were bled 30 mL/kg and, after a 20-minute waiting period, volume replacement was performed with HES (GHES; N = 6) or LR (GRL; N = 6). Bleeding caused a decrease of more than 50% in mean arterial pressure (P < 0.01) and a decrease in cerebral oximetry (P = 0.039), bispectral index, and electroencephalogram total power (P = 0.04 and P < 0.01, resp.), while propofol plasma concentrations increased (P < 0.01). Both solutions restored the haemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation similarly and were accompanied by an increase in electroencephalogram total power. No differences between groups were found. However, one hour after the end of the volume replacement, the cardiac output (P = 0.03) and the cerebral oxygenation (P = 0.008) decreased in the GLR and were significantly lower than in GHES (P = 0.02). Volume replacement with HES 130/0.4 was capable of maintaining the cardiac output and cerebral oxygenation during a longer period than LR and caused a decrease in the propofol plasma concentrations. PMID:24971192

  6. Effect of emissions uncertainty and variability on high-resolution concentrations of carbon monoxide, fine particle black carbon, and nitrogen oxides in Fort Collins, Colorado: development of a Bayesian uncertainty modeling and evaluation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, D. L.; Stuart, A. L.; Dagne, G.; Yu, H.

    2013-12-01

    Uncertainties in emissions estimates are known to be one of the primary sources of uncertainty in calculating concentrations and subsequent exposure estimates. Despite continued improvement in the accuracy of emissions downscaling, the quantification of uncertainties is necessary in order to generate a representative emissions product. Bayesian data assimilation is a promising approach to uncertainty estimation when used to calibrate model results with measurement data. This study discusses an emissions inventory and concentration estimates for carbon monoxide (CO), fine particle (PM2.5) black carbon, and nitrogen oxides (NOx) for the city of Fort Collins, Colorado. The development of a Bayesian framework for updating estimates of emissions and concentrations in multiple stages, using measurement data, is also presented. The emissions inventory was constructed using the 2008 National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The spatial and temporal allocation methods from the Emission Modeling Clearinghouse data set are used to downscale the NEI data from annual and county-level resolution for point, nonpoint, and nonroad sources. Onroad mobile source emissions were estimated by combining a bottom-up emissions calculation approach (using emission factors and activities) for large roadway links within Fort Collins with a top-down spatial allocation approach for other roadways. Vehicle activity data for road links were obtained from local 2009 travel demand model results and automatic traffic recorder (ATR) data. The CALPUFF Gaussian puff dispersion model was used to estimate air pollutant concentrations. Hourly, 1.33 km x 1.33 km MM5 meteorological data was used to capture temporal variability in transport. Distributions of concentrations are obtained for spatial locations and time spans using a Monte Carlo sampling approach. Data for ensemble members are sampled from distributions defined from the emissions inventory and meteorological data. Modeled concentrations of CO, PM2

  7. Applications of linking PBPK and PD models to predict the impact of genotypic variability, formulation differences, differences in target binding capacity and target site drug concentrations on drug responses and variability

    PubMed Central

    Chetty, Manoranjenni; Rose, Rachel H.; Abduljalil, Khaled; Patel, Nikunjkumar; Lu, Gaohua; Cain, Theresa; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the added value of integrating prior in vitro data and knowledge-rich physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models with pharmacodynamics (PDs) models. Four distinct applications that were developed and tested are presented here. PBPK models were developed for metoprolol using different CYP2D6 genotypes based on in vitro data. Application of the models for prediction of phenotypic differences in the pharmacokinetics (PKs) and PD compared favorably with clinical data, demonstrating that these differences can be predicted prior to the availability of such data from clinical trials. In the second case, PK and PD data for an immediate release formulation of nifedipine together with in vitro dissolution data for a controlled release (CR) formulation were used to predict the PK and PD of the CR. This approach can be useful to pharmaceutical scientists during formulation development. The operational model of agonism was used in the third application to describe the hypnotic effects of triazolam, and this was successfully extrapolated to zolpidem by changing only the drug related parameters from in vitro experiments. This PBPK modeling approach can be useful to developmental scientists who which to compare several drug candidates in the same therapeutic class. Finally, differences in QTc prolongation due to quinidine in Caucasian and Korean females were successfully predicted by the model using free heart concentrations as an input to the PD models. This PBPK linked PD model was used to demonstrate a higher sensitivity to free heart concentrations of quinidine in Caucasian females, thereby providing a mechanistic understanding of a clinical observation. In general, permutations of certain conditions which potentially change PK and hence PD may not be amenable to the conduct of clinical studies but linking PBPK with PD provides an alternative method of investigating the potential impact of PK changes on PD. PMID:25505415

  8. Variability in plasma concentration of cefotaxime in critically ill patients in an Intensive Care Unit of India and its pharmacodynamic outcome: A nonrandomized, prospective, open-label, analytical study

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, B.; Tripathi, Chakra Dhar; Gogia, Anoop Raj; Meshram, Girish Gulab; Kumar, Manu; Suraj, B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cefotaxime is a widely utilized cephalosporin in most intensive care units of India. However, no data are available about its pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic variability in critically ill patients of the Indian population. Aim: To investigate the variability in the plasma concentration and pharmacodynamic profile of intermittent dosing of cefotaxime in critically ill patients, according to their locus of infection and causative organism. Materials and Methods: Cefotaxime levels were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography by grouping patients according to their locus of infection as hepatobiliary, renal, pulmonary, and others. Patients with cefotaxime concentration below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and 5 times below the MIC for the isolated organism were determined. Results: The difference in the plasma cefotaxime concentration between the hepatobiliary and the nonhepatobiliary groups was significant at 1 h (P = 0.02) following drug dosing, while the difference was significant between the renal and nonrenal group at 1 h (P = 0.001), 4 h (P = 0.009), and 8 h (P = 0.02) after drug dosing. The pulmonary group showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower plasma cefotaxime levels than the nonpulmonary group at all-time points. The cefotaxime levels were below the MIC and below 5 times the MIC for the isolated organism in 16.67% and 43.33% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion: The concentration of cefotaxime differs according to the locus of an infection in critically ill patients. Use of another class of antibiotic or shifting to continuous dosing of cefotaxime, for organisms having MIC values above 1 mg/L, is advisable due to the fear of resistance. PMID:27127389

  9. Water-saturated phase-equilibrium experiments on rhyolite and dacite obsidians: the effect of variable melt water concentration on the composition of phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, L.; Lange, R. A.; Andrews, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    Results of water-saturated phase equilibrium experiments on three obsidians ranging in composition from dacite to rhyolite (67-74 wt% SiO2) are presented and demonstrate the effect of changing melt water concentrations on the composition of plagioclase and orthopyroxene phenocrysts. Experiments were conducted in a cold-seal Ni-rich pressure vessel (Waspaloy) with Ni filler rod, so that experiments were buffered at ΔNNO +1 (± 0.5) (Gershwind & Rutherford, 1992) and pressurized with H2O (where Ptotal= PH2O). Temperatures ranged from 750-900°C and pressures ranged from 100-300 MPa. Prior to the experiments, detailed petrologic studies were first conducted on the three obsidian samples, which are from Cascade and Mexican arcs. Overall phenocryst abundances in all three samples are low (<2.3%), with little to no microlite crystallization. Despite low phenocryst abundances, the obsidians are saturated in five to seven mineral phases: plagioclase + orthopyroxene + ilmenite + magnetite + apatite ± clinopyroxene ± biotite. Eruptive temperatures (±1σ), on the basis of Fe-Ti two oxide thermometry (Ghiorso & Evans, 2008), range from 760 ± 18°C to 943 ± 20°C; corresponding ΔNNO values (±1σ) range from -0.9 ± 0.1 and 0.7 ± 0.1. Plagioclase compositions span a wide range in each sample (e.g., 9-40 and 30-54 mol% An), despite low phenocryst abundances. Orthopyroxene compositions also span a wide range (≤ 15 mol% En), which correspond to Fe-MgKD(opx-liq) values that range from 0.18-0.46. Given the low crystallinity, absence of evidence for mixing of magmas, and no apparent change in oxygen fugacity recorded by iron oxides, the progressive loss of water from a melt, through degassing during rapid magma ascent, is a plausible hypothesis to explain the observed variation in phenocryst compositions. This hypothesis is evaluated with the run products from the water-saturated phase equilibrium experiments on the three obsidian samples. The experimental results indicate

  10. Mercury Concentrations in Fish and Sediment within Streams are Influenced by Watershed and Landscape Variables including Historical Gold Mining in the Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, C. N.; Yee, J. L.; Ackerman, J. T.; Orlando, J. L.; Slotton, D. G.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    We compiled available data on total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish tissue and streambed sediment from stream sites in the Sierra Nevada, California, to assess whether spatial data, including information on historical mining, can be used to make robust predictions of fish fillet tissue THg concentrations. A total of 1,271 fish from five species collected at 103 sites during 1980-2012 were used for the modeling effort: 210 brown trout, 710 rainbow trout, 79 Sacramento pikeminnow, 93 Sacramento sucker, and 179 smallmouth bass. Sediment data were used from 73 sites, including 106 analyses of THg and 77 analyses of MeHg. The dataset included 391 fish (mostly rainbow trout) and 28 sediment samples collected explicitly for this study during 2011-12. Spatial data on historical mining included the USGS Mineral Resources Data System and publicly available maps and satellite photos showing the areas of hydraulic mine pits and other placer mines. Modeling was done using multivariate linear regression and multi-model inference using Akaike Information Criteria. Results indicate that fish THg, accounting for species and length, can be predicted using geospatial data on mining history together with other landscape characteristics including land use/land cover. A model requiring only geospatial data, with an R2 value of 0.61, predicted fish THg correctly with respect to over-or-under 0.2 μg/g wet weight (a California regulatory threshold) for 108 of 121 (89 %) size-species combinations tested. Data for THg in streambed sediment did not improve the geospatial-only model. However, data for sediment MeHg, loss on ignition (organic content), and percent of sediment less than 0.063 mm resulted in a slightly improved model, with an R2 value of 0.63. It is anticipated that these models will be useful to the State of California and others to predict areas where mercury concentrations in fish are likely to exceed regulatory criteria.

  11. Intra-urban spatial variability in wintertime street-level concentrations of multiple combustion-related air pollutants: the New York City Community Air Survey (NYCCAS).

    PubMed

    Clougherty, Jane E; Kheirbek, Iyad; Eisl, Holger M; Ross, Zev; Pezeshki, Grant; Gorczynski, John E; Johnson, Sarah; Markowitz, Steven; Kass, Daniel; Matte, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Although intra-urban air pollution differs by season, few monitoring networks provide adequate geographic density and year-round coverage to fully characterize seasonal patterns. Here, we report winter intra-urban monitoring and land-use regression (LUR) results from the New York City Community Air Survey (NYCCAS). Two-week integrated samples of fine particles (PM(2.5)), black carbon (BC), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) were collected at 155 city-wide street-level locations during winter 2008-2009. Sites were selected using stratified random sampling, randomized across sampling sessions to minimize spatio-temporal confounding. LUR was used to identify GIS-based source indicators associated with higher concentrations. Prediction surfaces were produced using kriging with external drift. Each pollutant varied twofold or more across sites, with higher concentrations near midtown Manhattan. All pollutants were positively correlated, particularly PM(2.5) and BC (Spearman's r=0.84). Density of oil-burning boilers, total and truck traffic density, and temporality explained 84% of PM(2.5) variation. Densities of total traffic, truck traffic, oil-burning boilers and industrial space, with temporality, explained 65% of BC variation. Temporality, built space, bus route location, and traffic density described 67% of nitrogen dioxide variation. Residual oil-burning units, nighttime population and temporality explained 77% of SO(2) variation. Spatial variation in combustion-related pollutants in New York City was strongly associated with oil-burning and traffic density. Chronic exposure disparities and unique local sources can be identified through year-round saturation monitoring. PMID:23361442

  12. Investigating the relationship between Ambrosia pollen concentration and meteorological variables in a European domain based on CORDEX and CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torma, Csaba Zsolt; Giorgi, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    As part of the European project, ATOPICA (atopic diseases in changing climate, land use & air quality) evaluation and scenario simulations were accomplished on 50-km grid spacing over a European domain which was defined in the framework of the international initiation called COordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX). Based on observational data collected from European pollen data bases, the pollen peak season of Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (short or common ragweed) was found between the period: August-September (AS). One sub-region was selected (the most contaminated one: southern part of the Carpathian Basin) for further studies. Based on the ERA-Interim driven simulation of a regional climate model (RegCM) developed at the Abdus Salam International Centre of Theoretical Physics: temperature and precipitation indices are introduced related to the total common ragweed pollen concentration amounts over the target region for the period 1984-2008. In each case (temperature, precipitation) the index was based on the August-September (AS, peak-season) and June-July (JJ, pre-season) means by subtracting the latter from the previous one. The results manifested in a relatively clear signal between total pollen amounts and the indices. The temperature index is negatively, while the precipitation index is positively correlated with the total pollen amounts. This means cooler and wetter pre-seasonal and relatively drier and warmer peak-season weather conditions are favorable for the common ragweed outburst with high pollen concentrations. In total twenty global climate models (GCMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and five regional climate models from the CORDEX initiative were involved in the analyses in order to assess the link between the indices and the seasonal total pollen amounts. The temperature and precipitation indices presented in this study can be a useful tool for seasonal pollen forecasting in future studies.

  13. Rate of strontium sorption and the effects of variable aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium on strontium distribution coefficients of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.; Liszewski, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The rate of strontium sorption and the effects of variable aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium on strontium sorption were measured as part of an investigation to determine strontium chemical transport properties of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine the rate of strontium sorption and strontium distribution coefficients (K(d)s) between aqueous and solid phases. Rate experiments indicate that strontium in solution reached an apparent equilibrium with the sediment in 26 h. K(d)s were derived using the linear isotherm model at initial sodium concentrations from 100 to 5,000 mg/l and initial potassium concentrations from 2 to 150 mg/l. K(d)s ranged from 56 ?? 2 to 62 ?? 3 ml/g at initial aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium equal to or less than 300 and 150 mg/l, respectively. K(d)s hinged from 4.7 ?? 0.2 to 19 ?? 1 ml/g with initial aqueous concentrations of sodium between 1,000 and 5,000 mg/l. These data indicate that sodium concentrations greater than 300 mg/l in wastewater increase the availability of strontium for transport beneath waste disposal ponds at the INEL by decreasing strontium sorption on the surficial sediment. Wastewater concentrations of sodium and potassium less than 300 and 150 mg/l, respectively, have little effect on the availability of strontium for transport.The rate of strontium sorption and the effects of variable aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium on strontium sorption were measured as part of an investigation to determine strontium chemical transport properties of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine the rate of strontium sorption and strontium distribution coefficients (Kds) between aqueous and solid phases. Rate experiments indicate that strontium in solution reached an apparent equilibrium with the sediment in 26

  14. Allocation of recent photoassimilates in mature European beech and Norway spruce - seasonal variability and responses to experimentally increased tropospheric O3 concentration and long-term drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    respiration is exclusively supplied by recently fixed C was rejected for both species. After long-term (7 years) exposure to elevated (i.e. twice-ambient) O3 concentrations, allocation of recently fixed C to stems was distinctly affected when studied during later summer. In correspondence with significantly lowered woody biomass development in beech (- 40 %), C allocation to stems was reduced in response to O3 exposure. Conversely in spruce, photoassimilate allocation to stems and coarse root respiration was hardly affected, reflecting the overall lower sensitivity of spruce to elevated O3 concentrations. Compartmental modeling characterized functional properties of substrate pools supplying respiratory C demands. Stem respiration of spruce appeared to be largely supplied by recent photoassimilates. Conversely in beech, stored C, putatively located in stem parenchyma cells, was a major source for respiration, reflecting the fundamental anatomical disparity between angiosperm beech and gymnosperm spruce. Overall, the observed differences in C allocation between the two study species reflect the high plasticity of beech trees in response to seasons and stressors such as drought and elevated O3, whereas spruce displayed much lower responsiveness to the applied stressors and along the seasonal course of the year.

  15. Postweaning substitution of grazed forage with a high-energy concentrate has variable long-term effects on subcutaneous fat and marbling in Bos taurus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, P L; Siddell, J P; Walmsley, B J; Geesink, G H; Pethick, D W; McPhee, M J

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the effects and interactions of stage of growth and genotype on commercial carcass traits and intramuscular fat (IMF) content in 5 muscles of steers ( = 165) and to test the hypothesis that substituting pasture with a high-energy concentrate during the immediate postweaning period increases IMF. Cattle of 3 genotypes (Angus, Hereford, and Wagyu × Angus; = 55/genotype) were selected at weaning from commercial herds, targeting genotypic differences in marbling and subcutaneous fatness. Following weaning, steers were fed for 168 d within 2 different improved, temperate pasture-based nutritional systems: a forage-only system (FS) and forage with high-energy supplemented system (SS), with 2 replicates per system. The supplement was fed at a level of 1% of average BW adjusted every 2 wk to provide an estimated 50% of energy requirements for 168 d from weaning. Pasture on offer in both systems was managed to match the BW of the FS and SS steers during the postweaning treatment period to avoid confounding due to differences in growth rate during this period. Steers were then regrouped into 2 replicates and backgrounded on improved, temperate pasture for 158 d and then grain fed within 1 group for 105 d (short fed) or 259 d (long fed). Groups were slaughtered at commencement (d 0) and end of postweaning nutritional treatments (d 168), end of backgrounding (d 326), and after short (d 431) or long feedlotting (d 585). Serial slaughter stage had an effect on all traits assessed ( < 0.01). The FS steers had more rib fat ( < 0.01) and higher Meat Standards Australia marbling score ( < 0.05) and a tendency ( < 0.10) to have greater eye muscle area than the SS steers throughout the study. Genotypic differences were evident ( < 0.05) for all traits assessed except HCW, dressing percentage, rib fat depth, ossification score, ultimate pH, and IMF in the semitendinosus muscle. The results for marbling and IMF do not support the use of a

  16. Biotic, temporal and spatial variability of tritium concentrations in transpirate samples collected in the vicinity of a near-surface low-level nuclear waste disposal site and nearby research reactor.

    PubMed

    Twining, J R; Hughes, C E; Harrison, J J; Hankin, S; Crawford, J; Johansen, M; Dyer, L

    2011-06-01

    The results of a 21 month sampling program measuring tritium in tree transpirate with respect to local sources are reported. The aim was to assess the potential of tree transpirate to indicate the presence of sub-surface seepage plumes. Transpirate gathered from trees near low-level nuclear waste disposal trenches contained activity concentrations of (3)H that were significantly higher (up to ∼700 Bq L(-1)) than local background levels (0-10 Bq L(-1)). The effects of the waste source declined rapidly with distance to be at background levels within 10s of metres. A research reactor 1.6 km south of the site contributed significant (p < 0.01) local fallout (3)H but its influence did not reach as far as the disposal trenches. The elevated (3)H levels in transpirate were, however, substantially lower than groundwater concentrations measured across the site (ranging from 0 to 91% with a median of 2%). Temporal patterns of tree transpirate (3)H, together with local meteorological observations, indicate that soil water within the active root zones comprised a mixture of seepage and rainfall infiltration. The degree of mixing was variable given that the soil water activity concentrations were heterogeneous at a scale equivalent to the effective rooting volume of the trees. In addition, water taken up by roots was not well mixed within the trees. Based on correlation modelling, net rainfall less evaporation (a surrogate for infiltration) over a period of from 2 to 3 weeks prior to sampling seems to be the optimum predictor of transpirate (3)H variability for any sampled tree at this site. The results demonstrate successful use of (3)H in transpirate from trees to indicate the presence and general extent of sub-surface contamination at a low-level nuclear waste site. PMID:21397999

  17. Concentration and spatial variability of mercury and other heavy metals in surface soil samples of periurban waste mine tailing along a transect in the Almadén mining district (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, P. Conde; Bellido, E.; Rubí, J. A. Martín; Ballesta, R. Jiménez

    2009-01-01

    concentration 19.3 and maximun 135); Pb mean concentration was 15.19 mg kg-1 (minimun 1.12 and maximun 1013). Metal distribution generally showed spatial variability ascribed to significant anthropogenic perturbation by mining tailing type. Hg showed vertical profile characterized by surface enrichment, with concentrations in the upper layer (93.7-82.2 mg kg-1 in front of 3.4 of the rock value) exceeding, in several occasions, the background value. The results obtained denote a potential toxicity of some heavy metals in some of the studied samples. Water-soluble mercury could enter the aquatic system and accumulate in sediments. Mercury and other heavy metals contamination depended on the duration and intensity of mining activities.

  18. Influence of psychological stress on immune-inflammatory variables in normal humans. Part II. Altered serum concentrations of natural anti-inflammatory agents and soluble membrane antigens of monocytes and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Song, C; Kenis, G; van Gastel, A; Bosmans, E; Lin, A; de Jong, R; Neels, H; Scharpé, S; Janca, A; Yasukawa, K; Maes, M

    1999-03-22

    The effects of academic examination stress on serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1 receptor (R) antagonist (A), soluble(s) IL-2R, sIL-6R, soluble glycoprotein 130 (sgp130), Clara cell protein (CC16), sCD8 and sCD14 were evaluated in 38 university students. The relationships among changes in the above immune-inflammatory variables, levels of serum cortisol, and scores on the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) or the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were examined. Academic examination stress was associated with significant increases in PSS and STAI scores, and in serum sgp130 and sCD8 values. Academic examination stress was associated with significantly decreased serum sCD14 concentrations in students with high, but not low, stress perception. There were stress-induced differences in serum IL-1RA, sIL-6R and CC16 concentrations between students with high vs. low stress-induced anxiety. The stress-induced increase in serum sCD8 was significantly more pronounced in male students, whereas the increase in serum sgp130 was more pronounced in female students taking contraceptive drugs. These results suggest that: (1) psychological stress induces immune-inflammatory changes pointing toward complex regulatory responses in IL-6 signalling, a decreased anti-inflammatory capacity of the serum, and interactions with T cell and monocytic activation; and that (2) sex hormones may modify stress-induced immune-inflammatory responses. PMID:10333381

  19. Concentrator Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque-Heredia, Ignacio; Luque, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * The early development of CPV * Concentrator solar cells * Optics for photovoltaic concentrators * Photovoltaic concentration modules * Tracking systems for photovoltaic concentration * High-concentration systems * Rating and performance * Cost considerations * Conclusions * References

  20. Development of a permeability-limited model of the human brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to integrate known physiological and biological knowledge: Estimating time varying CSF drug concentrations and their variability using in vitro data.

    PubMed

    Gaohua, Lu; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Johnson, Trevor N; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Jamei, Masoud

    2016-06-01

    A 4-compartment permeability-limited brain (4Brain) model consisting of brain blood, brain mass, cranial and spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments has been developed and incorporated into a whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model within the Simcyp Simulator. The model assumptions, structure, governing equations and system parameters are described. The model in particular considers the anatomy and physiology of the brain and CSF, including CSF secretion, circulation and absorption, as well as the function of various efflux and uptake transporters existing on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), together with the known parameter variability. The model performance was verified using in vitro data and clinical observations for paracetamol and phenytoin. The simulated paracetamol spinal CSF concentration is comparable with clinical lumbar CSF data for both intravenous and oral doses. Phenytoin CSF concentration-time profiles in epileptic patients were simulated after accounting for disease-induced over-expression of efflux transporters within the BBB. Various 'what-if' scenarios, involving variation of specific drug and system parameters of the model, demonstrated that the 4Brain model is able to simulate the possible impact of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions, the lumbar puncture process and the age-dependent change in the CSF turnover rate on the local PK within the brain. PMID:27236639

  1. Variability of particulate organic carbon concentration in the north polar Atlantic based on ocean color observations with Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Stramski, Dariusz

    2005-01-01

    We use satellite data from Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) to investigate distributions of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration in surface waters of the north polar Atlantic Ocean during the spring summer season (April through August) over a 6-year period from 1998 through 2003. By use of field data collected at sea, we developed regional relationships for the purpose of estimating POC from remote-sensing observations of ocean color. Analysis of several approaches used in the POC algorithm development and match-up analysis of coincident in situ derived and satellite-derived estimates of POC resulted in selection of an algorithm that is based on the blue-to-green ratio of remote-sensing reflectance R(sub rs) (or normalized water-leaving radiance L(sub wn)). The application of the selected algorithm to a 6-year record of SeaWiFS monthly composite data of L(sub wn) revealed patterns of seasonal and interannual variability of POC in the study region. For example, the results show a clear increase of POC throughout the season. The lowest values, generally less than 200 mg per cubic meters, and at some locations often less than 50 mg per cubic meters, were observed in April. In May and June, POC can exceed 300 or even 400 mg per cubic meters in some parts of the study region. Patterns of interannual variability are intricate, as they depend on the geographic location within the study region and particular time of year (month) considered. By comparing the results averaged over the entire study region and the entire season (April through August) for each year separately, we found that the lowest POC occurred in 2001 and the highest POC occurred in 2002 and 1999.

  2. Variability of particulate organic carbon concentration in the north polar Atlantic based on ocean color observations with Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Stramski, Dariusz

    2005-10-01

    We use satellite data from Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) to investigate distributions of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration in surface waters of the north polar Atlantic Ocean during the spring-summer season (April through August) over a 6-year period from 1998 through 2003. By use of field data collected at sea, we developed regional relationships for the purpose of estimating POC from remote-sensing observations of ocean color. Analysis of several approaches used in the POC algorithm development and match-up analysis of coincident in situ-derived and satellite-derived estimates of POC resulted in selection of an algorithm that is based on the blue-to-green ratio of remote-sensing reflectance Rrs (or normalized water-leaving radiance Lwn). The application of the selected algorithm to a 6-year record of SeaWiFS monthly composite data of Lwn revealed patterns of seasonal and interannual variability of POC in the study region. For example, the results show a clear increase of POC throughout the season. The lowest values, generally less than 200 mg m-3, and at some locations often less than 50 mg m-3, were observed in April. In May and June, POC can exceed 300 or even 400 mg m-3 in some parts of the study region. Patterns of interannual variability are intricate, as they depend on the geographic location within the study region and particular time of year (month) considered. By comparing the results averaged over the entire study region and the entire season (April through August) for each year separately, we found that the lowest POC occurred in 2001 and the highest POC occurred in 2002 and 1999.

  3. Intra-catchment variability and significance of catchment-averaged denudation rates from 10Be concentrations in stream sediments: a 10Be-budget of the Etages catchment, French Western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delunel, Romain; van der Beek, Peter; Carcaillet, Julien; Bourlès, Didier

    2010-05-01

    As most of the European Alps, The Ecrins-Pelvoux massif (French Western Alps) was extensively glaciated during Quaternary glaciations, leading to strong rejuvenation of its morphology. The massif therefore provides a suitable area to study the efficiency of erosion processes in relief evolution on postglacial timescales. Denudation rates inferred from in-situ produced 10Be concentrations in stream sediments, obtained from 12 catchments throughout the Ecrins-Pelvoux massif, have been recently shown to correlate with mean catchment elevation in the absence of significant relationships with other morphometric parameters (Delunel et al., in press). We have proposed that the present-day denudation of Ecrins-Pelvoux massif climatically driven trough increasing frost-controlled processes with elevation, providing a mechanistic link for the inferred feedback between uplift, elevation and denudation rates observed in the European Alps (Wittmann et al., 2007; Champagnac et al., 2009). However, cosmogenic isotope measurements of stream sediments do not allow distinguishing the intrinsic spatial variability of denudation within a catchment. Therefore, we have sought to verify our previous conclusions on a smaller scale within a single catchment, from exhaustive measurements of 10Be concentrations carried by quartz fraction of different sources feeding the high-altitude stream sediment routing system. We focus our current study on the Etages catchment, a high-elevation hanging tributary of the Vénéon valley (western part of the Ecrins-Pelvoux massif) underlain by homogenous granitic bedrock. This 14 km2 catchment presents elevations ranging from 1600 m to ~3600 m (mean catchment elevation ~2700 m), within the altitudinal range where frost-controlled processes are most efficient in the Western Alps (Delunel et al., in press). This catchment also hosts a small cirque-glacier, remaining from the Little Ice Age glacial advance. We have collected 19 samples on the most

  4. Seasonal and spatial variability of aquatic N2O, CH4 and CO2 concentrations and their contribution to the overall greenhouse gas budget of the river Tay catchment, NW Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiba, Ute; Harley, James; Carvalho, Laurence; Heal, Kate; Rees, Bob

    2016-04-01

    River networks act as a link between components of the terrestrial landscape with the atmosphere and oceans, and are believed to contribute significantly to global budgets of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). However, knowledge of flux magnitudes and drivers of seasonal and spatial variability required to understand their contribution to the overall catchment greenhouse (GHG) flux is only available for relatively few river systems. For this reason we conducted a two year study of monthly GHG concentration measurements from the river Tay. The river Tay is the largest river in Scotland, in terms of discharge and can be considered typical for many North European river systems. The Tay and its tributaries drain peat dominated uplands and agricultural lowlands before entering the North Sea via the large intertidal estuary. We collected water samples from 9 locations along the river monthly and analysed these sampes for dissolved concentrations of N2O, CH4 and CO2, NH4+ , NO3-, O2, total organic carbon and nitrogen, pH and turbidity. Fluxes across the air water interface were calculated using published gas transfer equations. All GHGs showed considerable spatial and seasonal variation. Nitrous oxide emissions ranged from 176 to 1850 μg N m-2 d-1 over the almost two year period February 2009 to December 2010. Emissions were highest in the lowland tributaries related to higher nutrient concentrations associated with more intensive agricultural activity. Methane emissions ranged from 1720 to 15500 μg C m-2 d-1, and in general decreased from upland to lowland sites. Variation in sediment quality was the predominant driving factor. Carbon dioxide emissions ranged from 517 to 2550 mg C m-2 d-1 and generally increased from upland to lowland sites. Emissions were highest in late summer and autumn and lowest in winter at most sites, highlighting the role of seasonal environmental controls such as temperature, light, and substrate availability

  5. Glucose Variability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proposed contribution of glucose variability to the development of the complications of diabetes beyond that of glycemic exposure is supported by reports that oxidative stress, the putative mediator of such complications, is greater for intermittent as opposed to sustained hyperglycemia. Variability of glycemia in ambulatory conditions defined as the deviation from steady state is a phenomenon of normal physiology. Comprehensive recording of glycemia is required for the generation of any measurement of glucose variability. To avoid distortion of variability to that of glycemic exposure, its calculation should be devoid of a time component. PMID:23613565

  6. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  7. Data Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Orbital Research, Inc., developed, built, and tested three high-temperature components for use in the design of a data concentrator module in distributed turbine engine control. The concentrator receives analog and digital signals related to turbine engine control and communicates with a full authority digital engine control (FADEC) or high-level command processor. This data concentrator follows the Distributed Engine Controls Working Group (DECWG) roadmap for turbine engine distributed controls communication development that operates at temperatures at least up to 225 C. In Phase I, Orbital Research developed detailed specifications for each component needed for the system and defined the total system specifications. This entailed a combination of system design, compiling existing component specifications, laboratory testing, and simulation. The results showed the feasibility of the data concentrator. Phase II of this project focused on three key objectives. The first objective was to update the data concentrator design modifications from DECWG and prime contractors. Secondly, the project defined requirements for the three new high-temperature, application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs): one-time programmable (OTP), transient voltage suppression (TVS), and 3.3V. Finally, the project validated each design by testing over temperature and under load.

  8. Cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, Paula; Cropper, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Recent observations of cataclysmic variables (CVs) at different wavelengths are reviewed, with a focus on their implications for theoretical models. Consideration is given to disk CVs (the flux distribution of the disk and changes during dwarf-nova outbursts), magnetic CVs (flux distributions and components), and the underlying stars. Typical data are presented in graphs, tables, and sample spectra, and it is concluded that more detailed multiwavelength observations are needed to improve models of radiative transfer and viscosity effects in accretion disks.

  9. Solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.S.

    1982-06-08

    A solar concentrator having an open framework formed as a geodesic dome. A rotatable support axle extends substantially diametrically across the dome and has the opposite ends thereof supported on the framework. The support axle defines a first rotational axis which is oriented to extend substantially parallel with the earth's north-south axis. A support post is hingedly mounted on the support shaft substantially at the midpoint thereof for permitting angular displacement of the support post relative to the support shaft about a second rotational axis which is perpendicular to the first axis. A dishshaped reflector assembly is positioned within the interior of the framework and fixedly secured to the support post. First and second drives effect angular displacement of the reflector assembly about the first and second axes, respectively, to permit tracking of the solar position.

  10. In Vivo Transmission of an IncA/C Plasmid in Escherichia coli Depends on Tetracycline Concentration, and Acquisition of the Plasmid Results in a Variable Cost of Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Randall S.; Isaacson, Richard E.; Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Lang, Kevin; Kobluk, Kristi; Rivet, Bernadette; Borewicz, Klaudyna; Frye, Jonathan G.; Englen, Mark; Anderson, Janet; Davies, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    IncA/C plasmids are broad-host-range plasmids enabling multidrug resistance that have emerged worldwide among bacterial pathogens of humans and animals. Although antibiotic usage is suspected to be a driving force in the emergence of such strains, few studies have examined the impact of different types of antibiotic administration on the selection of plasmid-containing multidrug resistant isolates. In this study, chlortetracycline treatment at different concentrations in pig feed was examined for its impact on selection and dissemination of an IncA/C plasmid introduced orally via a commensal Escherichia coli host. Continuous low-dose administration of chlortetracycline at 50 g per ton had no observable impact on the proportions of IncA/C plasmid-containing E. coli from pig feces over the course of 35 days. In contrast, high-dose administration of chlortetracycline at 350 g per ton significantly increased IncA/C plasmid-containing E. coli in pig feces (P < 0.001) and increased movement of the IncA/C plasmid to other indigenous E. coli hosts. There was no evidence of conjugal transfer of the IncA/C plasmid to bacterial species other than E. coli. In vitro competition assays demonstrated that bacterial host background substantially impacted the cost of IncA/C plasmid carriage in E. coli and Salmonella. In vitro transfer and selection experiments demonstrated that tetracycline at 32 μg/ml was necessary to enhance IncA/C plasmid conjugative transfer, while subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline in vitro strongly selected for IncA/C plasmid-containing E. coli. Together, these experiments improve our knowledge on the impact of differing concentrations of tetracycline on the selection of IncA/C-type plasmids. PMID:25769824

  11. Vapor concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  12. Plasma concentrations of benzodiazepines.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, A J; Hailey, D M; Lader, M H

    1977-01-01

    1. Twenty anxious patients were treated with medazepam, diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, amylobarbitone and placebo, each given in flexible dosage for 2-4 weeks. 2. At the end of each treatment, a series of clinical, physiological and behavioural variables were measured and plasma samples were taken for estimation of the appropriate drug and metabolite concentrations. 3. Nordiazepam was shown to be an important metabolite of both medazepam and diazepam: the ratio of medazepam to noradiazepam was 0.14 and the ratio of diazepam to nordiazepam following diazepam administration was 0.72. 4. No significant correlations were found between the plasma concentrations of any of the treatments and the clinical ratings or behavioural measures. 5. Some relationship was shown between levels of medazepam and its physiological effects. PMID:14659

  13. The solution of the laminar-boundary-layer equation for the flat plate for velocity and temperature fields for variable physical properties and for the diffusion field at high concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuh, H

    1950-01-01

    In connection with Pohlhausen's solution for the temperature field on the flat plate, a series of formulas were indicated by means of which the velocity and temperature field for variable physical characteristics can be computed by an integral equation and an iteration method based on it. With it, the following cases were solved: On the assumption that the viscosity simply varies with the temperature while the other fluid properties remain constant, the velocity and temperature field on the heated and cooled plate, respectively, was computed at the Prandtl numbers 12.5 and 100 (viscous fluids). A closer study of these two cases resulted in general relations: The calculations for a gas of Pr number 0.7 (air) were conducted on the assumption that all fluid properties vary with the temperature, and the velocities are low enough for the heat of friction to be discounted. The result was a thickening of the boundary layers, but no appreciable modification in shearing stress or heat-transfer coefficient.

  14. Fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosol in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA: Variability of concentrations and possible constituents and sources of particles in various spectral clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Fernandez, E.; Rosen, J. M.; Hill, S. C.; Wang, Y.; Pan, Y. L.

    2013-02-01

    The UV-excited laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectra of single atmospheric particles and the three-band integrating-nephelometer elastic scattering of atmospheric aerosol were measured during four approximately 24-h periods on May 2007 in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. Aerosol scattering measurements in the nephelometer red channel (50-nm band centered at 700-nm) ranged from around 3-10 times the molecular (Rayleigh) scattering background. On average 22.8% of particles with size greater than about 1 μm diameter have fluorescence above a preset fluorescence threshold. A hierarchical cluster analysis indicates that most of the single-particle UV-LIF spectra fall into about 10 categories (spectral clusters) as found previously at other geographic sites (Pinnick et al., 2004; Pan et al., 2007). The clusters include spectra characteristic of various humic/fulvic acids, humic-like-substances (HULIS), chemically aged terpenes, fungal spores, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, bacteria, cellulose/pollens, and mixtures of various organic carbon compounds. By far the most populated cluster category is similar to those of chemically aged terpenes/humic-materials; on average this population comprises about 62% of fluorescent particles. Clusters with spectra similar to that of some HULIS aerosol contain on average 10.0% of particles; those characteristic of some fungal spores (or perhaps mixtures of aromatic organic compounds) 8.4% of particles; bacteria-like spectra 1.6% of particles; and cellulose/pollen-like spectra 0.8% of particles. Measurements of fluorescent particles over relatively short (24 min) periods reveal that the concentrations of particles in the most populated clusters are highly correlated, suggesting that the particles populating them derive from the same region; these particles might be composed of crustal material coated with secondary organic carbon. On the other hand, concentrations of particles having cellulose-like spectra are generally

  15. Ozone variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duetsch, H. U.

    1983-09-01

    The annual and long-term variations in the atmospheric ozone layer were examined on the basis of 55 yr of data taken at Aroya, Switzerland and 25 yr of data gathered by the global ozone network. Attention was given to annual and biennial variations, which showed that the midlatitude peak concentration was affected by a quasi-biennial variation of the tropical stratospheric circulation. Smaller scale circulation patterns were dominant in the lower stratosphere, although an observed negative trend of the total ozone was equally distributed between the troposphere and 24 km altitude. The global ozone increase detected in the 1960s was possible due to general circulation alterations, but may also have been influenced by injection of NO(x) into the atmosphere during atomic bomb testing.

  16. Variability of plasma phenobarbitone concentration in Asian children in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, H S

    1984-01-01

    In a study with 113 Asian children in which phenobarbitone was used as the sole antiepileptic drug in 75 children, including Chinese, Malays, and Indians, the mean phenobarbitone dosage required to produce a plasma level of 15 micrograms/ml was 5.2 mg/kg/day. While the mean plasma level/dose ratio varied, the differences between the three ethnic groups were not statistically significant. Also of little difference were the ratios between the male and female groups. For those patients with poor seizure control, however, the mean plasma level/dose ratio was significantly lower than in those whose seizures were controlled. Using additional anticonvulsant drugs concurrently with phenobarbitone in 40 children raised the mean plasma level/dose ratios significantly in each ethnic group. Further, the greater age level in those given additional antiepileptic drugs might have contributed slightly to a higher mean plasma level/dose ratio. PMID:6740737

  17. CONCENTRATIONS AND VARIABILITY OF ß-CRYPTOXANTHIN IN FRUITS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ß-cryptoxanthin is a carotenoid with an unusual capacity to increase bone formation. Furthermore, a number of experimental and rodent studies have shown that ß-cryptoxanthin appears to have an anabolic effect on bone, increasing osteoblasts and decreasing osteoclasts (Uchiyama et al 2005, Yamaguchi ...

  18. Predicting variability of aquatic concentrations of human pharmaceuticals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potential exposure to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in the aquatic environment is a subject of ongoing concern. We recently estimated maximum likely potency-normalized exposure rates at the national level for several hundred commonly used human prescription pharmaceut...

  19. conindex: Estimation of concentration indices

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Owen; O'Neill, Stephen; Van Ourti, Tom; Walsh, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Concentration indices are frequently used to measure inequality in one variable over the distribution of another. Most commonly, they are applied to the measurement of socioeconomic-related inequality in health. We introduce a user-written Stata command conindex which provides point estimates and standard errors of a range of concentration indices. The command also graphs concentration curves (and Lorenz curves) and performs statistical inference for the comparison of inequality between groups. The article offers an accessible introduction to the various concentration indices that have been proposed to suit different measurement scales and ethical responses to inequality. The command’s capabilities and syntax are demonstrated through analysis of wealth-related inequality in health and healthcare in Cambodia. PMID:27053927

  20. Variable contribution of functional prey groups in diets reveals inter- and intraspecific differences in faecal concentrations of essential and non-essential elements in three sympatric avian aerial insectivores: a re-assessment of usefulness of bird faeces in metal biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Orłowski, Grzegorz; Kamiński, Piotr; Karg, Jerzy; Baszyński, Jędrzej; Szady-Grad, Małgorzata; Koim-Puchowska, Beata; Klawe, Jacek J

    2015-06-15

    Aerial insectivores through their insect diet can contribute to biotransfer of elements across habitats. We investigate the relationship between dietary composition as expressed by the contributions of six functional invertebrate prey groups (primarily of agriculturally subsidised invertebrates characteristic of agricultural areas in temperate regions of Europe) and concentrations of essential (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Co) and non-essential (As, Cd, Pb) elements of environmental concern in the faeces of nestlings of three species of avian aerial insectivores - Common Swift Apus apus, Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica and House Martin Delichon urbicum - which breed sympatrically and use apparently similar resources of flying insect prey. There were significant differences between the species for 7 of the 12 elements (Ca, Zn, Cu, Co, As, Pb, Cd); these differences were attributable to the variable dietary composition, even though the concentrations of the elements varied enormously between the faecal samples from the individual species. Partial correlation analysis between the biomass (expressed in mg dry weight) of the six functional prey groups and faecal concentrations of elements showed the highest number of significant relationships for toxic metals (As, Pb and Cd). The results of the General Regression Model explaining faecal element concentrations revealed the different explanatory power of the effects of PCA (of six functional prey groups) dietary scores. A significant fit of GRM was obtained for 7 elements (Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, As, Pb, Cd) for Barn Swallows, 2 elements (Cu, As) for House Martins and 1 element (Mn) for Common Swifts. Overall, the results confirmed our predictions that the biomass of consumed coprophilous taxa and insects from crop habitats was positively correlated with the faecal concentrations of toxic elements. Unexpectedly, however, the faecal samples (primarily those of Common Swifts) that contained many oil-seed rape insect pests had lower

  1. Decomposing global crop yield variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Ari, Tamara; Makowski, David

    2014-11-01

    Recent food crises have highlighted the need to better understand the between-year variability of agricultural production. Although increasing future production seems necessary, the globalization of commodity markets suggests that the food system would also benefit from enhanced supplies stability through a reduction in the year-to-year variability. Here, we develop an analytical expression decomposing global crop yield interannual variability into three informative components that quantify how evenly are croplands distributed in the world, the proportion of cultivated areas allocated to regions of above or below average variability and the covariation between yields in distinct world regions. This decomposition is used to identify drivers of interannual yield variations for four major crops (i.e., maize, rice, soybean and wheat) over the period 1961-2012. We show that maize production is fairly spread but marked by one prominent region with high levels of crop yield interannual variability (which encompasses the North American corn belt in the USA, and Canada). In contrast, global rice yields have a small variability because, although spatially concentrated, much of the production is located in regions of below-average variability (i.e., South, Eastern and South Eastern Asia). Because of these contrasted land use allocations, an even cultivated land distribution across regions would reduce global maize yield variance, but increase the variance of global yield rice. Intermediate results are obtained for soybean and wheat for which croplands are mainly located in regions with close-to-average variability. At the scale of large world regions, we find that covariances of regional yields have a negligible contribution to global yield variance. The proposed decomposition could be applied at any spatial and time scales, including the yearly time step. By addressing global crop production stability (or lack thereof) our results contribute to the understanding of a key

  2. Latent Variable Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borsboom, Denny

    2008-01-01

    This paper formulates a metatheoretical framework for latent variable modeling. It does so by spelling out the difference between observed and latent variables. This difference is argued to be purely epistemic in nature: We treat a variable as "observed" when the inference from data structure to variable structure can be made with certainty and as…

  3. The Concentration of Affluence in the United States, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Examines the concentration of affluent households in metropolitan areas, considering the rate of concentrated affluence for the total population and for Blacks and Whites and racial differences in concentrated affluence. Variables measuring industry/occupation employment mix influence the rate of concentrated affluence through levels of income…

  4. Photovoltaic concentrator module technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Elizabeth H.; Chamberlin, Jay L.; Boes, Eldon C.

    Significant developments in the development of photovoltaic (PV) concentrator technology are described. Concentrator cell research, advances in PV concentrator cell technology, and PV concentrator module development are described. Reliability issues currently of concern, including the applicability of wet insulation resistance tests to concentrator modules, correlation of accelerated thermal cycling tests with life expectancy in the field, and the importance of quality assurance during manufacture, are discussed. Two PV concentrator power systems installed in 1989 are discussed. A PV concentrator initiative program established by the DOE is given, and the results of the latest cost study are presented.

  5. Variability as an Operant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holth, Per

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments on operant variability by Neuringer and colleagues (e.g., Neuringer, 1986, 2002; Page & Neuringer, 1985) have been repeatedly cited as showing that behavioral variability can be reinforced by making reinforcement contingent on it. They showed that the degree of variability in pigeons' eight-peck sequences, as measured by U…

  6. Photovoltaic concentrator initiative: Concentrator cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.H.; Narayanan, S.

    1993-05-01

    This project involves the development of a large-area, low-cost, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell for use in the Entech 22-sun linear-focus Fresnel lens concentrator system. The buried contact solar cell developed at the University of New South Wales was selected for this project. Both Entech and the University of New South Wales are subcontractors. This annual report presents the program efforts from November 1990 through December 1991, including the design of the cell, development of a baseline cell process, and presentation of the results of preliminary cell processing. Important results include a cell designed for operation in a real concentrator system and substitution of mechanical grooving for the previously utilized laser scribing.

  7. Oxygen-Concentrating Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, K.

    1986-01-01

    High-purity oxygen produced from breathing air or from propellantgrade oxygen in oxygen-concentrating cell. Operating economics of concentrator attractive: Energy consumption about 4 Wh per liter of oxygen, slightly lower than conventional electrochemical oxygen extractors.

  8. Urine concentration test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine concentration test measures the ability of the kidneys to conserve or excrete water. ... Increased urine concentration may be due to different conditions, such as: Heart failure Loss of body fluids (dehydration) from diarrhea or ...

  9. Problem of hidden variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Emilio

    1992-10-01

    The problem of hidden variables in quantum mechanics is formalized as follows. A general or contextual (noncontextual) hidden-variables theory is defined as a mapping f: Q×M → C (f: Q→C) where Q is the set of projection operators in the appropriate (quantum) Hilbert space, M is the set of maximal Boolean subalgebras of Q and C is a (classical) Boolean algebra. It is shown that contextual (noncontextual) hidden-variables always exist (do not exist).

  10. The ROSAT variable sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; Giommi, P.; White, N. E.

    1996-01-01

    The spectral and timing characteristics from a sample, of 91 objects, of the variable sources obtained using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test technique are presented. The data were extracted from the catalog constructed by White, Giommi and Angelini, the WGACAT, based on the pointed observations from the Rosat missions. The application of the test revealed more than 2400 individual variable candidates, with 'sq chi' greater than 12. The sample of these variable sources, mostly unidentified, probably contains many flare stars, a few cataclysmic variables and a possible transient source.

  11. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  12. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  13. Microinertia and internal variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovski, Arkadi; Ván, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The description of microinertia in micromorphic continua is discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In the framework of dual internal variables, the microinertia stems from a thermodynamic equation of state related to the internal variable, which has the properties similar to mechanical momentum.

  14. Variable Synthetic Capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    Feedback amplifier circuit synthesizes electronically variable capacitance. Variable Synthetic Capacitor is amplifier circuit with follower/feedback configuration. Effective input capacitance depends on input set current. If synthetic capacitor is connected across resonant element of oscillator, oscillator frequency controlled via input set current. Circuit especially suitable for fine frequency adjustments of piezoelectric-crystal or inductor/capacitor resonant oscillators.

  15. Reinforcing Saccadic Amplitude Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paeye, Celine; Madelain, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Saccadic endpoint variability is often viewed as the outcome of neural noise occurring during sensorimotor processing. However, part of this variability might result from operant learning. We tested this hypothesis by reinforcing dispersions of saccadic amplitude distributions, while maintaining constant their medians. In a first experiment we…

  16. Latent Variable Interaction Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacker, Randall E.

    2002-01-01

    Used simulation to study two different approaches to latent variable interaction modeling with continuous observed variables: (1) a LISREL 8.30 program and (2) data analysis through PRELIS2 and SIMPLIS programs. Results show that parameter estimation was similar but standard errors were different. Discusses differences in ease of implementation.…

  17. Variable speed drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A variable speed drive wherein a first embodiment is comprised of a pivotally mounted prime mover coupled to a rotary fluid output device, such as a fan or pump, through a variable and fixed pulley drive arrangement is described. The pivotal position of the prime mover and accordingly the pitch diameter of variable pulley means is controlled in accordance with fluid motor means coupled to the prime mover. This is actuated in response to a fluid feedback control signal derived from a sensed output of the rotary fluid output device. The pivotal motion of the prime mover imparts an arcuate motion to the variable pulley means which effects a speed variation of the rotary fluid output device in accordance with the variation of the pitch diameter ratio of opposing variable and fixed pulley means.

  18. Basic properties and variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querci, Francois R.

    1987-01-01

    Giant and supergiant M, S, and C stars are discussed in this survey of research. Basic properties as determined by spectra, chemical composition, photometry, or variability type are discussed. Space motions and space distributions of cool giants are described. Distribution of these stars in our galaxy and those nearby is discussed. Mira variables in particular are surveyed with emphasis on the following topics: (1) phase lag phenomenon; (2) Mira light curves; (3) variations in color indices; (4) determination of multiple periods; (5) correlations between quantities such as period length, light-curve shape, infrared (IR) excess, and visible and IR color diagram; (6) semiregular (SR) variables and different time scales in SR light variations; (7) irregular variable Lb and Lc stars; (8) different time-scale light variations; (9) hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars, in particular RCB stars; and (10) irreversible changes and rapid evolution in red variable stars.

  19. Automated solvent concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, J. S.; Stuart, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Designed for automated drug identification system (AUDRI), device increases concentration by 100. Sample is first filtered, removing particulate contaminants and reducing water content of sample. Sample is extracted from filtered residue by specific solvent. Concentrator provides input material to analysis subsystem.

  20. Photovoltaic concentrator research status

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the most important developments in concentrator research and development since the fifth E.C. Photovoltaic Energy Conference in October 1983. Within the Sandia managed Photovoltaic Concentrator Research Project several record cell efficiencies have been reported. Applied Solar Energy Corporation has fabricated a concentrator silicon cell with 20.9% peak efficiency, at 90X concentration. Varian Associates has demonstrated a 26.0% efficient GaAs cell at 700X concentration. Hughes Research Labs together with Applied Solar Energy Corporation and Sandia has demonstrated a 24.7% efficient, at 70X concentration, mechanically-stacked multijunction device using GaAs on silicon. In addition, a record efficiency for silicon technology has been demonstrated with the Sandia developed 200X silicon module. The module has been measured to have 17% peak efficiency. This paper will review these accomplishments, other research progress, and current research directions in concentrator cells, modules, and arrays. A brief economic assessment is also presented which indicates the potential of concentrator technology.

  1. Extracting concentrated guided light.

    PubMed

    Ries, H; Segal, A; Karni, J

    1997-05-01

    The maximum concentration of radiation is proportional to the square of the refractive index of the medium in which it propagates. A medium with a high refractive index can also serve as a lightguide for concentrated radiation. However, if concentrated radiation is extracted from one medium, with a high refractive index, to another, whose index is lower (e.g., from fused silica into air), part of the radiation may be lost because of the total internal reflection at the interface. We present polygonal shapes suitable for efficient extraction of the concentrated radiation in a controllable way, without increasing the cross-section area (or diameter) of the lightguide. It is shown analytically and experimentally that the use of a secondary concentrator, followed by such a light extractor, both having a high refractive index, can provide considerably more power to a solar receiver with a specific aperture. PMID:18253285

  2. Uranium concentrations in asparagus

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, B.L.; Poston, T.M.

    1992-05-01

    Concentrations of uranium were determined in asparagus collected from eight locations near and ten locations on the Hanford Site southcentral Washington State. Only one location (Sagemoor) had samples with elevated concentrations. The presence of elevated uranium in asparagus at Sagemoor may be explained by the elevated levels in irrigation water. These levels of uranium are comparable to levels previously reported upstream and downstream of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site (0.0008 {mu}g/g), but were below the 0.020-{mu}g/g level reported for brush collected at Sagemoor in a 1982 study. Concentrations at all other onsite and offsite sample locations were considerably lower than concentrations reported immediately upstream and downstream of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. Using an earlier analysis of the uranium concentrations in asparagus collected from the Hanford Site constitutes a very small fraction of the US Department of Energy effective dose equivalent limit of 100 mrem.

  3. Ionospheric variability over Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquer, R. G.; Mosert, M.; Corbella, R.; Erazu, M.; de La Zerda, L.

    The understanding of ionospheric variability is important for the user of ionospheric models. A satellite designer or operator needs to know not only monthly average conditions but also the expected deviations from these mean values. In order to contribute to the studies on ionospheric variability, in this paper values of critical frequencies of F2, F1 and E regions and M(3000)F2 factor measured at 4 Japanese stations are used. Data correspond to equinoxes, solstices, high and low solar activity. Quartiles and median values are used to specify variability, because they have the advantage of being less affected by large deviations that can occur during magnetic storms. The results are similar for the considered stations and show that the highest variability correspond to foF2. For March high solar activity the variability of fof2 decreases during hours of maximum ionisation. The M3000F2 factor, in general, shown low variability. Akita (39.72° N, 140.13° E) showed the highest variability for the three frequencies. Moreover, it can be seen that quartiles are not equidistant from the median value.

  4. Variability study for saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Hansen, E. K.; Williams, V. J.

    2005-10-01

    This report is a summary of the bench-scale experimental studies performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to establish the viability of a grout-based variability study. In order for a variability study to be useful, the property measurements of the fresh and cured Saltstone must be reproducible with an inherent variation that is small compared to the changes in the properties measured over the expected range of variability for a Salt Batch. This scoping task addressed the issue of reproducibility for Saltstone.

  5. Magnetically Controlled Variable Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Improved variable-transformer circuit, output voltage and current of which controlled by use of relatively small current supplied at relatively low power to control windings on its magnetic cores. Transformer circuits of this type called "magnetic amplifiers" because ratio between controlled output power and power driving control current of such circuit large. This ratio - power gain - can be as large as 100 in present circuit. Variable-transformer circuit offers advantages of efficiency, safety, and controllability over some prior variable-transformer circuits.

  6. Finding New Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) Initial findings are presented for several new variable stars that have been identified using CCD photometry done with the 0.9-meter telescope located at the BYU West Mountain Observatory.

  7. INTEGRAL and Cataclysmic Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, R.; Blazek, M.; Galis, R.; Kocka, M.

    2010-07-15

    The results of investigations of cataclysmic variables (CVs) with the ESA INTEGRAL satellite are briefly presented and discussed. It is evident that the satellite serves as an efficient tool to study some of these objects.

  8. Discovery of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurochkin, N. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumented methods of discovering variable stars are reviewed, specifically the blink comparator, color contrast method, positive-negative method, and television method. Among the empirical methods discussed, the Van Gent method is the most important.

  9. Variable star data online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Roger; Wilson, Andy; Poyner, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Roger Pickard, Andy Wilson and Gary Poyner describe the online database of the British Astronomical Association Variable Star Section, a treasure trove of observations stretching back nearly 125 years.

  10. Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; Tyler L. Westover

    2013-01-01

    If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per-ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that, due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions and differing harvest, collection and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

  11. Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Garold L. Gresham; Tyler L. Westover

    2013-01-01

    If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions, and differing harvest, collection, and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture, and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

  12. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    SciTech Connect

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  13. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  14. VARIABLE-THROW CAM

    DOEpatents

    Godsil, E.C.; Robinson, E.Y.

    1963-07-16

    A variable-throw cam comprising inner and outer eccentric sleeves which are adjustably locked together is described. The cam throw is varied by unlocking the inner and outer sleeves, rotating the outer sleeve relative to the inner one until the desired throw is obtained, and locking the sleeves together again. The cam is useful in applications wherein a continuously-variable throw is required, e.g., ram-and-die pressing operations, cyclic fatigue testing of materials, etc. (AEC)

  15. Variable contour securing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebus, P. P.; Packer, P. N.; Haynie, C. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A variable contour securing system has a retaining structure for a member whose surface contains a variable contour. The retaining mechanism includes a spaced array of adjustable spindles mounted on a housing. Each spindle has a base member support cup at one end. A vacuum source is applied to the cups for seating the member adjacent to the cups. A locking mechanism sets the spindles in a predetermined position once the member has been secured to the spindle support cups.

  16. Deconstructed transverse mass variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Virzi, Joseph S.; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2015-04-01

    Traditional searches for R-parity conserving natural supersymmetry (SUSY) require large transverse mass and missing energy cuts to separate the signal from large backgrounds. SUSY models with compressed spectra inherently produce signal events with small amounts of missing energy that are hard to explore. We use this difficulty to motivate the construction of "deconstructed" transverse mass variables which are designed preserve information on both the norm and direction of the missing momentum. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these variables in searches for the pair production of supersymmetric top-quark partners which subsequently decay into a final state with an isolated lepton, jets and missing energy. We show that the use of deconstructed transverse mass variables extends the accessible compressed spectra parameter space beyond the region probed by traditional methods. The parameter space can further be expanded to neutralino masses that are larger than the difference between the stop and top masses. In addition, we also discuss how these variables allow for novel searches of single stop production, in order to directly probe unconstrained stealth stops in the small stop- and neutralino-mass regime. We also demonstrate the utility of these variables for generic gluino and stop searches in all-hadronic final states. Overall, we demonstrate that deconstructed transverse variables are essential to any search wanting to maximize signal separation from the background when the signal has undetected particles in the final state.

  17. Concentrator silicon cell research

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A.

    1992-04-01

    This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

  18. Cryogenic flux-concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, B. M.; Brechna, H.; Hill, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Flux concentrator has high primary to secondary coupling efficiency enabling it to produce high magnetic fields. The device provides versatility in pulse duration, magnetic field strengths and power sources.

  19. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  20. Water Sample Concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2009-07-21

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  1. Concentration and content.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Arderiu, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    One of the more frequent activities in health sciences is the measurement of biological quantities. Frequently, when reading biomedical books and journals some confusion on the metrological meaning of biological quantities related to the concepts 'concentration' and 'content' may be observed. Classically, a concentration is an amount of any type per volume of liquid or gas system, whereas content is an amount of any type per mass of liquid or gas or solid system. However the concepts 'concentration' and 'content' alone are still ambiguous because, depending on the type of amount of the component (analyte) per volume or mass of a system, there are different types of concentrations and contents. This article attempts to give a clarification of these concepts, mainly based on international recommendations about nomenclature and terminology of metrology, chemistry and clinical laboratory sciences. PMID:23894859

  2. Rheology of concentrated biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaniuk, J. R.; Wang, J.; Root, T. W.; Scott, C. T.; Klingenberg, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Economic processing of lignocellulosic biomass requires handling the biomass at high solids concentration. This creates challenges because concentrated biomass behaves as a Bingham-like material with large yield stresses. Here we employ torque rheometry to measure the rheological properties of concentrated lignocellulosic biomass (corn stover). Yield stresses obtained using torque rheometry agree with those obtained using other rheometric methods, but torque rheometry can be used at much larger solids concentration (weight fractions of insoluble solids greater than 0.2). Yield stresses decrease with severity of hydrolysis, decrease when water-soluble polymers are added (for nonhydrolyzed biomass), and increase with particle length. Experimental results are qualitatively consistent with those obtained from particle-level simulations.

  3. Advanced concentrator panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D. M.; Bedard, R. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The prototype fabrication of a lightweight, high-quality cellular glass substrate reflective panel for use in an advanced point-focusing solar concentrator was completed. The reflective panel is a gore shaped segment of an 11-m paraboloidal dish. The overall concentrator design and the design of the reflective panels are described. prototype-specific panel design modifications are discussed and the fabrication approach and procedure outlined.

  4. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    DOEpatents

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  5. Joined concentric tubes

    SciTech Connect

    DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

  6. Forecasting residual herbicide concentrations in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Gavan; Scanlan, Craig; van Zwieten, Lukas; Rose, Mick; Rose, Terry

    2016-04-01

    High concentrations of herbicides remaining in soil at the time of planting can adversely impact agricultural production and lead to off-site impacts in streams and groundwater. Being able to forecast the likelihood of residual concentrations at specific times in the future offers the potential to improve environmental and economic outcomes. Here we develop a solution for the full transient probability density function for herbicide concentrations in soil as a function of rainfall variability. Quasi-analytical solutions that account for rainfall seasonality are also demonstrated. In addition, new rapid and relatively cost-effective bioassays to quantify herbicide concentrations in near real-time, offers opportunities for data assimilation approaches to improve forecast risks.

  7. Antifungal serum concentration monitoring: an update.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Megan L; Drew, Richard H

    2008-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are occurring with increasing incidence and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Understanding the relationship between the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of antifungals is essential to optimize the potential for favourable clinical and microbiological outcomes while minimizing risks of treatment-related toxicity. Antifungal serum concentrations may aid in the determination of appropriate dosing in select circumstances. The polyene and echinocandin classes of antifungals lack sufficient data to justify serum concentration monitoring in routine clinical practice. In contrast, serum concentration monitoring of flucytosine may help to reduce the risk of treatment-related haematological toxicity. Determination of itraconazole serum concentrations is advised in situations where the drug is used for prolonged periods to treat serious IFIs (such as invasive aspergillosis or histoplasmosis) because of variability in absorption following oral administration (most notable for the capsule formulation). The use of serum concentration monitoring during therapy with the extended-spectrum triazoles (i.e. voriconazole and posaconazole) is still evolving, due primarily to inter-patient variability in drug exposure combined with sparse data regarding relationships with efficacy (posaconazole) and both safety and efficacy (voriconazole). PMID:17999982

  8. Neuroanatomical variability of religiosity.

    PubMed

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Barbey, Aron K; Su, Michael; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that religiosity, a set of traits variably expressed in the population, is modulated by neuroanatomical variability. We tested this idea by determining whether aspects of religiosity were predicted by variability in regional cortical volume. We performed structural magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in 40 healthy adult participants who reported different degrees and patterns of religiosity on a survey. We identified four Principal Components of religiosity by Factor Analysis of the survey items and associated them with regional cortical volumes measured by voxel-based morphometry. Experiencing an intimate relationship with God and engaging in religious behavior was associated with increased volume of R middle temporal cortex, BA 21. Experiencing fear of God was associated with decreased volume of L precuneus and L orbitofrontal cortex BA 11. A cluster of traits related with pragmatism and doubting God's existence was associated with increased volume of the R precuneus. Variability in religiosity of upbringing was not associated with variability in cortical volume of any region. Therefore, key aspects of religiosity are associated with cortical volume differences. This conclusion complements our prior functional neuroimaging findings in elucidating the proximate causes of religion in the brain. PMID:19784372

  9. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2014-09-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  10. Generalized Principles of Unchanging Total Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Kottke, Peter A.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2008-01-01

    We consider transport of multiple reacting species under the continuum assumption in situations such as those that frequently arise in electroanalytical chemistry. Under certain limitations, it has been shown that the total species concentration (as defined by Oldham and Feldberg1) of such a system is uniform and constant. In this work, we extend the limits of the previous analysis to enable greater applicability. This is accomplished by using either of two new dependent variables, which are generalizations of the concept of total concentration. Then conditions are determined under which the dependent variable will be uniform, and constant in time. From a practical viewpoint, the described formalism allows one to simplify the multispecies transport problem formulation by eliminating one equation from the system of governing equations. PMID:16853140

  11. Variables Separation in Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Valery

    2004-12-01

    To solve the problem of exact integration of the field equations or equations of motion of matter in curved spacetimes one can use a class of Riemannian metrics for which the simplest equations of motion can be integrated by the complete separation of variables method. Here, we consider the particular case of the class of Stäckel metrics. These metrics admit integration of the Hamilton Jacobi equation for test particle by the complete separation of variables method. It appears that the other important equations of motion (Klein Gordon Fock, Dirac,Weyl) in curved spacetimes can be integrated by complete separation of variables method only for the metrics, belonging to the class of Stäckel spaces.

  12. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  13. Seasonal variability of surface ozone in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wie, J.; Moon, B. K.; Choi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone around East Asia include Korea impacts on air quality and climate, and has been increased with rapid economic growth. To better understanding, we analyzed seasonal variability of tropospheric ozone simulated by using GEOS-Chem. Surface ozone concentration in Korea has double peaks in April and September. Tropospheric ozone increases primarily associated with westerly wind anomaly in spring, with warming in summer and autumn, and with cloud depletion in winter. Surface ozone in spring elevated after mature-phase El Niño winters. Key words: surface ozone, seasonal variability, Korea, East Asia Acknowledgements This work was supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "Climate Change Correspondence Program."

  14. Solar concentrator protective system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A mechanism that blocks concentrated sunlight from reaching a receiver, in the event of a tracking failure or loss of coolant is described. Sunlight is normally concentrated by a dish reflector onto the opening of a receiver. A faceplate surrounds the opening, and coolant carrying tubes, line the receiver. If the concentrated sunlight wanders so it begins to fall on the faceplate, then the sunlight will melt a portion of a fuse wire portion will break. The wire is attached to a flange on a shutter frame, and breaking of the fuse wire allows the frame to fall. Normally, the shutter frame supports shutter elements that are held open by cam followers that bear against cams.

  15. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2016-03-15

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  16. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2012-12-11

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  17. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  18. Photovoltaic concentrator research progress

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper provides a review of progress in the DOE sponsored, Sandia managed Photovoltaic Concentrator Research Project. Research status, project goals and a discussion of concentrator economics is presented. Recent research accomplishments that will be discussed include 21% efficient baseline silicon cells by Applied Solar Energy Corporation and Sandia, 26% efficient GaAs cells by Varian Associates, and near 25% mechanically stacked multijunction GaAs/Si cells by Hughes Research, Applied Solar, and Sandia. In addition, improvements in breadboard module units (i.e. single lens/cell combination) such as a 19% GaAs unit by Varian and a near 17% silicon unit by ENTECH will be reviewed. This paper concludes that the photovoltaic concentrator option is making excellent progress toward competitive cost-effectiveness and provides a strong photovoltaic alternative.

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Thermal cloak-concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiangying; Li, Ying; Jiang, Chaoran; Ni, Yushan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-07-01

    For macroscopically manipulating heat flow at will, thermal metamaterials have opened a practical way, which possesses a single function, such as either cloaking or concentrating the flow of heat even though environmental temperature varies. By developing a theory of transformation heat transfer for multiple functions, here we introduce the concept of intelligent thermal metamaterials with a dual function, which is in contrast to the existing thermal metamaterials with single functions. By assembling homogeneous isotropic materials and shape-memory alloys, we experimentally fabricate a kind of intelligent thermal metamaterials, which can automatically change from a cloak (or concentrator) to a concentrator (or cloak) when the environmental temperature changes. This work paves an efficient way for a controllable gradient of heat, and also provides guidance both for arbitrarily manipulating the flow of heat and for efficiently designing similar intelligent metamaterials in other fields.

  1. Variable Lifting Index (VLI)

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Thomas; Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela; Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Fox, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We seek to develop a new approach for analyzing the physical demands of highly variable lifting tasks through an adaptation of the Revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Lifting Equation (RNLE) into a Variable Lifting Index (VLI). Background: There are many jobs that contain individual lifts that vary from lift to lift due to the task requirements. The NIOSH Lifting Equation is not suitable in its present form to analyze variable lifting tasks. Method: In extending the prior work on the VLI, two procedures are presented to allow users to analyze variable lifting tasks. One approach involves the sampling of lifting tasks performed by a worker over a shift and the calculation of the Frequency Independent Lift Index (FILI) for each sampled lift and the aggregation of the FILI values into six categories. The Composite Lift Index (CLI) equation is used with lifting index (LI) category frequency data to calculate the VLI. The second approach employs a detailed systematic collection of lifting task data from production and/or organizational sources. The data are organized into simplified task parameter categories and further aggregated into six FILI categories, which also use the CLI equation to calculate the VLI. Results: The two procedures will allow practitioners to systematically employ the VLI method to a variety of work situations where highly variable lifting tasks are performed. Conclusions: The scientific basis for the VLI procedure is similar to that for the CLI originally presented by NIOSH; however, the VLI method remains to be validated. Application: The VLI method allows an analyst to assess highly variable manual lifting jobs in which the task characteristics vary from lift to lift during a shift. PMID:26646300

  2. Nebulization reflux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, V. G.; Cofer, W. R., III

    1986-01-01

    A nebulization reflux concentrator for removing trace gas contaminants from a sample gas is described. Sample gas from a gas supply is drawn by a suction source into a vessel. The gas enters the vessel through an atomizing nozzle, thereby atomizing and entraining a scrubbing liquid solvent drawn through a siphon tube from a scrubbing liquid reservoir. The gas and entrained liquid rise through a concentrator and impinge upon a solvent phobic filter, whereby purified gas exits through the filter housing and contaminated liquid coalesces on the solvent phobic filter and falls into the reservoir.

  3. Dilution, Concentration, and Flotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Ling; Schmuckler, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    As both classroom teaching practice and literature show, many students have difficulties learning science concepts such as density. Here are some investigations that identify the relationship between density and floating through experimenting with successive dilution of a liquid, or the systematic change of concentration of a saltwater solution.…

  4. Parabolic solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecpoyotl-Torres, M.; Campos-Alvarez, J.; Tellez-Alanis, F.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J.

    2006-08-01

    In this work we present the basis of the solar concentrator design, which has is located at Temixco, Morelos, Mexico. For this purpose, this place is ideal due to its geographic and climatic conditions, and in addition, because it accounts with the greatest constant illumination in Mexico. For the construction of the concentrator we use a recycled parabolic plate of a telecommunications satellite dish (NEC). This plate was totally covered with Aluminum. The opening diameter is of 332 cm, the focal length is of 83 cm and the opening angle is of 90°. The geometry of the plate guaranties that the incident beams, will be collected at the focus. The mechanical treatment of the plate produces an average reflectance of 75% in the visible region of the solar spectrum, and of 92% for wavelengths up to 3μm in the infrared region. We obtain up to 2000°C of temperature concentration with this setup. The reflectance can be greatly improved, but did not consider it as typical practical use. The energy obtained can be applied to conditions that require of those high calorific energies. In order to optimize the operation of the concentrator we use a control circuit designed to track the apparent sun position.

  5. Concentrating Tripartite Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, Alexander; Lee, Soojoon; Adesso, Gerardo

    2015-07-01

    We introduce the concentrated information of tripartite quantum states. For three parties Alice, Bob, and Charlie, it is defined as the maximal mutual information achievable between Alice and Charlie via local operations and classical communication performed by Charlie and Bob. We derive upper and lower bounds to the concentrated information, and obtain a closed expression for it on several classes of states including arbitrary pure tripartite states in the asymptotic setting. We show that distillable entanglement, entanglement of assistance, and quantum discord can all be expressed in terms of the concentrated information, thus revealing its role as a unifying informational primitive. We finally investigate quantum state merging of mixed states with and without additional entanglement. The gap between classical and quantum concentrated information is proven to be an operational figure of merit for mixed state merging in the absence of additional entanglement. Contrary to the pure state merging, our analysis shows that classical communication in both directions can provide an advantage for merging of mixed states.

  6. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  7. BISAC Variable Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology and Libraries, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents revision of Book Industry Systems Advisory Committee (BISAC) format designed specifically for electronic transmission of purchase orders for monograph or series titles combining fixed and variable length data fields which was approved in January 1983. Special characters, sample address descriptions, summary of fixed records, glossary, and…

  8. Variable capacity gasification burner

    SciTech Connect

    Saxon, D.I.

    1985-03-05

    A variable capacity burner that may be used in gasification processes, the burner being adjustable when operating in its intended operating environment to operate at two different flow capacities, with the adjustable parts being dynamically sealed within a statically sealed structural arrangement to prevent dangerous blow-outs of the reactants to the atmosphere.

  9. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  10. Variable thrust cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  11. Variable camber rotor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, L.; Cowan, J.; Mchugh, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Deployment of variable camber concepts on helicopter rotors was analytically assessed. It was determined that variable camber extended the operating range of helicopters provided that the correct compromise can be obtained between performance/loads gains and mechanical complexity. A number of variable camber concepts were reviewed on a two dimensional basis to determine the usefulness of leading edge, trailing edge and overall camber variation schemes. The most powerful method to vary camber was through the trailing edge flaps undergoing relatively small motions (-5 deg to +15 deg). The aerodynamic characteristics of the NASA/Ames A-1 airfoil with 35% and 50% plain trailing edge flaps were determined by means of current subcritical and transonic airfoil design methods and used by rotor performance and loads analysis codes. The most promising variable camber schedule reviewed was a configuration with a 35% plain flap deployment in an on/off mode near the tip of a blade. Preliminary results show approximately 11% reduction in power is possible at 192 knots and a rotor thrust coefficient of 0.09. The potential demonstrated indicates a significant potential for expanding the operating envelope of the helicopter. Further investigation into improving the power saving and defining the improvement in the operational envelope of the helicopter is recommended.

  12. Slotted variable camber flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Variable camber actuator assemblies broaden the range of speeds at which lift to drag performance is maximized for slotted flap wings. Lift is improved over a broader range of cruising speeds by varying wing camber with rotational flap movements that do not introduce wing slots and induced drag. Forward flaps are secured to forward flange links which extended from, and are a part of forward flap linkage assemblies. The forward flaps rotate about flap pivots with their rotational displacement controlled by variable camber actuator assemblies located between the forward flaps and the forward flange links. Rear flaps are held relative to the forward flaps by rear flap linkage assemblies which may act independently from the forward flap linkage assemblies and the variable camber actuator assemblies. Wing camber is varied by rotating the flaps with the variable camber actuator assemblies while the flaps are in a deployed or tucked position. Rotating the flaps in a tucked position does not introduce significant wing surface discontinuities, and reduces aircraft fuel consumption on most flight profiles.

  13. Lake Ontario: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey with towed electronic instrumentation along the Lake Ontario nearshore (720 km) at a 20 meter contour. The survey was conducted September 6-10, 2008 with a shorter 300 km survey conducted August 14-15 for comparing of temporal variability. ...

  14. Genetic variability in Macadamia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic variability analysis involving 45 accessions of Macadamia including four species, M. integrifolia, M. tetraphylla, M. ternifolia, and M. hildebrandii and a wild relative, Hicksbeachia pinnatifolia was performed usingeight enzyme systems encoded by 16 loci (Gpi-1 and 2, Idh-1 and 2, Lap, Md...

  15. Climate Variability Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Climate Variability Program briefly describes research activities of 40 Principal Investigators who are funded by NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Research Division. The report is focused on the year 1998. Utilization of satellite observations is a singularity of research on climate science and technology at JPL. Research at JPL has two foci: generate new knowledge and develop new technology.

  16. Variable rate irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems are available to producers to make variable-rate applications of defoliants, fertilizer, lime, pesticides, plant growth regulators, and seed. These systems could potentially offer cost savings to a producer; however, the full potential of the benefits and savings cannot be realized if water ...

  17. Variable Rate Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems are available to producers with the ability to make variable-rate applications of defoliants, fertilizer, lime, pesticides, plant growth regulators, and seed. These systems could potentially offer a producer great cost savings; however, the full potential of these benefits and savings cannot...

  18. Tides and Decadal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms by which oceanic tides and decadal variability in the oceans are connected. We distinguish between variability caused by tides and variability observed in the tides themselves. Both effects have been detected at some level. The most obvious connection with decadal timescales is through the 18.6-year precession of the moon's orbit plane. This precession gives rise to a small tide of the same period and to 18.6-year modulations in the phase and amplitudes of short-period tides. The 18.6-year "node tide" is very small, no more than 2 cm anywhere, and in sea level data it is dominated by the ocean's natural Variability. Some authors have naively attributed climate variations with periods near 19 years directly to the node tide, but the amplitude of the tide is too small for this mechanism to be operative. The more likely explanation (Loder and Garrett, JGR, 83, 1967-70, 1978) is that the 18.6-y modulations in short-period tides, especially h e principal tide M2, cause variations in ocean mixing, which is then observed in temperature and other climatic indicators. Tidally forced variability has also been proposed by some authors, either in response to occasional (and highly predictable) tidal extremes or as a nonlinear low-frequency oscillation caused by interactions between short-period tides. The former mechanism can produce only short-duration events hardly more significant than normal tidal ranges, but the latter mechanism can in principle induce low-frequency oscillations. The most recent proposal of this type is by Keeling and Whorf, who highlight the 1800-year spectral peak discovered by Bond et al. (1997). But the proposal appears contrived and should be considered, in the words of Munk et al. (2002), "as the most likely among unlikely candidates."

  19. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, Noel C.

    2015-01-31

    This program set out to explore a scattering-based approach to concentrate sunlight with the aim of improving collector field reliability and of eliminating wind loading and gross mechanical movement through the use of a stationary collection optic. The approach is based on scattering sunlight from the focal point of a fixed collection optic into the confined modes of a sliding planar waveguide, where it is transported to stationary tubular heat transfer elements located at the edges. Optical design for the first stage of solar concentration, which entails focusing sunlight within a plane over a wide range of incidence angles (>120 degree full field of view) at fixed tilt, led to the development of a new, folded-path collection optic that dramatically out-performs the current state-of-the-art in scattering concentration. Rigorous optical simulation and experimental testing of this collection optic have validated its performance. In the course of this work, we also identified an opportunity for concentrating photovoltaics involving the use of high efficiency microcells made in collaboration with partners at the University of Illinois. This opportunity exploited the same collection optic design as used for the scattering solar thermal concentrator and was therefore pursued in parallel. This system was experimentally demonstrated to achieve >200x optical concentration with >70% optical efficiency over a full day by tracking with <1 cm of lateral movement at fixed latitude tilt. The entire scattering concentrator waveguide optical system has been simulated, tested, and assembled at small scale to verify ray tracing models. These models were subsequently used to predict the full system optical performance at larger, deployment scale ranging up to >1 meter aperture width. Simulations at an aperture widths less than approximately 0.5 m with geometric gains ~100x predict an overall optical efficiency in the range 60-70% for angles up to 50 degrees from normal. However, the

  20. Analyzing biomolecular interactions by variable angle ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiun-Yan; Lee, Chih-Kung; Lee, J. H.; Shiue, Shuen-Chen; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lin, Shiming

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, an innovative ellipsometer is developed and applied to metrology of the biomolecular interaction on a protein biochip. Both the theory, optical and opto-mechanical configurations of this newly developed ellipsometer and methodologies adopted in system design to improve the system performance are presented. It will be shown that by measuring the ellipsometric parameters, the corresponding concentration variation in biochemical reaction can be calculated according to stoichiometry analysis. By applying the variable angle ellipsometry to analysis of a multi-layered sample, the thickness and concentration are resolved. It is believed that the newly developed ellipsometer biosensor is able to undertake an accurate measurement on biomedical interaction.

  1. Iron line variability of discoseismic corrugation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David; Butsky, Iryna

    2013-10-01

    Using a fast semi-analytic raytracing code, we study the variability of relativistically broadened Fe-Kα lines due to discoseismic oscillations concentrated in the innermost regions of accretion discs around black holes. The corrugation mode, or c-mode, is of particular interest as its natural frequency corresponds well to the ˜0.1-15 Hz range observed for low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) for lower spins. Comparison of the oscillation phase dependent variability and quasi-periodic oscillation-phase stacked Fe-Kα line observations will allow such discoseismic models to be confirmed or ruled out as a source of particular LFQPOs. The spectral range and frequency of the variability of the Fe-Kα line due to c-modes can also potentially be used to constrain the black hole spin if observed with sufficient temporal and spectral resolution.

  2. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  3. Concentration through large advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleja, D.; López-Gómez, J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we extend the elegant results of Chen, Lam and Lou [6, Section 2], where a concentration phenomenon was established as the advection blows up, to a general class of adventive-diffusive generalized logistic equations of degenerate type. Our improvements are really sharp as we allow the carrying capacity of the species to vanish in some subdomain with non-empty interior. The main technical devices used in the derivation of the concentration phenomenon are Proposition 3.2 of Cano-Casanova and López-Gómez [5], Theorem 2.4 of Amann and López-Gómez [1] and the classical Harnack inequality. By the relevance of these results in spatial ecology, complete technical details seem imperative, because the proof of Theorem 2.2 of [6] contains some gaps originated by an “optimistic” use of Proposition 3.2 of [5]. Some of the general assumptions of [6] are substantially relaxed.

  4. Solar concentrator materials development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, D. E.; Ayers, S. R.; Gulino, D. A.; Tennyson, R. C.; Egger, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Materials with potential applications in reflective and refractive solar dynamic concentrators are tested for resistance to atomic oxygen degradation. It is found that inorganic coatings such as MgF2, SiO(x), and ITO provide excellent protection for reflective surfaces while organic materials are much more susceptible to erosion and mass loss. Of the organic polymers tested, the silicones have the highest intrinsic resistance to atomic oxygen degradation.

  5. Electrolyte Concentrates Treat Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Wellness Brands Inc. of Boulder, Colorado, exclusively licensed a unique electrolyte concentrate formula developed by Ames Research Center to treat and prevent dehydration in astronauts returning to Earth. Marketed as The Right Stuff, the company's NASA-derived formula is an ideal measure for athletes looking to combat dehydration and boost performance. Wellness Brands also plans to expand with products that make use of the formula's effective hydration properties to help treat conditions including heat stroke, altitude sickness, jet lag, and disease.

  6. X-Ray Variability and the Secondary Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Ishibashi, K.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the history of X-ray observations of the 11 Car system, concentrating on the periodic variability discovered in the 1990s. We discuss the interpretation of these variations, concentrating on a model of the system as a "collidingwind" binary. This interpretation allows the physical and orbital parameters of eta Car and its companion star to be constrained.

  7. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  8. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  9. [Socioeconomic variables and fertility].

    PubMed

    Arguello, O

    1980-08-01

    While making comparative analyses of data collected by the World Fertility Survey regarding Latin America, a group of investigators of CELADE (Centro Latinoamericano de Demografia) realized that the selection of economic variables for the study of fertility had serious limitations. Such limitations did not allow the elaboration of a theory which took into account the complicated process of fertility, in all its socioeconomic, cultural, and psychological manifestations. Thus, this paper intends to lay the theoretical basis for the selection of all relevant variables, distinguishing, for example, the average fertility of women according to area of residence, place of early socialization, migrant status, social status, occupation of husband, level of instruction, occupation, and all changes in occupational activities of women in fertile age. PMID:12336394

  10. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  11. Variable Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, T.; Iwashita, Y.; Kumada, M.; Spencer, C.M.; /SLAC

    2007-05-23

    A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) is one of the candidates for the final focus lens in a linear collider. An over 120 T/m strong variable permanent magnet quadrupole is achieved by the introduction of saturated iron and a 'double ring structure'. A fabricated PMQ achieved 24 T integrated gradient with 20 mm bore diameter, 100 mm magnet diameter and 20 cm pole length. The strength of the PMQ is adjustable in 1.4 T steps, due to its 'double ring structure': the PMQ is split into two nested rings; the outer ring is sliced along the beam line into four parts and is rotated to change the strength. This paper describes the variable PMQ from fabrication to recent adjustments.

  12. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  13. Variable laser attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprng one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength.

  14. Variable laser attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, S.R.

    1987-05-29

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprising one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength. 9 figs.

  15. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  16. Variable percentage sampler

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jr., William H.

    1976-01-01

    A remotely operable sampler is provided for obtaining variable percentage samples of nuclear fuel particles and the like for analyses. The sampler has a rotating cup for a sample collection chamber designed so that the effective size of the sample inlet opening to the cup varies with rotational speed. Samples of a desired size are withdrawn from a flowing stream of particles without a deterrent to the flow of remaining particles.

  17. Climate Variability Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Climate Variability Program briefly describes research activities of Principal Investigators who are funded by NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Research Division. The report is focused on the year 2001. Utilization of satellite observations is a singularity of research on climate science and technology at JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Research at JPL has two foci: generate new knowledge and develop new technology.

  18. Variable reluctance drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipo, T.A.; Liang, F.

    1995-10-17

    A variable reluctance drive system including a motor and corresponding converter for improved current commutation is described. The motor incorporates a salient pole rotor and a salient pole stator having one or more full pitch windings which operate by mutual inductance to transfer the current from the active short pitch winding following phase alignment. This increases output torque and/or speed and permits a number of simple and economical converter circuits. 17 figs.

  19. Present and Future Modes of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-02-20

    This project addressed area (1) of the FOA, “Interaction of Climate Change and Low Frequency Modes of Natural Climate Variability”. Our overarching objective is to detect, describe and understand the changes in low frequency variability between model simulations of the preindustrial climate and simulations of a doubled CO2 climate. The deliverables are a set of papers providing a dynamical characterization of interannual, decadal, and multidecadal variability in coupled models with attention to the changes in this low frequency variability between pre-industrial concentrations of greenhouse gases and a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The principle mode of analysis, singular vector decomposition, is designed to advance our physical, mechanistic understanding. This study will include external natural variability due to solar and volcanic aerosol variations as well as variability internal to the climate system. An important byproduct is a set of analysis tools for estimating global singular vector structures from the archived output of model simulations.

  20. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Pavan S.; Bortoli, D.; Salgado, R.; Antón, M.; Costa, M. J.; Silva, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    To study tropospheric ozone variability over the Iberian Peninsula (IP), NASA Langley TOR data have been analyzed for the 1979-2005 period. The maximum tropospheric ozone concentration over the entire IP was found in June (˜41 DU) and a minimum in December (˜29 DU). However the maximum tropospheric ozone concentration was found over West Atlantic Coast (WAC) (˜44 DU), followed by Mediterranean Coast (MC) (˜42 DU), North Atlantic Coast (NAC) (˜41 DU), Central Iberian Peninsula (CIP) (˜40 DU) and Pyrenees Mountain Range (PMR) (˜39 DU) during June-July. The high concentration of tropospheric ozone in July over the Atlantic Ocean near IP is due to the presence of Azores anticyclone and related photochemistry and dynamics, and affects the observed higher tropospheric ozone concentration over WAC zone. Strong seasonal cycle in tropospheric ozone concentration has been observed with large variation over NAC (˜49%), followed by WAC (˜48%) and MC (˜41%) compared to CIP and PMR (˜38%) zones. When the data are compared over the IP for the two periods (1979-1993 and 1997-2005), a systematic increase in the number of months with higher tropospheric ozone concentration has been observed during the second period with respect to the first. These increases are almost 8% to 24% over NAC, 6% to 17% over WAC, 5% to 24% over CIP, 6% to 23% over MC and 13% to 18% over PMR, zones. It has been observed that topography, climatology and population density distribution plays a crucial role in the variability of tropospheric ozone concentration over the IP.

  1. Limit of concentration for cylindrical concentrators under extended light sources.

    PubMed

    Miñano, J C; Luque, A

    1983-08-15

    Cylindrical concentrators illuminated by an extended source with an arbitrary distribution of radiance are analyzed taking into account basic properties derived from the Fermat principle and not from the specific concentrator shape. The upper limit of concentration achievable with this type of concentrator is obtained and it is found to be lower than that of general (3-D) concentrators. Cylindrical compound parabolic concentrators are analyzed in the light of this theory, and it is shown that they achieve the highest optical concentration possible for a cylindrical concentrator. PMID:18196152

  2. Female-Headed Families: An Ecological Model of Residential Concentration in a Small City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Roncek, Dennis W.

    1980-01-01

    Proposed an ecological model to explain the concentration of female-headed families in a small city. Data for city blocks provided patterns of concentration. Of the physical variables, only historical development of the city and market decisions by nonresidential consumers were important predictors of concentration; spatial concentration was not…

  3. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gang; Ren, Zhifeng

    2015-07-09

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate in the lab that solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) can exceed 10% solar-to-electricity efficiency, and STEGs can be integrated with phase-change materials (PCM) for thermal storage, providing operation beyond daylight hours. This project achieved significant progress in many tasks necessary to achieving the overall project goals. An accurate Themoelectric Generator (TEG) model was developed, which included realistic treatment of contact materials, contact resistances and radiative losses. In terms of fabricating physical TEGs, high performance contact materials for skutterudite TE segments were developed, along with brazing and soldering methods to assemble segmented TEGs. Accurate measurement systems for determining device performance (in addition to just TE material performance) were built for this project and used to characterize our TEGs. From the optical components’ side, a spectrally selective cermet surface was developed with high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance, with thermal stability at high temperature. A measurement technique was also developed to determine absorptance and total hemispherical emittance at high temperature, and was used to characterize the fabricated spectrally selective surfaces. In addition, a novel reflective cavity was designed to reduce radiative absorber losses and achieve high receiver efficiency at low concentration ratios. A prototype cavity demonstrated that large reductions in radiative losses were possible through this technique. For the overall concentrating STEG system, a number of devices were fabricated and tested in a custom built test platform to characterize their efficiency performance. Additionally, testing was performed with integration of PCM thermal storage, and the storage time of the lab scale system was evaluated. Our latest testing results showed a STEG efficiency of 9.6%, indicating promising potential for high performance concentrated STEGs.

  4. Postprandial Hyperglycemia and Glycemic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Standl, Eberhard; Schnell, Oliver; Ceriello, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate the pros and cons of a specific impact of postprandial hyperglycemia and glycemic variability on the—mainly cardiovascular (CV)—complications of diabetes, above and beyond the average blood glucose (BG) as measured by HbA1c or fasting plasma glucose (FPG). The strongest arguments in favor of this hypothesis come from impressive pathophysiological studies, also in the human situation. Measures of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction seem to be especially closely related to glucose peaks and even more so to fluctuating high and low glucose concentrations and can be restored to normal by preventing those glucose peaks or wide glucose excursions. The epidemiological evidence, which is more or less confined to postprandial hyperglycemia and postglucose load glycemia, is also rather compelling in favor of the hypothesis, although certainly not fully conclusive as there are also a number of conflicting results. The strongest cons are seen in the missing evidence as derived from randomized prospective intervention studies targeting postprandial hyperglycemia longer term, i.e., over several years, and seeking to reduce hard CV end points. In fact, several such intervention studies in men have recently failed to produce the intended beneficial outcome results. As this evidence by intervention is, however, key for the ultimate approval of a treatment concept in patients with diabetes, the current net balance of attained evidence is not in favor of the hypothesis here under debate, i.e., that we should care about postprandial hyperglycemia and glycemic variability. The absence of a uniformly accepted standard of how to estimate these parameters adds a further challenge to this whole debate. PMID:21525442

  5. Plutonium in Concentrated Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Sue B.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2002-08-01

    Complex, high ionic strength media are used throughout the plutonium cycle, from its processing and purification in nitric acid, to waste storage and processing in alkaline solutions of concentrated electrolytes, to geologic disposal in brines. Plutonium oxidation/reduction, stability, radiolysis, solution and solid phase chemistry have been studied in such systems. In some cases, predictive models for describing Pu chemistry under such non-ideal conditions have been developed, which are usually based on empirical databases describing specific ion interactions. In Chapter 11, Non-Ideal Systems, studies on the behavior of Pu in various complex media and available model descriptions are reviewed.

  6. PFC concentration and recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, G.M.; McManus, J.; Knolle, W.; Stoll, I.

    1994-12-31

    The semiconductor industry uses PFC gases such as CF{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6} as etchant and cleaning gases during plasma processes. The gases do not fully react within the reactor chamber. The unused gases enter the atmosphere through the process effluent. These gases have long persistence in the atmosphere and absorb infrared radiation. The PFC gases are, therefore, potential global warming gases. A method is described that will recover and recycle PFC gases. The method that the authors have employed to trap and concentrate the PFC gases is based on a dual bed adsorber. The adsorption material is activated carbon.

  7. Characterization of Photovoltaic Concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehl, J.; Emery, E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the resources at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for performing characterization of photovoltaic (PV) materials designed for operation under concentrated light. NREL has the capability to measure devices ranging from very small, unencapsulated research cells to reasonably sized, environmentally protected modules. Data gathering and interpretation are also ongoing areas of revision and improvement. The main goal of the current research is to reduce the measurement uncertainty to the lowest practical value. At present, the state of the art is limited at a ?5% level in measuring efficiency accurately.

  8. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, T.I.; Spindel, W.

    1960-02-01

    A method of concentrating N/sup 15/ in a liquid is described. Gaseous nitric oxide and at least one liquid selected from the group consisting of the aqueous oxyacids and oxides of nitrogen, wherein the atomic ratio of oxygen to nitrogen is greater than unity, are brought into intimate contact to cause an enrichment of the liquid and a depletion of the gas in N/sup 15/. The liquid is, thereafter, reacted with sulfur dioxide to produce a gas contuining nitric oxide. The gas contuining nitric oxide is then continuously passed in countercurrent contact with the liquid to cause further enrichment of the liquid.

  9. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kebabian, Paul

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

  10. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kebabian, P.

    1997-07-22

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

  11. Ionospheric Variability and Storms on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this grant was to conduct the first-ever study of ionospheric variability on Mars. To do so, we used data from the Radio Science (RS) experiment onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) satellite. Dr. David Hinson of the RS team at Stanford University was a most helpful and valuable colleague throughout the studies we conducted. For the initial RS datasets available from the MGS mission, there were no severe storms caused by solar wind activity, so we concentrated on day-to-day effects. This turned out to be a wise approach since understanding "normal variability" had to be done before any claim could be made about "space weather" effects. Our approach was three-fold: (1) select a good dataset for characterization of ionosphere variability at Mars, one for which excellent terrestrial data were also available. This turned out to be the period 9-27 March 1999; (2) once the variability at Mars was described, develop and use a new photochemical model of the martian ionosphere to find the extent to which solar variability on those days caused or contributed to the observed patterns; (3) use the results from the above, together with additional datasets from the MGS/RS experiment, to describe some practical consequences that the martian ionosphere would have upon NASA s proposed navigation and communications systems for Mars. The results of these studies showed that: (a) solar variability is the dominant source of ionospheric variability at Mars (during periods of quiet solar wind), (b) that current models do a good job in portraying such effects at the height of the ionospheric peak electron density, and (c) that ionospheric structure on Mars can affect attempts at precise position-fixing at Mars should relatively high (GPS-like) frequencies not be used in a Mars communications and navigation system.

  12. Variable camshaft timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, R.P.; Smith, F.R.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes an improvement in a variable camshaft timing system for an internal combustion engine having intake and exhaust valves and a camshaft for each of the intake and exhaust valves, an intake sprocket and an exhaust sprocket keyed to their respective camshaft, only one of the camshafts being directly driven by an engine crankshaft, and a timing chain engaging both sprockets. The improvement comprising a single bracket carrying at least one idler sprocket engaging the timing chain, the bracket being mounted for movement to alter the timing relationship between the intake and exhaust sprockets.

  13. Zoonoses and climate variability.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Rocio; Sandoval, Claudia M; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Vivas, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Leishmaniasis in the Americas is transmitted by Lutzomyia spp., which have many animal reservoirs. Previous studies indicated potential changes in vectors of climate-related distribution, but impact outcomes need to be further studied. We report climatic and El Niño events during 1985-2002 that may have had an impact on leishmaniasis in 11 southern departments of Colombia: Amazonas, Caquetá, Cauca (Ca), Huila, Meta (Mt), Nariño, Putumayo (Py), Tolima, Valle (Va), Vaupes (Vp), and Vichada. Climatic data were obtained by satellite and epidemiologic data were obtained from the Health Ministry. NOAA climatic classification and SOI/ONI indexes were used as indicators of global climate variability. Yearly variation comparisons and median trend deviations were made for disease incidence and climatic variability. During this period there was considerable climatic variability, with a strong El Niño for 6 years and a strong La Niña for 8. During this period, 19,212 cases of leishmaniasis were registered, for a mean of 4756.83 cases/year. Disease in the whole region increased (mean of 4.98%) during the El Niño years in comparison to the La Niña years, but there were differences between departments with increases during El Niño (Mt 6.95%, Vp 4.84%), but the rest showed an increase during La Niña (1.61%-64.41%). Differences were significant in Va (P= 0.0092), Py (P= 0.0001), Ca (P= 0.0313), and for the whole region (P= 0.0023), but not in the rest of the departments. The importance of climate change is shown by shifts in insect and animal distributions. These data reflect the importance of climate on transmission of leishmaniasis and open further investigations related to forecasting and monitoring systems, where understanding the relationship between zoonoses and climate variability could help to improve the management of these emerging and reemerging diseases. PMID:19120241

  14. Variable leak gas source

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A variable leak gas source and a method for obtaining the same which includes filling a quantity of hollow glass micro-spheres with a gas, storing said quantity in a confined chamber having a controllable outlet, heating said chamber above room temperature, and controlling the temperature of said chamber to control the quantity of gas passing out of said controllable outlet. Individual gas filled spheres may be utilized for calibration purposes by breaking a sphere having a known quantity of a known gas to calibrate a gas detection apparatus.

  15. Climate Variability and Change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a science strategy outlining the major natural science issues facing the Nation in the next decade. The science strategy consists of six science directions of critical importance, focusing on areas where natural science can make a substantial contribution to the well-being of the Nation and the world. This fact sheet focuses on climate variability and change and how USGS research can strengthen the Nation with information needed to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

  16. Inflammation is associated with voriconazole trough concentrations.

    PubMed

    van Wanrooy, Marjolijn J P; Span, Lambert F R; Rodgers, Michael G G; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Uges, Donald R A; van der Werf, Tjip S; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2014-12-01

    Voriconazole concentrations display a large variability, which cannot completely be explained by known factors. Inflammation may be a contributing factor, as inflammatory stimuli can change the activities and expression levels of cytochrome P450 isoenzymes. We explored the correlation between inflammation, reflected by C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, and voriconazole trough concentrations. A retrospective chart review of patients with at least one steady-state voriconazole trough concentration and a CRP concentration measured on the same day was performed. A total of 128 patients were included. A significantly (P < 0.001) higher voriconazole trough concentration was observed in patients with severe inflammation (6.2 mg/liter; interquartile range [IQR], 3.4 to 8.7 mg/liter; n = 20) than in patients with moderate inflammation (3.4 mg/liter; IQR, 1.6 to 5.4 mg/liter; n = 60) and in patients with no to mild inflammation (1.6 mg/liter; IQR, 0.8 to 3.0 mg/liter; n = 48). The patients in all three groups received similar voriconazole doses based on mg/kg body weight (P = 0.368). Linear regression analyses, both unadjusted and adjusted for covariates of gender, age, dose, route of administration, liver enzymes, and interacting coadministered medications, showed a significant association between voriconazole and CRP concentration (P < 0.001). For every 1-mg/liter increase in the CRP concentration, the voriconazole trough concentration increased by 0.015 mg/liter (unadjusted 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.011 to 0.020 mg/liter; adjusted 95% CI, 0.011 to 0.019 mg/liter). Inflammation, reflected by the C-reactive protein concentration, is associated with voriconazole trough concentrations. Further research is necessary to assess if taking the inflammatory status of a patient into account is helpful in therapeutic drug monitoring of voriconazole to maintain concentrations in the therapeutic window, thereby possibly preventing suboptimal treatment or adverse events

  17. Non-tracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, Henry

    1977-01-01

    A nontracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio is provided. The concentrator includes a plurality of energy absorbers which communicate with a main header by which absorbed heat is removed. Undesired heat flow of those absorbers not being heated by radiant energy at a particular instant is impeded, improving the efficiency of the concentrator.

  18. Consistency of patterns in concentration-discharge plots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chanat, J.G.; Rice, K.C.; Hornberger, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    Concentration-discharge (c-Q) plots have been used to infer how flow components such as event water, soil water, and groundwater mix to produce the observed episodic hydrochemical response of small catchments. Because c-Q plots are based only on observed streamflow and solute concentration, their interpretation requires assumptions about the relative volume, hydrograph timing, and solute concentration of the streamflow end-members. Evans and Davies [1998] present a taxonomy of c-Q loops resulting from three-component conservative mixing. Their analysis, based on a fixed template of end-member hydrograph volume, timing, and concentration, suggests a unique relationship between c-Q loop form and the rank order of end-member concentrations. Many catchments exhibit variability in component contributions to storm flow in response to antecedent conditions or rainfall characteristics, but the effects of such variation on c-Q relationships have not been studied systematically. Starting with a "baseline" condition similar to that assumed by Evans and Davies [1998], we use a simple computer model to characterize the variability in c-Q plot patterns resulting from variation in end-member volume, timing, and solute concentration. Variability in these three factors can result in more than one c-Q loop shape for a given rank order of end-member solute concentrations. The number of resulting hysteresis patterns and their relative frequency depends on the rank order of solute concentrations and on their separation in absolute value. In ambiguous cases the c-Q loop shape is determined by the relative "prominence" of the event water versus soil water components. This "prominence" is broadly defined as a capacity to influence the total streamflow concentration and may result from a combination of end-member volume, timing, or concentration. The modeling results indicate that plausible hydrological variability in field situations can confound the interpretation of c-Q plots, even when

  19. Fine particulate concentrations on sidewalks in five Southern California cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boarnet, Marlon G.; Houston, Douglas; Edwards, Rufus; Princevac, Marko; Ferguson, Gavin; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian

    2011-08-01

    This research provides an exploratory examination of the factors associated with fine particle concentrations in intersection and sidewalk microenvironments in five study areas in the Los Angeles region. The study areas range from low-density, auto-oriented development patterns to dense urban areas with mid- and high-rise buildings. Average concentrations of FP DT (fine particle concentrations measured with DustTrak Aerosol Monitors) ranged from about 20 to 70 μg m -3 across study areas during stationary and mobile (walking) monitoring in morning, midday, and evening periods. Results suggest that fine particle concentrations are highly variable on urban sidewalks. A regression analysis shows that concentrations are associated with traffic and the proximate built environment characteristics after accounting for meteorological factors, time of day, and location in the region. Regressions show higher concentrations were associated with lower wind speeds and higher temperatures, higher adjacent passenger vehicle traffic, higher ambient concentrations, and street canyons with buildings of over five stories. Locations in street canyons with 2-5 story buildings and with more paving and open space had lower concentrations after accounting for other factors. The associations with traffic and built environment variables explained a small amount of the variation in FP DT concentrations, suggesting that future research should examine the relative role of localized traffic and built environment characteristics compared to regional ambient concentrations and meteorology.

  20. Concentrating Solar Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehos, Mark

    2008-09-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) has the potential to contribute significantly to the generation of electricity by renewable energy resources in the U.S.. Thermal storage can extend the duty cycle of CSP beyond daytime hours to early evening where the value of electricity is often the highest. The potential solar resource for the southwest U.S. is identified, along with the need to add power lines to bring the power to consumers. CSP plants in the U.S. and abroad are described. The CSP cost of electricity at the busbar is discussed. With current incentives, CSP is approaching competiveness with conventional gas-fired systems during peak-demand hours when the price of electricity is the highest. It is projected that a mature CSP industry of over 4 GWe will be able to reduce the energy cost by about 50%, and that U.S. capacity could be 120 GW by 2050.

  1. Concentric differential gearing arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiger, R. J.; Gerdts, J. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Two input members and two concentric rotatable output members are interconnected by a planetary gear arrangement. The first input drives directly the first output. The second input engages a carrier having the planetary gears affixed thereto. Rotation of the carriage causes rotation of the central sun gear of the planetary gear system. The sun gear is journaled to the carriage and is drivingly connected to the second output through a direction reversing set of bevel gears. The first input drive member includes a ring gear drivingly connected to the planetary gears for driving the second output member in the same direction and by the same amount as the first output member. Motion of the first input results in equal motion of the two outputs while input motion of the second input results in movement of the second output relative to the first output. This device is useful where non-interacting two-axis control of remote gimbaled systems is required.

  2. Concentrating solar thermal power.

    PubMed

    Müller-Steinhagen, Hans

    2013-08-13

    In addition to wind and photovoltaic power, concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) will make a major contribution to electricity provision from renewable energies. Drawing on almost 30 years of operational experience in the multi-megawatt range, CSP is now a proven technology with a reliable cost and performance record. In conjunction with thermal energy storage, electricity can be provided according to demand. To date, solar thermal power plants with a total capacity of 1.3 GW are in operation worldwide, with an additional 2.3 GW under construction and 31.7 GW in advanced planning stage. Depending on the concentration factors, temperatures up to 1000°C can be reached to produce saturated or superheated steam for steam turbine cycles or compressed hot gas for gas turbine cycles. The heat rejected from these thermodynamic cycles can be used for sea water desalination, process heat and centralized provision of chilled water. While electricity generation from CSP plants is still more expensive than from wind turbines or photovoltaic panels, its independence from fluctuations and daily variation of wind speed and solar radiation provides it with a higher value. To become competitive with mid-load electricity from conventional power plants within the next 10-15 years, mass production of components, increased plant size and planning/operating experience will be accompanied by technological innovations. On 30 October 2009, a number of major industrial companies joined forces to establish the so-called DESERTEC Industry Initiative, which aims at providing by 2050 15 per cent of European electricity from renewable energy sources in North Africa, while at the same time securing energy, water, income and employment for this region. Solar thermal power plants are in the heart of this concept. PMID:23816910

  3. Variable venturi type carburetor

    SciTech Connect

    Tahata, M.

    1986-09-02

    A variable venturi type carburetor is described comprising a carburetor body provided with a suction passage therein for flow of air through the passage, a slide valve supported by the body for slidable movement across the suction passage to serve as a variable venturi, a butterfly throttle valve pivotably supported by the carburetor body downstream of the slide valve, interlocking means connecting the slide valve and the butterfly throttle valve together for operating in correspondence with one another, operating means connected to one of the valves for operating the same by application of an external force thereto. A low-speed fuel nozzle opens into the suction passage in the vicinity of the butterfly throttle valve, an intermediate and a high speed main fuel nozzle opens into the suction passage opposite the slide valve, and a low and intermediate-speed primary fuel nozzle opens into the suction passage between the slide valve and the butterfly throttle valve. The slide valve includes a bottom portion having a front side surface facing upstream in the suction passage and a rear side surface facing downstream in the suction passage, the front and rear side surfaces having lower edges which are located in the same horizontal plane, the rear side surface being provided with an inverted cutaway.

  4. Glycemic variability: Clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Satya Krishna, Surabhi Venkata; Kota, Sunil K.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control and its benefits in preventing microvascular diabetic complications are convincingly proved by various prospective trials. Diabetes control and complications trial (DCCT) had reported variable glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) as a cause of increased microvascular complications in conventional glycemic control group versus intensive one. However, in spite of several indirect evidences, its link with cardiovascular events or macrovascular complications is still not proved. Glycemic variability (GV) is one more tool to explain relation between hyperglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. In fact GV along with fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, HbA1C, and quality of life has been proposed to form glycemic pentad, which needs to be considered in diabetes management. Postprandial spikes in blood glucose as well as hypoglycemic events, both are blamed for increased cardiovascular events in Type 2 diabetics. GV includes both these events and hence minimizing GV can prevent future cardiovascular events. Modern diabetes management modalities including improved sulfonylureas, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy, newer basal insulins, and modern insulin pumps address the issue of GV effectively. This article highlights mechanism, clinical implications, and measures to control GV in clinical practice. PMID:23961476

  5. Variable speed transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, W.S.

    1987-08-11

    This patent describes a variable speed transmission for transmitting rotational forces between a first shaft and a second shaft wherein a sprocket is mounted on the first shaft and a variable effective diameter pulley, having opposed inclined chain-belt engaging surfaces, is mounted on the second shaft, an endless chain-belt assembly for transmitting rotational forces. The assembly has side edges thereon, comprising: a first portion defining the edges of the chain-belt assembly and having a plurality of links defining a surface corresponding to the opposed inclined chain-belt engaging surfaces on the pulley; and a second portion intermediate of the first portion having a plurality of links for engaging the teeth on the sprocket, the links being joined by a plurality of pins extending transverse to the links; and a flexible shield mounted over the links and retained relative thereto by the pins wherein the flexible shield surrounds the links of the second portion of the chain-belt assembly and retains lubrication for the second portion and to prevent same for communicating to the first portion of the chain-belt assembly.

  6. Plasma lipid concentrations during episodic occupational stress.

    PubMed

    McCann, B S; Benjamin, G A; Wilkinson, C W; Retzlaff, B M; Russo, J; Knopp, R H

    1999-01-01

    The possibility that stress affects plasma lipid concentrations has been the subject of recent investigation, but the findings are equivocal in nonlaboratory settings. To determine whether psychological stress contributes to variability in plasma lipid concentrations and concomitant changes in health behaviors, the effect of increased work load on plasma lipids and apolipoproteins was examined in 173 lawyers. Plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, and apolipoprotein concentrations were studied during periods of high work load (corresponding to impending tax deadlines) and during periods of usual work load. Self-reports of stress, work load, and time pressure, and cortisol, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured to verify that impending deadlines were associated with increased stress levels. Health behaviors which may affect plasma lipoprotein concentrations, including dietary intake and exercise, were also examined. High work load was accompanied by increases in self-reported work load among lawyers most directly affected by the impending deadlines. Plasma apolipoprotein B and triglycerides increased during periods of high work load (M = 1.9 mg/dL, SD = 10.1 and M = 5.3, SD = 34.4, respectively). No changes in dietary intake and exercise were observed. Psychological stress (high work load) is associated with potentially atherogenic changes in plasma lipid concentrations. While the lipoprotein effect of this short-term work stress is small, the effects of longer-term stress on multiple rise factors including triglycerides and apolipoprotein B could have significance for the development of coronary artery disease. PMID:10499130

  7. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of the

  8. Current Climate Variability & Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, J.; Criswell, B.; Elliott, W. C.

    2013-12-01

    Current Climate Variability & Change is the ninth among a suite of ten interconnected, sequential labs that address all 39 climate-literacy concepts in the U.S. Global Change Research Program's Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Sciences. The labs are as follows: Solar Radiation & Seasons, Stratospheric Ozone, The Troposphere, The Carbon Cycle, Global Surface Temperature, Glacial-Interglacial Cycles, Temperature Changes over the Past Millennium, Climates & Ecosystems, Current Climate Variability & Change, and Future Climate Change. All are inquiry-based, on-line products designed in a way that enables students to construct their own knowledge of a topic. Questions representative of various levels of Webb's depth of knowledge are embedded in each lab. In addition to the embedded questions, each lab has three or four essential questions related to the driving questions for the lab suite. These essential questions are presented as statements at the beginning of the material to represent the lab objectives, and then are asked at the end as questions to function as a summative assessment. For example, the Current Climate Variability & Change is built around these essential questions: (1) What has happened to the global temperature at the Earth's surface, in the middle troposphere, and in the lower stratosphere over the past several decades?; (2) What is the most likely cause of the changes in global temperature over the past several decades and what evidence is there that this is the cause?; and (3) What have been some of the clearly defined effects of the change in global temperature on the atmosphere and other spheres of the Earth system? An introductory Prezi allows the instructor to assess students' prior knowledge in relation to these questions, while also providing 'hooks' to pique their interest related to the topic. The lab begins by presenting examples of and key differences between climate variability (e.g., Mt. Pinatubo eruption) and

  9. Quantifying strain variability in modeling growth of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Aryani, D C; den Besten, H M W; Hazeleger, W C; Zwietering, M H

    2015-09-01

    Prediction of microbial growth kinetics can differ from the actual behavior of the target microorganisms. In the present study, the impact of strain variability on maximum specific growth rate (μmax) (h(-1)) was quantified using twenty Listeria monocytogenes strains. The μmax was determined as function of four different variables, namely pH, water activity (aw)/NaCl concentration [NaCl], undissociated lactic acid concentration ([HA]), and temperature (T). The strain variability was compared to biological and experimental variabilities to determine their importance. The experiment was done in duplicate at the same time to quantify experimental variability and reproduced at least twice on different experimental days to quantify biological (reproduction) variability. For all variables, experimental variability was clearly lower than biological variability and strain variability; and remarkably, biological variability was similar to strain variability. Strain variability in cardinal growth parameters, namely pHmin, [NaCl]max, [HA]max, and Tmin was further investigated by fitting secondary growth models to the μmax data, including a modified secondary pH model. The fitting results showed that L. monocytogenes had an average pHmin of 4.5 (5-95% prediction interval (PI) 4.4-4.7), [NaCl]max of 2.0mM (PI 1.8-2.1), [HA]max of 5.1mM (PI 4.2-5.9), and Tmin of -2.2°C (PI (-3.3)-(-1.1)). The strain variability in cardinal growth parameters was benchmarked to available literature data, showing that the effect of strain variability explained around 1/3 or less of the variability found in literature. The cardinal growth parameters and their prediction intervals were used as input to illustrate the effect of strain variability on the growth of L. monocytogenes in food products with various characteristics, resulting in 2-4 logCFU/ml(g) difference in growth prediction between the most and least robust strains, depending on the type of food product. This underlined the importance

  10. WIND VARIABILITY IN BZ CAMELOPARDALIS

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, R. K.; Kafka, S.; Robertson, J. W. E-mail: skafka@dtm.ciw.edu

    2013-02-01

    Sequences of spectra of the nova-like cataclysmic variable (CV) BZ Cam were acquired on nine nights in 2005-2006 in order to study the time development of episodes of wind activity known to occur frequently in this star. We confirm the results of Ringwald and Naylor that the P-Cygni absorption components of the lines mostly evolve from higher expansion velocity to lower velocity as an episode progresses. We also commonly find blueshifted emission components in the H{alpha} line profile, whose velocities and durations strongly suggest that they are also due to the wind. Curiously, Ringwald and Naylor reported common occurrences of redshifted H{alpha} emission components in their BZ Cam spectra. We have attributed these emission components in H{alpha} to occasions when gas concentrations in the bipolar wind (both front side and back side) become manifested as emission lines as they move beyond the disk's outer edge. We also suggest, based on changes in the P-Cygni profiles during an episode, that the progression from larger to smaller expansion velocities is due to the higher velocity portions of a wind concentration moving beyond the edge of the continuum light of the disk first, leaving a net redward shift of the remaining absorption profile. We derive a new orbital ephemeris for BZ Cam, using the radial velocity of the core of the He I {lambda}5876 line, finding P = 0.15353(4). Using this period, the wind episodes in BZ Cam are found to be concentrated near the inferior conjunction of the emission line source. This result helps confirm that the winds in nova-like CVs are often phase dependent, in spite of the puzzling implication that such winds lack axisymmetry. We argue that the radiation-driven wind in BZ Cam receives an initial boost by acting on gas that has been lifted above the disk by the interaction of the accretion stream with the disk, thereby imposing flickering timescales onto the wind events, as well as leading to an orbital modulation of the wind

  11. Estimating whole-body fish PCB concentrations from fillet data

    SciTech Connect

    Rigg, D.; Hohreiter, D.; Strause, K.; Brown, M.; Barnes, C.

    1995-12-31

    A study was designed to assess a potentially cost-effective method for generating both types of data from single fish specimens. The method is based on the testable hypothesis that whole-body PCE concentrations are predictable from fillet PCB concentrations and fillet and whole-body lipid concentrations. The study involved the collection of small-mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and carp (Cyprinus carpio) from several locations in the Kalamazoo River (Michigan) watershed to represent a range in PCB exposure. PCB and lipid concentrations were determined in aliquots of homogenized fillets and remaining carcasses. Wet-weight total PCB concentrations in carp ranged from 0.06 to 17 mg/kg in fillets, and from 0.11 to 14 mg/kg for remaining carcass; small-mouth bass ranged from 0.08 to 5.8 mg/kg in fillets, and from 0.21 to 13.2 mg/kg for remaining carcass. Whole-body PCB concentrations predicted using fillet PCB concentrations and fillet and carcass lipid concentrations accounted for 94% and 88% of the variability in measured whole-body small-mouth and whole-body carp concentrations, respectively. Predicted and measured whole-body PCB concentrations had a correlation of 91% for small-mouth bass, and 84% for carp. These results demonstrate that value of the lipid-based model in predicting whole-body PCB concentrations from measured fillet PCB concentrations and lipid concentrations in fillet and remaining carcass.

  12. Distribution of gases in the unsaturated zone at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    The unsaturated zone is a medium that provides pneumatic communication for the movement of gases from wastes buried in landfills to the atmosphere, biota, and groundwater. Gases in unsaturated glacial and eolian deposits near a waste-disposal trench at the low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Bureau County, Illinois, were identified, and the spatial and temporal distributions of the partial pressures of those gases were determined for the period January 1984 through January 1986. Methods for the collection and analyses of the gases are described, as are geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the unsaturated zone that affect gas transport. The identified gases, which are of natural and of waste origin, include nitrogen, oxygen, and argon, carbon dioxide, methane, propane, butane, tritiated water vapor, 14carbon dioxide, and 222 radon. Concentrations of methane and 14carbon dioxide originated at the waste, as shown by partial-pressure gradients of the gases; 14carbon dioxide partial pressures exceeded natural background partial pressures by factors greater than 1 million at some locations. Variations in partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide were seasonal among piezometers because of increased root and soil-microbe respiration during summer. Variations in methane and 14carbon dioxide partial pressures were apparently related to discrete releases from waste sources at unpredictable intervals of time. No greater than background partial pressures for tritiated water vapor or 222 radon were measured. (USGS)

  13. The variable density aircraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    In the variable density aircraft concept the aircraft's density is varied by varying its volume. This is accomplished by combining a variable volume hull, which is called the dynapod, with intrinsic means for the controlled variation of a mass of working fluid or substance within the aircraft. The dynapod is a hinged structure and follows the volumetric variations of the working fluid. The result is a variable density hull, which with the attachment of power plants, etc., becomes a variable density aircraft.

  14. Variable-Resolution GCMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    Variable resolution GCMs using a global stretched grid (SG) with enhanced regional resolute over multiple (four) areas of interest represent a viable new approach to regional climate and climate change studies and applications. The four areas, one at each global quadrant, include major global monsoonal circulations over North America, South America, India-China, and Australia. The SG-approach is an ideal tool for representing consistent interactions of global/large- and regional/mesoscales. It is an alternative to the widely used nested-grid approach. Several existing SG-GCMs are briefly described. The major discussion is based on the GEOS (Goddard Earth Observing System) SG-GCM regional climate simulations.

  15. Essential biodiversity variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, H.M.; Ferrier, S.; Walters, M.; Geller, G.N.; Jongman, R.H.G.; Scholes, R.J.; Bruford, M.W.; Brummitt, N.; Butchart, S.H.M.; Cardoso, A.C.; Coops, N.C.; Dulloo, E.; Faith, D.P.; Freyhof, J.; Gregory, R.D.; Heip, C.; Höft, R.; Hurtt, G.; Jetz, W.; Karp, D.S.; McGeoch, M.A.; Obura, D.; Onada, Y.; Pettorelli, N.; Reyers, B.; Sayre, R.; Scharlemann, J.P.W.; Stuart, S.N.; Turak, E.; Walpole, M.; Wegmann, M.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the rate of biodiversity loss and averting dangerous biodiversity change are international goals, reasserted by the Aichi Targets for 2020 by Parties to the United Nations (UN) Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) after failure to meet the 2010 target (1, 2). However, there is no global, harmonized observation system for delivering regular, timely data on biodiversity change (3). With the first plenary meeting of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) soon under way, partners from the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON) (4) are developing—and seeking consensus around—Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) that could form the basis of monitoring programs worldwide.

  16. Variable mixer propulsion cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rundell, D. J.; Mchugh, D. P.; Foster, T.; Brown, R. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A design technique, method and apparatus are delineated for controlling the bypass gas stream pressure and varying the bypass ratio of a mixed flow gas turbine engine in order to achieve improved performance. The disclosed embodiments each include a mixing device for combining the core and bypass gas streams. The variable area mixing device permits the static pressures of the core and bypass streams to be balanced prior to mixing at widely varying bypass stream pressure levels. The mixed flow gas turbine engine therefore operates efficiently over a wide range of bypass ratios and the dynamic pressure of the bypass stream is maintained at a level which will keep the engine inlet airflow matched to an optimum design level throughout a wide range of engine thrust settings.

  17. Variable cycle engine

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, A.P.; Sprunger, E.V.

    1980-09-16

    A variable cycle turboshaft engine includes a remote fan system and respective high and low pressure systems for selectively driving the fan system in such a manner as to provide VTOL takeoff capability and minimum specific fuel consumption (SFC) at cruise and loiter conditions. For takeoff the fan system is primarily driven by the relatively large low pressure system whose combustor receives the motive fluid from a core bypass duct and, for cruise and loiter conditions, the fan system is driven by both a relatively small high pressure core and the low pressure system with its combustor inoperative. A mixer is disposed downstream of the high pressure system for mixing the relatively cold air from the bypass duct and the relatively hot air from the core prior to its flow to the low pressure turbine.

  18. Variable speed controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Christa; Spiggle, Charles; Swift, Shannon; Vangeffen, Stephen; Younger, Frank

    1992-01-01

    This report details a new design for a variable speed controller which can be used to operate lunar machinery without the astronaut using his or her upper body. In order to demonstrate the design, a treadle for an industrial sewing machine was redesigned to be used by a standing operator. Since the invention of an electrically powered sewing machine, the operator has been seated. Today, companies are switching from sit down to stand up operation involving modular stations. The old treadle worked well with a sitting operator, but problems have been found when trying to use the same treadle with a standing operator. Emphasis is placed on the ease of use by the operator along with the ergonomics involved. Included with the design analysis are suggestions for possible uses for the speed controller in other applications.

  19. Tropical Pacific moisture variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives are to describe synoptic scale variability of moisture over the tropical Pacific Ocean and the systems leading to this variability; implement satellite analysis procedures in support of this effort, and to incorporate additional satellite information into operational analysis forecast systems at the National Meteorological Center (NMC). Composite satellite radiance patterns describe features detectable well before the development of synoptic scale tropical plumes. These typical features were extracted from historical files of Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) radiance observations for a pair of tropical plumes which developed during January 1989. Signals were inserted into the NMC operational medium range forecast model and a suite of model integrations were conducted. Many of the 48 h model errors of the historical forecasts were eliminated by the inclusion of more complete satellite observations. Three studies in satellite radiance analysis progressed. An analysis which blended TOVS moisture channels, OLR observations and European Center for Medium Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model analysis to generate fields of total precipitable water comparable to those estimated from Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) mu-wave observations. This study demonstrated that a 10 y climatology of precipitable water over the oceans is feasible, using available infrared observations (OLR and TOVS) and model analysis (ECMWF, NMC or similar quality). The estimates are sensitive to model quality and the estimating model must be updated with operational model changes. Coe developed a set of tropical plume and ITCZ composites from TOVS observations, and from NMC and ECMWF analyses which had been passed through a radiative transfer model to simulate TOVS radiances. The composites have been completed as well as many statistical diagnostics of individual TOVS channels. Analysis of the computations is commencing. Chung has initiated a study of the

  20. Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sue; Bergman, Judy

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the research on middle school students' understanding of variables and explores preservice elementary and middle school teachers' knowledge of variables. According to research studies, middle school students have limited understanding of variables. Many studies have examined the performance of middle school students and offered…

  1. Workplace Concentration of Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Fredrik; García-Pérez, Mónica; Haltiwanger, John; McCue, Kristin; Sanders, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Casual observation suggests that in most U.S. urban labor markets, immigrants have more immigrant coworkers than native-born workers do. While seeming obvious, this excess tendency to work together has not been precisely measured, nor have its sources been quantified. Using matched employer–employee data from the U.S. Census Bureau Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) database on a set of metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) with substantial immigrant populations, we find that, on average, 37% of an immigrant’s coworkers are themselves immigrants; in contrast, only 14% of a native-born worker’s coworkers are immigrants. We decompose this difference into the probability of working with compatriots versus with immigrants from other source countries. Using human capital, employer, and location characteristics, we narrow the mechanisms that might explain immigrant concentration. We find that industry, language, and residential segregation collectively explain almost all the excess tendency to work with immigrants from other source countries, but they have limited power to explain work with compatriots. This large unexplained compatriot component suggests an important role for unmeasured country-specific factors, such as social networks. PMID:25425452

  2. Workplace concentration of immigrants.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Fredrik; García-Pérez, Mónica; Haltiwanger, John; McCue, Kristin; Sanders, Seth

    2014-12-01

    Casual observation suggests that in most U.S. urban labor markets, immigrants have more immigrant coworkers than native-born workers do. While seeming obvious, this excess tendency to work together has not been precisely measured, nor have its sources been quantified. Using matched employer-employee data from the U.S. Census Bureau Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) database on a set of metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) with substantial immigrant populations, we find that, on average, 37 % of an immigrant's coworkers are themselves immigrants; in contrast, only 14 % of a native-born worker's coworkers are immigrants. We decompose this difference into the probability of working with compatriots versus with immigrants from other source countries. Using human capital, employer, and location characteristics, we narrow the mechanisms that might explain immigrant concentration. We find that industry, language, and residential segregation collectively explain almost all the excess tendency to work with immigrants from other source countries, but they have limited power to explain work with compatriots. This large unexplained compatriot component suggests an important role for unmeasured country-specific factors, such as social networks. PMID:25425452

  3. Photovoltaic solar concentrator module

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.J.

    1991-05-16

    This invention consists of a planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation which includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

  4. Concentric tube support assembly

    DOEpatents

    Rubio, Mark F.; Glessner, John C.

    2012-09-04

    An assembly (45) includes a plurality of separate pie-shaped segments (72) forming a disk (70) around a central region (48) for retaining a plurality of tubes (46) in a concentrically spaced apart configuration. Each segment includes a support member (94) radially extending along an upstream face (96) of the segment and a plurality of annularly curved support arms (98) transversely attached to the support member and radially spaced apart from one another away from the central region for receiving respective upstream end portions of the tubes in arc-shaped spaces (100) between the arms. Each segment also includes a radial passageway (102) formed in the support member for receiving a fluid segment portion (106) and a plurality of annular passageways (104) formed in the support arms for receiving respective arm portions (108) of the fluid segment portion from the radial passageway and for conducting the respective arm portions into corresponding annular spaces (47) formed between the tubes retained by the disk.

  5. Modeling Natural Stream Nutrient Concentrations from Landscape Predictors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J. R.; Hawkins, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding how much land use change has affected nutrient concentrations in aquatic ecosystems requires a way of estimating the nutrient concentrations that were present in these systems before they were altered. Pre-alteration data are generally not available, but models that associate natural landscape variation with stream nutrient concentrations can be used to predict natural nutrient concentrations. These models can also provide insight into which processes are primarily responsible for observed natural spatial and temporal variability in stream nutrient concentrations. We used data from 782 reference sites across the western USA to develop empirical models that predict natural, base-flow concentrations of total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN). Models were built using Random Forests, a nonparametric regression technique that accounts for both interactions between variables and non-linear relationships. We developed candidate predictor variables associated with nutrient sources, sinks, or other processes potentially affecting nutrient concentrations among sites. Factors associated with watershed geology and P availability were the most important predictors of TP. Climate and co-precipitates were less important predictors. TN concentrations were equally associated with climate, atmospheric deposition, and vegetation phenology. Both models were relatively accurate (Root Mean Squared Errors < 12% of the range of observations for independent validation sites) and made better predictions than previous models of natural nutrient concentrations. However, the models were not very precise (r2 = 0.46 for the TP model, and r2 = 0.23 for the TN model). An analysis of the sources of variation showed that our models accounted for a majority of the spatial variation in nutrient concentrations, and much of the imprecision was due to temporal or measurement variation in nutrient concentrations.

  6. Processes Understanding of Decadal Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prömmel, Kerstin; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The realistic representation of decadal climate variability in the models is essential for the quality of decadal climate predictions. Therefore, the understanding of those processes leading to decadal climate variability needs to be improved. Several of these processes are already included in climate models but their importance has not yet completely been clarified. The simulation of other processes requires sometimes a higher resolution of the model or an extension by additional subsystems. This is addressed within one module of the German research program "MiKlip II - Decadal Climate Predictions" (http://www.fona-miklip.de/en/) with a focus on the following processes. Stratospheric processes and their impact on the troposphere are analysed regarding the climate response to aerosol perturbations caused by volcanic eruptions and the stratospheric decadal variability due to solar forcing, climate change and ozone recovery. To account for the interaction between changing ozone concentrations and climate a computationally efficient ozone chemistry module is developed and implemented in the MiKlip prediction system. The ocean variability and air-sea interaction are analysed with a special focus on the reduction of the North Atlantic cold bias. In addition, the predictability of the oceanic carbon uptake with a special emphasis on the underlying mechanism is investigated. This addresses a combination of physical, biological and chemical processes.

  7. Oxygen derived variables in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Covelli, H D; Nessan, V J; Tuttle, W K

    1983-08-01

    The clinical course of 33 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was monitored by noninvasive oxygen derived variables and compared to data obtained by invasive monitoring. A total of 350 data points were used to compare the physiologic shunt fraction (Qsp/Qt) with the ratio of arterial oxygen to inspired oxygen concentration (PaO2/FIO2), the alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure difference [P(A-a)O2], the respiratory index (RI)-[P(A-a)O2/PaO2], and the ratio of arterial oxygen to alveolar oxygen (a/A). The PaO2/FIO2 ratio, the RI and the aA ratio correlated well with Qsp/Qt (r = 0.87 to 0.94). The P(A-a)O2 correlated less well (r = 0.68). Changes in the cardiac index (CI) and the arteriovenous oxygen content difference C(a-v)O2 had only a minimal effect on the correlation of the oxygen derived variables with Qsp/Qt, although a higher correlation resulted when these extrapulmonary factors were within normal range. We conclude that a number of oxygen derived variables may accurately reflect the degree of Qsp/Qt. The PaO2/FIO2 ratio is the easiest of these variables to calculate, yet accurately predicts the degree of Qsp/Qt throughout a course of acute respiratory failure. PMID:6409506

  8. Neural variability: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Dinstein, Ilan; Heeger, David J; Behrmann, Marlene

    2015-06-01

    Although we may not realize it, our brain function varies markedly from moment to moment such that our brain responses exhibit substantial variability across trials even in response to a simple repeating stimulus. Should we care about such within-subject variability? Are there developmental, cognitive, and clinical consequences to having a brain that is more or less variable/noisy? Although neural variability seems to be beneficial for learning, excessive levels of neural variability are apparent in individuals with different clinical disorders. We propose that measuring distinct types of neural variability in autism and other disorders is likely to reveal crucial insights regarding their neuropathology. We further discuss the importance of studying neural variability more generally across development and aging in humans. PMID:25979849

  9. Variable anodic thermal control coating on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duckett, R. J.; Gilliland, C. S.

    1983-01-01

    A variable thermal control coating (modified chromic acid anodizing) has been developed to meet the needs for the thermal control of spacecraft. This coating, with controlled variable ranges of 0.10 to 0.72 thermal emittance and 0.2 to 0.4 solar absorptance, allows the user to select any value of thermal emittance and solar absorptance within the range specified and obtain both values within + or - 0.02. Preliminary solar stability has shown less than 15 percent degradation over 2000 hours of vacuum solar exposure. The technique has been determined to be sensitive to the parameters of voltage, rate of voltage application, time, temperature, acid concentration, and material pretreatment.

  10. Droplet Number Concentration Value Added Product

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-06

    Cloud droplet number concentration is an important factor in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. As aerosol concentration increases, it is expected that droplet number concentration (Nd) will increase and droplet size will decrease, for a given liquid water path. This will greatly affect cloud albedo as smaller droplets reflect more shortwave radiation; however, the magnitude and variability of these processes under different environmental conditions is still uncertain.McComiskey et al. (2009) have implemented a method, based onBoers andmore » Mitchell (1994), for calculating Nd from ground-based remote sensing measurements of optical depth and liquid water path. They show that the magnitude of the aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) varies with a range of factors, including the relative value of the cloud liquid water path (LWP), the aerosol size distribution, and the cloud updraft velocity. Estimates of Nd under a range of cloud types and conditions and at a variety of sites are needed to further quantify the impacts of aerosol cloud interactions. In order to provide data sets for studying aerosol-cloud interactions, the McComiskey et al. (2009) method was implemented as the Droplet Number Concentration (NDROP) value-added product (VAP).« less

  11. Organic Wheat Farming Improves Grain Zinc Concentration.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein, Julian; Müller, Isabel; Grüter, Roman; Bhullar, Gurbir; Mandloi, Lokendra; Papritz, Andreas; Siegrist, Michael; Schulin, Rainer; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) nutrition is of key relevance in India, as a large fraction of the population suffers from Zn malnutrition and many soils contain little plant available Zn. In this study we compared organic and conventional wheat cropping systems with respect to DTPA (diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid)-extractable Zn as a proxy for plant available Zn, yield, and grain Zn concentration. We analyzed soil and wheat grain samples from 30 organic and 30 conventional farms in Madhya Pradesh (central India), and conducted farmer interviews to elucidate sociological and management variables. Total and DTPA-extractable soil Zn concentrations and grain yield (3400 kg ha-1) did not differ between the two farming systems, but with 32 and 28 mg kg-1 respectively, grain Zn concentrations were higher on organic than conventional farms (t = -2.2, p = 0.03). Furthermore, multiple linear regression analyses revealed that (a) total soil zinc and sulfur concentrations were the best predictors of DTPA-extractable soil Zn, (b) Olsen phosphate taken as a proxy for available soil phosphorus, exchangeable soil potassium, harvest date, training of farmers in nutrient management, and soil silt content were the best predictors of yield, and (c) yield, Olsen phosphate, grain nitrogen, farmyard manure availability, and the type of cropping system were the best predictors of grain Zn concentration. Results suggested that organic wheat contained more Zn despite same yield level due to higher nutrient efficiency. Higher nutrient efficiency was also seen in organic wheat for P, N and S. The study thus suggests that appropriate farm management can lead to competitive yield and improved Zn concentration in wheat grains on organic farms. PMID:27537548

  12. Organic Wheat Farming Improves Grain Zinc Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Helfenstein, Julian; Müller, Isabel; Grüter, Roman; Bhullar, Gurbir; Mandloi, Lokendra; Papritz, Andreas; Siegrist, Michael; Schulin, Rainer; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) nutrition is of key relevance in India, as a large fraction of the population suffers from Zn malnutrition and many soils contain little plant available Zn. In this study we compared organic and conventional wheat cropping systems with respect to DTPA (diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid)-extractable Zn as a proxy for plant available Zn, yield, and grain Zn concentration. We analyzed soil and wheat grain samples from 30 organic and 30 conventional farms in Madhya Pradesh (central India), and conducted farmer interviews to elucidate sociological and management variables. Total and DTPA-extractable soil Zn concentrations and grain yield (3400 kg ha-1) did not differ between the two farming systems, but with 32 and 28 mg kg-1 respectively, grain Zn concentrations were higher on organic than conventional farms (t = -2.2, p = 0.03). Furthermore, multiple linear regression analyses revealed that (a) total soil zinc and sulfur concentrations were the best predictors of DTPA-extractable soil Zn, (b) Olsen phosphate taken as a proxy for available soil phosphorus, exchangeable soil potassium, harvest date, training of farmers in nutrient management, and soil silt content were the best predictors of yield, and (c) yield, Olsen phosphate, grain nitrogen, farmyard manure availability, and the type of cropping system were the best predictors of grain Zn concentration. Results suggested that organic wheat contained more Zn despite same yield level due to higher nutrient efficiency. Higher nutrient efficiency was also seen in organic wheat for P, N and S. The study thus suggests that appropriate farm management can lead to competitive yield and improved Zn concentration in wheat grains on organic farms. PMID:27537548

  13. Titan's Variable Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini observations have found that the plasma and magnetic field conditions upstream of Titan are far more complex than they were thought to be after the Voyager encounter. Rymer et al., (2009) used the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) electron observations to classify the plasma conditions along Titan's orbit into 5 types (Plasma Sheet, Lobe, Mixed, Magnetosheath and Misc.). Nemeth et al., (2011) found that the CAPS ion observations could also be separated into the same plasma regions as defined by Rymer et al. Additionally the T-96 encounter found Titan in the solar wind adding a sixth classification. Understanding the effects of the variable upstream plasma conditions on Titan's plasma interaction and the evolution of Titan's ionosphere/atmosphere is one of the main objectives of the Cassini mission. To compliment the mission we perform hybrid simulations of Titan's plasma interaction to examine the effects of the incident plasma distribution function and the flow velocity. We closely examine the results on Titan's induced magnetosphere and the resulting pickup ion properties.

  14. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  15. Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Biman; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common primary immunodeficiency of young adolescents and adults which also affects the children. The disease remains largely under-diagnosed in India and Southeast Asian countries. Although in majority of cases it is sporadic, disease may be inherited in a autosomal recessive pattern and rarely, in autosomal dominant pattern. Patients, in addition to frequent sino-pulmonary infections, are also susceptible to various autoimmune diseases and malignancy, predominantly lymphoma and leukemia. Other characteristic lesions include lymphocytic and granulomatous interstitial lung disease, and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of gut. Diagnosis requires reduced levels of at least two immunoglobulin isotypes: IgG with IgA and/or IgM and impaired specific antibody response to vaccines. A number of gene mutations have been described in CVID; however, these genetic alterations account for less than 20% of cases of CVID. Flow cytometry aptly demonstrates a disturbed B cell homeostasis with reduced or absent memory B cells and increased CD21(low) B cells and transitional B cell populations. Approximately one-third of patients with CVID also display T cell functional defects. Immunoglobulin therapy remains the mainstay of treatment. Immunologists and other clinicians in India and other South East Asian countries need to be aware of CVID so that early diagnosis can be made, as currently, majority of these patients still go undiagnosed. PMID:26868026

  16. Variable camshaft timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, S.J.

    1988-05-17

    A variable camshaft timing system in combination with an internal combustion engine having at least one cylinder, a rotatable member such as a crankshaft, and an intake and exhaust valve coupled to an intake camshaft and an exhaust camshaft respectively, the system is described comprising: a pulley wheel fixedly attached at one end of each of the intake and exhaust camshafts and the crankshaft; belt means interconnecting each of the pulley wheels for transferring rotational motion from the crankshaft to the intake and exhaust camshafts; first and second idler arm means pivotally attached to the engine, each of the idler arm means having a pivoting arm, a cam follower arm and an idler wheel in operative contact with the belt means; positioning cam means operatively coupled to each of the cam follower arms of the idler arm means; a control means responsive to various engine operating parameters for generating motor control signals; and electric motor means responsive to the motor control signals and operatively coupled to rotate the positioning cams means for positioning each of the idler arm means for changing the relative rotational position between the input camshaft and the exhaust camshaft.

  17. Variability of phonetograms.

    PubMed

    Gramming, P; Sundberg, J; Akerlund, L

    1991-01-01

    Various sources of phonetogram variation were investigated, i.e. graphs showing voice sound pressure level (SPL) for a speaker's loudest and softest phonation at different fundamental frequencies. The short-term SPL variation within a vocalization was analyzed for 10 female and 10 male normal speakers and for 10 female patients with nonorganic dysphonia, i.e. patients with insufficient voices and no indication of pathology according to microlaryngostroboscopy. This variability was about 5 dB in soft phonation and less in loud phonation. The agreement between 2 investigators independently determining SPL for identical vocalizations by means of a sound-level meter was also studied and found to be quite good. The long-term variation was analyzed in 1 male and 1 female normal subject in 15 phonetogram recordings made on different days; the standard deviation averaged across fundamental frequency and subjects was found to be approximately 3 dB. The implications of these findings for a clinical use of phonetograms are discussed. PMID:1916550

  18. Nova-like variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladous, Constanze

    1993-01-01

    On grounds of different observable characteristics five classes of nova-like objects are distinguished: the UX Ursae Majoris stars, the antidwarf novae, the DQ Herculis stars, the AM Herculis stars, and the AM Canum Venaticorum stars. Some objects have not been classified specifically. Nova-like stars share most observable features with dwarf novae, except for the outburst behavior. The understanding is that dwarf novae, UX Ursae Majoris stars, and anti-dwarf novae are basically the same sort of objects. The difference between them is that in UX Ursae Majoris stars the mass transfer through the accretion disc always is high so the disc is stationary all the time; in anti-dwarf novae for some reason the mass transfer occasionally drops considerably for some time, and in dwarf novae it is low enough for the disc to undergo semiperiodic changes between high and low accretion events. DQ Herculis stars are believed to possess weakly magnetic white dwarfs which disrupt the inner disc at some distance from the central star; the rotation of the white dwarf can be seen as an additional photometric period. In AM Herculis stars, a strongly magnetic white dwarf entirely prevents the formation of an accretion disk and at the same time locks the rotation of the white dwarf to the binary orbit. Finally, AM Canum Venaticorum stars are believed to be cataclysmic variables that consist of two white dwarf components.

  19. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  20. Extragalactic Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Neill, James D.

    2005-03-01

    SALT is uniquely poised to make major inroads in the study of extragalactic cataclysmic variables (CVs) - novae and dwarf novae. The ability to search an external galaxy for erupting CVs night after night, for months at a time, AND to obtain confirmatory spectra within a night of discovery is unique and invaluable. We present several examples of multi-week to multi-month searches for extragalactic CVs with 1 to 4 meter-class telescopes. In particular, we have detected the first erupting dwarf novae in the LMC and placed a lower limit on the number of CVs in that galaxy. We have also observed the Local Group dwarf ellipticals M32 and NGC 205 in their entirety every clear night over a 4.5 month interval. In this survey we discovered one nova each in M32 and NGC 205, far more than previous nova surveys led us to expect. A similar search in M81 again reveals more novae than expected, and demonstrates, conclusively, that novae are predominantly a bulge population in spiral galaxies. Finally we report the detection of intergalactic tramp novae in the Fornax cluster, and emphasize that these are valuable tracers of stars stripped from their hosts during galaxy harassment. The insights gained during these preliminary studies illustrate how valuable SALT campaigns on extragalactic CVs will be.

  1. Variables, variability, and variations research: implications for medical informatics.

    PubMed Central

    Holzemer, W L; Reilly, C A

    1995-01-01

    Variations research is one important strategy in the quality management movement designed to improve the quality of health care and to control costs. Information systems are being utilized in variations research to provide an array of potential variables, to provide measures of the variability inherent in these variables, and to assist with the study of the linkages of patient and provider characteristics with interventions and outcomes. This article presents a systems model of inputs, processes, and outcomes with explication of factors related to client, provider, and setting as a heuristic strategy for variable specification. The implications of variable specification, the design and measurement of variability, and the key issue of control in variations research are linked with a discussion of the implications for medical informatics. PMID:7614119

  2. Investigating causes of regional variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Katherine D.

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations are rapidly increasing due to anthropogenic activities; however, only about half of the emissions have accumulated in the atmosphere, and the fate of the remaining half remains uncertain. Since atmospheric CO2 concentrations contain information regarding carbon sources and sinks, it is important to understand CO 2 variability. This study investigated causes of atmospheric CO 2 variability, focusing on the relationship between CO2 concentrations and clouds, the impact of heterogeneous land cover and agricultural production, and the effect of redistributing fossil fuel emissions. Due to global coverage and sheer data volume, satellite CO2 concentrations will be used in inverse models to improve carbon source and sink estimates. Satellite concentrations will only retrieve CO2 measurements in clear conditions, and it is important to understand how CO 2 concentrations vary with cloud cover in order to optimally utilize these data. This study evaluated differences between clear-sky and mean concentrations on local, regional, and global scales. Analyses of in situ data, regional model simulations, and global model output all revealed clear-sky differences that were regionally coherent on sub-continental scales and that varied both with time and location. In the mid-latitudes, clear-sky CO2 concentrations were systematically lower than on average, and these differences were not due to biology, but rather to frontal convergence of large-scale gradients that were covered by clouds. Instead of using satellite data to represent temporal averages, inverse models and data assimilation systems that use satellite data to calculate carbon sources and sinks must be sampled consistently with the observations, including precise modeling of winds, clouds, fronts, and frontal timing. Just as CO2 concentrations vary with cloud cover, variability in atmospheric CO2 concentrations is also caused by heterogeneity in land cover and surface fluxes. This study

  3. Metallization problems with concentrator cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Cells used with concentrators have similar contact requirements to other cells, but operation at high intensity imposes more than the usual demands on the metallization. Overall contact requirements are listed and concentrator cell requirements are discussed.

  4. Markets for concentrating solar power

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-04-01

    The report describes the markets for concentrating solar power. As concentrating solar power technologies advance into the early stages of commercialization, their economic potential becomes more sharply defined and increasingly tangible.

  5. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  6. Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Residential Dust: Sources of Variability

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Brown, F. Reber; Metayer, Catherine; Park, June-Soo; Does, Monique; Dhaliwal, Joginder; Petreas, Myrto X.; Buffler, Patricia A.; Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    We characterized the variability in concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) measured in residential dust. Vacuum cleaner samples were collected from 289 homes in the California Childhood Leukemia Study during two sampling rounds from 2001 to 2010 and 15 PCBs were measured by high resolution gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Median concentrations of the most abundant PCBs (i.e., PCBs 28, 52, 101, 105, 118, 138, 153, and 180) ranged from 1.0–5.8 ng per g of dust in the first sampling round and from 0.8–3.4 ng/g in the second sampling round. For each of these eight PCBs, we used a random-effects model to apportion total variation into regional variability (6–11%), intra-regional between-home variability (27–56%), within-home variability over time (18–52%), and within-sample variability (9–16%). In mixed-effects models, differences in PCB concentrations between homes were explained by home age, with older homes having higher PCB levels. Differences in PCB concentrations within homes were explained by decreasing time trends. Estimated half-lives ranged from 5–18 years, indicating that PCBs are removed very slowly from the indoor environment. Our findings suggest that it may be feasible to use residential dust for retrospective assessment of PCB exposures in studies of children’s health. PMID:24313682

  7. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, John; McGlynn, Brian; Covino, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater ‑ surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role

  8. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, J. M.; McGlynn, B. L.; Covino, T. P.; Bergstrom, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater - surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with a distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role

  9. Development and Application of Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) for Estimating Atrazine Concentration Distributions in Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Steven J.; Crawford, Charles G.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Regression models were developed for predicting atrazine concentration distributions in rivers and streams, using the Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) methodology. Separate regression equations were derived for each of nine percentiles of the annual distribution of atrazine concentrations and for the annual time-weighted mean atrazine concentration. In addition, seasonal models were developed for two specific periods of the year--the high season, when the highest atrazine concentrations are expected in streams, and the low season, when concentrations are expected to be low or undetectable. Various nationally available watershed parameters were used as explanatory variables, including atrazine use intensity, soil characteristics, hydrologic parameters, climate and weather variables, land use, and agricultural management practices. Concentration data from 112 river and stream stations sampled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment and National Stream Quality Accounting Network Programs were used for computing the concentration percentiles and mean concentrations used as the response variables in regression models. Tobit regression methods, using maximum likelihood estimation, were used for developing the models because some of the concentration values used for the response variables were censored (reported as less than a detection threshold). Data from 26 stations not used for model development were used for model validation. The annual models accounted for 62 to 77 percent of the variability in concentrations among the 112 model development stations. Atrazine use intensity (the amount of atrazine used in the watershed divided by watershed area) was the most important explanatory variable in all models, but additional watershed parameters significantly increased the amount of variability explained by the models. Predicted concentrations from all 10 models were within a factor of 10 of the observed concentrations at most

  10. Microsheet Glass In Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1993-01-01

    Microsheet glass used as highly protective covering material for developmental concentrating reflectors for solar power systems. Together with other materials, possible to fabricate lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, and long-lived concentrators. Desirable properties include durability and smoothness. Glass not affected by ultraviolet radiation, and not degraded by atomic oxygen, found in low orbits around Earth. Though concentrators intended for use in outer space, noteworthy that terrestrial concentrator fabricated with glass sheet 0.7 mm thick.

  11. Increased Brain Signal Variability Accompanies Lower Behavioral Variability in Development

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Anthony Randal; Kovacevic, Natasa; Itier, Roxane J.

    2008-01-01

    As the brain matures, its responses become optimized. Behavioral measures show this through improved accuracy and decreased trial-to-trial variability. The question remains whether the supporting brain dynamics show a similar decrease in variability. We examined the relation between variability in single trial evoked electrical activity of the brain (measured with EEG) and performance of a face memory task in children (8–15 y) and young adults (20–33 y). Behaviorally, children showed slower, more variable response times (RT), and less accurate recognition than adults. However, brain signal variability increased with age, and showed strong negative correlations with intrasubject RT variability and positive correlations with accuracy. Thus, maturation appears to lead to a brain with greater functional variability, which is indicative of enhanced neural complexity. This variability may reflect a broader repertoire of metastable brain states and more fluid transitions among them that enable optimum responses. Our results suggest that the moment-to-moment variability in brain activity may be a critical index of the cognitive capacity of the brain. PMID:18604265

  12. Bronchial secretion concentrations of tobramycin.

    PubMed

    Alexander, M R; Schoell, J; Hicklin, G; Kasik, J E; Coleman, D

    1982-02-01

    The mean concentrations of tobramycin in bronchial secretions from patients with pneumonia were almost two times greater than secretions from patients free of lung infection. Mean tobramycin bronchial secretion to serum concentration ratios also were higher when obtained from infected lungs (0.66 versus 0.17) These data suggest that lung infection enhances the concentrations of tobramycin in bronchial secretions. PMID:7065524

  13. Modeling the Factors Impacting Pesticide Concentrations in Groundwater Wells.

    PubMed

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Binning, Philip J; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Bjerg, Poul L

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effect of pumping, hydrogeology, and pesticide characteristics on pesticide concentrations in production wells using a reactive transport model in two conceptual hydrogeologic systems; a layered aquifer with and without a stream present. The pumping rate can significantly affect the pesticide breakthrough time and maximum concentration at the well. The effect of the pumping rate on the pesticide concentration depends on the hydrogeology of the aquifer; in a layered aquifer, a high pumping rate resulted in a considerably different breakthrough than a low pumping rate, while in an aquifer with a stream the effect of the pumping rate was insignificant. Pesticide application history and properties have also a great impact on the effect of the pumping rate on the concentration at the well. The findings of the study show that variable pumping rates can generate temporal variability in the concentration at the well, which helps understanding the results of groundwater monitoring programs. The results are used to provide guidance on the design of pumping and regulatory changes for the long-term supply of safe groundwater. The fate of selected pesticides is examined, for example, if the application of bentazone in a region with a layered aquifer stops today, the concentration at the well can continue to increase for 20 years if a low pumping rate is applied. This study concludes that because of the rapid response of the pesticide concentration at the drinking water well due to changes in pumping, wellhead management is important for managing pesticide concentrations. PMID:25243476

  14. Inherent variability in lead and copper collected during standardized sampling.

    PubMed

    Masters, Sheldon; Parks, Jeffrey; Atassi, Amrou; Edwards, Marc A

    2016-03-01

    Variability in the concentration of lead and copper sampled at consumers' taps poses challenges to assessing consumer health threats and the effectiveness of corrosion control. To examine the minimum variability that is practically achievable, standardized rigs with three lead and copper containing plumbing materials (leaded brass, copper tube with lead solder, and a lead copper connection) were deployed at five utilities and sampled with regimented protocols. Variability represented by relative standard deviation (RSD) in lead release was high in all cases. The brass had the lowest variability in lead release (RSD = 31 %) followed by copper-solder (RSD = 49%) and lead-copper (RSD = 80%). This high inherent variability is due to semi-random detachment of particulate lead to water, and represents a modern reality of water lead problems that should be explicitly acknowledged and considered in all aspects of exposure, public education, and monitoring. PMID:26896965

  15. Greenland Glacier Albedo Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a NASA-funded project with the prime goal of addressing the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. Since the formal initiation of the program in 1995, there has been a significant improvement in the estimates of the mass balance of the ice sheet. Results from this program reveal that the high-elevation regions of the ice sheet are approximately in balance, but the margins are thinning. Laser surveys reveal significant thinning along 70 percent of the ice sheet periphery below 2000 m elevations, and in at least one outlet glacier, Kangerdlugssuaq in southeast Greenland, thinning has been as much as 10 m/yr. This study examines the albedo variability in four outlet glaciers to help separate out the relative contributions of surface melting versus ice dynamics to the recent mass balance changes. Analysis of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder albedo shows that at the Petermann and Jakobshavn glaciers, there has been a negative trend in albedo at the glacier terminus from 1981 to 2000, whereas the Stor+strommen and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers show slightly positive trends in albedo. These findings are consistent with recent observations of melt extent from passive microwave data which show more melt on the western side of Greenland and slightly less on the eastern side. Significance of albedo trends will depend on where and when the albedo changes occur. Since the majority of surface melt occurs in the shallow sloping western margin of the ice sheet where the shortwave radiation dominates the energy balance in summer (e.g. Jakobshavn region) this region will be more sensitive to changes in albedo than in regions where this is not the case. Near the Jakobshavn glacier, even larger changes in albedo have been observed, with decreases as much as 20 percent per decade.

  16. Variable Cosmological Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina

    2003-06-01

    In the spherically symmetric case the dominant energy condition, together with the requirement of regularity of a density and finiteness of the mass, defines the family of asymptotically flat globally regular solutions to the Einstein minimally coupled equations which includes the class of metrics asymptotically de Sitter as r --> 0 and asymptotically Schwarzschild as r --> ∞. A source term connects smoothly de Sitter vacuum in the origin with the Minkowski vacuum at infinity and corresponds to anisotropic vacuum defined macroscopically by the algebraic structure of its stress-energy tensor invariant under boosts in the radial direction. Dependently on parameters, geometry describes vacuum nonsingular black and white holes, and self-gravitating particle-like structures. ADM mass for this class is related to both de Sitter vacuum trapped inside an object and to breaking of space-time symmetry. This class of metrics is easily extended to the case of nonzero cosmological constant at infinity. The source term connects then smoothly two de Sitter vacua and corresponds to extension of the Einstein cosmological term Λgμν to an r-dependent cosmological term Λμν. In this approach a constant scalar Λ associated with a vacuum density Λ = 8πGρvac, becomes a tensor component Λtt associated explicitly with a density component of a perfect fluid tensor whose vacuum properties follow from its symmetry and whose variability follows from the Bianchi identities. In this review we outline and discuss Λμν geometry and its applications.

  17. Urban-scale variability of ambient particulate matter attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiman, M. T.; Hirshel, N.; Broday, D. M.

    Real-time sampling of ambient particulate matter (PM) in the size range 0.23-10 μm and of carbonaceous matter concentrations has been carried out in a carefully designed field campaign in proximate paired neighborhoods in Haifa, Israel. The paired sites are characterized by a similar population density and neighborhood-wise socioeconomic (deprivation) index but show distinct canopy coverage. The data indicate clear sub-urban (neighborhood) scale variations in any measured PM attribute, such as concentrations, size distribution, and carbonaceous matter content. Mean ambient PM levels were comparatively higher than in other urban studies whereas carbonaceous airborne PM concentrations were lower. On top of the diurnal and seasonal variability and in spite of the significant regional effect of the semi-arid climate, local emissions and removal processes affect the PM concentrations to which people residing in urbanized regions are exposed. Analysis of possible mechanisms that could affect the observed spatial sub-urban PM differences, including local meteorology and emissions, reveal that sub-urban variability of removal processes has a major influence on ambient PM levels. Observations suggest that on top of the regional air masses which affect the city air quality and emissions from local sources, a normally unnoticed removal process, showing urban scale variability, is interception by trees and dense vegetation. In particular, the observed sub-urban variability in ambient PM concentrations is attributed, in part, to local variation of removal processes, among them the neighborhood-wise deposition on available surfaces, including canopy.

  18. Searching for nova shells around cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahman, D. I.; Dhillon, V. S.; Knigge, C.; Marsh, T. R.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a search for nova shells around 101 cataclysmic variables (CVs), using H α images taken with the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric H α Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS). Both telescopes are located on La Palma. We concentrated our WHT search on nova-like variables, whilst our IPHAS search covered all CVs in the IPHAS footprint. We found one shell out of the 24 nova-like variables we examined. The newly discovered shell is around V1315 Aql and has a radius of ˜2.5 arcmin, indicative of a nova eruption approximately 120 yr ago. This result is consistent with the idea that the high mass-transfer rate exhibited by nova-like variables is due to enhanced irradiation of the secondary by the hot white dwarf following a recent nova eruption. The implications of our observations for the lifetime of the nova-like variable phase are discussed. We also examined four asynchronous polars, but found no new shells around any of them, so we are unable to confirm that a recent nova eruption is the cause of the asynchronicity in the white dwarf spin. We find tentative evidence of a faint shell around the dwarf nova V1363 Cyg. In addition, we find evidence for a light echo around the nova V2275 Cyg, which erupted in 2001, indicative of an earlier nova eruption ˜300 yr ago, making V2275 Cyg a possible recurrent nova.

  19. VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gross, J.E.

    1959-10-31

    This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

  20. Variable Selection through Correlation Sifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jim C.; Jojic, Nebojsa

    Many applications of computational biology require a variable selection procedure to sift through a large number of input variables and select some smaller number that influence a target variable of interest. For example, in virology, only some small number of viral protein fragments influence the nature of the immune response during viral infection. Due to the large number of variables to be considered, a brute-force search for the subset of variables is in general intractable. To approximate this, methods based on ℓ1-regularized linear regression have been proposed and have been found to be particularly successful. It is well understood however that such methods fail to choose the correct subset of variables if these are highly correlated with other "decoy" variables. We present a method for sifting through sets of highly correlated variables which leads to higher accuracy in selecting the correct variables. The main innovation is a filtering step that reduces correlations among variables to be selected, making the ℓ1-regularization effective for datasets on which many methods for variable selection fail. The filtering step changes both the values of the predictor variables and output values by projections onto components obtained through a computationally-inexpensive principal components analysis. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of our method on synthetic datasets and on novel applications in virology. These include HIV viral load analysis based on patients' HIV sequences and immune types, as well as the analysis of seasonal variation in influenza death rates based on the regions of the influenza genome that undergo diversifying selection in the previous season.

  1. MEETING IN PHILADELPHIA: NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN FLOWING WATERS OF THE SOUTH FORK BROAD RIVER, GEORGIA WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this poster is by comparing nutrient and DOM concentrations in small and large streams, we hope to better understand: (1) watershed controls on stream nutrient and DOM concentrations; and (2) the variability of nutrient and DOM concentrations within a river netwo...

  2. Variable Selection for Qualitative Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, L.; Zhu, J.; Murphy, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we discuss variable selection for decision making with focus on decisions regarding when to provide treatment and which treatment to provide. Current variable selection techniques were developed for use in a supervised learning setting where the goal is prediction of the response. These techniques often downplay the importance of interaction variables that have small predictive ability but that are critical when the ultimate goal is decision making rather than prediction. We propose two new techniques designed specifically to find variables that aid in decision making. Simulation results are given along with an application of the methods on data from a randomized controlled trial for the treatment of depression. PMID:21179592

  3. Quantum Backreaction on Classical'' Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A. Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Rd., London SW7 2BZ )

    1995-01-30

    A mathematically consistent procedure for coupling quasiclassical and quantum variables through coupled Hamilton-Heisenberg equations of motion is derived from a variational principle. During evolution, the quasiclassical variables become entangled with the quantum variables with the result that the value of the quasiclassical variables depends on the quantum state. This provides a formalism to compute the backreaction of any quantum system on a quasiclassical one. In particular, it leads to a natural candidate for a theory of gravity coupled to quantized matter in which the gravitational field is not quantized.

  4. AUTOMATED VARIABLE STAR CLASSIFICATION USING THE NORTHERN SKY VARIABILITY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D. I.; Harrison, T. E.; McNamara, B. J. E-mail: tharriso@nmsu.edu

    2009-08-15

    We have identified 4659 variable objects in the Northern Sky Variability Survey. We have classified each of these objects into one of the five variable star classes: (1) Algol/{beta} Lyr systems including semidetached, and detached eclipsing binaries, (2) W Ursae Majoris overcontact and ellipsoidal variables, (3) long-period variables such as Cepheid and Mira-type objects, (4) RR Lyr pulsating variables, and (5) short-period variables including {delta} Scuti stars. All the candidates have outside of eclipse magnitudes of {approx}10-13. The primary classification tool is the use of Fourier coefficients combined with period information and light-curve properties to make the initial classification. Brief manual inspection was done on all light curves to remove nonperiodic variables that happened to slip through the process and to quantify any errors in the classification pipeline. We list the coordinates, period, Two Micron All Sky Survey colors, total amplitude variation, and any previous classification of the object. 548 objects previously identified as Algols in our previous paper are not included here.

  5. Variable Sampling Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey, S.; Aronstein, David L.; Dean, Bruce H.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of an optical system (for example, a telescope) is limited by the misalignments and manufacturing imperfections of the optical elements in the system. The impact of these misalignments and imperfections can be quantified by the phase variations imparted on light traveling through the system. Phase retrieval is a methodology for determining these variations. Phase retrieval uses images taken with the optical system and using a light source of known shape and characteristics. Unlike interferometric methods, which require an optical reference for comparison, and unlike Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors that require special optical hardware at the optical system's exit pupil, phase retrieval is an in situ, image-based method for determining the phase variations of light at the system s exit pupil. Phase retrieval can be used both as an optical metrology tool (during fabrication of optical surfaces and assembly of optical systems) and as a sensor used in active, closed-loop control of an optical system, to optimize performance. One class of phase-retrieval algorithms is the iterative transform algorithm (ITA). ITAs estimate the phase variations by iteratively enforcing known constraints in the exit pupil and at the detector, determined from modeled or measured data. The Variable Sampling Mapping (VSM) technique is a new method for enforcing these constraints in ITAs. VSM is an open framework for addressing a wide range of issues that have previously been considered detrimental to high-accuracy phase retrieval, including undersampled images, broadband illumination, images taken at or near best focus, chromatic aberrations, jitter or vibration of the optical system or detector, and dead or noisy detector pixels. The VSM is a model-to-data mapping procedure. In VSM, fully sampled electric fields at multiple wavelengths are modeled inside the phase-retrieval algorithm, and then these fields are mapped to intensities on the light detector, using the properties

  6. Impact of weather variability on nitrate leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Karl; Premrov, Alina; Hackett, Richard; Coxon, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The loss of nitrate (NO3 - N) to water via leaching and overland flow contributes to eutrophication of freshwaters, transitional and near coastal waters with agriculture contributing significantly to nitrogen (N) loading to these water. Environmental regulations, such as the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, have increased constraints on farmers to improve N management in regions at risk of NO3--N loss to water. In addition, farmers also have to manage their systems within a changing climate as the imapcts of climate change begin to impact resulting in more frequent extreme events such as floods and droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the link between weather volatility and the concentration of leached NO3--N spring barley. Leaching was quantified under spring barley grown on a well-drained, gravelly sandy soil using ceramic cup samplers over 6 drainage years under the same farming practices and treatments. Soil solution NO3--N concentrations under spring barley grown by conventional inversion ploughing and reduced tillage were compared to weather parameters over the period. Weather was recorded at a national Met Eireann weather station on site. Soil solution NO3--N varied significantly between years. Within individual years NO3--N concentrations varied over the drainage season, with peak concentrations generally observed in the autumn time, decreasing thereafter. Under both treatments there was a three-fold difference in mean annual soil solution NO3--N concentration over the 6 years with no change in the agronomic practices (crop type, tillage type and fertiliser input). Soil solution nitrate concentrations were significantly influenced by weather parameters such as rainfall, effective drainage and soil moisture deficit. The impact of climate change in Ireland could lead to increased NO3--N loss to water further exacerbating eutrophication of sensitive estuaries. The increased impact on eutrophication of waters, related to climatic

  7. Low concentrator PV optics optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Leonard; Chang, Ben

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Cost reduction is a major focus of the solar industry. Thin film technologies and concentration systems are viable ways to reducing cost, with unique strengths and weakness for both. Most of the concentrating PV work focuses on high concentration systems for reducing energy cost. Meanwhile, many believe that low concentrators provide significant cost reduction potential while addressing the mainstream PV market with a product that acts as a flat panel replacement. This paper analyzes the relative benefit of asymmetric vs. symmetric optics for low-concentrators in light of specific PV applications. Approach: Symmetric and asymmetric concentrating PV module performance is evaluated using computer simulation to determine potential value across various geographic locations and applications. The selected optic design is modeled against standard cSi flat panels and thin film to determine application fit, system level energy density and economic value. Results: While symmetric designs may seem ideal, asymmetric designs have an advantage in energy density. Both designs are assessed for aperture, optimum concentration ratio, and ideal system array configuration. Analysis of performance across climate specific effects (diffuse, direct and circumsolar) and location specific effects (sunpath) are also presented. The energy density and energy production of low concentrators provide a compelling value proposition. More significantly, the choice of optics for a low concentrating design can affect real world performance. With the goal of maximizing energy density and return on investment, this paper presents the advantages of asymmetric optic concentration and illustrates the value of this design within specific PV applications.

  8. Factors underlying residential radon concentration: Results from Galicia, Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Barros-Dios, J.M.; Gastelu-Iturri, J.; Figueiras, A.

    2007-02-15

    Radon causes lung cancer when inhaled for prolonged periods of time. A range of factors influence residential radon concentration and this study therefore sought to ascertain which dwelling-related factors exert an influence on radon levels. A cross-sectional study was conducted from 2001 to 2003 which analyzed 983 homes of as many subjects randomly selected from the 1991 census. Sampling was carried out by district and stratified by population density to ensure that more detectors were placed in the most heavily populated areas. Radon concentration and different dwelling characteristics were measured in each of the homes selected. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to ascertain which factors influenced radon concentration. The geometric mean of radon concentration was 69.5 Bq/m{sup 3}, and 21.3% of homes had concentrations above 148 Bq/m{sup 3}. Factors shown to influence radon concentration in the bivariate analysis were: age of dwelling; interior building material; exterior building material; and storey on which the detector was placed. Explanatory variables in the multivariate analysis were: age of dwelling; number of storeys; distance off floor; and interior building material. The model was significant, but the variability explained was around 10%. These results highlight the fact that the study area is an area of high radon emission and that factors other than those directly related with the characteristics of the dwelling also influence radon concentration.

  9. Variations in aqueous sulfate concentrations at Panola Mountain, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.; Peters, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    Aqueous sulfate concentrations were measured in incident precipitation, canopy throughfall, stemflow, soil water, groundwater, and streamwater at three locations in a 41 ha forested watershed at Panola Mountain State Park in the Georgia Piedmont. To evaluate the variations in sulfate concentrations, sampling intensity was increased during storms by automated collection of surface water and by incremental subsampling of rainfall, throughfall, and soil solution. Canopy throughfall, stemflow, and runoff from a bedrock outcrop in the watershed headwaters were enriched in sulfate relative to incident precipitation due to washoff of dry deposition that accumulated between storms. Soil waters collected from zero-tension lysimeters at 15 cm and 50 cm below land surface also were enriched in sulfate relative to precipitation, groundwater and streamwater. Sulfate concentrations in groundwater and in streamwater at base flow varied in an annual sinusoidal pattern with winter maxima and summer minima. Stream discharge and groundwater levels varied in a similar annual pattern in phase with the sulfate concentrations. The temporal variability of sulfate concentrations at most groundwater sites was small relative to the spatial variability among groundwater sites. Streamwater sulfate concentrations during base flow were controlled by low-sulfate groundwater discharge. As flow increased, an increasing proportion of shallow, high-sulfate groundwater and soil water contributed to streamflow. The dominant control on stream sulfate concentration shifted from sulfate retention by adsorption in the mineral soil at base flow to mobilization of sulfate from the upper, organic-rich horizons of the soil at high flow. ?? 1993.

  10. THE COLOR VARIABILITY OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Knecht, Matthias; Hogg, David W.; Shields, Joseph C.; Maoz, Dan; Bovy, Jo

    2012-01-10

    We quantify quasar color variability using an unprecedented variability database-ugriz photometry of 9093 quasars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, observed over 8 years at {approx}60 epochs each. We confirm previous reports that quasars become bluer when brightening. We find a redshift dependence of this blueing in a given set of bands (e.g., g and r), but show that it is the result of the flux contribution from less-variable or delayed emission lines in the different SDSS bands at different redshifts. After correcting for this effect, quasar color variability is remarkably uniform, and independent not only of redshift, but also of quasar luminosity and black hole mass. The color variations of individual quasars, as they vary in brightness on year timescales, are much more pronounced than the ranges in color seen in samples of quasars across many orders of magnitude in luminosity. This indicates distinct physical mechanisms behind quasar variability and the observed range of quasar luminosities at a given black hole mass-quasar variations cannot be explained by changes in the mean accretion rate. We do find some dependence of the color variability on the characteristics of the flux variations themselves, with fast, low-amplitude, brightness variations producing more color variability. The observed behavior could arise if quasar variability results from flares or ephemeral hot spots in an accretion disk.

  11. Modeling Learner Variability in CALL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heift, Trude

    2008-01-01

    This article describes challenges and benefits of modeling learner variability in Computer-Assisted Language Learning. We discuss the learner model of "E-Tutor," a learner model that addresses learner variability by focusing on certain aspects and/or features of the learner's interlanguage. Moreover, we introduce the concept of phrase descriptors,…

  12. Students' Misconceptions about Random Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachapova, Farida; Kachapov, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    This article describes some misconceptions about random variables and related counter-examples, and makes suggestions about teaching initial topics on random variables in general form instead of doing it separately for discrete and continuous cases. The focus is on post-calculus probability courses. (Contains 2 figures.)

  13. Variability in human body size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The range of variability found among homogeneous groups is described and illustrated. Those trends that show significantly marked differences between sexes and among a number of racial/ethnic groups are also presented. Causes of human-body size variability discussed include genetic endowment, aging, nutrition, protective garments, and occupation. The information is presented to aid design engineers of space flight hardware and equipment.

  14. Operant Variability: Procedures and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Armando; Tonneau, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Barba's (2012) article deftly weaves three main themes in one argument about operant variability. From general theoretical considerations on operant behavior (Catania, 1973), Barba derives methodological guidelines about response differentiation and applies them to the study of operant variability. In the process, he uncovers unnoticed features of…

  15. Bruise chromophore concentrations over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Mark G.; Caspall, Jayme J.; Mappus, Rudolph L., IV; Kong, Linghua; Yi, Dingrong; Sprigle, Stephen H.

    2008-03-01

    During investigations of potential child and elder abuse, clinicians and forensic practitioners are often asked to offer opinions about the age of a bruise. A commonality between existing methods of bruise aging is analysis of bruise color or estimation of chromophore concentration. Relative chromophore concentration is an underlying factor that determines bruise color. We investigate a method of chromophore concentration estimation that can be employed in a handheld imaging spectrometer with a small number of wavelengths. The method, based on absorbance properties defined by Beer-Lambert's law, allows estimation of differential chromophore concentration between bruised and normal skin. Absorption coefficient data for each chromophore are required to make the estimation. Two different sources of this data are used in the analysis- generated using Independent Component Analysis and taken from published values. Differential concentration values over time, generated using both sources, show correlation to published models of bruise color change over time and total chromophore concentration over time.

  16. Harvested populations are more variable only in more variable environments.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Tom C; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Reynolds, Alan; Hicks, Joseph P; Piertney, Stuart B; Benton, Tim G

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between environmental variation and population dynamics is of major importance, particularly for managed and economically important species, and especially given contemporary changes in climate variability. Recent analyses of exploited animal populations contested whether exploitation or environmental variation has the greatest influence on the stability of population dynamics, with consequences for variation in yield and extinction risk. Theoretical studies however have shown that harvesting can increase or decrease population variability depending on environmental variation, and requested controlled empirical studies to test predictions. Here, we use an invertebrate model species in experimental microcosms to explore the interaction between selective harvesting and environmental variation in food availability in affecting the variability of stage-structured animal populations over 20 generations. In a constant food environment, harvesting adults had negligible impact on population variability or population size, but in the variable food environments, harvesting adults increased population variability and reduced its size. The impact of harvesting on population variability differed between proportional and threshold harvesting, between randomly and periodically varying environments, and at different points of the time series. Our study suggests that predicting the responses to selective harvesting is sensitive to the demographic structures and processes that emerge in environments with different patterns of environmental variation. PMID:27516873

  17. An assessment of ENSO-scale secular variability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.L.; Ropelewski, C.F.

    1995-06-01

    Secular changes in the spatial and temporal structures of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle using four different versions of global sea surface temperature (SST) analysis are examined. The assessments were made for both multidecadal climate means and multidecadal measures of variability by separating the SST variations into low-frequency components. The reliability of these estimates is also addressed. This study substantiates a conceptual framework that views the multidecadal, low-frequency variations as a varying climate {open_quotes}base state{close_quotes} upon which ENSO-scale variability is superposed. The secular changes of the climate base state were quantified both in space and in time. The analysis suggests that multidecadal SST variability has been concentrated in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean Basins. The Pacific is dominated by the ENSO-scale variability. The analyses reveal that variations in the climate base state and ENSO-scale variability were positively correlated; that is, ENSO-scale variability is higher (lower) when the climate mean SST is relatively warmer (colder). However, the quantification of secular changes of the ENSO-scale variability was found to be sensitive to the particular SST analysis used. Therefore, the conclusions from this study are subject to further verification by using more variables and longer records. 18 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Utility-scale photovoltaic