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Sample records for 22q phenotypic overlap

  1. Interstitial duplication of proximal 22q: Phenotypic overlap with cat eye syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, J.H.M.; Asamoah, A.; Wagstaff, J.

    1995-01-16

    We describe a child with downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular malfunctions, congenital heart defect (total anomalous pulmonary venous return), unilateral absence of a kidney, and developmental delay with an apparent interstitial duplication of proximal 22q. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed duplication of the IGLC locus, and C-banding of the duplicated region was negative. The duplication appears to involve 22q11.2-q12. Although the child has neither colobomas nor microphthalmia, he shows phenotypic overlap with with the cat eye syndrome, which is caused by a supernumerary bisatellited chromosome arising from inverted duplication of the short arm and proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Further molecular studies of this patient should help to define the regions responsible for the manifestations of cat eye syndrome. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Candidate Genes and the Behavioral Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Sarah E.; Howley, Sarah; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an overwhelming evidence that children and adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a characteristic behavioral phenotype. In particular, there is a growing body of evidence that indicates an unequivocal association between 22q11.2DS and schizophrenia, especially in adulthood. Deletion of 22q11.2 is the third highest risk…

  3. Cognitive phenotype and psychiatric disorder in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A review.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Asit B; Furniss, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    The behavioural phenotype of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome syndrome (22q11DS), one of the most common human multiple anomaly syndromes, frequently includes intellectual disability (ID) together with high risk of diagnosis of psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. Candidate cognitive endophenotypes include problems with retrieval of contextual information from memory and in executive control and focussing of attention. 22q11DS may offer a model of the relationship between ID and risk of psychiatric disorder. This paper reviews research on the relationship between the cognitive phenotype and the development of psychiatric disorders in 22q11DS. Aspects of cognitive function including verbal I.Q., visual memory, and executive function, are associated with mental health outcome in people with 22q11DS. This relationship may result from a common neurobiological basis for the cognitive difficulties and psychiatric disorders. Some of the cognitive difficulties experienced by people with 22q11DS, especially in attention, memory retrieval, and face processing, may, however, in themselves constitute risk factors for development of hallucinations and paranoid delusions. Future research into factors leading to psychiatric disorder in people with 22q11DS should include assessment of social and psychological factors including life events, symptoms associated with trauma, attachment, and self-esteem, which together with cognitive risk factors may mediate mental health outcome. PMID:26942704

  4. Behavioral and Psychiatric Phenotypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kerri L; Antshel, Kevin M; Fremont, Wanda P; Kates, Wendy R

    2015-10-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is a chromosomal microdeletion that affects approximately 40 to 50 genes and affects various organs and systems throughout the body. Detection is typically achieved by fluorescence in situ hybridization after diagnosis of one of the major features of the deletion or via chromosomal microarray or noninvasive prenatal testing. The physical phenotype can include congenital heart defects, palatal and pharyngeal anomalies, hypocalcemia/hypoparathyroidism, skeletal abnormalities, and cranial/brain anomalies, although prevalence rates of all these features are variable. Cognitive function is impaired to some degree in most individuals, with prevalence rates of greater than 90% for motor/speech delays and learning disabilities. Attention, executive function, working memory, visual-spatial abilities, motor skills, and social cognition/social skills are affected. The deletion is also associated with an increased risk for behavioral disorders and psychiatric illness. The early onset of psychiatric symptoms common to 22q11.2DS disrupts the development and quality of life of individuals with the syndrome and is also a potential risk factor for later development of a psychotic disorder. This review discusses prevalence, phenotypic features, and management of psychiatric disorders commonly diagnosed in children and adolescents with 22q11.2DS, including autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and schizophrenia/psychotic disorders. Guidelines for the clinical assessment and management of psychiatric disorders in youth with this syndrome are provided, as are treatment guidelines for the use of psychiatric medications. PMID:26372046

  5. Cognitive, Behavioural and Psychiatric Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome has become an important model for understanding the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental conditions, particularly schizophrenia which develops in about 20–25% of individuals with a chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion. From the initial discovery of the syndrome, associated developmental delays made it clear that changes in brain development were a key part of the expression. Once patients were followed through childhood into adult years, further neurobehavioural phenotypes became apparent, including a changing cognitive profile, anxiety disorders and seizure diathesis. The variability of expression is as wide as for the myriad physical features associated with the syndrome, with the addition of evolving phenotype over the developmental trajectory. Notably, variability appears unrelated to length of the associated deletion. Several mouse models of the deletion have been engineered and are beginning to reveal potential molecular mechanisms for the cognitive and behavioural phenotypes observable in animals. Both animal and human studies hold great promise for further discoveries relevant to neurodevelopment and associated cognitive, behavioural and psychiatric disorders. PMID:21573985

  6. Evaluation of Potential Modifiers of the Cardiac Phenotype in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Driscoll, Deborah A.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Mei, Minghua; Zackai, Elaine; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The phenotype associated with deletion of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region is highly variable, yet little is known about the source of this variability. Cardiovascular anomalies, including tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic arch type B, perimembranous ventricular septal defects, and aortic arch anomalies, occur in approximately 75% of individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion. METHODS Data from 343 subjects enrolled in a study of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were used to evaluate potential modifiers of the cardiac phenotype in this disorder. Subjects with and without cardiac malformations, and subjects with and without aortic arch anomalies were compared with respect to sex and race. In addition, in the subset of subjects from whom a DNA sample was available, genotypes for variants of four genes that are involved in the folate-homocysteine metabolic pathway and that have been implicated as risk factors for other birth defects were compared. Five variants in four genes were genotyped by heteroduplex or restriction digest assays. The chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used to evaluate the association between the cardiac phenotype and each potential modifier. RESULTS The cardiac phenotype observed in individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion was not significantly associated with either sex or race. The genetic variants that were evaluated also did not appear to be associated with the cardiovascular phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Variation in the cardiac phenotype observed between individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion does not appear to be related to sex, race, or five sequence variants in four folate-related genes that are located outside of the 22q11.2 region. PMID:18770859

  7. A candidate gene approach to identify modifiers of the palatal phenotype in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Widdershoven, Josine C.C.; Bowser, Mark; Sheridan, Molly B.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Solot, Cynthia B.; Kirschner, Richard E.; Beemer, Frits A.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Devoto, Marcella; Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Palatal anomalies are one of the identifying features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) affecting about one third of patients. To identify genetic variants that increase the risk of cleft or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients, we performed a candidate gene association study in 101 patients with 22q11.2DS genotyped with the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0. Methods Patients from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, USA and Wilhelmina Children's Hospital Utrecht, The Netherlands were stratified based on palatal phenotype (overt cleft, submucosal cleft, bifid uvula). SNPs in 21 candidate genes for cleft palate were analyzed for genotype-phenotype association. In addition, TBX1 sequencing was carried out. Quality control and association analyses were conducted using the software package PLINK. Results Genotype and phenotype data of 101 unrelated patients (63 non-cleft subjects (62.4%), 38 cleft subjects (37.6%)) were analyzed. A Total of 39 SNPs on 10 genes demonstrated a p-value ≤0.05 prior to correction. The most significant SNPs were found on FGF10. However none of the SNPs remained significant after correcting for multiple testing. Conclusions Although these results are promising, analysis of additional samples will be required to confirm that variants in these regions influence risk for cleft palate or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients. PMID:23121717

  8. 22q11.2 duplication syndrome: two new familial cases with some overlapping features with DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndromes.

    PubMed

    Portnoï, Marie-France; Lebas, Fanny; Gruchy, Nicolas; Ardalan, Azarnouche; Biran-Mucignat, Valérie; Malan, Valérie; Finkel, Lina; Roger, Gilles; Ducrocq, Sarah; Gold, Francis; Taillemite, Jean-Louis; Marlin, Sandrine

    2005-08-15

    Twenty-one patients, including our two cases, with variable clinical phenotype, ranging from mild learning disability to severe congenital malformations or overlapping features with DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndromes (DG/VCFS), have been shown to have a chromosome duplication 22q11 of the region that is deleted in patients with DG/VCFS. The reported cases have been identified primarily by interphase FISH and could have escaped identification and been missed by routine cytogenetic analysis. Here we report on two inherited cases, referred to us, to rule out 22q11 microdeletion diagnosis of VCFS. The first patient was a 2-month-old girl, who presented with cleft palate, minor dysmorphic features including short palpebral fissures, widely spaced eyes, long fingers, and hearing loss. Her affected mother had mild mental retardation and learning disabilities. The second patient was a 7(1/2)-year-old boy with velopharyngeal insufficiency and mild developmental delay. He had a left preauricular tag, bifida uvula, bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly, and bilateral cryptorchidism. His facial features appeared mildly dysmorphic with hypertelorism, large nose, and micro/retrognathia. The affected father had mild mental retardation and had similar facial features. FISH analysis of interphase cells showed three TUPLE1-probe signals with two chromosome-specific identification probes in each cell. FISH analysis did not show the duplication on the initial testing of metaphase chromosomes. On review, band q11.2 was brighter on one chromosome 22 in some metaphase spreads. The paucity of reported cases of 22q11.2 microduplication likely reflects a combination of phenotypic diversity and the difficulty of diagnosis by FISH analysis on metaphase spreads. These findings illustrate the importance of scanning interphase nuclei when performing FISH analysis for any of the genomic disorders. PMID:16007629

  9. Delineation of a recognizable phenotype for the recurrent LCR22-C to D/E atypical 22q11.2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Bengoa-Alonso, Amaya; Artigas-López, Mercè; Moreno-Igoa, María; Cattalli, Claudio; Hernández-Charro, Blanca; Ramos-Arroyo, Maria Antonia

    2016-06-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is typically caused by haploinsufficiency of a 3 Mb region that extends from LCR22-A until LCR22-D, while the recurrent recombination between any of the LCR22-D to H causes the 22q11.2 distal deletion syndrome. Here, we describe three patients with a de novo atypical ∼1.4 Mb 22q11.2 deletion that involves LCR22-C to a region beyond D (LCR22-C to D/E), encompassing the distal portion of the typical deleted region and the proximal portion of the distal deletion. We also review six previous published patients with the same rearrangement and compare their features with those found in patients with overlapping deletions. Patients with LCR22-C to D/E deletion present a recognizable phenotype characterized by facial dysmorphic features, high frequency of cardiac defects, including conotruncal defects, prematurity, growth restriction, microcephaly, and mild developmental delay. Genotype-phenotype analysis of the patients indicates that CRKL and MAPK1 genes play an important role as causative factors for the main clinical features of the syndrome. In particular, CRKL gene seems to be involved in the occurrence of conotruncal cardiac anomalies, mainly tetralogy of Fallot. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991864

  10. Neuroanatomical Phenotypes in a Mouse Model of the 22q11.2 Microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, J.P.; Steadman, P.E.; Genç, C.; Provenzano, F; Kushner, S.A.; Henkelman, R.M.; Karayiorgou, M.; Gogos, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent deletions at the 22q11.2 locus have been established as a strong genetic risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunction. Individuals with 22q11.2 deletions have a range of well-defined volumetric abnormalities in a number of critical brain structures. A mouse model of the 22q11.2 deletion (Df(16)A+/−) has previously been utilized to characterize disease-associated abnormalities on synaptic, cellular, neurocircuitry, and behavioral levels. We performed a high-resolution MRI analysis of mutant mice compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Our analysis revealed a striking similarity in the specific volumetric changes of Df(16)A+/− mice compared with human 22q11.2 deletion carriers, including in cortico-cerebellar, cortico-striatal, and cortico-limbic circuits. In addition, higher resolution compared with neuroimaging in human subjects allowed detection of previously unknown subtle local differences. The cerebellar findings in Df(16)A+/− mice are particularly instructive as they are localized to specific areas within both the deep cerebellar nuclei and the cerebellar cortex. Our study indicates that the Df(16)A+/− mouse model recapitulates most of the hallmark neuroanatomical changes observed in 22q11.2 deletion carriers. Our findings will help guide the design and interpretation of additional complementary studies and thereby advance our understanding of the abnormal brain development underlying the emergence of 22q11.2 deletion-associated psychiatric and cognitive symptoms. PMID:23999526

  11. Histone Modifier Genes Alter Conotruncal Heart Phenotypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingwei; Chung, Jonathan H.; Wang, Tao; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Kates, Wendy R.; Hawuła, Wanda; Coleman, Karlene; Zackai, Elaine; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2015-01-01

    We performed whole exome sequence (WES) to identify genetic modifiers on 184 individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), of whom 89 case subjects had severe congenital heart disease (CHD) and 95 control subjects had normal hearts. Three genes including JMJD1C (jumonji domain containing 1C), RREB1 (Ras responsive element binding protein 1), and SEC24C (SEC24 family member C) had rare (MAF < 0.001) predicted deleterious single-nucleotide variations (rdSNVs) in seven case subjects and no control subjects (p = 0.005; Fisher exact and permutation tests). Because JMJD1C and RREB1 are involved in chromatin modification, we investigated other histone modification genes. Eighteen case subjects (20%) had rdSNVs in four genes (JMJD1C, RREB1, MINA, KDM7A) all involved in demethylation of histones (H3K9, H3K27). Overall, rdSNVs were enriched in histone modifier genes that activate transcription (Fisher exact p = 0.0004, permutations, p = 0.0003, OR = 5.16); however, rdSNVs in control subjects were not enriched. This implicates histone modification genes as influencing risk for CHD in presence of the deletion. PMID:26608785

  12. Overlapping Numerical Cognition Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion or Turner Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, T. J.; Takarae, Y.; DeBoer, T.; McDonald-McGinn, D. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Ross, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with one of two genetic disorders (chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Turner syndrome) as well typically developing controls, participated in three cognitive processing experiments. Two experiments were designed to test cognitive processes involved in basic aspects numerical cognition. The third was a test of simple manual motor…

  13. Central 22q11.2 deletions.

    PubMed

    Rump, Patrick; de Leeuw, Nicole; van Essen, Anthonie J; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, Corien C; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; Swinkels, Mariëlle E M; Oostdijk, Wilma; Ruivenkamp, Claudia; Reardon, Willie; de Munnik, Sonja; Ruiter, Mariken; Frumkin, Ayala; Lev, Dorit; Evers, Christina; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M

    2014-11-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome is one of the most common microdeletion syndromes. Most patients have a deletion resulting from a recombination of low copy repeat blocks LCR22-A and LCR22-D. Loss of the TBX1 gene is considered the most important cause of the phenotype. A limited number of patients with smaller, overlapping deletions distal to the TBX1 locus have been described in the literature. In these patients, the CRKL gene is deleted. Haploinsufficiency of this gene has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. To distinguish these deletions (comprising the LCR22-B to LCR22-D region) from the more distal 22q11.2 deletions (located beyond LCR22-D), we propose the term "central 22q11.2 deletions". In the present study we report on 27 new patients with such a deletion. Together with information on previously published cases, we review the clinical findings of 52 patients. The prevalence of congenital heart anomalies and the frequency of de novo deletions in patients with a central deletion are substantially lower than in patients with a common or distal 22q11.2 deletion. Renal and urinary tract malformations, developmental delays, cognitive impairments and behavioral problems seem to be equally frequent as in patients with a common deletion. None of the patients had a cleft palate. Patients with a deletion that also encompassed the MAPK1 gene, located just distal to LCR22-D, have a different and more severe phenotype, characterized by a higher prevalence of congenital heart anomalies, growth restriction and microcephaly. Our results further elucidate genotype-phenotype correlations in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome spectrum. PMID:25123976

  14. Phenotypic variability in Waardenburg syndrome resulting from a 22q12.3-q13.1 microdeletion involving SOX10.

    PubMed

    Jelena, Brezo; Christina, Lam; Eric, Vilain; Fabiola, Quintero-Rivera

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a neurocristopathy characterized by pigmentation abnormalities of the skin, hair, and iris, as well as sensorineural hearing loss. Contiguous gene deletions encompassing SOX10 are rare, which limits conclusions about genotype-phenotype correlation regarding patient prognosis and management. This study adds to the existing body of knowledge by characterizing a 2.4 Mb deletion [arr[hg19] 22q12.3-q13.1 (36467502-38878207)x1] encompassing SOX10 and 53 additional RefSeq genes in a 15-year-old female with atypical WS. The patient presented with developmental delay, profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis, hypotonia, and bilateral finger contractures. Published genomic and phenotypic profiles of patients with SOX10-encompassing deletions point toward several plausible candidate gene that could account for the considerable clinical heterogeneity. These studies suggest the existence of modifiers among the co-deleted, dosage-sensitive genes (e.g., MYH9) and among genes whose effect may depend on the unmasking of recessive mutations (e.g., PLA2G6). Finally, we highlight evidence illustrating extensive interconnectivity of SOX10-hypothesizing that haploinsufficiency of SOX10 may "unmask" subtler effects on expression or epistasis associated with variants in SOX10 targets (e.g., DHH), in its partners (e.g., PAX3, EGR2), and in genes with functional overlap (e.g., SOX8, SOX9). PMID:24715709

  15. Prospective investigation of autism and genotype-phenotype correlations in 22q13 deletion syndrome and SHANK3 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 22q13 deletion syndrome, also known as Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, hypotonia, delayed or absent speech, and autistic features. SHANK3 has been identified as the critical gene in the neurological and behavioral aspects of this syndrome. The phenotype of SHANK3 deficiency has been described primarily from case studies, with limited evaluation of behavioral and cognitive deficits. The present study used a prospective design and inter-disciplinary clinical evaluations to assess patients with SHANK3 deficiency, with the goal of providing a comprehensive picture of the medical and behavioral profile of the syndrome. Methods A serially ascertained sample of patients with SHANK3 deficiency (n = 32) was evaluated by a team of child psychiatrists, neurologists, clinical geneticists, molecular geneticists and psychologists. Patients were evaluated for autism spectrum disorder using the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-G. Results Thirty participants with 22q13.3 deletions ranging in size from 101 kb to 8.45 Mb and two participants with de novo SHANK3 mutations were included. The sample was characterized by high rates of autism spectrum disorder: 27 (84%) met criteria for autism spectrum disorder and 24 (75%) for autistic disorder. Most patients (77%) exhibited severe to profound intellectual disability and only five (19%) used some words spontaneously to communicate. Dysmorphic features, hypotonia, gait disturbance, recurring upper respiratory tract infections, gastroesophageal reflux and seizures were also common. Analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations indicated that larger deletions were associated with increased levels of dysmorphic features, medical comorbidities and social communication impairments related to autism. Analyses of individuals with small deletions or point mutations identified features related to SHANK3 haploinsufficiency

  16. Whole genome sequencing and integrative genomic analysis approach on two 22q11.2 deletion syndrome family trios for genotype to phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jonathan H.; Cai, Jinlu; Suskin, Barrie G.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Coleman, Karlene

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) affects 1:4000 live births and presents with highly variable phenotype expressivity. In this study, we developed an analytical approach utilizing whole genome sequencing and integrative analysis to discover genetic modifiers. Our pipeline combined available tools in order to prioritize rare, predicted deleterious, coding and non-coding single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletions (INDELs) from whole genome sequencing (WGS). We sequenced two unrelated probands with 22q11DS, with contrasting clinical findings, and their unaffected parents. Proband P1 had cognitive impairment, psychotic episodes, anxiety, and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF); while proband P2 had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis but no other major clinical findings. In P1, we identified common variants in COMT and PRODH on 22q11.2 as well as rare potentially deleterious DNA variants in other behavioral/neurocognitive genes. We also identified a de novo SNV in ADNP2 (NM_014913.3:c.2243G>C), encoding a neuroprotective protein that may be involved in behavioral disorders. In P2, we identified a novel non-synonymous SNV in ZFPM2 (NM_012082.3:c.1576C>T), a known causative gene for TOF, which may act as a protective variant downstream of TBX1, haploinsufficiency of which is responsible for congenital heart disease in individuals with 22q11DS. PMID:25981510

  17. 22q11 deletion syndrome: current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hacıhamdioğlu, Bülent; Hacıhamdioğlu, Duygu; Delil, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11 is characterized by the presence of chromosome-specific low-copy repeats or segmental duplications. This region of the chromosome is very unstable and susceptible to mutations. The misalignment of low-copy repeats during nonallelic homologous recombination leads to the deletion of the 22q11.2 region, which results in 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). The 22q11.2 deletion is associated with a wide variety of phenotypes. The term 22q11DS is an umbrella term that is used to encompass all 22q11.2 deletion-associated phenotypes. The haploinsufficiency of genes located at 22q11.2 affects the early morphogenesis of the pharyngeal arches, heart, skeleton, and brain. TBX1 is the most important gene for 22q11DS. This syndrome can ultimately affect many organs or systems; therefore, it has a very wide phenotypic spectrum. An increasing amount of information is available related to the pathogenesis, clinical phenotypes, and management of this syndrome in recent years. This review summarizes the current clinical and genetic status related to 22q11DS. PMID:26056486

  18. Mammary-digital-nail (MDN) syndrome: a novel phenotype maps to human chromosome 22q12.3–13.1

    PubMed Central

    Genzer-Nir, Mira; Khayat, Morad; Kogan, Leonid; Cohen, Hector I; Hershkowitz, Miriam; Geiger, Dan; Falik-Zaccai, Tzipora C

    2010-01-01

    Mammary-digital-nail syndrome is a novel phenotypic association consisting of anonychia onychodystrophy with hypoplasia or absence of distal phalanges in males and females, accompanied by juvenile hypertrophy of the breast in affected females. This newly described genetic trait presents an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, with either reduced penetrance or germ-line mosaicism. Analysis of the pedigree, linkage studies followed by a genome-wide screen and by haplotype analysis defined the locus for the phenotype within a 12 cM (4.3 Mb) interval on chromosome 22q12.3-13.1. This chromosomal region has not been implicated before in genetic disorders of the mammary tissue or limbs. These data suggest a possibly novel signaling pathway affecting the organogenesis of limbs and mammary glands in humans. PMID:20145678

  19. Mother-Child Interaction as a Window to a Unique Social Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Omri; Feldman, Ruth; Burg-Malki, Merav; Keren, Miri; Geva, Ronny; Diesendruck, Gil; Gothelf, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Mother-child interactions in 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) and Williams syndrome (WS) were coded for maternal sensitivity/intrusiveness, child's expression of affect, levels of engagement, and dyadic reciprocity. WS children were found to express more positive emotions towards their mothers compared to 22q11.2DS children and those with…

  20. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Marino, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Swillen, Ann; Vorstman, Jacob A S; Zackai, Elaine H; Emanuel, Beverly S; Vermeesch, Joris R; Morrow, Bernice E; Scambler, Peter J; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common chromosomal microdeletion disorder, estimated to result mainly from de novo non-homologous meiotic recombination events occurring in approximately 1 in every 1,000 fetuses. The first description in the English language of the constellation of findings now known to be due to this chromosomal difference was made in the 1960s in children with DiGeorge syndrome, who presented with the clinical triad of immunodeficiency, hypoparathyroidism and congenital heart disease. The syndrome is now known to have a heterogeneous presentation that includes multiple additional congenital anomalies and later-onset conditions, such as palatal, gastrointestinal and renal abnormalities, autoimmune disease, variable cognitive delays, behavioural phenotypes and psychiatric illness - all far extending the original description of DiGeorge syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach involving paediatrics, general medicine, surgery, psychiatry, psychology, interventional therapies (physical, occupational, speech, language and behavioural) and genetic counselling. Although common, lack of recognition of the condition and/or lack of familiarity with genetic testing methods, together with the wide variability of clinical presentation, delays diagnosis. Early diagnosis, preferably prenatally or neonatally, could improve outcomes, thus stressing the importance of universal screening. Equally important, 22q11.2DS has become a model for understanding rare and frequent congenital anomalies, medical conditions, psychiatric and developmental disorders, and may provide a platform to better understand these disorders while affording opportunities for translational strategies across the lifespan for both patients with 22q11.2DS and those with these associated features in the general population. PMID:27189754

  1. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Marino, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Swillen, Ann; Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Scambler, Peter J.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common chromosomal microdeletion disorder, estimated to result mainly from de novo non-homologous meiotic recombination events occurring in approximately 1 in every 1,000 fetuses. The first description in the English language of the constellation of findings now known to be due to this chromosomal difference was made in the 1960s in children with DiGeorge syndrome, who presented with the clinical triad of immunodeficiency, hypoparathyroidism and congenital heart disease. The syndrome is now known to have a heterogeneous presentation that includes multiple additional congenital anomalies and later-onset conditions, such as palatal, gastrointestinal and renal abnormalities, autoimmune disease, variable cognitive delays, behavioural phenotypes and psychiatric illness — all far extending the original description of DiGeorge syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach involving paediatrics, general medicine, surgery, psychiatry, psychology, interventional therapies (physical, occupational, speech, language and behavioural) and genetic counselling. Although common, lack of recognition of the condition and/or lack of familiarity with genetic testing methods, together with the wide variability of clinical presentation, delays diagnosis. Early diagnosis, preferably prenatally or neonatally, could improve outcomes, thus stressing the importance of universal screening. Equally important, 22q11.2DS has become a model for understanding rare and frequent congenital anomalies, medical conditions, psychiatric and developmental disorders, and may provide a platform to better understand these disorders while affording opportunities for translational strategies across the lifespan for both patients with 22q11.2DS and those with these associated features in the general population. PMID:27189754

  2. Interstitial 22q13 deletions not involving SHANK3 gene: a new contiguous gene syndrome.

    PubMed

    Disciglio, Vittoria; Lo Rizzo, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Mucciolo, Mafalda; Marozza, Annabella; Di Marco, Chiara; Massarelli, Antonio; Canocchi, Valentina; Baldassarri, Margherita; Ndoni, Enea; Frullanti, Elisa; Amabile, Sonia; Anderlid, Britt Marie; Metcalfe, Kay; Le Caignec, Cédric; David, Albert; Fryer, Alan; Boute, Odile; Joris, Andrieux; Greco, Donatella; Pecile, Vanna; Battini, Roberta; Novelli, Antonio; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra

    2014-07-01

    Phelan-McDermid syndrome (22q13.3 deletion syndrome) is a contiguous gene disorder resulting from the deletion of the distal long arm of chromosome 22. SHANK3, a gene within the minimal critical region, is a candidate gene for the major neurological features of this syndrome. We report clinical and molecular data from a study of nine patients with overlapping interstitial deletions in 22q13 not involving SHANK3. All of these deletions overlap with the largest, but not with the smallest deletion associated with Phelan-McDermid syndrome. The deletion sizes and breakpoints varied considerably among our patients, with the largest deletion spanning 6.9 Mb and the smallest deletion spanning 2.7 Mb. Eight out of nine patients had a de novo deletion, while in one patient the origin of deletion was unknown. These patients shared clinical features common to Phelan-McDermid syndrome: developmental delay (11/12), speech delay (11/12), hypotonia (9/12), and feeding difficulties (7/12). Moreover, the majority of patients (8/12) exhibited macrocephaly. In the minimal deleted region, we identified two candidate genes, SULT4A1 and PARVB (associated with the PTEN pathway), which could be associated in our cohort with neurological features and macrocephaly/hypotonia, respectively. This study suggests that the haploinsufficiency of genes in the 22q13 region beside SHANK3 contributes to cognitive and speech development, and that these genes are involved in the phenotype associated with the larger Phelan-McDermid syndrome 22q13 deletions. Moreover, because the deletions in our patients do not involve the SHANK3 gene, we posit the existence of a new contiguous gene syndrome proximal to the smallest terminal deletions in the 22q13 region. PMID:24700646

  3. Chromosome 22q11 deletion presenting as the Potter sequence.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, K; Moerman, P; Van Schoubroeck, D; Vandenberghe, K; Fryns, J P

    1997-05-01

    A female fetus with the Potter sequence, caused by unilateral renal agenesis and contralateral multicystic renal dysplasia, was found to have a submicroscopic deletion in chromosome 22q11. The only associated anomaly was agenesis of the uterus and oviducts (Von Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster anomaly). The deletion was inherited from the father, who presented the typical velocardiofacial syndrome phenotype, but no urological anomalies. This observation further extends the clinical spectrum associated with a deletion in 22q11. PMID:9152843

  4. Transcriptome Profiling of Peripheral Blood in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Reveals Functional Pathways Related to Psychosis and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Lazaro, Maria T.; Gao, Fuying; Huang, Alden; Chow, Carolyn; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Background 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) represents one of the greatest known genetic risk factors for the development of psychotic illness, and is also associated with high rates of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) in childhood. We performed integrated genomic analyses of 22q11DS to identify genes and pathways related to specific phenotypes. Methods We used a high-resolution aCGH array to precisely characterize deletion breakpoints. Using peripheral blood, we examined differential expression (DE) and networks of co-expressed genes related to phenotypic variation within 22q11DS patients. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling was performed using Illumina Human HT-12 microarrays. Data mining techniques were used to validate our results against independent samples of both peripheral blood and brain tissue from idiopathic psychosis and ASD cases. Results Eighty-five percent of 22q11DS individuals (N = 39) carried the typical 3 Mb deletion, with significant variability in deletion characteristics in the remainder of the sample (N = 7). DE analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) identified expression changes related to psychotic symptoms in patients, including a module of co-expressed genes which was associated with psychosis in 22q11DS and involved in pathways associated with transcriptional regulation. This module was enriched for brain-expressed genes, was not related to antipsychotic medication use, and significantly overlapped with transcriptional changes in idiopathic schizophrenia. In 22q11DS-ASD, both DE and WGCNA analyses implicated dysregulation of immune response pathways. The ASD-associated module showed significant overlap with genes previously associated with idiopathic ASD. Conclusion These findings further support the use of peripheral tissue in the study of major mutational models of diseases affecting the brain, and point towards specific pathways dysregulated in 22q11DS carriers with psychosis and ASD. PMID:26201030

  5. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  6. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-07-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  7. Familial DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome with deletions of chromosome area 22q11.2: Report of five families with a review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Leana-Cox, J.; Pangkanon, Suthipong; Eanet, K.R.

    1996-11-11

    The DiGeorge (DG), velocardiofacial (VCF), and conotruncal anomaly-face (CTAF) syndromes were originally described as distinct disorders, although overlapping phenotypes have been recognized. It is now clear that all three syndromes result from apparently similar or identical 22q11.2 deletions, suggesting that they represent phenotypic variability of a single genetic syndrome. We report on 12 individuals in five families with del(22)(q11.2) by fluorescent in situ hybridization, and define the frequency of phenotypic abnormalities in those cases and in 70 individuals from 27 del(22)(q11.2) families from the literature. Common manifestations include mental impairment (97%), abnormal face (93%), cardiac malformations (681%), thymic (64%) and parathyroid (63%) abnormalities, and cleft palate or velopharyngeal insufficiency (48%). Familial DG, VCF, and CTAF syndromes due to del(22)(q11.2) show significant inter- and intrafamilial clinical variability consistent with the hypothesis that a single gene or group of tightly linked genes is the common cause of these syndromes. Up to 25% of 22q deletions are inherited, indicating that parents of affected children warrant molecular cytogenetic evaluation. We propose use of the compound term {open_quotes}DiGeorge/velocardiofacial (DGNCF) syndrome{close_quotes} in referring to this condition, as it calls attention to the phenotypic spectrum using historically familiar names. 41 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Clinical Features of 78 Adults With 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Anne S.; Chow, Eva W.C.; Husted, Janice; Weksberg, Rosanna; Caluseriu, Oana; Webb, Gary D.; Gatzoulis, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    22q11 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) is a common microdeletion syndrome with multisystem expression. Phenotypic features vary with age, ascertainment, and assessment. We systematically assessed 78 adults (36 M, 42 F; mean age 31.5, SD 10.5 years) with a 22q11.2 deletion ascertained through an adult congenital cardiac clinic (n = 35), psychiatric-related sources (n = 39), or as affected parents of subjects (n = 4). We recorded the lifetime prevalence of features requiring attention, with 95% confidence intervals (CI) not overlapping zero. Subtle learning difficulties, hypernasality and facial gestalt were not included. We investigated ascertainment effects using non-overlapping subgroups ascertained with tetralogy of Fallot (n = 31) or schizophrenia (n = 31). Forty-three features met inclusion criteria and were present in 5% or more patients, including several of later onset (e.g., hypothyroidism, cholelithiasis). Number of features per patient (median 9, range 3–22) correlated with hospitalizations (P=0.0002) and, when congenital features were excluded, with age (P=0.02). Adjusting for ascertainment, 25.8% (95% CI, 9.5–42.1%) of patients had cardiac anomalies and 22.6% (95% CI, 7.0–38.2%) had schizophrenia. Ascertainment subgroups were otherwise similar in median number and prevalence of features. Non-characteristic features are common in 22q11DS. Adjusting for ascertainment effects is important. Many treatable conditions may be anticipated and features may accumulate over time. The results have implications for clinical assessment and management, genetic counseling and research into pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:16208694

  9. Subtypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Associated with Behaviour and Neurofacial Morphology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinderberry, Brooke; Brown, Scott; Hammond, Peter; Stevens, Angela F.; Schall, Ulrich; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Campbell, Linda E.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) has a complex phenotype with more than 180 characteristics, including cardiac anomalies, cleft palate, intellectual disabilities, a typical facial morphology, and mental health problems. However, the variable phenotype makes it difficult to predict clinical outcome, such as the high prevalence of psychosis among…

  10. Nasal dimple as part of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gripp, K.W.; Reed, L.A.; Emanuel, B.S. |

    1997-03-31

    The phenotype of the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome is quite variable. We describe 2 patients with a 22q11.2 deletion and a dimpled nasal tip, which, we suggest can be the extreme of the broad or bulbous nose commonly found in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and should not be confused with the more severe nasal abnormalities seen in frontonasal dysplasia. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Developmental trajectories in 22q11.2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Swillen, Ann; McDonald-McGinn, Donna

    2015-06-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), a neurogenetic condition, is the most common microdeletion syndrome affecting 1 in 2,000-4,000 live births and involving haploinsufficiency of ∼50 genes resulting in a multisystem disorder. Phenotypic expression is highly variable and ranges from severe life-threatening conditions to only a few associated features. Most common medical problems include: congenital heart disease, in particular conotruncal anomalies; palatal abnormalities, most frequently velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI); immunodeficiency; hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism; genitourinary anomalies; severe feeding/gastrointestinal differences; and subtle dysmorphic facial features. The neurocognitive profile is also highly variable, both between individuals and during the course of development. From infancy onward, motor delays (often with hypotonia) and speech/language deficits are commonly observed. During the preschool and primary school ages, learning difficulties are very common. The majority of patients with 22q11.2DS have an intellectual level that falls in the borderline range (IQ 70-84), and about one-third have mild to moderate intellectual disability. More severe levels of intellectual disability are uncommon in children and adolescents but are more frequent in adults. Individuals with 22q11.2DS are at an increased risk for developing several psychiatric disorders including attention deficit with hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), anxiety and mood disorders, and psychotic disorders and schizophrenia. In this review, we will focus on the developmental phenotypic transitions regarding cognitive development in 22q11.2DS from early preschool to adulthood, and on the changing behavioral/psychiatric phenotype across age, on a background of frequently complex medical conditions. PMID:25989227

  12. Diminished dosage of 22q11 genes disrupts neurogenesis and cortical development in a mouse model of 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Tucker, Eric S.; Maynard, Thomas M.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The 22q11 deletion (or DiGeorge) syndrome (22q11DS), the result of a 1.5- to 3-megabase hemizygous deletion on human chromosome 22, results in dramatically increased susceptibility for “diseases of cortical connectivity” thought to arise during development, including schizophrenia and autism. We show that diminished dosage of the genes deleted in the 1.5-megabase 22q11 minimal critical deleted region in a mouse model of 22q11DS specifically compromises neurogenesis and subsequent differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Proliferation of basal, but not apical, progenitors is disrupted, and subsequently, the frequency of layer 2/3, but not layer 5/6, projection neurons is altered. This change is paralleled by aberrant distribution of parvalbumin-labeled interneurons in upper and lower cortical layers. Deletion of Tbx1 or Prodh (22q11 genes independently associated with 22q11DS phenotypes) does not similarly disrupt basal progenitors. However, expression analysis implicates additional 22q11 genes that are selectively expressed in cortical precursors. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage disrupts cortical neurogenesis and interneuron migration. Such developmental disruption may alter cortical circuitry and establish vulnerability for developmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism. PMID:19805316

  13. [Genetic and clinical characteristics of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Iu O; Zabnenkova, V V; Shilova, N V; Min'zhenkova, M E; Antonenko, V G; Kotlukova, N P; Simonova, L V; Kazanceva, I A; Levchenko, E G; Bombardirova, T D; Zolotukhina, T V; Poliakov, A V

    2014-05-01

    In a group of 140 patients with typical phenotype, the 22q11.2 microdeletion was detected in 43 patients (32%) using FISH and MLPA methods. There were no deletions of other chromosomal loci leading to phenotypes similar to the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). Sequencing of the TBX1 gene did not detect any mutations, except for some common neutral polymorphisms. For the first time in the Russian Federation, the diagnostic efficiency of 22q11.2DS appeared to be 32%, as a result of the application of a combination of genetic approaches for a large group of patients with suspected 22q11.2DS. PMID:25715476

  14. 22q11.2 Deletions in Patients with Conotruncal Defects: Data from 1610 Consecutive Cases

    PubMed Central

    Peyvandi, Shabnam; Lupo, Philip J; Garbarini, Jennifer; Woyciechowski, Stacy; Edman, Sharon; Emanuel, Beverly S; Mitchell, Laura; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital anomalies including conotruncal cardiac defects. Identifying the patient with a 22q11.2 deletion (22q11del) can be challenging because many extracardiac features become apparent later in life. We sought to better define the cardiac phenotype associated with a 22q11del to help direct genetic testing. Methods 1,610 patients with conotruncal defects were sequentially tested for a 22q11del. Counts and frequencies for primary lesions and cardiac features were tabulated for those with and without a 22q11del. Logistic regression models investigated cardiac features that predicted deletion status in tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Results Deletion frequency varied by primary anatomic phenotype. Regardless of the cardiac diagnosis, a concurrent aortic arch anomaly (AAA) was strongly associated with deletion status (OR 5.07, 95% CI: 3.66–7.04). In the TOF subset, the strongest predictor of deletion status was an AAA (OR 3.14, 95% CI: 1.87–5.27, p <0.001), followed by pulmonary valve atresia (OR 2.03, 95% CI: 1.02–4.02, p= 0.04). Among those with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of the great arteries, only those with an AAA had a 22q11del. However, five percent of patients with an isolated conoventricular ventricular septal defect and normal aortic arch anatomy had a 22q11del, while no one with an IAA-A had a 22q11del. Conclusion A subset of patients with conotruncal defects are at risk for a 22q11del. A concurrent AAA increases the risk regardless of the intracardiac anatomy. These findings help direct genetic screening for the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in the cardiac patient. PMID:23604262

  15. Rare copy number variants and congenital heart defects in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E.; Xie, Michael; Taylor, Deanne; Sheridan, Molly B.; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Chow, Eva W. C.; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Simon, Tony J.; Roberts, Amy E.; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Bearden, Carrie E.; Eliez, Stephan; Gothelf, Doron; Coleman, Karlene; Kates, Wendy R.; Devoto, Marcella; Zackai, Elaine; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Bassett, Anne S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS; MIM #192430; 188400) is the most common microdeletion syndrome. The phenotypic presentation of 22q11DS is highly variable; approximately 60–75 % of 22q11DS patients have been reported to have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or aortic arch defect. The etiology of the cardiac phenotypic variability is not currently known for the majority of patients. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region may modify the risk of being born with a CHD in this sensitized population. Rare CNV analysis was performed using Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 data from 946 22q11DS subjects with CHDs (n = 607) or with normal cardiac anatomy (n = 339). Although there was no significant difference in the overall burden of rare CNVs, an overabundance of CNVs affecting cardiac-related genes was detected in 22q11DS individuals with CHDs. When the rare CNVs were examined with regard to gene interactions, specific cardiac networks, such as Wnt signaling, appear to be overrepresented in 22q11DS CHD cases but not 22q11DS controls with a normal heart. Collectively, these data suggest that CNVs outside the 22q11.2 region may contain genes that modify risk for CHDs in some 22q11DS patients. PMID:26742502

  16. Rare copy number variants and congenital heart defects in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E; Xie, Michael; Taylor, Deanne; Sheridan, Molly B; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Chow, Eva W C; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Simon, Tony J; Roberts, Amy E; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Bearden, Carrie E; Eliez, Stephan; Gothelf, Doron; Coleman, Karlene; Kates, Wendy R; Devoto, Marcella; Zackai, Elaine; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Bassett, Anne S; Morrow, Bernice E; Emanuel, Beverly S

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS; MIM #192430; 188400) is the most common microdeletion syndrome. The phenotypic presentation of 22q11DS is highly variable; approximately 60-75 % of 22q11DS patients have been reported to have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or aortic arch defect. The etiology of the cardiac phenotypic variability is not currently known for the majority of patients. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region may modify the risk of being born with a CHD in this sensitized population. Rare CNV analysis was performed using Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 data from 946 22q11DS subjects with CHDs (n = 607) or with normal cardiac anatomy (n = 339). Although there was no significant difference in the overall burden of rare CNVs, an overabundance of CNVs affecting cardiac-related genes was detected in 22q11DS individuals with CHDs. When the rare CNVs were examined with regard to gene interactions, specific cardiac networks, such as Wnt signaling, appear to be overrepresented in 22q11DS CHD cases but not 22q11DS controls with a normal heart. Collectively, these data suggest that CNVs outside the 22q11.2 region may contain genes that modify risk for CHDs in some 22q11DS patients. PMID:26742502

  17. Multitasking Abilities in Adolescents With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Results From an Experimental Ecological Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Maude; Eliez, Stephan; Birr, Julie; Menghetti, Sarah; Debbané, Martin; Van der Linden, Martial

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is associated with cognitive and functional impairments and increased risk for schizophrenia. We characterized multitasking abilities of adolescents with 22q11.2DS using an experimental naturalistic setting and examined whether multitasking impairments were associated with real-world functioning and negative symptoms. Thirty-nine adolescents (19 with 22q11.2DS and 20 controls) underwent the Multitasking Evaluation for Adolescents. Real-world functioning and clinical symptoms were assessed in participants with 22q11.2DS. Adolescents with 22q11.2DS performed poorly in the multitasking evaluation. Our data also suggest that multitasking abilities are related to adaptive functioning in the practical domain and negative symptoms. This study shows that adolescents with 22q11.2DS are characterized by multitasking impairments, which may be relevant for several aspects of the clinical phenotype. PMID:26914469

  18. A catalog of hemizygous variation in 127 22q11 deletion patients

    PubMed Central

    Hestand, Matthew S; Nowakowska, Beata A; Vergaelen, Elfi; Van Houdt, Jeroen; Dehaspe, Luc; Suhl, Joshua A; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Mortier, Geert; Zackai, Elaine; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koenraad; Gur, Raquel E; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Warren, Stephen T; Emanuel, Beverly S; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the most common microdeletion disorder, with wide phenotypic variability. To investigate variation within the non-deleted allele we performed targeted resequencing of the 22q11.2 region for 127 patients, identifying multiple deletion sizes, including two deletions with atypical breakpoints. We cataloged ~12,000 hemizygous variant positions, of which 84% were previously annotated. Within the coding regions 95 non-synonymous variants, three stop gains, and two frameshift insertions were identified, some of which we speculate could contribute to atypical phenotypes. We also catalog tolerability of 22q11 gene mutations based on related autosomal recessive disorders in man, embryonic lethality in mice, cross-species conservation and observations that some genes harbor more or less variants than expected. This extensive catalog of hemizygous variants will serve as a blueprint for future experiments to correlate 22q11DS variation with phenotype. PMID:27274857

  19. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of seven patients with deletions of chromosome 22q13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Nesslinger, N.J.; McDermid, H.E. ); Gorski, J.L. ); Kurczynski, T.W.; French, B.N. ); Shapira, S.K. ); Siegel-Bartelt, J. ); Dumanski, J.P.; Cullen, R.F. Jr. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors have studied seven patients who have chromosome 22q13.3 deletions as revealed by high-resolution cytogenetic analysis. Clinical evaluation of the patients revealed a common phenotype that includes generalized developmental delay, normal or accelerated growth, hypotonia, severe delays in expressive speech, and mild facial dysmorphic features. Dosage analysis using a series of genetically mapped probes showed that the proximal breakpoints of the deletions varied over [approximately]13.8 cM, between loci D22S92 and D22S94. The most distally mapped locus, arylsulfatase A (ARSA), was deleted in all seven patients. Therefore, the smallest region of overlap (critical region) extends between locus D22S94 and a region distal to ARSA a distance of >25.5 cM. 38 rfs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. The effect of hypocalcemia in early childhood on autism-related social and communication skills in patients with 22q11 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, Meghan; Ousley, Opal Y.; Kobrynski, Lisa J.; Patel, Sheena; Oster, Matthew E.; Fernandez-Carriba, Samuel; Cubells, Joseph F.; Coleman, Karlene; Pearce, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    22q11 deletion syndrome (22qDS), also known as DiGeorge Syndrome, is a copy number variant disorder that has a diverse clinical presentation including hypocalcaemia, learning disabilities, and psychiatric disorders. Many patients with 22q11DS present with signs that overlap with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) yet the possible physiological mechanisms that link 22q11DS with ASD are unknown. We hypothesized that early childhood hypocalcemia influences the neurobehavioral phenotype of 22q11DS. Drawing on a longitudinal cohort of 22q11DS patients, we abstracted albumin-adjusted serum calcium levels from 151 participants ranging in age from newborn to 19.5 years (mean 2.5 years). We then examined a subset of 20 infants and toddlers from this group for the association between the lowest calcium level on record and scores on the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales-Developmental Profile Infant-Toddler Checklist (CSBS-DP ITC). The mean (SD) age at calcium testing was 6.2 (8.5) months whereas the mean (SD) age at the CSBS-DP ITC assessment was 14.7 (3.8) months. Lower calcium was associated with significantly greater impairment in the CSBS-DP ITC Social (p<0.05), Speech (p<0.01), and Symbolic domains (p<0.05), in regression models adjusted for sex, age at blood draw, and age at the psychological assessment. Nevertheless, these findings are limited by the small sample size of children with combined data on calcium and CSBS-DP ITC, and hence will require replication in a larger cohort with longitudinal assessments. Considering the role of calcium regulation in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity, low calcium during early brain development could be a risk factor for adverse neurobehavioral outcomes. PMID:25267002

  1. Thrombocytopenia and Postpartum Hemorrhage in a Woman with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kathy; Nanda, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, also known as DiGeorge or velocardiofacial syndrome, is associated with a wide spectrum of phenotypic features. It is known to be associated with severe macrothrombocytopenia. Postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality globally. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is rare cause of thrombocytopenia that can be a significant risk factor for life-threatening postpartum hemorrhage. We report a case of postpartum hemorrhage in a woman with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome causing severe macrothrombocytopenia. PMID:27366335

  2. Dopamine dysfunction in 22q11 deletion syndrome: possible cause of motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Casarelli, Livia; Minnei, Maurizio; Pitzianti, Mariabernarda; Armando, Marco; Pontillo, Maria; Vicari, Stefano; Pasini, Augusto

    2016-10-01

    22q11 Deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a neurogenetic disorder, resulting from a hemizygous microdeletion on the long arm of chromosome 22. In 22q11DS, the phenotypic expression is highly variable. Approximately one-third of all individuals with 22q11DS develop schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder. Among the genes in the deleted region, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) has a particular relevance for psychiatric disorders: lower COMT enzymatic activity decreases the clearance of dopamine (DA), yielding higher levels of catecholamines in the central nervous system. Deficits in myelinogenesis and dysfunctions in the DA system could justify the white matter abnormalities in motor/premotor circuits described in 22q11DS. The alterations in DA could determine the high incidence of psychiatric disorders and the presence of neurological soft signs in 22q11DS. Neurological soft signs are defined as non-normative performance on an examination of motor and sensory tasks without focal neurological deficits. COMT haploinsufficiency, DA dysfunction, and white matter abnormalities may contribute toward the presence of neurological soft signs in 22q11DS. PMID:27548835

  3. Psychopathology and cognition in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Niarchou, Maria; Zammit, Stanley; van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.; Thapar, Anita; Tierling, Hayley M.; Owen, Michael J.; van den Bree, Marianne B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been reported to have high rates of cognitive and psychiatric problems. Aims To establish the nature and prevalence of psychiatric disorder and neurocognitive impairment in children with 22q11.2DS and test whether risk of psychopathology is mediated by the children’s intellectual impairment. Method Neurocognition and psychopathology were assessed in 80 children with 22q11.2DS (mean age 10.2 years, s.d. = 2.1) and 39 sibling controls (mean age 10.9 years, s.d. = 2.0). Results More than half (54%) of children with 22q11.2DS met diagnostic criteria for one or more DSM-IV-TR psychiatric disorder. These children had lower IQ (mean 76.8, s.d. = 13.0) than controls (mean 108.6, s.d. = 15.2) (P<0.001) and showed a range of neurocognitive impairments. Increased risk of psychopathology was not mediated by intellectual impairment. Conclusions 22q11.2DS is not related to a specific psychiatric phenotype in children. Moreover, the deletion has largely independent effects on IQ and risk of psychopathology, indicating that psychopathology in 22q11.2DS is not a non-specific consequence of generalised cognitive impairment. PMID:24115343

  4. The internet is parents' main source of information about psychiatric manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS)☆

    PubMed Central

    van den Bree, Marianne B.M.; Miller, Gregory; Mansell, Elizabeth; Thapar, Anita; Flinter, Frances; Owen, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    With advances in laboratory technology, an increasing number of potentially pathogenic CNVs is recognised. The phenotypic effects of some CNVs are well characterised, however, it remains unclear how much information reaches the parents of affected children and by what route. The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (del22q11.2) is caused by the deletion of approximately 40 genes from the long arm of chromosome 22 and was first described in 1955 [1]. Our study reports the extent to which parents of an affected child are aware of the various manifestation of the condition and describes how they first learned about these potential problems. PMID:23707654

  5. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in African-American patients: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Veerapandiyan, Aravindhan; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Adam, Margaret P; Lyons, Michael J; Manning, Melanie; Coleman, Karlene; Kobrynski, Lisa; Taneja, Deeksha; Schoch, Kelly; Zimmerman, Holly H; Shashi, Vandana

    2011-09-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with numerous and variable clinical manifestations including conotruncal heart abnormalities, palatal anomalies, hypoparathyroidism, immune deficiency, and cognitive deficits. The clinical suspicion of this syndrome is often heightened by the presence of characteristic facial features. A previous report highlighted the under-diagnosis of this condition in African Americans, thought to be related to a paucity of typical facial features. We ascertained the largest cohort (n = 50) of African-American individuals with 22q11DS reported thus far, across five genetics centers in the United States and report on their facial and other phenotypic features. About 3/4 of our cohort has at least one dysmorphic facial feature. Auricular abnormalities, especially small ears, are the most common dysmorphic facial feature followed by nasal and ocular abnormalities. Skeletal findings are seen in about 2/3 of our cohort, higher than the typical frequency reported in 22q11DS. Cardiac anomalies, developmental delay, and palatal abnormalities are seen at a lower frequency in our cohort. Thus, it is evident that the features traditionally associated with 22q11DS are difficult to recognize in African-American individuals with this syndrome, due to both altered frequencies of major anomalies and a non-classic facial appearance. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is needed to recognize 22q11DS in African-American individuals. PMID:21834039

  6. Mitochondrial Citrate Transporter-dependent Metabolic Signature in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Eleonora; Tassone, Flora; Wong, Sarah; Angkustsiri, Kathleen; Simon, Tony J; Song, Gyu; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2015-09-18

    The congenital disorder 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), characterized by a hemizygous deletion of 1.5-3 Mb on chromosome 22 at locus 11.2, is the most common microdeletion disorder (estimated prevalence of 1 in 4000) and the second risk factor for schizophrenia. Nine of ∼30 genes involved in 22qDS have the potential of disrupting mitochondrial metabolism (COMT, UFD1L, DGCR8, MRPL40, PRODH, SLC25A1, TXNRD2, T10, and ZDHHC8). Deficits in bioenergetics during early postnatal brain development could set the basis for a disrupted neuronal metabolism or synaptic signaling, partly explaining the higher incidence in developmental and behavioral deficits in these individuals. Here, we investigated whether mitochondrial outcomes and metabolites from 22qDS children segregated with the altered dosage of one or several of these mitochondrial genes contributing to 22qDS etiology and/or morbidity. Plasma metabolomics, lymphocytic mitochondrial outcomes, and epigenetics (histone H3 Lys-4 trimethylation and 5-methylcytosine) were evaluated in samples from 11 22qDS children and 13 age- and sex-matched neurotypically developing controls. Metabolite differences between 22qDS children and controls reflected a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis (higher lactate/pyruvate ratios) accompanied by an increase in reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate (increased concentrations of 2-hydroxyglutaric acid, cholesterol, and fatty acids). Altered metabolism in 22qDS reflected a critical role for the haploinsufficiency of the mitochondrial citrate transporter SLC25A1, further enhanced by HIF-1α, MYC, and metabolite controls. This comprehensive profiling served to clarify the biochemistry of this disease underlying its broad, complex phenotype. PMID:26221035

  7. Genetics Home Reference: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions 22q11.2 deletion syndrome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (which is also known by several ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 22q11.2 duplication

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions 22q11.2 duplication 22q11.2 duplication Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description 22q11.2 duplication is a condition caused by an extra ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: 22q13.3 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions 22q13.3 deletion syndrome 22q13.3 deletion syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description 22q13.3 deletion syndrome , which is also commonly known as ...

  10. Molecular Definition of the 22q11 Deletions in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Bernice; Goldberg, Rosalie; Carlson, Christine; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Sirotkin, Howard; Collins, John; Dunham, Ian; O'Donnell, Hilary; Scambler, Peter; Shprintzen, Robert; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1995-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is a common genetic disorder among individuals with cleft palate and is associated with hemizygous deletions in human chromosome 22q11. Toward the molecular definition of the deletions, we constructed a physical map of 22q11 in the form of overlapping YACs. The physical map covers >9 cM of genetic distance, estimated to span 5 Mb of DNA, and contains a total of 64 markers. Eleven highly polymorphic short tandem-repeat polymorphic (STRP) markers were placed on the physical map, and 10 of these were unambiguously ordered. The 11 polymorphic markers were used to type the DNA from a total of 61 VCFS patients and 49 unaffected relatives. Comparison of levels of heterozygosity of these markers in VCFS patients and their unaffected relatives revealed that four of these markers are commonly hemizygous among VCFS patients. To confirm these results and to define further the breakpoints in VCFS patients, 15 VCFS individuals and their unaffected parents were genotyped for the 11 STRP markers. Haplotypes generated from this study revealed that 82% of the patients have deletions that can be defined by the STRP markers. The results revealed that all patients who have a deletion share a common proximal breakpoint, while there are two distinct distal breakpoints. Markers D22S941 and D22S944 appear to be consistently hemizygous in patients with deletions. Both of these markers are located on a single nonchimeric YAC that is 400 kb long. The results also show that the parental origin of the deleted chromosome does not have any effect on the phenotypic manifestation ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:7762562

  11. 22q11 deletion syndrome: a review of the neuropsychiatric features and their neurobiological basis

    PubMed Central

    Squarcione, Chiara; Torti, Maria Chiara; Di Fabio, Fabio; Biondi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is caused by an autosomal dominant microdeletion of chromosome 22 at the long arm (q) 11.2 band. The 22q11DS is among the most clinically variable syndromes, with more than 180 features related with the deletion, and is associated with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, accounting for up to 1%–2% of schizophrenia cases. In recent years, several genes located on chromosome 22q11 have been linked to schizophrenia, including those encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase and proline dehydrogenase, and the interaction between these and other candidate genes in the deleted region is an important area of research. It has been suggested that haploinsufficiency of some genes within the 22q11.2 region may contribute to the characteristic psychiatric phenotype and cognitive functioning of schizophrenia. Moreover, an extensive literature on neuroimaging shows reductions of the volumes of both gray and white matter, and these findings suggest that this reduction may be predictive of increased risk of prodromal psychotic symptoms in 22q11DS patients. Experimental and standardized cognitive assessments alongside neuroimaging may be important to identify one or more endophenotypes of schizophrenia, as well as a predictive prodrome that can be preventively treated during childhood and adolescence. In this review, we summarize recent data about the 22q11DS, in particular those addressing the neuropsychiatric and cognitive phenotypes associated with the deletion, underlining the recent advances in the studies about the genetic architecture of the syndrome. PMID:24353423

  12. Opitz GBBB syndrome and the 22q11.2 deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Lacassie, Y.; Arriaza, M.I.

    1996-03-29

    Recently, McDonald-McGinn et al. reported the presence of a deletion 22q11.2 in a family with autosomal dominant inheritance and in a sporadic case with the Opitz GBBB syndrome. The presence of a vascular ring in these patients prompted them to look for this deletion, since this anomaly may be associated with the 22q11.2 deletion. They reviewed the Opitz GBBB syndrome and the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome, finding considerable overlap of manifestations. They proposed that, in some patients, the Opitz GBBB syndrome may be due to a 22q11.2 deletion. We recently examined a newborn boy referred because of MCA. The cardinal findings in this patient (hypertelorism, hypospadias with descended testicles, characteristic nose and truncus arteriosus type I) were suggestive of the Opitz GBBB syndrome and of the velocardiofacial syndrome. The chromosomes were apparently normal (46,XY), but the FISH study showed a 22q11.2 deletion. The patient developed hypocalcemia with very low level of PTH and heart failure requiring surgery. His immunological status was normal except that CD4 cells were mildly low and natural killer cells were increased in number. The family history was noncontributory, but the full evaluation of the family is pending. The mother at first glance presents apparent hypertelorism. 3 refs.

  13. An affected core drives network integration deficits of the structural connectome in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Váša, František; Griffa, Alessandra; Scariati, Elisa; Schaer, Marie; Urben, Sébastien; Eliez, Stephan; Hagmann, Patric

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a genetic disease known to lead to cerebral structural alterations, which we study using the framework of the macroscopic white-matter connectome. We create weighted connectomes of 44 patients with 22q11DS and 44 healthy controls using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, and perform a weighted graph theoretical analysis. After confirming global network integration deficits in 22q11DS (previously identified using binary connectomes), we identify the spatial distribution of regions responsible for global deficits. Next, we further characterize the dysconnectivity of the deficient regions in terms of sub-network properties, and investigate their relevance with respect to clinical profiles. We define the subset of regions with decreased nodal integration (evaluated using the closeness centrality measure) as the affected core (A-core) of the 22q11DS structural connectome. A-core regions are broadly bilaterally symmetric and consist of numerous network hubs - chiefly parietal and frontal cortical, as well as subcortical regions. Using a simulated lesion approach, we demonstrate that these core regions and their connections are particularly important to efficient network communication. Moreover, these regions are generally densely connected, but less so in 22q11DS. These specific disturbances are associated to a rerouting of shortest network paths that circumvent the A-core in 22q11DS, "de-centralizing" the network. Finally, the efficiency and mean connectivity strength of an orbito-frontal/cingulate circuit, included in the affected regions, correlate negatively with the extent of negative symptoms in 22q11DS patients, revealing the clinical relevance of present findings. The identified A-core overlaps numerous regions previously identified as affected in 22q11DS as well as in schizophrenia, which approximately 30-40% of 22q11DS patients develop. PMID:26870660

  14. An affected core drives network integration deficits of the structural connectome in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Váša, František; Griffa, Alessandra; Scariati, Elisa; Schaer, Marie; Urben, Sébastien; Eliez, Stephan; Hagmann, Patric

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a genetic disease known to lead to cerebral structural alterations, which we study using the framework of the macroscopic white-matter connectome. We create weighted connectomes of 44 patients with 22q11DS and 44 healthy controls using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, and perform a weighted graph theoretical analysis. After confirming global network integration deficits in 22q11DS (previously identified using binary connectomes), we identify the spatial distribution of regions responsible for global deficits. Next, we further characterize the dysconnectivity of the deficient regions in terms of sub-network properties, and investigate their relevance with respect to clinical profiles. We define the subset of regions with decreased nodal integration (evaluated using the closeness centrality measure) as the affected core (A-core) of the 22q11DS structural connectome. A-core regions are broadly bilaterally symmetric and consist of numerous network hubs — chiefly parietal and frontal cortical, as well as subcortical regions. Using a simulated lesion approach, we demonstrate that these core regions and their connections are particularly important to efficient network communication. Moreover, these regions are generally densely connected, but less so in 22q11DS. These specific disturbances are associated to a rerouting of shortest network paths that circumvent the A-core in 22q11DS, “de-centralizing” the network. Finally, the efficiency and mean connectivity strength of an orbito-frontal/cingulate circuit, included in the affected regions, correlate negatively with the extent of negative symptoms in 22q11DS patients, revealing the clinical relevance of present findings. The identified A-core overlaps numerous regions previously identified as affected in 22q11DS as well as in schizophrenia, which approximately 30–40% of 22q11DS patients develop. PMID:26870660

  15. The use of two different MLPA kits in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Evers, L J M; Engelen, J J M; Houben, L M H; Curfs, L M G; van Amelsvoort, T A M J

    2016-04-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is one of the most common recurrent copy-number variant disorder, caused by a microdeletion in chromosome band 22q11.2 and occurring with a population prevalence of 1 in 2000. Until today there has been no evidence that the size of the deletion has an influence on the clinical phenotype. Most studies report that 22q11DS is associated with mild or borderline intellectual disability. There are a limited number of reports on 22q11DS subjects with moderate or severe intellectual disability. In this study we describe 63 adult patients with 22q11DS, including 22q11DS patients functioning at a moderate to severe intellectual disabled level. Deletion size was established with an experimental Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) mixture (P324) in addition to the commonly used MLPA kit (P250). We compared deletion size with intellectual functioning and presence of psychotic symptoms during life. The use of the experimental MLPA kit gives extra information on deletion size, only when combined with the common MLPA kit. We were able to detect eleven atypical deletions and in two cases the deletion size was shorter than all other "typical ones". We conclude that the use of the experimental kit P324 gives extra information about the deletion size, but only when used together with the standard P250 kit. We did not found any relation of deletion size with intelligence or presence of psychosis. PMID:26921528

  16. Are 22q11.2 distal deletions associated with math difficulties?

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria Raquel Santos; Vianna, Gabrielle; Oliveira, Lívia de Fátima Silva; Costa, Annelise Julio; Pinheiro-Chagas, Pedro; Sturzenecker, Rosane; Zen, Paulo Ricardo Gazzola; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano Machado; de Aguiar, Marcos José Burle; Haase, Vitor Geraldi

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 6% of school-aged children have math difficulties (MD). A neurogenetic etiology has been suggested due to the presence of MD in some genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2DS. However, the contribution of 22q11.2DS to the MD phenotype has not yet been investigated. This is the first population-based study measuring the frequency of 22q11.2DS among school children with MD. Children (1,564) were identified in the schools through a screening test for language and math. Of these children, 152 (82 with MD and 70 controls) were selected for intelligence, general neuropsychological, and math cognitive assessments and for 22q11.2 microdeletion screening using MLPA. One child in the MD group had a 22q11.2 deletion spanning the LCR22-4 to LCR22-5 interval. This child was an 11-year-old girl with subtle anomalies, normal intelligence, MD attributable to number sense deficit, and difficulties in social interactions. Only 19 patients have been reported with this deletion. Upon reviewing these reports, we were able to characterize a new syndrome, 22q11.2 DS (LCR22-4 to LCR22-5), characterized by prematurity; pre- and postnatal growth restriction; apparent hypotelorism, short/upslanting palpebral fissures; hypoplastic nasal alae; pointed chin and nose; posteriorly rotated ears; congenital heart defects; skeletal abnormalities; developmental delay, particularly compromising the speech; learning disability (including MD, in one child); intellectual disability; and behavioral problems. These results suggest that 22q11.2 DS (LCR22-4 to LCR22-5) may be one of the genetic causes of MD. PMID:24989330

  17. A patient with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Eryılmaz, Sema Kabataş; Baş, Firdevs; Satan, Ali; Darendeliler, Feyza; Bundak, Rüveyde; Günöz, Hülya; Saka, Nurçin

    2009-01-01

    22q11 deletion is one of the most frequently encountered genetic syndromes. The phenotypic spectrum shows a wide variability. We report a boy who presented at age 11.9 years with seizures due to hypocalcemia as a result of hypoparathyroidism. FISH analysis revealed a heterozygote deletion at 22q11.2. Positive findings for the syndrome were delayed speech development due to velofacial dysfunction, recurrent croup attacks in early childhood due to latent hypocalcemia and mild dysmorphic features. The findings of this patient indicate that 22q11 deletion syndrome may present with a wide spectrum of clinical findings and that this diagnosis needs to be considered even in patients of older ages presenting with hypocalcemia. PMID:21274400

  18. Phenotypic Overlap between Core Diagnostic Features and Emotional/Behavioral Problems in Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiades, Stelios; Szatmari, Peter; Duku, Eric; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bryson, Susan; Roberts, Wendy; Fombonne, Eric; Mirenda, Pat; Smith, Isabel; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Volden, Joanne; Waddell, Charlotte; Thompson, Ann

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the phenotypic overlap between core diagnostic features and emotional/behavioral problems in a sample of 335 preschool children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results from principal component analysis (2 components; 49.70% variance explained) suggested substantial phenotypic overlap between core diagnostic features and…

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in TBX1 in individuals with and without 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heike, Carrie L.; Starr, Jacqueline R.; Rieder, Mark J.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Edwards, Karen L.; Stanaway, Ian; Crawford, Dana C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a wide range of clinical features. TBX1 has been proposed as a candidate gene for some of the features in this condition. Polymorphisms in the non-deleted TBX1, which may affect the function of the sole TBX1 gene in individuals with the 22q11.2DS, may be a key to understanding the phenotypic variability among individuals with a shared deletion. Comprehensive single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery by resequencing candidate genes can identify genetic variants that influence a given phenotype. The purpose of this study was to further characterize the sequence variability in TBX1 by identifying all common SNPs in this gene. METHODS We resequenced TBX1 in 29 children with a documented 22q11.2 deletion and 95 non-deleted, healthy individuals. We estimated allele frequencies, performed tagSNP selection, and inferred haplotypes. We also compared SNP frequencies between 22q11.2DS and control samples. RESULTS We identified 355 biallelic markers among the 190 chromosomes resequenced in the control panel. The vast majority of the markers identified were SNPs (n=331), and the remainder indels (n=24). We did not identify SNPs or indels in the cis- regulatory element (FOX–binding site) upstream of TBX1. In children with 22q11.2DS we detected 187 biallelic markers, six of which were indels. Four of the seven coding SNPs identified in the controls were identified in children with 22q11.2DS. CONCLUSIONS This comprehensive SNP discovery data can be used to select SNPs to genotype for future association studies assessing the role of TBX1 and phenotypic variability in individuals with 22q11.2DS. PMID:19645056

  20. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Laboratory Diagnosis and TBX1 and FGF8 Mutation Screening

    PubMed Central

    Sgardioli, Ilária C.; Vieira, Társis P.; Simioni, Milena; Monteiro, Fabíola P.; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L.

    2015-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is one of the recognized forms of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) and has an incidence of 1 of 4,000 to 1 of 6,000 births. Nevertheless, the 22q11 deletion is not found in several patients with a 22q11.2 DS phenotype. In this situation, other chromosomal aberrations and/or mutations in the T-box 1 transcription factor C (TBX1) gene have been detected in some patients. A similar phenotype to that of the 22q11.2 DS has been reported in animal models with mutations in fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) gene. To date, FGF8 mutations have not been investigated in humans. We tested a strategy to perform laboratory testing to reduce costs in the investigation of patients presenting with the 22q11.2 DS phenotype. A total of 109 individuals with clinical suspicion were investigated using GTG-banding karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A conclusive diagnosis was achieved in 33 of 109 (30.2%) cases. In addition, mutations in the coding regions of TBX1 and FGF8 genes were investigated in selected cases where 22q11.2 deletion had been excluded, and no pathogenic mutations were detected in both genes. This study presents a strategy for molecular genetic characterization of patients presenting with the 22q11.2 DS using different laboratory techniques. This strategy could be useful in different countries, according to local resources. Also, to our knowledge, this is the first investigation of FGF8 gene in humans with this clinical suspicion.

  1. What`s in a name? Chromosome 22q abnormalities and the DiGeorge, velocardiofacial and conotruncal anomalies face syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Wulfsberg, E.A.; Leana-Cox, J.; Neri, G.

    1996-11-11

    The recent advances in our understanding of the phenotype associated with deletion of the DiGeorge Chromosome Region (DGCR) at 22q11.2 are in many ways analogous to the fable about the blind men and the elephant. Originally described as three distinct phenotypes (DiGeorge (DG) syndrome, velocardiofacial (VCF) syndrome, and the conotruncal anomalies face (CTAF) syndrome), it is now clear that there is only a single broad and variable phenotype associated with deletion of the DGCR. As in the fable, distinguished clinicians approached this phenotypic {open_quotes}elephant{close_quotes} from different perspectives and provided three separate, although overlapping descriptions. Our analogy to this fable is not to imply some {open_quotes}blindness{close_quotes} on the part of these clinicians, but rather to point out the well-known difficulty in delineating the indistinct phenotypic boundaries of a syndrome until a genetic or biochemical marker for the condition is available. The recent availability of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probe to detect deletion of the DGCR now allows delineation of the broad phenotype of our {open_quotes}elephant{close_quotes} which spans from lethal DG phenotypes through the intermediate VCF and CTAF phenotypes to the newly recognized {open_quotes}mild{close_quotes} phenotype consisting of only developmental delays and subtle facial abnormalities. 33 refs.

  2. Functional outcomes of adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Chow, Eva W.C.; Costain, Gregory; Karas, Dominique; Ho, Andrew; Bassett, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a common multisystem genomic disorder with congenital and later-onset manifestations, including congenital heart disease, intellectual disability, and psychiatric illness, that may affect long-term functioning. There are limited data on adult functioning in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Methods We used the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales to assess functioning in 100 adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n = 46 male; mean age = 28.8 (standard deviation = 9.7) years) where intellect ranged from average to borderline (n = 57) to mild intellectual disability (n = 43). Results More than 75% of the subjects scored in the functional deficit range. Although personal, vocational, and financial demographics confirmed widespread functional impairment, daily living skills and employment were relative strengths. Intelligence quotient was a significant predictor (P < 0.001) of overall and domain-specific adaptive functioning skills. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was a significant predictor (P < 0.05) of overall adaptive functioning, daily living skills, and socialization scores. Notably, congenital heart disease, history of mood/anxiety disorders, sex, and age were not significant predictors of functioning. Conclusion Despite functional impairment in adulthood that is primarily mediated by cognitive and psychiatric phenotypes, relative strengths in activities of daily living and employment have important implications for services and long-term planning. These results may help to inform expectations about outcomes for patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:22744446

  3. Mapping cortical thickness in children with 22q11.2 deletions.

    PubMed

    Bearden, Carrie E; van Erp, Theo G M; Dutton, Rebecca A; Tran, Helen; Zimmermann, Lara; Sun, Daqiang; Geaga, Jennifer A; Simon, Tony J; Glahn, David C; Cannon, Tyrone D; Emanuel, Beverly S; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2007-08-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome, 22q11.2DS) involves cardiac and craniofacial anomalies, marked deficits in visuospatial cognition, and elevated rates of psychosis. Although the mechanism is unknown, characteristic brain alterations may predispose to development of psychosis and cognitive deficits in 22q11DS. We applied cortical pattern matching and new methods for measuring cortical thickness in millimeters to structural magnetic resonance images of 21 children with confirmed 22q11.2 deletions and 13 demographically matched healthy comparison subjects. Thickness was mapped at 65 536 homologous points, based on 3-dimensional distance from the cortical gray-white matter interface to the external gray-cerebrospinal fluid boundary. A pattern of regionally specific cortical thinning was observed in superior parietal cortices and right parietooccipital cortex, regions critical for visuospatial processing, and bilaterally in the most inferior portion of the inferior frontal gyrus (pars orbitalis), a key area for language development. Several of the 30 genes encoded in the deleted segment are highly expressed in the developing brain and known to affect early neuronal migration. These brain maps reveal how haploinsufficiency for such genes can affect cortical development and suggest a possible underlying pathophysiology of the neurobehavioral phenotype. PMID:17056649

  4. Mapping Cortical Thickness in Children with 22q11.2 Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Bearden, Carrie E.; van Erp, Theo G.M.; Dutton, Rebecca A.; Tran, Helen; Zimmermann, Lara; Sun, Daqiang; Geaga, Jennifer A.; Simon, Tony J.; Glahn, David C.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome, 22q11.2DS) involves cardiac and craniofacial anomalies, marked deficits in visuospatial cognition, and elevated rates of psychosis. Although the mechanism is unknown, characteristic brain alterations may predispose to development of psychosis and cognitive deficits in 22q11DS. We applied cortical pattern matching and new methods for measuring cortical thickness in millimeters to structural magnetic resonance images of 21 children with confirmed 22q11.2 deletions and 13 demographically matched healthy comparison subjects. Thickness was mapped at 65 536 homologous points, based on 3-dimensional distance from the cortical gray-white matter interface to the external gray-cerebrospinal fluid boundary. A pattern of regionally specific cortical thinning was observed in superior parietal cortices and right parietooccipital cortex, regions critical for visuospatial processing, and bilaterally in the most inferior portion of the inferior frontal gyrus (pars orbitalis), a key area for language development. Several of the 30 genes encoded in the deleted segment are highly expressed in the developing brain and known to affect early neuronal migration. These brain maps reveal how haploinsufficiency for such genes can affect cortical development and suggest a possible underlying pathophysiology of the neurobehavioral phenotype. PMID:17056649

  5. De novo direct duplication of chromosome segment 22q11.2-q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Atsuko; Lin, Ming S.

    1996-03-29

    Lindsay et al. [1995] reported a case of de novo duplication of the segment 22q11-q12. Molecular cytogenetics studies showed that the segment includes the regions responsible for the {open_quotes}cat eye,{close_quotes} DiGeorge, and velo-cardio-facial syndrome, and extends distal to the breakpoint cluster region. The phenotype was milder than that of complete trisomy 22 and der(22)t(11;22) (q23;q11) syndrome and was similar in type and severity to that of {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome (CES). They suggested that trisomy of gene(s) responsible for the CES might have a predominant phenotypic effect over other genes present in the region duplicated in their patient. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Velo-cardio-facial syndrome: Frequency and textent of 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Goldberg, R.; Jurecic, V.

    1995-07-03

    Velo-cardio-facial (VCFS) or Shprintzen syndrome is associated with deletions in a region of chromosome 22q11.2 also deleted in DiGeorge anomaly and some forms of congenital heart disease. Due to the variability of phenotype, the evaluation of the incidence of deletions has been hampered by uncertainty of diagnosis. In this study, 54 patients were diagnosed with VCFS by a single group of clinicians using homogeneous clinical criteria independent of the deletion status. Cell lines of these patients were established and the deletion status evaluated for three loci within the commonly deleted region at 22q11.2 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In 81% of the patients all three loci were hemizygous. In one patient we observed a smaller interstitial deletion than that defined by the three loci. The phenotype of this patient was not different from that observed in patients with larger deletions. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. An Fgf8 Mouse Mutant Phenocopies Human 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Deborah U.; Fotheringham, Lori K.; Brewer, Judson A.; Muglia, Louis J.; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Capecchi, Mario R.; Moon, Anne M.

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Deletion of chromosome 22q11, the most common microdeletion detected in humans, is associated with a life-threatening array of birth defects. Although 90% of affected individuals share the same three megabase deletion, their phenotype is highly variable and includes craniofacial and cardiovascular anomalies, hypoplasia or aplasia of the thymus with associated deficiency of T cells, hypocalcemia with hypoplasia or aplasia of the parathyroids, and a variety of central nervous system abnormalities. Because ablation of neural crest in chicks produces many features of the deletion 22q11 syndrome, it has been proposed that haploinsufficiency in this region impacts neural crest function during cardiac and pharyngeal arch development. Few factors required for migration, survival, proliferation and subsequent differentiation of pharyngeal arch neural crest and mesoderm-derived mesenchyme into their respective cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and glandular derivatives have been identified. However, the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and pharyngeal endoderm function is becoming increasingly clear. Fibroblast growth factor 8 is a signaling molecule expressed in the ectoderm and endoderm of the developing pharyngeal arches and known to play an important role in survival and patterning of first arch tissues. We demonstrate a dosage-sensitive requirement for FGF8 during development of pharyngeal arch, pharyngeal pouch and neural crest-derived tissues. We show that FGF8 deficient embryos have lethal malformations of the cardiac outflow tract, great vessels and heart due, at least in part, to failure to form the fourth pharyngeal arch arteries, altered expression of Fgf10 in the pharyngeal mesenchyme, and abnormal apoptosis in pharyngeal and cardiac neural crest. The Fgf8 mutants described herein display the complete array of cardiovascular, glandular and craniofacial phenotypes seen in human deletion 22q11 syndromes. This represents the first single gene

  8. Elusive identities and overlapping phenotypes of proangiogenic myeloid cells in tumors.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Lewis, Claire E; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-04-01

    It is now established that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid cells. Since then, identifying the exact myeloid cell types involved in this process has proved challenging because of myeloid cell heterogeneity and the expression of overlapping phenotypic markers in tumors. As a result, investigators often simply refer to them now as "bone marrow-derived myeloid cells." Here we review the findings of various attempts to phenotype the myeloid cells involved and discuss the therapeutic implications of correctly identifying-and thus being able to target-this proangiogenic force in tumors. PMID:20167863

  9. Elusive Identities and Overlapping Phenotypes of Proangiogenic Myeloid Cells in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Lewis, Claire E.; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J. Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-01-01

    It is now established that bone marrow–derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid cells. Since then, identifying the exact myeloid cell types involved in this process has proved challenging because of myeloid cell heterogeneity and the expression of overlapping phenotypic markers in tumors. As a result, investigators often simply refer to them now as “bone marrow–derived myeloid cells.” Here we review the findings of various attempts to phenotype the myeloid cells involved and discuss the therapeutic implications of correctly identifying—and thus being able to target—this proangiogenic force in tumors. PMID:20167863

  10. The clinical presentation of attention deficit‐hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joanna; Thapar, Anita; Owen, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although attention deficit‐hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most prevalent psychiatric disorder in children with 22q11.2DS, it remains unclear whether its clinical presentation is similar to that in children with idiopathic ADHD. The aim of this study is to compare the ADHD phenotype in children with and without 22q11.2DS by examining ADHD symptom scores, patterns of psychiatric comorbidity, IQ and gender distribution. Methods: Forty‐four children with 22q11.2DS and ADHD (mean age = 9.6), 600 clinic children (mean age = 10.8) and 77 children with ADHD from a population cohort (mean age = 10.8) participated in the study. Psychopathology was assessed using parent‐report research diagnostic instruments. Results: There was a higher proportion of females in the 22q11.2DS ADHD sample in relation to the clinical sample (χ2 = 18.2, P < 0.001). The 22q11.2DS group showed a higher rate of ADHD inattentive subtype (χ2 = 114.76, P < 0.001), and fewer hyperactive‐impulsive symptoms compared to the clinical group (z = 8.43, P < 0.001). The 22q11.2DS ADHD group parents reported fewer oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder symptoms (z = 6.33, P < 0.001) and a higher rate of generalized anxiety disorder (χ2 = 4.56, P = 0.03) in relation to the clinical group. Two percent of the 22q11.2 DS ADHD sample had received ADHD treatment. The results were similar when the 22q11.2 ADHD group was compared to the population cohort ADHD group. Conclusions: The clinical presentation of ADHD and patterns of co‐morbidity in 22q11.2DS is different from that in idiopathic ADHD. This could lead to clinical under‐recognition of ADHD in this group. Examining psychopathology in 22q11.2DS can provide insights into the genetic origins of psychiatric problems with implications beyond the 22q11.2DS population. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley

  11. Congenital Heart Disease as a Warning Sign for the Diagnosis of the 22q11.2 Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Marcília S.; Jacob, Cristina M. A.; Kulikowski, Leslie D.; Pastorino, Antonio C.; Dutra, Roberta L.; Miura, Nana; Jatene, Marcelo B.; Pegler, Stephanie P.; Kim, Chong A.; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

    2014-01-01

    Background To alert for the diagnosis of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Objective To describe the main CHDs, as well as phenotypic, metabolic and immunological findings in a series of 60 patients diagnosed with 22q11.2DS. Methods The study included 60 patients with 22q11.2DS evaluated between 2007 and 2013 (M:F=1.3, age range 14 days to 20 years and 3 months) at a pediatric reference center for primary immunodeficiencies. The diagnosis was established by detection of the 22q11.2 microdeletion using FISH (n = 18) and/or MLPA (n = 42), in association with clinical and laboratory information. Associated CHDs, progression of phenotypic facial features, hypocalcemia and immunological changes were analyzed. Results CHDs were detected in 77% of the patients and the most frequent type was tetralogy of Fallot (38.3%). Surgical correction of CHD was performed in 34 patients. Craniofacial dysmorphisms were detected in 41 patients: elongated face (60%) and/or elongated nose (53.3%), narrow palpebral fissure (50%), dysplastic, overfolded ears (48.3%), thin lips (41.6%), elongated fingers (38.3%) and short stature (36.6%). Hypocalcemia was detected in 64.2% and decreased parathyroid hormone (PTH) level in 25.9%. Decrease in total lymphocytes, CD4 and CD8 counts were present in 40%, 53.3% and 33.3%, respectively. Hypogammaglobulinemia was detected in one patient and decreased concentrations of immunoglobulin M (IgM) in two other patients. Conclusion Suspicion for 22q11.2DS should be raised in all patients with CHD associated with hypocalcemia and/or facial dysmorphisms, considering that many of these changes may evolve with age. The 22q11.2 microdeletion should be confirmed by molecular testing in all patients. PMID:25317860

  12. Is child intelligence associated with parent and sibling intelligence in individuals with developmental disorders? An investigation in youth with 22q11.2 deletion (velo-cardio-facial) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Amy K; Radoeva, Petya D; Fremont, Wanda; Kates, Wendy R; Antshel, Kevin M

    2014-12-01

    Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a copy-number variation (CNV) genetic disorder, demonstrate a great deal of variability in IQ scores and are at particular risk for cognitive difficulties, with up to 45% experiencing intellectual disability. This study explored the IQ relationship between individuals with 22q11DS, their parents and their siblings. Participants included individuals with 22q11DS, unaffected siblings and community controls, who participated in a longitudinal study of 22q11DS. Significant associations between proband and relative (parent, sibling) IQ scores were found. Results suggest that the cognitive functioning of first-degree relatives could be a useful marker of general genetic background and/or environmental effects, and can explain some of the large phenotypic variability in 22q11DS. These findings underscore the importance of including siblings and parents in studies of 22q11DS whenever possible. PMID:25244692

  13. Is Child Intelligence Associated with Parent and Sibling Intelligence in Individuals with Developmental Disorders? An Investigation in Youth with 22q11.2 Deletion (Velo-Cardio-Facial) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Amy K.; Radoeva, Petya D.; Fremont, Wanda; Kates, Wendy R.; Antshel, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a copy-number variation (CNV) genetic disorder, demonstrate a great deal of variability in IQ scores and are at particular risk for cognitive difficulties, with up to 45% experiencing intellectual disability. This study explored the IQ relationship between individuals with 22q11DS, their parents and their siblings. Participants included individuals with 22q11DS, unaffected siblings and community controls, who participated in a longitudinal study of 22q11DS. Significant associations between proband and relative (parent, sibling) IQ scores were found. Results suggest that the cognitive functioning of first-degree relatives could be a useful marker of general genetic background and/or environmental effects, and can explain some of the large phenotypic variability in 22q11DS. These findings underscore the importance of including siblings and parents in studies of 22q11DS whenever possible. PMID:25244692

  14. Language and Traits of Autism Spectrum Conditions: Evidence of Limited Phenotypic and Etiological Overlap

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Mark J.; Charman, Tony; Robinson, Elise B.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Happé, Francesca; Dale, Philip S.; Ronald, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Language difficulties have historically been viewed as integral to autism spectrum conditions (ASC), leading molecular genetic studies to consider whether ASC and language difficulties have overlapping genetic bases. The extent of genetic, and also environmental, overlap between ASC and language is, however, unclear. We hence conducted a twin study of the concurrent association between autistic traits and receptive language abilities. Internet-based language tests were completed by ~3,000 pairs of twins, while autistic traits were assessed via parent ratings. Twin model fitting explored the association between these measures in the full sample, while DeFries-Fulker analysis tested these associations at the extremes of the sample. Phenotypic associations between language ability and autistic traits were modest and negative. The degree of genetic overlap was also negative, indicating that genetic influences on autistic traits lowered language scores in the full sample (mean genetic correlation = −0.13). Genetic overlap was also low at the extremes of the sample (mean genetic correlation = 0.14), indicating that genetic influences on quantitatively defined language difficulties were largely distinct from those on extreme autistic traits. Variation in language ability and autistic traits were also associated with largely different nonshared environmental influences. Language and autistic traits are influenced by largely distinct etiological factors. This has implications for molecular genetic studies of ASC and understanding the etiology of ASC. Additionally, these findings lend support to forthcoming DSM-5 changes to ASC diagnostic criteria that will see language difficulties separated from the core ASC communication symptoms, and instead listed as a clinical specifier. PMID:25088445

  15. Language and traits of autism spectrum conditions: evidence of limited phenotypic and etiological overlap.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark J; Charman, Tony; Robinson, Elise B; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E; Happé, Francesca; Dale, Philip S; Ronald, Angelica

    2014-10-01

    Language difficulties have historically been viewed as integral to autism spectrum conditions (ASC), leading molecular genetic studies to consider whether ASC and language difficulties have overlapping genetic bases. The extent of genetic, and also environmental, overlap between ASC and language is, however, unclear. We hence conducted a twin study of the concurrent association between autistic traits and receptive language abilities. Internet-based language tests were completed by ~3,000 pairs of twins, while autistic traits were assessed via parent ratings. Twin model fitting explored the association between these measures in the full sample, while DeFries-Fulker analysis tested these associations at the extremes of the sample. Phenotypic associations between language ability and autistic traits were modest and negative. The degree of genetic overlap was also negative, indicating that genetic influences on autistic traits lowered language scores in the full sample (mean genetic correlation = -0.13). Genetic overlap was also low at the extremes of the sample (mean genetic correlation = 0.14), indicating that genetic influences on quantitatively defined language difficulties were largely distinct from those on extreme autistic traits. Variation in language ability and autistic traits were also associated with largely different nonshared environmental influences. Language and autistic traits are influenced by largely distinct etiological factors. This has implications for molecular genetic studies of ASC and understanding the etiology of ASC. Additionally, these findings lend support to forthcoming DSM-5 changes to ASC diagnostic criteria that will see language difficulties separated from the core ASC communication symptoms, and instead listed as a clinical specifier. PMID:25088445

  16. 22q11 Deletion Syndrome: A Genetic Subtype of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Anne S.; Chow, Eva W.C.

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is likely to be caused by several susceptibility genes and may have environmental factors that interact with susceptibility genes and/or nongenetic causes. Recent evidence supports the likelihood that 22q11 Deletion Syndrome (22qDS) represents an identifiable genetic subtype of schizophrenia. 22qDS is an under-recognized genetic syndrome associated with microdeletions on chromosome 22 and a variable expression that often includes mild congenital dysmorphic features, hypernasal speech, and learning difficulties. Initial evidence indicates that a minority of patients with schizophrenia (~2%) may have 22qDS and that prevalence may be somewhat higher in subpopulations with developmental delay. This paper proposes clinical criteria (including facial features, learning disabilities, hypernasal speech, congenital heart defects and other congenital anomalies) to aid in identifying patients with schizophrenia who may have this subtype and outlines features that may increase the index of suspicion for this syndrome. Although no specific causal gene or genes have yet been identified in the deletion region, 22qDS may represent a more homogeneous subtype of schizophrenia. This subtype may serve as a model for neurodevelopmental origins of schizophrenia that could aid in delineating etiologic and pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:10509171

  17. Phenotypic overlap among paroxysmal dyskinesia subtypes: Lesson from a family with PRRT2 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Zhao, Xiaoyu; Du, Yue; He, Fangping; Peng, Guoping; Luo, Benyan

    2013-08-01

    Paroxysmal dyskinesia (PD) is a group of rare neurological conditions which was divided into paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) and paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia (PED) according to their clinical features. PRRT2 gene was initially identified as the major gene responsible for PKD followed by presence of various PRRT2 mutations discovered in families with benign familial infantile convulsions (BFIC) and infantile convulsions and choreoathetosis (ICCA). We describe a family with characteristic PD showing overlaps in clinical pictures among the three PD subgroups, and a nonsense PRRT2 mutation c.649C>T (p.Arg217X) was also detected. This broadens the phenotypic spectrum in PRRT2-related disorders. In addition, an unusual exercise trigger observed in the proband, likely representing an underestimated occurrence, together with the current clinical PD classification is also elucidated. PMID:22902309

  18. The Neural Correlates of Non-Spatial Working Memory in Velocardiofacial Syndrome (22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Wendy R.; Krauss, Beth R.; AbdulSabur, Nuria; Colgan, Deirdre; Antshel, Kevin M.; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a neurogenetic disorder that is associated with both learning disabilities and a consistent neuropsychological phenotype, including deficits in executive function, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Anatomic imaging studies have identified significant…

  19. Emotion Regulation and Development in Children with Autism and 22q13 Deletion Syndrome: Evidence for Group Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Sarah E.; Shaw, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Emotion regulation (ER) abilities and developmental differences were investigated among 19 children with autism and 18 children with 22q13 Deletion Syndrome (a rare chromosomal disorder with certain autistic symptoms). The purpose of this study was to examine the phenotypic similarities between the two disorders. ER was measured by the Temperament…

  20. [Microdeletion 22q11: apropos of case of schizophrenia in an adolescent].

    PubMed

    Pinquier, C; Héron, D; de Carvalho, W; Lazar, G; Mazet, P; Cohen, D

    2001-01-01

    Deletion of chromosome 22q11 concerns nearly 1/5.000 births, and is the most frequent interstitial microdeletion. The deletion generates various phenotypes which were initially regarded as distinct syndromes. 1) Di George syndrome was described in 1962 by immunologists, and associates thymic and parathyroid hypoplasia, cardiac malformation, and dysmorphic face; the prognosis is severe, as Di George syndrome is a life-threatening condition. 2) The velocardiofacial syndrome was described in 1978 by stomatologists, and associates palate abnormalities, cardiac malformations, dysmorphic faces, and learning disabilities. 3) The Takao syndrome was described in the late seventies by cardiologists as a clinical condition associating cardiac abnormalities and dysmorphic faces. During the nineties, a common molecular etiology was identified, and a new name proposed: CATCH 22, an acronyme for Cardiac abnormalities, Abnormal face, Thymic hypoplasia, Cleft palate, Hypocalcemia, deleted chromosome 22. Furthermore, new phenotypes have been recently recognized, most of them belonging to the psychiatric spectrum. Descriptive studies of large samples of children with 22q11 deletion, conducted, both in the United States and european countries, have shown the following pattern of associated symptoms:--abnormal face (100%), which expression varies with age, and can be discrete;--cardiac abnormalities (84%), including cardiac malformations of conotroncal types;--mouth abnormalities (49%), including cleft palate (14%), and velar dysfunction (20%);--urinary tract abnormalities (36%), including ureteric reflux, lung dysplasia;--transitory hypocalcemia (60%) mostly during infancy, and due to transitory hypoparathyroid dysfunction;--seizures (21%), which are usually a consequence of hypocalcemia;--immunodeficiency (1%), which worsens the prognosis. Deletion of chromosome 22q11 has been also associated with various psychiatric phenotypes, which can be classified into two groups, developmental

  1. Idiopathic thromobocytopenic purpura in two mothers of children with DiGeorge sequence: A new component manifestation of deletion 22q11?

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.; Philip, N.; Michel, G.

    1997-04-14

    The phenotypic spectrum caused by the microdeletion of chromosome 22q11 region is known to be variable. Nearly all patients with DiGeorge sequence (DGS) and approximately 60% of patients with velocardiofacial syndrome exhibit the deletion. Recent papers have reported various congenital defects in patients with 22q11 deletions. Conversely, some patients have minimal clinical expression. Ten to 25% of parents of patients with DGS exhibit the deletion and are nearly asymptomatic. Two female patients carrying a 22q11 microdeletion and presenting with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura are reported. Both had children with typical manifestations of DGS. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Decreased DGCR8 Expression and miRNA Dysregulation in Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sellier, Chantal; Hwang, Vicki J.; Dandekar, Ravi; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Ander, Bradley P.; Sharp, Frank R.; Angkustsiri, Kathleen; Simon, Tony J.; Tassone, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of the 1.5–3 Mb region of chromosome 22 at locus 11.2 gives rise to the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), also known as DiGeorge and Velocardiofacial Syndromes. It is the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans and one of the most common multiple malformation syndromes. The syndrome is characterized by a broad phenotype, whose characterization has expanded considerably within the last decade and includes many associated findings such as craniofacial anomalies (40%), conotruncal defects of the heart (CHD; 70–80%), hypocalcemia (20–60%), and a range of neurocognitive anomalies with high risk of schizophrenia, all with a broad phenotypic variability. These phenotypic features are believed to be the result of a change in the copy number or dosage of the genes located in the deleted region. Despite this relatively clear genetic etiology, very little is known about which genes modulate phenotypic variations in humans or if they are due to combinatorial effects of reduced dosage of multiple genes acting in concert. Here, we report on decreased expression levels of genes within the deletion region of chromosome 22, including DGCR8, in peripheral leukocytes derived from individuals with 22q11DS compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, we found dysregulated miRNA expression in individuals with 22q11DS, including miR-150, miR-194 and miR-185. We postulate this to be related to DGCR8 haploinsufficiency as DGCR8 regulates miRNA biogenesis. Importantly we demonstrate that the level of some miRNAs correlates with brain measures, CHD and thyroid abnormalities, suggesting that the dysregulated miRNAs may contribute to these phenotypes and/or represent relevant blood biomarkers of the disease in individuals with 22q11DS. PMID:25084529

  3. Understanding the Role of Tbx1 as a Candidate Gene for 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Li, Xiao; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is caused by a commonly occurring microdeletion on chromosome 22. Clinical findings include cardiac malformations, thymic and parathyroid hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and dental defects. These phenotypes are due mainly to abnormal development of the pharyngeal apparatus. Targeted deletion studies in mice and analysis of naturally occurring mutations in humans have implicated Tbx1 as a candidate gene for 22q11.2DS. Tbx1 belongs to an evolutionarily conserved T-box family of transcription factors, whose expression is precisely regulated during embryogenesis, and it appears to regulate the proliferation and differentiation of various progenitor cells during organogenesis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of Tbx1 during development of the heart, thymus and parathyroid glands, as well as during formation of the palate, teeth, and other craniofacial features. PMID:23996541

  4. Genetic Dosage Compensation in a Family with Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alkalay, Avishai A.; Guo, Tingwei; Montagna, Cristina; Digilio, M. Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Morrow, Bernice

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies of a male child carrying the 22q11.2 deletion common in patients with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome revealed an unexpected rearrangement of the 22q11.2 region in his normal appearing mother. The mother carries a 3 Mb deletion on one copy and a reciprocal, similar sized duplication on the other copy of chromosome 22q11.2 as revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array comparative genome hybridization analysis. The most parsimonious mechanism for the rearrangement is a mitotic non-allelic homologous recombination event in a cell in the early embryo soon after fertilization. The normal phenotype of the mother can be explained by the theory of genetic dosage compensation. This is the second documented case of such an event for this or any genomic disorder. This finding helps to reinforce this phenomenon in a human model, and has significant implications for genetic counseling of future children. PMID:21337693

  5. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11) deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karpinski, Beverly A.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Fralish, Matthew S.; Nuwayhid, Samer; Zohn, Irene E.; Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA) signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V), glossopharyngeal (IX) or vagus (X) cranial nerves (CNs) that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS. PMID:24357327

  6. Genetic Counseling for the 22q11.2 Deletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.

    2008-01-01

    Because of advances in palliative medical care, children with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome are surviving into adulthood. An increase in reproductive fitness will likely follow necessitating enhanced access to genetic counseling for these patients and their families. Primary care physicians/obstetric practitioners are in a unique position to…

  7. Minimum prevalence of chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.I.; Cross, I.E.; Burn, J.

    1994-09-01

    Submicroscopic deletions from within chromosome 22q11 are associated with DiGeorge (DGS), velocardiofacial (VCFS) and conotruncal anomaly syndromes and isolated congenital heart defects. In 1993 our pediatric cardiologists clinically referred all children in whom a chromosome 22q11 deletion was suspected for fluorescent in situ hybridization studies using probes from the DGS critical region. 10 affected individuals have been identified to date from the children born in 1993 in the Northern Region served exclusively by our center. A further case, the subsequent pregnancy in one of these families was affected and terminated on the basis of a major heart malformation. In the years 1988-92, for which we have complete ascertainment, there were 1009 heart defects among 191,700 births (mean 202 per annum). Thus we estimate that chromosome 22q11 deletions were the cause of at least 5% of congenital heart disease. As not all children with chromosome 22q11 deletions have a heart defect, this gives an estimated minimum prevalence of 1/4000 live births.

  8. Pachygyria, seizures, hypotonia, and growth retardation in a patient with an atypical 1.33Mb inherited microduplication at 22q11.23.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiazhen; Zhao, Lijuan; Chen, Chen; Peng, Ying; Xia, Yan; Tang, Guizhi; Bai, Ting; Zhang, Yanghui; Ma, Ruiyu; Guo, Ruolan; Mei, Libin; Liang, Desheng; Cao, Qinying; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-09-10

    22q11.2 microduplication syndrome was recently described as a new disorder with variable clinical features that ranged from normal to mental retardation and with congenital defects. According to published reports, majority of patients with 22q11.2 duplications inherit these from unaffected parents rather than by de novo mutations, which is different from most microduplication/microdeletion syndromes. In this study, we report a patient that carried a paternally inherited atypical 1.33Mb duplication at 22q11.23. The proband (or proposita) presented with hypotonia, feeding difficulties, intractable epilepsy, hearing disability, and pachygyria. A pachygyria phenotype had not been previously reported to be associated with a 22q11 microduplication syndrome. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses based on standard G-banding, SNP array, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed for the proband and her parents. An atypical 1.33Mb duplication at 22q11.23 was detected in both the proband and her father. Thus, our findings verify the pathogenicity and diverse phenotypes of 22q11.2 microduplication and expand its phenotypic spectrum. PMID:26099517

  9. Phenotypic and genotypic overlap between atelosteogenesis type 2 and diastrophic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; van der Harten, H J; Beemer, F A; Kleijer, W J; Gitzelmann, R; Steinmann, B; Superti-Furga, A

    1996-12-01

    Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene DTDST have been associated with a family of chondrodysplasias that comprises, in order of increasing severity, diastrophic dysplasia (DTD), atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO2), and achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG1B). To learn more about the molecular basis of DTDST chondrodysplasias and about genotype-phenotype correlations, we studied fibroblast cultures of three new patients: one with AO-2, one with DTD, and one with an intermediate phenotype (AO2/DTD). Reduced incorporation of inorganic sulfate into macromolecules was found in all three. Each of the three patients was found to be heterozygous for a c862t transition predicting a R279W substitution in the third extracellular loop of DTDST. In two patients (DTD and AO2/DTD), no other structural mutation was found, but polymerase chain reaction amplification and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of fibroblast cDNA showed reduced mRNA levels of the wild-type DTDST allele: these two patients may be compound heterozygotes for the "Finnish" mutation (as yet uncharacterized at the DNA level), which causes reduced expression of DTDST. The third patient (with AO2) had the R279W mutation compounded with a novel mutation, the deletion of cytosine 418 (delta c418), predicting a frameshift with premature termination. Also the delta c418 allele was underrepresented in the cDNA, in accordance with previous observations that premature stop codons reduce mRNA levels. The presence of the DTDST R279W mutation in a total of 11 patients with AO2 or DTD emphasizes the overlap between these conditions. This mutation has not been found so far in 8 analyzed ACG1B patients, suggesting that it allows some residual activity of the sulfate transporter. PMID:8931695

  10. Modeling a model: Mouse genetics, 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, and disorders of cortical circuit development.

    PubMed

    Meechan, Daniel W; Maynard, Thomas M; Tucker, Eric S; Fernandez, Alejandra; Karpinski, Beverly A; Rothblat, Lawrence A; LaMantia, Anthony-S

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the developmental etiology of autistic spectrum disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia remains a major challenge for establishing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to these common, difficult-to-treat diseases that compromise neural circuits in the cerebral cortex. One aspect of this challenge is the breadth and overlap of ASD, ADHD, and SCZ deficits; another is the complexity of mutations associated with each, and a third is the difficulty of analyzing disrupted development in at-risk or affected human fetuses. The identification of distinct genetic syndromes that include behavioral deficits similar to those in ASD, ADHC and SCZ provides a critical starting point for meeting this challenge. We summarize clinical and behavioral impairments in children and adults with one such genetic syndrome, the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, routinely called 22q11DS, caused by micro-deletions of between 1.5 and 3.0 MB on human chromosome 22. Among many syndromic features, including cardiovascular and craniofacial anomalies, 22q11DS patients have a high incidence of brain structural, functional, and behavioral deficits that reflect cerebral cortical dysfunction and fall within the spectrum that defines ASD, ADHD, and SCZ. We show that developmental pathogenesis underlying this apparent genetic "model" syndrome in patients can be defined and analyzed mechanistically using genomically accurate mouse models of the deletion that causes 22q11DS. We conclude that "modeling a model", in this case 22q11DS as a model for idiopathic ASD, ADHD and SCZ, as well as other behavioral disorders like anxiety frequently seen in 22q11DS patients, in genetically engineered mice provides a foundation for understanding the causes and improving diagnosis and therapy for these disorders of cortical circuit development. PMID:25866365

  11. Modeling a model: Mouse genetics, 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, and disorders of cortical circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Fernandez, Alejandra; Karpinski, Beverly A.; Rothblat, Lawrence A.; LaMantia, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the developmental etiology of autistic spectrum disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia remains a major challenge for establishing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to these common, difficult-to-treat diseases that compromise neural circuits in the cerebral cortex. One aspect of this challenge is the breadth and overlap of ASD, ADHD, and SCZ deficits; another is the complexity of mutations associated with each, and a third is the difficulty of analyzing disrupted development in at-risk or affected human fetuses. The identification of distinct genetic syndromes that include behavioral deficits similar to those in ASD, ADHC and SCZ provides a critical starting point for meeting this challenge. We summarize clinical and behavioral impairments in children and adults with one such genetic syndrome, the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, routinely called 22q11DS, caused by micro-deletions of between 1.5 and 3.0 MB on human chromosome 22. Among many syndromic features, including cardiovascular and craniofacial anomalies, 22q11DS patients have a high incidence of brain structural, functional, and behavioral deficits that reflect cerebral cortical dysfunction and fall within the spectrum that defines ASD, ADHD, and SCZ. We show that developmental pathogenesis underlying this apparent genetic “model” syndrome in patients can be defined and analyzed mechanistically using genomically accurate mouse models of the deletion that causes 22q11DS. We conclude that “modeling a model”, in this case 22q11DS as a model for idiopathic ASD, ADHD and SCZ, as well as other behavioral disorders like anxiety frequently seen in 22q11DS patients, in genetically engineered mice provides a foundation for understanding the causes and improving diagnosis and therapy for these disorders of cortical circuit development. PMID:25866365

  12. Divergent Patterns of Social Cognition Performance in Autism and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Kathryn L.; Melville, Jessica L.; Rich, Dominique; Strutt, Paul A.; Cooper, Gavin; Loughland, Carmel M.; Schall, Ulrich; Campbell, Linda E.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with developmental disorders frequently report a range of social cognition deficits including difficulties identifying facial displays of emotion. This study examined the specificity of face emotion processing deficits in adolescents with either autism or 22q11DS compared to typically developing (TD) controls. Two tasks (face emotion…

  13. Genotype–phenotype relationship in three cases with overlapping 19p13.12 microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Bonaglia, Maria C; Marelli, Susan; Novara, Francesca; Commodaro, Simona; Borgatti, Renato; Minardo, Grazia; Memo, Luigi; Mangold, Elisabeth; Beri, Silvana; Zucca, Claudio; Brambilla, Daniele; Molteni, Massimo; Giorda, Roberto; Weber, Ruthild G; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2010-01-01

    We describe the detailed clinical and molecular characterization of three patients (aged 7, 84/12 and 31 years) with overlapping microdeletions in 19p13.12, extending to 19p13.13 in two cases. The patients share the following clinical features with a recently reported 10-year-old girl with a 19p13.12 microdeletion: mental retardation (MR), psychomotor and language delay, hearing impairment, brachycephaly, anteverted nares and ear malformations. All patients share a 359-kb deleted region in 19p13.12 harboring six genes (LPHN1, DDX39, CD97, PKN1, PTGER1 and GIPC1), several of which may be MR candidates because of their function and expression pattern. LPHN1 and PKN1 are the most appealing; LPHN1 for its interaction with Shank family proteins, and PKN1 because it is involved in a variety of functions in neurons, including cytoskeletal organization. Haploinsufficiency of GIPC1 may contribute to hearing impairment for its interaction with myosin VI. A behavioral phenotype was observed in all three patients; it was characterized by overactive disorder associated with MR and stereotyped movements (ICD10) in one patient and hyperactivity in the other two. As Ptger1-null mice show behavioral inhibition and impulsive aggression with defective social interaction, PTGER1 haploinsufficiency may be responsible for the behavioral traits observed in these patients. PMID:20648052

  14. Evidence for a chromosome 22q susceptibility locus for some schizophrenics

    SciTech Connect

    Pulver, A.E.; Wolyniec, P.; Nestadt, G.

    1994-09-01

    Recent reports from linkage studies suggests that in some families there may be a gene associated with schizophrenia on chromosome 22q. Given the probable heterogeneity of schizophrenia, further exploration of this region was undertaken. The region was examined for candidate genes and diseases reported to have some psychiatric manifestations. Studies were initiated to examine the the potential phenotypic and molecular similarity between schizophrenia and velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a syndrome associated with an interstitial deletion of 22q11.2. Phenotypic expression: (1) psychiatric evaluations of VCFS patients and their relatives found a high rate of DSM III-R schizophrenia in the patients and of psychotic illness in their 2nd and 3rd degree relatives. (2) 160 schizophrenic patients from the Maryland Epidemiology Sample (MES) were evaluated for the presence of typical facies seen in VCFS. Rating a 5-point scale, {open_quotes}5{close_quotes} being most likely, 15 (9.4%) were rated {open_quotes}5{close_quotes} and 27 (16.9%) were rated {open_quotes}4{close_quotes} for the VCFS-like facial features. Molecular characteristics: fluorescent in situ hybridization methods (FISH) identified 3 schizophrenics among 60 in the MES with the microdeletion of probe sc11.lab commonly deleted in VCFS subjects. This work provides a model for the mapping of complex phenotypes such schizophrenia using both genetic and epidemiological methods.

  15. 22q13.3 Deletion Syndrome: Clinical and Molecular Analysis Using Array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, S.U.; del Gaudio, D.; German, J.R.; Peters, S.U.; Ou, Z.; Bader, P.I.; Berg, J.S.; Blazo, M.; Brown, C.W.; Graham, B.H.; Grebe, T.A.; Lalani, S.; Irons, M.; Sparagana, S.; Williams, M.; Phillips, J.A.; Beaudet, A.L.; Stankiewicz, P.; Patel, A.; Cheung, S.W.; Sahoo, T.

    2011-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome results from loss of terminal segments of varying sizes at 22qter. Few genotype–phenotype correlations have been found but all patients have mental retardation and severe delay, or absence of, expressive speech. We carried out clinical and molecular characterization of 13 patients. Developmental delay and speech abnormalities were common to all and comparable in frequency and severity to previously reported cases. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization showed the deletions to vary from 95 kb to 8.5 Mb. We also carried out high-resolution 244K array comparative genomic hybridization in 10 of 13 patients, that defined the proximal and distal breakpoints of each deletion and helped determine the size, extent, and gene content within the deletion. Two patients had a smaller 95 kb terminal deletion with breakpoints within the SHANK3 gene while three other patients had a similar 5.5 Mb deletion implying the recurrent nature of these deletions. The two largest deletions were found in patients with ring chromosome 22. No correlation could be made with deletion size and phenotype although complete/partial SHANK3 was deleted in all patients. There are very few reports on array comparative genomic hybridization analysis on patients with the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome, and we aim to accurately characterize these patients both clinically and at the molecular level, to pave the way for further genotype–phenotype correlations. PMID:20186804

  16. Whole-Genome Sequencing Suggests Schizophrenia Risk Mechanisms in Humans with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Merico, Daniele; Zarrei, Mehdi; Costain, Gregory; Ogura, Lucas; Alipanahi, Babak; Gazzellone, Matthew J.; Butcher, Nancy J.; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Chow, Eva W. C.; Andrade, Danielle M.; Frey, Brendan J.; Marshall, Christian R.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletions impart a high but incomplete risk for schizophrenia. Possible mechanisms include genome-wide effects of DGCR8 haploinsufficiency. In a proof-of-principle study to assess the power of this model, we used high-quality, whole-genome sequencing of nine individuals with 22q11.2 deletions and extreme phenotypes (schizophrenia, or no psychotic disorder at age >50 years). The schizophrenia group had a greater burden of rare, damaging variants impacting protein-coding neurofunctional genes, including genes involved in neuron projection (nominal P = 0.02, joint burden of three variant types). Variants in the intact 22q11.2 region were not major contributors. Restricting to genes affected by a DGCR8 mechanism tended to amplify between-group differences. Damaging variants in highly conserved long intergenic noncoding RNA genes also were enriched in the schizophrenia group (nominal P = 0.04). The findings support the 22q11.2 deletion model as a threshold-lowering first hit for schizophrenia risk. If applied to a larger and thus better-powered cohort, this appears to be a promising approach to identify genome-wide rare variants in coding and noncoding sequence that perturb gene networks relevant to idiopathic schizophrenia. Similarly designed studies exploiting genetic models may prove useful to help delineate the genetic architecture of other complex phenotypes. PMID:26384369

  17. Whole-Genome Sequencing Suggests Schizophrenia Risk Mechanisms in Humans with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merico, Daniele; Zarrei, Mehdi; Costain, Gregory; Ogura, Lucas; Alipanahi, Babak; Gazzellone, Matthew J; Butcher, Nancy J; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Chow, Eva W C; Andrade, Danielle M; Frey, Brendan J; Marshall, Christian R; Scherer, Stephen W; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-11-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletions impart a high but incomplete risk for schizophrenia. Possible mechanisms include genome-wide effects of DGCR8 haploinsufficiency. In a proof-of-principle study to assess the power of this model, we used high-quality, whole-genome sequencing of nine individuals with 22q11.2 deletions and extreme phenotypes (schizophrenia, or no psychotic disorder at age >50 years). The schizophrenia group had a greater burden of rare, damaging variants impacting protein-coding neurofunctional genes, including genes involved in neuron projection (nominal P = 0.02, joint burden of three variant types). Variants in the intact 22q11.2 region were not major contributors. Restricting to genes affected by a DGCR8 mechanism tended to amplify between-group differences. Damaging variants in highly conserved long intergenic noncoding RNA genes also were enriched in the schizophrenia group (nominal P = 0.04). The findings support the 22q11.2 deletion model as a threshold-lowering first hit for schizophrenia risk. If applied to a larger and thus better-powered cohort, this appears to be a promising approach to identify genome-wide rare variants in coding and noncoding sequence that perturb gene networks relevant to idiopathic schizophrenia. Similarly designed studies exploiting genetic models may prove useful to help delineate the genetic architecture of other complex phenotypes. PMID:26384369

  18. A deletion and a duplication in distal 22q11.2 deletion syndrome region. Clinical implications and review

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Luis; Nevado, Julián; Santos, Fernando; Heine-Suñer, Damià; Martinez-Glez, Victor; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Palomo, Rebeca; Delicado, Alicia; Pajares, Isidora López; Palomares, María; García-Guereta, Luis; Valverde, Eva; Hawkins, Federico; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals affected with DiGeorge and Velocardiofacial syndromes present with both phenotypic diversity and variable expressivity. The most frequent clinical features include conotruncal congenital heart defects, velopharyngeal insufficiency, hypocalcemia and a characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism. The etiology in most patients is a 3 Mb recurrent deletion in region 22q11.2. However, cases of infrequent deletions and duplications with different sizes and locations have also been reported, generally with a milder, slightly different phenotype for duplications but with no clear genotype-phenotype correlation to date. Methods We present a 7 month-old male patient with surgically corrected ASD and multiple VSDs, and dysmorphic facial features not clearly suggestive of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and a newborn male infant with cleft lip and palate and upslanting palpebral fissures. Karyotype, FISH, MLPA, microsatellite markers segregation studies and SNP genotyping by array-CGH were performed in both patients and parents. Results Karyotype and FISH with probe N25 were normal for both patients. MLPA analysis detected a partial de novo 1.1 Mb deletion in one patient and a novel partial familial 0.4 Mb duplication in the other. Both of these alterations were located at a distal position within the commonly deleted region in 22q11.2. These rearrangements were confirmed and accurately characterized by microsatellite marker segregation studies and SNP array genotyping. Conclusion The phenotypic diversity found for deletions and duplications supports a lack of genotype-phenotype correlation in the vicinity of the LCRC-LCRD interval of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region, whereas the high presence of duplications in normal individuals supports their role as polymorphisms. We suggest that any hypothetical correlation between the clinical phenotype and the size and location of these alterations may be masked by other genetic and/or epigenetic modifying factors. PMID

  19. Overlapping phenotypes in complex spastic paraplegias SPG11, SPG15, SPG35 and SPG48.

    PubMed

    Pensato, Viviana; Castellotti, Barbara; Gellera, Cinzia; Pareyson, Davide; Ciano, Claudia; Nanetti, Lorenzo; Salsano, Ettore; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Sarto, Elisa; Eoli, Marica; Moroni, Isabella; Soliveri, Paola; Lamperti, Elena; Chiapparini, Luisa; Di Bella, Daniela; Taroni, Franco; Mariotti, Caterina

    2014-07-01

    in the SPG21/ACP33 and SPG54/DDH2H genes. Our study confirms that the phenotype of patients with SPG11 and with SPG15 is homogeneous, whereas cases with SPG35 and with SPG48 cases present overlapping features, and a broader clinical spectrum. The large group of non-diagnosed subjects (51%) suggests further genetic heterogeneity. The observation of common clinical features in association with defects in different causative genes, suggest a general vulnerability of the corticospinal tract axons to a wide spectrum of cellular alterations. PMID:24833714

  20. Asthma COPD Overlap Syndrome on CT Densitometry: A Distinct Phenotype from COPD.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanli; Zhai, Xiaoli; Li, Kun; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Lu, Yong; Pan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Kewu; Zhai, Renyou

    2016-08-01

    Patients with asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) are an important but poorly characterized group. This study sought to explore the distinct characteristics of ACOS on CT densitometry. The study population was randomly selected from communities via questionnaires. All participants underwent low-dose volumetric chest CT both before and after bronchodilator administration. Each CT scan was performed at full-inspiration and full-expiration for CT densitometry. Emphysema index (EI), air trapping (AT), mean lung density (MLD) and total lung volume (TLV) were measured and compared between the ACOS and COPD groups. The distributions of both EI and AT were compared between patients with ACOS and COPD. The variations between the pre- and post-BD measurements observed in patients with ACOS were compared with those in patients with COPD. A total of 71 patients completed the study, including 32 patients with COPD and 39 patients with ACOS. The patients with ACOS exhibited lower EI and more upper-zone-predominant EI distributions, compared with the patients with COPD. No significant differences were exhibited in AT and its distribution. Following bronchodilator administration, the variations in AT and expiratory MLD were greater in patients with ACOS than in patients with COPD. No differences were observed in the variations of EI and inspiratory MLD. Our results indicate that patients with ACOS have lower extent of emphysema and different emphysema distribution, as well as greater post-BD variations in air trapping, compared with patients with COPD. These findings suggest that CT densitometry characterizes ACOS as a distinct phenotype from COPD. PMID:26742511

  1. Identification of familial and de novo microduplications of 22q11.21–q11.23 distal to the 22q11.21 microdeletion syndrome region

    PubMed Central

    Coppinger, Justine; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Zackai, Elaine; Shane, Kate; Atkin, Joan F.; Asamoah, Alexander; Leland, Robert; Weaver, David D.; Lansky-Shafer, Susan; Schmidt, Karen; Feldman, Heidi; Cohen, William; Phalin, Judy; Powell, Berkley; Ballif, Blake C.; Theisen, Aaron; Geiger, Elizabeth; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Shaikh, Tamim H.; Saitta, Sulagna; Bejjani, Bassem A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.

    2009-01-01

    Deletions of the 22q11.2 region distal to the 22q11.21 microdeletion syndrome region have recently been described in individuals with mental retardation and congenital anomalies. Because these deletions are mediated by low-copy repeats (LCRs), located distal to the 22q11.21 DiGeorge/velocardiofacial microdeletion region, duplications are predicted to occur with a frequency equal to the deletion. However, few microduplications of this region have been reported. We report the identification of 18 individuals with microduplications of 22q11.21–q11.23. The duplication boundaries for all individuals are within LCRs distal to the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial microdeletion region. Clinical records for nine subjects reveal shared characteristics, but also several examples of contradicting clinical features (e.g. macrocephaly versus microcephaly and upslanting versus downslanting palpebral fissures). Of 12 cases for whom parental DNA samples were available for testing, one is de novo and 11 inherited the microduplication from a parent, three of whom reportedly have learning problems or developmental delay. The variable phenotypes and preponderance of familial cases obfuscate the clinical relevance of the molecular data and emphasize the need for careful parental assessments and clinical correlations. PMID:19193630

  2. Phenotypic overlap between Blepharo-naso-facial syndrome and Nablus mask-like syndrome. Report from the first Indian family.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Manav; Rastogi, Anju; Singh, Ankur; Kumar, Kamlesh; Kapoor, Seema; Bansal, Yuvika; Goel, Shilpa

    2013-01-01

    We describe two siblings with epiphora, telecanthus, expressionless face, thick facial skin, bulky nose and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Constellation of these features presented a phenotypic overlap with Blepharo-naso-facial syndrome (BNFS) and Nablus mask-like syndrome (NMLS). They in addition had posterior helical pits. The molecular basis of NMLS is known, while BNFS remains an elusive disorder. We report the first Indian family with features having significant overlap between the two but we attempt to summarize the frequency of reported features and bring out the most consistent features for these two syndromes for the treating clinician. PMID:22697357

  3. Confirmation that the conotruncal anomaly face syndrome is associated with a deletion within 22q11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Rumiko; Takao, Atsuyoshi; Kimura, Misa; Kondo, Chisato; Ando, Masahiko; Momma, Kazuo; Imamura, Shin-ichiro; Joh-o, Kunitaka; Ikeda, Kazuo; Nishibatake, Makoto

    1994-11-15

    The so-called {open_quotes}conotruncal anomaly face syndrome{close_quotes} (CTAFS) is characterized by a peculiar facial appearance associated with congenital heart disease (CHD), especially cardiac outflow tract defects such as tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), double outlet ring ventricle (DORV), and truncus arteriosus (TAC). CTAFS and the DiGeorge anomaly (DGA) have many similar phenotypic characteristics, suggesting that they share a common cause. In many cases DGA is known to be associated with monosomy for a region of chromosome 22q11.2. Fifty CTAFS patients and 10 DGA patients, 11 parents couples and 10 mothers of CTAFS patients, and 3 parents couples and 2 mothers of DGA patients were examined by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using the N25 (D22S75) DGCR probe (Oncor). Monosomy for a region of 22q11.2 was found in 42 CTAFS, 9 DGA, 4 mothers, and 1 father who had CTAF without CHD. The remaining 8 CTAFS patients, 1 DGA patient and 1 mother who had questionable CTAF without CHD, showed no such chromosome abnormality. For the control, 60 patients who had CHD without CTAF or other know malformation syndromes were examined and had no deletion of 22q11.2. Therefore, we conclude that CTAFS is a part of the CATCH 22 syndrome; cardiac defects, abnormal faces, thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and hypocalcemia (CATCH) resulting from 22q11.2 deletions. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Secondary Immunologic Consequences in Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (DiGeorge Syndrome/Velocardiofacial Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Zemble, R.; Prak, E. Luning; McDonald, K.; McDonald-McGinn, D.; Zackai, E.; Sullivan, K.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that patients with Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion (Ch22q11.2D) have an increased prevalence of atopic and autoimmune disease and this has been without explanation. We hypothesized that the increase in atopy was due to homeostatic proliferation of T cells leading to a Th2 skew. We performed intracellular cytokine staining to define Th1/Th2 phenotypes in toddlers (early homeostatic proliferation) and adults (post homeostatic proliferation) with this syndrome. To attempt to understand the predisposition to autoimmunity we performed immunophenotyping analyses to define Th17 cells and B cell subsets. Adult Ch22q11.2D patients had a higher percentage of IL-4+CD4+ T cells than controls. Th17 cells were no different in patients and controls. In addition, adult Ch22q11.2D syndrome patients had significantly lower switched memory B cells, suggesting a dysregulated B cell compartment. These studies demonstrate that the decrement in T cell production has secondary consequences in the immune system, which could mold the patients’ clinical picture. PMID:20472505

  5. Molecular definition of 22q11 deletions in 151 velo-cardio-facial syndrome patients.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, C; Sirotkin, H; Pandita, R; Goldberg, R; McKie, J; Wadey, R; Patanjali, S R; Weissman, S M; Anyane-Yeboa, K; Warburton, D; Scambler, P; Shprintzen, R; Kucherlapati, R; Morrow, B E

    1997-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is a relatively common developmental disorder characterized by craniofacial anomalies and conotruncal heart defects. Many VCFS patients have hemizygous deletions for a part of 22q11, suggesting that haploinsufficiency in this region is responsible for its etiology. Because most cases of VCFS are sporadic, portions of 22q11 may be prone to rearrangement. To understand the molecular basis for chromosomal deletions, we defined the extent of the deletion, by genotyping 151 VCFS patients and performing haplotype analysis on 105, using 15 consecutive polymorphic markers in 22q11. We found that 83% had a deletion and >90% of these had a similar approximately 3 Mb deletion, suggesting that sequences flanking the common breakpoints are susceptible to rearrangement. We found no correlation between the presence or size of the deletion and the phenotype. To further define the chromosomal breakpoints among the VCFS patients, we developed somatic hybrid cell lines from a set of VCFS patients. An 11-kb resolution physical map of a 1,080-kb region that includes deletion breakpoints was constructed, incorporating genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) isolated by the hybridization selection method. The ordered markers were used to examine the two separated copies of chromosome 22 in the somatic hybrid cell lines. In some cases, we were able to map the chromosome breakpoints within a single cosmid. A 480-kb critical region for VCFS has been delineated, including the genes for GSCL, CTP, CLTD, HIRA, and TMVCF, as well as a number of novel ordered ESTs. PMID:9326327

  6. Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Exhibit Impaired Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Ling M.; Riggins, Tracy; Harvey, Danielle; Cabaral, Margarita; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been shown to have impairments in processing spatiotemporal information. The authors examined whether children with 22q11.2DS exhibit impairments in spatial working memory performance due to these weaknesses, even when controlling for maintenance of attention. Children with…

  7. 22q11 chromosome abnormalities and the cleft service.

    PubMed

    Nugent, N; McGillivary, A; Earley, M J

    2010-04-01

    Deletion of chromosome 22q11 gives rise to a spectrum of anomalies, including cleft palate. These are grouped together as the DiGeorge or velocardiofacial syndrome. Patients with this chromosomal abnormality account for a small, but noteworthy proportion of patients attending our cleft service. They frequently have other significant comorbidities consistent with their diagnosis. Over a ten-year period, 16 patients within our cleft service have been diagnosed, using chromosome analysis, as having deletions at 22q11. All had either a cleft palate and/or velopharyngeal incompetence, for which they underwent repair of the cleft palate or pharyngoplasty. Several have required secondary palate surgery following initial palate surgery. Poor quality of speech was the indication for secondary procedures in the majority of cases. Fourteen of the 16 have other comorbidities, ranging from congenital heart disease to ocular abnormalities. In addition, 15 of the 16 have developmental delays and/or learning difficulties. Other specialties, such as ENT, cardiology, genetics and ophthalmology have been involved in the care of all these patients. Although comprising only a small proportion of patients attending a cleft team, the diagnosis of this chromosomal abnormality is significant, as these patients may require substantial input of resources and the expertise of several specialties. Early recognition of features of this entity and diagnosis can aid more efficient intervention. PMID:19249264

  8. Fine Mapping on Chromosome 10q22-q23 Implicates Neuregulin 3 in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Lung; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Lasseter, Virginia K.; McGrath, John A.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Liang, Kung-Yee; Nestadt, Gerald; Feng, Ningping; Steel, Gary; Cutting, Andrew S.; Wolyniec, Paula; Pulver, Ann E.; Valle, David

    2009-01-01

    Linkage studies have implicated 10q22-q23 as a schizophrenia (SZ) susceptibility locus in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) and Han Chinese from Taiwan populations. To further explore our previous linkage signal in the AJ population (NPL score: 4.27, empirical p = 2 × 10−5), we performed a peakwide association fine mapping study by using 1414 SNPs across ∼12.5 Mb in 10q22-q23. We genotyped 1515 AJ individuals, including 285 parent-child trios, 173 unrelated cases, and 487 unrelated controls. We analyzed the binary diagnostic phenotype of SZ and 9 heritable quantitative traits derived from a principal components factor analysis of 73 items from our consensus diagnostic ratings and direct assessment interviews. Although no marker withstood multiple test correction for association with the binary SZ phenotype, we found strong evidence of association by using the “delusion” factor as the quantitative trait at three SNPs (rs10883866, rs10748842, and rs6584400) located in a 13 kb interval in intron 1 of Neuregulin 3 (NRG3). Our best p value from family-based association analysis was 7.26 × 10−7. We replicated this association in the collection of 173 unrelated AJ cases (p = 1.55 × 10−2), with a combined p value of 2.30 × 10−7. After performing 10,000 permutations of each of the phenotypes, we estimated the empirical study-wide significance across all 9 factors (90,000 permutations) to be p = 2.7 × 10−3. NRG3 is primarily expressed in the central nervous system and is one of three paralogs of NRG1, a gene strongly implicated in SZ. These biological properties together with our linkage and association results strongly support NRG3 as a gene involved in SZ. PMID:19118813

  9. Microduplication 22q11.2: a description of the clinical, developmental and behavioral characteristics during childhood.

    PubMed

    Van Campenhout, S; Devriendt, K; Breckpot, J; Frijns, J-P; Peeters, H; Van Buggenhout, G; Van Esch, H; Maes, B; Swillen, A

    2012-01-01

    Microduplication 22q11.2 is a recently discovered genomic disorder. So far, targeted research on the cognitive and behavioral characteristics of individuals with this microduplication is limited. Therefore, 11 Flemish children (3-13 years old) with a microduplication 22q 1.2 were investigated in order to describe their clinical, developmental and behavioral characteristics. We measured their general intelligence, visual-motor capacities, attention, behavioral problems and characteristics of autism. In addition, there was an interview with the parents on developmental history and we reviewed available information from other specialists. The results show that the cognitive and behavioral phenotype of the children with microduplication 22q.11.2 is very wide and heterogeneous. Some of the children have a cognitively nearly normal development whereas others are more severely affected. All children had some degree of developmental delay and some of them have an intellectual disability. The most common clinical features include congenital malformations such as heart defects and cleft lip, feeding problems, hearing impairment and facial dysmorphism. The most common non-medical problems are learning difficulties, motor impairment, attention deficits, social problems and behavioral problems. There is no correlation between the size of the duplication and the phenotype. PMID:22876571

  10. The Identification of Microdeletion and Reciprocal Microduplication in 22q11.2 Using High-Resolution CMA Technology

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Ana Julia Cunha; Pinto, Irene Plaza; Cunha, Damiana Mirian da Cruz e; Ribeiro, Cristiano Luiz; da Silva, Claudio Carlos; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino; Minasi, Lysa Bernardes

    2016-01-01

    The chromosome 22q11.2 region has long been implicated in genomic diseases. Some genomic regions exhibit numerous low copy repeats with high identity in which they provide increased genomic instability and mediate deletions and duplications in many disorders. DiGeorge Syndrome is the most common deletion syndrome and reciprocal duplications could be occurring in half of the frequency of microdeletions. We described five patients with phenotypic variability that carries deletions or reciprocal duplications at 22q11.2 detected by Chromosomal Microarray Analysis. The CytoScan HD technology was used to detect changes in the genome copy number variation of patients who had clinical indication to global developmental delay and a normal karyotype. We observed in our study three microdeletions and two microduplications in 22q11.2 region with variable intervals containing known genes and unstudied transcripts as well as the LCRs that are often flanking and within this genomic rearrangement. The identification of these variants is of particular interest because it may provide insight into genes or genomic regions that are crucial for specific phenotypic manifestations and are useful to assist in the quest for understanding the mechanisms subjacent to genomic deletions and duplications. PMID:27123452

  11. Refining the 22q11.2 deletion breakpoints in DiGeorge syndrome by aCGH.

    PubMed

    Bittel, D C; Yu, S; Newkirk, H; Kibiryeva, N; Holt, A; Butler, M G; Cooley, L D

    2009-01-01

    Hemizygous deletions of the chromosome 22q11.2 region result in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome also referred to as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial or Shprintzen syndromes. The phenotype is variable but commonly includes conotruncal cardiac defects, palatal abnormalities, learning and behavioral problems, immune deficiency, and facial anomalies. Four distinct highly homologous blocks of low copy number repeat sequences (LCRs) flank the deletion region. Mispairing of LCRs during meiosis with unequal meiotic exchange is assumed to cause the recurrent and consistent deletions. The proximal LCR is reportedly located at 22q11.2 from 17.037 to 17.083 Mb while the distal LCR is located from 19.835 to 19.880 Mb. Although the chromosome breakpoints are thought to localize to the LCRs, the positions of the breakpoints have been investigated in only a few individuals. Therefore, we used high resolution oligonucleotide-based 244K microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to resolve the breakpoints in a cohort of 20 subjects with known 22q11.2 deletions. We also investigated copy number variation (CNV) in the rest of the genome. The 22q11.2 breaks occurred on either side of the LCR in our subjects, although more commonly on the distal side of the reported proximal LCR. The proximal breakpoints in our subjects spanned the region from 17.036 to 17.398 Mb. This region includes the genes DGCR6 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region protein 6) and PRODH (proline dehydrogenase 1), along with three open reading frames that may encode proteins of unknown function. The distal breakpoints spanned the region from 19.788 to 20.122 Mb. This region includes the genes GGT2 (gamma-glutamyltransferase-like protein 2), HIC2 (hypermethylated in cancer 2), and multiple transcripts of unknown function. The genes in these two breakpoint regions are variably hemizygous depending on the location of the breakpoints. Our 20 subjects had 254 CNVs throughout the genome, 94 duplications and 160 deletions

  12. Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Exhibit Impaired Spatial Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ling M; Riggins, Tracy; Harvey, Danielle; Cabaral, Margarita; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been shown to have impairments in processing spatiotemporal information. We examined whether children with 22q11.2DS exhibit impairments in spatial working memory performance due to these weaknesses, even when controlling for maintenance of attention. Children with 22q11.2DS (n = 47) and typically developing controls (n = 49) ages 6–15 years saw images within a grid and after a delay, then indicated the positions of the images in the correct temporal order. Children with 22q11.2DS made more spatial and temporal errors than controls. Females with 22q11.2DS made more spatial and temporal errors than males. These results extend findings of impaired spatiotemporal processing into the memory domain in 22q11.2DS by documenting their influence on working memory performance. PMID:24679349

  13. Disrupted anatomic networks in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J Eric; Yi, James; Calkins, Monica E; Ruparel, Kosha; Roalf, David R; Cassidy, Amy; Souders, Margaret C; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H; Gur, Ruben C; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gur, Raquel E

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is an uncommon genetic disorder with an increased risk of psychosis. Although the neural substrates of psychosis and schizophrenia are not well understood, aberrations in cortical networks represent intriguing potential mechanisms. Investigations of anatomic networks within 22q11DS are sparse. We investigated group differences in anatomic network structure in 48 individuals with 22q11DS and 370 typically developing controls by analyzing covariance patterns in cortical thickness among 68 regions of interest using graph theoretical models. Subjects with 22q11DS had less robust geographic organization relative to the control group, particularly in the occipital and parietal lobes. Multiple global graph theoretical statistics were decreased in 22q11DS. These results are consistent with prior studies demonstrating decreased connectivity in 22q11DS using other neuroimaging methodologies. PMID:27622139

  14. Behavioral abnormalities are common and severe in patients with distal 22q11.2 microdeletions and microduplications

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Valerie; McRae, Anne; Dineen, Richard; Saulsberry, Alexandria; Hoganson, George; Schrift, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We describe six individuals with microdeletions and microduplications in the distal 22q11.2 region detected by microarray. Five of the abnormalities have breakpoints in the low-copy repeats (LCR) in this region and one patient has an atypical rearrangement. Two of the six patients with abnormalities in the region between LCR22 D–E have hearing loss, which has previously been reported only once in association with these abnormalities. We especially note the behavioral/neuropsychiatric problems, including the severity and early onset, in patients with distal 22q11.2 rearrangements. Our patients add to the genotype–phenotype correlations which are still being generated for these chromosomal anomalies. PMID:26247050

  15. Detection of overlapping protein complexes in gene expression, phenotype and pathways of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using Prorank based Fuzzy algorithm.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, P; Ramyachitra, D; Banupriya, D

    2016-04-15

    Proteins show their functional activity by interacting with other proteins and forms protein complexes since it is playing an important role in cellular organization and function. To understand the higher order protein organization, overlapping is an important step towards unveiling functional and evolutionary mechanisms behind biological networks. Most of the clustering algorithms do not consider the weighted as well as overlapping complexes. In this research, Prorank based Fuzzy algorithm has been proposed to find the overlapping protein complexes. The Fuzzy detection algorithm is incorporated in the Prorank algorithm after ranking step to find the overlapping community. The proposed algorithm executes in an iterative manner to compute the probability of robust clusters. The proposed and the existing algorithms were tested on different datasets such as PPI-D1, PPI-D2, Collins, DIP, Krogan Core and Krogan-Extended, gene expression such as GSE7645, GSE22269, GSE26923, pathways such as Meiosis, MAPK, Cell Cycle, phenotypes such as Yeast Heterogeneous and Yeast Homogeneous datasets. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm predicts protein complexes with better accuracy compared to other state of art algorithms. PMID:26809099

  16. Tetralogy of Fallot associated with deletion in the DiGeorge region of chromosome 22 (22q11)

    SciTech Connect

    D`Angelo, J.A.; Pillers, D.M.; Jett, P.L.

    1994-09-01

    Cardiac conotruncal defects, such as Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), are associated with DiGeorge syndrome which has been mapped to the q11 region of chromosome 22 and includes abnormalities of neural crest and branchial arch development. Patients with conotruncal defects and velo-cardio-facial syndrome may have defects in the 22q11 region but not show the complete DiGeorge phenotype consisting of cardiac, thymus, and parathyroid abnormalities. We report two neonates with TOF and small deletions in the DiGeorge region of chromosome 22 (46,XX,del(22)(q11.21q11.23) and 46,XY,del(22)(q11.2q11.2)) using both high-resolution cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The first patient is a female with TOF and a family history of congenital heart disease. The mother has pulmonic stenosis and a right-sided aortic arch, one brother has TOF, and a second brother has a large VSD. The patient had intrauterine growth retardation and had thrombocytopenia due to maternal IgG platelet-directed autoantibody. Lymphocyte populations, both T and B cells, were reduced in number but responded normally to stimulation. The findings were not attributed to a DiGeorge phenotype. Although she had transient neonatal hypocalcemia, her parathyroid hormone level was normal. The patient was not dysmorphic in the newborn period but her mother had features consistent with velo-cardio-facial syndrome. The second patient was a male with TOF who was not dysmorphic and had no other significant clinical findings and no family history of heart disease. Lymphocyte testing did not reveal a specific immunodeficiency. No significant postnatal hypocalcemia was noted. These cases illustrate that there is a wide spectrum of clinical features associated with defects of the 22q11 region. We recommend karyotype analysis, including FISH probes specific to the DiGeorge region, in any patient with conotruncal cardiac defects.

  17. Molecular diagnosis reveals genetic heterogeneity for the overlapping MKKS and BBS phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Elise; Durand, Myriam; Stoetzel, Corinne; Doray, Bérénice; Viville, Brigitte; Hellé, Sophie; Danse, Jean-Marc; Hamel, Christian; Bitoun, Pierre; Goldenberg, Alice; Finck, Sonia; Faivre, Laurence; Sigaudy, Sabine; Holder, Muriel; Vincent, Marie-Claire; Marion, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Verloes, Alain; Nisand, Israël; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Hydrometrocolpos and polydactyly diagnosed in the prenatal period or early childhood may raise diagnostic dilemmas especially in distinguishing McKusick-Kaufman syndrome (MKKS) and the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). These two conditions can initially overlap. With time, the additional features of BBS appearing in childhood, such as retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, learning disabilities and progressive renal dysfunction allow clear differentiation between BBS and MKKS. Genotype overlap also exists, as mutations in the MKKS-BBS6 gene are found in both syndromes. We report 7 patients diagnosed in the neonatal period with hydrometrocolpos and polydactyly who carry mutations in various BBS genes (BBS6, BBS2, BBS10, BBS8 and BBS12), stressing the importance of wide BBS genotyping in patients with this clinical association for diagnosis, prognosis and genetic counselling. PMID:21044901

  18. Default mode network connectivity and reciprocal social behavior in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Matthew J.; Karlsgodt, Katherine H.; Uddin, Lucina Q.; Chow, Carolyn; Congdon, Eliza; Jalbrzikowski, Maria

    2014-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a genetic mutation associated with disorders of cortical connectivity and social dysfunction. However, little is known about the functional connectivity (FC) of the resting brain in 22q11DS and its relationship with social behavior. A seed-based analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data was used to investigate FC associated with the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), in (26) youth with 22qDS and (51) demographically matched controls. Subsequently, the relationship between PCC connectivity and Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) scores was examined in 22q11DS participants. Relative to 22q11DS participants, controls showed significantly stronger FC between the PCC and other default mode network (DMN) nodes, including the precuneus, precentral gyrus and left frontal pole. 22q11DS patients did not show age-associated FC changes observed in typically developing controls. Increased connectivity between PCC, medial prefrontal regions and the anterior cingulate cortex, was associated with lower SRS scores (i.e. improved social competence) in 22q11DS. DMN integrity may play a key role in social information processing. We observed disrupted DMN connectivity in 22q11DS, paralleling reports from idiopathic autism and schizophrenia. Increased strength of long-range DMN connectivity was associated with improved social functioning in 22q11DS. These findings support a ‘developmental-disconnection’ hypothesis of symptom development in this disorder. PMID:23912681

  19. 8p23.1 Interstitial Deletion in a Patient with Congenital Cardiopathy, Neurobehavioral Disorders, and Minor Signs Suggesting 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Molck, Miriam C; Monteiro, Fabíola P; Simioni, Milena; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L

    2015-09-01

    Copy number variation studies of known disorders have the potential to improve the characterization of clinical phenotypes and may help identifying candidate genes and their pathways. The authors described a child with congenital heart disease, microcephaly, facial dysmorphisms, developmental delay, learning difficulties, and behavioral problems. There was initially a clinical suspicion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS), but molecular cytogenetic analysis (array genomic hybridization [aGH]) showed the presence of a de novo 3.6-Mb interstitial microdeletion in 8p23.1. The main features of 8p23.1 DS include congenital heart disease and behavioral problems, in addition to minor dysmorphisms and mental delay. Therefore, this article highlights the application of aGH to investigate 8p23.1 deletion in nonconfirmed 22q11.2 DS patients presenting neurobehavioral disorders, congenital cardiopathy, and minor dysmorphisms. PMID:26263419

  20. Performance on a computerized neurocognitive battery in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A comparison between US and Israeli cohorts.

    PubMed

    Yi, James J; Weinberger, Ronnie; Moore, Tyler M; Calkins, Monica E; Guri, Yael; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gur, Raquel E; Gothelf, Doron; Gur, Ruben C

    2016-07-01

    Increasingly, the effects of copy number variation (CNV) in the genome on brain function and behaviors are recognized as means to elucidate pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. Such studies require large samples and we characterized the neurocognitive profile of two cohorts of individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), the most common CNV associated with schizophrenia, in an effort to harmonize phenotyping in multi-site global collaborations. The Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (PCNB) was administered to individuals with 22q11DS in Philadelphia (PHL; n=155, aged 12-40) and Tel Aviv (TLV; n=59, aged 12-36). We examined effect sizes of performance differences between the cohorts and confirmed the factor structure of PCNB performance efficiency in the combined sample based on data from a large comparison community sample. The cohorts performed comparably with notable deficits in executive function, episodic memory and social cognition domains that were previously associated with abnormal neuroimaging findings in 22q11DS. In mixed model analysis, while there was a main effect for site for accuracy (number of correct response) and speed (time to correct response) independently, there were no main site effects for standardized efficiency (average of accuracy and speed). The fit of a structural model was excellent indicating that PCNB tests were related to the targeted cognitive domains. Thus, our results provide preliminary support for the use of the PCNB as an efficient tool for neurocognitive assessment in international 22q11DS collaborations. PMID:27200494

  1. Discordant phenotype of two overlapping deletions involving the PAX3 gene in chromosome 2q35.

    PubMed

    Pasteris, N G; Trask, B J; Sheldon, S; Gorski, J L

    1993-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS), the most common form of inherited congenital deafness, is a pleiotropic, autosomal dominant condition with variable penetrance and expressivity. WS is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The basis for the phenotypic variability observed among and between WS families is unknown. However, mutations within the paired-box gene, PAX3, have been associated with a subset of WS patients. In this report we use cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques to study a patient with WS type 3, a form of WS consisting of typical WS type 1 features plus mental retardation, microcephaly, and severe skeletal anomalies. Our results show that the WS3 patient has a de novo paternally derived deletion, del (2)(q35q36), that spans the genetic loci PAX3 and COL4A3. A molecular analysis of a chromosome 2 deletional mapping panel maps the PAX3 locus to 2q35 and suggests the locus order: centromere-(INHA, DES)-PAX3-COL4A3-(ALPI, CHRND)-telomere. Our analyses also show that a patient with a cleft palate and lip pits, but lacking diagnostic WS features, has a deletion, del (2)(q33q35), involving the PAX3 locus. This result suggests that not all PAX3 mutations are associated with a WS phenotype and that additional regional loci may modify or regulate the PAX3 locus and/or the development of a WS phenotype. PMID:8103404

  2. Copy-Number Variation of the Glucose Transporter Gene SLC2A3 and Congenital Heart Defects in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E.; Sheridan, Molly B.; Xie, Michael; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Gai, Xiaowu; Chow, Eva W.C.; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Simon, Tony J.; Roberts, Amy E.; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Bearden, Carrie E.; Eliez, Stephan; Gothelf, Doron; Coleman, Karlene; Kates, Wendy R.; Devoto, Marcella; Zackai, Elaine; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Shaikh, Tamim H.; Bassett, Anne S.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Morrow, Bernice E.; Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome and the phenotypic presentation is highly variable. Approximately 65% of individuals with 22q11DS have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or an aortic arch defect. The etiology of this phenotypic variability is not currently known. We hypothesized that copy-number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region might increase the risk of being born with a CHD in this sensitized population. Genotyping with Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 was performed on two groups of subjects with 22q11DS separated by time of ascertainment and processing. CNV analysis was completed on a total of 949 subjects (cohort 1, n = 562; cohort 2, n = 387), 603 with CHDs (cohort 1, n = 363; cohort 2, n = 240) and 346 with normal cardiac anatomy (cohort 1, n = 199; cohort 2, n = 147). Our analysis revealed that a duplication of SLC2A3 was the most frequent CNV identified in the first cohort. It was present in 18 subjects with CHDs and 1 subject without (p = 3.12 × 10−3, two-tailed Fisher’s exact test). In the second cohort, the SLC2A3 duplication was also significantly enriched in subjects with CHDs (p = 3.30 × 10−2, two-tailed Fisher’s exact test). The SLC2A3 duplication was the most frequent CNV detected and the only significant finding in our combined analysis (p = 2.68 × 10−4, two-tailed Fisher’s exact test), indicating that the SLC2A3 duplication might serve as a genetic modifier of CHDs and/or aortic arch anomalies in individuals with 22q11DS. PMID:25892112

  3. Upper limb malformations in chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Shalev, S.A.; Dar, H.; Barel, H.; Borochowitz, Z.

    1996-03-29

    We read with interest the report of Cormier-Daire et al. in a recent issue of the journal, describing upper limb malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. We observed a family with this group of rare clinical expression of chromosome 22q11 deletions. The proposita was examined in our clinic when she was 4 years old. She was mildly mentally retarded. Clinical evaluation showed normal growth, long thin nose with squared tip, nasal speech, and abundant scalp hair and no cardiac anomalies. The girl was accompanied by her mother. Facial similarities were noted between the two. The mother reported to be treated with oral calcium due to hypoparathyroidism, diagnosed several years ago. Clinical evaluation showed wide flat face, short stature, mild mental retardation, slight hypertelorism, peculiar nose similar to her daughter`s, and nasal speech. No cardiac anomalies were found. Recently, a brother was born. Clinical examination documented large ventriculo-septal defect, retrognathia, narrow palpebral fissures, and long thin nose with squared tip. 1 ref.

  4. A French multicenter study of over 700 patients with 22q11 deletions diagnosed using FISH or aCGH.

    PubMed

    Poirsier, Céline; Besseau-Ayasse, Justine; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Toutain, Jérôme; Missirian, Chantal; Le Caignec, Cédric; Bazin, Anne; de Blois, Marie Christine; Kuentz, Paul; Catty, Marie; Choiset, Agnès; Plessis, Ghislaine; Basinko, Audrey; Letard, Pascaline; Flori, Elisabeth; Jimenez, Mélanie; Valduga, Mylène; Landais, Emilie; Lallaoui, Hakima; Cartault, François; Lespinasse, James; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Callier, Patrick; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Portnoi, Marie-France; Busa, Tiffany; Receveur, Aline; Amblard, Florence; Yardin, Catherine; Harbuz, Radu; Prieur, Fabienne; Le Meur, Nathalie; Pipiras, Eva; Kleinfinger, Pascale; Vialard, François; Doco-Fenzy, Martine

    2016-06-01

    Although 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most recurrent human microdeletion syndrome associated with a highly variable phenotype, little is known about the condition's true incidence and the phenotype at diagnosis. We performed a multicenter, retrospective analysis of postnatally diagnosed patients recruited by members of the Association des Cytogénéticiens de Langue Française (the French-Speaking Cytogeneticists Association). Clinical and cytogenetic data on 749 cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2013 were collected by 31 French cytogenetics laboratories. The most frequent reasons for referral of postnatally diagnosed cases were a congenital heart defect (CHD, 48.6%), facial dysmorphism (49.7%) and developmental delay (40.7%). Since 2007 (the year in which array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was introduced for the routine screening of patients with intellectual disability), almost all cases have been diagnosed using FISH (96.1%). Only 15 cases (all with an atypical phenotype) were diagnosed with aCGH; the deletion size ranged from 745 to 2904 kb. The deletion was inherited in 15.0% of cases and was of maternal origin in 85.5% of the latter. This is the largest yet documented cohort of patients with 22q11.2DS (the most commonly diagnosed microdeletion) from the same population. French cytogenetics laboratories diagnosed at least 108 affected patients (including fetuses) per year from among a national population of ∼66 million. As observed for prenatal diagnoses, CHDs were the most frequently detected malformation in postnatal diagnoses. The most common CHD in postnatal diagnoses was an isolated septal defect. PMID:26508576

  5. Dubowitz syndrome is a complex comprised of multiple, genetically distinct and phenotypically overlapping disorders.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Douglas R; Pemov, Alexander; Johnston, Jennifer J; Sapp, Julie C; Yeager, Meredith; He, Ji; Boland, Joseph F; Burdett, Laurie; Brown, Christina; Gatti, Richard A; Alter, Blanche P; Biesecker, Leslie G; Savage, Sharon A

    2014-01-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, cognitive delay, growth failure, an immune defect, and an increased risk of blood dyscrasia and malignancy. There is considerable phenotypic variability, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. We clinically characterized and performed exome sequencing and high-density array SNP genotyping on three individuals with Dubowitz syndrome, including a pair of previously-described siblings (Patients 1 and 2, brother and sister) and an unpublished patient (Patient 3). Given the siblings' history of bone marrow abnormalities, we also evaluated telomere length and performed radiosensitivity assays. In the siblings, exome sequencing identified compound heterozygosity for a known rare nonsense substitution in the nuclear ligase gene LIG4 (rs104894419, NM_002312.3:c.2440C>T) that predicts p.Arg814X (MAF:0.0002) and an NM_002312.3:c.613delT variant that predicts a p.Ser205Leufs*29 frameshift. The frameshift mutation has not been reported in 1000 Genomes, ESP, or ClinSeq. These LIG4 mutations were previously reported in the sibling sister; her brother had not been previously tested. Western blotting showed an absence of a ligase IV band in both siblings. In the third patient, array SNP genotyping revealed a de novo ∼ 3.89 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 17q24.2 (chr 17:62,068,463-65,963,102, hg18), which spanned the known Carney complex gene PRKAR1A. In all three patients, a median lymphocyte telomere length of ≤ 1st centile was observed and radiosensitivity assays showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Our work suggests that, in addition to dyskeratosis congenita, LIG4 and 17q24.2 syndromes also feature shortened telomeres; to confirm this, telomere length testing should be considered in both disorders. Taken together, our work and other reports on Dubowitz syndrome, as currently recognized, suggest that it is not a unitary entity but instead a collection of phenotypically

  6. Dubowitz Syndrome Is a Complex Comprised of Multiple, Genetically Distinct and Phenotypically Overlapping Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Douglas R.; Pemov, Alexander; Johnston, Jennifer J.; Sapp, Julie C.; Yeager, Meredith; He, Ji; Boland, Joseph F.; Burdett, Laurie; Brown, Christina; Gatti, Richard A.; Alter, Blanche P.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, cognitive delay, growth failure, an immune defect, and an increased risk of blood dyscrasia and malignancy. There is considerable phenotypic variability, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. We clinically characterized and performed exome sequencing and high-density array SNP genotyping on three individuals with Dubowitz syndrome, including a pair of previously-described siblings (Patients 1 and 2, brother and sister) and an unpublished patient (Patient 3). Given the siblings' history of bone marrow abnormalities, we also evaluated telomere length and performed radiosensitivity assays. In the siblings, exome sequencing identified compound heterozygosity for a known rare nonsense substitution in the nuclear ligase gene LIG4 (rs104894419, NM_002312.3:c.2440C>T) that predicts p.Arg814X (MAF:0.0002) and an NM_002312.3:c.613delT variant that predicts a p.Ser205Leufs*29 frameshift. The frameshift mutation has not been reported in 1000 Genomes, ESP, or ClinSeq. These LIG4 mutations were previously reported in the sibling sister; her brother had not been previously tested. Western blotting showed an absence of a ligase IV band in both siblings. In the third patient, array SNP genotyping revealed a de novo ∼3.89 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 17q24.2 (chr 17:62,068,463–65,963,102, hg18), which spanned the known Carney complex gene PRKAR1A. In all three patients, a median lymphocyte telomere length of ≤1st centile was observed and radiosensitivity assays showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Our work suggests that, in addition to dyskeratosis congenita, LIG4 and 17q24.2 syndromes also feature shortened telomeres; to confirm this, telomere length testing should be considered in both disorders. Taken together, our work and other reports on Dubowitz syndrome, as currently recognized, suggest that it is not a unitary entity but instead a collection of phenotypically

  7. Interstitial duplication of 22q13.2 in a girl with short stature, impaired speech and language, and dysmorphism

    PubMed Central

    Samanich, Joy; Montagna, Cristina; Morrow, Bernice E.; Babcock, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome has been widely reported, with a known phenotype including global developmental delay, normal to accelerated growth and a characteristic facial appearance. A duplication syndrome involving this region has also been reported, with a somewhat more variable phenotype including psychomotor retardation, growth restriction, characteristic facial appearance differing from that seen in the deletion syndrome, and multiple malformations. The majority of reported patients have terminal duplications, with only three previous reports of interstitial duplication of the region. Herein we report a young woman with a de novo 569 kb interstitial duplication of 22q13.2 and short stature, speech and language impairment, refractive amblyopia, menorrhagia and facial dysmorphism. Comparison of her phenotype to previously reported patients with interstitial duplications reveals common traits including growth restriction, craniofacial anomalies and developmental delays. Included in the duplicated region is the gene EP300, mutations and deletions of which are implicated in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and thyrotroph embryonic factor, which has been proposed to be related to the pituitary hypoplasia seen in one patient with a large duplication, and several other genes without clear relation to disease.

  8. Mathematical Learning Disabilities in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smedt, Bert; Swillen, Ann; Verschaffel, Lieven; Ghesquiere, Pol

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical learning disabilities (MLD) occur frequently in children with specific genetic disorders, like Turner syndrome, fragile X syndrome and neurofibromatosis. This review focuses on MLD in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). This syndrome is the most common known microdeletion syndrome with a prevalence of at…

  9. Cardiac Defects and Results of Cardiac Surgery in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carotti, Adriano; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Piacentini, Gerardo; Saffirio, Claudia; Di Donato, Roberto M.; Marino, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Specific types and subtypes of cardiac defects have been described in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome as well as in other genetic syndromes. The conotruncal heart defects occurring in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome include tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic…

  10. Domain Specific Attentional Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bish, Joel P.; Chiodo, Renee; Mattei, Victoria; Simon, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the defining cognitive characteristics of the chromosome 22q deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2) is visuospatial processing impairments. The purpose of this study was to investigate and extend the specific attentional profile of children with this disorder using both an object-based attention task and an inhibition of return task. A group of…

  11. Core Neuropsychological Characteristics of Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, C.; Shearer, J.; Habel, A.; Kane, F.; Tsakanikos, E.; Kravariti, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) confers high risk for intellectual disability and neuropsychological/academic impairment, although a minority of patients show average intelligence. Intellectual heterogeneity and the high prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses in earlier studies may have obscured the prototypical neuropsychological…

  12. Supporting Children with Genetic Syndromes in the Classroom: The Example of 22q Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Colin; Stedman, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of children are likely to have a known genetic cause for their special educational needs. One such genetic condition is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), a genetic syndrome associated with early speech and language difficulties, global and specific cognitive impairments, difficulties with attention and difficulties with…

  13. Molecular Mechanisms and Diagnosis of Chromosome 22q11.2 Rearrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2008-01-01

    Several recurrent, constitutional genomic disorders are present on chromosome 22q. These include the translocations and deletions associated with DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome and the translocations that give rise to the recurrent t(11;22) supernumerary der(22) syndrome (Emanuel syndrome). The rearrangement breakpoints on 22q cluster…

  14. Association Between Early-Onset Parkinson Disease and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Chow, Eva W. C.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Lang, Anthony E.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Clinical case reports of parkinsonism co-occurring with hemizygous 22q11.2 deletions and the associated multisystem syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), suggest that 22q11.2 deletions may lead to increased risk of early-onset Parkinson disease (PD). The frequency of PD and its neuropathological presentation remain unknown in this common genetic condition. OBJECTIVE To evaluate a possible association between 22q11.2 deletions and PD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational study of the occurrence of PD in the world’s largest cohort of well-characterized adults with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of 22q11.2DS (n = 159 [6 with postmortem tissue]; age range, 18.1–68.6 years) was conducted in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Rare postmortem brain tissue from individuals with 22q11.2DS and a clinical history of PD was investigated for neurodegenerative changes and compared with that from individuals with no history of a movement disorder. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES A clinical diagnosis of PD made by a neurologist and neuropathological features of PD. RESULTS Adults with 22q11.2DS had a significantly elevated occurrence of PD compared with standard population estimates (standardized morbidity ratio = 69.7; 95% CI, 19.0–178.5). All cases showed early onset and typical PD symptom pattern, treatment response, and course. All were negative for family history of PD and known pathogenic PD-related mutations. The common use of antipsychotics in patients with 22q11.2DS to manage associated psychiatric symptoms delayed diagnosis of PD by up to 10 years. Postmortem brain tissue revealed classic loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in all 3 postmortem 22q11.2DS-PD cases. Typical α-synuclein–positive Lewy bodies were present in the expected distribution in 2 cases but absent in another. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings suggest that 22q11.2 deletions represent a novel genetic risk factor for early-onset PD with variable neuropathological

  15. Movement Disorders and Other Motor Abnormalities in Adults With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boot, Erik; Butcher, Nancy J; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse AMJ; Lang, Anthony E; Marras, Connie; Pondal, Margarita; Andrade, Danielle M; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Movement abnormalities are frequently reported in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), but knowledge in this area is scarce in the increasing adult population. We report on five individuals illustrative of movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2DS. In addition to an increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, seizures, and early-onset Parkinson disease, the underlying brain dysfunction associated with 22q11.2DS may give rise to an increased vulnerability to multiple movement abnormalities, including those influenced by medications. Movement abnormalities may also be secondary to treatable endocrine diseases and congenital musculoskeletal abnormalities. We propose that movement abnormalities may be common in adults with 22q11.2DS and discuss the implications and challenges important to clinical practice. PMID:25684639

  16. Noonan like appearance and familial deletion of the 22q11 Shprintzen-DiGeorge critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Piussan, C.; Mathieu, M.; Boudailliez, B.

    1994-09-01

    Shprintzen velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) and reported cases of autosomal dominant DiGeorge sequence (DGS) both belong to a heterogeneous developmental field defect due to the familial segregation of a 22q11 deletion. Two sisters present with mental retardation, dysmorphia and multiple congenital anomalies. The eldest has a Noonan-like appearance; short stature, short webbed neck, low posterior hairline, widely spaced nipples, hemivertebrae, speech disability and mild hypoparathyroidism. Her younger sister has prominent eyes, floppy ears, pulmonary valvular stenosis, hypoplastic right kidney, left multicystic kidney, hypoparathyroidism and renal failure causing death at age 3. Their retarded mother has a typical Shprintzen phenotype and no hypoparathyroidism. A deletion of the critical DiGeorge-Shprintzen conotruncal malformation region was found by FISH in the mother and her Noonan-like daughter. In the mother`s family exist 3 cleft palates, an imperforate anus, a stillbirth and one infant died at age 3 months because of heart malformation. To our knowledge, another case of Noonan-like appearance in a DG patient affected with monosomy 22q11 has been reported in 1992 by Wilson et al. Whether resulting from the hemizygosity of a gene or from the deletion of contiguous genes, the wide DGS-VCFS spectrum encompasses quite variable phenotypes, discordant for palatal and conotruncal defects as well as for hypoparathyroidism, dysmorphic features and multiple congenital anomalies. Physical mapping of both the large 22q11 region commonly lost and the smallest deletion sufficient to produce DGS has been done and may account for the broadening spectrum, the variable expression and the frequently delayed diagnosis of this syndrome.

  17. Social Cognition in 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome: Relevance to Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Carter, Chelsea; Senturk, Damla; Chow, Carolyn; Hopkins, Jessica M.; Green, Michael F.; Galván, Adriana; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2012-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) represents one of the largest known genetic risk factors for schizophrenia. Approximately 30% of individuals with 22qDS develop psychotic illness in adolescence or young adulthood. Given that deficits in social cognition are increasingly viewed as a central aspect of idiopathic schizophrenia, we sought to investigate abilities in this domain as a predictor of psychotic symptoms in 22qDS participants. We assessed multiple domains of social and non-social cognition in 22qDS youth to: 1) characterize performance across these domains in 22qDS, and identify whether 22qDS participants fail to show expected patterns of age-related improvements on these tasks; and 2) determine whether social cognition better predicts positive and negative symptoms than does non-social cognition. Task domains assessed were: emotion recognition and differentiation, Theory of Mind (ToM), verbal knowledge, abstract reasoning, working memory, and processing speed. Positive and negative symptoms were measured using scores obtained from the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS). 22qDS participants (N=31, mean age: 15.9) showed the largest impairment, relative to healthy controls (N=31, mean age: 15.6), on measures of ToM and processing speed. In contrast to controls, 22qDS participants did not show age-related improvements on measures of working memory and verbal knowledge. Notably, ToM performance was the best predictor of positive symptoms in 22qDS, accounting for 39% of the variance in symptom severity. Processing speed emerged as the best predictor of negative symptoms, accounting for 37% of the variance in symptoms. Given that ToM was a robust predictor of positive symptoms in our sample, these findings suggest that social cognition may be a valuable intermediate trait for predicting the development of psychosis. PMID:23122739

  18. Social cognition in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome: relevance to psychosis?

    PubMed

    Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Carter, Chelsea; Senturk, Damla; Chow, Carolyn; Hopkins, Jessica M; Green, Michael F; Galván, Adriana; Cannon, Tyrone D; Bearden, Carrie E

    2012-12-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) represents one of the largest known genetic risk factors for schizophrenia. Approximately 30% of individuals with 22qDS develop psychotic illness in adolescence or young adulthood. Given that deficits in social cognition are increasingly viewed as a central aspect of idiopathic schizophrenia, we sought to investigate abilities in this domain as a predictor of psychotic symptoms in 22qDS participants. We assessed multiple domains of social and non-social cognition in 22qDS youth to: 1) characterize performance across these domains in 22qDS, and identify whether 22qDS participants fail to show expected patterns of age-related improvements on these tasks; and 2) determine whether social cognition better predicts positive and negative symptoms than does non-social cognition. Task domains assessed were: emotion recognition and differentiation, Theory of Mind (ToM), verbal knowledge, visuospatial skills, working memory, and processing speed. Positive and negative symptoms were measured using scores obtained from the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS). 22qDS participants (N=31, mean age: 15.9) showed the largest impairment, relative to healthy controls (N=31, mean age: 15.6), on measures of ToM and processing speed. In contrast to controls, 22qDS participants did not show age-related improvements on measures of working memory and verbal knowledge. Notably, ToM performance was the best predictor of positive symptoms in 22qDS, accounting for 39% of the variance in symptom severity. Processing speed emerged as the best predictor of negative symptoms, accounting for 37% of the variance in symptoms. Given that ToM was a robust predictor of positive symptoms in our sample, these findings suggest that social cognition may be a valuable intermediate trait for predicting the development of psychosis. PMID:23122739

  19. A rare case of trisomy 11q23.3-11q25 and trisomy 22q11.1-22q11.21.

    PubMed

    Zou, P-S; Li, H-F; Chen, L-S; Ma, M; Chen, X-H; Xue, D; Cao, D-H

    2016-01-01

    Partial duplication of the long arm of chromosome 11 and the partial trisomy of 22q are uncommon karyotypic abnormalities. Here, we report the case of a 6-year-old girl who showed partial trisomy of 11q and 22q, as a result of a maternal balanced reciprocal translocation (11;22), and exhibited dysmorphic features, severe intellectual disability, brain malformations, and speech delay related to this unique chromosomal abnormality. Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) revealed a gain in copy number on the long arm of chromosome 11, spanning at least 18.22 Mb. Additionally, there was a gain in copy number on the long arm of chromosome 22, spanning at least 3.46 Mb. FISH analysis using a chromosome 11 short arm telomere probe (11p14.2), a chromosome 11 long arm telomere probe (11q24.3), and a chromosome 22 long arm telomere probe (22q13.33) confirmed the origin of the marker chromosome. It has been confirmed by the State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics of China that this is the first reported instance of the karyotype 47,XX, +der(22)t(11;22)(q23.3;q11.1)mat in the world. Our study reports an additional case that can be used to further characterize and delineate the clinical ramifications of partial trisomy of 11q and 22q. PMID:27173335

  20. Production of White Colonies on CHROMagar Candida Medium by Members of the Candida glabrata Clade and Other Species with Overlapping Phenotypic Traits▿

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Justin A.; Chase, Nancy; Lee, Richard; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Merz, William G.

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that species of the Candida glabrata clade and species with phenotypic traits that overlap those of C. glabrata would produce white colonies on CHROMagar Candida medium. Of 154 isolates (seven species) tested, C. bracarensis, C. nivariensis, C. norvegensis, C. glabrata, and C. inconspicua produced white colonies; the Pichia fermentans group and C. krusei did not. Many of these species are difficult to identify phenotypically; white colonies may signal the need for the use of molecular approaches. PMID:18685009

  1. Impaired multiple object tracking in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS) occurs in approximately 1:4,000 live births with a complex and variable presentation that includes medical, socioemotional and psychological symptoms with intellectual impairment. Cognitive impairments in spatiotemporal and visuospatial attention have also been reported. However, maintenance of selective attention to dynamic and interacting objects has not been systematically investigated in children with 22q11.2DS. Methods We used a multiple object tracking task to assay capacity and resolution performance of children with 22q11.2DS aged 7 to 14 years versus age-matched typically developing (TD) peers. Results Children with 22q11.2DS but not TD children demonstrated impaired performance when task demands increased due to an increase in the number of targets presented, but not from an increase in object speed. Task performance in children with 22q11.2DS was also unrelated to intelligence or measures of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Conclusions These findings suggest that children with 22q11.2DS may be particularly susceptible to dynamic crowding of objects with increasing cognitive demands related to monitoring multiple targets reflecting a reduced acuity in spatiotemporal cognitive representation. PMID:22958454

  2. Identification of Proximal and Distal 22q11.2 Microduplications among Patients with Cleft Lip and/or Palate: A Novel Inherited Atypical 0.6 Mb Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Sedghi, Maryam; Abdali, Hossein; Memarzadeh, Mehrdad; Salehi, Mansoor; Nouri, Narges; Hosseinzadeh, Majid; Nouri, Nayereh

    2015-01-01

    Misalignments of low-copy repeats (LCRs) located in chromosome 22, particularly band 22q11.2, predispose to rearrangements. A variety of phenotypic features are associated with 22q11.2 microduplication syndrome which makes it challenging for the genetic counselors to recommend appropriate genetic assessment and counseling for the patients. In this study, multiplex ligation probe dependent amplification (MLPA) analysis was performed on 378 patients with cleft lip and/or palate to characterize rearrangements in patients suspected of 22q11.2 microduplication and microdeletion syndromes. Of 378 cases, 15 were diagnosed with a microdeletion with various sizes and 3 with duplications. For the first time in this study an atypical 0.6 Mb duplication is reported. Illustration of the phenotypes associated with the microduplications increases the knowledge of phenotypes reported in the literature. PMID:26640714

  3. Ultrasonographic (TCS) and clinical findings in overlapping phenotype of essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease (ET-PD)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are considered distinct disorders. The aim of the study was to look for a link or any distinguishing features by transcranial sonography (TCS), together with the clinical examination findings in a group of patients with overlapping phenotype of ET and PD (ET-PD). Methods A prospective observational case-control study was carried out from the 3rd January 2011 until 30th January 2013 at the Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. The final study group consisted of 15 patients with ET-PD, 116 patients with ET-only and 141 patients with PD-only. The control group included 101 subjects. Clinical diagnosis was of a diagnostic standard. Results The main ultrasonographic findings in the ET-PD group were similar to those of the PD-only: hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra (66.7%, p < 0.001) and nuclei raphe interruptions/absence (38.5%, p < 0.001). The single distinguishing TCS finding in ET-PD group was a lentiform nucleus hyperechogenicity (26.7%), however this was only significant when compared to controls (p = 0.006). An asymmetrical onset of symptoms (73.3%) in ET-PD group was characteristic to PD-only. The ET-PD patients had the longest disease duration (median 6 years, p < 0.001), the most frequent rate of positive family history (53.3%, p = 0.005), rather low prevalence of cogwheel rigidity (26.7%, p < 0.001), and higher mean Hoehn & Yahr scores compared to PD-only (2.6 ± 0.8 vs. 1.8 ± 0.8, p = 0.012). Conclusions The main TCS findings of the present study in patients with overlapping ET-PD phenotype were similar to the PD-only group. The highest positive family history rate among ET-PD patients indicates a strong hereditary predisposition and needs genetic underpinnings. Some ET patients, who look like they may be developing co-morbid PD clinically, may have an alternative diagnosis for Parkinsonism, which could be delineated by TCS examination

  4. Investigation of TBX1 gene deletion in Iranian children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: correlation with conotruncal heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Hamid; Salehi, Mansoor; Sedghi, Maryam; Abdali, Hossein; Nouri, Nayereh; Sadri, Leyli; Hosseinzadeh, Majid; Vakili, Bahareh; Lotfi, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Background DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the result of a microdeletion in chromosome 22q11.2 in over 90% of cases. DGS is the second most frequent syndrome after Down syndrome and has an incidence of 1/4000 births. Unequal crossover between low-copy repeats, on the proximal part of the long arm of chromosome 22, usually results in a 3 Mb deletion in one of the chromosome 22 and a reciprocal and similarly sized duplication on the other one. Several studies have indicated that TBX1 (T-box 1) haploinsufficiency is responsible for many of the phenotypic traits of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Conotruncal heart defects (CTDs) are present in 75–85% of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in Western countries. Methods Among 78 patients fulfilling the criteria for DGS diagnosed by the fluorescence in situ hybridisation test, 24 had 22q11.2 deletion. Screening for TBX1 gene deletion was performed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Results Our results revealed that of 24 patients with TBX1 gene deletion, 12 had CTDs while 12 did not show any heart defects. Conclusions Our findings indicate that other genes or gene interactions may play a role in penetrance or the severity of heart disease among patients with DGS. PMID:27326128

  5. A Case of Concurrent Miller-Dieker Syndrome (17p13.3 Deletion) and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Macmurdo, C

    2015-12-01

    Features of Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS, 17p13.3 deletion syndrome, LIS1-associated lissencephaly) include classic lissencephaly, microcephaly, cardiac malformations, growth restriction, and characteristic facial changes. Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome or velocardiofacial syndrome) are known to have congenital cardiac malformations (in particular conotruncal defects), palatal abnormalities (especially velopharyngeal insufficiency), hypocalcemia, immune deficiency, learning disabilities, and characteristic facial features. This case report describes phenotypic characteristics of a patient with extremely rare instance of having both MDS and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome that is unique in the medical literature. Prognosis in this concurrent phenotype is poor with our patient suffering from several malformations seen in both conditions and expiring in the neonatal period. PMID:27617133

  6. Follow-up report of potential linkage for schizophrenia on chromosome 22q: Part 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-24

    The previously published results of a random search of the genome for susceptibility loci for schizophrenia showed a {open_quotes}hot spot{close_quotes} region on chromosome 22 (22q12-q13.1). We now have a sample of 57 families being genotyped and have completed analysis of 495 markers throughout the genome. From the results, no region of 22q can be excluded in our families, and the most likely region may be 22q11-q12. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Production of White Colonies on CHROMagar Candida(TM) by Members of the Candida glabrata Clade and Other Species with Overlapping Phenotypic Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that species of the Candida glabrata clade and species with phenotypic traits overlapping with C. glabrata would produce white colonies on CHROMagar Candida. Of 154 isolates (seven species) tested, C. bracarensis, C. nivariensis, C. norvegensis, C. glabrata, and C. inconspicua produ...

  8. Two patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion presenting with childhood obesity and hyperphagia.

    PubMed

    Bassett, J K; Chandler, K E; Douzgou, S

    2016-08-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a clinically heterogeneous condition of intellectual disability, parathyroid and thyroid hypoplasia, palatal abnormalities, cardiac malformations and psychiatric symptoms. Hyperphagia and childhood obesity is widely reported in Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) but there is only one previous report of this presentation in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We describe two further cases of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in which hyperphagia and childhood obesity were the presenting features. This may be a manifestation of obsessive behaviour secondary to some of the psychiatric features commonly seen in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Serious complications may result from hyperphagia and childhood obesity therefore early recognition and intervention is crucial. Due to the similar clinical presentation of these two patients to patients with PWS, it is suggested that the hyperphagia seen here should be managed in a similar way to how it is managed in PWS. PMID:27184501

  9. Ocular findings associated with chromosome 22q11.2 duplication.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Brian J; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Wootton, Georgia; Dawson, Lindsay; Zackai, Elaine; Binenbaum, Gil

    2016-06-01

    We describe the ocular features of the chromosome 22q11.2 duplication syndrome and provide ophthalmologic examination recommendations for affected patients. The medical records of 19 children with chromosome 22q11.2 duplication who had undergone complete ophthalmological examination, including dilated fundus examination and cycloplegic refraction, were studied retrospectively. Over half of the children with 22q11.2 duplication syndrome were found to have visually significant ocular abnormalities, including 6 with strabismus, 2 with moderately high astigmatism requiring glasses, 1 with unilateral congenital cataract requiring surgery, 1 with optic disk drusen, 1 with bilateral megalocornea with normal eye pressures, 1 with nystagmus that resolved spontaneously, and 1 with delayed visual maturation. Because of the high incidence of conditions that could affect visual development, we recommend that children with 22q11.2 duplication syndrome have a complete ophthalmological examination on diagnosis and regular vision screenings by their primary care physician thereafter. PMID:27108843

  10. Practical guidelines for managing adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Butcher, Nancy J.; Costain, Gregory; Andrade, Danielle M.; Boot, Erik; Chow, Eva W.C.; Chung, Brian; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Faghfoury, Hanna; Fishman, Leona; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; George, Susan; Lang, Anthony E.; Repetto, Gabriela; Shugar, Andrea; Silversides, Candice; Swillen, Ann; van Amelsvoort, Therese; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans, estimated to affect up to 1 in 2,000 live births. Major features of this multisystem condition include congenital anomalies, developmental delay, and an array of early- and later-onset medical and psychiatric disorders. Advances in pediatric care ensure a growing population of adults with 22q11.2DS. Informed by an international panel of multidisciplinary experts and a comprehensive review of the existing literature concerning adults, we present the first set of guidelines focused on managing the neuropsychiatric, endocrine, cardiovascular, reproductive, psychosocial, genetic counseling, and other issues that are the focus of attention in adults with 22q11.2DS. We propose practical strategies for the recognition, evaluation, surveillance, and management of the associated morbidities. PMID:25569435

  11. Practical guidelines for managing adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Butcher, Nancy J; Costain, Gregory; Andrade, Danielle M; Boot, Erik; Chow, Eva W C; Chung, Brian; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Faghfoury, Hanna; Fishman, Leona; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; George, Susan; Lang, Anthony E; Repetto, Gabriela; Shugar, Andrea; Silversides, Candice; Swillen, Ann; van Amelsvoort, Therese; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-08-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans, estimated to affect up to 1 in 2,000 live births. Major features of this multisystem condition include congenital anomalies, developmental delay, and an array of early- and later-onset medical and psychiatric disorders. Advances in pediatric care ensure a growing population of adults with 22q11.2DS. Informed by an international panel of multidisciplinary experts and a comprehensive review of the existing literature concerning adults, we present the first set of guidelines focused on managing the neuropsychiatric, endocrine, cardiovascular, reproductive, psychosocial, genetic counseling, and other issues that are the focus of attention in adults with 22q11.2DS. We propose practical strategies for the recognition, evaluation, surveillance, and management of the associated morbidities.Genet Med 17 8, 599-609. PMID:25569435

  12. Social Impairments in Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS): Autism Spectrum Disorder or a Different Endophenotype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angkustsiri, Kathleen; Goodlin-Jones, Beth; Deprey, Lesley; Brahmbhatt, Khyati; Harris, Susan; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been reported in 22q11.2DS, although this has been based solely on parent report measures. This study describes the presence of ASD using a procedure more similar to that used in clinical practice by incorporating history (Social Communication Questionnaire) AND a standardized observation…

  13. Prevalence and Nature of Hearing Loss in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Eynde, Charlotte; Swillen, Ann; Lambeens, Elien; Verhaert, Nicolas; Desloovere, Christian; Luts, Heleen; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hens, Greet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence, type, severity, and age-dependency of hearing loss in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Method: Extensive audiological measurements were conducted in 40 persons with proven 22q11.2 deletion (aged 6-36 years). Besides air and bone conduction thresholds in the frequency range between 0.125…

  14. The Neuropsychology of 22q11 Deletion Syndrome. A Neuropsychiatric Study of 100 Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niklasson, Lena; Gillberg, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to study the impact of ASD/ADHD on general intellectual ability and profile, executive functions and visuo-motor skills in children and adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). A secondary aim was to study if gender, age, heart disease, ASD, ADHD or ASD in combination with ADHD had an impact on general…

  15. Eye Gaze During Face Processing in Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Bronwyn; Debbane, Martin; Ottet, Marie-Christine; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Zesiger, Pascal; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Eliez, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a neurogenetic syndrome with high risk for the development of psychiatric disorder. There is interest in identifying reliable markers for measuring and monitoring socio-emotional impairments in 22q11DS during development. The current study investigated eye gaze as a potential marker during a…

  16. Maladaptive Conflict Monitoring as Evidence for Executive Dysfunction in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bish, Joel P.; Ferrante, Samantha M.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Zackai, Elaine; Simon, Tony J.

    2005-01-01

    Using an adaptation of the Attentional Networks Test, we investigated aspects of executive control in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2), a common but not well understood disorder that produces non-verbal cognitive deficits and a marked incidence of psychopathology. The data revealed that children with DS22q11.2…

  17. Analysis of 22q11.2 deletions by FISH in a series of velocardiofacial syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ravnan, J.B.; Golabi, M.; Lebo, R.V.

    1994-09-01

    Deletions in chromosome 22 band q11.2 have been associated with velocardiofacial (VCF or Shprintzen) syndrome and the DiGeorge anomaly. A study of VCF patients evaluated at the UCSF Medical Center was undertaken to correlate disease phenotype with presence or absence of a deletion. Patients referred for this study had at least two of the following: dysmorphic facial features, frequent ear infections or hearing loss, palate abnormalities, thymic hypoplasia, hypocalcemia, congenital heart defect, hypotonia, and growth or language delay. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the DiGeorge critical region probe N25 was used to classify patients according to the presence or absence of a deletion in 22q11.2, and the results were compared to clinical characteristics. We have completed studies on 58 patients with features of VCF. Twenty-one patients (36%) were found to have a deletion in 22q11.2 by FISH. A retrospective study of archived slides from 14 patients originally studied only by prometaphase GTG banding found six patients had a deletion detected by FISH; of these, only two had a microscopically visible chromosome deletion. Our study of 11 sets of parents of children with the deletion found two clinically affected mothers with the deletion, including one with three of three children clinically affected. A few patients who did not fit the classical VCF description had a 22q11.2 deletion detected by FISH. These included one patient with both cleft lip and palate, and another with developmental delay and typical facial features but no cardiac or palate abnormalities. Both patients with the DiGeorge anomaly as part of VCF had the deletion. On the other hand, a number of patients diagnosed clinically with classical VCF did not have a detectable deletion. This raises the question whether they represent a subset of patients with a defect of 22q11.2 not detected by the N25 probe, or whether they represent a phenocopy of VCF.

  18. Communication of Psychiatric Risk in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    Hart, Sarah J; Schoch, Kelly; Shashi, Vandana; Callanan, Nancy

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have an increased chance of developing a psychiatric disorder. While parents of children affected by 22q11.2DS typically receive counseling about risk for non-psychiatric health concerns, genetic counselors may be reluctant to discuss psychiatric risk. Further education of genetic counselors may be necessary to encourage discussion of psychiatric risk with these families. The goal of this project was to develop recommendations for genetic counselors to provide psychiatric risk information to families affected by 22q11.2DS. The recommendations were developed by synthesizing resources in the literature about risk communication. These recommendations were refined following an online focus group meeting with five health care professionals who were recruited for participation from 22q11.2DS clinics across the U.S.A. The focus group data revealed three themes related to discussion of psychiatric risk: 1) Stepwise approach, 2) Discussing treatment options and reducing risks, and 3) Addressing stigma. These recommendations may be used as a foundation for a future clinical protocol to encourage discussion about the risk for psychiatric illness at an earlier point in the diagnostic process for 22q11.2DS and to provide improved information, support and resources to affected families. PMID:26578232

  19. Disrupted fornix integrity in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J.; Cabaral, Margarita; Amaral, David G.; Buonocore, Michael H.; Harvey, Danielle; Kalish, Kristopher; Carmichael, Owen; Schumann, Cynthia M.; Lee, Aaron; Dougherty, Robert F.; Perry, Lee M.; Wandell, Brian A.; Simon, Tony J.

    2015-01-01

    The fornix is the primary subcortical output fiber system of the hippocampal formation. In children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), hippocampal volume reduction has been commonly reported, but few studies as yet have evaluated the integrity of the fornix. Therefore, we investigated the fornix of 45 school-aged children with 22q11.2DS and 38 matched typically developing (TD) children. Probabilistic diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography was used to reconstruct the body of fornix in each child's brain native space. Compared with children, significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and higher radial diffusivity (RD) was observed bilaterally in the body of the fornix in children with 22q11.2DS. Irregularities were especially prominent in the posterior aspect of the fornix where it emerges from the hippocampus. Smaller volumes of hippocampal formations were also found in the 22q11.2DS group. The reduced hippocampal volumes were correlated with fornix lower FA and higher RD in the right hemisphere. Our findings provide neuroanatomical evidence of disrupted hippocampal connectivity in children with 22q11.2DS, which may help to further understand the biological basis for spatial impairments, affective regulation, and other factors related to the ultra-high risk for schizophrenia in this population. PMID:25748884

  20. Recurrence risk figures for isolated tetralogy of Fallot after screening for 22q11 microdeletion.

    PubMed Central

    Digilio, M C; Marino, B; Giannotti, A; Toscano, A; Dallapiccola, B

    1997-01-01

    Isolated tetralogy of Fallot (TF) has a multifactorial mode of inheritance in most cases, and recurrence risk rates of 2.5-3% have been attributed to first degree relatives of an affected child. In a subgroup of patients with a strong family history, the transmission of a monogenic trait has been suspected. Microdeletion 22q11 (del(22q11)) can cause TF in the setting of DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndromes, and has also been related to familial conotruncal cardiac defects. Empirical risk figures in families after exclusion of del(22q11) have never been calculated. We have investigated the overall occurrence of congenital heart defect (CHD) in relatives of 102 patients with isolated non-syndromic TF previously screened for del(22q11). Our results show that the frequency of CHD is 3% in sibs, 0.5% in parents, 0.3% in grandparents, 0.2% in uncles or aunts, and 0.6% in first cousins. The recurrence risk rate for sibs in our series is the same as that previously estimated, indicating that after exclusion of patients with del(22q11) genetic counselling to patients with isolated TF should not be modified. A high concordance rate among our affected sibs has been documented. Gene(s) different from those located on chromosome 22q11 must be involved in causing familial aggregation of non-syndromic TF in these cases. Images PMID:9132487

  1. White matter microstructural abnormalities in girls with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Fragile X or Turner syndrome as evidenced by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Villalon-Reina, Julio; Jahanshad, Neda; Beaton, Elliott; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M; Simon, Tony J

    2013-11-01

    Children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), Fragile X syndrome (FXS), or Turner syndrome (TS) are considered to belong to distinct genetic groups, as each disorder is caused by separate genetic alterations. Even so, they have similar cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions, particularly in visuospatial and numerical abilities. To assess evidence for common underlying neural microstructural alterations, we set out to determine whether these groups have partially overlapping white matter abnormalities, relative to typically developing controls. We scanned 101 female children between 7 and 14years old: 25 with 22q11.2DS, 18 with FXS, 17 with TS, and 41 aged-matched controls using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Anisotropy and diffusivity measures were calculated and all brain scans were nonlinearly aligned to population and site-specific templates. We performed voxel-based statistical comparisons of the DTI-derived metrics between each disease group and the controls, while adjusting for age. Girls with 22q11.2DS showed lower fractional anisotropy (FA) than controls in the association fibers of the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, the splenium of the corpus callosum, and the corticospinal tract. FA was abnormally lower in girls with FXS in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule, posterior thalami, and precentral gyrus. Girls with TS had lower FA in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right internal capsule and left cerebellar peduncle. Partially overlapping neurodevelopmental anomalies were detected in all three neurogenetic disorders. Altered white matter integrity in the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi and thalamic to frontal tracts may contribute to the behavioral characteristics of all of these disorders. PMID:23602925

  2. Explaining the variable penetrance of CNVs: Parental intelligence modulates expression of intellectual impairment caused by the 22q11.2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Petra; Duijff, Sasja; Swanenburg de Veye, Henriëtte; Beemer, Frits; Sinnema, Gerben; Breetvelt, Elemi; Schappin, Renske; Vorstman, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    The role of rare genetic variants, in particular copy number variants (CNVs), in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders is becoming increasingly clear. While the list of these disorder-related CNVs continues to lengthen, it has also become clear that in nearly all genetic variants the proportion of carriers who express the associated phenotype is far from 100%. To understand this variable penetrance of CNVs it is important to realize that even the largest CNVs represent only a tiny fraction of the entire genome. Therefore, part of the mechanism underlying the variable penetrance of CNVs is likely the modulatory impact of the rest of the genome. In the present study we used the 22q11DS as a model to examine whether the observed penetrance of intellectual impairment-one of the main phenotypes associated with 22q11DS-is modulated by the intellectual level of their parents, for which we used the parents' highest level of education as a proxy. Our results, based on data observed in 171 children with 22q11DS in the age range of 5-15 years, showed a significant association between estimated parental cognitive level and intelligence in offspring (full scale, verbal and performance IQ), with the largest effect size for verbal IQ. These results suggest that possible mechanisms involved in the variable penetrance observed in CNVs include the impact of genetic background and/or environmental influences. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26953189

  3. Subthreshold Psychotic Symptoms in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sunny X.; Yi, James J.; Moore, Tyler M.; Calkins, Monica E.; Kohler, Christian G.; Whinna, Daneen A.; Souders, Margaret C.; Zackai, Elaine H.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Bilker, Warren B.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) confers 25% risk for psychosis and is an invaluable window for understanding the neurobiological substrate of psychosis risk. The Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) is well validated in non-deleted populations for detecting clinical risk but has been only recently applied to 22q11DS. We assessed the largest 22q11DS cohort to date and report on SIPS implementation and symptoms elicited. Method The SIPS, including its 19 subscales, was administered to 157 individuals with 22q11DS aged 8 to 25. Youth and caregiver interviews were conducted and rated separately, then compared for agreement. Implementation of the SIPS in 22q11DS was challenging due to the prevalence of developmental delay and comorbid conditions. However, by explaining questions and eliciting examples, we were able to help youths and caregivers understand and respond appropriately. Consensus ratings were formulated and analyzed with item-wise and factor analysis. Results Subthreshold symptoms were common, with 85% of individuals endorsing one or more. The most commonly rated items were ideational richness (47%) and trouble with focus and attention (44%). Factor analysis revealed a three-factor solution with positive, negative, and disorganized components. Youth-caregiver comparisons suggested that youths report greater symptoms of perceptual abnormalities, suspiciousness, trouble with emotional expression, and bizarre thinking. Caregivers reported more impaired tolerance to normal stress, poor hygiene, and inattention. Conclusion The SIPS was adapted for 22q11DS through comprehensive and semi-structured administration methods, yielding a high prevalence of subthreshold psychotic symptoms. The significance and predictive validity of these symptoms require future longitudinal analysis. PMID:25151422

  4. Clinical and molecular characterization of a patient with a combination of a deletion and a duplication of 22q13 using array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Ochando, Isabel; Urbano, Antonio; Rubio, Juana; Rueda, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    Phelan–McDermid syndrome is caused by the loss of terminal regions of different sizes at 22q13. There is a wide range of severity of symptoms in patients with a 22q13 deletion, but these patients usually show neonatal hypotonia, global developmental delay, and dysmorphic traits. We carried out a clinical and molecular characterization of a patient with neonatal hypotonia and dysmorphic features. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization showed an 8.24 Mb terminal deletion associated with a 0.20 Mb duplication. Characterization of patients with Phelan–McDermid syndrome both clinically and at the molecular level allows genotype-phenotype correlations that provide clues to help elucidate the clinical implications. PMID:23776384

  5. Jacobsen syndrome due to an unbalanced translocation between 11q23 and 22q11.2 identified at age 40 years.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ikuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Sawada, Kenichi; Shimojima, Keiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    A woman with psychomotor developmental delay, congenital glaucoma, and distinctive facial features, and a short neck was diagnosed with Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) at age 40 years. A previously reported balanced translocation between chromosome 11 and 22 instead showed an unbalanced translocation by a microarray-based comparative hybridization analysis with the final karyotype of 46,XX,der(11)t(11;22)(q23.3;q11.21),del(22)(q11.21) dn. The breakpoint of chromosome 11 was determined to be at TECTA and not near the apolipoprotein gene cluster site or the fragile site (FRA11B), which are commonly seen in patients with t(11;22) and patients with typical 11q deletions, respectively. Although the phenotypic features of the patient, including psychomotor developmental delay, distinctive features, and mild thrombocytopenia, were consistent with JBS, congenital glaucoma, which is an uncommon finding of JBS, was the most prominent condition during her natural history. PMID:22139980

  6. A Case Report of an Infant with Robertsonian Translocation (15;22)(q10;q10) and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chi Hyun; Shin, Jung-Hee; Nam, Myung Hyun; Lim, Chae Seung; Lee, Chang Kyu; Cho, Yunjung; Kim, Young Kee; Yoon, Soo Young

    2016-01-01

    Rob(15; 22) is rare and account for only 0.6% of all Robertsonian translocations. We describe a case with rob(15;22) in which the phenotype includes generalized hypotonia, respiratory distress, tent shaped upper lips, hyporeflexia and single umbilical artery. Chromosome analysis with peripheral blood was performed, while the karyotype was interpreted as 45,XX,der(15;22)(q10;q10). In Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome FISH studies, deletion of the SNRPN gene was not observed, but deletion of 15p11.2 was noted. Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and chromosomal microarrays showed negative findings. Molecular studies associated with spinal muscular atrophy and progressive muscular dystrophy also showed negative findings. We suggest that rob(15;22) and deletion of 15p11.2 could be related to clinical presentation like this case. PMID:26927352

  7. Incidental Radiologic Findings in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, J.E.; Yi, J.J.; Roalf, D.R.; Loevner, L.A.; Ruparel, K.; Whinna, D.; Souders, M.C.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.; Yodh, E.; Vandekar, S.; Zackai, E.H.; Gur, R.C.; Emanuel, B.S.; Gur, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a common genetic microdeletion syndrome that results in cognitive delays and an increased risk of several psychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia. The current study investigates the prevalence of incidental neuroradiologic findings within this population and their relationships with psychiatric conditions. Materials and Methods Brain MR imaging from 58 individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome was reviewed by board-certified radiologists by using standard clinical procedures. Intracranial incidental findings were classified into 8 categories and compared with a large typically developing cohort. Results The rate of incidental findings was significantly higher (P < .0001) in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome compared with typically developing individuals, driven by a high prevalence of cavum septum pellucidum (19.0%) and white matter abnormalities (10.3%). Both of these findings were associated with psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Conclusions Cavum septum pellucidum and white matter hyperintensities are significantly more prevalent in patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and may represent biomarkers for psychosis. PMID:24948496

  8. EFFECTS OF COMT GENOTYPE ON BEHAVIORAL SYMPTOMATOLOGY IN THE 22q11.2 DELETION SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Bearden, Carrie E.; Jawad, Abbas F.; Lynch, David R.; Monterossso, John R.; Sokol, Set; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Saitta, Sulagna C.; Harris, Stacy E.; Moss, Edward; Wang, Paul P.; Zackai, Elaine; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Simon, Tony J.

    2010-01-01

    The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome) is associated with elevated rates of psychosis, and is also characterized by severe attentional difficulties and executive dysfunction. Behavioral manifestations of this syndrome could result from haploinsufficiency of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene, located within the 22q11 region. The goal of the present study was to examine COMT genotype in relation to behavioral symptomatology in this syndrome. Val158/108Met was genotyped in 38 patients (16 Met/-, 22 Val/-) with confirmed 22q11.2 deletions who had received the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Results indicated that the Val genotype was associated with significantly greater internalizing and externalizing behavioral symptomatology in children with 22q11.2 deletions. Val allele status was associated with a greater-than-four-fold increase in risk for clinically significant behavior problems in children with this syndrome. These data are consistent with previous findings of increased psychopathology associated with the Val genotype in normal individuals and suggest that a functional genetic polymorphism in the 22q11 region may influence behavior in individuals with COMT haploinsufficiency. PMID:15846854

  9. Neuroimaging correlates of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: implications for schizophrenia research.

    PubMed

    Boot, E; van Amelsvoort, T A M J

    2012-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common known recurrent copy-number variant disorder. It is also the most common known genetic risk factor for schizophrenia. The greater homogeneity of subjects with schizophrenia in 22q11DS compared with schizophrenia in the wider non-deleted population may help to identify much needed information on neuroanatomical substrates, and neurochemical and neurofunctional mechanisms that may modulate the risk for schizophrenia. Identification of the underlying pathophysiology creates opportunities for developing genotype-specific, biology-based and targeted treatments to prevent, delay or minimize the severity of schizophrenia in both 22q11DS and the wider non-deleted population. This article reviews neuroimaging studies that focused on brain structure and function in this high-risk population, with particular attention to schizophrenia research. We also discuss the evidence on the role of candidate genes within the 22q11.2 region, with particular reference to catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and proline dehydrogenase (PRODH). PMID:23279171

  10. An unusual three-way translocation t(21;8;1)(q22;q22;q32) in a case of acute myeloid leukemia (M2).

    PubMed

    Gmidène, Abir; Sennana, Hlima; Frikha, Rim; Elloumi, Moez; Belaaj, Hatem; Saad, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Variant forms of the classic translocation t(8;21) are uncommon and account approximately 3% of all t(8;21)(q22;q22) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. These forms involve chromosomes 8, 21, and other chromosomes. Here we report a Tunisian patient with a complex rearrangement t(21;8;1)(q22;q22;q32) revealed by conventional chromosomal study at diagnosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization study revealed the presence of the AML1-ETO chimeric gene on the derivative chromosome 8. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of t(21;8;1) of AML-M2 reported in the literature with the involvement of the same breakpoint at 1q32. This illustrates that this complex translocation is rarely encountered in AML and reinforces the fact that this region may harbour a critical gene candidate that may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AML. More cases are needed to elucidate its clinical features and prognosis. PMID:22484534

  11. Prenatal diagnosis by FISH of a 22q11 deletion in two families.

    PubMed Central

    Portnoï, M F; Joyé, N; Gonzales, M; Demczuk, S; Fermont, L; Gaillard, G; Bercau, G; Morlier, G; Taillemite, J L

    1998-01-01

    We report on prenatal diagnosis by FISH of a sporadic 22q11 deletion associated with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) in two fetuses after an obstetric ultrasonographic examination detected cardiac anomalies, an interrupted aortic arch in case 1 and tetralogy of Fallot in case 2. The parents decided to terminate the pregnancies. At necropsy, fetal examination showed characteristic facial dysmorphism associated with congenital malformations, confirming full DGS in both fetuses. In addition to the 22q11 deletion, trisomy X was found in the second fetus and a reciprocal balanced translocation t(11;22) (q23;q11) was found in the clinically normal father of case 1. These findings highlight the importance of performing traditional cytogenetic analysis and FISH in pregnancies with a high risk of having a deletion. Images PMID:9507401

  12. Early onset intellectual disability in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Marco; Muzio, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, or DiGeorge syndrome, or velocardiofacial syndrome, is one of the most common multiple anomaly syndromes in humans. This syndrome is commonly caused by a microdelection from chromosome 22 at band q11.2. Although this genetic disorder may reflect several clinical abnormalities and different degrees of organ commitment, the clinical features that have driven the greatest amount of attention are behavioral and developmental features, because individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have a 30-fold risk of developing schizophrenia. There are differing opinions about the cognitive development, and commonly a cognitive decline rather than an early onset intellectual disability has been observed. We report a case of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome with both early assessment of mild intellectual disabilities and tetralogy of Fallot as the only physic manifestation. PMID:26358864

  13. Altered white matter microstructure is associated with social cognition and psychotic symptoms in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Villalon-Reina, Julio E.; Karlsgodt, Katherine H.; Senturk, Damla; Chow, Carolyn; Thompson, Paul M.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2014-01-01

    22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome (22q11DS) is a highly penetrant genetic mutation associated with a significantly increased risk for psychosis. Aberrant neurodevelopment may lead to inappropriate neural circuit formation and cerebral dysconnectivity in 22q11DS, which may contribute to symptom development. Here we examined: (1) differences between 22q11DS participants and typically developing controls in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures within white matter tracts; (2) whether there is an altered age-related trajectory of white matter pathways in 22q11DS; and (3) relationships between DTI measures, social cognition task performance, and positive symptoms of psychosis in 22q11DS and typically developing controls. Sixty-four direction diffusion weighted imaging data were acquired on 65 participants (36 22q11DS, 29 controls). We examined differences between 22q11DS vs. controls in measures of fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD), using both a voxel-based and region of interest approach. Social cognition domains assessed were: Theory of Mind and emotion recognition. Positive symptoms were assessed using the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes. Compared to typically developing controls, 22q11DS participants showed significantly lower AD and RD in multiple white matter tracts, with effects of greatest magnitude for AD in the superior longitudinal fasciculus. Additionally, 22q11DS participants failed to show typical age-associated changes in FA and RD in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Higher AD in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO) and left uncinate fasciculus was associated with better social cognition in 22q11DS and controls. In contrast, greater severity of positive symptoms was associated with lower AD in bilateral regions of the IFO in 22q11DS. White matter microstructure in tracts relevant to social cognition is disrupted in 22q11DS, and may contribute to psychosis risk. PMID

  14. Hearing Loss in a Mouse Model of 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jennifer C.; Zinnamon, Fhatarah A.; Taylor, Ruth R.; Ivins, Sarah; Scambler, Peter J.; Forge, Andrew; Tucker, Abigail S.; Linden, Jennifer F.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) arises from an interstitial chromosomal microdeletion encompassing at least 30 genes. This disorder is one of the most significant known cytogenetic risk factors for schizophrenia, and can also cause heart abnormalities, cognitive deficits, hearing difficulties, and a variety of other medical problems. The Df1/+ hemizygous knockout mouse, a model for human 22q11DS, recapitulates many of the deficits observed in the human syndrome including heart defects, impaired memory, and abnormal auditory sensorimotor gating. Here we show that Df1/+ mice, like human 22q11DS patients, have substantial rates of hearing loss arising from chronic middle ear infection. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurements revealed significant elevation of click-response thresholds in 48% of Df1/+ mice, often in only one ear. Anatomical and histological analysis of the middle ear demonstrated no gross structural abnormalities, but frequent signs of otitis media (OM, chronic inflammation of the middle ear), including excessive effusion and thickened mucosa. In mice for which both in vivo ABR thresholds and post mortem middle-ear histology were obtained, the severity of signs of OM correlated directly with the level of hearing impairment. These results suggest that abnormal auditory sensorimotor gating previously reported in mouse models of 22q11DS could arise from abnormalities in auditory processing. Furthermore, the findings indicate that Df1/+ mice are an excellent model for increased risk of OM in human 22q11DS patients. Given the frequently monaural nature of OM in Df1/+ mice, these animals could also be a powerful tool for investigating the interplay between genetic and environmental causes of OM. PMID:24244619

  15. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion in a boy with Opitz (G/BBB) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Fryburg, J.S.; Lin, K.Y.; Golden, W.L.

    1996-03-29

    This report is on a 14-month-old boy with manifestations of Opitz (G/BBB) syndrome in whom a 22q11.2 deletion was found. Deletion analysis was requested because of some findings in this patient reminiscent of velocardiofacial (VCF) syndrome. The extent of aspiration and of respiratory symptoms in this child is not usually seen in VCF syndrome. Opitz syndrome maps to at least two loci, one on Xp, the other on 22q11.2. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Acute Dystonia in a Patient with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Maillis, Antonis; Maltezou, Maria; Tsiori, Sofia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (di George syndrome) is one of the most prevalent genetic disorders. The clinical features of the syndrome are distinct facial appearance, velopharyngeal insufficiency, conotruncal heart disease, parathyroid and immune dysfunction; however, little is known about possible neurodegenerative diseases. We describe the case of an 18-year old patient suffering from 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Since adolescence, he presented with behavioral disorders, recommended treatment with 2 mg aloperidin and he presented cervical dystonia and emergence of torticollis and trunk dystonia. Antipsychotic medications either accelerate or reveal dystonic symptoms. PMID:26605035

  17. Significant Evidence of Linkage for a Gene Predisposing to Colorectal Cancer and Multiple Primary Cancers on 22q11

    PubMed Central

    Teerlink, Craig; Nelson, Quentin; Burt, Randall; Cannon-Albright, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The genetic basis of colorectal cancer (CRC) is not completely specified. Part of the difficulty in mapping predisposition genes for CRC may be because of phenotypic heterogeneity. Using data from a population genealogy of Utah record linked to a statewide cancer registry, we identified a subset of CRC cases that exhibited familial clustering in excess of that expected for all CRC cases in general, which may represent a genetically homogeneous subset of CRC. Methods: Using a new familial aggregation method referred to as the subset genealogic index of familiality (subsetGIF), combined with detailed information from a statewide tumor registry, we identified a subset of CRC cases that exhibited excess familial clustering above that expected for CRC: CRC cases who had at least one other primary tumor at a different site. A genome-wide linkage analysis was performed on a set of high-risk CRC pedigrees that included multiple CRC cases with additional primaries to identify evidence for predisposition loci. Results: A total of 13 high-risk CRC pedigrees with multiple CRC cases with other primary cancers were identified. Linkage analysis identified one pedigree with a significant linkage signal at 22q11 (LOD (logarithm (base 10) of odds)=3.39). Conclusions: A predisposition gene or variant for CRC that also predisposes to other primary cancers likely resides on chromosome 22q11. The ability to use statewide population genealogy and tumor registry data was critical to identify an informative subset of CRC cases that is possibly more genetically homogeneous than CRC in general, and may have improved statistical power for predisposition locus identification in this study. PMID:24572700

  18. Visual scanpath abnormalities in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: is this a face specific deficit?

    PubMed

    McCabe, Kathryn; Rich, Dominique; Loughland, Carmel Maree; Schall, Ulrich; Campbell, Linda Elisabet

    2011-09-30

    People with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) have deficits in face emotion recognition. However, it is not known whether this is a deficit specific to faces, or represents maladaptive information processing strategies to complex stimuli in general. This study examined the specificity of face emotion processing deficits in 22q11DS by exploring recognition accuracy and visual scanpath performance to a Faces task compared to a Weather Scene task. Seventeen adolescents with 22q11DS (11=females, age=17.4) and 18 healthy controls (11=females, age=17.7) participated in the study. People with 22q11DS displayed an overall impoverished scanning strategy to face and weather stimuli alike, resulting in poorer accuracy across all stimuli for the 22q11DS participants compared to controls. While the control subjects altered their information processing in response to faces, a similar change was not present in the 22q11DS group indicating different visual scanpath strategies to identify category within each of the tasks, of which faces appear to represent a particularly difficult subcategory. To conclude, while this study indicates that people with 22q11DS have a general visual processing deficit, the lack of strategic change between tasks suggest that the 22q11DS group did not adapt to the change in stimuli content as well as the controls, indicative of cognitive inflexibility rather than a face specific deficit. PMID:21831452

  19. Association of tetralogy of Fallot with a distinct region of del22q11.2.

    PubMed

    Kessler-Icekson, Gania; Birk, Einat; Weintraub, Ari Y; Barhum, Yael; Kotlyar, Violetta; Schlesinger, Hadassa; Rockah, Rivka; Vidne, Bernardo A; Frisch, Amos

    2002-02-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) appear in greater frequency among relatives of patients and in individuals with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) or velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS). A majority of these patients and part of the apparently nonsyndromic CHD patients with conotruncal defects manifest hemizygous deletions within chromosome 22q11.2 (del22q11). We tested myocardial tissues of 31 CHD patients, 21 with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and 10 with a double-chamber right ventricle (DCRV). DNA isolated from tissues removed at corrective surgery was analyzed for homo- or heterozygosity of nine polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) markers along the 22q11.2 region. DNA from the blood of 45 healthy individuals represented the general population. Ten of the 21 TOF patients (48%) showed homozygosity for three or more consecutive markers, indicating deletions of various sizes. No such indication was found for DCRV patients. Heterozygosity for markers D22S1648, D22S941, and D22S944 was lower in the TOF group than in normal controls, defining a minimal critical region (MCR) for the deletion. Our findings support an association between TOF and hemizygosity in 22q11.2, suggesting a distinct region, between markers D22S1638 and COMT, that may harbor TOF susceptibility genes. PMID:11840485

  20. Mapping Cortical Morphology in Youth with Velocardiofacial (22q11.2 Deletion) Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Wendy R.; Bansal, Ravi; Fremont, Wanda; Antshel, Kevin M.; Hao, Xuejun; Higgins, Anne Marie; Liu, Jun; Shprintzen, Robert J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS; 22q11.2 deletion syndrome) represents one of the highest known risk factors for schizophrenia. Insofar as up to 30% of individuals with this genetic disorder develop schizophrenia, VCFS constitutes a unique, etiologically homogeneous model for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Method:…

  1. [Analysis of microdeletions in 22q11 in Colombian patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Salazar, Marleny; Villalba, Guiovanny; Mateus, Heidi; Villegas, Victoria; Fonseca, Dora; Núñez, Federico; Caicedo, Víctor; Pachón, Sonia; Bernal, Jaime E

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac defects are the most frequent congenital malformations, with an incidence estimated between 4 and 12 per 1000 newborns. Their etiology is multifactorial and might be attributed to genetic predispositions and environmental factors. Since 1990 these types of pathologies have been associated with 22q11 microdeletion. In this study, the frequency of microdeletion 22q11 was determined in 61 patients with non-syndromic congenital heart disease. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and TUPLE1 and STR D10S2198 genes were amplified by multiplex PCR and visualized in agarose gels. Gene content was quantified by densitometry. Three patients were found with microdeletion 22q11, representing a 4.9% frequency. This microdeletion was associated with two cases of Tetralogy of Fallot and a third case with atrial septal defect (ASD). In conclusion, the frequency for microdeletion 22q11 in the population analyzed was 4.9%. The cases that presented Teratology of Fallot had a frequency for this microdeletion of 7.4% and for ASD of 11.1%. PMID:22523843

  2. Microsatellite DNA markers detects 95% of chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, D.; Cormier-Daire, V.; Munnich, A.; Lyonnet, S.

    1997-01-20

    Cono-truncal cardiac malformations account for some 50% of congenital heart defects in newborn infants. Recently, hemizygosity for chromosome 22q11.2 was reported in patients with the DiGeorge/Velo-cardio-facial syndromes (DGS/VCFS) and causally related disorders. We have explored the potential use of microsatellite DNA markers for rapid detection of 22q11 deletions in 19 newborn infants referred for cono-truncal heart malformations with associated DGS/VCFS anomalies. A failure of parental inheritance was documented in 84.2% of cases (16/19). PCR-based genotyping using microsatellite DNA markers located within the commonly deleted region allowed us either to confirm or reject a 22q11 microdeletion in 94.3% of cases (18/19) within 24 hours. This test is now currently performed in the infants referred to us for a cono-truncal heart malformation as a first intention screening for 22q11 microdeletion. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Microdeletions of chromosomal region 22q11 in patients with congenital conotruncal cardiac defects.

    PubMed Central

    Goldmuntz, E; Driscoll, D; Budarf, M L; Zackai, E H; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Biegel, J A; Emanuel, B S

    1993-01-01

    Congenital conotruncal cardiac defects occur with increased frequency in patients with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS). Previous studies have shown that the majority of patients with DGS or velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) have a microdeletion within chromosomal region 22q11. We hypothesised that patients with conotruncal defects who were not diagnosed with DGS or VCFS would also have 22q11 deletions. Seventeen non-syndromic patients with one of three types of conotruncal defects most commonly seen in DGS or VCFS were evaluated for a 22q11 deletion. DNA probes from within the DiGeorge critical region were used. Heterozygosity at a locus was assessed using restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Copy number was determined by dosage analysis using Southern blot analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridisation of metaphase spreads. Five of 17 patients were shown to have a 22q11 deletion when evaluated by dosage analysis. This study shows a genetic contribution to the development of some conotruncal cardiac malformations and alters knowledge regarding the risk of heritability of these defects in certain cases. Images PMID:7901419

  4. Overlapping Phenotypes in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison of Motor and Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumner, Emma; Leonard, Hayley C.; Hill, Elisabeth L.

    2016-01-01

    Motor and social difficulties are often found in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), to varying degrees. This study investigated the extent of overlap of these problems in children aged 7-10 years who had a diagnosis of either ASD or DCD, compared to typically-developing controls.…

  5. Platybasia in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Is Not Correlated with Speech Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Moshe; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B

    2014-01-01

    Background An abnormally obtuse cranial base angle, also known as platybasia, is a common finding in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). Platybasia increases the depth of the velopharynx and is therefore postulated to contribute to velopharyngeal dysfunction. Our objective was to determine the clinical significance of platybasia in 22q11DS by exploring the relationship between cranial base angles and speech resonance. Methods In this retrospective chart review at a tertiary hospital, 24 children (age, 4.0-13.1 years) with 22q11.2DS underwent speech assessments and lateral cephalograms, which allowed for the measurement of the cranial base angles. Results One patient (4%) had hyponasal resonance, 8 (33%) had normal resonance, 10 (42%) had hypernasal resonance on vowels only, and 5 (21%) had hypernasal resonance on both vowels and consonants. The mean cranial base angle was 136.5° (standard deviation, 5.3°; range, 122.3-144.8°). The Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant relationship between the resonance ratings and cranial base angles (P=0.242). Cranial base angles and speech ratings were not correlated (Spearman correlation=0.321, P=0.126). The group with hypernasal resonance had a significantly more obtuse mean cranial base angle (138° vs. 134°, P=0.049) but did not have a greater prevalence of platybasia (73% vs. 56%, P=0.412). Conclusions In this retrospective chart review of patients with 22q11DS, cranial base angles were not correlated with speech resonance. The clinical significance of platybasia remains unknown. PMID:25075355

  6. Velopharyngeal Anatomy in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Three-Dimensional Cephalometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruotolo, Rachel A.; Veitia, Nestor A.; Corbin, Aaron; McDonough, Joseph; Solot, Cynthia B.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Zackai, Elaine H.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Cnaan, Avital; LaRossa, Don; Arens, Raanan; Kirschner, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the most common genetic cause of velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising method for noninvasive, three-dimensional (3D) assessment of velopharyngeal (VP) anatomy. The purpose of this study was to assess VP structure in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome by using 3D MRI analysis. Design This was a retrospective analysis of magnetic resonance images obtained in patients with VPD associated with a 22q11.2 deletion compared with a normal control group. Setting This study was conducted at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, a pediatric tertiary care center. Patients, Participants The study group consisted of 5 children between the ages of 2.9 and 7.9 years, with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. All had VPD confirmed by nasendoscopy or videofluoroscopy. The control population consisted of 123 unaffected patients who underwent MRI for reasons other than VP assessment. Interventions Axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images with 3-mm slice thickness were obtained from the orbit to the larynx in all patients by using a 1.5T Siemens Visions system. Outcome Measures Linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of VP structures were obtained from the magnetic resonance images with VIDA image- processing software. Results The study group demonstrated greater anterior and posterior cranial base and atlanto-dental angles. They also demonstrated greater pharyngeal cavity volume and width and lesser tonsillar and adenoid volumes. Conclusion Patients with a 22q11.2 deletion demonstrate significant alterations in VP anatomy that may contribute to VPD. PMID:16854203

  7. Overlapping Phenotypes in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison of Motor and Social Skills.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Emma; Leonard, Hayley C; Hill, Elisabeth L

    2016-08-01

    Motor and social difficulties are often found in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), to varying degrees. This study investigated the extent of overlap of these problems in children aged 7-10 years who had a diagnosis of either ASD or DCD, compared to typically-developing controls. Children completed motor and face processing assessments. Parents completed questionnaires concerning their child's early motor and current motor and social skills. There was considerable overlap between the ASD and DCD groups on the motor and social assessments, with both groups more impaired than controls. Furthermore, motor skill predicted social functioning for both groups. Future research should consider the relationships between core symptoms and their consequences in other domains. PMID:27126816

  8. Neuropsychological profile of Italian children and adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome with and without intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Vicari, Stefano; Mantovan, Manuela; Addona, Francesca; Costanzo, Floriana; Verucci, Lorena; Menghini, Deny

    2012-03-01

    As individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) show a wide range of IQs, intellectual heterogeneity could mask the neuropsychological profile of the syndrome. This study was designed to identify specific neuropsychological features of children and adolescents with 22q11DS by taking into account the possible source of variability deriving from intellectual disability (ID). First, we compared several neuropsychological domains involving linguistic, visual-motor/visual-perceptual and memory abilities in 34 children and adolescents with 22q11DS and 83 mental age-matched typically developing (TD) participants. Then, we selected participants with 22q11DS according to whether or not they had ID and compared their neuropsychological profiles with those of chronological age-matched TD controls. Although language and several aspects of memory have been found impaired only in children with 22q11DS with ID, deficits in visual-spatial abilities and visual-object short-term memory persist in participants without ID and might be considered a characteristic of 22q11DS, not just related to the presence of ID. On the basis of our findings, children and adolescents with 22q11DS cannot be considered as a single group with a homogeneous neuropsychological profile and must be studied in relation to their global intellectual abilities. PMID:21870177

  9. Social Skills and Associated Psychopathology in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Implications for Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shashi, V.; Veerapandiyan, A.; Schoch, K.; Kwapil, T.; Keshavan, M.; Ip, E.; Hooper, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although distinctive neuropsychological impairments have been delineated in children with chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), social skills and social cognition remain less well-characterised. Objective: To examine social skills and social cognition and their relationship with neuropsychological function/behaviour and…

  10. Large-scale functional network reorganization in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome revealed by modularity analysis.

    PubMed

    Scariati, Elisa; Schaer, Marie; Karahanoglu, Isik; Schneider, Maude; Richiardi, Jonas; Debbané, Martin; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Eliez, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with cognitive impairments and a 41% risk of developing schizophrenia. While several studies performed on patients with 22q11DS showed the presence of abnormal functional connectivity in this syndrome, how these alterations affect large-scale network organization is still unknown. Here we performed a network modularity analysis on whole-brain functional connectomes derived from the resting-state fMRI of 40 patients with 22q11DS and 41 healthy control participants, aged between 9 and 30 years old. We then split the sample at 18 years old to obtain two age subgroups and repeated the modularity analyses. We found alterations of modular communities affecting the visuo-spatial network and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in both age groups. These results corroborate previous structural and functional studies in 22q11DS that showed early impairment of visuo-spatial processing regions. Furthermore, as ACC has been linked to the development of psychotic symptoms in 22q11DS, the early impairment of its functional connectivity provide further support that ACC alterations may provide potential biomarkers for an increased risk of schizophrenia. Finally, we found an abnormal modularity partition of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) only in adults with 22q11DS, suggesting the presence of an abnormal development of functional network communities during adolescence in 22q11DS. PMID:27371790

  11. The 22Q11.2 Deletion in Children: High Rate of Autistic Disorders and Early Onset of Psychotic Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; Morcus, Monique E. J.; Duijff, Sasja N.; Klaassen, Petra W. J.; Heineman-de, Josien A.; Beemer, Frits A.; Swaab, Hanna; Kahn, Rene S.; van Engeland, Herman

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine psychopathology and influence of intelligence level on psychiatric symptoms in children with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). Method: Sixty patients, ages 9 through 18 years, were evaluated. Assessments followed standard protocols, including structured and semistructured interviews of parents, videotaped psychiatric…

  12. A Longitudinal Examination of the Psychoeducational, Neurocognitive, and Psychiatric Functioning in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Curtiss, Kathleen; Schoch, Kelly; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Allen, Andrew; Shashi, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the longitudinal psychoeducational, neurocognitive, and psychiatric outcomes of children and adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a population with a high incidence of major psychiatric illnesses appearing in late adolescence/early adulthood. Little is known of the developmental…

  13. Memory in Intellectually Matched Groups of Young Participants with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Those with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravariti, Eugenia; Jacobson, Clare; Morris, Robin; Frangou, Sophia; Murray, Robin M.; Tsakanikos, Elias; Habel, Alex; Shearer, Jo

    2010-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) and schizophrenia have genetic and neuropsychological similarities, but are likely to differ in memory profile. Confirming differences in memory function between the two disorders, and identifying their genetic determinants, can help to define genetic subtypes in both syndromes, identify genetic risk factors…

  14. Altered Brain Structure-Function Relationships Underlie Executive Dysfunction in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Rachel K; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Montojo, Caroline A; Patel, Arati; Kushan, Leila; Chow, Carolyn C; Vesagas, Therese; Bearden, Carrie E

    2015-12-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a neurogenetic disorder associated with elevated rates of developmental neuropsychiatric disorders and impaired executive function (EF). Disrupted brain structure-function relationships may underlie EF deficits in 22q11DS. We administered the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) to assess real-world EF in patients with 22q11DS and matched controls (n = 86; age 6-17 years), along with cognitive measures that tap behavioral regulation and metacognition aspects of EF. Using FreeSurfer's whole-brain vertex cortical thickness pipeline, we investigated brain structure-EF relationships in patients with 22q11DS and controls. Behaviorally, patients with 22q11DS were impaired on multiple EF measures. Right orbitofrontal cortical thickness showed a differential relationship between real-world EF in patients with 22q11DS and controls. We also observed a group difference in the relationship between behavioral regulation and metacognition measures with thickness of ventral and dorsolateral prefrontal regions, respectively. Our findings suggest that executive dysfunction characteristic of 22q11DS is underscored by altered prefrontal cortical structure. PMID:27606315

  15. Unmasking an autosomal recessive disorder by a deletion in the DiGeorge/Velo-cardio-facial chromosome region (DGCR) in 22q11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Budarf, M.L.; Michaud, D.; Emanuel, B.

    1994-09-01

    Unmasking an autosomal recessive disorder by constitutional hemizygosity is well documented for the embryonal tumors RB and WAGR, where the second hit is a somatic event. Few deletion-mediated recessive conditions have been reported in patients with germline mutations. The major platelet receptor for von Willebrand factor, Glycoprotein Ib (GpIb), is a complex of two plasma membrane glycoproteins, Ib{alpha} and Ib{beta}, covalently linked by disulfide bonds. Defects in this receptor have been associated with the rare congenital autosomal recessive bleeding disorder, Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS). BSS is characterized by prolonged bleeding times, thrombocytopenia and very large platelets. The GpIb{beta} gene has been cloned and we have mapped it within the DGCR. We have identified a patient with phenotypic features of both BSS and VCFS. The patient was referred for 22q11-deletion FISH studies because of a conventricular VSD and mild dysmorphia. FISH with the N25 DiGeorge cosmid demonstrated a deletion in 22q11.2. Western blot analysis of the patient`s platelet proteins demonstrates a complete absence of GpIb{beta}. We suggest that haploinsufficiency for the DGCR in this patient unmasks a mutation in the remaining GpIb{beta} allele, resulting in manifestations of BSS. This mechanism, haploinsufficiency coupled with a mutation of the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} chromosome, might explain some of the phenotypic variability seen amongst patients with 22q11.2 microdeletions. These results further suggest that patients with contiguous gene deletion syndromes are at increased risk for autosomal recessive disorders and that they provide the opportunity to {open_quotes}map{close_quotes}disease loci.

  16. Reproductive Health Issues for Adults with a Common Genomic Disorder: 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chrystal; Costain, Gregory; Ogura, Lucas; Silversides, Candice K; Chow, Eva W C; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-10-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans. Survival to reproductive age and beyond is now the norm. Several manifestations of this syndrome, such as congenital cardiac disease and neuropsychiatric disorders, may increase risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes in the general population. However, there are limited data on reproductive health in 22q11.2DS. We performed a retrospective chart review for 158 adults with 22q11.2DS (75 male, 83 female; mean age 34.3 years) and extracted key variables relevant to pregnancy and reproductive health. We present four illustrative cases as brief vignettes. There were 25 adults (21 > age 35 years; 21 female) with a history of one or more pregnancies. Outcomes for women with 22q11.2DS, compared with expectations for the general population, showed a significantly elevated prevalence of small for gestational age liveborn offspring (p < 0.001), associated mainly with infants with 22q11.2DS. Stillbirths also showed elevated prevalence (p < 0.05). Not all observed adverse events appeared to be attributable to transmission of the 22q11.2 deletion. Recurring issues relevant to reproductive health in 22q11.2DS included the potential impact of maternal morbidities, inadequate social support, unsafe sexual practices, and delayed diagnosis of 22q11.2DS and/or lack of genetic counseling. These preliminary results emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and long term follow-up that could help facilitate genetic counseling for men and women with 22q11.2DS. We propose initial recommendations for pre-conception management, educational strategies, prenatal planning, and preparation for possible high-risk pregnancy and/or delivery. PMID:25579115

  17. Early-onset Parkinson's Disease Associated with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oki, Mitsuaki; Hori, Shin-ichiro; Asayama, Shinya; Wate, Reika; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 43-year-old man with a 4-year history of resting tremor and akinesia. His resting tremor and rigidity were more prominent on the left side. He also presented retropulsion. His symptoms responded to the administration of levodopa. The patient also had a cleft lip and palate, cavum vergae, and hypoparathyroidism. A chromosome analysis disclosed a hemizygous deletion in 22q11.2, and he was diagnosed with early-onset Parkinson's disease associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the patient lacked autonomic nerve dysfunction, and his cardiac uptake of (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine was normal, indicating an underlying pathological mechanism that differed to that of sporadic Parkinson's disease. PMID:26831029

  18. SNP Microarray in FISH Negative Clinically Suspected 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the role of SNP microarray in 101 cases of clinically suspected FISH negative (noninformative/normal) 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. SNP microarray was carried out using 300 K HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip array or CytoScan 750 K array. SNP microarray identified 8 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletions and/or microduplications in addition to cases of chromosomal abnormalities and other pathogenic/likely pathogenic CNVs. Clinically suspected specific deletions (22q11.2) were detectable in approximately 8% of cases by SNP microarray, mostly from FISH noninformative cases. This study also identified several LOH/AOH loci with known and well-defined UPD (uniparental disomy) disorders. In conclusion, this study suggests more strict clinical criteria for FISH analysis. However, if clinical criteria are few or doubtful, in particular newborn/neonate in intensive care, SNP microarray should be the first screening test to be ordered. FISH is ideal test for detecting mosaicism, screening family members, and prenatal diagnosis in proven families. PMID:27051557

  19. SNP Microarray in FISH Negative Clinically Suspected 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Halder, Ashutosh; Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the role of SNP microarray in 101 cases of clinically suspected FISH negative (noninformative/normal) 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. SNP microarray was carried out using 300 K HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip array or CytoScan 750 K array. SNP microarray identified 8 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletions and/or microduplications in addition to cases of chromosomal abnormalities and other pathogenic/likely pathogenic CNVs. Clinically suspected specific deletions (22q11.2) were detectable in approximately 8% of cases by SNP microarray, mostly from FISH noninformative cases. This study also identified several LOH/AOH loci with known and well-defined UPD (uniparental disomy) disorders. In conclusion, this study suggests more strict clinical criteria for FISH analysis. However, if clinical criteria are few or doubtful, in particular newborn/neonate in intensive care, SNP microarray should be the first screening test to be ordered. FISH is ideal test for detecting mosaicism, screening family members, and prenatal diagnosis in proven families. PMID:27051557

  20. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of six patients with ring chromosomes 22, including one with concomitant 22q11.2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Soares, Karina Cunha; Simioni, Milena; Vieira, Tarsis Paiva; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lúcia; Kim, Chong Ae; Brunoni, Décio; Spinner, Nancy Bettina; Conlin, Laura Kathleen; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici; Steiner, Carlos Eduardo; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2014-07-01

    We report here on six patients with a ring chromosome 22 and the range of cytogenetic and phenotypic features presented by them. Genomic analysis was carried out using classical and molecular cytogenetics, MLPA (Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification) and genome-wide SNP-array analysis. The ring was found in all patients, but Patient 6 displayed constitutional mosaicism with a normal cell line. Five patients had deletions in the ring chromosome 22, and in four of them the breakpoints--unique for each patient--could be identified by genome-wide SNP-array analysis. One patient presented with a 22q11.2 deletion concomitant with the deletion caused by the ring formation. Common phenotypic features included autism, speech delay and seizures, as previously reported for individuals with r(22) and/or 22q13.3 deletions. Investigation of the genes within the deletions revealed multiple genes related to development of the central nervous system, psychomotor delay, severe language impairment, hypotonia, and autistic symptoms. There was no clear correlation between the severity of clinical features and the size of the deleted segment. This study underscores the variability in ring structure and clinical presentation of the r(22) and adds information to the limited literature on this rare disorder. PMID:24700634

  1. Parental Communication and Experiences and Knowledge of Adolescent Siblings of Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okashah, Rebecca; Schoch, Kelly; Hooper, Stephen R; Shashi, Vandana; Callanan, Nancy

    2015-10-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common microdeletion in humans. There have been few studies assessing the impact of this condition on the family and no previous studies conducted on unaffected siblings of children with 22q11DS. The goal of this study was to determine the frequency, method, and content of information being communicated by parents to unaffected siblings about the condition and to assess unaffected siblings' knowledge of 22q11DS and perceptions of the impact of the condition on their affected sibling and themselves. Families were recruited from several 22q11DS educational and support organizations and asked to complete a single anonymous online survey. Families were eligible to participate if they had one child with 22q11DS and at least one unaffected child between the ages of 12 and 17. Survey questions were developed based on previous literature and authors' expertise with individuals with 22q11DS. Responses to quantitative and qualitative questions were analyzed to calculate frequencies and proportions and to extract themes, respectively. A total of 25 families (defined as a unit of at least one parent, one affected child, and at least one unaffected child) participated in the study. Parents shared genetic information less often as compared to behavioral and medical information. Siblings of children with 22q11DS had both positive and negative experiences in having a brother or sister with this condition. Genetic counselors can use the results of this study to develop anticipatory guidance for parents of children with 22q11DS in talking with their unaffected children about the condition. PMID:25540895

  2. A multilevel analysis of cognitive dysfunction and psychopathology associated with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in children

    PubMed Central

    SIMON, TONY J.; BISH, JOEL P.; BEARDEN, CARRIE E.; DING, LIJUN; FERRANTE, SAMANTHA; NGUYEN, VY; GEE, JAMES C.; McDONALD–McGINN, DONNA M.; ZACKAI, ELAINE H.; EMANUEL, BEVERLY S.

    2006-01-01

    We present a multilevel approach to developing potential explanations of cognitive impairments and psychopathologies common to individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Results presented support our hypothesis of posterior parietal dysfunction as a central determinant of characteristic visuospatial and numerical cognitive impairments. Converging data suggest that brain development anomalies, primarily tissue reductions in the posterior brain and changes to the corpus callosum, may affect parietal connectivity. Further findings indicate that dysfunction in “frontal” attention systems may explain some executive cognition impairments observed in affected children, and that there may be links between these domains of cognitive function and some of the serious psychiatric conditions, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, and schizophrenia, that have elevated incidence rates in the syndrome. Linking the neural structure and the cognitive processing levels in this way enabled us to develop an elaborate structure/function mapping hypothesis for the impairments that are observed. We show also, that in the case of the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene, a fairly direct relationship between gene expression, cognitive function, and psychopathology exists in the affected population. Beyond that, we introduce the idea that variation in other genes may further explain the phenotypic variation in cognitive function and possibly the anomalies in brain development. PMID:16262991

  3. Severe laryngeal stenosis in newly born twins with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Clive, B; Corsten, G; Penney, L S; Van den Hof, M; El-Naggar, W

    2016-05-18

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is common and presents with a range of clinical features from cardiac malformations to hypocalcemia. Laryngeal anomalies are not a common feature of this syndrome. We describe newly born twins who presented with unexpected severe birth depression secondary to severe type IV glottic webs requiring extensive resuscitation and emergency tracheostomy. They were diagnosed postnatally to have deletion of 22q11.2. The successful resuscitation of these infants at birth was only possible because they were born in a tertiary care hospital. This report shows the critical nature of prenatal diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:27197926

  4. Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome; variability in age at onset and disease progression highlighting the phenotypic overlap with Fazio-Londe disease.

    PubMed

    Dipti, Subrahmanian; Childs, Anne-Marie; Livingston, John H; Aggarwal, A K; Miller, Mike; Williams, Chris; Crow, Yanick J

    2005-09-01

    We report four siblings showing features of a pontobulbar palsy, a mixed spinal and upper motor neuropathy and variable deafness. The observation of affected males and females born to consanguineous first cousin parents suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Two children presented in the first 16 months of life with stridor and died of respiratory failure by the age of 2 years. Hearing loss was not apparent in these infants. In contrast, 2 further siblings developed a bulbar palsy in their sixth year followed by the onset of deafness and features of an anterior horn neuropathy with corticospinal tract involvement. They exhibited a relatively slow but relentless decline over a period of several years. These cases highlight the phenotypic overlap of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome with Fazio-Londe disease. Rather than representing two separate disorders, our findings suggest the possibility of a single disease entity which may usefully be considered a form of juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:16122634

  5. Seizures as the first manifestation of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in a 40-year old man: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Adriano R; Kosuri, Kalyan; Wei, Sainan; Chick, Davoren

    2007-01-01

    Background The microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2 is the most common human deletion syndrome. It typically presents early in life and is rarely considered in adult patients. As part of the manifestations of this condition, patients can have parathyroid glandular involvement ranging from hypocalcemic hypoparathyroidism to normocalcemia with normal parathryroid hormone levels. The first manifestation of the syndrome might be seizures due to profound hypocalcemia. Case presentation A 40-year-old man without significant past medical history presented with a new-onset generalized tonic-clonic seizure. He had no personal history of hypocalcemia or seizures. Physical examination was remarkable for short stature, hypertelorism, prominent forehead and nasal voice. His initial laboratory examination showed hypocalcemia (Calcium 5.2 mg/dl and Calcium ionized 0.69 mmol/l) with hypoparathyroidism (Parathyroid hormone intact < 2.5 pg/ml. NV: 14–72 pg/ml). Urine Calcium was 3 mg/dl on a spot and 88 mg in a 24-hour urine collection (NV: 100–300 mg/24 hs). The electrocardiogram showed a prolonged corrected QT interval. Echocardiogram, abdominal ultrasound and electroencephalogram were normal. A computer tomography of the brain showed basal ganglia calcification. The subtle physical findings and the presence of idiopathic hypoparathyroidism motivated the performance of fluorescent in situ hybridization which demonstrated a microdeletion on one of the homologs 22q11.2. The patient was treated with calcium citrate and calcitriol with good response. Conclusion Microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2 is among the most clinically variable syndromes, with more than 180 features associated with the deletion. It has a variable phenotypical expression, requiring a high level of awareness for its early diagnosis. Seizures, related to marked hypocalcemia due to idiopathic hypoparathyroidism, might be the presenting feature in an adult patient with this syndrome. PMID:18053182

  6. Brain and Behavior in Children with 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Volumetric and Voxel-Based Morphometry MRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Linda E.; Daly, Eileen; Toal, Fiona; Stevens, Angela; Azuma, Rayna; Catani, Marco; Ng, Virginia; Van Amelsvoort, Therese; Chitnis, Xavier; Cutter, William; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2006-01-01

    In people with velo-cardio-facial syndrome [or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS)], a single interstitial deletion of chromosome 22q11.2 causes a wide spectrum of cognitive deficits ranging from global learning difficulties to specific cognitive deficits. People with 22qDS are also at high risk of developing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder…

  7. Potential Role of Cortisol in Social and Memory Impairments in Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Daniel; Bursch, Megan; Lajiness-O'Neill, Renee

    2016-09-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by physiological and psychological symptoms. This study investigated the role of cortisol on the social and cognitive impairments in children with 22q11.2. A total of 11 children with 22q11.2 were assessed for baseline cortisol levels and received broad neuropsychological testing. Results were compared with 11 controls. Children with 22q11.2 had significantly higher cortisol levels. A significant negative correlation was observed between the general memory and attention/concentration indices of the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning, 2nd edition and cortisol concentrations in the control population. These data provide evidence of a possible causal mechanism that underlies social impairments in stress disorders. PMID:27617156

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci at chromosomes 10p15, 12q13 and 22q13.

    PubMed

    Barton, Anne; Thomson, Wendy; Ke, Xiayi; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Gibbons, Laura J; Wilson, Anthony G; Bax, Deborah E; Morgan, Ann W; Emery, Paul; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Worthington, Jane

    2008-10-01

    The WTCCC study identified 49 SNPs putatively associated with rheumatoid arthritis at P = 1 x 10(-4) - 1 x 10(-5) (tier 3). Here we show that three of these SNPs, mapping to chromosome 10p15 (rs4750316), 12q13 (rs1678542) and 22q13 (rs3218253), are also associated (trend P = 4 x 10(-5), P = 4 x 10(-4) and P = 4 x 10(-4), respectively) in a validation study of 4,106 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and an expanded reference group of 11,238 subjects, confirming them as true susceptibility loci in individuals of European ancestry. PMID:18794857

  9. Frontonasal malformation with tetralogy of Fallot associated with a submicroscopic deletion of 22q11

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.F.; Payne, R.M.

    1997-03-31

    We report on a 14-month-old girl with bifid nasal tip and tetralogy of Fallot. Several similar patients have been described with CNS or eye abnormalities. Chromosome analysis with FISH, using Oncor DiGeorge probes, confirmed a submicroscopic deletion of 22q11. Many patients with Shprintzen (velo-cardio-facial) syndrome have a similar deletion with conotruncal cardiac defects and an abnormal nasal shape, suggesting that a gene in this area, possibly affecting neural crest cells, influences facial and other midline development. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Partial trisomy 2q due to a maternal balanced translocation t(2;22) (q31;p12)

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, L.S.; Bleiman, M.; Punnett, H.H.

    1994-09-01

    Features consistent among reported patients with 2q duplications due to familial translocations or de novo duplications include pre- and postnatal growth failure, ocular defects such as congenital glaucoma, cardiac defects, micrognathia, urogenital defects, renal defects, connective tissue laxity, neurologic defects, and dermatologic abnormalities. Genotype/phenotype correlations of patients with trisomy 2q due to familial translocations are complicated by the presence of the deletions of the other chromosome involved. We have had the opportunity to observe `pure` trisomy 2q31-qter resulting from adjacent-1 segregation from 46,XX,t(2;22)(q31;p12) in a carrier mother with apparent loss of the 22 NOR region. He was the 2453 gm product of a gestation complicated by gestational diabetes to a 29-year-old G1 P0 mother and a 30-year-old father. At birth, he was noted to have hypotonia, micrognathia, microphthalmia, left cryptorchidism, hypospadias, bilateral clinodactyly of the fifth digits, mild hyperextensibility of the joints, dry skin disorder, and bilateral hydronephrosis by ultrasound. He was treated for hypoglycemia in the nursery and had a vesicostomy at two months for vesicoureteral reflux. A hearing test at two months found moderate hearing loss in the right ear and mild to moderate hearing loss in the left ear. At 3 months he had surgery for a PDA and bilateral glaucoma and was treated for periods of hypothermia and type IV renal tubular acidosis. This patient and others with unbalanced translocations involving the NOR region of an acrocentric chromosome allow for genotype/phenotype correlation of the `pure` trisomic region.

  11. Intelligence and Visual Motor Integration in 5-Year-Old Children with 22q11-Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duijff, Sasja; Klaassen, Petra; Beemer, Frits; Swanenburg de Veye, Henriette; Vorstman, Jacob; Sinnema, Gerben

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between intelligence and visual motor integration skills in 5-year-old children with 22q11-deletion syndrome (22q11DS) (N = 65, 43 females, 22 males; mean age 5.6 years (SD 0.2), range 5.23-5.99 years). Sufficient VMI skills seem a prerequisite for IQ testing. Since problems related to…

  12. Developmental changes in multivariate neuroanatomical patterns that predict risk for psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gothelf, Doron; Hoeft, Fumiko; Ueno, Takefumi; Sugiura, Lisa; Lee, Agatha D; Thompson, Paul; Reiss, Allan L

    2011-03-01

    The primary objective of the current prospective study was to examine developmental patterns of voxel-by-voxel gray and white matter volumes (GMV, WMV, respectively) that would predict psychosis in adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), the most common known genetic risk factor for schizophrenia. We performed a longitudinal voxel-based morphometry analysis using structural T1 MRI scans from 19 individuals with 22q11.2DS and 18 typically developing individuals. In 22q11.2DS, univariate analysis showed that greater reduction in left dorsal prefrontal cortical (dPFC) GMV over time predicted greater psychotic symptoms at Time2. This dPFC region also showed significantly reduced volumes in 22q11.2DS compared to typically developing individuals at Time1 and 2, greater reduction over time in 22q11.2DS COMT(Met) compared to COMT(Val), and greater reduction in those with greater decline in verbal IQ over time. Leave-one-out Multivariate pattern analysis results (MVPA) on the other hand, showed that patterns of GM and WM morphometric changes over time in regions including but not limited to the dPFC predicted risk for psychotic symptoms (94.7-100% accuracy) significantly better than using univariate analysis (63.1%). Additional predictive brain regions included medial PFC and dorsal cingulum. This longitudinal prospective study shows novel evidence of morphometric spatial patterns predicting the development of psychotic symptoms in 22q11.2DS, and further elucidates the abnormal maturational processes in 22q11.2DS. The use of neuroimaging using MVPA may hold promise to predict outcome in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:20817203

  13. Dysregulation of DGCR6 and DGCR6L: psychopathological outcomes in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, D; Bernal, A J; Schoch, K; Howard, T D; Ip, E H; Hooper, S R; Keshavan, M S; Jirtle, R L; Shashi, V

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans. It is typified by highly variable symptoms, which might be explained by epigenetic regulation of genes in the interval. Using computational algorithms, our laboratory previously predicted that DiGeorge critical region 6 (DGCR6), which lies within the deletion interval, is imprinted in humans. Expression and epigenetic regulation of this gene have not, however, been examined in 22q11DS subjects. The purpose of this study was to determine if the expression levels of DGCR6 and its duplicate copy DGCR6L in 22q11DS subjects are associated with the parent-of-origin of the deletion and childhood psychopathologies. Our investigation showed no evidence of parent-of-origin-related differences in expression of both DGCR6 and DGCR6L. However, we found that the variability in DGCR6 expression was significantly greater in 22q11DS children than in age and gender-matched control individuals. Children with 22q11DS who had anxiety disorders had significantly lower DGCR6 expression, especially in subjects with the deletion on the maternal chromosome, despite the lack of imprinting. Our findings indicate that epigenetic mechanisms other than imprinting contribute to the dysregulation of these genes and the associated childhood psychopathologies observed in individuals with 22q11DS. Further studies are now needed to test the usefulness of DGCR6 and DGCR6L expression and alterations in the epigenome at these loci in predicting childhood anxiety and associated adult-onset pathologies in 22q11DS subjects. PMID:22832905

  14. Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Are Impaired at Explicit, but Not Implicit, Discrimination of Local Forms Embedded in Global Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giersch, Anne; Glaser, Bronwyn; Pasca, Catherine; Chabloz, Mélanie; Debbané, Martin; Eliez, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) are impaired at exploring visual information in space; however, not much is known about visual form discrimination in the syndrome. Thirty-five individuals with 22q11.2DS and 41 controls completed a form discrimination task with global forms made up of local elements. Affected individuals…

  15. Relationship between Reaction Time, Fine Motor Control, and Visual-Spatial Perception on Vigilance and Visual-Motor Tasks in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Sarah A.; Prasad, Sarah E.; Pender, Niall P.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2012-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) is a common microdeletion disorder associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability and specific neurocognitive deficits, particularly in visual-motor and attentional abilities. Currently there is evidence that the visual-motor profile of 22q11DS is not entirely mediated by intellectual disability and…

  16. A Comparative Study of Cognition and Brain Anatomy between Two Neurodevelopmental Disorders: 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Linda E.; Stevens, Angela; Daly, Eileen; Toal, Fiona; Azuma, Rayna; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with intellectual disability, poor social interaction and a high prevalence of psychosis. However, to date there have been no studies comparing cognition and neuroanatomical characteristics of 22q11DS with other syndromes to investigate if the cognitive strengths and difficulties and…

  17. Association of the Family Environment with Behavioural and Cognitive Outcomes in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, T. M.; Hersh, J.; Schoch, K.; Curtiss, K.; Hooper, S. R.; Shashi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) are at risk for social-behavioural and neurocognitive sequelae throughout development. The current study examined the impact of family environmental characteristics on social-behavioural and cognitive outcomes in this paediatric population. Method: Guardians of children with 22q11DS…

  18. Performance on the Modified Card Sorting Test and Its Relation to Psychopathology in Adolescents and Young Adults with 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockers, K.; Ousley, O.; Sutton, T.; Schoenberg, E.; Coleman, K.; Walker, E.; Cubells, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Approximately one-third of individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a common genetic disorder highly associated with intellectual disabilities, may develop schizophrenia, likely preceded by a mild to moderate cognitive decline. Methods: We examined adolescents and young adults with 22q11DS for the presence of executive…

  19. Epilepsy and Other Neuropsychiatric Manifestations in Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Yum, Mi-Sun; Lee, Beom-Hee; Kim, Hyo-Won; Lee, Hyun-Jeoung; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Lee, Yun-Jeong; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome. Epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric (NP) manifestations of this genetic syndrome are not uncommon, but they are also not well-understood. We sought to identify the characteristics of epilepsy and other associated NP manifestations in patients with 22q11.2DS. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 145 child and adolescent patients (72 males and 73 females) with genetically diagnosed 22q11.2DS. The clinical data included seizures, growth chart, psychological reports, development characteristics, school performance, other clinical manifestations, and laboratory findings. Results Of the 145 patients with 22q11.2DS, 22 (15.2%) had epileptic seizures, 15 (10.3%) had developmental delay, and 5 (3.4%) had a psychiatric illness. Twelve patients with epilepsy were classified as genetic epilepsy whereas the remaining were classified as structural, including three with malformations of cortical development. Patients with epilepsy were more likely to display developmental delay (odds ratio=3.98; 95% confidence interval=1.5-10.5; p=0.005), and developmental delay was more common in patients with structural epilepsy than in those with genetic epilepsy. Conclusions Patients with 22q11.2DS have a high risk of epilepsy, which in these cases is closely related to other NP manifestations. This implies that this specific genetic locus is critically linked to neurodevelopment and epileptogenesis. PMID:26754781

  20. Inherited and de novo 22q11.2 distal duplications in two patients with autistic features, speech delay and no dysmorphology

    PubMed Central

    Hantash, Feras M.; Wang, Boris T.; Owen, Renius; Ross, Leslie P.; Mahon, Loretta W.; Boyar, Fatih Z.; Anguiano, Arturo; Strom, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    In a screen of patients by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and array comparative genomic hybridization in the past two years (July 2007--July 2009), we identified two patients with duplications in the 22q11.22-23, occurring outside the common DiGeorge syndrome/valocardiofacial syndrome region. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and high density bacterial artificial chromosomes and oligo arrays were used to identify the extent of the duplications. In one patient the duplication extended from LCR22-E/5 to LCR22-H/8, which is similar to recently described 22q11.2 distal duplications, while in the second patient, a de novo duplication was identified extending between LCR22-E/5 to LCR22-F/6. The second proband also harbored a de novo 15q14 duplication, complicating phenotype interpretation. The patients were affected with speech delay and autistic features, but neither reported cardiac concern or dysmorphic features.

  1. A case report of 22q11 deletion syndrome confirmed by array-CGH method

    PubMed Central

    Sedghi, Maryam; Nouri, Narges; Abdali, Hossein; Memarzadeh, Mehrdad; Nouri, Nayereh

    2012-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is caused by a submicroscopic deletion on the long arm of chromosome 22 and affects approximately 1 in 4000 persons, making it the second most prevalent genetic syndrome after Down syndrome and the most common genetic syndrome associated with cleft palate. Most of the 22q11.2 deletion cases are new occurrences or sporadic; however, in about 10 % of families, the deletion is inherited and other family members are affected or at risk for passing this deletion to their children. This report describes a 1.5 years-old male child with clinical signs of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) presented with heart defect, soft cleft palate, developmental delay, acrocephaly, seizure, MRI abnormalities and descriptive facial feature, such as hypertelorism. Array-CGH test was done to confirm the diagnosis; the result revealed a 2.6 Mbp deletion in 22q11.2 chromosome that containing TBX1 and COMT genes. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of TBX1 gene is probably a major contributor to some of the syndrome characteristic signs, such as heart defect. Because of developmental delay and dysmorphic facial feature were observed in the index's mother and relatives, inherited autosomal dominant form of VCF is probable, and MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) test should be performed for parents to estimate the recurrent risk in next pregnancy. PMID:23267387

  2. A longitudinal examination of the psychoeducational, neurocognitive, and psychiatric functioning in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Stephen R; Curtiss, Kathleen; Schoch, Kelly; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Allen, Andrew; Shashi, Vandana

    2013-05-01

    The present study sought to examine the longitudinal psychoeducational, neurocognitive, and psychiatric outcomes of children and adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a population with a high incidence of major psychiatric illnesses appearing in late adolescence/early adulthood. Little is known of the developmental changes that occur in the early teen years, prior to the age of highest psychosis risk. Data were collected from 71 participants (42 subjects with 22q11DS and 29 control subjects) at Time 1 (T1) and Time 2 (T2), approximately 3.5 years later. The 22q11DS group was significantly lower functioning than controls on IQ, neurocognition, and academic achievement at both T1 and T2. Children with 22q11DS also showed significantly greater social-behavioral difficulties and psychiatric symptoms, and were more likely to meet criteria for psychiatric disorders at both time points. In evaluating change over time from T1 to T2, the 22q11DS group did not show significant changes in psychoeducational or psychiatric outcomes relative to the controls, however, lack of expected age-related gains in attention regulation were noted. Within the 22q11DS group, an increase in the Attenuated Prodrome for Schizophrenia (number of psychiatric symptoms) was noted from T1 to T2 and four children with 22q11DS met criteria for Psychosis for the first time. Predictors at T1 that uncovered psychopathology symptoms at T2 included full-scale IQ, externalizing symptoms, and problem social behaviors. Overall, younger adolescent and preadolescent children with 22q11DS in this study exhibited slowed growth in attention regulation, with an increase in subclinical symptoms of schizophrenia, suggestive of increasing impairments in domains that are relevant to the high risk of Schizophrenia. Early predictors of later psychopathology included both cognitive and behavioral abnormalities. These findings begin to elucidate the trajectory of changes in psychopathology in

  3. Inv(7)(q22q36) in refactory anemia with excess blasts

    SciTech Connect

    Rayburn, J.; Stegeman, D.; Berger, C.

    1994-09-01

    Morphological review of bone marrow from an 89 year-old male revealed an immature cell population with increased blasts (25% CD34 positive). However, the morphology was not sufficiently clear to discriminate lymphoid from myeloid precursors. Immunophenotypically, there was evidence for both lymphoid and myeloid derivation with dual expression of CD5 and CD20, aberrant expression of CD19 versus CD20, and an increased CD13 population. Twenty percent (20%) of the cells were TdT positive. Cytogenetically, an inversion of chromosome 7, inv(7)(q22q36), was observed in 9 of 20 cells. This abnormality has been reported only once previously, in association with refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB). The patient, to date, has not developed an acute leukemic process, but remains in a myelodysplastic state, defined as RAEB.

  4. Mutation in a gene for type I procollagen (COL1A2) in a woman with postmenopausal osteoporosis: Evidence for phenotypic and genotypic overlap with mild osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Spotila, L.D.; Constantinou, C.D.; Sereda, L.; Ganguly, A.; Prockop, D.J. ); Riggs, B.L. )

    1991-06-15

    Mutations in the two genes for type I collagen (COL1A1 or COL1A2) cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a heritable disease characterized by moderate to extreme brittleness of bone early in life. Here, the authors show that a 52-year-old post menopausal woman with severe osteopenia and a compression fracture of a thoracic vertebra had a mutation in the gene for the {alpha}2(I) chain of type I collagen (COL1A2) similar to mutations that cause OI. cDNA was prepared from the woman's skin fibroblast RNA and assayed for the presence of a mutation by treating DNA heteroduplexes with carbodiimide. The results indicated a sequence variation in the region encoding amino acid residues 660-667 of the {alpha}2(I) chain. Further analysis demonstrated a single-base mutation that caused a serine-for-glycine substitution at position 661 of the {alpha}2(I) triple-helical domain. The substitution produced posttranslational overmodification of the collagen triple helix, as is seen with most glycine substitutions that cause OI. The patient had a history of five previous fractures, slightly blue sclerae, and slight hearing loss. Therefore, the results suggest that there may be phenotypic and genotypic overlap between mild osteogenesis imperfecta and postmenopausal osteoporosis, and that a subset of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis may have mutations in the genes for type I procollagen.

  5. Signature MicroRNA expression patterns identified in humans with 22q11.2 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de la Morena, M. Teresa; Eitson, Jennifer L.; Dozmorov, Igor M.; Belkaya, Serkan; Hoover, Ashley R.; Anguiano, Esperanza; Pascual, M. Virginia; van Oers, Nicolai S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have heterogeneous clinical presentations including immunodeficiency, cardiac anomalies, and hypocalcemia. The syndrome arises from hemizygous deletions of up to 3 Mb on chromosome 22q11.2, a region that contains 60 genes and 4 microRNAs. MicroRNAs are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, with mutations in several microRNAs causal to specific human diseases. We characterized the microRNA expression patterns in the peripheral blood of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n=31) compared to normal controls (n=22). Eighteen microRNAs had a statistically significant differential expression (p<0.05), with miR-185 expressed at 0.4× normal levels. The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome cohort exhibited microRNA expression hyper-variability and group dysregulation. Selected microRNAs distinguished patients with cardiac anomalies, hypocalcemia, and/or low circulating T cell counts. In summary, microRNA profiling of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome/DiGeorge patients revealed a signature microRNA expression pattern distinct from normal controls with clinical relevance. PMID:23454892

  6. MLPA: A Rapid, Reliable, and Sensitive Method for Detection and Analysis of Abnormalities of 22q

    PubMed Central

    Vorstman, J.A.S.; Jalali, G.R.; Rappaport, E.F.; Hacker, A.M.; Scott, C.; Emanuel, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, essential test characteristics of the recently described multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) method are presented, using chromosome 22 as a model. This novel method allows the relative quantification of ~40–45 different target DNA sequences in a single reaction. For the purpose of this study, MLPA was performed in a blinded manner on a training set containing over 50 samples, including typical 22q11.2 deletions, various atypical deletions, duplications (trisomy and tetrasomy), and unbalanced translocations. All samples in the training set have been previously characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with cosmid or BAC clones and/or cytogenetic studies. MLPA findings were consistent with cytogenetic and FISH studies, no rearrangement went undetected and repeated tests gave consistent results. At a relative change in comparative signal strength of 30% or more, sensitivity and specificity values were 0.95 and 0.99, respectively. Given that MLPA is likely to be used as an initial screening method, a higher sensitivity, at the cost of a lower specificity, was deemed more appropriate. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to calculate the most optimal threshold range, with associated sensitivity and specificity values of 0.99 and 0.97, respectively. Finally, performance of each individual probe was analyzed, providing further useful information for the interpretation of MLPA results. In conclusion, MLPA has proven to be a highly sensitive and accurate tool for detecting copy number changes in the 22q11.2 region, making it a fast and economic alternative to currently used methods. The current study provides valuable and detailed information on the characteristics of this novel method. PMID:16791841

  7. Novel Susceptibility Locus at 22q11 for Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wessman, Maija; Forsblom, Carol; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Söderlund, Jenny; Ilonen, Jorma; Sallinen, Riitta; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Parkkonen, Maija; Maxwell, Alexander P.; Tarnow, Lise; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Hadjadj, Samy; Marre, Michel; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) affects about 30% of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and contributes to serious morbidity and mortality. So far only the 3q21–q25 region has repeatedly been indicated as a susceptibility region for DN. The aim of this study was to search for new DN susceptibility loci in Finnish, Danish and French T1D families. Methods and Results We performed a genome-wide linkage study using 384 microsatellite markers. A total of 175 T1D families were studied, of which 94 originated from Finland, 46 from Denmark and 35 from France. The whole sample set consisted of 556 individuals including 42 sib-pairs concordant and 84 sib-pairs discordant for DN. Two-point and multi-point non-parametric linkage analyses were performed using the Analyze package and the MERLIN software. A novel DN locus on 22q11 was identified in the joint analysis of the Finnish, Danish and French families by genome-wide multipoint non-parametric linkage analysis using the Kong and Cox linear model (NPLpairs LOD score 3.58). Nominal or suggestive evidence of linkage to this locus was also detected when the three populations were analyzed separately. Suggestive evidence of linkage was found to six additional loci in the Finnish and French sample sets. Conclusions This study identified a novel DN locus at chromosome 22q11 with significant evidence of linkage to DN. Our results suggest that this locus may be of importance in European populations. In addition, this study supports previously indicated DN loci on 3q21–q25 and 19q13. PMID:21909410

  8. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) Degrades Soluble Vasculotropic Amyloid-β E22Q and L34V Mutants, Delaying Their Toxicity for Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Guillamon, Mar; Mawhirt, Stephanie; Fossati, Silvia; Blais, Steven; Pares, Mireia; Penalba, Anna; Boada, Merce; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Neubert, Thomas A.; Montaner, Joan; Ghiso, Jorge; Rostagno, Agueda

    2010-01-01

    Patients carrying mutations within the amyloid-β (Aβ) sequence develop severe early-onset cerebral amyloid angiopathy with some of the related variants manifesting primarily with hemorrhagic phenotypes. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are typically associated with blood brain barrier disruption and hemorrhagic transformations after ischemic stroke. However, their contribution to cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related hemorrhage remains unclear. Human brain endothelial cells challenged with Aβ synthetic homologues containing mutations known to be associated in vivo with hemorrhagic manifestations (AβE22Q and AβL34V) showed enhanced production and activation of MMP-2, evaluated via Multiplex MMP antibody arrays, gel zymography, and Western blot, which in turn proteolytically cleaved in situ the Aβ peptides. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry analysis highlighted the generation of specific C-terminal proteolytic fragments, in particular the accumulation of Aβ-(1–16), a result validated in vitro with recombinant MMP-2 and quantitatively evaluated using deuterium-labeled internal standards. Silencing MMP-2 gene expression resulted in reduced Aβ degradation and enhanced apoptosis. Secretion and activation of MMP-2 as well as susceptibility of the Aβ peptides to MMP-2 degradation were dependent on the peptide conformation, with fibrillar elements of AβE22Q exhibiting negligible effects. Our results indicate that MMP-2 release and activation differentially degrades Aβ species, delaying their toxicity for endothelial cells. However, taking into consideration MMP ability to degrade basement membrane components, these protective effects might also undesirably compromise blood brain barrier integrity and precipitate a hemorrhagic phenotype. PMID:20576603

  9. Deletions at 22q11.2 in idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a combined analysis of genome-wide association data

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Kin Y; Sheerin, Una; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Salaka, Afnan; Chester, Lucy; Escott-Price, Valentina; Mantripragada, Kiran; Doherty, Karen M; Noyce, Alastair J; Mencacci, Niccolo E; Lubbe, Steven J; Williams-Gray, Caroline H; Barker, Roger A; van Dijk, Karin D; Berendse, Henk W; Heutink, Peter; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Cormier, Florence; Lesage, Suzanne; Brice, Alexis; Brockmann, Kathrin; Schulte, Claudia; Gasser, Thomas; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Morrison, Karen E; Clarke, Carl E; Sawcer, Stephen; Warner, Tom T; Lees, Andrew J; Morris, Huw R; Nalls, Mike A; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Abramov, Andrey Y; Plagnol, Vincent; Williams, Nigel M; Wood, Nicholas W

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Parkinson's disease has been reported in a small number of patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. In this study, we screened a series of large, independent Parkinson's disease case-control studies for deletions at 22q11.2. Methods We used data on deletions spanning the 22q11.2 locus from four independent case-control Parkinson's disease studies (UK Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2, Dutch Parkinson's Disease Genetics Consortium, US National Institute on Aging, and International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium studies), which were independent of the original reports of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We did case-control association analysis to compare the proportion of 22q11.2 deletions found, using the Fisher's exact test for the independent case-control studies and the Mantel-Haenszel test for the meta-analyses. We retrieved clinical details of patients with Parkinson's disease who had 22q11.2 deletions from the medical records of these patients. Findings We included array-based copy number variation data from 9387 patients with Parkinson's disease and 13 863 controls. Eight patients with Parkinson's disease and none of the controls had 22q11.2 deletions (p=0·00082). In the 8451 patients for whom age at onset data were available, deletions at 22q11.2 were associated with Parkinson's disease age at onset (Mann-Whitney U test p=0·001). Age at onset of Parkinson's disease was lower in patients carrying a 22q11.2 deletion (median 37 years, 95% CI 32·0–55·5; mean 42·1 years [SD 11·9]) than in those who did not carry a deletion (median 61 years, 95% CI 60·5–61·0; mean 60·3 years [SD 12·8]). A 22q11.2 deletion was present in more patients with early-onset (p<0·0001) and late-onset Parkinson's disease (p=0·016) than in controls, and in more patients with early-onset than late-onset Parkinson's disease (p=0·005). Interpretation Clinicians should be alert to the possibility of 22q11.2 deletions in

  10. SDF1-CXCR4 signaling: A new player involved in DiGeorge/22q11-deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Duband, Jean-Loup; Escot, Sophie; Fournier-Thibault, Claire

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The DiGeorge/22q11-deletion syndrome (22q11DS), also known as velocardiofacial syndrome, is a congenital disease causing numerous structural and behavioral disorders, including cardiac outflow tract anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphogenesis, parathyroid and thymus hypoplasia, and mental disorders. It results from a unique chromosomal microdeletion on the 22q11.2 region in which the transcriptional activator TBX1 is decisive for the occurrence of the disease. During embryogenesis, Tbx1 is required for patterning of pharyngeal region giving rise to structures of the face, neck and chest. Genetic and developmental studies demonstrated that the severity and variability of the syndrome are determined by Tbx1 targets involved in pharyngeal neural crest cell migration and survival. Recently, we demonstrated that the chemokine Sdf1/Cxcl12 and its receptor Cxcr4 are genetically downstream of Tbx1 during pharyngeal development and that reduction of CXCR4 signaling results in defects which recapitulate the major morphological anomalies of 22q11DS, supporting the possibility of a pivotal role for the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in its etiology. PMID:27500073

  11. Regional brain abnormalities in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: association with cognitive abilities and behavioral symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bearden, Carrie E; van Erp, Theo G M; Monterosso, John R; Simon, Tony J; Glahn, David C; Saleh, Peter A; Hill, Nicole M; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine; Emanuel, Beverly S; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2004-06-01

    Children with 22q11.2 microdeletions (Velocardiofacial Syndrome; VCFS) have previously been shown to exhibit learning deficits and elevated rates of psychopathology. The aim of this study was to assess regional brain abnormalities in children with 22q11DS, and to determine the relationship of these measures to neurocognitive and behavioral function. Thirteen children with confirmed deletions and 9 demographically matched comparison subjects were assessed with a neurocognitive battery, behavioral measures, and high-resolution MRI. Twenty-two qllDS children showed a nonsignificant 4.3% global decrease in total brain volume as compared to healthy controls,with differential reduction in white matter, and significantly increased sulcal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in temporal and posterior brain regions. In 22q11 DS subjects, but not controls, bilateral temporal gray and white matter volumes were significant predictors of overall cognitive performance. Further, reduced temporal gray matter was associated with elevated Thought Problems score on the CBCL. Results indicate that global alterations in brain volume are common in children with 22q deletions, particularly those with low IQ and/or behavioral disturbance. Although preliminary,these findings suggest a possible underlying pathophysiology of the cognitive deficits seen in this syndrome,and provide insight into complex gene-brain-behavior relationships. PMID:15788257

  12. The deletion of 22q13 region in both intracranial and spinal meningiomas in a patient (case report).

    PubMed

    Durmaz, R; Arslantaş, A; Artan, S; Ozon, Y H; Işiksoy, S; Başaran, N; Tel, E

    1998-09-01

    We present a 69 year old man with two simultaneous meningiomas in different compartment of neural axis, in both of which 22q13 locus is lost. Histologically the two tumours appeared to be different; meningotheliomatous and transitional with psammoma bodies, respectively. No numerical or structural chromosome abnormalities were seen in karyotype analysis of the cultured spinal and cranial meningioma samples. Since long arm structural aberrations and/or whole loss of chromosome 22 are frequently reported abnormalities of meningiomas, the tumours were also analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with different colour-labelled probes in respect to relevant chromosome. The metaphases and interphase nuclei of the samples were evaluated by the combined biotinylated 22q11 and digoxigenin-labelled 22q13 locus specific FISH probes, and 22q13 deletion was revealed in both of spinal and cranial tumour cells. In conclusion, since both tumours from the presented case show the same genetic alterations, multiplicity may be derived from the same clone of cells, and support the theory of development of multiple meningiomas from the spreading of tumour cells via cerebrospinal fluid as a possible mechanism. PMID:9822846

  13. Discussing the psychiatric manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: an exploration of clinical practice among medical geneticists

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Emily; Inglis, Angela; Friedman, Jan; Austin, Jehannine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the frequency with which medical geneticists discuss the psychiatric manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) with families in relation to the frequency with which they discuss the other manifestations of the syndrome and to explore relationships between discussion of these features and stigma toward psychiatric disorders. Methods We surveyed medical geneticists in the United States and Canada regarding the frequency with which they discuss various features of 22q11DS with families in the context of four clinical scenarios in which only the age of the patient at diagnosis differed. Respondents also completed a 20-item validated psychometric measure of stigma towards psychiatric disorders. Results 308/546 medical geneticists completed the survey (56% response rate). Psychiatric disorders were discussed significantly less often than other features of 22q11DS (p<0.0001), but psychiatric disorders were discussed significantly more often when the patient was ≥ 13 years old (p<0.0001), than when the patient was younger. Geneticists who discussed psychiatric disorders the least had significantly higher levels of stigma towards psychiatric disorders (p=0.007). Conclusion Psychiatric risks are less often discussed with families during childhood. Education for physicians to help reduce stigma towards psychiatric disorders (which may impede discussion of psychiatric disorders) may warrant exploration in this population. PMID:23579435

  14. Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome and DiGeorge sequence with meningomyelocele and deletions of the 22q11 region

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, R.E.; Pillers, D.M.; Merkens, M.; Magenis, R.E.; Zonana, J.; Driscoll, D.A.; Emanuel, B.S.

    1994-10-01

    Approximately 5% of children with neural tube defects (NTDs) have a congenital heart defect and/or cleft lip and palate. The cause of isolated meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, or cleft lip and palate has been largely thought to be multifactorial. However, chromosomal, teratogenic, and single gene causes of combinations of NTDs with congenital heart defects and/or cleft lip and palate have been reported. We report on 3 patients with meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, and 22q11 deletions. Two of the children had the clinical diagnosis of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS); both have bifid uvula. The third child had DiGeorge sequence (DGS). The association of NTDs with 22q11 deletion has not been reported previously. An accurate diagnosis of the 22q11 deletion is critical as this micro-deletion and its associated clinical problems is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait due to the inheritance of the deletion-bearing chromosome. We recommend that all children with NTDs and congenital heart defects, with or without cleft palate, have cytogenetic and molecular studies performed to detect 22q11 deletions. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  15. A defect in early myogenesis causes Otitis media in two mouse models of 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jennifer C.; Linden, Jennifer F.; Baldini, Antonio; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2015-01-01

    Otitis media (OM), the inflammation of the middle ear, is the most common disease and cause for surgery in infants worldwide. Chronic Otitis media with effusion (OME) often leads to conductive hearing loss and is a common feature of a number of craniofacial syndromes, such as 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS). OM is more common in children because the more horizontal position of the Eustachian tube (ET) in infants limits or delays clearance of middle ear effusions. Some mouse models with OM have shown alterations in the morphology and angle of the ET. Here, we present a novel mechanism in which OM is caused not by a defect in the ET itself but in the muscles that control its function. Our results show that in two mouse models of 22q11.2DS (Df1/+ and Tbx1+/−) presenting with bi- or unilateral OME, the fourth pharyngeal arch-derived levator veli palatini muscles were hypoplastic, which was associated with an earlier altered pattern of MyoD expression. Importantly, in mice with unilateral OME, the side with the inflammation was associated with significantly smaller muscles than the contralateral unaffected ear. Functional tests examining ET patency confirmed a reduced clearing ability in the heterozygous mice. Our findings are also of clinical relevance as targeting hypoplastic muscles might present a novel preventative measure for reducing the high rates of OM in 22q11.2DS patients. PMID:25452432

  16. GABA(B) receptor subunit 1 binds to proteins affected in 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zunner, Dagmar; Deschermeier, Christina; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2010-03-01

    GABA(B) receptors mediate slow inhibitory effects of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. They function as heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors composed of the seven-transmembrane domain proteins GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), which are linked through a coiled-coil interaction. The ligand-binding subunit GABA(B1) is at first retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and is transported to the cell surface only upon assembly with GABA(B2). Here, we report that GABA(B1), via the coiled-coil domain, can also bind to soluble proteins of unknown function, that are affected in 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome and are therefore referred to as DiGeorge critical region 6 (DGCR6). In transfected neurons the GABA(B1)-DGCR6 association resulted in a redistribution of both proteins into intracellular clusters. Furthermore, the C-terminus of GABA(B2) interfered with the novel interaction, consistent with heterodimer formation overriding transient DGCR6-binding to GABA(B1). Thus, sequential coiled-coil interactions may direct GABA(B1) into functional receptors. PMID:20036641

  17. Potential linkage for schizophrenia on chromosome 22q12-q13: A replication study

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, S.G.; Bondy, B.; Wildenauer, D.B.

    1995-10-09

    In an attempt to replicate a potential linkage on chromosome 22q12-q13.1 reported by Pulver et al., we have analyzed 4 microsatellite markers which span this chromosomal region, including the IL2RB locus, for linkage with schizophrenia in 30 families from Israel and Germany. Linkage analysis by pairwise lod score analysis as well as by multipoint analysis did not provide evidence for a single major gene locus. However, a lod score of Z{sub max} = 0.612 was obtained for a dominant model of inheritance with the marker D22S304 at recombination fraction 0.2 by pairwise analysis. In addition, using a nonparametric method, sib pair analysis, a P value of 0.068 corresponding to a lod score of 0.48 was obtained for this marker. This finding, together with those of Pulver et al., is suggestive of a genetic factor in this region, predisposing for schizophrenia in a subset of families. Further studies using nonparametric methods should be conducted in order to clarify this point. 32 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Caregiver and adult patient perspectives on the importance of a diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Costain, G.; Chow, E. W. C.; Ray, P. N.; Bassett, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent advances in genetics are particularly relevant in the field of intellectual disability (ID), where sub-microscopic deletions or duplications of genetic material are increasingly implicated as known or suspected causal factors. Data-driven reports on the impact of providing an aetiological explanation in ID are needed to help justify widespread use of new and expensive genetic technologies. Methods We conducted a survey of caregivers on the value of a genetic/aetiologic diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), the most common microdeletion syndrome in ID. We also surveyed the opinion of a high-functioning subset of adults with 22q11.2DS themselves. We used standard quantitative and qualitative methods to analyse the responses. Results In total, 73 of 118 surveys were returned (61.9%). There was convergence of quantitative and qualitative results, and consistency between adult patient and caregiver responses. A definitive molecular diagnosis of 22q11.2DS was a critical event with diverse positive repercussions, even if occurring later in life. Frequently cited benefits included greater understanding and certainty, newfound sense of purpose and a platform for advocacy, and increased opportunities to optimise medical, social and educational needs. Conclusions This is the first study to characterise the impact of a diagnosis of this representative microdeletion syndrome on adult patients and their families. The results both validate and expand on the theoretical benefits proposed by clinicians and researchers. The use of genome-wide microarray technologies will provide an increasing number of molecular diagnoses. The importance of a diagnosis of 22q11.2DS demonstrated here therefore has implications for changing attitudes about molecular genetic diagnosis that could benefit individuals with ID of currently unknown cause and their families. PMID:22142442

  19. Facial emotion perception by intensity in children and adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leleu, Arnaud; Saucourt, Guillaume; Rigard, Caroline; Chesnoy, Gabrielle; Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Rossi, Massimiliano; Edery, Patrick; Franck, Nicolas; Demily, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Difficulties in the recognition of emotions in expressive faces have been reported in people with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). However, while low-intensity expressive faces are frequent in everyday life, nothing is known about their ability to perceive facial emotions depending on the intensity of expression. Through a visual matching task, children and adolescents with 22q11.2DS as well as gender- and age-matched healthy participants were asked to categorise the emotion of a target face among six possible expressions. Static pictures of morphs between neutrality and expressions were used to parametrically manipulate the intensity of the target face. In comparison to healthy controls, results showed higher perception thresholds (i.e. a more intense expression is needed to perceive the emotion) and lower accuracy for the most expressive faces indicating reduced categorisation abilities in the 22q11.2DS group. The number of intrusions (i.e. each time an emotion is perceived as another one) and a more gradual perception performance indicated smooth boundaries between emotional categories. Correlational analyses with neuropsychological and clinical measures suggested that reduced visual skills may be associated with impaired categorisation of facial emotions. Overall, the present study indicates greater difficulties for children and adolescents with 22q11.2DS to perceive an emotion in low-intensity expressive faces. This disability is subtended by emotional categories that are not sharply organised. It also suggests that these difficulties may be associated with impaired visual cognition, a hallmark of the cognitive deficits observed in the syndrome. These data yield promising tracks for future experimental and clinical investigations. PMID:26149605

  20. Increased Levels of Interferon-Inducible Protein 10 (IP-10) in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aresvik, D M; Lima, K; Øverland, T; Mollnes, T E; Abrahamsen, T G

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS), also known as DiGeorge syndrome, is a genetic disorder with an estimated incidence of 1:4000 births. These patients may suffer from affection of many organ systems with cardiac malformations, thymic hypoplasia or aplasia, hypoparathyroidism, palate anomalies and psychiatric disorders being the most frequent. The incidence of autoimmune diseases is increased in older patients. The aim of the present study was to examine a cytokine profile in patients with 22q11.2 DS by measuring a broad spectrum of serum cytokines. Patients with a proven deletion of chromosome 22q11.2 (n = 55) and healthy individuals (n = 54) recruited from an age- and sex-comparable group were included in the study. Serum levels of 27 cytokines, including chemokines and growth factors, were analysed using multiplex technology. Interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) was also measured by ELISA to confirm the multiplex results. The 22q11.2 DS patients had distinctly and significantly raised levels of pro-inflammatory and angiostatic chemokine IP-10 (P < 0.001) compared to controls. The patients with congenital heart defects (n = 31) had significantly (P = 0.018) raised serum levels of IP-10 compared to patients born without heart defects (n = 24). The other cytokines investigated were either not detectable or did not differ between patients and controls. PMID:26708691

  1. Accuracy in identification of patients with 22q11.2 deletion by likely care providers using facial photographs.

    PubMed

    Becker, Devra B; Pilgram, Thomas; Marty-Grames, Lynn; Govier, Daniel P; Marsh, Jeffrey L; Kane, Alex A

    2004-11-01

    Numerous facial characteristics are associated with velocardiofacial syndrome. Care providers may use these facial characteristics to identify patients who may benefit from fluorescence in situ hybridization genetic testing to determine the presence of the 22q11.2 deletion. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that experienced care providers were able to correctly diagnose the 22q11.2 deletion on the basis of studying frontal facial photographs. After approval was obtained from the human studies committee, patients who had undergone fluorescence in situ hybridization genetics testing for the presence of a 22q11.2 deletion were asked to submit two frontal photographs: one at infancy and one beyond the second birthday. These photographs were randomized, made anonymous, and then placed on a secure Web site. Specialists in the fields of plastic surgery, otolaryngology, genetics, and speech pathology were asked to evaluate their experience and confidence levels in diagnosing a 22q11.2 deletion and were then asked to rate the photographs by likelihood of deletion using a five-point Likert scale. Thirty-two specialists (10 surgeons, nine geneticists, and 13 speech pathologists) participated in the study. On the basis of clear responses, respondents predicted the presence (sensitivity) and absence (specificity) of the 22q11.2 deletion at chance levels. Of the remaining responses, 20 to 25 percent were unsure and 20 to 25 percent were clearly wrong. When an unsure response was treated as a weak positive, the results favored sensitivity slightly, with a sensitivity of 70 percent and a specificity of 50 percent. Sensitivity improved somewhat with experience, as measured by the number of patients seen per year. The prediction of the presence or absence of the 22q11.2 deletion at chance levels suggests that the ability to diagnose on the basis of appearance alone is not a sufficient diagnostic tool. Although the ability does increase with experience, it is of

  2. Intellectual Functioning in Relation to Autism and ADHD Symptomatology in Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidding, E.; Swaab, H.; Sonneville, L. M. J.; Engeland, H.; Sijmens-Morcus, M. E. J.; Klaassen, P. W. J.; Duijff, S. N.; Vorstman, J. A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velo-cardio-facial syndrome) is associated with an increased risk of various disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). With this study, we aimed to investigate the relation between intellectual functioning and severity of ASD and ADHD…

  3. Discrepancies in Parent and Teacher Ratings of Social-Behavioral Functioning of Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Implications for Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shashi, Vandana; Wray, Emily; Schoch, Kelly; Curtiss, Kathleen; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome exhibit high rates of social-behavioral problems, particularly in the internalizing domain, indicating an area in need of intervention. The current investigation was designed to obtain information regarding parent and teacher ratings of the social-emotional behavior of children with 22q11DS. Using the Child…

  4. Social Cognition Dysfunction in Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome): Relationship with Executive Functioning and Social Competence/Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, L. E.; McCabe, K. L.; Melville, J. L.; Strutt, P. A.; Schall, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Social difficulties are often noted among people with intellectual disabilities. Children and adults with 22q.11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) often have poorer social competence as well as poorer performance on measures of executive and social-cognitive skills compared with typically developing young people. However, the relationship…

  5. Social Cognitive Training in Adolescents with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Feasibility and Preliminary Effects of the Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shashi, V.; Harrell, W.; Eack, S.; Sanders, C.; McConkie-Rosell, A.; Keshavan, M. S.; Bonner, M. J.; Schoch, K.; Hooper, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) often have deficits in social cognition and social skills that contribute to poor adaptive functioning. These deficits may be of relevance to the later occurrence of serious psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia. Yet, there are no evidence-based interventions to improve…

  6. The hippocampi of children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have localized anterior alterations that predict severity of anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Julia A.; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi; Kalish, Kristopher; Lee, Aaron; Hunsaker, Michael R.; Schumann, Cynthia M.; Carmichael, Owen T.; Simon, Tony J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have an elevated risk for schizophrenia, which increases with history of childhood anxiety. Altered hippocampal morphology is a common neuroanatomical feature of 22q11.2DS and idiopathic schizophrenia. Relating hippocampal structure in children with 22q11.2DS to anxiety and impaired cognitive ability could lead to hippocampus-based characterization of psychosis-proneness in this at-risk population. Methods We measured hippocampal volume using a semiautomated approach on MRIs collected from typically developing children and children with 22q11.2DS. We then analyzed hippocampal morphology with Localized Components Analysis. We tested the modulating roles of diagnostic group, hippocampal volume, sex and age on local hippocampal shape components. Lastly, volume and shape components were tested as covariates of IQ and anxiety. Results We included 48 typically developing children and 69 children with 22q11.2DS in our study. Hippocampal volume was reduced bilaterally in children with 22q11.2DS, and these children showed greater variation in the shape of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Children with 22q11.2DS had greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus was associated with greater severity of anxiety, specifically fear of physical injury, within the 22q11.2DS group. Limitations Shape alterations are not specific to hippocampal subfields. Conclusion Alterations in the structure of the anterior hippocampus likely affect function and may impact limbic circuitry. We suggest these alterations potentially contribute to anxiety symptoms in individuals with 22q11.2DS through modulatory pathways. Altered hippocampal morphology may be uniquely linked to anxiety risk factors for schizophrenia, which could be a powerful neuroanatomical marker of schizophrenia risk and hence protection

  7. De novo tandem duplication of chromosome segement 22q11-q12: Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Shaffer, L.G.; Carrozzo, R.

    1995-04-10

    We report on a case of duplication of the segment 22q11-q12 due to a de novo duplication. Molecular cytogenetics studies demonstrated this to be a tandem duplication, flanked proximally by the marker D22Z4, a centromeric alpha satellite DNA repeat, and distally by D22S260, an anonymous DNA marker proximal to the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint. The segment includes the regions responsible for the {open_quotes}cat-eye{close_quotes}, Di George, and velo-cardio-facial syndromes and extends distal to the breakpoint cluster region (BCR). The clinical picture is dominated by the cardiac defects and includes findings reminiscent of {open_quotes}cat-eye{close_quotes} syndrome. These findings reinforce the hypothesis that the proximal 22q region contains dosage-sensitive genes involved in development. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Tight association of loss of merlin expression with loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 22q in sporadic meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ueki, K; Wen-Bin, C; Narita, Y; Asai, A; Kirino, T

    1999-12-01

    Mutations of NF2, the gene for neurofibromatosis 2, are detected in 20-30% of sporadic meningiomas, and almost all mutations lead to loss of merlin expression. However, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at chromosome 22q is found at a much higher frequency, up to 50-70%, and the possibility of another tumor suppressor gene in this region has not been excluded. Furthermore, a recent report proposed that abnormal activation of a protease micro-calpain can be an alternative pathway for merlin loss in meningiomas and schwannomas. To determine the correlation of merlin loss with NF2 genetic alteration or micro-calpain activation, we performed a molecular genetic analysis of 50 sporadic meningiomas and also examined the expression status of merlin and active form micro-calpain. LOH assay of five microsatellite markers franking NF2 revealed LOH in 22 cases, and single-strand conformation polymorphism assay detected six frameshift mutations, two splicing mutations, one nonsense mutation, and one missense mutation, all accompanied by 22q LOH. In addition, a multiplex PCR assay indicated homozygous deletion of NF2 in two cases. Interestingly, a marked decrease of merlin expression was seen exclusively in the 22 cases with 22q LOH. Activated micro-calpain expression was observed in 28 cases at various levels but showed no correlation with merlin status. These data strongly support the notion that NF2 is the sole target of 22q LOH in meningiomas and that loss of merlin expression is always caused by genetic alteration of NF2, following the classic "two hit" theory. PMID:10606247

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome after Operative Intervention for Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, David Jeffrey; Goudy, Steven L.; Chinnadurai, Sivakumar; Wootten, Christopher Todd

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is often warranted. In this patient population, VPI is characterized by poor palatal elevation and muscular hypotonia with an intact palate. We hypothesize that 22q11.2 deletion patients are at greater risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after surgical correction of VPI, due, in part, to their functional hypotonia, large velopharyngeal gap size, and the need to surgically obstruct the velopharynx. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome treated at a tertiary pediatric hospital between the years of 2002 and 2012. The incidence of VPI, need for surgery, post-operative polysomnogram, post-operative VPI assessment, and OSA treatments were evaluated. Results: Forty-three patients (18 males, 25 females, ages 1–14 years) fitting the inclusion criteria were identified. Twenty-eight patients were evaluated by speech pathology due to hypernasality. Twenty-one patients had insufficient velopharyngeal function and required surgery. Fifteen underwent pharyngeal flap surgery, three underwent sphincter pharyngoplasty, two underwent Furlow palatoplasty, and one underwent combined sphincter pharyngoplasty with Furlow palatoplasty. Of these, eight had post-operative snoring. Six of these underwent polysomnography (five underwent pharyngeal flap surgeries and one underwent sphincter pharyngoplasty). Four patients were found to have OSA based on the results of the polysomnography (average apnea/hypopnea index of 4.9 events/h, median = 5.1, SD = 2.1). Two required continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) due to moderate OSA. Conclusion: Surgery is often necessary to correct VPI in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Monitoring for OSA should be considered after surgical correction of VPI due to a high occurrence in this population. Furthermore, families should be counseled of the risk of OSA after surgery and the

  10. Characterization of Terminal Deletions at 7q32 and 22q13.3 Healed by De Novo Telomere Addition

    PubMed Central

    Varley, Helen; Di, Shaojie; Scherer, Stephen W.; Royle, Nicola J.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a strategy for the isolation of terminal deletion breakpoints from any chromosome that has been healed by de novo addition of a telomere repeat array. Breakpoints at 7q32 and 22q13.3 have been isolated and characterized in two patients (patients FB336R and AJ). Both truncated chromosomes have been healed by the addition of a novel telomere, with such an addition possibly mediated by the enzyme telomerase. The breakpoint at 7q32 in patient FB336R shows a structure similar to that of breakpoints on other chromosomes that have been healed in this way. However, the breakpoint at 22q13.3 in patient AJ has 10 nucleotides of unknown origin inserted between the sequence unique to chromosome 22q and the start of the telomere repeat array. This unusual structure is suggestive of a multistep healing event resulting in de novo telomere addition at this breakpoint, and possible mechanisms are discussed. PMID:10924407

  11. Alterations in midline cortical thickness and gyrification patterns mapped in children with 22q11.2 deletions.

    PubMed

    Bearden, Carrie E; van Erp, Theo G M; Dutton, Rebecca A; Lee, Agatha D; Simon, Tony J; Cannon, Tyrone D; Emanuel, Beverly S; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Zackai, Elaine H; Thompson, Paul M

    2009-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome) is a neurogenetic condition associated with visuospatial deficits, as well as elevated rates of attentional disturbance, mood disorder, and psychosis. Previously, we detected pronounced cortical thinning in superior parietal and right parieto-occipital cortices in patients with this syndrome, regions critical for visuospatial processing. Here we applied cortical pattern-matching algorithms to structural magnetic resonance images obtained from 21 children with confirmed 22q11.2 deletions (ages 8-17) and 13 demographically matched comparison subjects, in order to map cortical thickness across the medial hemispheric surfaces. In addition, cortical models were remeshed in frequency space to compute their surface complexity. Cortical maps revealed a pattern of localized thinning in the ventromedial occipital-temporal cortex, critical for visuospatial representation, and the anterior cingulate, a key area for attentional control. However, children with 22q11.2DS showed significantly increased gyral complexity bilaterally in occipital cortex. Regional gray matter volumes, particularly in medial frontal cortex, were strongly correlated with both verbal and nonverbal cognitive functions. These findings suggest that aberrant parieto-occipital brain development, as evidenced by both increased complexity and cortical thinning in these regions, may be a neural substrate for the deficits in visuospatial and numerical understanding characteristic of this syndrome. PMID:18483006

  12. Comparing the neural bases of self-referential processing in typically developing and 22q11.2 adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Maude; Debbané, Martin; Lagioia, Annalaura; Salomon, Roy; d'Argembeau, Arnaud; Eliez, Stephan

    2012-04-01

    The investigation of self-reflective processing during adolescence is relevant, as this period is characterized by deep reorganization of the self-concept. It may be the case that an atypical development of brain regions underlying self-reflective processing increases the risk for psychological disorders and impaired social functioning. In this study, we investigated the neural bases of self- and other-related processing in typically developing adolescents and youths with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a rare neurogenetic condition associated with difficulties in social interactions and increased risk for schizophrenia. The fMRI paradigm consisted in judging if a series of adjectives applied to the participant himself/herself (self), to his/her best friend or to a fictional character (Harry Potter). In control adolescents, we observed that self- and other-related processing elicited strong activation in cortical midline structures (CMS) when contrasted with a semantic baseline condition. 22q11DS exhibited hypoactivation in the CMS and the striatum during the processing of self-related information when compared to the control group. Finally, the hypoactivation in the anterior cingulate cortex was associated with the severity of prodromal positive symptoms of schizophrenia. The findings are discussed in a developmental framework and in light of their implication for the development of schizophrenia in this at-risk population. PMID:22483077

  13. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in children with heart disease and del22q11 syndrome: a review of the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Registry.

    PubMed

    Prodhan, P; Gossett, J M; Rycus, P T; Gupta, P

    2015-11-01

    The study objective was to evaluate outcomes among children with del22q11 (DiGeorge) syndrome supported on ECMO for heart disease. The ELSO registry database was queried to include all children <18 years undergoing heart surgery for either common atrio-ventricular canal, tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus or transposition of the great vessels and interrupted aortic arch and requiring ECMO, from 1998-2011. The outcomes evaluated included mortality, ECMO duration and length of hospital stay in patients with del22q11 syndrome and with no del22q11 syndrome. Eighty-eight ECMO runs occurred in children with del22q11 syndrome while 2694 ECMO runs occurred in children without del22q11 syndrome. For patients with heart defects receiving ECMO, del22q11 syndrome did not confer a significant mortality risk or an increased risk of infectious complications before or while on ECMO support. Neither the duration of ECMO nor mechanical ventilation prior to ECMO deployment were prolonged in patients with del22q11 syndrome compared to the controls. PMID:25795680

  14. Association of the family environment with behavioural and cognitive outcomes in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Allen, T. M.; Hersh, J.; Schoch, K.; Curtiss, K.; Hooper, S. R.; Shashi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) are at risk for social-behavioural and neurocognitive sequelae throughout development. The current study examined the impact of family environmental characteristics on social-behavioural and cognitive outcomes in this pediatric population. Method Guardians of children with 22q11DS were recruited through two medical genetics clinics. Con senting guardians were asked to complete several questionnaires regarding their child's social, emotional and behavioural functioning, as well as family social environment and parenting styles. Children with 22q11DS were asked to undergo a cognitive assessment, including IQ and achievement testing, and measures of attention, executive function and memory. Results Modest associations were found between aspects of the family social environment and parenting styles with social-behavioural and cognitive/academic outcomes. Regression models indicated that physical punishment, socioeconomic status, parental control and family organisation significantly predicted social-behavioural and cognitive outcomes in children with 22q11DS. Conclusion Characteristics of the family social environment and parenting approaches appear to be associated with functional outcomes of children with 22q11DS. Understanding the impact of environmental variables on developmental outcomes can be useful in determining more effective targets for intervention. This will be important in order to improve the quality of life of individuals affected by 22q11DS. PMID:23742203

  15. Prospective Control Abilities during Visuo-Manual Tracking in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Compared to Age- and IQ-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Aken, Katrijn; Swillen, Ann; Beirinckx, Marc; Janssens, Luc; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien

    2010-01-01

    To examine whether children with a 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) are able to use prospective control, 21 children with 22q11.2DS (mean age=9.6 [plus or minus] 1.9; mean FSIQ=73.05 [plus or minus] 10.2) and 21 control children (mean age=9.6 [plus or minus] 1.9; mean FSIQ=73.38 [plus or minus] 12.0) were asked to perform a visuo-manual…

  16. Structural abnormalities in cortical volume, thickness, and surface area in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome: Relationship with psychotic symptoms☆

    PubMed Central

    Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Jonas, Rachel; Senturk, Damla; Patel, Arati; Chow, Carolyn; Green, Michael F.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) represents one of the largest known genetic risk factors for psychosis, yet the neurobiological mechanisms underlying symptom development are not well understood. Here we conducted a cross-sectional study of 22q11DS to decompose cortical volume into its constituent parts, cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA), which are believed to have distinct neurodevelopmental origins. Methods High-resolution T1-weighted scans were collected on 65 participants (31 22q11DS, 34 demographically comparable typically developing controls, 10–25 years old). Measures of cortical volume, CT, and SA were extracted from regions of interest using the FreeSurfer image analysis suite. Group differences and age-related trajectories in these structures, as well as their association with psychotic symptomatology, were assessed. Results Relative to controls, 22q11DS participants showed bilateral volumetric reductions in the inferior temporal cortex, fusiform gyrus, anterior cingulate, superior parietal cortex, and cuneus, which were driven by decreased SA in these regions. 22q11DS participants also had increased volumes, driven by increased CT, in bilateral insula regions. 22q11DS youth had increased CT in frontal regions, particularly middle frontal and medial orbitofrontal cortices. A pattern of age-associated cortical thinning was observed in typically developing controls in brain regions associated with visual and sensory information-processing (i.e., left pericalcarine cortex and fusiform gyrus, right lingual and postcentral cortices). However, this relationship was disrupted in 22q11DS participants. Finally, correlational analyses revealed that increased CT in right medial orbitofrontal cortex was associated with increased positive symptom severity in 22q11DS. Conclusion Differential disruptions of CT and SA in distinct cortical regions in 22q11DS may indicate abnormalities in distinct developmental neural processes. Further

  17. Autistic Spectrum Disorders in Velo-Cardio Facial Syndrome (22q11.2 Deletion)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antshel, Kevin M.; Aneja, Alka; Strunge, Leslie; Peebles, Jena; Fremont, Wanda P.; Stallone, Kimberly; AbdulSabur, Nuria; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J.; Kates, Wendy R.

    2007-01-01

    The extent to which the phenotype of children comorbid for velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) differs from that of VCFS-only has not been studied. The sample consisted of 41 children (20 females) with VCFS, ranging in age from 6.5 years to 15.8 years. Eight children with VCFS met formal DSM-IV diagnostic criteria…

  18. Psychiatric Disorders and Intellectual Functioning throughout Development in Velocardiofacial (22q11.2 Deletion) Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Tamar; Gothelf, Doron; Glaser, Bronwyn; Debbane, Martin; Frisch, Amos; Kotler, Moshe; Weizman, Abraham; Eliez, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) is associated with cognitive deficits and high rates of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. We report the data from two large cohorts of individuals with VCFS from Israel and Western Europe to characterize the neuropsychiatric phenotype from childhood to adulthood in a large sample.…

  19. Breakpoint analysis of the recurrent constitutional t(8;22)(q24.13;q11.21) translocation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds The t(8;22)(q24.13;q11.2) has been identified as one of several recurrent constitutional translocations mediated by palindromic AT-rich repeats (PATRRs). Although the breakage on 22q11 utilizes the same PATRR as that of the more prevalent constitutional t(11;22)(q23;q11.2), the breakpoint region on 8q24 has not been elucidated in detail since the analysis of palindromic sequence is technically challenging. Results In this study, the entire 8q24 breakpoint region has been resolved by next generation sequencing. Eight polymorphic alleles were identified and compared with the junction sequences of previous and two recently identified t(8;22) cases . All of the breakpoints were found to be within the PATRRs on chromosomes 8 and 22 (PATRR8 and PATRR22), but the locations were different among cases at the level of nucleotide resolution. The translocations were always found to arise on symmetric PATRR8 alleles with breakpoints at the center of symmetry. The translocation junction is often accompanied by symmetric deletions at the center of both PATRRs. Rejoining occurs with minimal homology between the translocation partners. Remarkably, comparison of der (8) to der(22) sequences shows identical breakpoint junctions between them, which likely represent products of two independent events on the basis of a classical model. Conclusions Our data suggest the hypothesis that interactions between the two PATRRs prior to the translocation event might trigger illegitimate recombination resulting in the recurrent palindrome-mediated translocation. PMID:25478009

  20. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome due to a Translocation t(6;22) in a Patient Conceived via in vitro Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Gollo Dantas, Anelisa; Bortolai, Adriana; Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Takeno Herrero, Sylvia; Azoubel Antunes, Adriana; Tavares Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz; Ayres Meloni, Vera; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2016-01-01

    We report on a patient conceived via in vitro fertilization (IVF) with a 22q11.2 deletion due to an unusual unbalanced translocation involving chromosomes 6 and 22 in a karyotype with 45 chromosomes. Cytogenomic studies showed that the patient has a 3.3-Mb deletion of chromosome 22q and a 0.4-Mb deletion of chromosome 6p, which resulted in haploinsufficiency of the genes responsible for the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and also of the IRF4 gene, a member of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors, which is expressed in the immune system cells. The rearrangement could be due to the manipulation of the embryo or as a sporadic event unrelated to IVF. Translocation involving chromosome 22 in a karyotype with 45 chromosomes is a rare event, with no previous reports involving chromosomes 6p and 22q. PMID:26997945

  1. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome due to a Translocation t(6;22) in a Patient Conceived via in vitro Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Gollo Dantas, Anelisa; Bortolai, Adriana; Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Takeno Herrero, Sylvia; Azoubel Antunes, Adriana; Tavares Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz; Ayres Meloni, Vera; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2016-02-01

    We report on a patient conceived via in vitro fertilization (IVF) with a 22q11.2 deletion due to an unusual unbalanced translocation involving chromosomes 6 and 22 in a karyotype with 45 chromosomes. Cytogenomic studies showed that the patient has a 3.3-Mb deletion of chromosome 22q and a 0.4-Mb deletion of chromosome 6p, which resulted in haploinsufficiency of the genes responsible for the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and also of the IRF4 gene, a member of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors, which is expressed in the immune system cells. The rearrangement could be due to the manipulation of the embryo or as a sporadic event unrelated to IVF. Translocation involving chromosome 22 in a karyotype with 45 chromosomes is a rare event, with no previous reports involving chromosomes 6p and 22q. PMID:26997945

  2. A New Case of a Complex Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosome: A Der(9)t(7;9)(p22;q22) due to a Maternal Balanced Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Manvelyan, Marine; Simonyan, Izabella; Hovhannisyan, Galina; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Hamid, Ahmed B; Liehr, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Complex small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs) constitute one of the smallest subsets within the patients with an sSMC. Complex sSMCs consist of chromosomal material derived from more than one chromosome, for example, the derivative der(22)t(11;22)(q23;q11.2) in Emanuel syndrome. Here, a yet unreported case of a complex sSMC formed due to a t(7;9)(p22;q22)mat is presented. PMID:27617132

  3. White Matter Microstructural Abnormalities of the Cingulum Bundle in Youth with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Associations with Medication, Neuropsychological Function, and Prodromal Symptoms of Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Wendy R.; Olszewski, Amy K.; Gnirke, Matthew H.; Kikinis, Zora; Nelson, Joshua; Antshel, Kevin M.; Fremont, Wanda; Radoeva, Petya D.; Middleton, Frank A.; Shenton, Martha E.; Coman, Ioana L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS) is regarded as an etiologically homogenous model for understanding neuroanatomic disruptions associated with a high risk for schizophrenia. This study utilized diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to analyze white matter microstructure in individuals with 22q11.2DS. We focused on the cingulum bundle (CB), previously shown to be disrupted in patients with schizophrenia and associated with symptoms of psychosis. Methods White matter microstructure was assessed in the anterior, superior, and posterior CB using the tractography algorithm in DTIStudio. Neuropsychological function, presence of prodromal symptoms of psychosis, and medication history were assessed in all participants. Results Relative to controls, young adults with 22q11.2DS showed alterations in most DTI metrics of the CB. Alterations were associated with positive prodromal symptoms of psychosis. However, when individuals with 22q11.2DS were divided by usage of antipsychotics / mood stabilizers, the medicated and non-medicated groups differed significantly in axial diffusivity of the anterior CB and in fractional anisotropy of the superior CB. DTI metrics did not differ between the medicated group and the control group. Conclusions Results suggest that the microstructure of the CB is altered in individuals with 22q11.2DS, and that those alterations may underlie positive prodromal symptoms of psychosis. Our findings further provide preliminary evidence that antipsychotic / mood stabilizer usage may have a reparative effect on white matter microstructure in prodromal 22q11.2DS, independent of the potential effects of psychosis. Future studies of white matter pathology in individuals with 22q11.2DS should test for potential effects of medication on white matter microstructure. PMID:25066496

  4. A case of severe proximal focal femoral deficiency with overlapping phenotypes of Al-Awadi-Raas-Rothschild syndrome and Fuhrmann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Masaki; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Mishima, Kenichi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-12-01

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by various degrees of femoral deficiencies and associated anomalies of the pelvis and lower limbs. The etiology of the disease has not been determined. We report on a 3-year-old boy with severe PFFD, who showed almost completely absent femora and fibulae, malformed pelvis and ectrodactyly of the left foot. These features were partially overlapped with those of Al-Awadi-Raas-Rothschild syndrome or Fuhrmann syndrome, both of which are caused by WNT7A mutations. Molecular analysis of our case, however, demonstrated no disease-causing mutations in the WNT7A gene. PMID:24839142

  5. TBX1 protein interactions and microRNA-96-5p regulation controls cell proliferation during craniofacial and dental development: implications for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Moreno, Myriam; Eliason, Steven; Cao, Huojun; Li, Xiao; Yu, Wenjie; Bidlack, Felicitas B.; Margolis, Henry C.; Baldini, Antonio; Amendt, Brad A.

    2015-01-01

    T-box transcription factor TBX1 is the major candidate gene for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS, DiGeorge syndrome/Velo-cardio-facial syndrome), whose phenotypes include craniofacial malformations such as dental defects and cleft palate. In this study, Tbx1 was conditionally deleted or over-expressed in the oral and dental epithelium to establish its role in odontogenesis and craniofacial developmental. Tbx1 lineage tracing experiments demonstrated a specific region of Tbx1-positive cells in the labial cervical loop (LaCL, stem cell niche). We found that Tbx1 conditional knockout (Tbx1cKO) mice featured microdontia, which coincides with decreased stem cell proliferation in the LaCL of Tbx1cKO mice. In contrast, Tbx1 over-expression increased dental epithelial progenitor cells in the LaCL. Furthermore, microRNA-96 (miR-96) repressed Tbx1 expression and Tbx1 repressed miR-96 expression, suggesting that miR-96 and Tbx1 work in a regulatory loop to maintain the correct levels of Tbx1. Cleft palate was observed in both conditional knockout and over-expression mice, consistent with the craniofacial/tooth defects associated with TBX1 deletion and the gene duplication that leads to 22q11.2DS. The biochemical analyses of TBX1 human mutations demonstrate functional differences in their transcriptional regulation of miR-96 and co-regulation of PITX2 activity. TBX1 interacts with PITX2 to negatively regulate PITX2 transcriptional activity and the TBX1 N-terminus is required for its repressive activity. Overall, our results indicate that Tbx1 regulates the proliferation of dental progenitor cells and craniofacial development through miR-96-5p and PITX2. Together, these data suggest a new molecular mechanism controlling pathogenesis of dental anomalies in human 22q11.2DS. PMID:25556186

  6. Breakpoint Associated with a novel 2.3 Mb deletion in the VCFS region of 22q11 and the role of Alu (SINE) in recurring microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Raihan K; Zhang, Yang; Siu, Victoria Mok; Fan, Yao-Shan; O'Reilly, Richard L; Rao, Jay; Singh, Shiva M

    2006-01-01

    Background Chromosome 22q11.2 region is highly susceptible to rearrangement, specifically deletions that give rise to a variety of genomic disorders including velocardiofacial or DiGeorge syndrome. Individuals with this 22q11 microdeletion syndrome are at a greatly increased risk to develop schizophrenia. Methods Genotype analysis was carried out on the DNA from a patient with the 22q11 microdeletion using genetic markers and custom primer sets to define the deletion. Bioinformatic analysis was performed for molecular characterization of the deletion breakpoint sequences in this patient. Results This 22q11 deletion patient was established to have a novel 2.3 Mb deletion with a proximal breakpoint located between genetic markers RH48663 and RH48348 and a distal breakpoint between markers D22S1138 and SHGC-145314. Molecular characterization of the sequences at the breakpoints revealed a 270 bp shared sequence of the breakpoint regions (SSBR) common to both ends that share >90% sequence similarity to each other and also to short interspersed nuclear elements/Alu elements. Conclusion This Alu sequence like SSBR is commonly in the proximity of all known deletion breakpoints of 22q11 region and also in the low copy repeat regions (LCRs). This sequence may represent a preferred sequence in the breakpoint regions or LCRs for intra-chromosomal homologous recombination mechanisms resulting in common 22q11 deletion. PMID:16512914

  7. How many breaks do we need to CATCH on 22q11?

    SciTech Connect

    Dallapiccola, B.; Pizzuti, A.; Novelli, G. ||

    1996-07-01

    The major clinical manifestations of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS; MIM 188400), which reflect developmental abnormalities of the 3d and 4th pharyngeal pouch derivatives, include thymus- and parathyroid-gland aplasia or hypoplasia and conotruncal cardiac malformations. The additional dysmorphic facial features, such as hypertelorism, cleft lip and palate, bifid uvula, and small/low-set ears, which are also common, presumably reflect the same defect. The DGS phenotype has been associated with chromosome abnormalities and, sometimes, is the effect of teratogenic agents such as retinoic acid and alcohol. 53 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Mapping the gene causing hereditary primary hyperparathyroidism in a Portuguese kindred to chromosome 1q22-q31.

    PubMed

    Williamson, C; Cavaco, B M; Jauch, A; Dixon, P H; Forbes, S; Harding, B; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Schoell, B; Pereira, M C; Font, A P; Loureiro, M M; Sobrinho, L G; Santos, M A; Thakker, R V; Jausch, A

    1999-02-01

    A Portuguese kindred with autosomal dominant isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) that was associated with parathyroid adenomas and carcinomas was investigated with the aim of determining the chromosomal location of this gene, designated HPTPort. Leukocyte DNA from 9 affected and 16 unaffected members and 7 parathyroid tumors from 4 patients was used in comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), tumor loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and family linkage studies. The CGH studies revealed abnormalities of chromosomes 1 and 13, and the results of LOH studies were consistent with the involvements of tumor suppressor genes from these regions. Family segregation studies mapped HPTPort to chromosome 1q22-q31 by establishing linkage with eight loci (D1S254, D1S222, D1S202, D1S238, D1S428, D1S2877, D1S422, and D1S412) (peak two-point LOD scores = 3. 46-5.14 at 0% recombination), and defined the location of HPT Port to a 21 cM region flanked centromerically by D1S215 and telomerically by D1S306. Thus, HPTPort has been mapped to chromosome 1q22-q31, and a characterization of this gene will help to elucidate further the mechanisms that are involved in the development of parathyroid tumors. PMID:9933477

  9. Association of COMT and PRODH gene variants with intelligence quotient (IQ) and executive functions in 22q11.2DS subjects.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Miri; Zarchi, Omer; Michaelovsky, Elena; Frisch, Amos; Patya, Miriam; Green, Tamar; Gothelf, Doron; Weizman, Abraham

    2014-09-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) carries the highest genetic risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. We investigated the association of genetic variants in two schizophrenia candidate genes with executive function (EF) and IQ in 22q11.2DS individuals. Ninety two individuals with 22q11.2 deletion were studied for the genetic association between COMT and PRODH variants and EF and IQ. Subjects were divided into children (under 12 years old), adolescents (between 12 and 18 years old) and adults (older than 18 years), and genotyped for the COMT Val158Met (rs4680) and PRODH Arg185Trp (rs4819756) polymorphisms. The participants underwent psychiatric evaluation and EF assessment. Our main finding is a significant influence of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism on both IQ and EF performance. Specifically, 22q11.2DS subjects with Met allele displayed higher IQ scores in all age groups compared to Val carriers, reaching significance in both adolescents and adults. The Met allele carriers performed better than Val carriers in EF tasks, being statistically significant in the adult group. PRODH Arg185Trp variant did not affect IQ or EF in our 22q11.2DS cohort. In conclusion, functional COMT variant, but not PRODH, affects IQ and EF in 22q11.2DS subjects during neurodevelopment with a maximal effect at adulthood. Future studies should monitor the cognitive performance of the same individuals from childhood to old age. PMID:24853458

  10. A patient with both Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome and chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome: clue to the genetics of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome?

    PubMed

    Robertson, Mary M; Shelley, Bhaskara Pillai; Dalwai, Suraiya; Brewer, Carole; Critchley, Hugo D

    2006-09-01

    This is the first published case description of the association of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (GTS) and chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; previously referred to as CATCH-22 syndrome). The co-occurrence of GTS, 22q11DS, and their behavioral/neuropsychiatric abnormalities may be due to the common endophenotypic mechanisms shared by these disorders, rather than due to specificity for GTS. Research into this genomic region may lead to advancement in neurobehavioral/neuropsychiatric genetics, which will help us in further explicating a broader perspective of gene-brain-behavior interrelationships and of the genetic underpinnings of various developmental psychopathologies and behavioral/neuropsychiatric disorders that are common to both GTS and 22q11DS. Our report should warrant further genetic investigations of the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion site using alternative strategies to the quantitative trait loci endophenotype-based approach, which would be useful for establishing the biological and molecular underpinnings of obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and GTS. PMID:16938515

  11. Congenital Anomalies and Rhabdoid Tumor Associated with 22q11 Germline Deletion and Somatic Inactivation of the SMARCB1 Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Toth, George; Zraly, Claudia B.; Thomson, Tricia L.; Jones, Carolyn; Lapetino, Shawn; Muraskas, Jonathan; Zhang, Jiwang; Dingwall, Andrew K.

    2011-01-01

    The most common microdeletion in humans involves the 22q11 region. Congenital anomalies associated with 22q11 loss include cardiac and facial defects. Less frequent is the co-presentation of malignant rhabdoid tumors that are highly aggressive childhood malignancies typically found in renal or extra-renal soft tissues and central nervous system. A newborn patient presented with multiple congenital anomalies consistent with 22q11 deletion syndrome including cleft lip and palate, ear tags and ventricular septal defects co-presenting with an axillary rhabdoid tumor. Comparative genomic hybridization revealed a 2.8 Mb germline deletion in the 22q11.2 region containing genes required for normal fetal development and the SMARCB1 tumor suppressor gene. Analysis of tumor DNA revealed a somatic deletion of exon 7 in the second allele of SMARCB1. Expression of SMARCB1 was absent, while tumor markers including MYC, GFAP and CLAUDIN-6 were upregulated. The presence of tandem oriented BCRL modules located within interspersed low copy repeat elements throughout the 22q11 distal region may predispose this area for microdeletions through nonalleleic homologous recombination. PMID:21412926

  12. Cognitive ability is associated with altered medial frontal cortical circuits in the LgDel mouse model of 22q11.2DS.

    PubMed

    Meechan, D W; Rutz, H L H; Fralish, M S; Maynard, T M; Rothblat, L A; LaMantia, A-S

    2015-05-01

    We established a relationship between cognitive deficits and cortical circuits in the LgDel model of 22q11 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS)-a genetic syndrome with one of the most significant risks for schizophrenia and autism. In the LgDel mouse, optimal acquisition, execution, and reversal of a visually guided discrimination task, comparable to executive function tasks in primates including humans, are compromised; however, there is significant individual variation in degree of impairment. The task relies critically on the integrity of circuits in medial anterior frontal cortical regions. Accordingly, we analyzed neuronal changes that reflect previously defined 22q11DS-related alterations of cortical development in the medial anterior frontal cortex of the behaviorally characterized LgDel mice. Interneuron placement, synapse distribution, and projection neuron frequency are altered in this region. The magnitude of one of these changes, layer 2/3 projection neuron frequency, is a robust predictor of behavioral performance: it is substantially and selectively lower in animals with the most significant behavioral deficits. These results parallel correlations of volume reduction and altered connectivity in comparable cortical regions with diminished executive function in 22q11DS patients. Apparently, 22q11 deletion alters behaviorally relevant circuits in a distinct cortical region that are essential for cognitive function. PMID:24217989

  13. MicroRNA Profiling of Neurons Generated Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from Patients with Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder, and 22q11.2 Del

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dejian; Lin, Mingyan; Chen, Jian; Pedrosa, Erika; Hrabovsky, Anastasia; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Zheng, Deyou; Lachman, Herbert M.

    2015-01-01

    We are using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to study neuropsychiatric disorders associated with 22q11.2 microdeletions (del), the most common known schizophrenia (SZ)-associated genetic factor. Several genes in the region have been implicated; a promising candidate is DGCR8, which codes for a protein involved in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis. We carried out miRNA expression profiling (miRNA-seq) on neurons generated from iPSCs derived from controls and SZ patients with 22q11.2 del. Using thresholds of p<0.01 for nominal significance and 1.5-fold differences in expression, 45 differentially expressed miRNAs were detected (13 lower in SZ and 32 higher). Of these, 6 were significantly down-regulated in patients after correcting for genome wide significance (FDR<0.05), including 4 miRNAs that map to the 22q11.2 del region. In addition, a nominally significant increase in the expression of several miRNAs was found in the 22q11.2 neurons that were previously found to be differentially expressed in autopsy samples and peripheral blood in SZ and autism spectrum disorders (e.g., miR-34, miR-4449, miR-146b-3p, and miR-23a-5p). Pathway and function analysis of predicted mRNA targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs showed enrichment for genes involved in neurological disease and psychological disorders for both up and down regulated miRNAs. Our findings suggest that: i. neurons with 22q11.2 del recapitulate the miRNA expression patterns expected of 22q11.2 haploinsufficiency, ii. differentially expressed miRNAs previously identified using autopsy samples and peripheral cells, both of which have significant methodological problems, are indeed disrupted in neuropsychiatric disorders and likely have an underlying genetic basis. PMID:26173148

  14. Velo-cardio-facial and partial DiGeorge phenotype in a child with interstitial deletion at 10p13 - implications for cytogenetics and molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lipson, A.; Sholler, G.; Issacs, D.

    1996-11-11

    We report on a female with a interstitial deletion of 10p13 and a phenotype similar to that seen with the 22q deletion syndromes (DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial). She had a posterior cleft palate, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, dyscoordinate swallowing, T-cell subset abnormalities, small ears, maxillary and mandibular hypoplasia, broad nasal bridge, deficient alae nasi, contractures of fingers and developmental delay. This could indicate homology of some developmental genes at 22q and 10p so that patients with the velocardiofacial phenotype who do not prove to be deleted on 22q are candidates for a 10p deletion. 58 refs., 3 figs.

  15. A New Account of the Neurocognitive Foundations of Impairments in Space, Time, and Number Processing in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Tony J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I present an updated account that attempts to explain, in cognitive processing and neural terms, the nonverbal intellectual impairments experienced by most children with deletions of chromosome 22q11.2. Specifically, I propose that this genetic syndrome leads to early developmental changes in the structure and function of clearly…

  16. A gene prenature ovarian failure associated with eyelid malformation maps to chromosomes 3q22-q23

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    Premature ovarian failure and XX gonadal dysgenesis leading to female infertility have been reported in association with an autosomal dominantly inherited malformation of the eyelids: blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES; MIM 110100). This association distinguishes BPES type I from BPES type II, in which affected females are fertile and the transmission occurs through both sexes. Recently, a gene responsible for BPES type II has been mapped to chromosome 3q22-q23, and the critical region for the gene location has been reduced to the interval between loci D3S1615 and D3S1316. Hitherto, however, no information regarding the localization of the gene for BPES type I, in which female ovarian failure is associated with eyelid malformation, has been available. We have studied two independent families affected with BPES type I, including a total of 12 affected individuals (6 infertile women) and 6 healthy relatives. The diagnostic criteria for the ophthalmological anomaly included (1) reduced horizontal diameter of palpebral fissures, (2) drooping of the upper eyelids, and (3) an abnormal skinfold running from the lower lids. Telecanthus and a flat nasal bridge were present in most cases. In both families the disease was transmitted only by the male, and no affected woman of childbearing age was fertile. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Alterations of social interaction through genetic and environmental manipulation of the 22q11.2 gene Sept5 in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Harper, Kathryn M; Hiramoto, Takeshi; Tanigaki, Kenji; Kang, Gina; Suzuki, Go; Trimble, William; Hiroi, Noboru

    2012-08-01

    Social behavior dysfunction is a symptomatic element of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Although altered activities in numerous brain regions are associated with defective social cognition and perception, the causative relationship between these altered activities and social cognition and perception-and their genetic underpinnings-are not known in humans. To address these issues, we took advantage of the link between hemizygous deletion of human chromosome 22q11.2 and high rates of social behavior dysfunction, schizophrenia and ASD. We genetically manipulated Sept5, a 22q11.2 gene, and evaluated its role in social interaction in mice. Sept5 deficiency, against a high degree of homogeneity in a congenic genetic background, selectively impaired active affiliative social interaction in mice. Conversely, virally guided overexpression of Sept5 in the hippocampus or, to a lesser extent, the amygdala elevated levels of active affiliative social interaction in C57BL/6J mice. Congenic knockout mice and mice overexpressing Sept5 in the hippocampus or amygdala were indistinguishable from control mice in novelty and olfactory responses, anxiety or motor activity. Moreover, post-weaning individual housing, an environmental condition designed to reduce stress in male mice, selectively raised levels of Sept5 protein in the amygdala and increased active affiliative social interaction in C57BL/6J mice. These findings identify this 22q11.2 gene in the hippocampus and amygdala as a determinant of social interaction and suggest that defective social interaction seen in 22q11.2-associated schizophrenia and ASD can be genetically and environmentally modified by altering this 22q11.2 gene. PMID:22589251

  18. Investigation of 15q11-q13, 16p11.2 and 22q13 CNVs in Autism Spectrum Disorder Brazilian Individuals with and without Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Danielle P.; Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Bossolani-Martins, Ana L.; Lourenço, Naila C. V.; Takahashi, Vanessa N. O.; da Rocha, Kátia M.; Moreira, Eloisa S.; Vadasz, Estevão; Meira, Joanna Goes Castro; Bertola, Debora; Halloran, Eoghan O’; Magalhães, Tiago R.; Fett-Conte, Agnes C.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are an important cause of ASD and those located at 15q11-q13, 16p11.2 and 22q13 have been reported as the most frequent. These CNVs exhibit variable clinical expressivity and those at 15q11-q13 and 16p11.2 also show incomplete penetrance. In the present work, through multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis of 531 ethnically admixed ASD-affected Brazilian individuals, we found that the combined prevalence of the 15q11-q13, 16p11.2 and 22q13 CNVs is 2.1% (11/531). Parental origin could be determined in 8 of the affected individuals, and revealed that 4 of the CNVs represent de novo events. Based on CNV prediction analysis from genome-wide SNP arrays, the size of those CNVs ranged from 206 kb to 2.27 Mb and those at 15q11-q13 were limited to the 15q13.3 region. In addition, this analysis also revealed 6 additional CNVs in 5 out of 11 affected individuals. Finally, we observed that the combined prevalence of CNVs at 15q13.3 and 22q13 in ASD-affected individuals with epilepsy (6.4%) was higher than that in ASD-affected individuals without epilepsy (1.3%; p<0.014). Therefore, our data show that the prevalence of CNVs at 15q13.3, 16p11.2 and 22q13 in Brazilian ASD-affected individuals is comparable to that estimated for ASD-affected individuals of pure or predominant European ancestry. Also, it suggests that the likelihood of a greater number of positive MLPA results might be found for the 15q13.3 and 22q13 regions by prioritizing ASD-affected individuals with epilepsy. PMID:25255310

  19. Investigation of 15q11-q13, 16p11.2 and 22q13 CNVs in autism spectrum disorder Brazilian individuals with and without epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Danielle P; Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Bossolani-Martins, Ana L; Lourenço, Naila C V; Takahashi, Vanessa N O; da Rocha, Kátia M; Moreira, Eloisa S; Vadasz, Estevão; Meira, Joanna Goes Castro; Bertola, Debora; O'Halloran, Eoghan; Magalhães, Tiago R; Fett-Conte, Agnes C; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are an important cause of ASD and those located at 15q11-q13, 16p11.2 and 22q13 have been reported as the most frequent. These CNVs exhibit variable clinical expressivity and those at 15q11-q13 and 16p11.2 also show incomplete penetrance. In the present work, through multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis of 531 ethnically admixed ASD-affected Brazilian individuals, we found that the combined prevalence of the 15q11-q13, 16p11.2 and 22q13 CNVs is 2.1% (11/531). Parental origin could be determined in 8 of the affected individuals, and revealed that 4 of the CNVs represent de novo events. Based on CNV prediction analysis from genome-wide SNP arrays, the size of those CNVs ranged from 206 kb to 2.27 Mb and those at 15q11-q13 were limited to the 15q13.3 region. In addition, this analysis also revealed 6 additional CNVs in 5 out of 11 affected individuals. Finally, we observed that the combined prevalence of CNVs at 15q13.3 and 22q13 in ASD-affected individuals with epilepsy (6.4%) was higher than that in ASD-affected individuals without epilepsy (1.3%; p<0.014). Therefore, our data show that the prevalence of CNVs at 15q13.3, 16p11.2 and 22q13 in Brazilian ASD-affected individuals is comparable to that estimated for ASD-affected individuals of pure or predominant European ancestry. Also, it suggests that the likelihood of a greater number of positive MLPA results might be found for the 15q13.3 and 22q13 regions by prioritizing ASD-affected individuals with epilepsy. PMID:25255310

  20. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype. PMID:26799614

  1. Characterization of the human NIPSNAP1 gene from 22q12: a member of a novel gene family.

    PubMed

    Seroussi, E; Pan, H Q; Kedra, D; Roe, B A; Dumanski, J P

    1998-05-28

    Rapid progress in sequencing of human and other genomes allows high-resolution analysis of their gene content on the basis of comparison between species. We have used a combined computer and biochemical approach to characterize 135 kb of human genomic sequence from 22q12 and discovered a new 10 exon gene, termed NIPSNAP1, located between the neurofibromatosis type 2 and the pK1.3 genes. The NIPSNAP1 gene spans 26 kb of genomic sequence and shows to large introns in the 5'-region. All exon-intron junctions contain the gt/ag consensus splice site. The putative promoter of the NIPSNAP1 gene is TATA-less and resides in a GC-rich island characteristic of housekeeping genes. The NIPSNAP1 mRNA is 2.1 kb, is expressed ubiquitously at variable levels, with the highest expression in liver, is terminated by an uncommon ATTAAA polyadenylation site, and is capable of encoding a 284-amino-acid protein. This NIPSNAP1 protein has a strong sequence similarity limited to the central portion of a hypothetical protein (acc. P34492) from chromosome III of C. elegans, in which the other portions resemble a 4-nitrophenylphosphatase domain and non-neuronal SNAP25-like protein. Thus, the NIPSNAP1 gene is a member of an evolutionarily well conserved, novel gene family with two members in human and mouse that have now been characterized, and one member in C. elegans. The second human gene, NIPSNAP2, is localized in the vicinity of marker D7S499 on chromosome 7. Although the function of the NIPSNAP protein family is unknown, clues about its role may reside in the co-expression of the C. elegans orthologue, within an operon encoding protein motifs known to be involved in vesicular transport. PMID:9661659

  2. A 725 kb deletion at 22q13.1 chromosomal region including SOX10 gene in a boy with a neurologic variant of Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    PubMed

    Siomou, Elisavet; Manolakos, Emmanouil; Petersen, Michael; Thomaidis, Loretta; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Orru, Sandro; Papoulidis, Ioannis

    2012-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare (1/40,000) autosomal dominant disorder resulting from melanocyte defects, with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four clinical subtypes (WS1-S4). Six genes have been identified to be associated with the different subtypes of WS, among which SOX10, which is localized within the region 22q13.1. Lately it has been suggested that whole SOX10 gene deletions can be encountered when testing for WS. In this study we report a case of a 13-year-old boy with a unique de novo 725 kb deletion within the 22q13.1 chromosomal region, including the SOX10 gene and presenting clinical features of a neurologic variant of WS2. PMID:22842075

  3. Kinematic Movement Strategies in Primary School Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Compared to Age- and IQ-Matched Controls during Visuo-Manual Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Aken, Katrijn; Swillen, Ann; Beirinckx, Marc; Janssens, Luc; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien

    2010-01-01

    The present study focused on the mechanism subserving the production of kinematic patterns in 21 children with 22q11.2DS (mean age=9.6 [plus or minus] 1.9; mean FSIQ=73.05 [plus or minus] 10.2) and 21 age- and IQ-matched control children (mean age=9.6 [plus or minus] 1.9; mean FSIQ=73.38 [plus or minus] 12.0) when performing a visuo-manual…

  4. Extra skeletal Soft Tissue Ewing’s Sarcoma with Variant Translocation of Chromosome t (4; 22) (q35; q12)-A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Prashanth; H, Srinivas C; Rao, Raghavendra; Manohar, Sandesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ewing’s sarcomas is a rare primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) which has an annual incidence of 2.9 /million population in USA 1Jeffery Toretsky et al (2008) They are very uncommon in African and Asian population. It is commonly associated with reciprocal translocation between chromosome 11 and 12 t (11:12) or less frequently the t(21;22)(q22;ql 2) translocation. It is highly aggressive tumor which is PAS- and CD99 (MIC2)-positive relatively few variant translocations have been reported in primary Ewing’s sarcomas (ES). Case Report: We are hereby presenting a case of extra skeletal soft tissue Ewing’s sarcoma with unusual translocation of chromosome t (4, 22) (q35, q12). Patient presented to us in advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis and lower limb neurological deficit. Relatively few variant translocations have been reported in primary Ewing’s sarcomas (ES). To date, 13 variants of the EWS fusion gene have been described in literature. They are extremely rare, representing altogether < 1% of the cases’ 23we are reporting a case of a variant simple translocation of chromosome t (4; 22) (q35;1 2). In our exhaustive literature search we could find only one case of complex translocation which was identified in a dysmorphic 15-year-old girl, t (4:11; 22)(q21; q24; q12) reported by Squire Jet al (1993). Conclusion: This type of translocation is extremely rare and has not been reported in the literature so far. Clinical presentation was initial indolent but later at the time patient presented to our institute he had developed pulmonary metastases and paraplegia due to involvement of spine. Our case report will provide new insight about rare translocation types in Ewing’s sarcoma and understand their clinical behavior of Ewing’s sarcoma with such type of translocation. PMID:27298923

  5. Kabuki syndrome is not caused by a microdeletion in the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial chromosomal region within 22q11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Zackai, E.H.; Kaplan, P.; Driscoll, D.A.; Niikawa, Norio

    1996-10-16

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) or Niikawa-Kuroki syndrome is a sporadic disorder characterized by postnatal growth retardation, developmental delay, mild to moderate retardation, and a characteristic facial appearance. Cardiovascular defects, clefts of the lip, palate, or both, and musculoskeletal abnormalities occur in about 50% of patients with KS. The cause of this multiple congenital anomaly syndrome is unknown, and investigators have speculated that KS is a contiguous gene-deletion syndrome. Based on the presence of congenital heart defects in patients with KS, it was suggested that this disorder might share a common cause with the 22q11 deletion syndromes. A preliminary study of 2 patients with KS failed to detect a deletion within 22q11. We report the results of fluorescence in situ hybridization with cosmid probes for loci D22S75 (N25) and D22S259 (1132) within the DiGeorge chromosomal region (DGCR) on metaphase spreads from an additional 5 patients, 2 non-Japanese and 3 Japanese, with KS. None of the 5 had deletions at either locus. It is unlikely that KS is caused by a deletion within 22q11. 16 refs.

  6. A Pyrosequencing-Based Assay for the Rapid Detection of the 22q11.2 Deletion in DNA from Buccal and Dried Blood Spot Samples

    PubMed Central

    Koontz, Deborah; Baecher, Kirsten; Kobrynski, Lisa; Nikolova, Stanimila; Gallagher, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is one of the most common deletion syndromes in newborns. Some affected newborns may be diagnosed shortly after birth because of the presence of heart defects, palatal defects, or severe immune deficiencies. However, diagnosis is often delayed in patients presenting with other associated conditions that would benefit from early recognition and treatment, such as speech delays, learning difficulties, and schizophrenia. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the gold standard for deletion detection, but it is costly and time consuming and requires a whole blood specimen. Our goal was to develop a suitable assay for population-based screening of easily collectible specimens, such as buccal swabs and dried blood spots (DBS). We designed a pyrosequencing assay and validated it using DNA from FISH–confirmed 22q11 deletion syndrome patients and normal controls. We tested DBS from nine patients and paired buccal cell and venous blood specimens from 20 patients. Results were 100% concordant with FISH assay results. DNA samples from normal controls (n = 180 cell lines, n = 15 DBS, and n = 88 buccal specimens) were negative for the deletion. Limiting dilution experiments demonstrated that accurate results could be obtained from as little as 1 ng of DNA. This method represents a reliable and low-cost alternative for detection of the common 22q11.2 microdeletions and can be adapted to high-throughput population screening. PMID:24973633

  7. Histology of the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscle in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Non-Syndromic Children with Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Widdershoven, Josine C. C.; Spruijt, Nicole E.; Spliet, Wim G. M.; Breugem, Corstiaan C.; Kon, Moshe; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B.

    2011-01-01

    Plastic surgeons aim to correct velopharyngeal insufficiency manifest by hypernasal speech with a velopharyngoplasty. The functional outcome has been reported to be worse in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome than in patients without the syndrome. A possible explanation is the hypotonia that is often present as part of the syndrome. To confirm a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, specimens of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle were taken from children with and without the syndrome. Histologic properties were compared between the groups. Specimens from the two groups did not differ regarding the presence of increased perimysial or endomysial space, fiber grouping by size or type, internalized nuclei, the percentage type I fibers, or the diameters of type I and type II fibers. In conclusion, a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome could not be confirmed. PMID:21738760

  8. Unmasking of a Recessive SCARF2 Mutation by a 22q11.12 de novo Deletion in a Patient with Van den Ende-Gupta Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bedeschi, M.F.; Colombo, L.; Mari, F.; Hofmann, K.; Rauch, A.; Gentilin, B.; Renieri, A.; Clerici, D.

    2011-01-01

    Van den Ende-Gupta syndrome (VDEGS) is a congenital condition characterized by craniofacial and skeletal manifestations, specifically blepharophimosis, malar and maxillary hypoplasia, distinctive nose, arachnocamptodactyly, and long slender bones of the hands and feet. To date, only 24 patients have been described. It is generally thought that the syndrome is transmitted by an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, although evidence for genetic heterogeneity has recently been presented. We report on a girl followed from birth up to 3 years of life with a set of peculiar minor anomalies, arachnocamptodactyly of hands and feet, characteristic of VDEGS in association with a 22q11.12 deletion. Recently, the VDEGS gene was mapped to the DiGeorge syndrome region on 22q11.2, and homozygous mutations in the SCARF2 gene were identified. We now report the first patient with VDEGS due to compound heterozygosity for the common 22q11.2 microdeletion and a hemizygous SCARF2 splice site mutation. PMID:22140376

  9. Overlap in Bibliographic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, William W.; Wilson, Concepcion S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the topic of Fuzzy Set Theory to determine the overlap of coverage in bibliographic databases. Highlights include examples of comparisons of database coverage; frequency distribution of the degree of overlap; records with maximum overlap; records unique to one database; intra-database duplicates; and overlap in the top ten databases.…

  10. Haplotype differences for copy number variants in the 22q11.23 region among human populations: a pigmentation-based model for selective pressure

    PubMed Central

    Polimanti, Renato; Piacentini, Sara; Iorio, Andrea; De Angelis, Flavio; Kozlov, Andrey; Novelletto, Andrea; Fuciarelli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Two gene clusters are tightly linked in a narrow region of chromosome 22q11.23: the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) gene family and the glutathione S-transferase theta class. Within 120 kb in this region, two 30-kb deletions reach high frequencies in human populations. This gives rise to four haplotypic arrangements, which modulate the number of genes in both families. The variable patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between these copy number variants (CNVs) in diverse human populations remain poorly understood. We analyzed 2469 individuals belonging to 27 human populations with different ethnic origins. Then we correlated the genetic variability of 22q11.23 CNVs with environmental variables. We confirmed an increasing strength of LD from Africa to Asia and to Europe. Further, we highlighted strongly significant correlations between the frequency of one of the haplotypes and pigmentation-related variables: skin color (R2=0.675, P<0.001), distance from the equator (R2=0.454, P<0.001), UVA radiation (R2=0.439, P<0.001), and UVB radiation (R2=0.313, P=0.002). The fact that all MIF-related genes are retained on this haplotype and the evidences gleaned from experimental systems seem to agree with the role of MIF-related genes in melanogenesis. As such, we propose a model that explains the geographic and ethnic distribution of 22q11.23 CNVs among human populations, assuming that MIF-related gene dosage could be associated with adaptation to low UV radiation. PMID:24667780

  11. Self-Reported Speech Problems in Adolescents and Young Adults with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Vorstman, Jacob AS; Kon, Moshe; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B

    2014-01-01

    Background Speech problems are a common clinical feature of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. The objectives of this study were to inventory the speech history and current self-reported speech rating of adolescents and young adults, and examine the possible variables influencing the current speech ratings, including cleft palate, surgery, speech and language therapy, intelligence quotient, and age at assessment. Methods In this cross-sectional cohort study, 50 adolescents and young adults with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (ages, 12-26 years, 67% female) filled out questionnaires. A neuropsychologist administered an age-appropriate intelligence quotient test. The demographics, histories, and intelligence of patients with normal speech (speech rating=1) were compared to those of patients with different speech (speech rating>1). Results Of the 50 patients, a minority (26%) had a cleft palate, nearly half (46%) underwent a pharyngoplasty, and all (100%) had speech and language therapy. Poorer speech ratings were correlated with more years of speech and language therapy (Spearman's correlation= 0.418, P=0.004; 95% confidence interval, 0.145-0.632). Only 34% had normal speech ratings. The groups with normal and different speech were not significantly different with respect to the demographic variables; a history of cleft palate, surgery, or speech and language therapy; and the intelligence quotient. Conclusions All adolescents and young adults with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome had undergone speech and language therapy, and nearly half of them underwent pharyngoplasty. Only 34% attained normal speech ratings. Those with poorer speech ratings had speech and language therapy for more years. PMID:25276637

  12. In Search of the Optimal Surgical Treatment for Velopharyngeal Dysfunction in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Spruijt, Nicole E.; ReijmanHinze, Judith; Hens, Greet; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) and velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) tend to have residual VPD following surgery. This systematic review seeks to determine whether a particular surgical procedure results in superior speech outcome or less morbidity. Methodology/ Principal Findings A combined computerized and hand-search yielded 70 studies, of which 27 were deemed relevant for this review, reporting on a total of 525 patients with 22qDS and VPD undergoing surgery for VPD. All studies were levels 2c or 4 evidence. The methodological quality of these studies was assessed using criteria based on the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Heterogeneous groups of patients were reported on in the studies. The surgical procedure was often tailored to findings on preoperative imaging. Overall, 50% of patients attained normal resonance, 48% attained normal nasal emissions scores, and 83% had understandable speech postoperatively. However, 5% became hyponasal, 1% had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and 17% required further surgery. There were no significant differences in speech outcome between patients who underwent a fat injection, Furlow or intravelar veloplasty, pharyngeal flap pharyngoplasty, Honig pharyngoplasty, or sphincter pharyngoplasty or Hynes procedures. There was a trend that a lower percentage of patients attained normal resonance after a fat injection or palatoplasty than after the more obstructive pharyngoplasties (11–18% versus 44–62%, p = 0.08). Only patients who underwent pharyngeal flaps or sphincter pharyngoplasties incurred OSA, yet this was not statistically significantly more often than after other procedures (p = 0.25). More patients who underwent a palatoplasty needed further surgery than those who underwent a pharyngoplasty (50% versus 7–13%, p = 0.03). Conclusions/ Significance In the heterogeneous group of patients with 22qDS and VPD, a grade C recommendation can be made to

  13. Molecular localization of the t(11; 22)(q24; q12) translocation of Ewing sarcoma by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Selleri, L.; Hermanson, G.G.; Eubanks, J.H.; Lewis, K.A.; Evans, G.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Chromosome translocations are associated with a variety of human leukemias, lymphomas, and solid tumors. To localize molecular markers flanking the t(11;22)(q24;q12) breakpoint that occurs in virtually all cases of Ewing sarcoma and peripheral neuroepithelioma, high-resolution chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization was carried out using a panel of cosmid clones localized and ordered on chromosome 11q. The location of the Ewing sarcoma translocation breakpoint was determined relative to the nearest two cosmid markers on 11q, clones 23.2 and 5.8, through the analysis of metaphase chromosome hybridization. By in situ hybridization to interphase nuclei, the approximate physical separation of these two markers was determined. In both Ewing sarcoma and peripheral neuroepithelioma, cosmid clone 5.8 is translocated from chromosome 11q24 to the derivative chromosome 22 and a portion of chromosome 22q12 carrying the leukemia inhibitory factor gene is translocated to the derivative chromosome 11. The physical distance between the flanking cosmid markers on chromosome 11 was determined to be in the range of 1,000 kilobases, and genomic analysis using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed no abnormalities over a region of 650 kilobases in the vicinity of the leukemia inhibitory factor gene on chromosome 22. This approach localizes the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint to a small region on chromosome 11q24 and provides a rapid and precise technique for the molecular characterization of chromosomal aberrations.

  14. Identification of an inversion 16 coexisting with an isochromosome 22q by in situ hybridization in a case of childhood AML M4e.

    PubMed

    Gad, S G; Callen, D F; Kuss, B; Downing, J R; Behm, F; Head, D; Ribeiro, R C; Raimondi, S C

    1993-10-01

    Rearrangements involving chromosome 16, including inv(16) (p13q22), del(16)(q22), and t(16;16)(p13;q22), are frequent findings in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Each of these rearrangements can occur as the sole karyotypic change or in association with additional chromosomal abnormalities, including in decreasing order of frequency: trisomy 22, trisomy 8, and deletion of the long arm of chromosome 7. We report a pediatric case of de novo AML, M4e subtype, with a unique combination of inv(16) (p13q22) and i(22q) occurring within the same leukemic clone. The inv(16) was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with two cosmid probes specific for sequences flanking the inv(16) breakpoint on the long arm of chromosome 16. Use of a chromosome-22-specific painting probe unequivocally identified a small metacentric chromosome as an i(22q). This case illustrates a variation in the association of trisomy 22 with inv(16) and suggests that duplication of the long arm of chromosome 22 may contain critical gene(s) involved in the multistep process of evolution of leukemia with 16q22 abnormalities. PMID:8412329

  15. A new account of the neurocognitive foundations of impairments in space, time and number processing in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simon, Tony J

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I present an updated account that attempts to explain, in cognitive processing and neural terms, the nonverbal intellectual impairments experienced by most children with deletions of chromosome 22q11.2. Specifically, I propose that this genetic syndrome leads to early developmental changes in the structure and function of clearly delineated neural circuits for basic spatiotemporal cognition. This dysfunction then cascades into impairments in basic magnitude and then numerical processes, because of the central role that representations of space and time play in their construction. I propose that this takes the form of "spatiotemporal hypergranularity"; the increase in grain size and thus reduced resolution of mental representations of spatial and temporal information. The result is that spatiotemporal processes develop atypically and thereby produce the characteristic impairments in nonverbal cognitive domains that are a hallmark feature of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. If this hypothesis driven account is supported by future research, the results will create a neurocognitive explanation of spatiotemporal and numerical impairments in the syndrome that is specific enough to be directly translated into the development of targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:18612330

  16. The 22q11 PRODH/DGCR6 deletion is frequent in hyperprolinemic subjects but is not a strong risk factor for ASD.

    PubMed

    Richard, Anne Claire; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Delaby, Elsa; Charbonnier, Camille; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Hatchwell, Eli; Eis, Peggy S; Afenjar, Alexandra; Dussardier, Brigitte Gilbert; Scherer, Stephen W; Betancur, Catalina; Campion, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    The proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) gene maps to 22q11.2 in the region deleted in the velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS). A moderate to severe reduction (>50%) in PRODH activity resulting from recessive deletions and/or missense mutations has been shown to cause type 1 hyperprolinemia (HPI). Autistic features have been reported as a common clinical manifestation of HPI. Here we studied the frequency of a recurrent small 22q11.2 deletion encompassing PRODH and the neighboring DGCR6 gene in three case-control studies, one comprising HPI patients (n = 83), and the other two comprising autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients (total of n = 2800), analyzed with high-resolution microarrays. We found that the PRODH deletion is a strong risk factor for HPI (OR = 50.7; 95%CI = 7.5-2147) but not for ASD (P = 0.4, OR = 0.6-3.3). This result indicates either that the suggested association between ASD and HPI is spurious and results from a bias leading to the preferential inclusion of patients with autistic features in HPI series, or that HPI is present in only a very small subset of ASD patients. In this latter case, a very large sample size would be required to detect an association between the PRODH deletion and ASD in a case-control study. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26978485

  17. A combined analysis of D22S278 marker alleles in affected sib-pairs: Support for a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at chromosome 22q12

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.; Vallada, H.; Collier, D.

    1996-02-16

    Several groups have reported weak evidence for linkage between schizophrenia and genetic markers located on chromosome 22q using the lod score method of analysis. However these findings involved different genetic markers and methods of analysis, and so were not directly comparable. To resolve this issue we have performed a combined analysis of genotypic data from the marker D22S278 in multiply affected schizophrenic families derived from 11 independent research groups worldwide. This marker was chosen because it showed maximum evidence for linkage in three independent datasets. Using the affected sib-pair method as implemented by the program ESPA, the combined dataset showed 252 alleles shared compared with 188 alleles not shared (chi-square 9.31, 1df, P = 0.001) where parental genotype data was completely known. When sib-pairs for whom parental data was assigned according to probability were included the number of alleles shared was 514.1 compared with 437.8 not shared (chi-square 6.12, 1df, P = 0.006). Similar results were obtained when a likelihood ratio method for sib-pair analysis was used. These results indicate that there may be a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at 22q12. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Localization of a candidate colon tumor-suppressor gene (DRA) to 7q22-q31. 1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, T.; Testa, J.R. ); Papas, T.S.; Schweinfest, C. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that the DRA gene is located on chromosome 7. This assignment was based on Southern blot hybridization of a DRA cDNA to genomic DNA from rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. In this report, they localize the DRA gene to chromosome band 7q22-q31.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a full-length (2.9 kb) cDNA as probe. Metaphase spreads from normal human lymphocytes were prepared according to the method of Fan et al. The cDNA clone 611C was labeled with biotin-11-dUTP using a nick-translation kit (Oncor) followed by purification on a Sephadex G50-fine column. FISH and detection of immunofluorescence were performed according to the technique of Pinkel et al. with minor modifications. The chromosome preparations were stained with both diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide (Oncor) and observed with a Zeiss Axiophot fluorescence microscope. Hybridization was detected on chromosome 7 in 22 of 47 spreads examined. Of 89 fluorescent signals on all chromosomes, 44 (49%) were located on 7q. All signals on chromosome 7 appeared to be located at 7q22-q31.1. Hybridization is in the vicinity of the met protooncogene locus at 7q31.

  19. A New Account of the Neurocognitive Foundations of Impairments in Space, Time and Number Processing in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Tony J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I present an updated account that attempts to explain, in cognitive processing and neural terms, the nonverbal intellectual impairments experienced by most children with deletions of chromosome 22q11.2. Specifically, I propose that this genetic syndrome leads to early developmental changes in the structure and function of clearly delineated neural circuits for basic spatiotemporal cognition. This dysfunction then cascades into impairments in basic magnitude and then numerical processes, because of the central role that representations of space and time play in their construction. I propose that this takes the form of “spatiotemporal hypergranularity”; the increase in grain size and thus reduced resolution of mental representations of spatial and temporal information. The result is that spatiotemporal processes develop atypically and thereby produce the characteristic impairments in nonverbal cognitive domains that are a hallmark feature of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. If this hypothesis driven account is supported by future research, the results will create a neurocognitive explanation of spatiotemporal and numerical impairments in the syndrome that is specific enough to be directly translated into the development of targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:18612330

  20. Localization of a non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation gene (MRX80) to Xq22-q24.

    PubMed

    Verot, Lucie; Alloisio, Nicole; Morlé, Laurette; Bozon, Muriel; Touraine, Renaud; Plauchu, Henri; Edery, Patrick

    2003-09-15

    Isolated mental retardation is clinically and genetically heterogenous and may be inherited in an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked manner. We report here a linkage analysis in a large family including 15 members, 6 of whom presenting X-linked non-syndromic mental retardation (MRX). Two-point linkage analysis using 23 polymorphic markers covering the entire X chromosome demonstrated significant linkage between the causative gene and DXS8055 with a maximum LOD score of 2.98 at theta = 0.00. Haplotype analysis indicated location for the disease gene in a 23.1 cM interval between DXS1106 and DXS8067. This MRX localization overlaps with 7 XLMR loci (MRX23, MRX27, MRX30, MRX35, MRX47, MRX53, and MRX63). This interval contains two genes associated with non-syndromic mental retardation (NSMR), namely the PAK3 gene, encoding a p21-activated kinase (MRX30 and MRX47) and the FACL4 gene encoding a fatty acyl-CoA ligase (MRX63). As skewed X-inactivation, an apparently constant feature in FACL4 carrier females was not observed in an obligate carrier belonging to the MRX family presented here, the PAK3 gene should be considered as the strongest candidate for this MRX locus. PMID:12949969

  1. A systematic gene-based screen of chr4q22-q32 identifies association of a novel susceptibility gene, DKK2, with the quantitative trait of alcohol dependence symptom counts.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Gursharan; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Aliev, Fazil; Alexander, Jeffry; McMichael, Omari; Patterson, Diana G; Walsh, Dermot; Zhao, Zhongming; Schuckit, Marc; Nurnberger, John; Edenberg, Howard; Kramer, John; Hesselbrock, Victor; Tischfield, Jay A; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Prescott, Carol A; Dick, Danielle M; Kendler, Kenneth S; Riley, Brien P

    2010-06-15

    Studies of alcohol dependence (AD) have consistently found evidence of linkage on chromosome 4q21-q32. A genome-wide linkage scan in the Irish Affected Sib Pair Study of Alcohol Dependence (IASPSAD) sample also provided its strongest evidence of linkage on chromosome 4q22-q32 using an index of AD severity based on the count of DSM-IV AD symptoms (ADSX; LOD = 4.59). We conducted a systematic, gene-centric association study using 518 LD-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 65 known and predicted genes within the 1-LOD interval surrounding the linkage peak. Case-only regression analysis with the quantitative variable of ADSX was performed in the 562 genetically independent cases; nominal support for association was demonstrated by 32 tagging SNPs in 14 genes. We did not observe study-wide significance, but gene-wise correction for multiple testing with the Nyholt procedure yielded empirical evidence of association with two genes, DKK2 (dickkopf homolog 2) (P = 0.007) and EGF (epidermal growth factor) (P = 0.025) in the IASPSAD sample. Three SNPs in DKK2 (rs427983; rs419558; rs399087) demonstrated empirical significance. Assessment of possible replication in 847 cases of European descent from a large independent sample, the Collaborative Study of the Genetics of Alcoholism, yielded replication for DKK2 but not EGF. We observed genotypic and phenotypic replication for DKK2 with the three SNPs yielding significant association with ADSX in the IASPSAD sample. Haplotype-specific expression measurements in post-mortem tissue samples suggested a functional role for DKK2. This evidence notwithstanding, replication is needed before confidence can be placed in these findings. PMID:20332099

  2. Differential outcomes in an extended family with constitutional t(11;22)(q23.3;q11.2)

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Su Keyau; See, Valene Hsu-Lin; Chia, Patrick; Tan, Wei Ching; Tien, Sim Leng; Lim, Soon Tiong Alvin

    2013-01-01

    The t(11;22) rearrangement is the most common recurrent familial reciprocal translocation in man. Heterozygote carriers are phenotypically normal but are at risk of subfertility in the male, miscarriages, and producing chromosomally unbalanced offspring. The unbalanced progeny usually results from an extra der(22) chromosome resulting from a 3:1 malsegregation. We present here a family with t(11;22). Of six siblings, three were found to be carriers following prenatal diagnosis of the proband fetus. Neither of the two married carrier siblings have a live born child. In keeping with the prevailing knowledge of the pregnancy outcomes of heterozygote carriers, between the siblings they had recurrent miscarriages, a fetus with a +der(22) chromosome, and other subfertility issues resulting in multiple failed in vitro fertilization cycles with preimplantation genetic diagnosis. However, unlike the siblings, their extended family comprising their heterozygote translocation mother, married aunts and an uncle had normal fertility and a lack of a history of miscarriages or an abnormal child. The differing outcomes may be related to the male partners having additional semen anomalies which may further exacerbate problems associated with the t(11;22). Because the t(11;22) rearrangement tends to run in families, it is recommended that chromosome studies are offered to family members of an affected relative as an option, and provide them with appropriate genetic counseling so that they will have the necessary information with regard to their risk for subfertility, miscarriages, and production of viable unbalanced offspring. Follow-up prenatal diagnosis should also be offered to affected expectant family members, especially after preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  3. Sequential strategy to identify a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia: Report of potential linkage on chromosome 22q12-q13.1: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pulver, A.E.; Wolyniec, P.S.; Lasseter, V.K.

    1994-03-15

    To identify genes responsible for the susceptibility for schizophrenia, and to test the hypothesis that schizophrenia is etiologically heterogeneous, we have studied 39 multiplex families from a systematic sample of schizophrenic patients. Using a complex autosomal dominant model, which considers only those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder as affected, a random search of the genome for detection of linkage was undertaken. Pairwise linkage analyses suggest a potential linkage (LRH = 34.7 or maximum lod score = 1.54) for one region (22q12-q13.1). Reanalyses, varying parameters in the dominant model, maximized the LRH at 660.7 (maximum lod score 2.82). This finding is of sufficient interest to warrant further investigation through collaborative studies. 72 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. Linkage analysis of chromosome 22q12-13 in a United Kingdom/Icelandic sample of 23 multiplex schizophrenia families

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, G.; Read, T.; Butler, R.

    1995-08-14

    A possible linkage to a genetic subtype of schizophrenia and related disorders has been reported on the long arm of chromosome 22 at q12-13. However formal statistical tests in a combined sample could not reject homogeneity and prove that there was linked subgroup of families. We have studied 23 schizophrenia pedigrees to test whether some multiplex schizophrenia families may be linked to the microsatellite markers D22S274 and D22S283 which span the 22q12-13 region. Two point followed by multipoint lod and non-parametric linkage analyses under the assumption of heterogeneity provided no evidence for linkage over the relevant region. 16 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Velopharyngeal incompetence diagnosed in a series of cardiac patients prompted by the finding of a 22q11.2 deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, D.A.; Emanuel, B.S.; Goldmuntz, E.

    1994-09-01

    Congenital heart disease is very common and may occur as an isolated malformation or as part of a well-defined syndrome. In some syndromes, specific types are overrepresented as compared to their incidence in the general population. Conotruncal anomalies are one such example where they are seen as part of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome (VCFS). Often, the diagnosis of VCFS is not suspected because mild facial dysmorphia is frequently not appreciated in the newborn period. While overt cleft palate, a characteristic finding in VCFS, would be detected early, a submucousal cleft palate or velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI) may go unrecognized in the pre-verbal child and may remain undiagnosed in the older patient who is not referred for a palatal evaluation. In patients with either DGS or VCFS, microdeletions of chromosome 22q11.2 have been demonstrated in almost 90% of patients. As part of our ongoing study, twenty patients with a conotruncal cardiac anomaly, without an overt cleft palate, were referred for 22q11.2 deletion analysis. 13/20 patients were found to have a deletion. All 13 deleted patients underwent palatal evaluations by a plastic surgeon and speech pathologist. 7 patients were noted to have VPI. Intervention including speech therapy and/or posterior pharyngeal flap surgery for these previously undiagnosed abnormalities is underway. These results suggest that palatal abnormalities are underdiagnosed in a significant proportion of patients with conotruncal cardiac defects. We therefore propose deletion studies in these patients followed by prompt palatal evaluations when the deletion is present. Early diagnosis of VPI and submucousal cleft palate should lead to early intervention and appropriate management of the speech difficulties encountered by these individuals.

  6. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive lung diseases represent a major health problem worldwide due to their high prevalence associated with elevated socioeconomic costs. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are chronic obstructive ventilatory disorders with airway inflammation, however they are separate nosological entities based on thedifferent development, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and prognostic features. However, these diseases may coexist and can be defined as the coexistence of increased variability of airflow in a patient with incompletely reversible airway obstruction. This phenotype is called asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. The syndrome is a clinical and scientific challenge as the majority of these patients have been excluded from the clinical and pharmacological trials, thus well-defined clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches are lacking. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature focusing on pathophysiological and clinical features, and discuss possible therapeutic approaches of patients with asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1304-1313. PMID:27523313

  7. Persistent low thymic activity and non-cardiac mortality in children with chromosome 22q11·2 microdeletion and partial DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, P; Berger, C; Junge, S; Dougoud, S; Büchel, E Valsangiacomo; Riegel, M; Schinzel, A; Seger, R; Güngör, T

    2009-01-01

    A subgroup of patients with 22q11·2 microdeletion and partial DiGeorge syndrome (pDGS) appears to be susceptible to non-cardiac mortality (NCM) despite sufficient overall CD4+ T cells. To detect these patients, 20 newborns with 22q11·2 microdeletion and congenital heart disease were followed prospectively for 6 years. Besides detailed clinical assessment, longitudinal monitoring of naive CD4+ and cytotoxic CD3+CD8+ T cells (CTL) was performed. To monitor thymic activity, we analysed naive platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD31+) expressing CD45RA+RO−CD4+ cells containing high numbers of T cell receptor excision circle (TREC)-bearing lymphocytes and compared them with normal values of healthy children (n = 75). Comparing two age periods, low overall CD4+ and naive CD4+ T cell numbers were observed in 65%/75%, respectively, of patients in period A (< 1 year) declining to 22%/50%, respectively, of patients in period B (> 1/< 7 years). The percentage of patients with low CTLs (< P10) remained robust until school age (period A: 60%; period B: 50%). Low numbers of CTLs were associated with abnormally low naive CD45RA+RO−CD4+ T cells. A high-risk (HR) group (n = 11) and a standard-risk (SR) (n = 9) group were identified. HR patients were characterized by low numbers of both naive CD4+ and CTLs and were prone to lethal infectious and lymphoproliferative complications (NCM: four of 11; cardiac mortality: one of 11) while SR patients were not (NCM: none of nine; cardiac mortality: two of nine). Naive CD31+CD45RA+RO−CD4+, naive CD45RA+RO−CD4+ T cells as well as TRECs/106 mononuclear cells were abnormally low in HR and normal in SR patients. Longitudinal monitoring of naive CD4+ and cytotoxic T cells may help to discriminate pDGS patients at increased risk for NCM. PMID:19040613

  8. Illusion induced overlapped optics.

    PubMed

    Zang, XiaoFei; Shi, Cheng; Li, Zhou; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing; Zhu, HaiBin

    2014-01-13

    The traditional transformation-based cloak seems like it can only hide objects by bending the incident electromagnetic waves around the hidden region. In this paper, we prove that invisible cloaks can be applied to realize the overlapped optics. No matter how many in-phase point sources are located in the hidden region, all of them can overlap each other (this can be considered as illusion effect), leading to the perfect optical interference effect. In addition, a singular parameter-independent cloak is also designed to obtain quasi-overlapped optics. Even more amazing of overlapped optics is that if N identical separated in-phase point sources covered with the illusion media, the total power outside the transformation region is N2I0 (not NI0) (I0 is the power of just one point source, and N is the number point sources), which seems violating the law of conservation of energy. A theoretical model based on interference effect is proposed to interpret the total power of these two kinds of overlapped optics effects. Our investigation may have wide applications in high power coherent laser beams, and multiple laser diodes, and so on. PMID:24515019

  9. Phenotype overlap in Xylella fastidiosa is controlled by the cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase Eal in response to antibiotic exposure and diffusible signal factor-mediated cell-cell signaling.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Alessandra A; Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2013-06-01

    Eal is an EAL domain protein in Xylella fastidiosa homologous to one involved in resistance to tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EAL and HD-GYP domain proteins are implicated in the hydrolysis of the secondary messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (cyclic di-GMP). Cell density-dependent communication mediated by a Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) also modulates cyclic di-GMP levels in X. fastidiosa, thereby controlling the expression of virulence genes and genes involved in insect transmission. The possible linkage of Eal to both extrinsic factors such as antibiotics and intrinsic factors such as quorum sensing, and whether both affect virulence, was thus addressed. Expression of eal was induced by subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin, and an eal deletion mutant was more susceptible to this antibiotic than the wild-type strain and exhibited phenotypes similar to those of an rpfF deletion mutant blocked in DSF production, such as hypermotility, reduced biofilm formation, and hypervirulence to grape. Consistent with that, the rpfF mutant was more susceptible than the wild-type strain to tobramycin. Therefore, we propose that cell-cell communication and antibiotic stress can apparently lead to similar modulations of cyclic di-GMP in X. fastidiosa, resulting in similar phenotypes. However, the effect of cell density is dominant compared to that of antibiotic stress, since eal is suppressed by RpfF, which may prevent inappropriate behavioral changes in response to antibiotic stress when DSF accumulates. PMID:23542613

  10. Secondary EWSR1 gene abnormalities in SMARCB1-deficient tumors with 22q11-12 regional deletions: Potential pitfalls in interpreting EWSR1 FISH results.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-10-01

    SMARCB1 inactivation occurs in a variety of tumors, being caused by various genetic mechanisms. Since SMARCB1 and EWSR1 genes are located close to each other on chromosome 22, larger SMARCB1 deletions may encompass the EWSR1 locus. Herein, we report four cases with SMARCB1-deletions showing concurrent EWSR1 gene abnormalities by FISH, which lead initially to misinterpretations as EWSR1-rearranged tumors. Our study group included various morphologies: a poorly differentiated chordoma, an extrarenal rhabdoid tumor, a myoepithelial carcinoma, and a proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma. All cases showed loss of SMARCB1 (INI1) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and displayed characteristic histologic features for the diagnoses. The SMARCB1 FISH revealed homozygous or heterozygous deletions in three and one case, respectively. The co-hybridized EWSR1 probes demonstrated either unbalanced split signals or heterozygous deletion in two cases each. The former suggested bona fide rearrangement, while the latter resembled an unbalanced translocation. However, all the FISH patterns were quite complex and distinct from the simple and uniform split signals seen in typical EWSR1 rearrangements. We conclude that in the context of 22q11-12 regional alterations present in SMARCB1-deleted tumors, simultaneous EWSR1 involvement may be misinterpreted as equivalent to EWSR1 rearrangement. A detailed clinicopathologic correlation and supplementing the EWSR1 FISH assay with complementary methodology is mandatory for correct diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218413

  11. Follow-up of a report of a potential linkage for schizophrenia on chromosome 22q12-q13.1: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Pulver, A.E.; Lasseter, V.K.; Wolyniec, P.

    1994-03-15

    A collaboration involving four groups of investigators (Johns Hopkins University/Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Medical College of Virginia/The Health Research Board, Dublin; Institute of Psychiatry, London/University of Wales, Cardiff; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris) was organized to confirm results suggestive of a schizophrenia susceptibility locus on chromosome 22 identified by the JHU/MIT group after a random search of the genome. Diagnostic, laboratory, and analytical reliability exercises were conducted among the groups to ensure uniformity of procedures. Data from genotyping of 3 dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms (at the loci D22S268, IL2RB, D22S307) for a combined replication sample of 256 families, each having 2 or more affected individuals with DNA, were analysed using a complex autosomal dominant model. This study provided no evidence for linkage or heterogeneity for the region 22q12-q13 under this model. We conclude that if this region confers susceptibility to schizophrenia, it must be in only a small proportion of families. Collaborative efforts to obtain large samples must continue to play an important role in the genetic search for clues to complex psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Fine mapping of the human bone morphogenetic protein-4 gene (BMP4) to chromosome 14q22-q23 by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wijngaard, A. van den; Boersma, C.J.C.; Olijve, W.

    1995-06-10

    Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) is a member of the transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) superfamily and is involved in morphogenesis and bone cell differentiation. Recombinant BMP-4 can induce ectopic cartilage and bone formation when implanted subcutaneously or intramuscularly in rodents. This ectopic bone formation process resembles the process of bone formation during embryogenesis and fracture healing. A cosmid clone containing the complete human bone morphogenetic protein-4 gene (BMP4) was isolated (details to be published elsewhere) and used as a probe to determine the precise chromosomal localization of the human BMP4 gene. This cosmid clone was labeled with biotin-14-dATP and hybridized in situ to chromosomal preparations of metaphase cells as described previously. In 20 metaphase preparations, an intense and specific fluorescence signal (FITC) was detected on the q arm of chromosome 14. The DAPI-counterstained chromosomes were computer-converted into GTG-like banding patterns, allowing the regional localization of BMP4 within 14q22-q23. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Maternal uniparental disomy 22 has no impact on the phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Schinzel, A. A.; Basaran, S.; Bernasconi, F.; Karaman, B.; Yüksel-Apak, M.; Robinson, W. P.

    1994-01-01

    A 25-year-old normal healthy male was karyotyped because five of his wife's pregnancies terminated in spontaneous abortions at 6-14 wk of gestation. Cytogenetic investigation disclosed a de novo balanced Robertsonian t(22q;22q) translocation. Molecular studies revealed maternal only inheritance for chromosome 22 markers. Reduction to homozygosity for all informative markers indicates that the rearranged chromosome is an isochromosome derived from one of the maternal chromosomes 22. Except for the possibility of homozygosity for recessive mutations, maternal uniparental disomy 22 does not seem to have an adverse impact on the phenotype, apart from causing reproductive failure. It can be concluded that no maternally imprinted genes with major effect map to chromosome 22. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8279466

  14. Rippling muscle disease and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy-like phenotype in a patient carrying a heterozygous CAV3 T78M mutation and a D4Z4 partial deletion: Further evidence for “double trouble” overlapping syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Giulia; Scionti, Isabella; Alì, Greta; Volpi, Leda; Zampa, Virna; Fanin, Marina; Angelini, Corrado; Politano, Luisa; Tupler, Rossella; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    We report the first case of a heterozygous T78M mutation in the caveolin-3 gene (CAV3) associated with rippling muscle disease and proximal myopathy. The patient displayed also bilateral winged scapula with limited abduction of upper arms and marked asymmetric atrophy of leg muscles shown by magnetic resonance imaging. Immunohistochemistry on the patient’s muscle biopsy demonstrated a reduction of caveolin-3 staining, compatible with the diagnosis of caveolinopathy. Interestingly, consistent with the possible diagnosis of FSHD, the patient carried a 35 kb D4Z4 allele on chromosome 4q35. We discuss the hypothesis that the two genetic mutations may exert a synergistic effect in determining the phenotype observed in this patient. PMID:22245016

  15. Overlap among Environmental Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Betty

    1981-01-01

    Describes the methodology and results of a study comparing the overlap of Enviroline, Pollution, and the Environmental Periodicals Bibliography files through searches on acid rain, asbestos and water, diesel, glass recycling, Lake Erie, Concorde, reverse osmosis wastewater treatment cost, and Calspan. Nine tables are provided. (RBF)

  16. Overlap phenotype between CMT1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies caused by the novel small in-frame deletion c.407_418del12 in PMP22 gene.

    PubMed

    Vill, Katharina; Kuhn, Marius; Gläser, Dieter; Müller-Felber, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    We report monozygotic twins, who presented with a clinical picture of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1) with bilateral foot drop, pes cavus, thoracic kyphosis, and scoliosis. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) showed up in one of them. Neurography showed demyelinating neuropathy, typical for CMT1, and transient conduction block in the ulnar nerve correlating with clinical ulnar palsy due to minor mechanical stress in only one of them. Genetic analysis revealed novel small de novo deletion c.407_418del12 in the PMP22 gene. Our patient shows the rarely reported combination of CMT1A and HNPP, caused by an in-frame deletion in the PMP22 gene. HNPP is in the majority of cases correlated with heterozygous deletion of the whole PMP22 gene or other mutations leading to functional haploinsufficiency. The cases give further evidence that pathogenesis of HNPP is not completely understood and can obviously result from existence of a defective protein, too. The intrafamiliar phenotypic variability, even in monozygotic twins, confirms the well-known fact that factors apart from genetics contribute to the clinical course. PMID:25265422

  17. t(6;9)(p22;q34)/DEK-NUP214-rearranged pediatric myeloid leukemia: an international study of 62 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Coenen, Eva A.; Forestier, Erik; Harbott, Jochen; Johansson, Bertil; Kerndrup, Gitte; Adachi, Souichi; Auvrignon, Anne; Beverloo, H. Berna; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Chilton, Lucy; Fornerod, Maarten; de Haas, Valérie; Harrison, Christine J.; Inaba, Hiroto; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.; Liang, Der-Cherng; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; Perot, Christine; Raimondi, Susana C.; Reinhardt, Katarina; Tomizawa, Daisuke; von Neuhoff, Nils; Zecca, Marco; Zwaan, C. Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Hasle, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with t(6;9)(p22;q34) is listed as a distinct entity in the 2008 World Health Organization classification, but little is known about the clinical implications of t(6;9)-positive myeloid leukemia in children. This international multicenter study presents the clinical and genetic characteristics of 62 pediatric patients with t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214-rearranged myeloid leukemia; 54 diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia, representing <1% of all childhood acute myeloid leukemia, and eight as having myelodysplastic syndrome. The t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214 was associated with relatively late onset (median age 10.4 years), male predominance (sex ratio 1.7), French-American-British M2 classification (54%), myelodysplasia (100%), and FLT3-ITD (42%). Outcome was substantially better than previously reported with a 5-year event-free survival of 32%, 5-year overall survival of 53%, and a 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 57%. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission improved the 5-year event-free survival compared with chemotherapy alone (68% versus 18%; P<0.01) but not the overall survival (68% versus 54%; P=0.48). The presence of FLT3-ITD had a non-significant negative effect on 5-year overall survival compared with non-mutated cases (22% versus 62%; P=0.13). Gene expression profiling showed a unique signature characterized by significantly higher expression of EYA3, SESN1, PRDM2/RIZ, and HIST2H4 genes. In conclusion, t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214 represents a unique subtype of acute myeloid leukemia with a high risk of relapse, high frequency of FLT3-ITD, and a specific gene expression signature. PMID:24441146

  18. Comparison of facial features of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) due to deletion 10p13-10pter with DGS due to 22q11 deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodship, J.; Lynch, S.; Brown, J.

    1994-09-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a congenital anomaly consisting of cardiac defects, aplasia or hypoplasia of the thymus and parathroid glands, and dysmorphic facial features. The majority of DGS cases have a submicroscopic deletion within chromosome 22q11. However there have been a number of reports of DGS in association with other chromosomal abnormalities including four cases with chromosome 10p deletions. We describe a further 10p deletion case and suggest that the facial features in children with DGS due to deletions of 10p are different from those associated with chromosome 22 deletions. The propositus was born at 39 weeks gestation to unrelated caucasian parents, birth weight 2580g (10th centile) and was noted to be dysmorphic and cyanosed shortly after birth. The main dysmorphic facial features were a broad nasal bridge with very short palpebral fissures. Echocardiography revealed a large subsortic VSD and overriding aorta. She had a low ionised calcium and low parathroid hormone level. T cell subsets and PHA response were normal. Abdominal ultrasound showed duplex kidneys and on further investigation she was found to have reflux and raised plasma creatinine. She had an anteriorly placed anus. Her karyotype was 46,XX,-10,+der(10)t(3;10)(p23;p13)mat. The dysmorphic facial features in this baby are strikingly similar to those noted by Bridgeman and Butler in child with DGS as the result of a 10p deletion and distinct from the face seen in children with DiGeorge syndrome resulting from interstitial chromosome 22 deletions.

  19. Two Functional Copies of the DGCR6 Gene Are Present on Human Chromosome 22q11 Due to a Duplication of an Ancestral Locus

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Lisa; Stankiewicz, Pavel; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Pandita, Raj K.; Shaffer, Lisa; Lupski, James; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2001-01-01

    The DGCR6 (DiGeorge critical region) gene encodes a putative protein with sequence similarity to gonadal (gdl), a Drosophila melanogaster gene of unknown function. We mapped the DGCR6 gene to chromosome 22q11 within a low copy repeat, termed sc11.1a, and identified a second copy of the gene, DGCR6L, within the duplicate locus, termed sc11.1b. Both sc11.1 repeats are deleted in most persons with velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), and they map immediately adjacent and internal to the low copy repeats, termed LCR22, that mediate the deletions associated with VCFS/DGS. We sequenced genomic clones from both loci and determined that the putative initiator methionine is located further upstream than originally described, but in a position similar to the mouse and chicken orthologs. DGCR6L encodes a highly homologous, functional copy of DGCR6, with some base changes rendering amino acid differences. Expression studies of the two genes indicate that both genes are widely expressed in fetal and adult tissues. Evolutionary studies using FISH mapping in several different species of ape combined with sequence analysis of DGCR6 in a number of different primate species indicate that the duplication is at least 12 million years old and may date back to before the divergence of Catarrhines from Platyrrhines, 35 mya. These data suggest that there has been selective evolutionary pressure toward the functional maintenance of both paralogs. Interestingly, a full-length HERV-K provirus integrated into the sc11.1a locus after the divergence of chimpanzees and humans. PMID:11157784

  20. HUNTing the Overlap

    SciTech Connect

    Iancu, Costin; Parry, Husbands; Hargrove, Paul

    2005-07-08

    Hiding communication latency is an important optimization for parallel programs. Programmers or compilers achieve this by using non-blocking communication primitives and overlapping communication with computation or other communication operations. Using non-blocking communication raises two issues: performance and programmability. In terms of performance, optimizers need to find a good communication schedule and are sometimes constrained by lack of full application knowledge. In terms of programmability, efficiently managing non-blocking communication can prove cumbersome for complex applications. In this paper we present the design principles of HUNT, a runtime system designed to search and exploit some of the available overlap present at execution time in UPC programs. Using virtual memory support, our runtime implements demand-driven synchronization for data involved in communication operations. It also employs message decomposition and scheduling heuristics to transparently improve the non-blocking behavior of applications. We provide a user level implementation of HUNT on a variety of modern high performance computing systems. Results indicate that our approach is successful in finding some of the overlap available at execution time. While system and application characteristics influence performance, perhaps the determining factor is the time taken by the CPU to execute a signal handler. Demand driven synchronization at execution time eliminates the need for the explicit management of non-blocking communication. Besides increasing programmer productivity, this feature also simplifies compiler analysis for communication optimizations.

  1. A Novel Four-Way Complex Variant Translocation Involving Chromosome 46,XY,t(4;9;19;22)(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2) in a Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patient

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Muhammad; Jamal, Mohammad Sarwar; Khan, Abdul Rehman; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Hussain, Abrar; Choudhry, Hani; Malik, Arif; Khan, Shahida Aziz; Mahmoud, Maged Mostafa; Ali, Ashraf; Iram, Saima; Kamran, Kashif; Iqbal, Asim; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome (9;22)(q34;q11) is well established in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, and the remaining 5–8% of CML patients show variant and complex translocations, with the involvement of third, fourth, or fifth chromosome other than 9;22. However, in very rare cases, the fourth chromosome is involved. Here, we found a novel case of four-way Ph+ chromosome translocation involving 46,XY,t(4;9;19;22)(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2) with CML in the chronic phase. Complete blood cell count of the CML patient was carried out to obtain total leukocytes count, hemoglobin, and platelets. Fluorescence in situ hybridization technique was used for the identification of BCR–ABL fusion gene, and cytogenetic test for the confirmation of Ph (9;22)(q34;q11) and the mechanism of variant translocation in the bone marrow. The patient is successfully treated with a dose of 400 mg/day imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). We observed a significant decrease in white blood cell count of 11.7 × 109/L after 48-month follow-up. Patient started feeling better generally. There was a reduction in the swelling of the body, fatigue, and anxiety. PMID:27303656

  2. A Novel Four-Way Complex Variant Translocation Involving Chromosome 46,XY,t(4;9;19;22)(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2) in a Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patient.

    PubMed

    Asif, Muhammad; Jamal, Mohammad Sarwar; Khan, Abdul Rehman; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Hussain, Abrar; Choudhry, Hani; Malik, Arif; Khan, Shahida Aziz; Mahmoud, Maged Mostafa; Ali, Ashraf; Iram, Saima; Kamran, Kashif; Iqbal, Asim; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome (9;22)(q34;q11) is well established in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, and the remaining 5-8% of CML patients show variant and complex translocations, with the involvement of third, fourth, or fifth chromosome other than 9;22. However, in very rare cases, the fourth chromosome is involved. Here, we found a novel case of four-way Ph+ chromosome translocation involving 46,XY,t(4;9;19;22)(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2) with CML in the chronic phase. Complete blood cell count of the CML patient was carried out to obtain total leukocytes count, hemoglobin, and platelets. Fluorescence in situ hybridization technique was used for the identification of BCR-ABL fusion gene, and cytogenetic test for the confirmation of Ph (9;22)(q34;q11) and the mechanism of variant translocation in the bone marrow. The patient is successfully treated with a dose of 400 mg/day imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). We observed a significant decrease in white blood cell count of 11.7 × 10(9)/L after 48-month follow-up. Patient started feeling better generally. There was a reduction in the swelling of the body, fatigue, and anxiety. PMID:27303656

  3. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  4. Arsia Mons Overlapping Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image shows overlapping flows with different suface textures. In the middle of the image there is a round, darker feature -- a small volcano. To the left of the volcano a graben cuts across the lava flows.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -18.5, Longitude 244.5 East (115.5 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome: overlapping clinical and biochemical phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Greenhaw, G A; Hebert, A; Duke-Woodside, M E; Butler, I J; Hecht, J T; Cleaver, J E; Thomas, G H; Horton, W A

    1992-01-01

    Two siblings are described whose clinical presentation of cutaneous photosensitivity and central nervous system dysfunction is strongly reminiscent of the DeSanctis-Cacchione syndrome (DCS) variant of xeroderma pigmentosum. An extensive clinical evaluation supported a diagnosis of DCS and documented previously unreported findings. In vitro fibroblast studies showed UV sensitivity that was two to three times that of normal controls. However, neither a post-UV-irradiation DNA excision-repair defect indicative of XP nor a semiconservative DNA replication defect indicative of XP variant was found. Rather, a failure of RNA synthesis to recover to normal levels after UV exposure was observed, a biochemical abnormality seen in Cockayne syndrome (CS), one of the premature-aging syndromes with clinical UV sensitivity. These patients, therefore, clinically have XP, but their biochemical characteristics suggest CS. The reason(s) for the severe neurologic disease, in light of the relatively mild cutaneous abnormalities, is unclear. Other cases with unusual fibroblast responses to irradiation have been noted in the literature and, along with the data from our patients, reinforce the notion of the complexity of DNA maintenance and repair. Images Figure 1 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1372469

  6. Syndromes microdélétionnels (syndrome de Williams et syndrome de la délétion 22q11) au CHU Hassan II de Fès: à propos de 3 observations

    PubMed Central

    Ouldim, Karim; Bouguenouch, Laila; Samri, Imane; El Otmani, Ihsan; Hamdaoui, Hasna; Bennis, Sanae; Lakhdar, Mounia Idrissi; Chaouki, Sana; Atmani, Samir; Hida, Moustapha

    2012-01-01

    Les syndromes microdélétionnels sont définis par la présence d’une anomalie chromosomique de taille mineure (inférieure à 5 mégabases) ou aneusomie segmentaire, décelable par cytogénétique moléculaire (FISH : Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization). Les syndromes microdélétionnels représentent des syndromes cliniques avec des phénotypes suffisamment caractéristiques pour être reconnus cliniquement. Actuellement la FISH est la technique de choix pour rechercher ces syndromes. Plusieurs syndromes microdélétionnels peuvent être confirmés aisément, les plus recherchés sont Le syndrome de Williams (microdélétion en 7q11.23) et le syndrome de la délétion 22q11 (microdélétion en 22q11.2). Le syndrome de Williams est caractérisé par une anomalie du développement qui associe un retard psycho-moteur, une dysmorphie du visage évocatrice et un profil cognitif et comportemental spécifique, une sténose aortique supravalvulaire -SASV- le plus souvent. Le Syndrome de la délétion 22q11 se caractérise par l’association de plusieurs malformations d’expression variable: une cardiopathie congénitale de type conotroncal, une dysmorphie faciale discrète mais caractéristique et une hypoplasie du thymus et des parathyroïdes. Nous rapportons nos premières observations au CHU Hassan II confirmées par FISH : Syndrome de la délétion 22q11 (n:2) et un syndrome de Williams. Le but de cet article est la mise à jour de nos connaissances sur ces deux syndromes et la mise en valeur du rôle de la cytogénétique moléculaire dans le diagnostic et le conseil génétique des syndromes microdélétionnels. PMID:22368746

  7. Inheritance of balanced translocation t(17; 22) from a Down syndrome mother to a phenotypically normal daughter.

    PubMed

    Liu, X Y; Jiang, Y T; Wang, R X; Luo, L L; Liu, Y H; Liu, R Z

    2015-01-01

    We report that a 30-year-old woman with mental retardation was referred for prenatal diagnoses during pregnancy. An ultrasound scan showed that the heart structure and function of the fetus were normal. Cytogenetic analysis showed that the female karyotype was 47,XX, t(17; 22) (q21; q11), +21. The woman's husband had a normal male karyotype and was phenotypically normal. During this first pregnancy, an amniocentesis, which was done at 19 weeks, revealed that the fetal karyotype was 46,XX, t(17; 22) (q21; q11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization testing of amniotic fluid gave a normal result for chromosome 21. The child was a phenotypically normal female baby. PMID:26345964

  8. Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrokni, Vahab; Andersen, Reid; Gleich, David F.

    2010-11-01

    Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

  9. FISH diagnosis of partial trisomy 13 and tetrasomy 13 in a patient with severe trigonocephaly (C) phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.W.; Teebi, A.S.; Gibson, L.; Breg, W.R.; Yang-Feng, T.L.

    1994-08-01

    An infant girl with manifestations resembling Opitz trigonocephaly (C) syndrome who died at age 6 days was found to have a complex chromosome abnormality with t(13;18)(q22;q23) and a recombinant chromosome 13 involving duplicated segments of 13q. Precise characterization was possible with the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using chromosome specific probes. The patient`s phenotype is compared to that of other syndromes involving trigonocephaly. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Molecular cytogenetic findings in a three-way novel variant of t(1;8;21)(p35;q22;q22): a unique relocation of the AML1/ETO fusion gene 1p35 in AML-M2.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Firoz; Kokate, Prajakta; Chheda, Pratiksha; Dalvi, Rupa; Das, Bibhu Ranjan; Mandava, Swarna

    2008-01-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a malignant neoplasm of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by an abnormal proliferation of myeloid precursors, a reduced rate of apoptosis, and an arrest in cellular differentiation. The present report deals with the results of hematologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and molecular analyses of a 53-year-old female patient diagnosed with AML-M2. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis revealed a complex translocation involving three chromosomes showing t(1;8;21)(p35;q22;q22). The observation of breakpoints at 8q22 and 21q22 suggests a rearrangement of the ETO and AML1 genes, respectively. Using a dual-color FISH test with ETO and AML1 probes, an AML1/ETO fusion signal on the derivative 1p35 instead of der(8) was demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about the relocation of the AML1/ETO fusion gene to the 1p35 rather than der(8), suggesting the presence of a novel variant of t(8;21)(q22;q22) in the observed patient. PMID:18206543

  11. On the Neuberger overlap operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriçi, Artan

    1999-04-01

    We compute Neuberger's overlap operator by the Lanczos algorithm applied to the Wilson-Dirac operator. Locality of the operator for quenched QCD data and its eigenvalue spectrum in an instanton background are studied.

  12. Parkinsonism and frontotemporal dementia: the clinical overlap.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; Litvan, Irene

    2011-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is commonly associated with parkinsonism in several sporadic (i.e., progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration) and familial neurodegenerative disorders (i.e., frontotemporal dementia associated with parkinsonism and MAPT or progranulin mutations in chromosome 17). The clinical diagnosis of these disorders may be challenging in view of overlapping clinical features, particularly in speech, language, and behavior. The motor and cognitive phenotypes can be viewed within a spectrum of clinical, pathologic, and genetic disorders with no discrete clinicopathologic correlations but rather lying within a dementia-parkinsonism continuum. Neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis can be helpful, but the poor specificity of clinical and imaging features has enormously challenged the development of biological markers that could differentiate these disorders premortem. This gap is critical to bridge in order to allow testing of novel biological therapies that may slow the progression of these proteinopathies. PMID:21892619

  13. Behavioral and Neuroanatomical Phenotypes in Mouse Models of Autism.

    PubMed

    Ellegood, Jacob; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2015-07-01

    In order to understand the consequences of the mutation on behavioral and biological phenotypes relevant to autism, mutations in many of the risk genes for autism spectrum disorder have been experimentally generated in mice. Here, we summarize behavioral outcomes and neuroanatomical abnormalities, with a focus on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of postmortem mouse brains. Results are described from multiple mouse models of autism spectrum disorder and comorbid syndromes, including the 15q11-13, 16p11.2, 22q11.2, Cntnap2, Engrailed2, Fragile X, Integrinβ3, MET, Neurexin1a, Neuroligin3, Reelin, Rett, Shank3, Slc6a4, tuberous sclerosis, and Williams syndrome models, and inbred strains with strong autism-relevant behavioral phenotypes, including BTBR and BALB. Concomitant behavioral and neuroanatomical abnormalities can strengthen the interpretation of results from a mouse model, and may elevate the usefulness of the model system for therapeutic discovery. PMID:26036957

  14. A patient presenting a 22q13 deletion associated with an apparently balanced translocation t(16;22): An illustrative case in the investigation of patients with low ARSA activity

    PubMed Central

    Artigalás, Osvaldo; Paskulin, Giorgio; Riegel, Mariluce; Burin, Maira; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Maluf, Sharbel; Kiss, Andrea; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa D.

    2012-01-01

    A 10-year-old speechless, mentally deficient male, with low arylsulfatase A (ARSA) activity, and presumably, methachromatic leukodystrophy, underwent genetic evaluation. As the clinical picture was not compatible with this diagnosisan ARSA gene and chromosome analysis were performed, showing the presence of a pseudodeficiency ARSA allele and a de novo apparently balanced t(16;22)(p11.2;q13) translocation. A deletion on the long arm of chromosome 22 encompassing the ARSA gene, as shown by FISH and array-CGH, indicated a 22q13 deletion syndrome. This case illustrates the importance of detailed cytogenetic investigation in patients presenting low arylsulfatase A activity and atypical/unspecific clinical features. PMID:22888290

  15. Seeding for pervasively overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Conrad; Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    2011-06-01

    In some social and biological networks, the majority of nodes belong to multiple communities. It has recently been shown that a number of the algorithms specifically designed to detect overlapping communities do not perform well in such highly overlapping settings. Here, we consider one class of these algorithms, those which optimize a local fitness measure, typically by using a greedy heuristic to expand a seed into a community. We perform synthetic benchmarks which indicate that an appropriate seeding strategy becomes more important as the extent of community overlap increases. We find that distinct cliques provide the best seeds. We find further support for this seeding strategy with benchmarks on a Facebook network and the yeast interactome.

  16. A rare case of a three way complex variant positive Philadelphia translocation involving chromosome (9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11) in chronic myeloid leukemia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Abrar; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation is present in 90–95% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Variant complex translocations have been observed in 5–8% of CML patients, in which a third chromosome other than (9;22) is involved. Imatinib mesylate is the first line breakpoint cluster region-Abelson gene (BCR/ABL)-targeted oral therapy for CML, and may produce a complete response in 70–80% of CML patients in the chronic phase. In the present study, a bone marrow sample was used for conventional cytogenetic analysis, and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test was used for BCR/ABL gene detection. A hematological analysis was also performed to determine the white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin levels, packed and mean cell volumes, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and platelet values of the patient. The hematological analysis of the patient indicated the increased WBC of 186.5×103 cells/µl, and decreased hemoglobin levels of 11.1 g/dl. The FISH test revealed that 67% cells demonstrated BCR/ABL gene translocation. The patient was treated with 400 mg imatinib mesylate daily, and was monitored at various intervals over a 6-month period. The present study reports the rare case of a patient that demonstrates a three-way Philadelphia chromosome-positive translocation involving 46XY,t(9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11)[10], alongside CML in the chronic phase. The translocation was analyzed using cytogenetic and FISH tests. PMID:27602125

  17. Effect of chromosome constitution variations on the expression of Turner phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bispo, A V S; Dos Santos, L O; Burégio-Frota, P; Galdino, M B; Duarte, A R; Leal, G F; Araújo, J; Gomes, B; Soares-Ventura, E M; Muniz, M T C; Santos, N

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chronic disease related to haploinsufficiency of genes that are normally expressed in both X chromosomes in patients with female phenotype that is associated with a wide range of somatic malformations. We made detailed cytogenetic and clinical analysis of 65 patients with TS from the region of Recife, Brazil, to determine the effects of different chromosome constitutions on expression of the TS phenotype. Overall, patients with X-monosomy exhibited a tendency to have more severe phenotypes with higher morbidity, showing its importance in TS prognosis. Additionally, we found rare genetic and phenotypic abnormalities associated with this syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of 45,X,t(11;12)(q22;q22) described as a TS karyotype. Turner patients usually have normal intelligence; however, moderate to severe levels of mental retardation were found in 5 TS cases, which is considerate a very uncommon feature in this syndrome. PMID:23546984

  18. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  19. Intrafamilial and interfamilial variability of phenotype in familial velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hajianpour, M.J.; Covle, M.

    1994-09-01

    Two half-sisters and their mother from one family, and two full-brothers and their mother from another family presented with features of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCSF)/DiGeorge syndrome (DS) with intrafamilial and interfamilial variability of phenotypic expression. None of these patients had an apparent cleft palate. Cardiac anomaly, jejunal atresia and hypocalcemia were present only in the newborn patient. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for VCFS/DS with probe D22S75 showed a deletion in the 22q11.2 region in patients available for the study.

  20. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  1. Age-Dependent Specific Changes in Area CA2 of the Hippocampus and Social Memory Deficit in a Mouse Model of the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Piskorowski, Rebecca A; Nasrallah, Kaoutsar; Diamantopoulou, Anastasia; Mukai, Jun; Hassan, Sami I; Siegelbaum, Steven A; Gogos, Joseph A; Chevaleyre, Vivien

    2016-01-01

    Several neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with cognitive and social dysfunction. Postmortem studies of patients with schizophrenia have revealed specific changes in area CA2, a long-overlooked region of the hippocampus recently found to be critical for social memory formation. To examine how area CA2 is altered in psychiatric illness, we used the Df(16)A(+/-) mouse model of the 22q11.2 microdeletion, a genetic risk factor for developing several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report several age-dependent CA2 alterations: a decrease in the density of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, a reduction in the amount of feedforward inhibition, and a change in CA2 pyramidal-neuron intrinsic properties. Furthermore, we found that area CA2 is less plastic in Df(16)A(+/-) mice, making it nearly impossible to evoke action potential firing in CA2 pyramidal neurons. Finally, we show that Df(16)A(+/-) mice display impaired social cognition, providing a potential mechanism and a neural substrate for this impairment in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26748091

  2. Item Overlap Correlations: Definitions, Interpretations, and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Louis M.

    1994-01-01

    Item overlap coefficient (IOC) formulas are discussed, providing six warnings about their calculation and interpretation and some explanations of why item overlap influences the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory factor structures. (SLD)

  3. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... overlap does not already exists, if: (1) The total area of overlap with that station would not be... modified NCE-FM station other than a Class D (secondary) station will not be accepted if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by...

  4. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... overlap does not already exists, if: (1) The total area of overlap with that station would not be... modified NCE-FM station other than a Class D (secondary) station will not be accepted if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by...

  5. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... overlap does not already exists, if: (1) The total area of overlap with that station would not be... modified NCE-FM station other than a Class D (secondary) station will not be accepted if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by...

  6. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... overlap does not already exists, if: (1) The total area of overlap with that station would not be... modified NCE-FM station other than a Class D (secondary) station will not be accepted if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by...

  7. Hemodynamics in coronary arteries with overlapping stents.

    PubMed

    Rikhtegar, Farhad; Wyss, Christophe; Stok, Kathryn S; Poulikakos, Dimos; Müller, Ralph; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-22

    Coronary artery stenosis is commonly treated by stent placement via percutaneous intervention, at times requiring multiple stents that may overlap. Stent overlap is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcome. While changes in local blood flow are suspected to play a role therein, hemodynamics in arteries with overlapping stents remain poorly understood. In this study we analyzed six cases of partially overlapping stents, placed ex vivo in porcine left coronary arteries and compared them to five cases with two non-overlapping stents. The stented vessel geometries were obtained by micro-computed tomography of corrosion casts. Flow and shear stress distribution were calculated using computational fluid dynamics. We observed a significant increase in the relative area exposed to low wall shear stress (WSS<0.5 Pa) in the overlapping stent segments compared both to areas without overlap in the same samples, as well as to non-overlapping stents. We further observed that the configuration of the overlapping stent struts relative to each other influenced the size of the low WSS area: positioning of the struts in the same axial location led to larger areas of low WSS compared to alternating struts. Our results indicate that the overlap geometry is by itself sufficient to cause unfavorable flow conditions that may worsen clinical outcome. While stent overlap cannot always be avoided, improved deployment strategies or stent designs could reduce the low WSS burden. PMID:24275438

  8. Structure of the human gene encoding sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBF1) and localization of SREBF1 and SREBF2 to chromosomes 17p11.2 and 22q13

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, X.; Wu, J.; Goldstein, J.L.

    1995-02-10

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP1) and SREBP2 are structurally related proteins that control cholesterol homeostasis by stimulating transcription of sterol-regulated genes, including those encoding the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase. SREBP1 and SREBP2 are 47% identical, and they share a novel structure comprising a transcriptionally active NH{sub 2}-terminal basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) domain followed by a membrane attachment domain. Cleavage by a sterol-regulated protease frees the bHLH-Zip domain from the membrane and allows it to enter the nucleus. SREBP1 exists in several forms, possibly as a result of alternative splicing at both the 5{prime} and the 3{prime} ends of the mRNA. The genes for SREBP1 (SREBF1) and SREBP2 (SREBF2) have not been studied. In this paper we describe the cloning and characterization of the human SREBF1 gene. The gene is 26 kb in length and has 22 exons and 20 introns. The 5{prime} and 3{prime} sequences that differ between the two SREBP1 cDNAs are encoded by discrete exons, conforming the hypothesis that they result from alternative splicing. The chromosomal locations of human SREBF1 and SREBF2 were determined by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The SREBF1 gene mapped to the proximal short arm of chromosome 17 (17p11.2), and the SREBF2 gene was localized to the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q13). 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Bis(cyclopentadienyl)yttrium Complexes of the Ligand [N(QPPh(2))(2)](-) (Q = S, Se): Synthesis, Structure, and NMR Properties of Cp(2)Y[eta(3)-N(QPPh(2))(2)].

    PubMed

    Pernin, Christopher G.; Ibers, James A.

    1999-11-29

    The compounds Cp(2)Y[eta(3)-N(QPPh(2))(2)] (Q = S (1), Se (2)) have been synthesized in good yield from the protonolysis reaction between Cp(3)Y and HN(QPPh(2))(2) in tetrahydrofuran. In both compounds, the [N(QPPh(2))(2)](-) ligand is bound eta(3) to the Y center which, in 1, represents the first example of that mode of binding for the sulfur-containing ligand. The Y atom is also coordinated to two (C(5)H(5))(-) ligands and so is formally 9-coordinate. Both 1 and 2 are stable in inert environments for prolonged periods of time. Each is soluble in THF and CH(2)Cl(2). (1)H, (31)P, (77)Se, and (89)Y NMR data were collected to lend insight into the solution properties of these molecules. Crystallographic data for 1 (-120 degrees C): C(34)H(30)NP(2)S(2)Y, triclinic, P&onemacr;, a = 9.685(5) Å, b = 12.176(6) Å, c = 13.978(7) Å, alpha = 87.382(9) degrees, beta = 87.358(9) degrees, gamma = 68.689(9) degrees, V = 1533(1) Å(3), Z = 2, and R(1)(F) = 0.047 for the 4023 reflections with I > 2sigma(I). Crystallographic data for 2 (-120 degrees C): C(34)H(30)NP(2)Se(2)Y, triclinic, P&onemacr;, a = 9.745(5) Å, b = 12.222(6) Å, c = 13.930(7) Å, alpha = 88.024(9) degrees, beta = 87.380(9) degrees, gamma = 69.137(9) degrees, V = 1548(1) Å(3), Z = 2, and R(1)(F) = 0.056 for the 4324 reflections with I > 2sigma(I). PMID:11671274

  10. Overlapping Structures in Sensory-Motor Mappings

    PubMed Central

    Earland, Kevin; Lee, Mark; Shaw, Patricia; Law, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a biologically-inspired representation technique designed for the support of sensory-motor learning in developmental robotics. An interesting feature of the many topographic neural sheets in the brain is that closely packed receptive fields must overlap in order to fully cover a spatial region. This raises interesting scientific questions with engineering implications: e.g. is overlap detrimental? does it have any benefits? This paper examines the effects and properties of overlap between elements arranged in arrays or maps. In particular we investigate how overlap affects the representation and transmission of spatial location information on and between topographic maps. Through a series of experiments we determine the conditions under which overlap offers advantages and identify useful ranges of overlap for building mappings in cognitive robotic systems. Our motivation is to understand the phenomena of overlap in order to provide guidance for application in sensory-motor learning robots. PMID:24392118

  11. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  12. Evidence for Overlapping Genetic Influences on Autistic and ADHD Behaviours in a Community Twin Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Angelica; Simonoff, Emily; Kuntsi, Jonna; Asherson, Philip; Plomin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Background: High levels of clinical comorbidity have been reported between autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study takes an individual differences approach to determine the degree of phenotypic and aetiological overlap between autistic traits and ADHD behaviours in the general population.…

  13. Overlap in Facebook Profiles Reflects Relationship Closeness.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Araceli M; Wendel, Markie L; Crockett, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the association between self-reported Inclusion of Other in the Self (IOS) and Facebook overlap. Ninety-two participants completed online measures of IOS and investment model constructs. Researchers then recorded Facebook data from participants' profile pages. Results from multilevel models revealed that IOS predicted Facebook overlap. Furthermore, Facebook overlap was associated with commitment and investment in ways comparable to self-reported IOS. These findings suggest that overlap in Facebook profiles can be used to measure relationship closeness. PMID:25635533

  14. Finding Genetic Overlaps Among Diseases Based on Ranked Gene Lists

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Quan; Zhou, Xianghong J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To understand disease relationships in terms of their genetic mechanisms, it is important to study the common genetic basis among different diseases. Although discoveries on pleiotropic genes related to multiple diseases abound, methods flexibly applicable to various types of datasets generated from different studies or experiments are needed to gain big pictures on the genetic relationships among a large number of diseases. We develop a set of genetic similarity measures to gauge the genetic overlap between diseases, as well as several estimators of the number of overlapping disease genes between diseases. These methods are based on ranked gene lists so that they could be flexibly applied to different types of data. We first investigate the performance of the genetic similarity measure for evaluating the similarity between human diseases in simulation studies. Then we apply the method to diseases in the OMIM database. We show that our proposed genetic measure achieves superior performance in explaining phenotype similarities between diseases compared to simpler methods. Furthermore, we identified common genes underlying the genetic overlap between disease pairs. With an example of five vision-related diseases, we demonstrate how our methods can provide insights into the relationships among diseases based on their shared genetic mechanisms. PMID:25684200

  15. Molecular cytogenetic investigations in a novel complex variant of t(8;21)(q22;q22) with ins(15;21)(q15;q22.2q22.3) in a patient with AML-M2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Kokate, Prajakta; Ahmad, Firoz; Dalvi, Rupa; Das, Bibhu Ranjan; Mandava, Swarna

    2008-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous disease characterized by the aberrant proliferation of myeloid stem cells, reduced apoptosis and blockage in cellular differentiation. The present report describes the results of hematological, cytogenetic, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis in a 25-year-old man diagnosed with AML-M2. Cytogenetic as well as FISH analysis revealed a complex translocation involving four chromosomes, with the karyotype 45,-Y,der(X)t(X;8)(p21;q22),der(8)t(8;21)(q22;q22),ins(15;21)(q15;q22.2q22.3),der(21)t(8;21)(q22;q22). The breakpoints at 8q22 and 21q22 suggested a rearrangement of the RUNX1T1 (alias ETO) and RUNX1 (previously AML1) genes, respectively. Using a dual-color FISH test with RUNX1T1 and RUNX1 probes, we demonstrated an RUNX1/RUNX1T1 fusion signal on the derivative chromosome 8, establishing this translocation as a novel complex variant of t(8;21)(q22;q22). PMID:18558290

  16. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibited overlap. 73.509 Section 73.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.509 Prohibited overlap. (a) An application for a new or modified NCE-FM station...

  17. Physical findings in 21q22 deletion suggest critical region for 21q - phenotype in q22

    SciTech Connect

    Thedoropoulos, D.S.; Cowan, J.M.; Elias, E.R.; Cole, C.

    1995-11-06

    Multiple abnormalities were observed in a newborn infant with a deletion in the long arm of chromosome 21, from band 22q22.1{yields}qter. The phenotype of this infant was similar to that previously described in infants with deletions spanning the long arm of chromosome 21, from the centromere to 21q22. However, as a phenotypically normal child with normal intelligence and with deletion of 21q11.1-21q21.3 has also been identified, this case suggests that the critical region of deletion for the 21q - phenotype lies distal to 21q21, within 21q22.1-22.2. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Restoration and reconstruction from overlapping images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Kaiser, Daniel J.; Hanson, Andrew L.; Li, Jing

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for restoring and reconstructing a scene from overlapping images. In situations where there are multiple, overlapping images of the same scene, it may be desirable to create a single image that most closely approximates the scene, based on all of the data in the available images. For example, successive swaths acquired by NASA's planned Moderate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) will overlap, particularly at wide scan angles, creating a severe visual artifact in the output image. Resampling the overlapping swaths to produce a more accurate image on a uniform grid requires restoration and reconstruction. The one-pass restoration and reconstruction technique developed in this paper yields mean-square-optimal resampling, based on a comprehensive end-to-end system model that accounts for image overlap, and subject to user-defined and data-availability constraints on the spatial support of the filter.

  19. Neural overlap in processing music and speech

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing. PMID:25646513

  20. Neural overlap in processing music and speech.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L

    2015-03-19

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing. PMID:25646513

  1. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2016-05-01

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naively expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity.

  2. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-05-10

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new (to our knowledge) low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naïvely expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity. PMID:27166811

  3. Correlated edge overlaps in multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gareth J; Bianconi, Ginestra; da Costa, Rui A; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N; Mendes, José F F

    2016-07-01

    We develop the theory of sparse multiplex networks with partially overlapping links based on their local treelikeness. This theory enables us to find the giant mutually connected component in a two-layer multiplex network with arbitrary correlations between connections of different types. We find that correlations between the overlapping and nonoverlapping links markedly change the phase diagram of the system, leading to multiple hybrid phase transitions. For assortative correlations we observe recurrent hybrid phase transitions. PMID:27575144

  4. Correlated edge overlaps in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Gareth J.; Bianconi, Ginestra; da Costa, Rui A.; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N.; Mendes, José F. F.

    2016-07-01

    We develop the theory of sparse multiplex networks with partially overlapping links based on their local treelikeness. This theory enables us to find the giant mutually connected component in a two-layer multiplex network with arbitrary correlations between connections of different types. We find that correlations between the overlapping and nonoverlapping links markedly change the phase diagram of the system, leading to multiple hybrid phase transitions. For assortative correlations we observe recurrent hybrid phase transitions.

  5. Phenotypic variability in monozygotic twins with neurofibromatosis 2.

    PubMed

    Baser, M E; Ragge, N K; Riccardi, V M; Janus, T; Gantz, B; Pulst, S M

    1996-09-01

    Mutations in the neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22q12 cause a clinically variable autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VSs), other nervous system tumors, and early onset lenticular cataracts. We studied three pairs of monozygotic (MZ) twins with NF2, all with bilateral VSs, to separate genetic from nongenetic causes of clinical variability. The evaluation included gadolinium-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the head and spine, neuro-ophthalmic examination with slit lamp, physical examination, and zygosity testing with microsatellite markers. Each MZ pair was concordant for general phenotypic subtype (mild or severe) and often for the affected organ systems. However, the MZ pairs were discordant for some features of disease presentation or progression. For example, all three pairs were discordant for presence or type of associated cranial tumors. We hypothesize that phenotypic differences between NF2 MZ twins are at least partly due to stochastic processes, such as the loss of the second NF2 allele or alleles of other genes. PMID:8870923

  6. Phenotypic variability in monozygotic twins with neurofibromatosis 2

    SciTech Connect

    Baser, M.E.; Ragge, N.K.; Riccardi, V.M.

    1996-09-06

    Mutations in the neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22q12 cause a clinically variable autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VSs), other nervous system tumors, and early onset lenticular cataracts. We studied three pairs of monozygotic (MZ) twins with NF2, all with bilateral VSs, to separate genetic from nongenetic causes of clinical variability. The evaluation included gadolinium-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the head and spine, neuro-ophthalmic examination with slit lamp, physical examination, and zygosity testing with microsatellite markers. Each MZ pair was concordant for general phenotypic subtype (mild or severe) and often for the affected organ systems. However, the MZ pairs were discordant for some features of disease presentation or progression. For example, all three pairs were discordant for presence or type of associated cranial tumors. We hypothesize that phenotypic differences between NF2 MZ twins are at least partly due to stochastic processes, such as the loss of the second NF2 allele or alleles of other genes. 42 refs., 1 tab.

  7. The overlap between anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Guy M.

    2015-01-01

    The anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder. In addition to the specific symptoms of these disorders, there may be a common experience of anxiety and even dysphoria across the conditions, and of course recourse to the same drug or choice of drugs for treatment. This overlap probably occurs because of universal dimensions of distress or negative affectivity, a shared genetic predisposition, and a common neurobiology Evidence of shared genes is still based mainly on twin studies, but the shared neurobiology can be investigated directly by the investigation of emotional or cognitive bias either behaviorally or using functional brain imaging. This intermediate phenotype can then provide a substrate for understanding and developing medicines and psychological treatments. PMID:26487806

  8. The overlap between anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Guy M

    2015-09-01

    The anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder. In addition to the specific symptoms of these disorders, there may be a common experience of anxiety and even dysphoria across the conditions, and of course recourse to the same drug or choice of drugs for treatment. This overlap probably occurs because of universal dimensions of distress or negative affectivity, a shared genetic predisposition, and a common neurobiology Evidence of shared genes is still based mainly on twin studies, but the shared neurobiology can be investigated directly by the investigation of emotional or cognitive bias either behaviorally or using functional brain imaging. This intermediate phenotype can then provide a substrate for understanding and developing medicines and psychological treatments. PMID:26487806

  9. Clinical, morphologic, and cytogenetic characteristics of patients with lymphoid malignancies characterized by both t(14; 18)(q32; q21) and t(8; 14)(q24; q32) or t(8; 22)(q24; q11)

    SciTech Connect

    Thangavelu, M.; Olopade, O.; Beckman, E.; Vardiman, J.W.; Larson, R.A.; McKeithan, T.W.; Le Beau, M.M.; Rowley, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Six patients with an aggressive leukemia/lymphoma disorder had a t(14;18) as well as either a t(8;14) (three patients) or a t(8;22) (three patients). Leukemia cells from all three patients with the t(8;22) had a mature B cell phenotype (Smlg{sup +} and TdT{sup {minus}}), whereas two of three patients with the t(8;14) had a pre-B phenotype and were Smlg{sup {minus}}. None of the patients with the t(8;22) had a prior history of follicular lymphoma, whereas two of the three patients with the t(8;14) had had a follicular lymphoma. The clinical, cytogenetic, and morphologic characteristics of these six patients along with the eight previously reported cases with both the t(14;18) and the t(8;14), the t(8;22) or the t(2;8) are discussed.

  10. Overlapping MERS and mild AESD caused by HHV-6 infection.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Mari; Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Tanabe, Takuya; Nakahara, Hiroshi; Ohta, Kazumi; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of an overlapping encephalopathy syndrome consisting of clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) and a mild form of acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) caused by human herpesvirus-6. A previously healthy 17-month-old girl was admitted to our hospital as a precaution because of seizures that had developed more than 25 hours (h) after fever. Brain diffusion-weighted images (DWI) showed high signal intensity in the central splenial region on Day 2. She regained consciousness 16 h after the second seizure. On Day 6, she had a secondary cluster of partial seizures. DWI showed resolution of the splenial lesion and revealed reduced diffusion in the fronto-subcortical white matter. She regained consciousness 36 h after the secondary cluster of seizures without any sequelae. A third DWI performed on Day 15 showed that the fronto-subcortical white matter lesions had completely disappeared. Based on the clinicoradiological findings, we diagnosed the patient with overlapping MERS and mild AESD. Our case, together with previous reports, suggests that patients can develop combined encephalopathy syndromes as a phenotype. Many encephalopathy syndromes have been established and classified; however, some may not present as independent syndromes. PMID:24856142

  11. Automatic segmentation of overlapping and touching chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Renli; Yu, Chang

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes a technique to segment overlapping and touching chromosomes of human metaphase cells. Automated chromosome classification has been an important pattern recognition problem for decades, numerous attempts were made in the past to characterize chromosome band patterns. But successful separation between touching and overlapping chromosomes is vital for correct classification. Since chromosomes are non-rigid objects, common methods for separation between touching chromosomes are not usable. We proposed a method using shape concave and convex information, topology analysis information, and band pale paths for segmentation of touching and overlapping chromosomes. To detect shape concave and convex information, we should first pre-segment the chromosomes and get the edge of overlapping and touching chromosomes. After filtering the original image using edge-preserving filter, we adopt the Otsu's segmentation method and extract the boundary of chromosomes. Hence the boundary can be used for segment the overlapping and touching chromosomes by detecting the concave and convex information based on boundary information. Most of the traditional boundary-based algorithms detect corners based on two steps: the first step is to acquire the smoothed version of curvature at every point along the contour, and the second step is to detect the positions where curvature maximal occur and threshold the curvature as corner points. Recently wavelet transform has been adopted into corner detection algorithms. Since the metaphase overlapping chromosomes has multi-scale corners, we adopt a multi-scale corner detection method based on Hua's method for corner detection. For touching chromosomes, it is convenient to split them using pale paths. Starting from concave corner points, a search algorithm is represented. The searching algorithm traces three pixels into the object in the direction of the normal vector in order to avoid stopping at the initial boundary until it

  12. Kindlin-1 and -2 Have Overlapping Functions in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Yinghong; Esser, Philipp; Heinemann, Anja; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Has, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Kindlins are a novel family of intracellular adaptor proteins in integrin-containing focal adhesions. Kindlin-1 and -2 are expressed in the skin, but whether and how they cooperate in adult epithelial cells have remained elusive. We uncovered the overlapping roles of kindlin-1 and -2 in maintaining epithelial integrity and show that the phenotype of kindlin-1-deficient cells can be modulated by regulating kindlin-2 gene expression and vice versa. The experimental evidence is provided by use of human keratinocyte cell lines that express both kindlins, just kindlin-1 or kindlin-2, or none of them. Double deficiency of kindlin-1 and -2 had significant negative effects on focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion, survival, directional migration, and activation of β1 integrin, whereas deficiency of one kindlin only showed variable perturbation of these functions. Cell motility and formation of cell-cell contacts were particularly affected by lack of kindlin-2. These results predict that kindlin-1 and -2 can functionally compensate for each other, at least in part. The high physiologic and pathologic significance of the compensation was emphasized by the discovery of environmental regulation of kindlin-2 expression. UV-B irradiation induced loss of kindlin-2 in keratinocytes. This first example of environmental regulation of kindlin expression has implications for phenotype modulation in Kindler syndrome, a skin disorder caused by kindlin-1 deficiency. PMID:21356350

  13. Detecting overlapping communities in massive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bing-Jie; Shen, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-12-01

    Community detection is an essential work for network analysis. However, few methods could be used as off-the-shelf tools to detect communities in real-world networks for two main reasons: Real networks often contain millions of nodes or even hundreds of millions of nodes while most methods cannot handle networks at this scale. One node often belongs to multiple communities, posing another big challenge. In this paper, we circumvent the tricky problem of detecting overlapping communities using a two-stage framework, balancing efficiency and accuracy. Given a network, we first focus on efficiently finding its coarse-grained communities. Starting from them, we next obtain overlapping communities by optimizing a principled objective function. In this divide-and-conquer way, the framework achieves a much better performance than detecting overlapping communities from scratch. Extensive tests on synthetic and real networks demonstrate that it outperforms state-of-the-art methods in terms of both efficiency and accuracy.

  14. Generating Composite Overlapping Grids on CAD Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W.D.

    2002-02-07

    We describe some algorithms and tools that have been developed to generate composite overlapping grids on geometries that have been defined with computer aided design (CAD) programs. This process consists of five main steps. Starting from a description of the surfaces defining the computational domain we (1) correct errors in the CAD representation, (2) determine topology of the patched-surface, (3) build a global triangulation of the surface, (4) construct structured surface and volume grids using hyperbolic grid generation, and (5) generate the overlapping grid by determining the holes and the interpolation points. The overlapping grid generator which is used for the final step also supports the rapid generation of grids for block-structured adaptive mesh refinement and for moving grids. These algorithms have been implemented as part of the Overture object-oriented framework.

  15. Temporal niche overlap among insectivorous small mammals.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Emerson M; Paise, Gabriela

    2011-12-01

    Being active in the same environment at different times exposes animals to the effects of very different environmental factors, both biotic and abiotic. In the present study, we used live traps equipped with timing devices to evaluate the potential role of biotic factors (competition and food abundance) on overall overlap in the temporal niche axis of 4 insectivorous small mammals in high-elevation grassland fields ('campos de altitude') of southern Brazil. Based on resources availability (invertebrates), data on animal captures were pooled in 2 seasons: 'scarcity' (June 2001-September 2001) and 'abundance' (November 2001-May 2002) seasons. We tested for non-random structure in temporal niche overlap among the species in each season. These species were the rodents Oxymycterus nasutus (Waterhouse, 1837), Deltamys sp., Akodon azarae (Fischer, 1829), and the marsupial Monodelphis brevicaudis Olfers, 1818. The studied community was mainly diurnal with crepuscular peaks. Simulations using the Pianka index of niche overlap indicated that the empirical assemblage-wide overlap was not significantly different from randomly generated patterns in the abundance season but significantly greater than expected by chance alone in the scarcity season. All the species showed an increase in temporal niche breadth during the abundance season, which appears to be related to longer daylength and high nocturnal temperatures. Patterns on both temporal niche overlap and temporal niche breadth were the opposite to those that we were expecting in the case of diel activity patterns determined by competition for dietary resources. Therefore, we conclude that competition did not seem to be preponderant for determining patterns of temporal niche overlap by the studied community. PMID:22182329

  16. Sub-Plate Overlap Code Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.; Bucciarelli, B.; Zarate, N.

    1997-01-01

    An expansion of the plate overlap method of astrometric data reduction to a single plate has been proposed and successfully tested. Each plate is (artificially) divided into sub-plates which can then be overlapped. This reduces the area of a 'plate' over which a plate model needs to accurately represent the relationship between measured coordinates and standard coordinates. Application is made to non-astrographic plates such as Schmidt plates and to wide-field astrographic plates. Indeed, the method is completely general and can be applied to any type of recording media.

  17. Dynamics of overlapping structures in modular networks.

    PubMed

    Almendral, J A; Leyva, I; Li, D; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Havlin, S; Boccaletti, S

    2010-07-01

    Modularity is a fundamental feature of real networks, being intimately bounded to their functionality, i.e., to their capability of performing parallel tasks in a coordinated way. Although the modular structure of real graphs has been intensively studied, very little is known on the interactions between functional modules of a graph. Here, we present a general method based on synchronization of networking oscillators, that is able to detect overlapping structures in multimodular environments. We furthermore report the full analytical and theoretical description on the relationship between the overlapping dynamics and the underlying network topology. The method is illustrated by means of a series of applications. PMID:20866697

  18. Genetic Regulation of Phenotypic Plasticity and Canalisation in Yeast Growth.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anupama; Dhole, Kaustubh; Sinha, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a genotype to show diverse phenotypes in different environments is called phenotypic plasticity. Phenotypic plasticity helps populations to evade extinctions in novel environments, facilitates adaptation and fuels evolution. However, most studies focus on understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic regulation in specific environments. As a result, while it's evolutionary relevance is well established, genetic mechanisms regulating phenotypic plasticity and their overlap with the environment specific regulators is not well understood. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly sensitive to the environment, which acts as not just external stimulus but also as signalling cue for this unicellular, sessile organism. We used a previously published dataset of a biparental yeast population grown in 34 diverse environments and mapped genetic loci regulating variation in phenotypic plasticity, plasticity QTL, and compared them with environment-specific QTL. Plasticity QTL is one whose one allele exhibits high plasticity whereas the other shows a relatively canalised behaviour. We mapped phenotypic plasticity using two parameters-environmental variance, an environmental order-independent parameter and reaction norm (slope), an environmental order-dependent parameter. Our results show a partial overlap between pleiotropic QTL and plasticity QTL such that while some plasticity QTL are also pleiotropic, others have a significant effect on phenotypic plasticity without being significant in any environment independently. Furthermore, while some plasticity QTL are revealed only in specific environmental orders, we identify large effect plasticity QTL, which are order-independent such that whatever the order of the environments, one allele is always plastic and the other is canalised. Finally, we show that the environments can be divided into two categories based on the phenotypic diversity of the population within them and the two categories have differential regulators of

  19. Power divergences in overlapping Wilson lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwein, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the divergence structure of Wilson line operators with partially overlapping segments on the basis of the cyclic Wilson loop as an explicit example. The generalized exponentiation theorem is used to show the exponentiation and factorization of power divergences for certain linear combinations of associated loop functions.

  20. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms.

  1. Liberal Education: An Overlapping Pragmatic Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, David C.; Kimball, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests in Bruce Kimball's thesis that a pragmatic consensus was emerging about the understanding of liberal education offers that it might be best understood by comparing it to J. Rawl's idea of an "overlapping consensus." States that by comparing and contrasting these ideas that the emerging consensus is pragmatic in nature. (CMK)

  2. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27066904

  3. Autism and ADHD: Overlapping and Discriminating Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Mayes, Rebecca D.; Molitoris, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Children with ADHD and autism have some similar features, complicating a differential diagnosis. The purpose of our study was to determine the degree to which core ADHD and autistic symptoms overlap in and discriminate between children 2-16 years of age with autism and ADHD. Our study demonstrated that 847 children with autism were easily…

  4. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27066904

  5. Stochastic Cooling with Schottky Band Overlap

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Valeri

    2006-03-20

    Optimal use of stochastic cooling is essential to maximize the antiproton stacking rate for Tevatron Run II. Good understanding and characterization of the cooling is important for the optimization. The paper is devoted to derivation of the Fokker-Plank equations justified in the case of near or full Schottky base overlap for both longitudinal and transverse coolings.

  6. FAB overlapping: a strategy for sequencing homologous proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferranti, P.; Malorni, A.; Marino, G.; Pucci, P.; di Luccia, A.; Ferrara, L.

    1991-12-01

    Extensive similarity has been shown to exist between the primary structures of closely related proteins from different species, the only differences being restricted to a few amino acid variations. A new mass spectrometric procedure, which has been called FAB-overlapping, has been developed for sequencing highly homologous proteins based on the detection of these small differences as compared with a known protein used as a reference. Several complementary peptide maps are constructed using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) analysis of different proteolytic digests of the unknown protein and the mass values are related to those expected on the basis of the sequence of the reference protein. The mass signals exhibiting unusual mass values identify those regions where variations have taken place; fine location of the mutations can be obtained by coupling simple protein chemistry methodologies with FAB-MS. Using the FAB-overlapping procedure, it was possible to determine the sequence of [alpha]1, [alpha]3 and [beta] globins from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis hemoglobins (phenotype AA). Two amino acid substitutions were detected in the buffalo [beta] chain (Lys16 --> His and Asn118 --> His) whereas the [alpha]1 chains were found the [alpha]1 and [alpha]3 chains were found to contain four amino acid replacements, three of which were identical (Glu23 --> Asp, Glu71 --> Gly, Phe117 --> Cys), and the insertion of an alanine residue in position 124. The only differences between [alpha]1 and [alpha]3 globins were identified in the C -terminal region; [alpha]1 contains a Phe residue at position 130 whereas [alpha]3 shows serine at position 132.

  7. The genetic overlap between schizophrenia and height

    PubMed Central

    Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Chen, Xianging; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that height and schizophrenia risk are inversely correlated. These findings might arise because i) height and schizophrenia share genetic variants and ii) the effects of these shared variants are in opposite direction for the two traits. We use genome wide association data to empirically evaluate these hypotheses. We find that variants which impact on height and risk for schizophrenia are distributed across several genomic regions and the directions of effect vary, some consistent and others inconsistent with the direction expected from the phenotypic data. Moreover, signals that were in and not in accord with the phenotypic data aggregated in distinct biological pathways. PMID:24239283

  8. Vacuum structure as seen by overlap fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Koller, K.; Koma, Y.; Schierholz, G.; Streuer, T.; Weinberg, V.

    2007-02-27

    Three complementary views on the QCD vacuum structure, all based on eigenmodes of the overlap operator, are reported in their interrelation: (i) spectral density, localization and chiral properties of the modes, (ii) the possibility of filtering the field strength with the aim to detect selfdual and antiselfdual domains and (iii) the various faces of the topological charge density, with and without a cutoff {lambda}cut = O({lambda}QCD). The techniques are tested on quenched SU(3) configurations.

  9. Function approximation using adaptive and overlapping intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    A problem common to many disciplines is to approximate a function given only the values of the function at various points in input variable space. A method is proposed for approximating a function of several to one variable. The model takes the form of weighted averaging of overlapping basis functions defined over intervals. The number of such basis functions and their parameters (widths and centers) are automatically determined using given training data and a learning algorithm. The proposed algorithm can be seen as placing a nonuniform multidimensional grid in the input domain with overlapping cells. The non-uniformity and overlap of the cells is achieved by a learning algorithm to optimize a given objective function. This approach is motivated by the fuzzy modeling approach and a learning algorithms used for clustering and classification in pattern recognition. The basics of why and how the approach works are given. Few examples of nonlinear regression and classification are modeled. The relationship between the proposed technique, radial basis neural networks, kernel regression, probabilistic neural networks, and fuzzy modeling is explained. Finally advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  10. Burnout-depression overlap: a review.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Renzo; Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Laurent, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Whether burnout is a form of depression or a distinct phenomenon is an object of controversy. The aim of the present article was to provide an up-to-date review of the literature dedicated to the question of burnout-depression overlap. A systematic literature search was carried out in PubMed, PsycINFO, and IngentaConnect. A total of 92 studies were identified as informing the issue of burnout-depression overlap. The current state of the art suggests that the distinction between burnout and depression is conceptually fragile. It is notably unclear how the state of burnout (i.e., the end stage of the burnout process) is conceived to differ from clinical depression. Empirically, evidence for the distinctiveness of the burnout phenomenon has been inconsistent, with the most recent studies casting doubt on that distinctiveness. The absence of consensual diagnostic criteria for burnout and burnout research's insufficient consideration of the heterogeneity of depressive disorders constitute major obstacles to the resolution of the raised issue. In conclusion, the epistemic status of the seminal, field-dominating definition of burnout is questioned. It is suggested that systematic clinical observation should be given a central place in future research on burnout-depression overlap. PMID:25638755

  11. Can Multiple Hereditary Exostoses Overlap With Mesomelic Dysplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ben Ghachem, Maher; Ben Chehida, Farid; Hofstaetter, Jochen G.; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2016-01-01

    Background We studied an unusual combination of severe short stature, mesomelia (Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis syndrome), and multiple exostosis in several family subjects over three generations. The pattern of inheritance was compatible with autosomal dominant. Methods Of 21 affected members over three generations, shortness of stature, associated with mesomelia resembling Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis syndrome with no exostoses was evident in three family subjects. The rest of the family subjects manifested with normal height, and yet multiple exostoses. In this family, the skeletal manifestations were sufficiently variable for the presentation to be with either short stature or scoliosis, a Madelung’ deformity, or with severe hallux valgus associated with exostosis and with Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis syndrome. Results Subjects with structural chromosomal aberrations of the proband IV-7, who manifested with normal height but with multiple exostoses were excluded via 20 CAG-banded mitoses (there were no microdeletions or microduplication after performing Array-CGH-analysis). In addition, DNA examination for subject IV-8 (male cousin of the proband showed short stature and Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis syndrome) revealed no evidence of SHOX deletions. Conclusion We described a multigenerational non-consanguineous North African family , in which mesomelic dysplasia, whose clinical and radiological phenotypes resembled dyschondrosteosis, was a prominent feature in three family subjects. Multiple exostoses were evident in several other family subjects (most were with normal height). We would like to emphasize the variability in the phenotypic expression of multiple exostosis, especially the confusion that might arise when the condition appears both clinically and radiologically to be more complicated, and the overall picture might then be overlapped with one of the other bone dysplasias such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis syndrome. PMID:27429682

  12. Phenotype overlap in glial cell populations: astroglia, oligodendroglia and NG-2(+) cells

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Badrah; Fern, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which NG-2(+) cells form a distinct population separate from astrocytes is central to understanding whether this important cell class is wholly an oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) or has additional functions akin to those classically ascribed to astrocytes. Early immuno-staining studies indicate that NG-2(+) cells do not express the astrocyte marker GFAP, but orthogonal reconstructions of double-labeled confocal image stacks here reveal a significant degree of co-expression in individual cells within post-natal day 10 (P10) and adult rat optic nerve (RON) and rat cortex. Extensive scanning of various antibody/fixation/embedding approaches identified a protocol for selective post-embedded immuno-gold labeling. This first ultrastructural characterization of identified NG-2(+) cells revealed populations of both OPCs and astrocytes in P10 RON. NG-2(+) astrocytes had classic features including the presence of glial filaments but low levels of glial filament expression were also found in OPCs and myelinating oligodendrocytes. P0 RONs contained few OPCs but positively identified astrocytes were observed to ensheath pre-myelinated axons in a fashion previously described as a definitive marker of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Astrocyte ensheathment was also apparent in P10 RONs, was absent from developing nodes of Ranvier and was never associated with compact myelin. Astrocyte processes were also shown to encapsulate some oligodendrocyte somata. The data indicate that common criteria for delineating astrocytes and oligodendroglia are insufficiently robust and that astrocyte features ascribed to OPCs may arise from misidentification. PMID:26106302

  13. Phenotypic and Genetic Overlap between Autistic Traits at the Extremes of the General Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Angelica; Happe, Francesca; Price, Thomas S.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Plomin, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate children selected from a community sample for showing extreme autistic-like traits and to assess the degree to which these individual traits--social impairments (SIs), communication impairments (CIs), and restricted repetitive behaviors and interests (RRBIs)--are caused by genes and environments, whether all of them are…

  14. Arrhythmogenic Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy: Is There an Echocardiographic Phenotypic Overlap of Two Distinct Cardiomyopathies?

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Dursun; Cay, Serkan; Ozcan, Firat; Baser, Kazım; Dogan, Umuttan; Unlu, Murat; Demirkan, Burcu; Tufekcioglu, Omac; Topaloglu, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathies is often challenging. It is difficult to differentiate the isolated left ventricular (LV) noncompaction cardiomyopathy (NC) from biventricular NC or from coexisting arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy (AC). There are currently few established morphologic criteria for the diagnosis other than RV dilation and presence of excessive regional trabeculation. The gross and microscopic changes suggest pathological similarities between, or coexistence of, RV-NC and AC. Therefore, the term arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is somewhat misleading as isolated LV or biventricular involvement may be present and thus a broader term such as AC should be preferred. We describe an unusual case of AC associated with a NC in a 27-year-old man who had a history of permanent pacemaker 7 years ago due to second-degree atrioventricular block. PMID:26448828

  15. Application of Mass Cytometry (CyTOF) for Functional and Phenotypic Analysis of Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kay, Alexander W; Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Blish, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Mass cytometry is a novel platform for high-dimensional phenotypic and functional analysis of single cells. This system uses elemental metal isotopes conjugated to monoclonal antibodies to evaluate up to 42 parameters simultaneously on individual cells with minimal overlap between channels. The platform can be customized for analysis of both phenotypic and functional markers. Here, we will describe methods to stain, collect, and analyze intracellular functional markers and surface phenotypic markers on natural killer cells. PMID:27177653

  16. Influence of slice overlap on positron emission tomography image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Clare; Gillen, Gerry; Dempsey, Mary Frances; Findlay, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    PET scans use overlapping acquisition beds to correct for reduced sensitivity at bed edges. The optimum overlap size for the General Electric (GE) Discovery 690 has not been established. This study assesses how image quality is affected by slice overlap. Efficacy of 23% overlaps (recommended by GE) and 49% overlaps (maximum possible overlap) were specifically assessed. European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for calculating minimum injected activities based on overlap size were also reviewed. A uniform flood phantom was used to assess noise (coefficient of variation, (COV)) and voxel accuracy (activity concentrations, Bq ml-1). A NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) body phantom with hot/cold spheres in a background activity was used to assess contrast recovery coefficients (CRCs) and signal to noise ratios (SNR). Different overlap sizes and sphere-to-background ratios were assessed. COVs for 49% and 23% overlaps were 9% and 13% respectively. This increased noise was difficult to visualise on the 23% overlap images. Mean voxel activity concentrations were not affected by overlap size. No clinically significant differences in CRCs were observed. However, visibility and SNR of small, low contrast spheres (⩽13 mm diameter, 2:1 sphere to background ratio) may be affected by overlap size in low count studies if they are located in the overlap area. There was minimal detectable influence on image quality in terms of noise, mean activity concentrations or mean CRCs when comparing 23% overlap with 49% overlap. Detectability of small, low contrast lesions may be affected in low count studies—however, this is a worst-case scenario. The marginal benefits of increasing overlap from 23% to 49% are likely to be offset by increased patient scan times. A 23% overlap is therefore appropriate for clinical use. An amendment to EANM guidelines for calculating injected activities is also proposed which better reflects the effect overlap size has

  17. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM) algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier. Findings Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1) a low lung health scores phenotype, 2) a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3) various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency. Interpretation This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study. PMID:25822311

  18. Cenozoic Motion of Greenland - Overlaps and Seaways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawver, L. A.; Norton, I. O.; Gahagan, L.

    2014-12-01

    Using the seafloor magnetic anomalies found in the Labrador Sea, North Atlantic and Eurasian basin to constrain the Cenozoic motion of Greenland, we have produced a new model for the tectonic evolution of the region. The aeromagnetic data collected by the Naval Research Lab [Brozena et al., 2003] in the Eurasian Basin and Canadian data from the Labrador Sea have been re-evaluated using new gridding algorithms and profile modeling using ModMag (Mendel et al., 2005). As a consequence, we have changed the published correlations, mostly prior to Chron C6 [19.05 Ma]. Presently published seafloor magnetic anomalies from the Labrador Sea assume that seafloor spreading ceased at C13 [33.06 Ma] but such an assumption produces an unacceptable overlap of Kronprins Christian Land of northeast Greenland with Svalbard, up to 140 km of overlap in some models. Our new model does not need any "unacceptable" overlap but does produce a slight amount of Eocene compression on Svalbard as is found on land there. Our model allows for an Early Eocene seaway between Ellesmere Island and northwest Greenland that may have connected the Labrador Sea through Baffin Bay and ultimately to the nascent Eurasian Basin, although its depth or even its essential existence is unknowable. During the Miocene, there is no room for a deepwater seaway in Fram Strait until at least the very end of the Early Miocene and perhaps not until Middle Miocene. Brozena, J. and six others, 2003. New aerogeophysical study of the Eurasia Basin and Lomonosov Ridge: Implications for basin development. Geology 31, 825-828. Mendel, V., M. Munschy and D.Sauter, 2005, MODMAG, a MATLAB program to model marine magnetic anomalies, Comp. Geosci., 31, .589-597

  19. Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS): A diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Tho, Nguyen Van; Park, Hye Yun; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2016-04-01

    Asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) is characterized by persistent airflow limitation with several features usually associated with asthma and several features usually associated with COPD. ACOS may be a special phenotype of a spectrum of chronic obstructive airway diseases, in which asthma and COPD are at the two opposite ends. The prevalence of ACOS varies considerably due to differing criteria being applied for diagnosis. Patients with ACOS utilize a large proportion of medical resources. They are associated with more frequent adverse outcomes than those with asthma or COPD alone. ACOS is currently a diagnostic challenge for physicians because there are no specific biomarkers to differentiate ACOS from asthma or COPD. The approach to diagnosing ACOS depends on the population from which the patient originated. The management of ACOS should be individualized to ensure the most effective treatment with minimal side effects. In this paper, we review the diagnostic criteria of ACOS used in previous studies, propose practical approaches to diagnosing and managing ACOS and raise some research questions related to ACOS. PMID:26450153

  20. GAGA Factor Isoforms Have Distinct but Overlapping Functions In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Anthony J.; Schedl, Paul

    2001-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster GAGA factor (encoded by the Trithorax-like [Trl] gene) is required for correct chromatin architecture at diverse chromosomal sites. The Trl gene encodes two alternatively spliced isoforms of the GAGA factor (GAGA-519 and GAGA-581) that are identical except for the length and sequence of the C-terminal glutamine-rich (Q) domain. In vitro and tissue culture experiments failed to find any functional difference between the two isoforms. We made a set of transgenes that constitutively express cDNAs coding for either of the isoforms with the goal of elucidating their roles in vivo. Phenotypic analysis of the transgenes in Trl mutant background led us to the conclusion that GAGA-519 and GAGA-581 perform different, albeit largely overlapping, functions. We also expressed a fusion protein with LacZ disrupting the Q domain of GAGA-519. This LacZ fusion protein compensated for the loss of wild-type GAGA factor to a surprisingly large extent. This suggests that the Q domain either is not required for the essential functions performed by the GAGA protein or is exclusively used for tetramer formation. These results are inconsistent with a major role of the Q domain in chromatin remodeling or transcriptional activation. We also found that GAGA-LacZ was able to associate with sites not normally occupied by the GAGA factor, pointing to a role of the Q domain in binding site choice in vivo. PMID:11713290

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease: Overlaps and differences

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Virginia; Dieli-Crimi, Romina; López-Palacios, Natalia; Bodas, Andrés; Medrano, Luz María; Núñez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate the common genetic basis for many immune-mediated diseases, and consequently, the partially shared pathogenesis. We collected these findings and reviewed the extension of these overlaps to other disease characteristics. Two autoimmune diseases were selected that also share the specific target organ, the bowel. The etiology and immunopathogenesis of both conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease (CeD), are not completely understood. Both are complex diseases with genetics and environment contributing to dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to chronic inflammation and disease. CeD constitutes a particular disease because the main environmental and genetic triggers are largely known. IBD comprises two main clinical forms, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which most likely involve a complex interplay between some components of the commensal microbiota and other environmental factors in their origin. These multifactorial diseases encompass a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes and ages of onset, although the clinical presentation often differs depending on childhood or adult onset, with greater heterogeneity commonly observed in adults. PMID:24803796

  2. Shaft drill bit with overlapping cutter arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, R.A.; Pessier, R.C.

    1981-02-03

    An earth boring drill bit for large diameter shafts has an improved cutter arrangement. The drill bit has a cutter support member with a number of cutters mounted to it for disintegrating the earth formation face. At least one inner cutter is mounted near the center for cutting the center area. A number of gage cutters are mounted at the periphery to cut the gage area of the shaft. A number of intermediate cutters are spaced between the inner and gage cutters. Each intermediate cutter overlaps onehalf of its width with an adjacent intermediate cutter.

  3. Technology initiatives with government/business overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Robert H., Jr.

    2015-03-01

    Three important present-day technology development settings involve significant overlap between government and private sectors. The Advanced Research Project Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) supports a wide range of "high risk, high return" projects carried out in academic, non-profit or private business settings. The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI), based in the White House, aims at radical acceleration of the development process for advanced materials. California public utilities such as Pacific Gas & Electric operate under a structure of financial returns and political program mandates that make them arms of public policy as much as independent businesses.

  4. The role of Pannexin gene variants in schizophrenia: systematic analysis of phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, Micha; Wagner, Martin; Pfuhlmann, Bruno; Stöber, Gerald

    2016-08-01

    Pannexins are a group of brain-expressed channel proteins thought to be regulators of schizophrenia-linked pathways including glutamate release, synaptic plasticity and neural stem proliferation. We got evidence for linkage of a catatonic phenotype to the PANX2 locus in a family study. Aim of our study was to evaluate the role of Pannexins in schizophrenia and clinical phenotypes, particularly with regard to periodic catatonia. We genotyped six single-nucleotide polymorphisms at PANX1, five at PANX2 and three at PANX3 in 1173 German cases with schizophrenia according to DSM-5 and 480 controls. Our sample included 338 cases with periodic catatonia corresponding to Leonhard's classification. Association with schizophrenia according to DSM-5 was limited to genotype rs4838858-TT [p = 0.02, odds ratio (OR) 3.1] and haplotype rs4838858T-rs5771206G (p = 0.02, OR 2.7) at PANX2. We found no significant association with clinical phenotypes. Our limited findings do not support a major contribution of PANX1-3 to disease risk of schizophrenia according to DSM-5. We cannot confirm an association of the PANX2 loci at chromosome 22q13 with periodic catatonia. PMID:26223428

  5. Clinical phenotypes of COPD: identification, definition and implications for guidelines.

    PubMed

    Miravitlles, Marc; Calle, Myriam; Soler-Cataluña, Juan José

    2012-03-01

    The term phenotype in the field of COPD is defined as "a single or combination of disease attributes that describe differences between individuals with COPD as they relate to clinically meaningful outcomes". Among all phenotypes described, there are three that are associated with prognosis and especially are associated with a different response to currently available therapies. There phenotypes are: the exacerbator, the overlap COPD-asthma and the emphysema-hyperinflation. The exacerbator is characterised by the presence of, at least, two exacerbations the previous year, and on top of long-acting bronchodilators, may require the use of antiinflammatory drugs. The overlap phenotype presents symptoms of increased variability of airflow and incompletely reversible airflow obstruction. Due to the underlying inflammatory profile, it uses to have a good therapeutic response to inhaled corticosteroids in addition to bronchodilators. Lastly, the emphysema phenotype presents a poor therapeutic response to the existing antiinflammatory drugs and long-acting bronchodilators together with rehabilitation are the treatments of choice. Identifying the peculiarities of the different phenotypes of COPD will allow us to implement a more personalised treatment, in which the characteristics of the patients, together with their severity will be key to choose the best treatment option. PMID:22196477

  6. Diagnosis, assessment, and phenotyping of COPD: beyond FEV1

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Peter; Halpin, David M; O’Donnell, Denis E; MacNee, William

    2016-01-01

    COPD is now widely recognized as a complex heterogeneous syndrome, having both pulmonary and extrapulmonary features. In clinical practice, the diagnosis of COPD is based on the presence of chronic airflow limitation, as assessed by post-bronchodilator spirometry. The severity of the airflow limitation, as measured by percent predicted FEV1, provides important information to the physician to enable optimization of management. However, in order to accurately assess the complexity of COPD, there need to be other measures made beyond FEV1. At present, there is a lack of reliable and simple blood biomarkers to confirm and further assess the diagnosis of COPD. However, it is possible to identify patients who display different phenotypic characteristics of COPD that relate to clinically relevant outcomes. Currently, validated phenotypes of COPD include alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, and “frequent exacerbators”. Recently, a definition and assessment of a new phenotype comprising patients with overlapping features of asthma and COPD has been suggested and is known as “asthma COPD overlap syndrome”. Several other phenotypes have been proposed, but require validation against clinical outcomes. Defining phenotypes requires the assessment of multiple factors indicating disease severity, its impact, and its activity. Recognition and validation of COPD phenotypes has an important role to play in the selection of evidence-based targeted therapy in the future management of COPD, but regardless of the diagnostic terms, patients with COPD should be assessed and treated according to their individual treatable characteristics. PMID:26937185

  7. Improvement of overlapping nuclear track densitometry.

    PubMed

    Ghergherehchi, M; Kim, S Y; Afarideh, H; Kim, Y S; Chai, J S

    2015-03-01

    Detection of tracks produced by α particles, protons or nuclear fission fragments in plastic detectors, viz., solid-state nuclear track detectors, constitutes a very important tool in various areas. It is not easy for humans to count CR-39 nuclear tracks manually, especially when the track density is very high. An automated computer program called KTTMS2, written in C++ and running with a user friendly interface, has been developed for recognition and parametric measurements of etched tracks in images captured from the surface of solid-state nuclear track detectors. Well-known edge detection methods were applied to estimate the precision and accuracy of nuclear track densitometry using the CR-39 detector. Among the various routine edge detection methods, the Canny method was chosen because it was the most accurate technique. Because accuracy becomes more important as the track density increases, this allows more overlapping tracks to be detected. KTTMS2 (the proposed system) has an efficiency of 95% and can identify the noise as a background track (5%). Experimental results showed that the error percentage was reduced from 7.63% to 3.23% for high-density tracks when the count was adjusted by the estimated overlapping tracks. PMID:25581623

  8. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  9. Novel phenotypes of prediabetes?

    PubMed

    Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    This article describes phenotypes observed in a prediabetic population (i.e. a population with increased risk for type 2 diabetes) from data collected at the University hospital of Tübingen. We discuss the impact of genetic variation on insulin secretion, in particular the effect on compensatory hypersecretion, and the incretin-resistant phenotype of carriers of the gene variant TCF7L2 is described. Imaging studies used to characterise subphenotypes of fat distribution, metabolically healthy obesity and metabolically unhealthy obesity are described. Also discussed are ectopic fat stores in liver and pancreas that determine the phenotype of metabolically healthy and unhealthy fatty liver and the recently recognised phenotype of fatty pancreas. The metabolic impact of perivascular adipose tissue and pancreatic fat is discussed. The role of hepatokines, particularly that of fetuin-A, in the crosstalk between these organs is described. Finally, the role of brain insulin resistance in the development of the different prediabetes phenotypes is discussed. PMID:27344314

  10. Clinical interpretation of CNVs with cross-species phenotype data

    PubMed Central

    Czeschik, Johanna Christina; Doelken, Sandra C; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Ibn-Salem, Jonas; Mungall, Christopher J; Smedley, Damian; Haendel, Melissa A; Robinson, Peter N

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical evaluation of CNVs identified via techniques such as array comparative genome hybridisation (aCGH) involves the inspection of lists of known and unknown duplications and deletions with the goal of distinguishing pathogenic from benign CNVs. A key step in this process is the comparison of the individual's phenotypic abnormalities with those associated with Mendelian disorders of the genes affected by the CNV. However, because often there is not much known about these human genes, an additional source of data that could be used is model organism phenotype data. Currently, almost 6000 genes in mouse and zebrafish are, when knocked out, associated with a phenotype in the model organism, but no disease is known to be caused by mutations in the human ortholog. Yet, searching model organism databases and comparing model organism phenotypes with patient phenotypes for identifying novel disease genes and medical evaluation of CNVs is hindered by the difficulty in integrating phenotype information across species and the lack of appropriate software tools. Methods Here, we present an integrated ranking scheme based on phenotypic matching, degree of overlap with known benign or pathogenic CNVs and the haploinsufficiency score for the prioritisation of CNVs responsible for a patient's clinical findings. Results We show that this scheme leads to significant improvements compared with rankings that do not exploit phenotypic information. We provide a software tool called PhenogramViz, which supports phenotype-driven interpretation of aCGH findings based on multiple data sources, including the integrated cross-species phenotype ontology Uberpheno, in order to visualise gene-to-phenotype relations. Conclusions Integrating and visualising cross-species phenotype information on the affected genes may help in routine diagnostics of CNVs. PMID:25280750

  11. Phonological and Orthographic Overlap Effects in Fast and Masked Priming

    PubMed Central

    Frisson, Steven; Bélanger, Nathalie N.; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how orthographic and phonological information is activated during reading, using a fast priming task, and during single word recognition, using masked priming. Specifically, different types of overlap between prime and target were contrasted: high orthographic and high phonological overlap (track-crack), high orthographic and low phonological overlap (bear-gear), or low orthographic and high phonological overlap (fruit-chute). In addition, we examined whether (orthographic) beginning overlap (swoop-swoon) yielded the same priming pattern as end (rhyme) overlap (track-crack). Prime durations were 32 and 50ms in the fast priming version, and 50ms in the masked priming version, and mode of presentation (prime and target in lower case) was identical. The fast priming experiment showed facilitatory priming effects when both orthography and phonology overlapped, with no apparent differences between beginning and end overlap pairs. Facilitation was also found when prime and target only overlapped orthographically. In contrast, the masked priming experiment showed inhibition for both types of end overlap pairs (with and without phonological overlap), and no difference for begin overlap items. When prime and target only shared principally phonological information, facilitation was only found with a long prime duration in the fast priming experiment, while no differences were found in the masked priming version. These contrasting results suggest that fast priming and masked priming do not necessarily tap into the same type of processing. PMID:24365065

  12. Phonological and orthographic overlap effects in fast and masked priming.

    PubMed

    Frisson, Steven; Bélanger, Nathalie N; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how orthographic and phonological information is activated during reading, using a fast priming task, and during single-word recognition, using masked priming. Specifically, different types of overlap between prime and target were contrasted: high orthographic and high phonological overlap (track-crack), high orthographic and low phonological overlap (bear-gear), or low orthographic and high phonological overlap (fruit-chute). In addition, we examined whether (orthographic) beginning overlap (swoop-swoon) yielded the same priming pattern as end (rhyme) overlap (track-crack). Prime durations were 32 and 50 ms in the fast priming version and 50 ms in the masked priming version, and mode of presentation (prime and target in lower case) was identical. The fast priming experiment showed facilitatory priming effects when both orthography and phonology overlapped, with no apparent differences between beginning and end overlap pairs. Facilitation was also found when prime and target only overlapped orthographically. In contrast, the masked priming experiment showed inhibition for both types of end overlap pairs (with and without phonological overlap) and no difference for begin overlap items. When prime and target only shared principally phonological information, facilitation was only found with a long prime duration in the fast priming experiment, while no differences were found in the masked priming version. These contrasting results suggest that fast priming and masked priming do not necessarily tap into the same type of processing. PMID:24365065

  13. Phenotypic switching in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrin, Jack

    Living matter is a non-equilibrium system in which many components work in parallel to perpetuate themselves through a fluctuating environment. Physiological states or functionalities revealed by a particular environment are called phenotypes. Transitions between phenotypes may occur either spontaneously or via interaction with the environment. Even in the same environment, genetically identical bacteria can exhibit different phenotypes of a continuous or discrete nature. In this thesis, we pursued three lines of investigation into discrete phenotypic heterogeneity in bacterial populations: the quantitative characterization of the so-called bacterial persistence, a theoretical model of phenotypic switching based on those measurements, and the design of artificial genetic networks which implement this model. Persistence is the phenotype of a subpopulation of bacteria with a reduced sensitivity to antibiotics. We developed a microfluidic apparatus, which allowed us to monitor the growth rates of individual cells while applying repeated cycles of antibiotic treatments. We were able to identify distinct phenotypes (normal and persistent) and characterize the stochastic transitions between them. We also found that phenotypic heterogeneity was present prior to any environmental cue such as antibiotic exposure. Motivated by the experiments with persisters, we formulated a theoretical model describing the dynamic behavior of several discrete phenotypes in a periodically varying environment. This theoretical framework allowed us to quantitatively predict the fitness of dynamic populations and to compare survival strategies according to environmental time-symmetries. These calculations suggested that persistence is a strategy used by bacterial populations to adapt to fluctuating environments. Knowledge of the phenotypic transition rates for persistence may provide statistical information about the typical environments of bacteria. We also describe a design of artificial

  14. A Review of Journal Coverage Overlap with an Extension to the Definition of Overlap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Myke

    1990-01-01

    Examines the definition of journal coverage overlap in abstracting and indexing services during the past 30 years of research and expands the definition using a matrix of dissimilarity values. Multidimensional scaling analysis is applied to graphically demonstrate this definition and a naive secondary tool selection algorithm is presented. (43…

  15. Grid adaptation using chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite overlapping meshes in regions of large gradient to accurately capture the salient features during computation. The chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using trilinear interpolation. Application to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well-resolved.

  16. Grid adaptation using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  17. Competitive STDP Learning of Overlapping Spatial Patterns.

    PubMed

    Krunglevicius, Dalius

    2015-08-01

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a set of Hebbian learning rules firmly based on biological evidence. It has been demonstrated that one of the STDP learning rules is suited for learning spatiotemporal patterns. When multiple neurons are organized in a simple competitive spiking neural network, this network is capable of learning multiple distinct patterns. If patterns overlap significantly (i.e., patterns are mutually inclusive), however, competition would not preclude trained neuron's responding to a new pattern and adjusting synaptic weights accordingly. This letter presents a simple neural network that combines vertical inhibition and Euclidean distance-dependent synaptic strength factor. This approach helps to solve the problem of pattern size-dependent parameter optimality and significantly reduces the probability of a neuron's forgetting an already learned pattern. For demonstration purposes, the network was trained for the first ten letters of the Braille alphabet. PMID:26079753

  18. Recombining overlapping BACs into single large BACs.

    PubMed

    Kotzamanis, George; Kotsinas, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    BAC clones containing the entire genomic region of a gene including the long-range regulatory elements are very useful for gene functional analysis. However, large genes often span more than the insert of a BAC clone, and single BACs covering the entire region of interest are not available. Here, we describe a general system for linking two or more overlapping BACs into a single clone. Two rounds of homologous recombination are used. In the first, the BAC inserts are subcloned into the pBACLink vectors. In the second, the two BACs are combined together. Multiple BACs in a contig can be combined by alternating use of the pBACLInk vectors, resulting in several BAC clones containing as much of the genomic region of a gene as required. Such BACs can then be used in gene expression studies and/or gene therapy applications. PMID:25239744

  19. Overlapped Fourier coding for optical aberration removal

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    We present an imaging procedure that simultaneously optimizes a camera’s resolution and retrieves a sample’s phase over a sequence of snapshots. The technique, termed overlapped Fourier coding (OFC), first digitally pans a small aperture across a camera’s pupil plane with a spatial light modulator. At each aperture location, a unique image is acquired. The OFC algorithm then fuses these low-resolution images into a full-resolution estimate of the complex optical field incident upon the detector. Simultaneously, the algorithm utilizes redundancies within the acquired dataset to computationally estimate and remove unknown optical aberrations and system misalignments via simulated annealing. The result is an imaging system that can computationally overcome its optical imperfections to offer enhanced resolution, at the expense of taking multiple snapshots over time. PMID:25321982

  20. Grid adaption using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  1. Geometrical constraint experimental determination of Raman lidar overlap profile.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Chengcai; Zhao, Yiming; Li, Jing; Chu, Yiqi

    2016-06-20

    A simple experimental method to determine the overlap profile of Raman lidar is presented in this paper. Based on Mie and Raman backscattering signals and a geometrically constrained condition, the overlap profile of a Raman lidar system can be determined. Our approach simultaneously retrieves the lidar ratio of aerosols, which is one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the overlap profile determination. The results indicate that the overlap factor is significantly influenced by the lidar ratio in experimental methods. A representative case study indicates that the correction of the overlap profile obtained by this method is practical and feasible. PMID:27409119

  2. Anxiety and affective disorder comorbidity related to serotonin and other neurotransmitter systems: obsessive–compulsive disorder as an example of overlapping clinical and genetic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Dennis L.; Moya, Pablo R.; Fox, Meredith A.; Rubenstein, Liza M.; Wendland, Jens R.; Timpano, Kiara R.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) have also been shown to have comorbid lifetime diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD; rates greater than 70%), bipolar disorder (rates greater than 10%) and other anxiety disorders (e.g. panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)). In addition, overlap exists in some common genetic variants (e.g. the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene), and rare variants in genes/chromosomal abnormalities (e.g. the 22q11 microdeletion syndrome) found across the affective/anxiety disorder spectrums. OCD has been proposed as a possible independent entity for DSM-5, but by others thought best retained as an anxiety disorder subtype (its current designation in DSM-IV), and yet by others considered best in the affective disorder spectrum. This review focuses on OCD, a well-studied but still puzzling heterogeneous disorder, regarding alterations in serotonergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in addition to other systems involved, and how related genes may be involved in the comorbidity of anxiety and affective disorders. OCD resembles disorders such as depression, in which gene × gene interactions, gene × environment interactions and stress elements coalesce to yield OC symptoms and, in some individuals, full-blown OCD with multiple comorbid disorders. PMID:23440468

  3. Depression-Burnout Overlap in Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Walter; Vogel, Katrin; Holl, Anna; Ebner, Christoph; Bayer, Dietmar; Mörkl, Sabrina; Szilagyi, Istvan-Szilard; Hotter, Erich; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Hofmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether burnout is a distinct phenomenon rather than a type of depression and whether it is a syndrome, limited to three “core” components (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment) are subjects of current debate. We investigated the depression-burnout overlap, and the pertinence of these three components in a large, representative sample of physicians. Methods In a cross-sectional study, all Austrian physicians were invited to answer a questionnaire that included the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the Hamburg Burnout Inventory (HBI), as well as demographic and job-related parameters. Of the 40093 physicians who received an invitation, a total of 6351 (15.8%) participated. The data of 5897 participants were suitable for analysis. Results Of the participants, 10.3% were affected by major depression. Our study results suggest that potentially 50.7% of the participants were affected by symptoms of burnout. Compared to physicians unaffected by burnout, the odds ratio of suffering from major depression was 2.99 (95% CI 2.21–4.06) for physicians with mild, 10.14 (95% CI 7.58–13.59) for physicians with moderate, 46.84 (95% CI 35.25–62.24) for physicians with severe burnout and 92.78 (95% CI 62.96–136.74) for the 3% of participants with the highest HBI_sum (sum score of all ten HBI components). The HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Personal Accomplishment and Detachment (representing depersonalization) tend to correlate more highly with the main symptoms of major depression (sadness, lack of interest and lack of energy) than with each other. A combination of the HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium (adj.R2 = 0.92) explained more HBI_sum variance than the three “core” components (adj.R2 = 0.85) of burnout combined. Cronbach’s alpha for Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium combined was 0.90 compared to α = 0.54 for the combination of the three

  4. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype. PMID:25319333

  5. Paralytic ileus in MELAS with phenotypic features of MNGIE.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tung-Ming; Chi, Ching-Shiang; Tsai, Chi-Ren; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Li, Mu-Chun

    2004-11-01

    This report describes a child having the syndrome of overlapping phenotypic features of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) and mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy syndrome (MNGIE). Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed a point mutation at position A3243G, whereas activity of thymidine phosphorylase and its corresponding gene analysis were normal. The most striking feature of this case was paralysis of one segment of the terminal ileum observed on laparotomy. The electron microscopic findings of the resected ileum and colon by limited right hemicolectomy disclosed accumulation of numerous enlarged mitochondria with ill-defined cristae which were similar to mitochondria reported in three previous MELAS cases and one MNGIE case with intestinal dysmotility. We emphasize that the MELAS and MNGIE phenotypes overlapped in this case and that the mechanism of acute ileus in MELAS was associated with functional paralysis of the intestine. PMID:15519124

  6. EVOG: a database for evolutionary analysis of overlapping genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Soo; Cho, Chi-Young; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Heui-Soo; Cho, Hwan-Gue

    2009-01-01

    Overlapping genes are defined as a pair of genes whose transcripts are overlapped. Recently, many cases of overlapped genes have been investigated in various eukaryotic organisms; however, their origin and transcriptional control mechanism has not yet been clearly determined. In this study, we implemented evolutionary visualizer for overlapping genes (EVOG), a Web-based DB with a novel visualization interface, to investigate the evolutionary relationship between overlapping genes. Using this technique, we collected and analyzed all overlapping genes in human, chimpanzee, orangutan, marmoset, rhesus, cow, dog, mouse, rat, chicken, Xenopus, zebrafish and Drosophila. This integrated database provides a manually curated database that displays the evolutionary features of overlapping genes. The EVOG DB components included a number of overlapping genes (10074 in human, 10,009 in chimpanzee, 67,039 in orangutan, 51,001 in marmoset, 219 in rhesus, 3627 in cow, 209 in dog, 10,700 in mouse, 7987 in rat, 1439 in chicken, 597 in Xenopus, 2457 in zebrafish and 4115 in Drosophila). The EVOG database is very effective and easy to use for the analysis of the evolutionary process of overlapping genes when comparing different species. Therefore, EVOG could potentially be used as the main tool to investigate the evolution of the human genome in relation to disease by comparing the expression profiles of overlapping genes. EVOG is available at http://neobio.cs.pusan.ac.kr/evog/. PMID:18986995

  7. Enzymatic assembly of overlapping DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Three methods for assembling multiple, overlapping DNA molecules are described. Each method shares the same basic approach: (i) an exonuclease removes nucleotides from the ends of double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules, exposing complementary single-stranded (ss) DNA overhangs that are specifically annealed; (ii) the ssDNA gaps of the joined molecules are filled in by DNA polymerase, and the nicks are covalently sealed by DNA ligase. The first method employs the 3'-exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase (T4 pol), Taq DNA polymerase (Taq pol), and Taq DNA ligase (Taq lig) in a two-step thermocycled reaction. The second method uses 3'-exonuclease III (ExoIII), antibody-bound Taq pol, and Taq lig in a one-step thermocycled reaction. The third method employs 5'-T5 exonuclease, Phusion® DNA polymerase, and Taq lig in a one-step isothermal reaction and can be used to assemble both ssDNA and dsDNA. These assembly methods can be used to seamlessly construct synthetic and natural genes, genetic pathways, and entire genomes and could be very useful for molecular engineering tools. PMID:21601685

  8. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore » effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  9. [Autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndrome: therapy].

    PubMed

    Löhr, H F

    2002-08-21

    Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represent acute and chronic inflammatory liver diseases in which immune reactions against host antigens are found to be the major pathological mechanism. Only for AIH there is evidence of an autoimmune etiology and humoral and cellular immune reactions are found directed against various liver cell antigens. By diverse autoantibodies several subgroups of autoimmune hepatitis can be distinguished. A very important disease promoting factor seems to be the genetically determined background for autoimmunity characterized by the HLA haplotype A1, B8 and DR3, respectively DR4. Although the histopathology of AIH shows no pathognomonic features distinguishing this type of hepatitis from virus induced chronic hepatitis there are some distinct characteristic morphological lesions. If untreated the prognosis of AIH is unfavourable but the benefit from immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprin is well established. In the last years there was increasing evidence for an overlap syndrome between AIH and PBC and rarely AIH and PSC. These patients are characterized by PBC characteristic bileduct lesions and oftenly antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). They also show AIH typical inflammatory hepatic lesions in the periportal areas and portal tracts and oftenly the typical genetical background, the HLA haplotype A1, B8, DR3 or DR4. Most of these patients respond probably to a combination therapy containing prednisolon, azathioprine and ursodesoxycholic acid that leads to the reduction of the inflammatory activity. PMID:12233265

  10. Base drive and overlap protection circuit

    DOEpatents

    Gritter, David J.

    1983-01-01

    An inverter (34) which provides power to an A. C. machine (28) is controlled by a circuit (36) employing PWM control strategy whereby A. C. power is supplied to the machine at a preselectable frequency and preselectable voltage. This is accomplished by the technique of waveform notching in which the shapes of the notches are varied to determine the average energy content of the overall waveform. Through this arrangement, the operational efficiency of the A. C. machine is optimized. The control circuit includes a microcomputer and memory element which receive various parametric inputs and calculate optimized machine control data signals therefrom. The control data is asynchronously loaded into the inverter through an intermediate buffer (38). A base drive and overlap protection circuit is included to insure that both transistors of a complimentary pair are not conducting at the same time. In its preferred embodiment, the present invention is incorporated within an electric vehicle (10) employing a 144 VDC battery pack (32) and a three-phase induction motor (18).

  11. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  12. HMG Nuclear Proteins: Linking Chromatin Structure to Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    I. Summary Although the three families of mammalian HMG proteins (HMGA, HMGB and HMGN) participate in many of the same nuclear processes, each family plays its own unique role in modulating chromatin structure and regulating genomic function. This review focuses on the similarities and differences in the mechanisms by which the different HMG families impact chromatin structure and influence cellular phenotype. The biological implications of having three architectural transcription factor families with complementary, but partially overlapping, nuclear functions are discussed. PMID:19748605

  13. Modeling the autism spectrum disorder phenotype.

    PubMed

    McCray, Alexa T; Trevvett, Philip; Frost, H Robert

    2014-04-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is highly heritable, and although there has been active research in an attempt to discover the genetic factors underlying ASD, diagnosis still depends heavily on behavioral assessments. Recently, several large-scale initiatives, including those of the Autism Consortium, have contributed to the collection of extensive information from families affected by ASD. Our goal was to develop an ontology that can be used 1) to provide improved access to the data collected by those who study ASD and other neurodevelopmental disorders, and 2) to assess and compare the characteristics of the instruments that are used in the assessment of ASD. We analyzed two dozen instruments used to assess ASD, studying the nature of the questions asked and items assessed, the method of delivery, and the overall scope of the content. These data together with the extensive literature on ASD contributed to our iterative development of an ASD phenotype ontology. The final ontology comprises 283 concepts distributed across three high-level classes, 'Personal Traits', 'Social Competence', and 'Medical History'. The ontology is fully integrated with the Autism Consortium database, allowing researchers to pose ontology-based questions. The ontology also allows researchers to assess the degree of overlap among a set of candidate instruments according to several objective criteria. The ASD phenotype ontology has promise for use in research settings where extensive phenotypic data have been collected, allowing a concept-based approach to identifying behavioral features of importance and for correlating these with genotypic data. PMID:24163114

  14. A Lower Bound for Quantifying Overlap Effects: An Empirical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, Federico

    1997-12-31

    Among the many features that are implemented in today`s microprocessors there are some that have the capability of reducing the execution time via overlapping of different operations. Overlapping of instructions with other instructions, and overlapping of computation with memory activities are the main way in which execution time is reduced. In this paper we will introduce a notion of overlap and its definition, and a few different ways to capture its effects. We will characterize some of the DOE Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) benchmarks using the overlap and some other quantities related to it. Also, we will present a characterization of the overlap effects using a lower bound derived empirically from measured data. We will conclude by using the lower bound to estimate other components of the overall execution time.

  15. SECRET AGENT and SPINDLY have overlapping roles in the development of Arabidopsis thaliana L. Heyn.

    PubMed

    Hartweck, Lynn M; Genger, Ruth K; Grey, William M; Olszewski, Neil E

    2006-01-01

    O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) catalyses transfer of GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine) to serine or threonine of proteins. The Arabidopsis OGTs, SECRET AGENT (SEC) and SPINDLY (SPY) have overlapping functions during gametogenesis and embryogenesis. SPY functions in a number of processes including circadian, light, and gibberellin (GA) responses. The role of SEC in plant development and GA signalling was investigated by determining the phenotypes of sec-1 and sec-2 plants and the expression pattern of SEC. Similar to SPY, SEC transcripts were ubiquitous. Although there is no evidence of transcript-level regulation by other factors, SEC mRNA levels are elevated in spy plants and SPY mRNA levels are elevated in sec plants. sec-1 and sec-2 plants exhibited few of the defects observed in spy plants and had wild-type GA responses. Compared with wild type, sec plants produced leaves at a reduced rate. Haplo-insufficiency at SEC in a spy ga1 double mutant background suppressed spy during germination and enhanced the production of ovaries with four carpels by spy. By contrast, SPY haplo-insufficiency in a sec ga1 double mutant background caused a novel phenotype, production of a proliferation of pin-like structures instead of a floral shoot. These results are consistent with SEC function overlapping with SPY for leaf production and reproductive development. PMID:16473894

  16. Solving Fluid Flow Problems on Moving and Adaptive Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W

    2005-07-28

    Solution of fluid dynamics problems on overlapping grids will be discussed. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured component grids that cover a domain and overlap where they meet. Overlapping grids provide an effective approach for developing efficient and accurate approximations for complex, possibly moving geometry. Topics to be addressed include the reactive Euler equations, the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and elliptic equations solved with a multigrid algorithm. Recent developments coupling moving grids and adaptive mesh refinement and preliminary parallel results will also be presented.

  17. Genetic and Environmental Overlap Between Chinese and English Reading-Related Skills in Chinese Children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This twin study examined the relative contributions of genes and environment on 2nd language reading acquisition of Chinese-speaking children learning English. We examined whether specific skills—visual word recognition, receptive vocabulary, phonological awareness, phonological memory, and speech discrimination—in the 1st and 2nd languages have distinct or overlapping genetic and environmental origins. A sample of 279 Chinese twin pairs with a mean age of 6 years was tested. Univariate twin analyses were used to identify sources of individual variations in reading abilities and related cognitive–linguistic skills in Chinese and English, respectively. They were used to show both similar and distinctive patterns in these skills across Chinese and English. Bivariate Cholesky decomposition analyses indicated genetic overlaps between all parallel Chinese and English variables, as well as shared environmental overlaps in receptive vocabulary and phonological awareness. The phenotypic correlations between 1st and 2nd language skills previously observed in cross-linguistic studies could be explained by the shared genetic and environmental influences found in this twin study. PMID:25221842

  18. Genetic and environmental overlap between Chinese and English reading-related skills in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Wong, Simpson W L; Chow, Bonnie Wing-Yin; Ho, Connie Suk-Han; Waye, Mary M Y; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2014-11-01

    This twin study examined the relative contributions of genes and environment on 2nd language reading acquisition of Chinese-speaking children learning English. We examined whether specific skills-visual word recognition, receptive vocabulary, phonological awareness, phonological memory, and speech discrimination-in the 1st and 2nd languages have distinct or overlapping genetic and environmental origins. A sample of 279 Chinese twin pairs with a mean age of 6 years was tested. Univariate twin analyses were used to identify sources of individual variations in reading abilities and related cognitive-linguistic skills in Chinese and English, respectively. They were used to show both similar and distinctive patterns in these skills across Chinese and English. Bivariate Cholesky decomposition analyses indicated genetic overlaps between all parallel Chinese and English variables, as well as shared environmental overlaps in receptive vocabulary and phonological awareness. The phenotypic correlations between 1st and 2nd language skills previously observed in cross-linguistic studies could be explained by the shared genetic and environmental influences found in this twin study. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25221842

  19. Polygenic Overlap Between C-Reactive Protein, Plasma Lipids and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Rahul S.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Dehghan, Abbas; Ridker, Paul M; Chasman, Daniel I.; McEvoy, Linda K.; Holland, Dominic; Chen, Chi-Hua; Karow, David S.; Brewer, James B.; Hess, Christopher P.; Williams, Julie; Sims, Rebecca; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Choi, Seung Hoan; Bis, Joshua C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; DeStefano, Anita L.; van der Lee, Sven J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Launer, Lenore; Seshadri, Sudha; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Hardy, John; Ulstein, Ingun Dina; Aarsland, Dag; Fladby, Tormod; White, Linda R.; Sando, Sigrid B.; Rongve, Arvid; Witoelar, Aree; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hyman, Bradley T.; Snaedal, Jon; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiological findings suggest a relationship between Alzheimer's disease (AD), inflammation and dyslipidemia, although the nature of this relationship is not well understood. We investigated whether this phenotypic association arises from a shared genetic basis. Methods and Results Using summary statistics (p-values and odds ratios) from genome-wide association studies of over 200,000 individuals, we investigated overlap in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with clinically diagnosed AD and C-reactive protein (CRP), triglycerides (TG), high- (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels. We found up to 50-fold enrichment of AD SNPs for different levels of association with CRP, LDL, HDL and TG SNPs using an FDR threshold < 0.05. By conditioning on polymorphisms associated with the four phenotypes, we identified 55 loci associated with increased AD risk. We then conducted a meta-analysis of these 55 variants across four independent AD cohorts (total n = 29,054 AD cases and 114,824 healthy controls) and discovered two genome-wide significant variants on chromosome 4 (rs13113697, closest gene HS3ST1, odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-1.11, p = 2.86 × 10−8) and chromosome 10 (rs7920721, closest gene ECHDC3, OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.04-1.11, p = 3.38 × 10−8). We also found that gene expression of HS3ST1 and ECHDC3 was altered in AD brains compared with control brains. Conclusions We demonstrate genetic overlap between AD, CRP, and plasma lipids. By conditioning on the genetic association with the cardiovascular phenotypes, we identify novel AD susceptibility loci including two genome-wide significant variants conferring increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25862742

  20. Genetic resources for phenotyping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenotyping of structured populations, along with molecular genotyping, will be essential for marker development in peanut. This research is essential for making the peanut genome sequence and genomic tools useful to breeders because it makes the connection between genes, gene markers, genetic maps...

  1. Down Syndrome: Cognitive Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most prevalent cause of intellectual impairment associated with a genetic anomaly, in this case, trisomy of chromosome 21. It affects both physical and cognitive development and produces a characteristic phenotype, although affected individuals vary considerably with respect to severity of specific impairments. Studies…

  2. A reexamination of the small overlap frontal crash.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Paul; Morgan, Richard M; Mohan, Pradeep; Kan, Cing-Dao; Shanks, Kurt; Jin, Wook; Tangirala, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and rank the Small Overlap Frontal Crash as one of the eight-group taxonomy proposed by Ford. The Ford taxonomy classifies real-world frontal-impact crashes based on the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS). Frontally-impacted vehicles were identified for 1985 - 2008 model year passenger vehicles with Collision Deformation Classification (CDC) data from the 1995 - 2008 years of NASS. Small overlap frontal cases were identified where there was no engagement of the vehicle frame rails, and the direct damage was located entirely outside of the vehicle frame rails. The results are that full engagement and offset (offset category means the direct damage overlaps the vehicle frame rail, with the center of direct damage between the frame rails) were the most frequent crashes contributing 35% each. The frequency of the small overlap frontal was 6%. The risks of injury (AIS ≥ 2) for the full engagement, offset, and small overlap were 8%, 6%, and 3% respectively. For this study, the number of small overlap vehicles was 1,118 and the number of injured nearside occupants was 100. This study-following the Ford approach and reasonably identifying the location of the longitudinal rails based on CDC-suggests that the small overlap is at worst a moderately dangerous crash in the overall scheme of frontal crashes. The implications of this study are that the safety community should reexamine the significance of the small overlap frontal crash against an overall taxonomy of crashes. PMID:21050598

  3. An Exposition of Fischer's Model of Overlapping Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, T. Windsor; Hart, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests how the classic model of overlapping contracts can be incorporated into the contract wage model of aggregate supply. Illustrates dynamics of macroeconomic adjustment following a shock to aggregate demand. Concludes that overlapping contracts do not prolong the adjustment process; rather, the longest remaining contract determines the time…

  4. Overlaps and Accumulation in the Use of Rehabilitation Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkki, Jutta M.; Rissanen, Pekka; Raitanen, Jani A.; Viitanen, Elina A.

    2011-01-01

    The Finnish rehabilitation system is considered fragmented and multisectoral, and thus it may produce "multiclients" receiving inefficient and overlapping services. This paper addresses the overlaps and accumulation in the delivery of rehabilitation services in Finnish rehabilitation subsystems. Data were drawn from several administrative…

  5. Identifying Cluster Overlap with NORMIX Population Membership Probabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Lydia J.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the NORMIX algorithm to recover overlapping population structures was compared to the OVERCLUS procedure and another clustering procedure in a Monte Carlo study. NORMIX is found to be more accurate than other procedures in recovering overlapping population structure when appropriate implementation options are specified. (SLD)

  6. "Listenership" in Japanese: An Examination of Overlapping Listener Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Keiko

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on a particular listening pattern in Japanese which occurs by overlapping with the current speaker's incrementing utterance. Applying the Conversational Analysis approach to conversational data, the study delineates how native speakers utilize overlapping listener responses to indicate their strong alignment, and why learners of…

  7. Shake for Sigma, Pray for Pi: Classroom Orbital Overlap Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    An introductory organic classroom demonstration is discussed where analogies are made between common societal hand contact and covalent bond formation. A handshake signifies creation of a [sigma] bond ("head-on" orbital overlap), whereas the action of praying illustrates "sideways" overlap and generation of a [pi] bond. The nature of orbital and…

  8. AREA OVERLAP METHOD FOR DETERMINING ADEQUATE CHROMATOGRAPHIC RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Area Overlap method for evaluating analytical chromatograms is evaluated and compared with the Depth-of-the-Valley, IUPAC and Purnell criteria. The method is a resolution criterion based on the fraction of area contributed by an adjacent, overlapping peak. It accounts for bot...

  9. Overlap loss of manually and automatically guided mowers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overlap loss in harvesting machinery has been observed as a necessary inefficiency for many years. Each time a non-row-crop machine makes a pass in the field, it is favorable for the operator to overlap slightly into the previous pass (where the crop has already been cut), as opposed to undercutting...

  10. Spousal Network Overlap as a Basis for Spousal Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornwell, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The role social network structure plays in facilitating flows of support between spouses is often overlooked. This study examined whether levels of support between spouses depended on the degree of overlap between spouses' networks. Network overlap may enhance spouses' support capacities by increasing their understanding of each other's support…

  11. Overlapping and Non-overlapping Functions of Condensins I and II in Neural Stem Cell Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Nishide, Kenji; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    During development of the cerebral cortex, neural stem cells (NSCs) divide symmetrically to proliferate and asymmetrically to generate neurons. Although faithful segregation of mitotic chromosomes is critical for NSC divisions, its fundamental mechanism remains unclear. A class of evolutionarily conserved protein complexes, known as condensins, is thought to be central to chromosome assembly and segregation among eukaryotes. Here we report the first comprehensive genetic study of mammalian condensins, demonstrating that two different types of condensin complexes (condensins I and II) are both essential for NSC divisions and survival in mice. Simultaneous depletion of both condensins leads to severe defects in chromosome assembly and segregation, which in turn cause DNA damage and trigger p53-induced apoptosis. Individual depletions of condensins I and II lead to slower loss of NSCs compared to simultaneous depletion, but they display distinct mitotic defects: chromosome missegregation was observed more prominently in NSCs depleted of condensin II, whereas mitotic delays were detectable only in condensin I-depleted NSCs. Remarkably, NSCs depleted of condensin II display hyperclustering of pericentric heterochromatin and nucleoli, indicating that condensin II, but not condensin I, plays a critical role in establishing interphase nuclear architecture. Intriguingly, these defects are taken over to postmitotic neurons. Our results demonstrate that condensins I and II have overlapping and non-overlapping functions in NSCs, and also provide evolutionary insight into intricate balancing acts of the two condensin complexes. PMID:25474630

  12. Cleft Palate, Retrognathia and Congenital Heart Disease in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome: A Phenotype Correlation Study

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marcia A.; Miletta, Nathanial; Roe, Cheryl; Wang, Dongliang; Morrow, Bernice E.; Kates, Wendy R.; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is caused by a microdeletion of approximately 40 genes from one copy of chromosome 22. Expression of the syndrome is a variable combination of over 190 phenotypic characteristics. As of yet, little is known about how these phenotypes correlate with one another or whether there are predictable patterns of expression. Two of the most common phenotypic categories, congenital heart disease and cleft palate, have been proposed to have a common genetic relationship to the deleted T-box 1 gene (TBX1). The purpose of this study is to determine if congenital heart disease and cleft palate are correlated in a large cohort of human subjects with VCFS. Methods This study is a retrospective chart review including 316 Caucasian non-Hispanic subjects with FISH or CGH microarray confirmed chromosome 22q11.2 deletions. All subjects were evaluated by the interdisciplinary team at the Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome International Center at Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY. Each combination of congenital heart disease, cleft palates, and retrognathia was analyzed by chi square or Fisher exact test. Results For all categories of congenital heart disease and cleft palate or retrognathia no significant associations were found, with the exception of submucous cleft palate and retrognathia (nominal p=0.0325) and occult submucous cleft palate and retrognathia (nominal p=0.000013). Conclusions Congenital heart disease and cleft palate do not appear to be correlated in human subjects with VCFS despite earlier suggestions from animal models. Possible explanations include modification of the effect of TBX1 by genes outside of the 22q11.2 region that may further influence the formation of the palate or heart, or the presence of epigenetic factors that may effect genes within the deleted region, modifying genes elsewhere, or polymorphisms on the normal copy of chromosome 22. Lastly, it is possible that TBX1 plays a role in palate formation in some

  13. Clinical asthma phenotyping: A trial for bridging gaps in asthma management.

    PubMed

    Zedan, Magdy Mohamed; Laimon, Wafaa Nabil; Osman, Amal Mohamed; Zedan, Mohamed Magdy

    2015-05-01

    Asthma is a common disease affecting millions of people worldwide and exerting an enormous strain on health resources in many countries. Evidence is increasing that asthma is unlikely to be a single disease but rather a series of complex, overlapping individual diseases or phenotypes, each defined by its unique interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Asthma phenotypes were initially focused on combinations of clinical characteristics, but they are now evolving to link pathophysiological mechanism to subtypes of asthma. Better characterization of those phenotypes is expected to be most useful for allocating asthma therapies. This article reviews different published researches in terms of unbiased approaches to phenotype asthma and emphasizes how the phenotyping exercise is an important step towards proper asthma treatment. It is structured into three sections; the heterogeneity of asthma, the impact of asthma heterogeneity on asthma management and different trials for phenotyping asthma. PMID:26015875

  14. Systematic discovery of nonobvious human disease models through orthologous phenotypes.

    PubMed

    McGary, Kriston L; Park, Tae Joo; Woods, John O; Cha, Hye Ji; Wallingford, John B; Marcotte, Edward M

    2010-04-01

    Biologists have long used model organisms to study human diseases, particularly when the model bears a close resemblance to the disease. We present a method that quantitatively and systematically identifies nonobvious equivalences between mutant phenotypes in different species, based on overlapping sets of orthologous genes from human, mouse, yeast, worm, and plant (212,542 gene-phenotype associations). These orthologous phenotypes, or phenologs, predict unique genes associated with diseases. Our method suggests a yeast model for angiogenesis defects, a worm model for breast cancer, mouse models of autism, and a plant model for the neural crest defects associated with Waardenburg syndrome, among others. Using these models, we show that SOX13 regulates angiogenesis, and that SEC23IP is a likely Waardenburg gene. Phenologs reveal functionally coherent, evolutionarily conserved gene networks-many predating the plant-animal divergence-capable of identifying candidate disease genes. PMID:20308572

  15. Compressed Sensing Inspired Image Reconstruction from Overlapped Projections

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Lu, Yang; Wang, Ge

    2010-01-01

    The key idea discussed in this paper is to reconstruct an image from overlapped projections so that the data acquisition process can be shortened while the image quality remains essentially uncompromised. To perform image reconstruction from overlapped projections, the conventional reconstruction approach (e.g., filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms) cannot be directly used because of two problems. First, overlapped projections represent an imaging system in terms of summed exponentials, which cannot be transformed into a linear form. Second, the overlapped measurement carries less information than the traditional line integrals. To meet these challenges, we propose a compressive sensing-(CS-) based iterative algorithm for reconstruction from overlapped data. This algorithm starts with a good initial guess, relies on adaptive linearization, and minimizes the total variation (TV). Then, we demonstrated the feasibility of this algorithm in numerical tests. PMID:20689701

  16. Prevention of overlapping prescriptions of psychotropic drugs by community pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Shimane, Takuya; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Wada, Kiyoshi

    2012-10-01

    The nonmedical use or abuse of prescription drugs, including psychotropic medicines, is a growing health problem in Japan. Patient access to psychotropic drugs, specifically from the oversupply of medications due to overlapping prescriptions, may increase the risk of drug abuse and dependence. However, very little is known about such overlapping prescriptions. Today, the dispensing of prescriptions is generally moving from inside to outside of hospitals, with psychotropic drugs mainly dispensed at community pharmacies. In this study, we used health insurance claims (i.e., receipts) for dispensing as the main source of information in an investigation of overlapping prescriptions of psychotropic drugs. A total of 119 patients were found to have received overlapping prescriptions, as identified by community pharmacists who were members of the Saitama Pharmaceutical Association, using patient medication records, followed by medication counseling and prescription notes for the patient. According to our findings, the most frequently overlapping medication was etizolam. Etizolam can be prescribed for more than 30 days since it is not regulated under Japanese law as a "psychotropic drug." Generally, when a drug can be prescribed for a greater number of days, it increases the likelihood of an overlapping prescription during the same period. As a result, the long-term prescription of etizolam increases the risk of overlapping prescriptions. We also found that the patients who received overlapping prescriptions of etizolam were mostly elderly and the most common pattern was prescription from both internal medicine and orthopedics physicians. Etizolam has wide range of indications that are covered by health insurance. Our results suggest that patients who received overlapping prescriptions of etizolam may receive prescriptions from different prescribers for different purposes. Therefore, it may be appropriate to regulate etizolam as a "psychotropic drug" under Japanese law

  17. Neuropsychological phenotype and psychopathology in seven adult patients with Phelan-McDermid syndrome: implications for treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Egger, J I M; Zwanenburg, R J; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C M A; Kleefstra, T; Verhoeven, W M A

    2016-04-01

    Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS) or 22q13.3 deletion syndrome is characterized by a variable degree of intellectual disability, impaired speech and language as well as social communicative skills and mild dysmorphic features. The SHANK3 gene is thought to be a major contributor to the phenotype. Apart from the syndrome-associated autistic features, symptoms from the bipolar spectrum can be discerned, in particular behavior instability and fluctuating mood culminating in a (hypo)manic state. In case of coincident major somatic events, a deteriorating course may occur. This study comprises seven adult patients (four females and three males; aged 21-44 years) with genetically proven PMS. Data from medical records were collected and extensive assessment of neuropsychological variables was performed to identify cognitive characteristics and their relation with psychopathology and treatment. All patients showed profound communication deficits and their developmental functioning ranged from 1.0 to 6.3 years. In addition, they had slow speed of information processing, impairment of attentional and executive functions and cognitive alexithymia. As to psychopathology, features from the affective and anxiety domains were prominent findings in these seven patients suggesting the presence of a bipolar spectrum disorder that could be effectively moderated with mood-stabilizing agents. Results are discussed in terms of the putative involvement of structural brain abnormalities, in particular cerebellar vermis hypoplasia and corpus callosum thinning and their cognitive and emotional sequelae. It is concluded that the treatment of 22q13.3-associated psychopathology should include prescription of mood-stabilizing agents in combination with individually tailored contextual neuropsychological measures. PMID:26824576

  18. The asthma–COPD overlap syndrome: how is it defined and what are its clinical implications?

    PubMed Central

    van den Berge, Maarten; Aalbers, René

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous diseases with a large inter-individual variability with respect to their clinical expression, disease progression, and responsiveness to the available treatments. The introduction of asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) may lead to a better clinical characterization and improved treatment of patients with obstructive airways disease. However, it is still in its early phase and several improvements will have to be made. First, a clear definition of ACOS and preferably also its sub-phenotypes, eg, asthma–ACOS and COPD–ACOS, is urgently needed. That would also allow researchers to design clinical studies in well-defined patients. The latter is important since the interpretation of clinical studies performed so far is hampered by the use of many different definitions of ACOS. Second, future studies are needed to investigate the role of state-of-the-art techniques such as computed tomography, genetics, and genomics in the phenotyping of patients with obstructive airways disease, ie, asthma, COPD, and ACOS. Third, longitudinal studies are now needed to better define the clinical implications of ACOS with respect to the long-term outcome and treatment of ACOS and its sub-phenotypes compared to only asthma or COPD. PMID:26929652

  19. An extension to artifact-free projection overlaps

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jianyu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In multipinhole single photon emission computed tomography, the overlapping of projections has been used to increase sensitivity. Avoiding artifacts in the reconstructed image associated with projection overlaps (multiplexing) is a critical issue. In our previous report, two types of artifact-free projection overlaps, i.e., projection overlaps that do not lead to artifacts in the reconstructed image, were formally defined and proved, and were validated via simulations. In this work, a new proposition is introduced to extend the previously defined type-II artifact-free projection overlaps so that a broader range of artifact-free overlaps is accommodated. One practical purpose of the new extension is to design a baffle window multipinhole system with artifact-free projection overlaps. Methods: First, the extended type-II artifact-free overlap was theoretically defined and proved. The new proposition accommodates the situation where the extended type-II artifact-free projection overlaps can be produced with incorrectly reconstructed portions in the reconstructed image. Next, to validate the theory, the extended-type-II artifact-free overlaps were employed in designing the multiplexing multipinhole spiral orbit imaging systems with a baffle window. Numerical validations were performed via simulations, where the corresponding 1-pinhole nonmultiplexing reconstruction results were used as the benchmark for artifact-free reconstructions. The mean square error (MSE) was the metric used for comparisons of noise-free reconstructed images. Noisy reconstructions were also performed as part of the validations. Results: Simulation results show that for noise-free reconstructions, the MSEs of the reconstructed images of the artifact-free multiplexing systems are very similar to those of the corresponding 1-pinhole systems. No artifacts were observed in the reconstructed images. Therefore, the testing results for artifact-free multiplexing systems designed using the

  20. Space-use scaling and home range overlap in primates

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Fiona; Carbone, Chris; Cowlishaw, Guy; Isaac, Nick J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Space use is an important aspect of animal ecology, yet our understanding is limited by a lack of synthesis between interspecific and intraspecific studies. We present analyses of a dataset of 286 estimates of home range overlap from 100 primate species, with comparable samples for other space-use traits. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first multispecies study using overlap data estimated directly from field observations. We find that space-use traits in primates are only weakly related to body mass, reflecting their largely arboreal habits. Our results confirm a theory that home range overlap explains the differences in allometric scaling between population density and home range size. We then test a suite of hypotheses to explain home range overlap, both among and within species. We find that overlap is highest for larger-bodied species living in large home ranges at high population densities, where annual rainfall is low, and is higher for arboreal than terrestrial species. Most of these results are consistent with the economics of resource defence, although the predictions of one specific theory of home range overlap are not supported. We conclude that home range overlap is somewhat predictable, but the theoretical basis of animal space use remains patchy. PMID:23193124

  1. Overlap distributions for quantum quenches in the anisotropic Heisenberg chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Paolo P.; Stéphan, Jean-Marie; Canovi, Elena; Alba, Vincenzo; Brockmann, Michael; Haque, Masudul

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics after a quantum quench is determined by the weights of the initial state in the eigenspectrum of the final Hamiltonian, i.e. by the distribution of overlaps in the energy spectrum. We present an analysis of such overlap distributions for quenches of the anisotropy parameter in the one-dimensional anisotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg model (XXZ chain). We provide an overview of the form of the overlap distribution for quenches from various initial anisotropies to various final ones, using numerical exact diagonalization. We show that if the system is prepared in the antiferromagnetic Néel state (infinite anisotropy) and released into a non-interacting setup (zero anisotropy, XX point) only a small fraction of the final eigenstates gives contributions to the post-quench dynamics, and that these eigenstates have identical overlap magnitudes. We derive expressions for the overlaps, and present the selection rules that determine the final eigenstates having nonzero overlap. We use these results to derive concise expressions for time-dependent quantities (Loschmidt echo, longitudinal and transverse correlators) after the quench. We use perturbative analyses to understand the overlap distribution for quenches from infinite to small nonzero anisotropies, and for quenches from large to zero anisotropy.

  2. RIN2 syndrome: Expanding the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Simonetta; Syx, Delfien; Ivanovski, Ivan; Pollazzon, Marzia; Santodirocco, Daniela; De Marco, Loredana; Beltrami, Marina; Callewaert, Bert; Garavelli, Livia; Malfait, Fransiska

    2016-09-01

    Biallelic defects in the RIN2 gene, encoding the Ras and Rab interactor 2 protein, are associated with a rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder, with only nine patients from four independent families reported to date. The condition was initially termed MACS syndrome (macrocephaly, alopecia, cutis laxa, and scoliosis), based on the clinical features of the first identified family; however, with the expansion of the clinical phenotype in additional families, it was subsequently coined RIN2 syndrome. Hallmark features of this condition include dysmorphic facial features with striking, progressive facial coarsening, sparse hair, normal to enlarged occipitofrontal circumference, soft redundant and/or hyperextensible skin, and scoliosis. Patients with RIN2 syndrome present phenotypic overlap with other conditions, including EDS (especially the dermatosparaxis and kyphoscoliosis subtypes). Here, we describe a 10th patient, the first patient of Caucasian origin and the oldest reported patient so far, who harbors the previously identified homozygous RIN2 mutation c.1878dupC (p. (Ile627Hisfs*7)). Besides the hallmark features, this patient also presents problems not previously associated with RIN2 syndrome, including cervical vertebral fusion, mild hearing loss, and colonic fibrosis. We provide an overview of the clinical findings in all reported patients with RIN2 mutations and summarize some of the possible pathogenic mechanisms that may underlie this condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27277385

  3. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... have been genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of the following... Elements, Recombinant and/or Synthetic Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant and/or Synthetic Organisms:...

  4. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria are excluded... Equine Encephalitis virus (c) Genetic Elements, Recombinant Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant Organisms:...

  5. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria are excluded... Equine Encephalitis virus (c) Genetic Elements, Recombinant Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant Organisms:...

  6. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... have been genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of the following... Elements, Recombinant and/or Synthetic Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant and/or Synthetic Organisms:...

  7. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria are excluded... Equine Encephalitis virus (c) Genetic Elements, Recombinant Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant Organisms:...

  8. General Properties of Overlap Operators in Disordered Quantum Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoi, C.

    2016-04-01

    We study short-range quantum spin systems with Gaussian disorder. We obtain quantum mechanical extensions of the Ghirlanda-Guerra identities. We discuss properties of overlap spin operators with these identities.

  9. Analysis of Surface Roughness at Overlapping Laser Shock Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F. Z.; Zhang, Z. D.; Zhou, J. Z.; Lu, J. Z.; Zhang, Y. K.

    2016-02-01

    The overlapping effects on surface roughness are studied when samples are treated by laser shock peening (LSP). Surface roughness of overlapped circular laser spot is calculated by ISO 25178 height parameters. The usually used overlapping styles namely isosceles-right-triangle-style (AAP) and equilateral-triangle-style (AAA) are carefully investigated when the overlapping degree in x-axis (ηx) is below 50%. Surface roughness of isosceles-right-triangle-style attains its minimum value at ηx of 29.3%, and attains its maximum value at ηx of 43.6%. Surface roughness of equilateral-triangle-style attains its minimum value at ηx of 42.3%, and attains its maximum value at ηx of 32%. Experimental results are well consistent with theoretical analysis.

  10. SART-Type Image Reconstruction from Overlapped Projections

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hengyong; Ji, Changguo; Wang, Ge

    2011-01-01

    To maximize the time-integrated X-ray flux from multiple X-ray sources and shorten the data acquisition process, a promising way is to allow overlapped projections from multiple sources being simultaneously on without involving the source multiplexing technology. The most challenging task in this configuration is to perform image reconstruction effectively and efficiently from overlapped projections. Inspired by the single-source simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART), we hereby develop a multisource SART-type reconstruction algorithm regularized by a sparsity-oriented constraint in the soft-threshold filtering framework to reconstruct images from overlapped projections. Our numerical simulation results verify the correctness of the proposed algorithm and demonstrate the advantage of image reconstruction from overlapped projections. PMID:20871854

  11. A Reexamination of the Small Overlap Frontal Crash

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Paul; Morgan, Richard M.; Mohan, Pradeep; Kan, Cing-Dao; Shanks, Kurt; Jin, Wook; Tangirala, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and rank the Small Overlap Frontal Crash as one of the eight-group taxonomy proposed by Ford. The Ford taxonomy classifies real-world frontal-impact crashes based on the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS). Frontally-impacted vehicles were identified for 1985 – 2008 model year passenger vehicles with Collision Deformation Classification (CDC) data from the 1995 – 2008 years of NASS. Small overlap frontal cases were identified where there was no engagement of the vehicle frame rails, and the direct damage was located entirely outside of the vehicle frame rails. The results are that full engagement and offset (offset category means the direct damage overlaps the vehicle frame rail, with the center of direct damage between the frame rails) were the most frequent crashes contributing 35% each. The frequency of the small overlap frontal was 6%. The risks of injury (AIS ≥ 2) for the full engagement, offset, and small overlap were 8%, 6%, and 3% respectively. For this study, the number of small overlap vehicles was 1,118 and the number of injured nearside occupants was 100. This study—following the Ford approach and reasonably identifying the location of the longitudinal rails based on CDC—suggests that the small overlap is at worst a moderately dangerous crash in the overall scheme of frontal crashes. The implications of this study are that the safety community should reexamine the significance of the small overlap frontal crash against an overall taxonomy of crashes. PMID:21050598

  12. Errors in paleomagnetism: Structural control on overlapped vectors - mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pintó, A.; Ramón, M. J.; Oliva-Urcia, B.; Pueyo, E. L.; Pocoví, A.

    2011-05-01

    The reliability of paleomagnetic data is a keystone to obtain trustable kinematics interpretations. The determination of the real paleomagnetic component recorded at certain time in the geological evolution of a rock can be affected by several sources of errors: inclination shallowing, declination biases caused by incorrect restoration to the ancient field, internal deformation of rock volumes and lack of isolation of the paleomagnetic primary vector during the laboratory procedures (overlapping of components). These errors will limit or impede the validity of paleomagnetism as the only three-dimension reference. This paper presents the first systematic modeling of the effect of overlapped vectors referred to declination, inclination and stability tests taking into account the key variables: orientation of a primary and secondary (overlapped to the primary) vectors, degree of overlapping (intensity ratio of primary and secondary paleomagnetic vectors) and the fold axis orientation and dip of bedding plane. In this way, several scenarios of overlapping have been modeled in different fold geometries considering both polarities and all the variables aforementioned, allowing to calculate the deviations of the vector obtained in the laboratory (overlapped) with respect to the paleomagnetic reference (not overlapped). Observations from the models confirm that declination errors are larger than the inclination ones. In addition to the geometry factor, errors are mainly controlled by the relative magnitude of the primary respect to the secondary component (P/S ratio). We observe larger asymmetries and bigger magnitudes of errors along the fold location if the primary and secondary records have different polarities. If the primary record (declination) and the fold axis orientation are perpendicular ( Ω = 90°), errors reach maximum magnitudes and larger asymmetries along the fold surface (different dips). The effect of overlapping in the fold and reversal tests is also

  13. Dynamical overlap fermions in the epsilon-regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, Hidenori

    2006-12-01

    We report on the two-flavor QCD simulation in the ɛ-regime using the overlap fermion formu- lation. Sea quark mass is reduced to ˜ 2 MeV on a 163 × 32 lattice with the lattice spacing a 0.11 fm. Topological charge is fixed at Q = 0. We compare the eigenvalue distribution of the overlap-Dirac operator with the prediction of the chiral random matrix theory. Preliminary results on meson correlators are also reported.

  14. PhenoMiner: from text to a database of phenotypes associated with OMIM diseases

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Nigel; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Robinson, Peter N.; Oellrich, Anika; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of scientific and clinical phenotypes reported in the experimental literature has been curated manually to build high-quality databases such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). However, the identification and harmonization of phenotype descriptions struggles with the diversity of human expressivity. We introduce a novel automated extraction approach called PhenoMiner that exploits full parsing and conceptual analysis. Apriori association mining is then used to identify relationships to human diseases. We applied PhenoMiner to the BMC open access collection and identified 13 636 phenotype candidates. We identified 28 155 phenotype-disorder hypotheses covering 4898 phenotypes and 1659 Mendelian disorders. Analysis showed: (i) the semantic distribution of the extracted terms against linked ontologies; (ii) a comparison of term overlap with the Human Phenotype Ontology (HP); (iii) moderate support for phenotype-disorder pairs in both OMIM and the literature; (iv) strong associations of phenotype-disorder pairs to known disease-genes pairs using PhenoDigm. The full list of PhenoMiner phenotypes (S1), phenotype-disorder associations (S2), association-filtered linked data (S3) and user database documentation (S5) is available as supplementary data and can be downloaded at http://github.com/nhcollier/PhenoMiner under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. Database URL: phenominer.mml.cam.ac.uk PMID:26507285

  15. PhenoMiner: from text to a database of phenotypes associated with OMIM diseases.

    PubMed

    Collier, Nigel; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Robinson, Peter N; Oellrich, Anika; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2015-10-01

    Analysis of scientific and clinical phenotypes reported in the experimental literature has been curated manually to build high-quality databases such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). However, the identification and harmonization of phenotype descriptions struggles with the diversity of human expressivity. We introduce a novel automated extraction approach called PhenoMiner that exploits full parsing and conceptual analysis. Apriori association mining is then used to identify relationships to human diseases. We applied PhenoMiner to the BMC open access collection and identified 13,636 phenotype candidates. We identified 28,155 phenotype-disorder hypotheses covering 4898 phenotypes and 1659 Mendelian disorders. Analysis showed: (i) the semantic distribution of the extracted terms against linked ontologies; (ii) a comparison of term overlap with the Human Phenotype Ontology (HP); (iii) moderate support for phenotype-disorder pairs in both OMIM and the literature; (iv) strong associations of phenotype-disorder pairs to known disease-genes pairs using PhenoDigm. The full list of PhenoMiner phenotypes (S1), phenotype-disorder associations (S2), association-filtered linked data (S3) and user database documentation (S5) is available as supplementary data and can be downloaded at http://github.com/nhcollier/PhenoMiner under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. Database URL: phenominer.mml.cam.ac.uk. PMID:26507285

  16. Modeling the Autism Spectrum Disorder Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    McCray, Alexa T.; Trevvett, Philip; Frost, H. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is highly heritable, and although there has been active research in an attempt to discover the genetic factors underlying ASD, diagnosis still depends heavily on behavioral assessments. Recently, several large-scale initiatives, including those of the Autism Consortium, have contributed to the collection of extensive information from families affected by ASD. Purpose Our goal was to develop an ontology that can be used 1) to provide improved access to the data collected by those who study ASD and other neurodevelopmental disorders, and 2) to assess and compare the characteristics of the instruments that are used in the assessment of ASD. Materials and Methods We analyzed two dozen instruments used to assess ASD, studying the nature of the questions asked and items assessed, the method of delivery, and the overall scope of the content. These data together with the extensive literature on ASD contributed to our iterative development of an ASD phenotype ontology. Results The final ontology comprises 283 concepts distributed across three high-level classes, ‘Personal Traits’, ‘Social Competence’, and ‘Medical History’. The ontology is fully integrated with the Autism Consortium database, allowing researchers to pose ontology-based questions. The ontology also allows researchers to assess the degree of overlap among a set of candidate instruments according to several objective criteria. Conclusions The ASD phenotype ontology has promise for use in research settings where extensive phenotypic data have been collected, allowing a concept-based approach to identifying behavioral features of importance and for correlating these with genotypic data. PMID:24163114

  17. Overlap in prevalence between various types of environmental intolerance.

    PubMed

    Palmquist, Eva; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Neely, Gregory; Stenberg, Berndt; Nordin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Environmental intolerance (EI) is characterized by attribution of several, multisystem symptoms to specific environmental exposures, such as exposure to odorous/pungent chemicals, certain buildings, electromagnetic fields (EMFs) and everyday sounds. The symptoms are medically unexplained, non-specific and the symptoms overlap between different types of EI. To approach the issue of underlying mechanisms the matter of overlap in prevalence between intolerances can provide valuable information. The aim of the study was to examine if the overlap between intolerance to odorous/pungent chemicals, certain buildings, EMFs and sounds is larger than the expected overlap if no association would exist between them. The study was using cross-sectional data from the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study in Sweden; a large questionnaire-based survey. 8520 adults (18-79 years) were randomly selected after stratification for age and sex, of whom 3406 (40%) participated. Individuals with the four types of intolerance were identified either through self-report, or by having been physician-diagnosed with a specific EI. The overlaps between the four EIs were greater than predictions based on coincidence for both self-reported and diagnosed cases (except for the overlap between diagnosed intolerance to sounds and EMFs). The results raise the question whether different types of EI share similar underlying mechanisms, or at least that the sufferers of EI share some predisposition to acquire the conditions. PMID:24029726

  18. Radial sets: interactive visual analysis of large overlapping sets.

    PubMed

    Alsallakh, Bilal; Aigner, Wolfgang; Miksch, Silvia; Hauser, Helwig

    2013-12-01

    In many applications, data tables contain multi-valued attributes that often store the memberships of the table entities to multiple sets such as which languages a person masters, which skills an applicant documents, or which features a product comes with. With a growing number of entities, the resulting element-set membership matrix becomes very rich of information about how these sets overlap. Many analysis tasks targeted at set-typed data are concerned with these overlaps as salient features of such data. This paper presents Radial Sets, a novel visual technique to analyze set memberships for a large number of elements. Our technique uses frequency-based representations to enable quickly finding and analyzing different kinds of overlaps between the sets, and relating these overlaps to other attributes of the table entities. Furthermore, it enables various interactions to select elements of interest, find out if they are over-represented in specific sets or overlaps, and if they exhibit a different distribution for a specific attribute compared to the rest of the elements. These interactions allow formulating highly-expressive visual queries on the elements in terms of their set memberships and attribute values. As we demonstrate via two usage scenarios, Radial Sets enable revealing and analyzing a multitude of overlapping patterns between large sets, beyond the limits of state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:24051816

  19. A Bayesian variable selection procedure to rank overlapping gene sets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide expression profiling using microarrays or sequence-based technologies allows us to identify genes and genetic pathways whose expression patterns influence complex traits. Different methods to prioritize gene sets, such as the genes in a given molecular pathway, have been described. In many cases, these methods test one gene set at a time, and therefore do not consider overlaps among the pathways. Here, we present a Bayesian variable selection method to prioritize gene sets that overcomes this limitation by considering all gene sets simultaneously. We applied Bayesian variable selection to differential expression to prioritize the molecular and genetic pathways involved in the responses to Escherichia coli infection in Danish Holstein cows. Results We used a Bayesian variable selection method to prioritize Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. We used our data to study how the variable selection method was affected by overlaps among the pathways. In addition, we compared our approach to another that ignores the overlaps, and studied the differences in the prioritization. The variable selection method was robust to a change in prior probability and stable given a limited number of observations. Conclusions Bayesian variable selection is a useful way to prioritize gene sets while considering their overlaps. Ignoring the overlaps gives different and possibly misleading results. Additional procedures may be needed in cases of highly overlapping pathways that are hard to prioritize. PMID:22554182

  20. Identifying phenotypic signatures of neuropsychiatric disorders from electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Lyalina, Svetlana; Percha, Bethany; LePendu, Paea; Iyer, Srinivasan V; Altman, Russ B; Shah, Nigam H

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mental illness is the leading cause of disability in the USA, but boundaries between different mental illnesses are notoriously difficult to define. Electronic medical records (EMRs) have recently emerged as a powerful new source of information for defining the phenotypic signatures of specific diseases. We investigated how EMR-based text mining and statistical analysis could elucidate the phenotypic boundaries of three important neuropsychiatric illnesses—autism, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Methods We analyzed the medical records of over 7000 patients at two facilities using an automated text-processing pipeline to annotate the clinical notes with Unified Medical Language System codes and then searching for enriched codes, and associations among codes, that were representative of the three disorders. We used dimensionality-reduction techniques on individual patient records to understand individual-level phenotypic variation within each disorder, as well as the degree of overlap among disorders. Results We demonstrate that automated EMR mining can be used to extract relevant drugs and phenotypes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and characteristic patterns of associations among them. Patient-level analyses suggest a clear separation between autism and the other disorders, while revealing significant overlap between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. They also enable localization of individual patients within the phenotypic ‘landscape’ of each disorder. Conclusions Because EMRs reflect the realities of patient care rather than idealized conceptualizations of disease states, we argue that automated EMR mining can help define the boundaries between different mental illnesses, facilitate cohort building for clinical and genomic studies, and reveal how clear expert-defined disease boundaries are in practice. PMID:23956017

  1. Bioimaging for quantitative phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Xia, Xian; Huang, Yi; Chen, Xingwei; Han, Jing-Dong J

    2016-06-01

    With the development of bio-imaging techniques, an increasing number of studies apply these techniques to generate a myriad of image data. Its applications range from quantification of cellular, tissue, organismal and behavioral phenotypes of model organisms, to human facial phenotypes. The bio-imaging approaches to automatically detect, quantify, and profile phenotypic changes related to specific biological questions open new doors to studying phenotype-genotype associations and to precisely evaluating molecular changes associated with quantitative phenotypes. Here, we review major applications of bioimage-based quantitative phenotype analysis. Specifically, we describe the biological questions and experimental needs addressable by these analyses, computational techniques and tools that are available in these contexts, and the new perspectives on phenotype-genotype association uncovered by such analyses. PMID:26850283

  2. Accurate Morphology Preserving Segmentation of Overlapping Cells based on Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Csaba; Jermyn, Ian H.; Kato, Zoltan; Rahkama, Vesa; Östling, Päivi; Mikkonen, Piia; Pietiäinen, Vilja; Horvath, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The identification of fluorescently stained cell nuclei is the basis of cell detection, segmentation, and feature extraction in high content microscopy experiments. The nuclear morphology of single cells is also one of the essential indicators of phenotypic variation. However, the cells used in experiments can lose their contact inhibition, and can therefore pile up on top of each other, making the detection of single cells extremely challenging using current segmentation methods. The model we present here can detect cell nuclei and their morphology even in high-confluency cell cultures with many overlapping cell nuclei. We combine the “gas of near circles” active contour model, which favors circular shapes but allows slight variations around them, with a new data model. This captures a common property of many microscopic imaging techniques: the intensities from superposed nuclei are additive, so that two overlapping nuclei, for example, have a total intensity that is approximately double the intensity of a single nucleus. We demonstrate the power of our method on microscopic images of cells, comparing the results with those obtained from a widely used approach, and with manual image segmentations by experts. PMID:27561654

  3. Accurate Morphology Preserving Segmentation of Overlapping Cells based on Active Contours.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Csaba; Jermyn, Ian H; Kato, Zoltan; Rahkama, Vesa; Östling, Päivi; Mikkonen, Piia; Pietiäinen, Vilja; Horvath, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The identification of fluorescently stained cell nuclei is the basis of cell detection, segmentation, and feature extraction in high content microscopy experiments. The nuclear morphology of single cells is also one of the essential indicators of phenotypic variation. However, the cells used in experiments can lose their contact inhibition, and can therefore pile up on top of each other, making the detection of single cells extremely challenging using current segmentation methods. The model we present here can detect cell nuclei and their morphology even in high-confluency cell cultures with many overlapping cell nuclei. We combine the "gas of near circles" active contour model, which favors circular shapes but allows slight variations around them, with a new data model. This captures a common property of many microscopic imaging techniques: the intensities from superposed nuclei are additive, so that two overlapping nuclei, for example, have a total intensity that is approximately double the intensity of a single nucleus. We demonstrate the power of our method on microscopic images of cells, comparing the results with those obtained from a widely used approach, and with manual image segmentations by experts. PMID:27561654

  4. Therapeutic approaches to asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    The recognition that there are some patients with features of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has highlighted the need to develop more specific treatments for these clinical phenotypes. Some patients with COPD have predominantly eosinophilic inflammation and might respond to high doses of inhaled corticosteroids and newly developed specific antieosinophil therapies, including blocking antibodies against IL-5, IL-13, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin, as well as oral chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells antagonists. Other patients have severe asthma or are asthmatic patients who smoke with features of COPD-induced inflammation and might benefit from treatments targeting neutrophils, including macrolides, CXCR2 antagonists, phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors, p38 mitogen-activating protein kinase inhibitors, and antibodies against IL-1 and IL-17. Other patients appear to have largely fixed obstruction with little inflammation and might respond to long-acting bronchodilators, including long-acting muscarinic antagonists, to reduce hyperinflation. Highly selected patients with severe asthma might benefit from bronchial thermoplasty. Some patients with overlap syndromes can be conveniently treated with triple fixed-dose combination inhaler therapy with an inhaled corticosteroid, long-acting β2-agonist, and long-acting muscarinic antagonist, several of which are now in development. Corticosteroid resistance is a feature of asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, and understanding the various molecular mechanisms of this resistance has identified novel therapeutic targets and presented the prospect of therapies that can restore corticosteroid responsiveness. PMID:26343937

  5. Genomic insights into the overlap between psychiatric disorders: implications for research and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder are common and result in significant morbidity and mortality. Although currently classified into distinct disorder categories, they show clinical overlap and familial co-aggregation, and share genetic risk factors. Recent advances in psychiatric genomics have provided insight into the potential mechanisms underlying the overlap between these disorders, implicating genes involved in neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Furthermore, evidence from copy number variant, exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies supports a gradient of neurodevelopmental psychopathology indexed by mutational load or mutational severity, and cognitive impairment. These findings have important implications for psychiatric research, highlighting the need for new approaches to stratifying patients for research. They also point the way for work aiming to advance our understanding of the pathways from genotype to clinical phenotype, which will be required in order to inform new classification systems and to develop novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24944580

  6. The asthma–COPD overlap syndrome: do we really need another syndrome in the already complex matrix of airway disease?

    PubMed Central

    Kostikas, Konstantinos; Clemens, Andreas; Patalano, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The term asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) is one of multiple terms used to describe patients with characteristics of both COPD and asthma, representing ~20% of patients with obstructive airway diseases. The recognition of both sets of morbidities in patients is important to guide practical treatment decisions. It is widely recognized that patients with COPD and coexisting asthma present with a higher disease burden, despite the conceptual expectation that the “reversible” or “treatable” component of asthma would allow for more effective management and better outcomes. However, subcategorization into terms such as ACOS is complicated by the vast spectrum of heterogeneity that is encapsulated by asthma and COPD, resulting in different clinical clusters. In this review, we discuss the possibility that these different clusters are suboptimally described by the umbrella term “ACOS”, as this additional categorization may lead to clinical confusion and potential inappropriate use of resources. We suggest that a more clinically relevant approach would be to recognize the extreme variability and the numerous phenotypes encompassed within obstructive airway diseases, with various degrees of overlapping in individual patients. In addition, we discuss some of the evidence to be considered when making practical decisions on the treatment of patients with overlapping characteristics between COPD and asthma, as well as the potential options for phenotype and biomarker-driven management of airway disease with the aim of providing more personalized treatment for patients. Finally, we highlight the need for more evidence in patients with overlapping disease characteristics and to facilitate better characterization of potential treatment responders. PMID:27366057

  7. Presentation of dynamically overlapping auditory messages in user interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, A.L.

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation describes a methodology and example implementation for the dynamic regulation of temporally overlapping auditory messages in computer-user interfaces. The regulation mechanism exists to schedule numerous overlapping auditory messages in such a way that each individual message remains perceptually distinct from all others. The method is based on the research conducted in the area of auditory scene analysis. While numerous applications have been engineered to present the user with temporally overlapped auditory output, they have generally been designed without any structured method of controlling the perceptual aspects of the sound. The method of scheduling temporally overlapping sounds has been extended to function in an environment where numerous applications can present sound independently of each other. The Centralized Audio Presentation System is a global regulation mechanism that controls all audio output requests made from all currently running applications. The notion of multimodal objects is explored in this system as well. Each audio request that represents a particular message can include numerous auditory representations, such as musical motives and voice. The Presentation System scheduling algorithm selects the best representation according to the current global auditory system state, and presents it to the user within the request constraints of priority and maximum acceptable latency. The perceptual conflicts between temporally overlapping audio messages are examined in depth through the Computational Auditory Scene Synthesizer. At the heart of this system is a heuristic-based auditory scene synthesis scheduling method. Different schedules of overlapped sounds are evaluated and assigned penalty scores. High scores represent presentations that include perceptual conflicts between over-lapping sounds. Low scores indicate fewer and less serious conflicts. A user study was conducted to validate that the perceptual difficulties predicted by

  8. Adolescent irritability: phenotypic associations and genetic links with depressed mood

    PubMed Central

    Stringaris, Argyris; Zavos, Helena; Leibenluft, Ellen; Maughan, Barbara; Eley, Thalia

    2013-01-01

    Objective Irritability has been proposed to underlie the developmental link between oppositional problems and depression. However, little is known about the genetic and environmental influences on irritability and its overlap with depression. This paper tests the hypothesis that the association between irritability and depression is accounted for by genetic factors. As such, it draws on the notion of “generalist genes” i.e., genes of general effect that underlie phenotypic overlap between disorders. Method The G1219 study, a UK-based twin sample (N=2651), was used in a cross-sectional and longitudinal design. Irritable and headstrong/hurtful dimensions of oppositional behavior were derived using factor analysis. Regression was used to estimate the association between depression and delinquency. Multivariate genetic analyses were used to estimate the genetic overlap between irritability versus headstrong/hurtful behaviors with depression and delinquency respectively. Results Irritability showed a significantly stronger phenotypic relationship with depression than delinquency, whereas headstrong/hurtful behaviors were more strongly related to delinquency than depression. In multivariate genetic analyses, the genetic correlation between irritability and depression (0.70; CI: 0.59-0.82) was significantly higher than that between irritability and delinquency (0.57; CI: 0.45-0.69); conversely, the genetic correlation between headstrong/hurtful behaviors and delinquency (0.80; CI: 0.72-0.86) was significantly higher than that between headstrong/hurtful behaviors and depression (0.46; CI: 0.36-0.57). In longitudinal models, the phenotypic association between irritability at Time 1 and depression at Time 2 was accounted for by the genetic association between irritability and depression at Time1. Conclusions The findings are consistent with the theory that genes with general effects underlie the relationship between irritability and depression. PMID:22193524

  9. Increasing efficiency in intermediate band solar cells with overlapping absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Akshay; Krich, Jacob J.

    2016-07-01

    Intermediate band (IB) materials are promising candidates for realizing high efficiency solar cells. In IB photovoltaics, photons are absorbed in one of three possible electronic transitions—valence to conduction band, valence to intermediate band, or intermediate to conduction band. With fully concentrated sunlight, when the band gaps have been chosen appropriately, the highest efficiency IB solar cells require that these three absorptions be non-overlapping, so absorbed photons of fixed energy contribute to only one transition. The realistic case of overlapping absorptions, where the transitions compete for photons, is generally considered to be a source of loss. We show that overlapping absorptions can in fact lead to significant improvements in IB solar cell efficiencies, especially for IB that are near the middle of the band gap. At low to moderate concentration, the highest efficiency requires overlapping absorptions. We use the detailed-balance method and indicate how much overlap of the absorptions is required to achieve efficiency improvements, comparing with some known cases. These results substantially broaden the set of materials that can be suitable for high-efficiency IB solar cells.

  10. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome among patients with stable COPD].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, M-S; Nguyen Dang, D; Schleich, F; Manise, M; Corhay, J-L; Louis, R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe the frequency and characteristics of the overlap syndrome among stable COPD patients (stage 2 to 4 according to GOLD). Material and method: We studied 46 patients with stable COPD recruited from the outpatient clinic of the CHU of Liege from May 2013 to April 2014. Definition of the overlap syndrome was based on the coexistence of post-bronchodilation FEV1/FVC < 70% and, either, an asthmatic history before the age of 40, or, at least, two functional and immune-inflammatory asthmatic traits : 1) significant FEV1 reversibility to inhaled bronchodilator (FEVI change >/= 200 ml and >/= 12% after bronchodilation), 2) eosinophilic inflammation : sputum eosinophils ≥ 3%,blood eosinophils ≥ 400/μl, or FENO ≥ 45 ppb, 3) clinical history of airway allergy, or total serum IgE ≥ 113 KU/l, or RAST ≥ 0,35 KU/l against major aeroallergens. 37% patients had the COPD-asthma overlap syndrome and this group had a higher CAT score reflecting more severe symptoms (24,6 ± 8,1 vs 19,4 ± 8, p < 0,05) despite similar level of airway obstruction. The transfer coefficient DLCO/VA was preserved in the overlap group (97 ± 24%), but altered in the pure COPD group (80 ± 20%), p < 0,05. Approximately one third of COPD patients present with the overlap syndrome and they are more symptomatic without any evidence of more severe airway obstruction. PMID:25902605

  11. Molecular and clinical characterization of patients with overlapping 10p deletions.

    PubMed

    Lindstrand, Anna; Malmgren, Helena; Verri, Annapia; Benetti, Elisa; Eriksson, Maud; Nordgren, Ann; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Golovleva, Irina; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Blennow, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Chromosome 10p terminal deletions have been associated with DiGeorge phenotype, and within the same genomic region haploinsufficiency of GATA3 causes the HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, renal dysplasia). We have performed detailed molecular analysis of four patients with partial overlapping 10p deletions by using FISH-mapping, array-CGH, and custom-designed high-resolution oligonucleotide array. All four patients had mental retardation and speech impairment and three of them showed variable signs of HDR syndrome. In addition, two patients had autistic behaviors and had similar dysmorphic features giving them a striking physical resemblance. A review of the literature identified 10 previously published cases with similar 10p deletions and reliable molecular or molecular cytogenetic mapping data. The combined information of present and previous cases suggests that partial deletions of 10p14-p15 represent a syndrome with a distinct and more severe phenotype than previously assumed. The main characteristics include severe mental retardation, language impairment, autistic behavior, and characteristic clinical features. A critical region involved in mental retardation and speech impairment is defined within 1.6 Mb in 10p15.3. In addition, deletion of 4.3 Mb within 10p14 is associated with autism and characteristic clinical findings. PMID:20425828

  12. Deletion of 19q13 reveals clinical overlap with Dubowitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Jill E; Williams, Simon G; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Bowers, Naomi; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Newman, William G

    2015-12-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a presumed autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities: microcephaly, learning and developmental delay, growth failure, and a predisposition to allergies and eczema. There have been more than 150 individuals reported to have this diagnosis, but no unifying genetic alteration has been identified indicating genetic heterogeneity. We report on a pair of monozygotic twins diagnosed clinically with Dubowitz syndrome by Professor Dubowitz over 30 years ago and identified to have a de novo heterozygous 3.2-Mb deletion at 19q13.11q13.12. Exome sequencing did not identify either a putative pathogenic variant on the trans allele supporting recessive inheritance or any other causative sequence variants. Comparison of the phenotype in our cases shows considerable overlap with the 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome, suggesting that a subset of individuals diagnosed with Dubowitz syndrome may be due to deletions at 19q13. Our finding further reinforces the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of Dubowitz syndrome. PMID:26377242

  13. EHR Big Data Deep Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, L.; Lopez-Campos, G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Given the quickening speed of discovery of variant disease drivers from combined patient genotype and phenotype data, the objective is to provide methodology using big data technology to support the definition of deep phenotypes in medical records. Methods As the vast stores of genomic information increase with next generation sequencing, the importance of deep phenotyping increases. The growth of genomic data and adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR) in medicine provides a unique opportunity to integrate phenotype and genotype data into medical records. The method by which collections of clinical findings and other health related data are leveraged to form meaningful phenotypes is an active area of research. Longitudinal data stored in EHRs provide a wealth of information that can be used to construct phenotypes of patients. We focus on a practical problem around data integration for deep phenotype identification within EHR data. The use of big data approaches are described that enable scalable markup of EHR events that can be used for semantic and temporal similarity analysis to support the identification of phenotype and genotype relationships. Conclusions Stead and colleagues’ 2005 concept of using light standards to increase the productivity of software systems by riding on the wave of hardware/processing power is described as a harbinger for designing future healthcare systems. The big data solution, using flexible markup, provides a route to improved utilization of processing power for organizing patient records in genotype and phenotype research. PMID:25123744

  14. Climate-induced range overlap among closely related species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krosby, Meade; Wilsey, Chad B.; McGuire, Jenny L.; Duggan, Jennifer M.; Nogeire, Theresa M.; Heinrichs, Julie A.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Lawler, Joshua J.

    2015-09-01

    Contemporary climate change is causing large shifts in biotic distributions, which has the potential to bring previously isolated, closely related species into contact. This has led to concern that hybridization and competition could threaten species persistence. Here, we use bioclimatic models to show that future range overlap by the end of the century is predicted for only 6.4% of isolated, congeneric species pairs of New World birds, mammals and amphibians. Projected rates of climate-induced overlap are higher for birds (11.6%) than for mammals (4.4%) or amphibians (3.6%). As many species will have difficulty tracking shifting climates, actual rates of future overlap are likely to be far lower, suggesting that hybridization and competition impacts may be relatively modest.

  15. Evaluation of overlaps between arbitrary fermionic quasiparticle vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avez, B.; Bender, M.

    2012-03-01

    We derive an expression that allows for the unambiguous evaluation of the overlap between two arbitrary quasiparticle vacua, including its sign. Our expression is based on the Pfaffian of a skew-symmetric matrix, extending the overlap formula recently proposed by Robledo [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.79.021302 79, 021302(R) (2009)] to the most general case of quasiparticle vacua, including the one of the overlap between two different blocked n-quasiparticle states for either even or odd systems. The powerfulness of the method is illustrated for a few typical matrix elements that appear in realistic angular-momentum-restored generator coordinate method calculations when breaking time-reversal invariance and using the full model space of occupied single-particle states.

  16. Novel Definition and Algorithm for Chaining Fragments with Proportional Overlaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uricaru, Raluca; Mancheron, Alban; Rivals, Eric

    Chaining fragments is a crucial step in genome alignment. Existing chaining algorithms compute a maximum weighted chain with no overlaps allowed between adjacent fragments. In practice, using local alignments as fragments, instead of MEMs, generates frequent overlaps between fragments, due to combinatorial reasons and biological factors, i.e. variable tandem repeat structures that differ in number of copies between genomic sequences. In this paper, in order to raise this limitation, we formulate a novel definition of a chain, allowing overlaps proportional to the fragments lengths, and exhibit an efficient algorithm for computing such a maximum weighted chain. We tested our algorithm on a dataset composed of 694 genome couples and accounted for significant improvements in terms of coverage, while keeping the running times below reasonable limits.

  17. Finding overlapping communities in networks by label propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Steve

    2010-10-01

    We propose an algorithm for finding overlapping community structure in very large networks. The algorithm is based on the label propagation technique of Raghavan, Albert and Kumara, but is able to detect communities that overlap. Like the original algorithm, vertices have labels that propagate between neighbouring vertices so that members of a community reach a consensus on their community membership. Our main contribution is to extend the label and propagation step to include information about more than one community: each vertex can now belong to up to v communities, where v is the parameter of the algorithm. Our algorithm can also handle weighted and bipartite networks. Tests on an independently designed set of benchmarks, and on real networks, show the algorithm to be highly effective in recovering overlapping communities. It is also very fast and can process very large and dense networks in a short time.

  18. Overlap Functions for Measures in Conformal Iterated Function Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailescu, Eugen; Urbański, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    We employ thermodynamic formalism for the study of conformal iterated function systems (IFS) S = {φ _i}_{i in I} with arbitrary overlaps, and of measures μ on limit sets Λ , which are projections of equilibrium measures hat{μ } with respect to a certain lift map Φ on Σ _I^+ × Λ . No type of Open Set Condition is assumed. We introduce a notion of overlap function and overlap number for such a measure hat{μ } with respect to S; and, in particular a notion of (topological) overlap number o(S). These notions take in consideration the n-chains between points in the limit set. We prove that o(S, hat{μ }) is related to a conditional entropy of hat{μ } with respect to the lift Φ . Various types of projections to Λ of invariant measures are studied. We obtain upper estimates for the Hausdorff dimension HD(μ ) of μ on Λ , by using pressure functions and o(S, hat{μ }). In particular, this applies to projections of Bernoulli measures on Σ _I^+. Next, we apply the results to Bernoulli convolutions ν _λ for λ in (1/2, 1), which correspond to self-similar measures determined by composing, with equal probabilities, the contractions of an IFS with overlaps S_λ . We prove that for all λ in (1/2, 1), there exists a relation between HD(ν _λ ) and the overlap number o(S_λ ). We also estimate o(S_λ ) for certain values of λ.

  19. Overlaps among phenological phases in flood plain forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, Lenka; Bauer, Zdeněk; Trnka, Miroslav; Možný, Martin; Štěpánek, Petr; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing concern that climate change has significant impacts on species phenology, seasonal population dynamics, and thus interaction (a)synchrony between species. Species that have historically undergone life history events on the same seasonal calendar may lose synchrony and therefore lose the ability to interact as they have in the past. In view of the match/mismatch hypothesis, the different extents or directions of the phenological shifts among interacting species may have significant implications for community structure and dynamics. That's why our principal goal of the study is to determine the phenological responses within the ecosystem of flood plain forest and analyzed the phenological overlapping among each phenological periods of given species. The phenological observations were done at flood-plain forest experimental site during the period 1961-2012. The whole ecosystem in this study create 17 species (15 plants and 2 bird species) and each species is composed of 2 phenological phases. Phenological periods of all species of ecosystem overlap each other and 43 of these overlapping were chosen and the length, trend and correlation with temperature were elaborated. The analysis of phenophases overlapping of chosen species showed that the length of overlay is getting significantly shorter in 1 case. On the other hand the situation when the length of overlaps is getting significantly longer arose in 4 cases. Remaining overlaps (38) of all phenological periods among various species is getting shorter or longer but with no significance or have not changed anyhow. This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific team focused on drought" No. CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0248. and of projects no. LD13030 supporting participation of the Czech Republic in the COST action ES1106.

  20. Mature phenotype in Hemerocallis plantlets fortuitously generated in vitro