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Sample records for 23na neutron-induced reactions

  1. Spin distribution in neutron induced preequilibrium reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Kawano, T; Chadwick, M; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Macri, R; Younes, W

    2005-10-04

    The preequilibrium reaction mechanism makes an important contribution to neutron-induced reactions above E{sub n} {approx} 10 MeV. The preequilibrium process has been studied exclusively via the characteristic high energy neutrons produced at bombarding energies greater than 10 MeV. They are expanding the study of the preequilibrium reaction mechanism through {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Cross-section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 250 MeV) on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). Residual state population was predicted using the GNASH reaction code, enhanced for preequilibrium. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshback, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without preequilibrium effects is significant.

  2. Experimental determination of the {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na reaction cross section and calculation of the Maxwellian averaged cross section at stellar temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smet, L. de; Wagemans, C.; Wagemans, J.; Heyse, J.; Gils, J. van

    2007-10-15

    The {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na reaction cross section has been studied at the linear accelerator GELINA of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements in Geel, Belgium, and has been determined up to a neutron energy of about 100 keV using the time-of-flight technique. Six resonances could be observed in this energy region, whereas before only one had been identified experimentally. For four of them, resonance parameters such as resonance energy, total width, area, and spin of the state could be determined. From the obtained {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na cross section data, Maxwellian averaged cross section (MACS) values were calculated by numerical integration. Since neutron induced reactions are among the major destruction mechanisms of {sup 26}Al in our Galaxy, these new MACS values contribute to a better understanding of the observed {sup 26}Al abundance.

  3. Three New Low-Energy Resonances in the 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanna, F.; Depalo, R.; Aliotta, M.; Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Best, A.; Boeltzig, A.; Broggini, C.; Bruno, C. G.; Caciolli, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; di Leva, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ferraro, F.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Mossa, V.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Prati, P.; Scott, D. A.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Trezzi, D.; LUNA Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    The 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400 keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7 keV are reported. Their resonance strengths are derived with 2%-7% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances are greatly reduced. Data are taken using a windowless 22Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Italy, taking advantage of the ultralow background observed deep underground. The new reaction rate is a factor of 20 higher than the recent evaluation at a temperature of 0.1 GK, relevant to nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars.

  4. Three New Low-Energy Resonances in the ^{22}Ne(p,γ)^{23}Na Reaction.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, F; Depalo, R; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Boeltzig, A; Broggini, C; Bruno, C G; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Davinson, T; di Leva, A; Elekes, Z; Ferraro, F; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Menegazzo, R; Mossa, V; Pantaleo, F R; Prati, P; Scott, D A; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Szücs, T; Takács, M P; Trezzi, D

    2015-12-18

    The ^{22}Ne(p,γ)^{23}Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between ^{20}Ne and ^{27}Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The ^{22}Ne(p,γ)^{23}Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400 keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the ^{22}Ne(p,γ)^{23}Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7 keV are reported. Their resonance strengths are derived with 2%-7% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances are greatly reduced. Data are taken using a windowless ^{22}Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Italy, taking advantage of the ultralow background observed deep underground. The new reaction rate is a factor of 20 higher than the recent evaluation at a temperature of 0.1 GK, relevant to nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars. PMID:26722918

  5. 23Na (α,p )26Mg Reaction Rate at Astrophysically Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, A. M.; Munch, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Laursen, K. L.; Diget, C. Aa.; Hubbard, N. J.

    2015-07-01

    The production of 26Al in massive stars is sensitive to the 23Na (α,p )26Mg cross section. Recent experimental data suggest the currently recommended cross sections are underestimated by a factor of ˜40 . We present here differential cross sections for the 23Na (α,p )26Mg reaction measured in the energy range Ec .m .=1.7 - 2.5 MeV . Concurrent measurements of Rutherford scattering provide absolute normalizations that are independent of variations in target properties. Angular distributions are measured for both p0 and p1 permitting the determination of total cross sections. The results show no significant deviation from the statistical model calculations upon which the recommended rates are based. We therefore retain the previous recommendation without the increase in cross section and resulting stellar reaction rates by a factor of 40, impacting the 26Al yield from massive stars by more than a factor of 3.

  6. Cross sections of neutron-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Tapan; Lahiri, Joydev; Basu, D. N.

    2010-10-15

    We study the properties of the neutron-nucleus total and reaction cross sections for several nuclei. We have applied an analytical model, the nuclear Ramsauer model, justified it from the nuclear reaction theory approach, and extracted the values of 12 parameters used in the model. The given parametrization has an advantage as phenomenological optical model potentials are limited up to 150-200 MeV. The present model provides good estimates of the total cross sections for several nuclei particularly at high energies.

  7. Neutron-induced reaction studies using stored ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorius, Jan; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Reifarth, René

    2015-11-01

    Storage rings provide unique possibilities for investigations of nuclear reactions. Radioactive ions can be stored if the ring is connected to an appropriate facility and reaction studies are feasible at low beam intensities because of the recycling of beam particles. Using gas jet or droplet targets, charged particle-induced reactions on short-lived isotopes can be studied in inverse kinematics. In such a system a high-flux reactor could serve as a neutron target extending the experimental spectrum to neutron-induced reactions. Those could be studied over a wide energy range covering the research fields of nuclear astrophysics and reactor safety, transmutation of nuclear waste and fusion.

  8. Direct measurement of the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction cross section at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Federico; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction takes part in the NeNa cycle of hydrogen burning, influencing the production of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in red giant stars, asymptotic giant stars and classical novae. The 22Ne(p,γ)27Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of tentative resonances in the Gamow window, where only upper limits were quoted in literature. A direct measurement of the 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction cross section has been carried out at LUNA using a windowless differential-pumping gas target with two high- purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. A new measurement with a 4π bismuth germanate (BGO) summing detector is ongoing. During the HPGe phase of the experiment the strengths of the resonances at 156.2 keV, 189.5 keV and 259.7 keV have been directly measured for the first time and their contribution to the reaction rate has been calculated. The decay scheme of the newly discovered resonances has been established as well and some improved upper limits on the unobserved resonances have been put. The BGO detector with its 70% γ-detection efficiency allows to measure the cross section at lower energy. In order to further investigate the resonances at 71 keV and 105 keV and the direct-capture component, the data taking is ongoing.

  9. Low-Energy resonances in the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction directly observed at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalo, Rosanna; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning influences the synthesis of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in AGB stars and classical novae explosions. The 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. A new direct study of the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction has been performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) using a windowless gas target and two HPGe detectors. Several resonances have been observed for the first time in a direct experiment.

  10. Exploring the {sup 22}Ne(p,γ){sup 23}Na reaction at LUNA and at HZDR

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanna, Francesca; Collaboration: LUNA Collaboration

    2014-05-09

    The {sup 22}Ne(p,γ){sup 23}Na reaction is involved in the hydrogen burning NeNa cycle. This determines the nucleosynthesis of the Ne and Na isotopes in the Red Giant Branch and Asymptotic Giant Branch phases of stellar evolution. In the energy range relevant for astrophysics (20 keV < E < 600 keV), the {sup 22}Ne(p,γ){sup 23}Na reaction rate is highly uncertain because of the contribution of a large number of resonances never measured directly. A related study is under preparation at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA), in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, and it will cover the energy range 100 keV < E < 400 keV. Meanwhile, a measurement at higher energies (i.e. 436 keV) has been carried out at the Tandetron accelerator of the HZDR (Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf) in Germany. Some preliminary results will be presented.

  11. Neutron-induced fission cross sections of short-lived actinides with the surrogate reaction method.

    SciTech Connect

    Kessedijian, G.; Jurado, B.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Bidaud, A.; Czajkowski, S.; Dassie, D.; Haas, B.; Mathieu, L.; Audouin, L.; Capellan, N.; Tassan-Got, L.; Wilson, J. N.; Berthoumieux, E.; Gunsing, F.; Theisen, Ch.; Serot, O.; Bauge, E.; Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.

    2010-09-13

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup 242,243}Cm and {sup 241}Am have been obtained with the surrogate reaction method. Recent results for the neutron-induced cross section of {sup 243}Cm are questioned by the present data. For the first time, the {sup 242}Cm cross section has been determined up to the onset of second-chance fission. The good agreement at the lowest excitation energies between the present results and the existing neutron-induced data indicates that the distributions in spin and parity of states populated with both techniques are similar.

  12. Facility for neutron induced few body reactions at Bochum University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannach, B.; Bodek, K.; Börker, G.; Kamke, D.; Krug, J.; Lekkas, P.; Lübcke, W.; Stephan, M.

    1987-02-01

    A facility is described which is designed for the measurement of neutron induced three-body breakup. It has been used for the breakup of deuterium and of the nucleus 9Be. Neutrons are produced by a pulsed beam of deuterons from the Bochum 4MV Dynamitron-Tandem accelerator by bombarding a thick tritium-titanium target or a deuterium gas target. The outgoing beam is collimated by a 4π shielding to a solid angle of about 1 msr. In most cases, a liquid scintillator (NE232 or a mixture of NE232/NE213) serves as a target for the neutron beam. Scattered neutrons are detected by NE213-detectors of different sizes. For testing purposes the differential elastic n-d cross section and simultaneously the response of NE232 have been measured at 22.4 and 7.9 MeV.

  13. Low-background spectrometer for the study of fast neutron-induced (n,α) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khriachkov, V. A.; Ketlerov, V. V.; Mitrofanov, V. F.; Semenova, N. N.

    2000-04-01

    An α-particle spectrometer based on an ionization chamber with Frisch grid and a waveform digitizer has been developed for studies of fast neutron-induced (n,α) reactions. The information on the energy of the α-particle and its emission angle can be obtained from the amplitude and rise time of the digitized anode signal. For a situation where both the solid target on the cathode of the ionization chamber and the working gas are the α-particle sources, a new method for the suppression of the neutron-induced background is proposed. The background due to gaseous α-particles was reduced by a factor of 30.

  14. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  15. α and 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction ZAX(n,x) Z -2 A -4Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n ,n'α ) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n ,2 p 3 n ) reaction. The relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus. Purpose: Study fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni. Locate experimentally the nuclear charge region along the line of stability where the cross sections for α emission and for 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions are comparable as a further test of reaction models. Methods: Data were taken by using the Germanium Array for Neutron-Induced Excitations. The broad-spectrum pulsed neutron beam of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility provided neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the incident-neutron energies. Results: Absolute partial cross sections for production of seven discrete Fe γ rays populated in 60Ni (n ,α /2 p x n γ ) reactions with 2 ≤x ≤5 were measured for neutron energies 1 MeVneutron-induced reactions on stable targets via α emission at the peak of the (n ,α ) and (n ,n'α ) reactions is comparable to that for 2 p 2 n and 2 p 3 n emission at higher incident energies in the nuclear charge region around Fe.

  16. Barites - Anomalous xenon from spallation and neutron-induced reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, B.

    1976-01-01

    Sedimentary barites from South Africa and Western Australia (about 3 billion years old) contain spallogenic Xe isotopes produced by reactions of Ba with nuclear-active particles in cosmic rays. 'Surface residence time' of these samples was calculated from the observed concentrations of spallogenic Xe-126. Comparison of spallogenic ratios of Xe-131/Xe-126 in the two samples provides evidence for the reaction Ba-130(n, gamma) yields Xe-131, which is characterized by a large number of resonances for neutron absorption in the epithermal region. This observation lends additional support to the conclusions already reached regarding the origin of anomalous Xe-131 in lunar samples.

  17. Direct measurement of the (23)Na(α,p)(26)Mg reaction cross section at energies relevant for the production of galactic (26)Al.

    PubMed

    Almaraz-Calderon, S; Bertone, P F; Alcorta, M; Albers, M; Deibel, C M; Hoffman, C R; Jiang, C L; Marley, S T; Rehm, K E; Ugalde, C

    2014-04-18

    The 1809-keV γ ray from the decay of (26)Al(g) is an important target for γ-ray astronomy. In the convective C/Ne burning shell of massive presupernova stars, the (23)Na(α,p)(26)Mg reaction directly influences the production of (26)Al. We have performed a direct measurement of the (23)Na(α,p)(26)Mg reaction cross section at the appropriate astrophysically important energies. The stellar rate calculated in the present work is larger than the recommended rate by nearly a factor of 40 and could strongly affect the production of (26)Al in massive stars. PMID:24785033

  18. Neutron Induced Capture Reaction Studies in the Resonance Region at GELINA

    SciTech Connect

    Schillebeeckx, Peter; Borella, A.; Kopecky, S.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Siegler, P.; Sirakov, I.; Massimi, C.; Moxon, M.; Ware, T.

    2009-01-28

    The neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA installed at the IRMM Geel (B) has been designed to study neutron-induced reactions in the resonance region. It is a multi-user facility, providing a pulsed white neutron source, with a neutron energy range between 10 meV and 20 MeV and a time resolution of 1 ns. The research program concentrates on cross section data needs for nuclear energy applications. In this paper efforts to improve the quality of cross section data for neutron induced capture reactions in the resolved and unresolved resonance region are presented together with examples of cross section data to support the development of advanced reactor concepts and to optimize the use of present nuclear power plants.

  19. Evaluation of photon production data from neutron-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The evaluation methods and procedures used for generating the photon production data in the current Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B, Version V) are reviewed. There are 42 materials in the General Purpose File of ENDF/B-V that contain data for prompt photon production. Almost all evaluations had substantial experimental data bases, but fewer than half of them employed any of the following evaluation methods. Only a few used theoretical techniques that are sophisticated enough to ensure internal consistency with other particle production data. Comments are made on four evaluation methods: the empirical formalism of Howerton et al., the Troubetzkoy model, the multiparticle Hauser-Feshbach/precompound model, and the Yost method. Critiques are also made on three procedures used for conserving photon energies in neutron capture reactions. The presence of photon production data in the file is useful for studying energy balance, since photon production generally accounts for a large portion of the reaction energy output. Problems found in energy balance checks are discussed. 9 figures, 1 table.

  20. Neutron-induced reaction studies at FIGARO using a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochman, D.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.

    2004-05-01

    A description is given of the new flexible facility Fast Neutron-Induced Gamma-Ray Observer (FIGARO) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. FIGARO is designed to study fast-neutron-induced reactions that result in the emission of γ rays and neutrons, using the white neutron beam of the Weapons Neutron Research Facility. The emitted neutrons and γ rays are detected by several liquid scintillators and one high-resolution germanium or one barium-fluoride detector, respectively. As an example, the inelastic neutron scattering on Si from 4 to 20 MeV is presented and the results are compared with predictions of the nuclear model calculations performed with the codes GNASH and EMPIRE II.

  1. The Status of Cross Section Measurements for Neutron-induced Reactions Needed for Cosmic Ray Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with lunar rocks and meteorites produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. Advances in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) allow production rates to be measured routinely in well-documented lunar rocks and meteorites. These measurements are analyzed using theoretical models to learn about the object itself and the history of the cosmic rays that fell on it. Good cross section measurements are essential input to the theoretical calculations. Most primary cosmic ray particles are protons so reliable cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. A cross section is deemed accurate if measurements made by different experimenters using different techniques result in consistent values. Most cross sections for proton induced reactions are now well measured. However, good cross section measurements for neutron-induced reactions are still needed. These cross sections are required to fully account for all galactic cosmic ray interactions at depth in an extraterrestrial object. When primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interact with an object many secondary neutrons are produced, which also initiate spallation reactions. Thus, the total GCR contribution to the overall cosmogenic nuclide archive has to include the contribution from the secondary neutron interactions. Few relevant cross section measurements have been reported for neutron-induced reactions at neutron energies greater than approximately 20 MeV. The status of the cross section measurements using quasi-monoenergetic neutron energies at iThemba LABS, South Africa and white neutron beams at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos are reported here.

  2. Neutron-induced reactions on AlF3 studied using the optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Lv, Cui-Juan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Wei; Zuo, Jia-Xu

    2015-08-01

    Neutron-induced reactions on 27Al and 19F nuclei are investigated using the optical model implemented in the TALYS 1.4 toolkit. Incident neutron energies in a wide range from 0.1 keV to 30 MeV are calculated. The cross sections for the main channels (n, np), (n, p), (n, α), (n, 2n), and (n, γ) and the total reaction cross section (n, tot) of the reactions are obtained. When the default parameters in TALYS 1.4 are adopted, the calculated results agree with the measured results. Based on the calculated results for the n + 27Al and n + 19F reactions, the results of the n + 27Al19F reactions are predicted. These results are useful both for the design of thorium-based molten salt reactors and for neutron activation analysis techniques.

  3. FIGARO: a New Facility for Studying Neutron-Induced Reactions that Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, L.; Haight, R. C.; Devlin, M.; Aprahamian, A.

    2000-04-01

    FIGARO (Fast neutron-Induced GAmma-Ray Observer) was established in 1999 at LANSCE/WNR. This new capability is intended to extend our research into nuclear reactions and nuclear structure using gamma rays as the principal probe. The detector will consist of an array of germanium and NE-213 neutron detectors, operating in coincidence, placed at a distance of about 20 m from the neutron source. The scientific goals of FIGARO include: investigation of nuclear level densities using gamma-ray transitions as an indicator of angular momentum populated in the reaction; investigations of pre-equilibrium reactions; and study of cross sections and neutron emission spectra in (n,n') excitations. A first measurement, with the detection of only gamma-rays, has been performed with a ^59Co sample. By comparison with existing data(T. E. Slusarchyk, ORNL/TM-11404(1989)) we can assess the performance of the detector. Results will be discussed.

  4. The 12C(12C,α)20Ne and 12C(12C,p)23Na reactions at the Gamow peak via the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Guardo, L.; Gulino, M.; Indelicato, I.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Spartá, R.

    2016-05-01

    A measurement of the 12C(14N,α20Ne)2H and 12C(14N,p23Na)2Hreactions has been performed at a 14N beam energy of 30.0 MeV. The experiment aims to explore the extent to which contributing 24Mg excited states can be populated in the quasi-free reaction off the deuteron in 14N. In particular, the 24Mg excitation region explored in the measurement plays a key role in stellar carbon burning whose cross section is commonly determined by extrapolating high-energy fusion data. From preliminary results, α and proton channels are clearly identified. In particular, ground and first excited states of 20Ne and 23Na play a major role.

  5. Nuclear Reaction Models Responsible for Simulation of Neutron-induced Soft Errors in Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y. Abe, S.

    2014-06-15

    Terrestrial neutron-induced soft errors in MOSFETs from a 65 nm down to a 25 nm design rule are analyzed by means of multi-scale Monte Carlo simulation using the PHITS-HyENEXSS code system. Nuclear reaction models implemented in PHITS code are validated by comparisons with experimental data. From the analysis of calculated soft error rates, it is clarified that secondary He and H ions provide a major impact on soft errors with decreasing critical charge. It is also found that the high energy component from 10 MeV up to several hundreds of MeV in secondary cosmic-ray neutrons has the most significant source of soft errors regardless of design rule.

  6. Analysis of the Nuclear Structure of 186 Re Using Neutron-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matters, David; McClory, John; Carroll, James; Chiara, Chris; Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Matt; Nelson, Ron O.

    2015-04-01

    Evaluated nuclear structure data for 186 Re identifies the majority of spin-parity assignments as tentative, with approximate values associated with the energies of several levels and transitions. In particular, the absence of known transitions that feed the Jπ =8+ isomer motivates their discovery, which would have astrophysical implications and a potential application in the development of an isomer power source. Using the GErmanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE) spectrometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, the (n,2n γ) and (n,n' γ) reactions in a 99.52% enriched 187 Re target were used to measure γ-ray excitation functions in 186 Re and 187 Re, respectively. A preliminary analysis of the data obtained from the experiment reveals several new transitions in 186 Re and 187 Re.

  7. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the 22Ne(p ,γ ) 23Na reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalo, Rosanna; Cavanna, Francesca; Ferraro, Federico; Slemer, Alessandra; Al-Abdullah, Tariq; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Anders, Michael; Bemmerer, Daniel; Elekes, Zoltán; Mattei, Giovanni; Reinicke, Stefan; Schmidt, Konrad; Scian, Carlo; Wagner, Louis

    2015-10-01

    The 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominate the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with 22Ne. The strengths ω γ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479- and 1279-keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479- and 1279-keV resonances were determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which is found to be less intense by one order of magnitude. In addition, improved branching ratios have been determined for the gamma decay of the resonances at 436, 479, and 639 keV.

  8. Bayesian Evaluation Including Covariance Matrices of Neutron-induced Reaction Cross Sections of {sup 181}Ta

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb, H. Schnabel, G.; Srdinko, Th.; Wildpaner, V.

    2015-01-15

    A new evaluation of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 181}Ta using a consistent procedure based on Bayesian statistics is presented. Starting point of the evaluation is the description of nuclear reactions via nuclear models implemented in TALYS 1.4. A retrieval of experimental data was performed and covariance matrices of the experiments were generated from an extensive study of the corresponding literature. All reaction channels required for a transport file up to 200 MeV have been considered and the covariance matrices of cross section uncertainties for the most important channels are determined. The evaluation has been performed in one step including all available experimental data. A comparison of the evaluated cross sections and spectra with experimental data and available evaluations is performed. In general the evaluated cross section reflect our best knowledge and give a fair description of the observables. However, there are few deviations from expectation which clearly indicate the impact of the prior and the need to account for model defects. Using the results of the evaluation a complete ENDF-file similarly to those of the TENDL library is generated.

  9. Theoretical evaluation of the reaction rates for {sup 26}Al(n,p){sup 26}Mg and {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Oginni, B. M.; Iliadis, C.; Champagne, A. E.

    2011-02-15

    The reactions that destroy {sup 26}Al in massive stars have significance in a number of astrophysical contexts. We evaluate the reaction rates of {sup 26}Al(n,p){sup 26}Mg and {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na using cross sections obtained from the codes empire and talys. These have been compared to the published rates obtained from the non-smoker code and to some experimental data. We show that the results obtained from empire and talys are comparable to those from non-smoker. We also show how the theoretical results vary with respect to changes in the input parameters. Finally, we present recommended rates for these reactions using the available experimental data and our new theoretical results.

  10. Application of the Trojan Horse Method to study neutron induced reactions: the 17O(n, α)14C reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Tang, X. D.; Guardo, G. L.; Lamia, L.; Cherubini, S.; Bucher, B.; Burjan, V.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; deBoer, R.; Fang, X.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Lamm, L.; La Cognata, M.; Li, C.; Ma, C.; Mrazek, J.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Notani, M.; O'Brien, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Roberson, D.; Sergi, M. L.; Tan, W.; Thompson, I. J.; Wiescher, M.

    2014-03-01

    The reaction 17O(n, α)14C was studied using virtual neutrons coming from the quasi-free deuteron break-up in the three body reaction 17O+d → α+14C+p. This technique, called virtual neutron method, extends the Trojan Horse method to neutron-induced reactions allowing to study the reaction cross section avoiding the suppression effects coming from the penetrability of the centrifugal barrier. For incident neutron energies from thermal up to a few hundred keV, direct experiments have shown the population of two out of three expected excited states at energies 8213 keV and 8282 keV and the influence of the sub-threshold level at 8038 keV. In the present experiment the 18O excited state at E* = 8.125 MeV, missing in the direct measurement, is observed. The angular distributions of the populated resonances have been measured for the first time. The results unambiguously indicate the ability of the method to overcome the centrifugal barrier suppression effect and to pick out the contribution of the bare nuclear interaction.

  11. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Induced Reactions: Quasi-Free Reactions and RIBs

    SciTech Connect

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Coc, A.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; De Sereville, N.

    2010-08-12

    The use of quasi-free reactions in studying nuclear reactions between charged particles of astrophysical interest has received much attention over the last two decades. The Trojan Horse Method is based on this approach and it has been used to study a number of reactions relevant for Nuclear Astrophysics. Recently we applied this method to the study of nuclear reactions that involve radioactive species, namely to the study of the {sup 18}F+p{yields}{sup 15}O+{alpha} process at temperatures corresponding to the energies available in the classical novae scenario. Quasi-free reactions can also be exploited to study processes induced by neutrons. This technique is particularly interesting when applied to reaction induced by neutrons on unstable short-lived nuclei. Such processes are very important in the nucleosynthesis of elements in the sand r-processes scenarios and this technique can give hints for solving key questions in nuclear astrophysics where direct measurements are practically impossible.

  12. Feeding of isomers of stable Rh, Ag, Ir and Au isotopes in fast-neutron-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Nelson, R. O.; Carroll, J. J.

    2016-03-01

    The GEANIE spectrometer, comprised of 20 high-purity Ge detectors coupled to the broad-spectrum pulsed neutron beam of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's (LANSCE) WNR facility, has been used to determine partial γ-ray cross sections in (n , xn) fast-neutron-induced reactions. In (n ,n') reactions on stable Ir and Au isotopes the γ-ray feeding, as established with GEANIE, for the isomers relative to the feeding of the corresponding ground states increases with increasing neutron energy up to the neutron energy where the (n , 2 n) reaction channel opens and then decreases. The behavior in mass A = 100 region of the γ-ray feeding of isomers and ground states was also studied with GEANIE in fast-neutron-induced reactions on stable Rh and Ag isotopes. The feeding of the isomers was found to be very similar in the corresponding reaction channels and it was compared to the feeding determined for the ground states. The opening of higher-neutron-emitting reaction channels remove angular momentum from the compound system and reduce the population of higher-spin isomers relative to the feeding of lower-spin ground states in all cases studied.

  13. Measurement of fragment mass distributions in neutron-induced fission reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutkin, V. D.; Ryzhov, I. V.; Tutin, G. A.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Blomgren, J.; Pomp, S.; Österlund, M.; Andersson, P.; Bevilacqua, R.; Meulders, J. P.; Prieels, R.

    2009-10-01

    Fragment mass distributions from neutron-induced fission of 232Th and 238U have been measured at quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE. The measurements have been carried out making use of a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. The measurement technique as well as the data processing is described. Preliminary data on primary fragment mass yields are given for an incident neutron energy of 32.8 MeV.

  14. Neutron-induced reactions in the hohlraum to study reaction in flight neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Guiseppe, V.; Kidd, M.; Rundberg, B.; Tybo, J.

    2013-04-01

    We are currently developing the physics necessary to measure the Reaction In Flight (RIF) neutron flux from a NIF capsule. A measurement of the RIF neutron flux from a NIF capsule could be used to deduce the stopping power in the cold fuel of the NIF capsule. A foil irradiated at the Omega laser at LLE was counted at the LANL low-background counting facility at WIPP. The estimated production rate of 195Au was just below our experimental sensitivity. We have made several improvements to our counting facility in recent months. These improvements are designed to increase our sensitivity, and include installing two new low-background detectors, and taking steps to reduce noise in the signals.

  15. Neutron-induced reactions in the hohlraum to study reaction in flight neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Tybo, J.; Guiseppe, V.; Rundberg, B.; Kidd, M.

    2013-04-19

    We are currently developing the physics necessary to measure the Reaction In Flight (RIF) neutron flux from a NIF capsule. A measurement of the RIF neutron flux from a NIF capsule could be used to deduce the stopping power in the cold fuel of the NIF capsule. A foil irradiated at the Omega laser at LLE was counted at the LANL low-background counting facility at WIPP. The estimated production rate of {sup 195}Au was just below our experimental sensitivity. We have made several improvements to our counting facility in recent months. These improvements are designed to increase our sensitivity, and include installing two new low-background detectors, and taking steps to reduce noise in the signals.

  16. Cross Sections for Neutron-induced Reactions on Actinide Targets Extracted from Surrogate Experiments: A Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Lesher, S R; Scielzo, N D; Thompson, I J; Younes, W

    2009-10-01

    The Surrogate nuclear reactions method, an indirect approach for determining cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions involving difficult-to-measure targets, is reviewed. Focusing on cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on actinides, we review the successes of past and present applications of the method and assess its uncertainties and limitations. The approximations used in the analyses of most experiments work reasonably well for (n,f) cross sections for neutron energies above 1-2 MeV, but lead to discrepancies for low-energy (n,f) reactions, as well as for (n,{gamma}) applications. Correcting for some of the effects neglected in the approximate analyses leads to improved (n,f) results. We outline steps that will further improve the accuracy and reliability of the Surrogate method and extend its applicability to reactions that cannot be approached with the present implementation of the method.

  17. Revised Production Rates for Na-22 and Mn-54 in Meteorites Using Cross Sections Measured for Neutron-induced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with extraterrestrial bodies produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. The production rates of many relatively short-lived radionuclides, including 2.6-year Na-22 and 312-day Mn-54, have been measured in several meteorites collected very soon after they fell. Theoretical models used to calculate production rates for comparison with the measured values rely on input data containing good cross section measurements for all relevant reactions. Most GCR particles are protons, but secondary neutrons make most cosmogenic nuclides. Calculated production rates using only cross sections for proton-induced reactions do not agree well with measurements. One possible explanation is that the contribution to the production rate from reactions initiated by secondary neutrons produced in primary GCR interactions should be included explicitly. This, however, is difficult to do because so few of the relevant cross sections for neutron-induced reactions have been measured.

  18. Yield of delayed neutrons in the thermal-neutron-induced reaction 245Cm( n, f)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, V. R.; Vyachin, V. N.; Gundorin, N. A.; Druzhinin, A. A.; Zhdanova, K. V.; Lihachev, A. N.; Pikelner, L. B.; Rebrova, N. V.; Salamatin, I. M.; Furman, V. I.

    2008-10-01

    The yield of delayed neutrons, v d , from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 245Cm is measured. Experiments aimed at studying the properties of delayed neutrons from the fission of some reactor isotopes and initiated in 1997 were continued at the upgraded Isomer-M facility by a method according to which a periodic irradiation of a sample with a pulsed neutron beam from the IBR-2 reactor was accompanied by recording emitted neutrons in the intervals between the pulses. The accuracy of the resulting total delayed-neutron yield v d = (0.64 ± 0.02)% is two times higher than that in previous measurements. This work was performed at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna).

  19. Evaluation of cross sections for neutron-induced reactions in sodium. [10/sup -5/ eV to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.C.

    1980-09-01

    An evaluation of the neutron-induced cross sections of /sup 23/Na has been done for the energy range from 10/sup -5/ eV to 20 MeV. All significant cross sections are given, including differential cross sections for production of gamma rays. The recommended values are based on experimental data where available, and use results of a consistent model code analysis of available data to predict cross sections where there are no experimental data. This report describes the evaluation that was submitted to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) for consideration as a part of the Evaluated Nuclear Data File, Version V, and subsequently issued as MAT 1311. 126 references, 130 figures, 14 tables.

  20. Neutron Elastic and Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections on ^NatFe and ^23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersting, Luke; Lueck, Collin J.; Hicks, S. F.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2010-10-01

    Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering angular distributions from ^NatFe and ^23Na at incident neutron energies of 3.57 and 3.81 MeV have been measured at the University of Kentucky 7 MV Van de Graaff laboratory using neutron time-of-flight techniques. The neutron beam was produced using the ^3H(p,n)He^3reaction. The scattered neutrons were detected at angles between 20 and 150 in 10 intervals with a hexafluorbenzene detector located approximately 3 m from the scattering samples. Neutron scattering differential cross sections were deduced. These cross sections and their uncertainties are important for understanding neutron-induced reactions in fission reactors and are important for fission reactor criticality calculations.

  1. Neutron-induced transmutation reactions in 237Np, 238Pu, and 239Pu at the massive natural uranium spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavorka, L.; Adam, J.; Baldin, A. A.; Caloun, P.; Chilap, V. V.; Furman, W. I.; Kadykov, M. G.; Khushvaktov, J.; Pronskikh, V. S.; Solnyshkin, A. A.; Sotnikov, V.; Stegailov, V. I.; Suchopar, M.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.; Voronko, V.; Vrzalova, J.

    2015-04-01

    Transmutation reactions in the 237Np, 238Pu, and 239Pu samples were investigated in the neutron field generated inside a massive (m = 512 kg) natural uranium spallation target. The uranium target assembly QUINTA was irradiated with the deuteron beams of kinetic energy 2, 4, and 8 GeV provided by the Nuclotron accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna. The neutron-induced transmutation of the actinide samples was measured off-line by implementing methods of gamma-ray spectrometry with HPGe detectors. Results of measurement are expressed in the form of both the individual reaction rates and average fission transmutation rates. For the purpose of validation of radiation transport programs, the experimental results were compared with simulations of neutron production and distribution performed by the MCNPX 2.7 and MARS15 codes employing the INCL4-ABLA physics models and LAQGSM event generator, respectively. In general, a good agreement between the experimental and calculated reaction rates was found in the whole interval of provided beam energies.

  2. α and 2p2n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on Ni60

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-19

    The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction AZX(n,x)A-4Z-2Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n,n'α) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n,2p3n) reaction. In addition, the relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus.

  3. Neutron-Induced Reactions on Copper and Zero-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooden, Matthew; Kelley, John; Fallin, Brent; Finch, Sean; Howell, Calvin; Rusev, Gencho; Tonchev, Anton; Tornow, Werner

    2012-10-01

    Cross-section measurements of (n,xγ) reactions on ^natCu were carried out at TUNL using monoenergetic neutrons at six energies of En = 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 MeV. These studies were performed to provide accurate cross-section data on materials abundant in experimental setups involving HPGe detectors used to search for rare events, like the neutrino-less double-beta decay of ^76Ge. Spallation and (α,n) neutrons are expected to cause the largest source of external background in the energy region of interest. At TUNL pulsed neutron beams were produced via the ^2H(d,n)^3He reaction and the deexcitation γ rays from the reaction ^natCu(n,xγ) were detected with clover HPGe detectors. Our cross-section data will be compared to theoretical calculations and to data recently obtained at LANL with a white neutron beam.

  4. Neutron Induced Reactions with the 17 Mev Facility at the Athens Tandem Accelerator NCSR 'Demokritos'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlastou, R.; Kalamara, A.; Serris, M.; Diakaki, M.; Kokkoris, M.; Paneta, V.; Axiotis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.

    In the 5.5 MV tandem T11/25 Accelerator Laboratory of NCSR "Demokritos" monoenergetic neutron beams have been produced in the energy range∼ 15-20 MeV using anew Ti-tritiated target of 373 GBq activity, by means of the 3H(d,n)4He reaction. The corresponding deuteron beam energies obtained from the accelerator, were in the 1.5-4.5MeV range.The maximum flux has been determined to be of the order of 106 n/cm2 s, implementing reference reactions. The 17.1MeV neutron beam has been used for the measurement of 197Au(n,2n) reaction cross section. Theoretical calculations have been performed via the statistical model code EMPIRE and compared to the experimental data of the present work and data from literature.

  5. Neutron-induced reactions relevant for Inertial-Cofinement Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, Melissa; Devlin, Mathew; Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Merrill, Frank; Nelson, Ronald; Tonchev, Anton

    2014-09-01

    The typical ignition experiment at the National Ignition Facility ablatively implodes a plastic capsule filled with DT fuel, generating a high flux of 14-MeV neutrons from the d(t,n) α reaction. There is some spread in the energy of these primary 14-MeV neutrons, which is mainly attributable to Doppler shifting from the relative thermal motion of the burning DT fuel. Neutrons created during this reaction have 5--10% chance of scattering before escaping the fuel assembly, losing some fraction of their energy in the scattering process. Neutrons emerging with an energy greater than the reaction energy are generated by a two-step process where neutrons first transfer momentum to a deuteron or tritium ion, these enhanced energy ions then fuse in flight to produce higher energy neutrons; some of these neutrons have energies in excess of 30 MeV. Measuring the fluencies of both the low- and high-energy neutrons is a powerful mechanism for studying the properties of the fuel assembly, and the various parameters important to inertial confinement fusion. We have developed a number of tools to measure the spectral characteristics of the NIF neutron spectrum. Most of these methods rely on exploiting the energy dependence of (n, γ), (n,2n), (n,3n) and (n,p) reactions on a variety o.

  6. Influence of different data tables on neutron induced reactions in quasi-infinite 238U and 232Th targets irradiated by protons with relativistic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivkov, P.; Stoyanov, Ch; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Furman, W.

    2016-06-01

    The last decade saw the emergence of various theoretical analysis and developments of ADS (Accelerator Driving System). Different transport codes, nuclear models and nuclear cross sections have been used to predict and estimate the properties of ADS. The energy of the proton beam is supposed to range between 1 and 1.5 GeV, but some analyses suggest higher energy - up to 10 GeV. The recent papers examine the influence of the nuclear models on neutron induced reactions (n,f), (n,g), (n,xn), (n,el.) and (n,inel.). The experimental set-ups and the presumable ADS constructions consist of thousands of segments and details for example project Myrrha, Belgum [1]. The calculation of the above reactions depends on the neutron spectrum in each segment. There is a considerable difference in the size of these segments in ADS, which makes the estimation of the influence of the nuclear models and the cross sections on the integral number of neutron induced reactions more difficult. This article considers the influence of different cross section data tables on neutron induced reactions in 238U or 232Th targets. One nuclear model describing the high energy part of the nuclear interaction and various cross section data tagble (ENDF, ENDL, TENDL2014 and etc.) are used. All particles generated in the nuclear interaction process deposit their energy in the target volume. MCNP 6.1 transport code was used.

  7. Isomeric Cross-Section Study of Neutron-Induced Reactions on Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Vlastou, R.; Galanopoulos, S.; Papadopoulos, C. T.; Kokkoris, M.; Serris, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Demetriou, P.

    2009-01-28

    The {sup 72}Ge(n,{alpha}){sup 69m}Zn, {sup 74}Ge(n,{alpha}){sup 71m}Zn, {sup 76}Ge(n,2n){sup 75g+m}Ge reaction cross sections have been measured from 9.6 to 11.4 MeV and studied, along with data from literature, within the frame of the statistical model using the code EMPIRE-II.

  8. Determination of Resonance Parameters and their Covariances from Neutron Induced Reaction Cross Section Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Becker, B.; Danon, Y.; Guber, K.; Harada, H.; Heyse, J.; Junghans, A.R.; Kopecky, S.; Massimi, C.; Moxon, M.C.; Otuka, N.; Sirakov, I.; Volev, K.

    2012-12-15

    Cross section data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region are represented by nuclear reaction formalisms using parameters which are determined by fitting them to experimental data. Therefore, the quality of evaluated cross sections in the resonance region strongly depends on the experimental data used in the adjustment process and an assessment of the experimental covariance data is of primary importance in determining the accuracy of evaluated cross section data. In this contribution, uncertainty components of experimental observables resulting from total and reaction cross section experiments are quantified by identifying the metrological parameters involved in the measurement, data reduction and analysis process. In addition, different methods that can be applied to propagate the covariance of the experimental observables (i.e. transmission and reaction yields) to the covariance of the resonance parameters are discussed and compared. The methods being discussed are: conventional uncertainty propagation, Monte Carlo sampling and marginalization. It is demonstrated that the final covariance matrix of the resonance parameters not only strongly depends on the type of experimental observables used in the adjustment process, the experimental conditions and the characteristics of the resonance structure, but also on the method that is used to propagate the covariances. Finally, a special data reduction concept and format is presented, which offers the possibility to store the full covariance information of experimental data in the EXFOR library and provides the information required to perform a full covariance evaluation.

  9. Decay Properties of {sup 266}Bh and {sup 262}Db Produced in the {sup 248}Cm+{sup 23}Na Reaction - Further Confirmation of the {sup 278}113 Decay Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Morimoto, K.; Kaji, D.; Haba, H.; Ozeki, K.; Kudou, Y.; Yoneda, A.; Ichikawa, T.; Katori, K.; Yoshida, A.; Sato, N.; Sumita, T.; Fujimori, Y.; Tokanai, F.; Goto, S.; Ideguchi, E.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Koura, H.; Tsukada, K.; Komori, Y.

    2010-06-01

    Decay properties of an isotope {sup 266}Bh and its daughter nucleus {sup 262}Db produced by the {sup 248}Cm({sup 23}Na,5n) reaction were studied by using a gas-filled recoil separator coupled with a position-sensitive semiconductor detector. {sup 266}Bh was clearly identified from the correlation of the known nuclide, {sup 262}Db. The obtained decay properties of {sup 266}Bh and {sup 262}Db are consistent with those observed in the {sup 278}113 chain by RIKEN collaboration, which provided further confirmation of the discovery of {sup 278}113.

  10. Measurement of Neutron-Induced, Angular-Momentum-Dependent Fission Probabilities Direct Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Jovanovic, Igor; Burke, Jason; Casperson, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The surrogate method has previously been used to successfully measure (n , f) cross sections of a variety of difficult to produce actinide isotopes. These measurements are inaccurate at excitation energies below 1.5 MeV where the distribution of angular momentum states populated in the compound nucleus created by neutron absorption significantly differs from that arising from direct reactions. A method to measure the fission probability of individual angular momentum states arising from 239 Pu(d , pf) and 239 Pu(α ,α' f) reactions has been developed. This method consists on charged particle detectors with 40 keV FWHM resolution at 13 angles up and downstream of the beam. An array of photovoltaic (solar) cells is used to measure the angular distribution of fission fragments with high angular resolution. This distribution uniquely identifies the populated angular momentum states. These are fit to expected distributions to determine the contribution of each state. The charged particle and fission matrix obtained from these measurements determines fission probabilities of specific angular momentum states in the transition nucleus. Development of this scheme and first results will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number 2012-DN-130-NF0001.

  11. Advanced Monte Carlo modeling of prompt fission neutrons for thermal and fast neutron-induced fission reactions on Pu239

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talou, P.; Becker, B.; Kawano, T.; Chadwick, M. B.; Danon, Y.

    2011-06-01

    Prompt fission neutrons following the thermal and 0.5 MeV neutron-induced fission reaction of Pu239 are calculated using a Monte Carlo approach to the evaporation of the excited fission fragments. Exclusive data such as the multiplicity distribution P(ν), the average multiplicity as a function of fragment mass ν¯(A), and many others are inferred in addition to the most used average prompt fission neutron spectrum χ(Ein,Eout), as well as average neutron multiplicity ν¯. Experimental information on these more exclusive data help constrain the Monte Carlo model parameters. The calculated average total neutron multiplicity is ν¯c=2.871 in very close agreement with the evaluated value ν¯e=2.8725 present in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. The neutron multiplicity distribution P(ν) is in very good agreement with the evaluation by Holden and Zucker. The calculated average spectrum differs in shape from the ENDF/B-VII.0 spectrum, evaluated with the Madland-Nix model. In particular, we predict more neutrons in the low-energy tail of the spectrum (below about 300 keV) than the Madland-Nix calculations, casting some doubts on how much scission neutrons contribute to the shape of the low-energy tail of the spectrum. The spectrum high-energy tail is very sensitive to the total kinetic energy distribution of the fragments as well as to the total excitation energy sharing at scission. Present experimental uncertainties on measured spectra above 6 MeV are too large to distinguish between various theoretical hypotheses. Finally, comparisons of the Monte Carlo results with experimental data on ν¯(A) indicate that more neutrons are emitted from the light fragments than the heavy ones, in agreement with previous works.

  12. (22)Ne(proton, gamma)(23)Na, (23)Na(proton, gamma)(24)Mg, and globular cluster abundance anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Stephen Earl, Jr.

    Anticorrelations between sodium and oxygen have been observed in red giant stars in globular clusters, contrary to expectations from the standard theory of stellar evolution. It has been proposed that the 23Na is being produced through the NeNa cycle operating in layers above the main hydrogen-burning shell. The (p, γ) reactions that produce and destroy sodium have large uncertainties because of the possible influence of several resonances. We have carried out measurements of the ( 3He, d) proton-stripping reaction on 22Ne and 23Na in order to study these resonances. The upper limits on the resonance strengths of two possible resonances at Ecm = 68 and 100 keV, that account for most of the uncertainty in 22Ne( p, γ)23Na, have been reduced by factors of 10 and 4, respectively. The reaction rate of 23Na(p, γ) 24Mg has been increased dramatically with the observation of the resonance at Ecm = 136 keV with an increased strength from 10 to 6300 times stronger than the previously used value. The effect of these changes is to establish the nuclear reactions that can produce sodium in the red giant hydrogen-burning shell. The production of sodium is seen to coincide with the destruction of oxygen, through the NeNa and the CNO cycle respectively.

  13. Development of a Nuclear Reaction Database on Silicon for Simulation of Neutron-Induced Single-Event Upsets in Microelectronics and its Application

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Kodama, Akihiro; Tukamoto, Yasuyuki; Nakashima, Hideki

    2005-05-24

    We have developed a cross-section database for neutron-induced reactions on 28Si in the energy range between 2 MeV and 3 GeV in order to analyze single-event upsets (SEUs) phenomena induced by cosmic-ray neutrons in microelectronic devices. A simplified spherical device model is proposed for simulation of the initial processes of SEUs. The model is applied to SEU cross-section calculations for semiconductor memory devices. The calculated results are compared with measured SEU cross sections and the other simulation result. The dependence of SEU cross sections on incident neutron energy and secondary ions having the most important effects on SEUs are discussed.

  14. Cross-Section Measurements for Proton- and Neutron-Induced Reactions Needed to Understand Cosmic-Ray Interactions on Earth and in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisterson, Janet M.

    2005-05-01

    Primary cosmic rays interact directly with extraterrestrial bodies and cosmic-ray shower particles interact with the earth's surface to produce small quantities of radionuclides and stable isotopes, which are measured routinely using appropriate techniques. Theoretical models are used to analyze these measurements to learn the history of the object or the cosmic rays that fell upon it. Cross sections for reactions producing these cosmogenic nuclides are essential input to these models. Most primary cosmic rays are protons, and good measurements of the cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. Most relevant cross sections are now well measured, but discrepancies still exist between the measurements and calculations. One explanation is that neutrons produced in primary cosmic-ray interactions also initiate spallation reactions contributing significantly to the cosmogenic nuclide inventory, but few of the relevant cross sections have been measured at energies >30 MeV. We have measured many of these needed cross sections for neutron-induced reactions using two different techniques. Cross sections at selected unique neutron energies >70 MeV are measured at iThemba LABS, South Africa (iTL) using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams. Energy integrated (average) cross sections are measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), using `white' neutron beams with an energy range of 0.1-750 MeV.

  15. (n,2n) and (n,3n) cross sections of neutron-induced reactions on 150Sm for En from threshold to 35 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G; Kawano, T; Becker, J; Wu, C; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R; Kunieda, S

    2009-03-16

    Cross-section measurements were made of prompt discrete {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 35 MeV) on a {sup 150}Sm sample fo 1550 mg/cm{sup 2} of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} enriched to 95.6% in {sup 150}Sm. Results are compared with enhanced Hauser-Feshbach model calculations including the pre-equilibrium reactions. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Incident neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions for thirteen individual {gamma}-rays up to E{sub x} = 0.8 MeV in {sup 149}Sm and one {gamma}-ray transition between the first excited and ground state in {sup 148}Sm were measured. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections were calculated using GNASH, an enhanced Hauser-Feshbach statistical nuclear reaction model code, and compared with the experimental results. The particle transmission coefficients were calculated with new systematic 'global' optical model potential parameters. The coupled-channel optical model based on the soft rotor model was employed to calculate the particle transmission coefficients. The pre-equilibrium part of the spin distribution in {sup 150}Sm was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshbach, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK) and incorporated into the GNASH reaction model code. the partial cross sections for discrete {gamma}-ray cascade paths leading to the ground state in {sup 149}Sm and {sup 148}Sm have been summed (without double counting) to estimate lower limits for reaction cross sections. These lower limits are combined with Hauser-Feshbach model calculations to deduce the reaction channel cross sections. These reaction channel cross sections agree with previously measured experimental and ENDF/B-VII evaluations.

  16. Cross sections of proton- and neutron-induced reactions by the Liège intranuclear cascade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Dong, Tiekuang; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the paper is mainly to test the validity of the Liège intranuclear cascade (INCL) model in calculating the cross sections of proton-induced reactions for cosmogenic nuclei using the newly compiled database of proton cross sections. The model calculations of 3He display the rising tendency of cross sections with the increase of energy, in accordance with the experimental data. Meanwhile, the differences between the theoretical results and experimental data of production cross sections (10Be and 26Al) are generally within a factor of 3, meaning that the INCL model works quite well for the proton-induced reactions. Based on the good agreement, we predict the production cross sections of 26Al from reactions n + 27Al, n + 28Si, and n + 40Ca and those of 10Be from reactions n + 16O and n + 28Si. The results also show a good agreement with a posteriori excitation functions.

  17. A new set-up for the simultaneous measurement of neutron-induced capture and fission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Gunsing, F.; Andriamonje, S.

    2011-07-01

    The measurement of the capture cross section of fissile elements, of upmost importance for the design of innovative nuclear reactors and the management of nuclear waste, involves particular difficulties related to the {gamma}-ray background produced in the fission reactions. These difficulties are the reason why five out of the six actinide {sigma}(n,{gamma}) measurements in the NEA High Request Priority List are fissile isotopes. At n-TOF we have combined the Total Absorption Calorimeter capture detector with a set of three {sup 235}U loaded MicroMegas fission detectors for measuring simultaneously the two reactions: capture and fission. In a first test measurement we have succeeded in measuring simultaneously with high efficiency the {sup 235}U capture and fission cross sections, disentangling accurately the two types of reactions. (authors)

  18. Revised Calculations of the Production Rates for Co Isotopes in Meteorites Using New Cross Sections for Neutron-induced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Brooks, F. D.; Buffler, A.; Allie, M. S.; Herbert, M. S.; Nchodu, M. R.; Makupula, S.; Ullmann, J.; Reedy, R. C.; Jones, D. T. L.

    2002-01-01

    New cross section measurements for reactions induced by neutrons with energies greater than 70 MeV are used to calculate the production rates for cobalt isotopes in meteorites and these new calculations are compared to previous estimates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Measurement of activation cross-sections for high-energy neutron-induced reactions of Bi and Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Naik, Haladhara; Shahid, Muhammad; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-08-01

    The cross-sections for 209Bi(n, 4n)206Bi, 209Bi(n, 5n)205Bi, natPb(n, xn)204mPb, natPb(n, xn)203Pb, natPb(n, xn)202mPb,natPb(n, xn)201Pb, natPb(n, xn)200Pb, natPb(n, αxn)203Hg and natPb(n, p xn)202Tl reactions were determined at the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Korea in the neutron energy range of 15.2 to 37.2 MeV. The above cross-sections were obtained by using the activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The quasi-monoenergetic neutron used for the above reactions are based on the 9Be(p, n) reaction. Simulations of the spectral flux from the Be target were done using the MCNPX program. The cross-sections were estimated with the TALYS 1.6 code using the default parameter. The data from the present work and literature were compared with the data from the EAF-2010 and the TENDL-2013 libraries, and calculated values of TALYS 1.6 code. It shows that appropriate level density model, the γ-ray strength function, and the spin cut-off parameter are needed to obtain a good agreement between experimental data and theoretical values from TALYS 1.6 code.

  20. Measurement of gamma-ray production cross sections in neutron-induced reactions for Al and Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, A.; Vonach, H.; Hitzenberger, H.; Nelson, R.O.; Haight, R.C.; Wender, S.A.; Young, P.G.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    The prompt gamma-radiation from the interaction of fast neutrons with aluminum and lead was measured using the white neutron beam of the WNR facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The samples (Al and isotopically enriched {sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb) were positioned at about 20 m or 41 m distance from the neutron production target. The spectra of the emitted gamma-rays were measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector. The incident neutron energy was determined by the time-of-flight method and the neutron fluence was measured with a U fission chamber. From the aluminum gamma-ray spectra excitation functions for prominent gamma-transitions in various residual nuclei (in the range from O to Al) were derived for neutron energies from 3 MeV to 400 MeV. For lead (n,xn{gamma}) reactions were studied for neutron energies up to 200 MeV by analyzing prominent gamma-transitions in the residual nuclei {sup 200,202,204,206,207,208}Pb. The experimental results were compared with nuclear model calculations using the code GNASH. A good overall agreement was obtained without special parameter adjustments.

  1. Study of the 17O(n,α)14C reaction: Extension of the Trojan Horse Method to neutron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardo, G. L.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Gulino, M.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Burjan, V.; Cherubini, S.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; deBoer*, R.; Fang, X.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Lamm, L.; La Cognata, M.; Li, C.; Ma, C.; Mrazek, J.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Notani, M.; OBrien, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Roberson, D.; Sergi, M. L.; Tan, W.; Thompson, I. J.; Wiescher, M.

    2014-05-01

    The experimental study of the 17O(n,α)14C reaction has been performed in the energy range 0-350 keV. This reaction could play an important role in explaining heavy elements (s-process) nucleosynthesis in various astrophysical scenario. To overcome the practical problems arising from the neutrons production, a new application of the Trojan Horse Method has been recently suggested. In more details, the 17O(n,α)14C reaction has been studied using the quasi-free 2H(17O,α14C)1H reaction, induced at an energy of 43.5 MeV. The measurement allows one to investigate the ℓ=3, 75 keV resonance (E*=8.125 MeV, Jπ=5-), absent in the available direct measurements because of centrifugal suppression effects.

  2. Study of the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction: Extension of the Trojan Horse Method to neutron induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Guardo, G. L.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L.; Gulino, M.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; Boer, R. de; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; OBrien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.; and others

    2014-05-02

    The experimental study of the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction has been performed in the energy range 0-350 keV. This reaction could play an important role in explaining heavy elements (s-process) nucleosynthesis in various astrophysical scenario. To overcome the practical problems arising from the neutrons production, a new application of the Trojan Horse Method has been recently suggested. In more details, the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction has been studied using the quasi-free {sup 2}H({sup 17}O,α{sup 14}C){sup 1}H reaction, induced at an energy of 43.5 MeV. The measurement allows one to investigate the ℓ=3, 75 keV resonance (E*=8.125 MeV, J{sup π}=5{sup −}), absent in the available direct measurements because of centrifugal suppression effects.

  3. Statistical Hauser-Feshbach theory with width-fluctuation correction including direct reaction channels for neutron-induced reactions at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, T.; Capote, R.; Hilaire, S.; Chau Huu-Tai, P.

    2016-07-01

    A model to calculate particle-induced reaction cross sections with statistical Hauser-Feshbach theory including direct reactions is given. The energy average of the scattering matrix from the coupled-channels optical model is diagonalized by the transformation proposed by Engelbrecht and Weidenmüller [C. A. Engelbrecht and H. A. Weidenmüller, Phys. Rev. C 8, 859 (1973), 10.1103/PhysRevC.8.859]. The ensemble average of S -matrix elements in the diagonalized channel space is approximated by a model of Moldauer [P. A. Moldauer, Phys. Rev. C 12, 744 (1975), 10.1103/PhysRevC.12.744] using the newly parametrized channel degree-of-freedom νa to better describe the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) reference calculations. The Moldauer approximation is confirmed by a Monte Carlo study using a randomly generated S matrix, as well as the GOE threefold integration formula. The method proposed is applied to the 238U(n ,n' ) cross-section calculation in the fast-energy range, showing an enhancement in the inelastic scattering cross sections.

  4. Creation of a strongly dipolar gas of ultracold ground-state 23 Na87 Rb molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mingyang; Zhu, Bing; Lu, Bo; Ye, Xin; Wang, Fudong; Wang, Dajun; Vexiau, Romain; Bouloufa-Maafa, Nadia; Quéméner, Goulven; Dulieu, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    We report on successful creation of an ultracold sample of ground-state 23 Na87 Rb molecules with a large effective electric dipole moment. Through a carefully designed two-photon Raman process, we have successfully transferred the magneto-associated Feshbach molecules to the singlet ground state with high efficiency, obtaining up to 8000 23 Na87 Rb molecules with peak number density over 1011 cm-3 in their absolute ground-state level. With an external electric field, we have induced an effective dipole moment over 1 Debye, making 23 Na87 Rb the most dipolar ultracold particle ever achieved. Contrary to the expectation, we observed a rather fast population loss even for 23 Na87 Rb in the absolute ground state with the bi-molecular exchange reaction energetically forbidden. The origin for the short lifetime and possible ways of mitigating it are currently under investigation. Our achievements pave the way toward investigation of ultracold bosonic molecules with strong dipolar interactions. This work is supported by the Hong Kong RGC CUHK404712 and the ANR/RGC Joint Research Scheme ACUHK403/13.

  5. Neutron-induced background by an α-beam incident on a deuterium gas target and its implications for the study of the 2H(α,γ)6Li reaction at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, M.; Trezzi, D.; Bellini, A.; Aliotta, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Costantini, H.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; Elekes, Z.; Erhard, M.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Junker, M.; Lemut, A.; Marta, M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Prati, P.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Scott, D.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Szücs, T.

    2013-02-01

    The production of the stable isotope 6Li in standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis has recently attracted much interest. Recent observations in metal-poor stars suggest that a cosmological 6Li plateau may exist. If true, this plateau would come in addition to the well-known Spite plateau of 7Li abundances and would point to a predominantly primordial origin of 6Li , contrary to the results of standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations. Therefore, the nuclear physics underlying Big Bang 6Li production must be revisited. The main production channel for 6Li in the Big Bang is the 2H(α,γ)6Li reaction. The present work reports on neutron-induced effects in a high-purity germanium detector that were encountered in a new study of this reaction. In the experiment, an α-beam from the underground accelerator LUNA in Gran Sasso, Italy, and a windowless deuterium gas target are used. A low neutron flux is induced by energetic deuterons from elastic scattering and, subsequently, the 2H(d,n)3He reaction. Due to the ultra-low laboratory neutron background at LUNA, the effect of this weak flux of 2-3MeV neutrons on well-shielded high-purity germanium detectors has been studied in detail. Data have been taken at 280 and 400keV α-beam energy and for comparison also using an americium-beryllium neutron source.

  6. Towards a study of 22Ne(pγ)23Na at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalo, R.; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction is involved in the NeNa cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle plays an important role for nucleosynthesis in the Red Giant Branch and Asymptotic Giant Branch phases of stellar evolution, as well as in classical novae and type Ia supernovae explosions. The 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction rate is highly uncertain because of a large number of resonances lying in the energy region of the Gamow peak. Several of these resonances have never been studied in either direct or indirect experiments, and only upper limits exist for their strengths. A measurement of the 2Ne(p,γ)23Na cross section is on-going at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) in Gran Sasso. With the LUNA setup, it will be possible to study the 22Ne+p reaction inside the Gamow window. The results of a feasibility test, as well as the measurement strategy and the setup for the first experimental campaign are discussed

  7. Creation of an Ultracold Gas of Ground-State Dipolar 23Na 87 Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mingyang; Zhu, Bing; Lu, Bo; Ye, Xin; Wang, Fudong; Vexiau, Romain; Bouloufa-Maafa, Nadia; Quéméner, Goulven; Dulieu, Olivier; Wang, Dajun

    2016-05-01

    We report the successful production of an ultracold sample of absolute ground-state 23Na 87Rb molecules. Starting from weakly bound Feshbach molecules formed via magnetoassociation, the lowest rovibrational and hyperfine level of the electronic ground state is populated following a high-efficiency and high-resolution two-photon Raman process. The high-purity absolute ground-state samples have up to 8000 molecules and densities of over 1011 cm-3 . By measuring the Stark shifts induced by external electric fields, we determined the permanent electric dipole moment of the absolute ground-state 23Na 87Rb and demonstrated the capability of inducing an effective dipole moment over 1 D. Bimolecular reaction between ground-state 23Na 87Rb molecules is endothermic, but we still observed a rather fast decay of the molecular sample. Our results pave the way toward investigation of ultracold molecular collisions in a fully controlled manner and possibly to quantum gases of ultracold bosonic molecules with strong dipolar interactions.

  8. The molecular environment of intracellular sodium: 23Na NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rooney, W D; Springer, C S

    1991-10-01

    The comprehensive approach described in the accompanying paper is illustrated here with the 23Na signal of a concentrated solution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in saline and the intracellular (Nai) 23Na resonance of a dense suspension of Na(+)-loaded yeast cells. We use frequency shift reagents to discriminate the latter from the extracellular resonance. We find that the Nai signal corresponds to that of an effective single population of Na+ ions exhibiting a single type c spectrum. This is true despite the fact that the yeast protoplasm is too large and too compartmentalized for a given Na+ ion to sample its entirety on the relevant NMR timescale. Our results show clearly that, in addition to the decay of transverse magnetization, the recovery of longitudinal magnetization is biexponential. This is required for a type c spectrum but has not often been detected. The temperature dependence of the relaxation rate constants of the Nai resonance is not consistent with either a simple Debye process or a discrete exchange mechanism connecting two sites in the fast limit. We have fitted the data using an asymmetric continuous distribution of correlation times for the fluctuations of electric field gradients sensed by the Nai nuclei. The analogous distribution function for the Na+ in a 44% (w/w) BSA solution is quite similar to that of the Nai at the same temperature. This suggests that while the macromolecular environment of the Nai ions is quite congested, it is also isotropic on quite a small spatial scale. Also, one can use the correlation time distribution function, obtained from fitting the relaxation data, to calculate a relaxometry curve. This is useful because experimental 23Na relaxometry is difficult. The calculated curve may be a reasonable model for the mostly extracellular 23Na resonance encountered in vivo. PMID:1751346

  9. Neutron-Induced Charged Particle Studies at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye Young; Haight, Robert C.

    2014-09-01

    Direct measurements on neutron-induced charged particle reactions are of interest for nuclear astrophysics and applied nuclear energy. LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) produces neutrons in energy of thermal to several hundreds MeV. There has been an effort at LANSCE to upgrade neutron-induced charged particle detection technique, which follows on (n,z) measurements made previously here and will have improved capabilities including larger solid angles, higher efficiency, and better signal to background ratios. For studying cross sections of low-energy neutron induced alpha reactions, Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is designed with segmented anodes for improving signal-to-noise ratio near reaction thresholds. Since double-differential cross sections on (n,p) and (n,a) reactions up to tens of MeV provide important information on deducing nuclear level density, the ionization chamber will be coupled with silicon strip detectors (DSSD) in order to stop energetic charged particles. In this paper, we will present the status of this development including the progress on detector design, calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy - Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  10. Coherent Microwave Control of Ultracold 23Na 4K Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Sebastian A.; Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe Z.; Loh, Huanqian; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate coherent microwave control of rotational and hyperfine states of trapped, ultracold, and chemically stable 23Na 40K molecules. Starting with all molecules in the absolute rovibrational and hyperfine ground state, we study rotational transitions in combined magnetic and electric fields and explain the rich hyperfine structure. Following the transfer of the entire molecular ensemble into a single hyperfine level of the first rotationally excited state, J =1 , we observe lifetimes of more than 3 s, comparable to those in the rovibrational ground state, J =0 . Long-lived ensembles and full quantum state control are prerequisites for the use of ultracold molecules in quantum simulation, precision measurements, and quantum information processing.

  11. Application of 23Na MRI to Monitor Chemotherapeutic Response in RIF-1 Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Babsky, Andriy M; Hekmatyar, Shahryar K; Zhang, Hong; Solomon, James L; Bansal, Navin

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Effects of an alkylating anticancer drug, cyclophosphamide (Cp), on 23Na signal intensity (23Na SI) and water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were examined in subcutaneously-implanted radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumors by in vivo 23Na and 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI experiments were performed on untreated control (n = 5) and Cp-treated (n = 6) C3H mice, once before Cp injection (300 mg/kg) then daily for 3 days after treatment. Tumor volumes were significantly lower in treated animals 2 and 3 days posttreatment. At the same time points, MRI experiments showed an increase in both 23Na SI and water ADC in treated tumors, whereas control tumors did not show any significant changes. The correlation between 23Na SI and water ADC changes was dramatically increased in the Cp-treated group, suggesting that the observed increases in 23Na SI and water ADC were caused by the same mechanism. Histologic sections showed decreased cell density in the regions of increased 23Na and water ADC SI. Destructive chemical analysis showed that Cp treatment increased the relative extracellular space and tumor [Na+]. We conclude that the changes in water ADC and 23Na SI were largely due to an increase in extracellular space. 23Na MRI and 1H water ADC measurements may provide valuable noninvasive techniques for monitoring chemotherapeutic responses. PMID:16026645

  12. Measurement of 23Na(α,p)26Mg at Energies Relevant to 26Al Production in Massive Stars.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, J R; Fallis, J; Laird, A M; Fox, S P; Akers, C; Alcorta, M; Bentley, M A; Christian, G; Davids, B; Davinson, T; Fulton, B R; Galinski, N; Rojas, A; Ruiz, C; de Séréville, N; Shen, M; Shotter, A C

    2015-07-31

    26Al is an important radioisotope in astrophysics that provides evidence of ongoing nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy. The 23Na(α, p)26Mg reaction has been identified by a sensitivity study as being one of the most important reactions for the production of 26Al in the convective C/Ne burning shell of massive stars. Owing to large uncertainties in previous experimental data, model calculations are used for the reaction rate of 23Na(α, p)26Mg in this sensitivity study. Current experimental data suggest a reaction rate a factor of ∼40 higher than model calculations. However, a new measurement of this reaction cross section has been made in inverse kinematics in the energy range E(c.m.)=1.28-3.15  MeV at TRIUMF, and found to be in reasonable agreement with the model calculation. A new reaction rate is calculated and tight constraints on the uncertainty in the production of 26Al, due to this reaction, are determined. PMID:26274415

  13. Differential Cross Sections for Neutron Elastic and Inelastic Scattering on 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; Chakraborty, A.; Champine, B. R.; Combs, B.; Crider, B. P.; Kersting, L. J.; Kumar, A.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A.; Watts, D. W.; Yates, S. W.

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from 23Na have been performed for sixteen incident neutron energies above 1.5 MeV with the 7-MV University of Kentucky Accelerator using the 3H(p,n) reaction as the neutron source. These measurements were complemented by γ-ray excitation functions using the (n,n'γ) reaction. The time-of-flight technique is employed for background reduction in both neutron and γ- ray measurements and for determining the energy of the scattered neutrons. Cross section determinations support fuel cycle and structural materials research and development. Previous reaction model evaluations [1] relied primarily on total cross sections and four (n,n0) and (n,n1) angular distributions in the En = 5 to 9 MeV range. The inclusion of more inelastic channels at lower neutron energies provides additional information on direct couplings between elastic and inelastic scattering as a function of angular momentum transfer. Reaction model calculations examining direct collective and statistical properties were performed.

  14. Neutron-induced 2.2 MeV background in gamma ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanrosso, E. M.; Long, J. L.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron-induced gamma ray production is an important source of background in Compton scatter gamma ray telescopes where organic scintillator material is used. Most important is deuteron formation when atmospheric albedo and locally produced neutrons are thermalized and subsequently absorbed in the hydrogenous material. The resulting 2.2 MeV gamma ray line radiation essentially represents a continuous isotropic source within the scintillator itself. Interestingly, using a scintillator material with a high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio to minimize the scintillator material with a high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio to minimize the neutron-induced 4.4 MeV carbon line favors the np reaction. The full problem of neutron-induced background in Compton scatter telescopes has been previously discussed. Results are presented of observations with the University of California balloon-borne Compton scatter telescope where the 2.2 MeV induced line emission is prominently seen.

  15. Neutron-induced defects in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzolo, S.; Morana, A.; Cannas, M.; Bauer, S.; Perisse, J.; Mace, J.-R.; Boscaino, R.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.; Nacir, B.; Girard, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present a study on 0.8 MeV neutron-induced defects up to fluences of 1017 n/cm2 in fluorine doped optical fibers by using electron paramagnetic resonance, optical absorption and confocal micro-luminescence techniques. Our results allow to address the microscopic mechanisms leading to the generation of Silica-related point-defects such as E', H(I), POR and NBOH Centers.

  16. Neutron-induced defects in optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzolo, S.; Morana, A.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.; Girard, S.; Cannas, M.; Boscaino, R.; Bauer, S.; Perisse, J.; Mace, J-R.; Nacir, B.

    2014-10-21

    We present a study on 0.8 MeV neutron-induced defects up to fluences of 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2} in fluorine doped optical fibers by using electron paramagnetic resonance, optical absorption and confocal micro-luminescence techniques. Our results allow to address the microscopic mechanisms leading to the generation of Silica-related point-defects such as E', H(I), POR and NBOH Centers.

  17. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  18. Measurement of (23)Na(n,2n) cross section in well-defined reactor spectra.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Švadlenková, Marie; Baroň, Petr; Milčák, Ján; Mareček, Martin; Uhlíř, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The present paper aims to compare the calculated and experimental reaction rates of (23)Na(n,2n)(22)Na in a well-defined reactor spectra of a special core assembled in the LR-0 reactor. The experimentally determined reaction rate, derived using gamma spectroscopy of irradiated NaF sample, is used for average cross section determination. The resulting value averaged in spectra is 0.91±0.02µb. This cross-section is important as it is included in International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File and is also relevant to the correct estimation of long-term activity of Na coolant in Sodium Fast Reactors. The calculations were performed with the MCNP6 code using ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, ROSFOND-2010 and CENDL-3.1 nuclear data libraries. Generally the best C/E agreement, within 2%, was found using the ROSFOND-2010 data set, whereas the worst, as high as 40%, was found using the ENDF/B-VII.0. PMID:26894323

  19. Neutron scattering differential cross sections for 23Na from 1.5 to 4.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; Chakraborty, A.; Champine, B. R.; Combs, B. M.; Crider, B. P.; Kersting, L. J.; Kumar, A.; Lueck, C. J.; Liu, S. H.; McDonough, P. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Sidwell, L. C.; Sigillito, A. J.; Watts, D. W.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections from 23Na have been performed for sixteen incident neutron energies between 1.5 and 4.5 MeV. These measurements were complemented by γ-ray excitation functions using the (n ,n‧ γ) reaction to include excited levels not resolved in the neutron detection measurements. The time-of-flight (TOF) technique was employed for background reduction in both neutron and γ-ray measurements and for energy determination in neutron detection measurements. Previous reaction model evaluations relied primarily on neutron total cross sections and four (n, n0) and (n, n1) angular distributions in the 5 to 9 MeV range. The inclusion of more inelastic channels and measurements at lower incident neutron energies provide additional information on direct couplings between elastic and inelastic scattering as a function of angular momentum transfer. Reaction model calculations examining collective direct-coupling and compound absorption components were performed.

  20. 231Pa and 233Pa Neutron-Induced Fission Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, V.M.; Tetereva, N.A.; Baba, M.; Hasegawa, A.; Kornilov, N.V.; Kagalenko, A.B.

    2005-05-24

    The 231Pa and 233Pa neutron-induced fission cross-section database is analyzed within the Hauser-Feshbach approach. The consistency of neutron-induced fission cross-section data and data extracted from transfer reactions is investigated. The fission probabilities of Pa, fissioning in 231,233Pa(n,nf) reactions, are defined by fitting (3He,d) or (3He,t) transfer-reaction data. The present estimate of the 233Pa(n,f) fission cross section above the emissive fission threshold is supported by smooth level-density parameter systematics, validated in the case of the 231Pa(n,f) data description up to En =20 MeV.

  1. Status of the direct measurements of 18O(p,γ)19F and 23Na(p,γ)24Mg cross sections at astrophysical energies at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeltzig, A.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Best, A.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.

    2016-04-01

    18O(p, γ)19F and 23Na(p,γ)24Mg are reactions of astrophysical interest for example in AGB star scenarios. The rates of both reactions are potentially influenced by low-energy resonances for whose strengths either exist only values with large uncertainties, upper limits or even contradictory claims. Measurements at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) aim at a direct observation of these low-energy resonances, and additional cross section measurements to aid a more precise determination of the reaction rates in astrophysical scenarios. We report the experimental setup and the status of the ongoing measurements of the two reactions at LUNA.

  2. Elastic Scattering between Ultracold 23Na and 85Rb Atoms in the Triplet State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiu-Bo; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Sun, Jin-Feng; Yu, Ke

    2011-04-01

    The elastic scattering properties between ultracold 23Na and 85Rb atoms for the triplet state (a3 Σ+u) are researched. The s-wave scattering lengths of 23Na and 85Rb are calculated by the Numerov and semiclassical method with two kinds of interatomic potentials, which are the interpolation potential and Lennard—Jones potential (LJ12,6) by the same phase Φ. Shape resonances appear clearly in the l = 5 partial waves for the a3 Σ+u state. Moreover, the s-wave scattering cross section, total cross section and energy positions of shape resonances are also discussed.

  3. Partial Cross Sections of Neutron-Induced Reactions on nCu at En = 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 MeV for 0νββ Background Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooden, M. E.; Fallin, B. A.; Finch, S. W.; Kelley, J. H.; Howell, C. R.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Stanislav, V.

    2014-05-01

    Partial cross-section measurements of (n,n'γ) reactions on natCu were carried out at TUNL using monoenergetic neutrons at six energies of En = 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 MeV. These studies were performed to provide accurate cross-section data on materials abundant in experimental setups involving HPGe detectors used to search for rare events, like the neutrino-less double-beta decay of 76Ge. Spallation and (α,n) neutrons are expected to cause the largest source of external background in the energy region of interest. At TUNL pulsed neutron beams were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction and the deexcitation γ rays from the reaction natCu(n,xγ) were detected with clover HPGe detectors. Cross-section results for the strongest transtions in 63Cu and 65Cu will be reported, and will compared to model calculations and to data recently obtained at LANL with a white neutron beam.

  4. Neutron-induced reactions in tissue-resident elements

    SciTech Connect

    Herling, G.H.; Bassel, R.H.; Adams, J.H.; Fraser, W.A.

    1981-07-08

    Kerma-to-fluence ratios have been calculated for neutrons with energies between 20 and 60 MeV incident upon 1H, 12C, 14N, and 16O. The following charged particles have been taken into account: protons, deuterons, alpha particles, and heavy recoils. Results are presented for NE-213 plastic, muscle, and tissue-equivalent plastic.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance of 23Na ions interacting with the gramicidin channel.

    PubMed Central

    Monoi, H.

    1985-01-01

    Basic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) features of 23Na ions bound to the gramicidin channel (packaged into lecithin liposomes) were studied. The first binding constant K1 of Na+ was not significantly dependent on channel models employed. With the two-identical-site model (Model I), K1 was 13.7 (+/- 1.4) molal-1 (in the activity basis) at 25 degrees C; when the binding of a third ion was included (Model II), it was 13.0 (+/- 2.0) molal-1. The second binding constant K2 was model dependent; it was 1.6 (+/- 0.2) and 3-4 molal-1 for Models I and II, respectively. The rate constants, k-1 and k-2, of Na+ for exit from singly and doubly loaded channels, respectively, were 8 X 10(5) s-1 less than or equal to k-1 less than or equal to 3 X 10(6) s-1 and 8 X 10(5) s-1 less than or equal to k-2 less than or equal to 1.0 X 10(7) s-1 at 25 degrees C; the lower bound represents a rough approximation of k-1. The ratio k-2/k-1 was greater than one and did not greatly exceed 20. From the competition experiment, K1 of T1+ was 5.7 (+/- 0.6) X 10(2) molal-1. The longitudinal relaxation time T1 of bound 23Na in the state of single occupancy (T 1B sing) was virtually independent of models, 0.56 (+/- 0.03) and 0.55 (+/- 0.04) ms at 25 degrees C for Models I and II, respectively. For the state of double occupancy, T1 of bound 23Na (T 1B doub) was model dependent: 0.27 (+/- 0.01) and 0.4-0.6 ms for Models I and II. The correlation time tau c of bound 23Na was 2.2 (+/- 0.2) ns at 25 degrees C for single occupancy; tau c for double occupancy was not significantly different from this value. The estimated tau c was found to involve no appreciable contribution of the exchange of 23Na between the channel and the bulk solution. Thé quadrupole coupling constant chi was 1.0 (+/- 0.1) MHz for 23Na in single occupancy; chi for double occupancy was 0.9-1.4 MHz, depending on models. A lower bound of the average quadrupole coupling constant chi alpha was 0.13-0.26 MHz at 25 degrees C for 23Na in single

  6. Geometric Hall Effect of ^{23}Na Condensate in a Time- and Space-Dependent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Gong-Ping; Yang, Ling-Ling; Chang, Gao-Zhan; Wu, Zhe

    2016-04-01

    We simulate numerically the dynamics of ^{23}Na condensate in a time- and space-dependent magnetic field with a variational approach. It is shown to be an efficient method to describe the complex dynamics of the system, which may excite the breather mode, the scissor mode, and the dipole mode simultaneously. Our results agree with the experimental observations of Choi et al. (Phys Rev Lett 111:245301, 2013). We reproduce qualitatively the geometric Hall effect and resonance behavior. We also find that the condensate shows a scissor-mode-like motion, which may play the shearing force to deform the condensate and consequently leads to the dynamical nucleation of quantized vortices.

  7. Neutron-induced gamma-ray production

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Drake, D.M.; Haight, R.C.; Laymon, C.M.; Wender, S.A.; Young, P.G. ); Drosg, M.; Pavlik, A.; Vonach, H. . Inst. fuer Radiumforschung und Kernphysik); Larson, D.C. )

    1990-01-01

    High resolution Ge detectors coupled with the WNR high-intensity, high-energy, pulsed neutron source at LAMPF recently have been used to measure a variety of reactions including (n,xn) for 1 {le} x {le} 11, (n,n{alpha}), (n,np), etc. The reactions are identified by the known gamma-ray energies of prompt transitions between the low lying states in the final nuclei. With our spallation neutron source cross section data are obtained at all neutron energies from a few MeV to over 200 MeV. Applications of the data range from assisting the interpretation of the planned Mars Observer mission to map the elemental composition of the martian surface, to providing data for nuclear model verification and understanding reaction mechanisms. For example, a study of the Pb(n,xn) reactions for 2 {le} x {le} 11 populating the first excited states of the even Pb isotopes is underway. These data will be used to test preequilibrium and other reaction models. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Neutron radiography and neutron-induced autoradiography for the classroom

    SciTech Connect

    Aderhold, H.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The Cornell 500-kW MARK II TRIGA reactor at the Ward Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering has been used to illustrate the application of neutron radiography (NR) and neutron-induced autoradiography (NIAR) for solving problems in engineering as well as problems in art history. The applications are described in the paper.

  9. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  10. Rotational Spectroscopy on Ultracold 23 Na40 K Ground State Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Sebastian; Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe; Loh, Huanqian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold molecules with controllable dipolar long-range interactions will open up new routes for quantum simulation and the creation of novel states of matter. In particular, the molecules' rich internal degrees of freedom allow for versatile control of intermolecular interactions by applying static electric and microwave fields. Starting from an ultracold, spin-polarized ensemble of trapped fermionic 23 Na40 K molecules in the absolute ground state, we perform microwave spectroscopy on the first rotationally excited state for a range of magnetic and electric fields. Extracting the rotational and hyperfine coupling constants, we comprehensively understand the observed spectra. Following the coherent transfer of the entire ensemble of chemically stable 23 Na40 K molecules to the first rotationally excited state, we observe a lifetime of more than 3 sec, comparable to the lifetime in the rovibrational ground state. The collisional stability of excited rotational states opens up intriguing prospects for the control of intermolecular van-der-Waals interactions via electric fields.

  11. Four-dimensional 1H and 23Na imaging using continuously oscillating gradients.

    PubMed

    Star-Lack, J M; Roos, M S; Wong, S T; Schepkin, V D; Budinger, T F

    1997-02-01

    A class of fast magnetic spectroscopic imaging methods using continuously oscillating gradients for four-dimensional (three spatial and one spectral) localization is introduced. Sampling may start immediately following the application of an RF excitation pulse, thus enabling measurement of spin density, chemical shift, and relaxation rates of short-T2 species. For spatial localization, steady-state sinusoidal gradient waveforms are used to sample a ball in k space. The two types of trajectories presented include: (1) continuously oscillating gradients with continuously rotating direction used for steady-state free-precession imaging and (2) continuously oscillating gradients followed by a spoiler directed along discrete projections. Design criteria are given and spatial-spectral and spatial-temporal reconstruction methods are developed. Theoretical point-spread functions and signal-to-noise ratios are derived while considering T2*, off-resonance effects, and RF excitation options. Experimental phantom, in vivo, and in vitro 1H and 23Na images collected at 2.35 T are presented. The 1H images were acquired with isotropic spatial resolution ranging from 0.03 to 0.27 cm3 and gradient-oscillation frequencies ranging from 600 to 700 Hz, thus allowing for the separation of water and lipid signals within a voxel. The 23Na images, acquired with 500 and 800 Hz gradient waveforms and 0.70 cm3 isotropic resolution, were resolved in the time domain, yielding spatially localized FIDs. PMID:9169223

  12. Creating Fermionic Ground State Molecules of 23Na40K with Strong Dipolar Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Schloss, Jennifer; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2013-05-01

    In our experiment, we work towards creating fermionic ground state molecules of 23Na40K with strong dipolar interactions. These molecules will be chemically stable in the rovibrational ground state, and will carry a large induced dipole moment of 2.72 Debye. Building up on our previous work, we have done photoassociation spectroscopy on the 23Na-40K mixture in order to understand the molecular excited state potentials and identify possible intermediate states for efficient STIRAP transfer of Feshbach molecules down to the absolute rovibrational ground state. In addition, our recent effort in doing two-photon spectroscopy to locate the absolute rovibrational ground state will be presented. Our work paves the way towards creating stable dipolar quantum gases, which will open up new avenues to quantum many-body phases with intriguing properties such as supersolidity and topological phases. This work was supported by the NSF, AFOSR-MURI and -PECASE, ARO-MURI, ONR YIP, DARPA YFA, a grant from the Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program and the David and Lucille Packard Foundation.

  13. Measurement of Neutron Induced and Spontaneous Fission in Pu-242 at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, Andrii; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R.; Couture, A.; Lee, H. Y.; Ullmann, J.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Jandel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Dance Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Neutron capture and fission reactions are important in nuclear engineering and physics. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Measurement, LANL) combined with PPAC (avalanche technique based fission tagging detector, LLNL) were used to study neutron induced and spontaneous fission in 242Pu. 2 measurements were performed in 2013. The first experiment was done without the incident neutron beam with the fission tagging ability to study γ-rays emitted in the spontaneous fission of 242Pu. The second one - with the neutron beam to measure both the neutron capture and fission reactions. This is the first direct measurement of prompt fission γ-rays in 242Pu. The γ-ray multiplicity, γ-ray energy, and total energy of γ-rays per fission in 242Pu will be presented. These distributions of the 242Pu spontaneous fission will be compared to those in the 241Pu neutron induced fission. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Neutron induced fission of 234U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Al-Adili, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Pomp, S.

    2012-02-01

    The fission fragment properties of 234U(n,f) were investigated as a function of incident neutron energy from 0.2 MeV up to 5 MeV. The fission fragment mass, angular distribution and kinetic energy were measured with a double Frisch-grid ionization chamber using both analogue and digital data acquisition techniques. The reaction 234U(n,f) is relevant, since it involves the same compound nucleus as formed after neutron evaporation from highly excited 236U*, the so-called second-chance fission of 235U. Experimental data on fission fragment properties like fission fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE) as a function of incident neutron energy are rather scarce for this reaction. For the theoretical modelling of the reaction cross sections for Uranium isotopes this information is a crucial input parameter. In addition, 234U is also an important isotope in the Thorium-based fuel cycle. The strong anisotropy of the angular distribution around the vibrational resonance at En = 0.77 MeV could be confirmed using the full angular range. Fluctuations in the fragment TKE have been observed in the threshold region around the strong vibrational resonance at En = 0.77 MeV. The present results are in contradiction with corresponding literature values. Changes in the mass yield around the vibrational resonance and at En = 5 MeV relative to En = 2 MeV show a different signature. The drop in mean TKE around 2.5 to 3 MeV points to pair breaking as also observed in 235,238U(n,f). The measured two-dimensional mass yield and TKE distribution have been described in terms of fission modes. The yield of the standard 1 (S1) mode shows fluctuations in the threshold of the fission cross section due to the influence of the resonance and levels off at about 20% yield for higher incident neutron energies. The S2 mode shows the respective opposite behaviour. The mean TKE of both modes decreases with En. The decrease in mean TKE overrules the increase in S1 yield, so the mean TKE is dropping

  15. 23Na NMR study of the effect of organic osmolytes on DNA counterion atmosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Flock, S; Labarbe, R; Houssier, C

    1996-01-01

    The effect of different organic osmolytes on the DNA counterion condensation layer has been investigated by 23Na NMR relaxation measurements. The zwitterionic compounds glycine, beta-alanine, 4-aminobutyric acid, and 6-aminocaproic acid have shown an increasing capacity to decrease the amount of sodium ions in the vicinity of the macromolecule. The experimental data have been correlated with the dielectric constant increase in their corresponding solutions and have been compared with the prediction of counterion condensation theory. Polyols (sorbitol and mannitol) did not display the same effect. These compounds largely increase the relaxation rate of sodium ions in the proximity of DNA, unlike the zwitterionic compounds. This probably results from a perturbation of the water dynamic around the macromolecule, of the primary or secondary hydration shell of the sodium nuclei involved, or both. PMID:8874025

  16. Developments for neutron-induced fission at IGISOL-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, D.; Penttilä, H.; Al-Adili, A.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Koponen, J.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Reinikainen, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2016-06-01

    At the IGISOL-4 facility, neutron-rich, medium mass nuclei have usually been produced via charged particle-induced fission of natural uranium and thorium. Neutron-induced fission is expected to have a higher production cross section of the most neutron-rich species. Development of a neutron source along with a new ion guide continues to be one of the major goals since the commissioning of IGISOL-4. Neutron intensities at different angles from a beryllium neutron source have been measured in an on-line experiment with a 30 MeV proton beam. Recently, the new ion guide coupled to the neutron source has been tested as well. Details of the neutron source and ion guide design together with preliminary results from the first neutron-induced fission experiment at IGISOL-4 are presented in this report.

  17. Neutron-induced autoradiography used in the investigation of modern pigments in paintings of known composition

    SciTech Connect

    Aderhold, H.C.; Taft, W.S.

    1992-07-01

    Neutron-Induced Autoradiography is an effective analytical technique for mapping the location of a number of specified pigments in paintings. Most paintings which have been examined through neutron-induced autoradiography to date were painted prior to the introduction of the most common of modern pigments. By understanding die nuclear properties of these pigments, as revealed by this technique, a more informed analysis of modem paintings may result This investigation is part of an ongoing program to develop case studies for presentation to an undergraduate class at Cornell University, 'Art, Isotopes and Analysis'. We have found that this technique is a graphic and effective method of presenting nuclear reactions and radioactivity to non-specialists. Sample paintings are produced using pigments of known composition. A sequence of discreet layers, each a separate image, is documented in order to establish a reference for accurately interpreting the autoradiographs. The painting is then activated in the Cornell TRIGA reactor and a series of autoradiographs produced Gamma spectra taken before and after each film exposure gives us detailed information on which radioisotopes (and therefore, which pigments), are active. (author)

  18. Cryptate 13C and 23Na nuclear magnetic relaxation as a probe of counterion dynamics in aqueous polyacrylate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Maarel, J. R. C.; Van Duijn, D.; De Bleijser, J.; Leyte, J. C.

    1987-03-01

    In a series of fully alkali neutralized polyacrylate solutions the counterions are included by a macrobicyclic ligand (cryptand) to form a well-defined coordination shell. Vapor pressure experiments show the polyacrylate-cryptate system to behave osmotically as an ordinary polyelectrolyte solution. Cryptate 13C and 23Na relaxation show that the influence of polyions on the counter-ion reorientational mobility is moderate. The main 23Na relaxation mechanism is found to be the fluctuating electric field gradient caused by the surrounding ligand.

  19. Prompt Gamma Emission in Resonance Neutron Induced Fission of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, I.; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Panteleev, Ts.; Skoy, V. R.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Dermendjiev, E.; Janeva, N.; Pikelner, L. B.; Grigoriev, Yu. V.; Mezentseva, Zh. V.; Ivanov, I.

    The scientific interest in the resonance neutron induced capture and fission reactions on 239Pu is continuously rising during the last decade. From a practical point of view, this is because more precise data on capture and fission cross sections, fission fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions, variation of prompt fission neutron and gamma yields in the resonance neutron region, are needed for the modelling of new generation nuclear power plants and for nuclear spent fuel and waste transmutation. From a heuristic and fundamental point of view, such a research improves our knowledge and understanding of the fission phenomena itself. To achieve these goals more powerful neutron sources and more precise fission product detectors have to be used. At the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP), where already half a century the thermal and resonance neutron induced nuclear reactions are studied, a new electron accelerator driven white spectrum pulsed neutron source IREN has been built and successfully tested. The improved characteristics of this facility, in comparison with those of the former pulse neutron fast reactor IBR-30, will allow measuring some of the neutron-nuclear reaction data with better precision and accuracy. A new experimental setup for detecting gamma rays (and neutrons) has been designed and is under construction. It will consist of 2 rings (arrays) of 12 NaI(Tl) detectors each (or 1 array of 24 detectors) with variable ring diameter and distance between both rings. Such a setup will make possible not only to measure the multiplicity, energy and angular anisotropy of prompt fission gammas, but also to separate the contribution of prompt fission neutrons by their longer time-of-flight from the fissile target to the detectors. The signals from all the 24 detectors will be recorded simultaneously in digitized form and will be stored on the hard disk of the personal computer for further off

  20. Long Hyperfine Coherence Time of Ultracold Fermionic 23 Na40 K Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold molecules created and trapped at sub uK temperatures allow the full control of the molecule's external and internal degrees of freedom down to a single hyperfine state. In particular, an ensemble of molecules all initialized in a single rotational and hyperfine state can be prepared and be coherently addressed using microwave fields. In this talk, we report on the observation of long coherence time between two hyperfine states of fermionic 23 Na40 K molecules in the ro-vibronic ground state (v = 0 , J = 0). A direct two-photon microwave transition via the J = 1 state is used to prepare a superposition of two lowest hyperfine states of J = 0 , and we perform Ramsey spectroscopy as a direct probe of phase coherence between these states. The fermionic nature of the molecules and the lack of electronic angular momentum in the ro-vibronic ground state heavily suppress the decoherence from collisions and external fields, respectively, and we observe long coherence times upto 0.5 sec for this hyperfine superposition state. The observed long coherence time is a crucial step for applications of trapped dipolar molecules in quantum information processing schemes.

  1. Radioactive targets for neutron-induced cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, A.; Bond, E. M.; Glover, S. E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Esch, E. I.; Reifarth, R.; Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, Robert C.; Rochmann, D.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements using radioactive targets are important for the determination of key reaction path ways associated with the synthesis of the elements in nuclear astrophysics (sprocess), advanced fuel cycle initiative (transmutation of radioactive waste), and stockpile stewardship. High precision capture cross-section measurements are needed to interpret observations, predict elemental or isotopical ratios, and unobserved abundances. There are two new detector systems that are presently being commissioned at Los Alamos National Laboratory for very precise measurements of (n,{gamma}) and (n,f) cross-sections using small quantities of radioactive samples. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments), a 4 {pi} gamma array made up of 160 BaF{sub 2} detectors, is designed to measure neutron capture cross-sections of unstable nuclei in the low-energy range (thermal to {approx}500 keV). The high granularity and high detection efficiency of DANCE, combined with the high TOF-neutron flux available at the Lujan Center provides a versatile tool for measuring many important cross section data using radioactive and isotopically enriched targets of about 1 milligram. Another powerful instrument is the Lead-slowing down spectrometer (LSDS), which will enable the measurement of neutron-induced fission cross-section of U-235m and other short-lived actinides in a energy range from 1-200 keV with sample sizes down to 10 nanograms. Due to the short half-life of the U-235m isomer (T{sub 1/2} = 26 minutes), the samples must be rapidly and repeatedly extracted from its {sup 239}Pu parent. Since {sup 239}Pu is itself highly fissile, the separation must not only be rapid, but must also be of very high purity (the Pu must be removed from the U with a decontamination factor >10{sup 12}). Once extracted and purified, the {sup 235m}U isomer would be electrodeposited on solar cells as a fission detector and placed within the LSDS for direct (n,f) cross section measurements. The

  2. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections Measurements at n_TOF

    SciTech Connect

    Audouin, L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Isaev, S.; Koehler, Paul Edward; Collaboration, n_TOF

    2008-01-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 237}Np, {sup 209}Bi, {sup nat}Pb have been measured at the n{_}TOF facility at CERN over 9 orders of magnitude in neutron energy using {sup 235}U as a reference. Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters were used to detect both fission fragments in coincidence, thus efficiently discriminating fissions from other reactions. Data benefit from the remarkable energy resolution of the n{_}TOF facility. They are found in overall good agreement with databases and previous measurements, but some clear discrepancies can be put in evidence. These data are the first full coverage of the high-energy region (up to 1 GeV).

  3. A New Facility for High-Energy Neutron-Induced Fission Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Prokofiev, A.; Carlsson, M.; Einarsson, L.; Haag, N.; Pomp, S.; Bergenwall, B.; Blomgren, J.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Mermod, P.; Oesterlund, M.; Tippawan, U.; Dangtip, S.

    2005-05-24

    A new facility is constructed for measurements of neutron-induced fission cross sections in the 20-180 MeV energy region versus the np scattering cross section, which is adopted as the primary neutron standard. The advantage of the experiment compared to earlier studies is that the fission-fragment detection and the neutron-flux measurement via np scattering are performed simultaneously and at the same position in the beam, and, therefore, many sources of systematic errors cancel out. Further reduction of systematic errors is achieved due to 'embedded' determination of effective solid angle of particle detectors using {alpha}-particles from the radioactive decay of the target nuclei. The performance of the facility is illustrated by first data obtained for angular distributions of fission fragments in the 238U(n,f) reaction.

  4. Actinide neutron-induced fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tovesson, Fredrik K; Laptev, Alexander B; Hill, Tony S

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate ionization chamber are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with ex isting evaluations and previous data.

  5. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  6. Interface Induced Growth and Transformation of Polymer-Conjugated Proto-Crystalline Phases in Aluminosilicate Hybrids: A Multiple-Quantum (23)Na-(23)Na MAS NMR Correlation Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Brus, Jiri; Kobera, Libor; Urbanova, Martina; Doušová, Barbora; Lhotka, Miloslav; Koloušek, David; Kotek, Jiří; Čuba, Pavel; Czernek, Jiri; Dědeček, Jiří

    2016-03-22

    Nanostructured materials typically offer enhanced physicochemical properties because of their large interfacial area. In this contribution, we present a comprehensive structural characterization of aluminosilicate hybrids with polymer-conjugated nanosized zeolites specifically grown at the organic-inorganic interface. The inorganic amorphous Al-O-Si framework is formed by alkali-activated low-temperature transformation of metakaoline, whereas simultaneous copolymerization of organic comonomers creates a secondary epoxide network covalently bound to the aluminosilicate matrix. This secondary epoxide phase not only enhances the mechanical integrity of the resulting hybrids but also introduces additional binding sites accessible for compensating negative charge on the aluminosilicate framework. This way, the polymer network initiates growth and subsequent transformation of protocrystalline short-range ordered zeolite domains that are located at the organic-inorganic interface. By applying an experimental approach based on 2D (23)Na-(23)Na double-quantum (DQ) MAS NMR spectroscopy, we discovered multiple sodium binding sites in these protocrystalline domains, in which immobilized Na(+) ions form pairs or small clusters. It is further demonstrated that these sites, the local geometry of which allows for the pairing of sodium ions, are preferentially occupied by Pb(2+) ions during the ion exchange. The proposed synthesis protocol thus allows for the preparation of a novel type of geopolymer hybrids with polymer-conjugated zeolite phases suitable for capturing and storage of metal cations. The demonstrated (23)Na-(23)Na DQ MAS NMR combined with DFT calculations represents a suitable approach for understanding the role of Na(+) ions in aluminositicate solids and related inorganic-organic hybrids, particularly their specific arrangement and clustering at interfacial areas. PMID:26931131

  7. Energy dependence of mass, charge, isotopic, and energy distributions in neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasca, H.; Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kim, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The mass, charge, isotopic, and kinetic-energy distributions of fission fragments are studied within an improved scission-point statistical model in the reactions 235U+n and 239Pu+n at different energies of the incident neutron. The charge and mass distributions of the electromagnetic- and neutron-induced fission of 214,218Ra, 230,232,238U are also shown. The available experimental data are well reproduced and the energy-dependencies of the observable characteristics of fission are predicted for future experiments.

  8. Discrimination of intra- and extracellular 23Na + signals in yeast cell suspensions using longitudinal magnetic resonance relaxography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yajie; Poirer-Quinot, Marie; Springer, Charles S.; Balschi, James A.

    2010-07-01

    This study tested the ability of MR relaxography (MRR) to discriminate intra- (Nai+) and extracellular (Nae+)23Na + signals using their longitudinal relaxation time constant ( T1) values. Na +-loaded yeast cell ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suspensions were investigated. Two types of compartmental 23Na +T1 differences were examined: a selective Nae+T1 decrease induced by an extracellular relaxation reagent (RR e), GdDOTP 5-; and, an intrinsic T1 difference. Parallel studies using the established method of 23Na MRS with an extracellular shift reagent (SR e), TmDOTP 5-, were used to validate the MRR measurements. With 12.8 mM RR e, the 23Nae+T1 was 2.4 ms and the 23Nai+T1 was 9.5 ms (9.4T, 24 °C). The Na + amounts and spontaneous efflux rate constants were found to be identical within experimental error whether measured by MRR/RR e or by MRS/SR e. Without RR e, the Na +-loaded yeast cell suspension 23Na MR signal exhibited two T1 values, 9.1 (±0.3) ms and 32.7 (±2.3) ms, assigned to 23Nai+ and 23Nae+, respectively. The Nai+ content measured was lower, 0.88 (±0.06); while Nae+ was higher, 1.43 (±0.12) compared with MRS/SR e measures on the same samples. However, the measured efflux rate constant was identical. T1 MRR potentially may be used for Nai+ determination in vivo and Na + flux measurements; with RR e for animal studies and without RR e for humans.

  9. Lanl Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. B.; Tovesson, F.; Hill, T. S.

    2014-09-01

    A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R&D). Combining measurements at two LANSCE facilities, the Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), cover neutron energies over 10 orders of magnitude: from sub-thermal up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate fission ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The 235U(n,f) standard was used as the reference. Fission cross sections have been measured for multiple actinides. The new data presented here completes the suite of long-lived Uranium isotopes that were investigated with this experimental approach. The cross section data are presented in comparison with existing evaluations and previous measurements.

  10. Neutron Induced D Breakup in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the Omega Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Schroder, W. U.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution neutron spectroscopy is used to study the deuteron breakup reaction D(n,n ') np in the thermonuclear environment created in inertial confinement fusion experiments at the Omega Laser Facility. Neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV generated in the primary D-T fusion reactions scatter elastically and inelastically off the dense (cryogenic) D-T fuel assembly surrounding the central hot spot at peak fuel compression. These neutrons also induce a breakup of the fuel deuterons. The corresponding breakup cross section is measured relative to elastic n -D and n -T scattering, i.e., simultaneously in the same environment. Apart from astrophysical and technological interest, the neutron-induced deuteron breakup reaction is of interest to the physics of nucleon -nucleon forces. For example, theoretical calculations predict a noticeable influence of nucleonic three-body forces on the magnitude of the breakup cross section. Preliminary results from measurements of the neutron contribution in the 2- to 6-MeV range show reasonable agreement with the published ENDL 2008.2 semi-empirical cross-section. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. (39) K and (23) Na relaxation times and MRI of rat head at 21.1 T.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Armin M; Umathum, Reiner; Rösler, Manuela B; Ladd, Mark E; Litvak, Ilya; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Schepkin, Victor D

    2016-06-01

    At ultrahigh magnetic field strengths (B0  ≥ 7.0 T), potassium ((39) K) MRI might evolve into an interesting tool for biomedical research. However, (39) K MRI is still challenging because of the low NMR sensitivity and short relaxation times. In this work, we demonstrated the feasibility of (39) K MRI at 21.1 T, determined in vivo relaxation times of the rat head at 21.1 T, and compared (39) K and sodium ((23) Na) relaxation times of model solutions containing different agarose gel concentrations at 7.0 and 21.1 T. (39) K relaxation times were markedly shorter than those of (23) Na. Compared with the lower field strength, (39) K relaxation times were up to 1.9- (T1 ), 1.4- (T2S ) and 1.9-fold (T2L ) longer at 21.1 T. The increase in the (23) Na relaxation times was less pronounced (up to 1.2-fold). Mono-exponential fits of the (39) K longitudinal relaxation time at 21.1 T revealed T1  = 14.2 ± 0.1 ms for the healthy rat head. The (39) K transverse relaxation times were 1.8 ± 0.2 ms and 14.3 ± 0.3 ms for the short (T2S ) and long (T2L ) components, respectively. (23) Na relaxation times were markedly longer (T1  = 41.6 ± 0.4 ms; T2S  = 4.9 ± 0.2 ms; T2L  = 33.2 ± 0.2 ms). (39) K MRI of the healthy rat head could be performed with a nominal spatial resolution of 1 × 1 × 1 mm(3) within an acquisition time of 75 min. The increase in the relaxation times with magnetic field strength is beneficial for (23) Na and (39) K MRI at ultrahigh magnetic field strength. Our results demonstrate that (39) K MRI at 21.1 T enables acceptable image quality for preclinical research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27061712

  12. Sepsis does not alter red blood cell glucose metabolism or Na+ concentration: A 2H-, 23Na-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, R.S.; Song, S.K.; Ling, C.S.; Ackerman, J.J.; Karl, I.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of sepsis on intracellular Na+ concentration ((Na+)i) and glucose metabolism were examined in rat red blood cells (RBCs) by using 23Na- and 2H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Sepsis was induced in 15 halothane-anesthetized female Sprague-Dawley rats by using the cecal ligation and perforation technique; 14 control rats underwent cecal manipulation without ligation. The animals were fasted for 36 h, but allowed free access to water. At 36 h postsurgery, RBCs were examined by 23Na-NMR by using dysprosium tripolyphosphate as a chemical shift reagent. Human RBCs from 17 critically ill nonseptic patients and from 7 patients who were diagnosed as septic were also examined for (Na+)i. Five rat RBC specimens had (Na+)i determined by both 23Na-NMR and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). For glucose metabolism studies, RBCs from septic and control rats were suspended in modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing (6,6-2H2)glucose and examined by 2H-NMR. No significant differences in (Na+)i or glucose utilization were found in RBCs from control or septic rats. There were no differences in (Na+)i in the two groups of patients. The (Na+)i determined by NMR spectroscopy agreed closely with measurements using ICP-AES and establish that 100% of the (Na+)i of the RBC is visible by NMR. Glucose measurements determined by 2H-NMR correlated closely (correlation coefficient = 0.93) with enzymatic analysis. These studies showed no evidence that sepsis disturbed RBC membrane function or metabolism.

  13. Solid-state 23Na and 7Li NMR investigations of sodium- and lithium-reduced mesoporous titanium oxides.

    PubMed

    Lo, Andy Y H; Schurko, Robert W; Vettraino, Melissa; Skadtchenko, Boris O; Trudeau, Michel; Antonelli, David M

    2006-02-20

    Mesoporous titanium oxide synthesized using a dodecylamine template was treated with 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0 equiv of Li- or Na-naphthalene. The composite materials were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state 23Na and 7Li NMR spectroscopy. In all cases the wormhole mesoporosity was retained as evidenced by BET surface areas from 400 to 700 m(2)/g, Horvath-Kawazoe pore sizes in the 20 Angstroms range, and a lack of hysteresis in the nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Variable-temperature conductivity studies show that the Li-reduced materials are semiconductors, with conductivity values 3 orders of magnitude higher than those of the Na-reduced materials. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate reversible intercalation/deintercalation of Li+ ions into pristine mesoporous Ti oxides with good cycling capacity. Solid-state 23Na NMR reveals two distinct Na environments: one corresponding to sodium ions in the mesoporous channels and the other corresponding to sodium ions intercalated into the metal framework. 23Na NMR spectra also indicate that the relative population of the framework site increases with increased reduction levels. Solid-state 7Li NMR spectra display a single broad resonance, which increases in breadth with increased reduction levels, though individual resonances inferring the presence of channel and framework Li species are not resolved. Comparisons of the lithium chemical shifts with published values suggests an "anatase-like structure" with no long-range order in the least-reduced samples but a "lithium titanate-like structure" with no long-range order in the higher reduced materials. PMID:16472000

  14. 23Na Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Lower Leg of Acute Heart Failure Patients during Diuretic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hammon, Matthias; Grossmann, Susan; Linz, Peter; Kopp, Christoph; Dahlmann, Anke; Garlichs, Christoph; Janka, Rolf; Cavallaro, Alexander; Luft, Friedrich C.; Uder, Michael; Titze, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Objective Na+ can be stored in muscle and skin without commensurate water accumulation. The aim of this study was to assess Na+ and H2O in muscle and skin with MRI in acute heart failure patients before and after diuretic treatment and in a healthy cohort. Methods Nine patients (mean age 78 years; range 58–87) and nine age and gender-matched controls were studied. They underwent 23Na/1H-MRI at the calf with a custom-made knee coil. Patients were studied before and after diuretic therapy. 23Na-MRI gray-scale measurements of Na+-phantoms served to quantify Na+-concentrations. A fat-suppressed inversion recovery sequence was used to quantify H2O content. Results Plasma Na+-levels did not change during therapy. Mean Na+-concentrations in muscle and skin decreased after furosemide therapy (before therapy: 30.7±6.4 and 43.5±14.5 mmol/L; after therapy: 24.2±6.1 and 32.2±12.0 mmol/L; p˂0.05 and p˂0.01). Water content measurements did not differ significantly before and after furosemide therapy in muscle (p = 0.17) and only tended to be reduced in skin (p = 0.06). Na+-concentrations in calf muscle and skin of patients before and after diuretic therapy were significantly higher than in healthy subjects (18.3±2.5 and 21.1±2.3 mmol/L). Conclusions 23Na-MRI shows accumulation of Na+ in muscle and skin in patients with acute heart failure. Diuretic treatment can mobilize this Na+-deposition; however, contrary to expectations, water and Na+-mobilization are poorly correlated. PMID:26501774

  15. A double species 23Na and 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate with tunable miscibility via an interspecies Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fudong; Li, Xiaoke; Xiong, Dezhi; Wang, Dajun

    2016-01-01

    We have realized a dual-species Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 23Na and 87Rb atoms and observed its immiscibility. Because of the favorable background intra- and inter-species scattering lengths, stable condensates can be obtained via efficient evaporative cooling and sympathetic cooling without the need for fine tuning of the interactions. Our system thus provides a clean platform for studying inter-species interactions-driven effects in superfluid mixtures. With a Feshbach resonance, we have successfully created double BECs with largely tunable inter-species interactions and studied the miscible-immiscible phase transition.

  16. 23Na NMR and FT-IR studies of sodium complexes with the ionophore lasalocid in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, G.; Gierczyk, B.; Brzezinski, B.; Różalski, B.; Bartl, F.; Zundel, G.; Sośnicki, J.; Grech, E.

    2000-01-01

    Lasalocid forms 1:1 or 2:2 complexes with sodium ions. The process of complexation was studied in different solvents at various temperatures by 23Na NMR. The formation constants and Δ G values were determined. The nature of the complex between lasalocid and Na + ions was also studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. In chloroform, a 2:2 complex of lasalocid and Na + ions is formed. A continuous absorption is observed in the far FT-IR spectrum of this complex. It indicates the large Na + polarizability due to fast fluctuations of the Na + ions in multiminima potentials, in the dimeric structure.

  17. A double-tuned 1H/23Na dual resonator system for tissue sodium concentration measurements in the rat brain via Na-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Tabbert, Martin; Junge, Sven; Gallagher, Lindsay; Mhairi Macrae, I.; Fagan, Andrew J.

    2010-12-01

    A method for quantifying the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the rat brain from 23Na-MR images was developed. TSC is known to change in a variety of common human diseases and holds considerable potential to contribute to their study; however, its accurate measurement in small laboratory animals has been hindered by the extremely low signal to noise ratio (SNR) in 23Na images. To address this, the design, construction and characterization of a double-tuned 1H/23Na dual resonator system for 1H-guided quantitative 23Na-MRI are described. This system comprises an SNR-optimized surface detector coil for 23Na image acquisition, and a volume resonator producing a highly homogeneous B1 field (<5% inhomogeneity) for the Na channel across the rat head. The resonators incorporated channel-independent balanced matching and tuning capabilities with active decoupling circuitry at the 23Na resonance frequency. A quantification accuracy of TSC of <10 mM was achieved in Na-images with 1.2 µl voxel resolution acquired in 10 min. The potential of the quantification technique was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment of a rat model of cerebral stroke, where the evolution of the TSC was successfully monitored for 8 h after the stroke was induced.

  18. The Upgrade of the Neutron Induced Positron Source NEPOMUC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Ceeh, H.; Gigl, T.; Lippert, F.; Piochacz, C.; Pikart, P.; Reiner, M.; Weber, J.; Zimnik, S.

    2013-06-01

    In summer 2012, the new NEutron induced POsitron Source MUniCh (NEPOMUC) was installed and put into operation at the research reactor FRM II. At NEPOMUC upgrade 80% 113Cd enriched Cd is used as neutron-gamma converter in order to ensure an operation time of 25 years. A structure of Pt foils inside the beam tube generates positrons by pair production. Moderated positrons leaving the Pt front foil are electrically extracted and magnetically guided to the outside of the reactor pool. The whole design, including Pt-foils, the electric lenses and the magnetic fields, has been improved in order to enhance both the intensity and the brightness of the positron beam. After adjusting the potentials and the magnetic guide and compensation fields an intensity of about 3·109 moderated positrons per second is expected. During the first start-up, the measured temperatures of about 90°C ensure a reliable operation of the positron source. Within this contribution the features and the status of NEPOMUC upgrade are elucidated. In addition, an overview of recent positron beam experiments and current developments at the spectrometers is given.

  19. Neutron-induced background in charge-coupled device detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jaanimagi, P. A.; Boni, R.; Keck, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    The inertial confinement fusion (ICF) community must become more cognizant of the neutron-induced background levels in charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors that are replacing film as the recording medium in many ICF diagnostics. This background degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the recorded signals and for the highest-yield shots comprises a substantial fraction of the pixel's full well capacity. CCD detectors located anywhere in the OMEGA Target Bay are precluded from recording high precision signals (SNR>30) for deuterium--tritium neutron yields greater than 10{sup 13}. CCDs make excellent calibrated neutron detectors. The average CCD background level is proportional to the neutron yield, and we have measured a linear response over four decades. The spectrum of deposited energy per pixel is heavily weighted to low energies, <50 keV, with a few isolated saturated pixels. Most of the background recorded by the CCDs is due to secondary radiation produced by interactions of the primary neutrons with all the materials in the Target Bay as well as the shield walls and the floor. Since the noise source comes from all directions it is very difficult to shield. The fallback position of using film instead of CCD cameras for high-neutron-yield target shots is flawed, as we have observed substantially increased fog levels on our x-ray recording film as a function of the neutron yield.

  20. Measurement of a wide range of intracellular sodium concentrations in erythrocytes by 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Y; Vinay, P; Desroches, M

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of the 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the sodium concentration in erythrocytes was tested by comparing the NMR results to those obtained by emission-flame photometry. Comparisons were made on aqueous solutions, hemolysates, gels, ghosts, and intact erythrocytes. The intra- and extracellular 23Na NMR signals were distinguished by addition of the dysprosium tripolyphosphate [Dy(PPP)7-2] shift reagent to the extracellular fluid. The intra- and extracellular volumes of ghosts and cells were determined by the isotope dilution method. Our results indicate that greater than 20% of the intracellular signal remains undetected by NMR in ghosts and cells. When the cells are hemolyzed, the amount of NMR-detectable sodium varies depending on the importance of gel formation. In hemolysates prepared by water addition, the NMR and flame photometry results are identical. The loss of signal in ghosts, cells, and undiluted hemolysates is attributed to partial binding of the Na+ ion to intracellular components, this binding being operative only when these components exist in a gel state. In a second part, 31P NMR was used to monitor the penetration of the shift reagent into the cells during incubation. Our data demonstrate that free Dy3+ can slowly accumulate inside the red cell. PMID:3986283

  1. Diagnostics of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source helium plasma with the injection of 23Na1+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Galatà, A.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Thuillier, T.; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the utilization of an injected 23Na1+ ion beam as a diagnostics of the helium plasma of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The obtained data allows estimating the upper limit for the ion-ion collision mean-free path of the incident sodium ions, the lower limit of ion-ion collision frequencies for all charge states of the sodium ions and the lower limit of the helium plasma density. The ion-ion collision frequencies of high charge state ions are shown to be at least on the order of 1-10 MHz and the plasma density is estimated to be on the order of 1011 cm-3 or higher. The experimental results are compared to simulations of the 23Na1+ capture into the helium plasma. The results indicate that the lower breeding efficiency of light ions in comparison to heavier elements is probably due to different capture efficiencies in which the in-flight ionization of the incident 1 + ions plays a vital role.

  2. Time course of myocardial sodium accumulation after burn trauma: a (31)P- and (23)Na-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Sikes, P J; Zhao, P; Maass, D L; Horton, J W

    2001-12-01

    In this study, (23)Na- and (31)P- nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were examined in perfused rat hearts harvested 1, 2, 4, and 24 h after 40% total body surface area burn trauma and lactated Ringer resuscitation, 4 ml. kg(-1). %(-1) burn. (23)Na-NMR spectroscopy monitored myocardial intracellular Na+ using the paramagnetic shift reagent thulium 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetra(methylenephosphonic acid). Left ventricular function, cardiac high-energy phosphates (ATP/PCr), and myocyte intracellular pH were studied by using (31)P NMR spectroscopy to examine the hypothesis that burn-mediated acidification of cardiomyocytes contributes to subsequent Na+ accumulation by this cell population. Intracellular Na+ accumulation was confirmed by sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate loading and fluorescence spectroscopy in cardiomyocytes isolated 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h postburn. This myocyte Na+ accumulation as early as 2 h postburn occurred despite no changes in cardiac ATP/PCr and intracellular pH. Left ventricular function progressively decreased after burn trauma. Cardiomyocyte Na+ accumulation paralleled cardiac contractile dysfunction, suggesting that myocardial Na+ overload contributes, in part, to the progressive postburn decrease in ventricular performance. PMID:11717236

  3. α and 2p2n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on Ni60

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-19

    The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction AZX(n,x)A-4Z-2Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n,n'α) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n,2p3n) reaction. In addition, the relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus.

  4. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Methods and procedures for evaluation of neutron-induced activation cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.A.

    1981-09-01

    One cannot expect measurements alone to supply all of the neutron-induced activation cross-section data required by the fission reactor, fusion reactor, and nuclear weapons development communities, given the wide ranges of incident neutron energies, the great variety of possible reaction types leading to activation, and targets both stable and unstable. Therefore, the evaluator must look to nuclear model calculations and systematics to aid in fulfilling these cross-section data needs. This review presents some of the recent developments and improvements in the prediction of neutron activation cross sections, with specific emphasis on the use of empirical and semiempirical methods. Since such systematics require much less nuclear informaion as input and much less computational time than do the multistep Hauser-Feshbach codes, they can often provide certain cross-section data at a sufficient level of accuracy within a minimum amount of time. The cross-section information that these systematics can and cannot provide and those cases in which they can be used most reliably are discussed.

  6. Practical design of a 4 Tesla double-tuned RF surface coil for interleaved 1H and 23Na MRI of rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecci, M.; Romanzetti, S.; Kaffanke, J.; Celik, A.; Wegener, H. P.; Shah, N. J.

    2006-08-01

    MRI is proving to be a very useful tool for sodium quantification in animal models of stroke, ischemia, and cancer. In this work, we present the practical design of a dual-frequency RF surface coil that provides 1H and 23Na images of the rat head at 4 T. The dual-frequency RF surface coil comprised of a large loop tuned to the 1H frequency and a smaller co-planar loop tuned to the 23Na frequency. The mutual coupling between the two loops was eliminated by the use of a trap circuit inserted in the smaller coil. This independent-loop design was versatile since it enabled a separate optimisation of the sensitivity and RF field distributions of the two coils. To allow for an easy extension of this simple double-tuned coil design to other frequencies (nuclei) and dimensions, we describe in detail the practical aspects of the workbench design and MRI testing using a phantom that mimics in vivo conditions. A comparison between our independent-loop, double-tuned coil and a single-tuned 23Na coil of equal size obtained with a phantom matching in vivo conditions, showed a reduction of the 23Na sensitivity (about 28 %) because of signal losses in the trap inductance. Typical congruent 1H and 23Na rat brain images showing good SNR ( 23Na: brain 7, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid 11) and spatial resolution ( 23Na: 1.25 × 1.25 × 5 mm 3) are also reported. The in vivo SNR values obtained with this coil were comparable to, if not better than, other contemporary designs in the literature.

  7. Fast production of large {sup 23}Na Bose-Einstein condensates in an optically plugged magnetic quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Myoung-Sun; Choi, Jae-yoon; Shin, Yong-il

    2011-01-15

    We demonstrate a fast production of large {sup 23}Na Bose-Einstein condensates in an optically plugged magnetic quadrupole trap. A single global minimum of the trapping potential is generated by slightly displacing the plug beam from the center of the quadrupole field. With a dark magneto-optical trap and a simple rf evaporation, our system produces a condensate with N{approx_equal}10{sup 7} atoms every 17 s. The Majorana loss rates and the resultant heating rates for various temperatures are measured with and without plugging. The average energy of a spin-flipped atom is almost linearly proportional to temperature and determined to be about 60% of the average energy of a trapped atom. We present a numerical study of the evaporation dynamics in a plugged linear trap.

  8. Determination of neutron-induced alpha-particle cross sections on carbon using the response of a liquid scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brede, H.J.; Dietze, G.; Klein, H.; Schoelermann, H. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the sums of the cross section {sup 12}C(n, {alpha}{sub 0}) {sup 9}Be and {sup 12}C(n, N{prime}3{alpha}) determined in the neutron energy range between 7.4 and 11 MeV. An NE-213 scintillation detector is simultaneously used as a carbon target, an alpha-particle detector, and a neutron fluence monitor. By comparing the measured and calculated response spectra, the neutron-induced alpha-particle events in the scintillation volume are separated and the cross sections {sigma}{sub n,{alpha}0} + {sigma}{sub n,n{prime}3{alpha}} are determined relative to the n-p scattering cross section. The pulse-height distribution due to alpha particles allows the angular distribution to be extracted on the basis of the reaction kinematics and an accurately determined light output function for alpha particles in the NE-213 detector.

  9. Calculated neutron-induced cross sections for /sup 53/Cr from 1 to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, K.; Hetrick, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    Neutron-induced cross sections of /sup 53/Cr have been calculated in the energy regions from 1 to 20 MeV. The quantities obtained are the cross sections for the reactions (n,n'..gamma..), (n,2n), (n,np), (n,n..cap alpha..), (n,p..gamma..), (n,pn), (n,..cap alpha gamma..), (n,..cap alpha..n), (n,d), (n,t), (n,/sup 3/He), and (n,..gamma..), as well as the spectra of emitted neutrons, protons, alpha particles, and gamma rays. The precompound process was included above 5 MeV in addition to the compound process. For the inelastic scattering, the contribution of the direct interaction was calculated with DWBA. 36 refs., 23 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Evaluation of {sup 28,29,30}Si neutron induced cross sections for ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect

    Hetrick, D.M.; Larson, D.C.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Epperson, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    Separate evaluations have been done for the three stable isotopes of silicon for ENDF/B-VI. The evaluations are based on analysis of experimental data, supplemented by results of nuclear model calculations. The computational methods and the parameters required as input to the nuclear model codes are reviewed. Discussion of the evaluated data given for resonance parameters, neutron induced reaction cross sections, associated angular and energy distributions, and gamma-ray production cross sections is included. Extensive comparisons of the evaluated cross sections to measured data are shown in this report. The evaluations include all necessary data to allow KERMA (Kinetic Energy Released in MAterials) and displacement cross sections to be calculated directly. These quantities are fundamental to studies of neutron heating and radiation damage.

  11. Dynamical simulation of neutron-induced fission of uranium isotopes using four-dimensional Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Mirfathi, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    Four-dimensional Langevin equations have been suggested for the dynamical simulation of neutron-induced fission at low and medium excitation energies. The mass distribution of the fission fragments, the neutron multiplicity, and the fission cross section for the thermal and fast neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U, and 238U is studied by considering energy dissipation of the compound nucleus through the fission using four-dimensional Langevin equations combined with a Monte Carlo simulation approach. The calculated results using this approach indicate reasonable agreement with available experimental data.

  12. NMR relaxation behavior and quadrupole coupling constants of 39K and 23Na ions in glycerol. Comparisons with 39K tissue data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellard, R. Mark; Shehan, B. Philip; Craik, David J.; Adam, William R.

    The quadrupole coupling constants (qcc) for 39K and 23Na ions in glycerol have been calculated from linewidths measured as a function of temperature (which in turn results in changes in solution viscosity). The qcc of 39K in glycerol is found to be 1.7 MHz, and that of 23Na is 1.6 MHz. The relaxation behavior of 39K and 23Na ions in glycerol shows magnetic field and temperature dependence consistent with the equations for transverse relaxation more commonly used to describe the reorientation of nuclei in a molecular framework with intramolecular field gradients. It is shown, however, that τ c is not simply proportional to the ratio of viscosity/temperature (η T). The 39K qcc in glycerol and the value of 1.3 MHz estimated for this nucleus in aqueous solution are much greater than values of 0.075 to 0.12 MHz calculated from T 2 measurements of 39K in freshly excised rat tissues. This indicates that, in biological samples, processes such as exchange of potassium between intracellular compartments or diffusion of ions through locally ordered regions play a significant role in determining the effective quadrupole coupling constant and correlation time governing 39K relaxation. T1 and T2 measurements of rat muscle at two magnetic fields also indicate that a more complex correlation function may be required to describe the relaxation of 39K in tissue. Similar results and conclusions are found for 23Na.

  13. 23Na and 35/37Cl as NMR probes of growth and shape of sodium taurodeoxycholate micellar aggregates in the presence of NaCl.

    PubMed

    Asaro, Fioretta; Feruglio, Luigi; Galantini, Luciano; Nardelli, Alessia

    2013-02-15

    The growth of the aggregates of the dihydroxylated bile salt sodium taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC) upon NaCl addition and the involvement of the counterion were investigated by NMR spectroscopy of monoatomic ionic species. (23)Na T(1) values from 0.015, 0.100, and 0.200 mol kg(-1) NaTDC solutions in D(2)O, at variable NaCl content, proved to be sensitive to the transition from primary to secondary aggregates, which occurs in the former sample, and to intermicellar interaction. Some (79)Br NMR measurements were performed on a 0.100 mol kg(-1) NaTDC sample added by NaBr in place of NaCl for comparison purposes. The (23)Na, (35)Cl, and (37)Cl double quantum filtered (DQF) patterns, from the 0.100 mol kg(-1) NaTDC sample, and (23)Na ones also from the 0.200 mol kg(-1) NaTDC one, in the presence of 0.750 mol kg(-1) NaCl, are a clear manifestation of motional anisotropy. Moreover, the DQF spectra of (23)Na and (37)Cl, which possess close quadrupole moments, display a striking similarity. The DQF lineshapes were simulated exploiting the Scilab environment to obtain an estimate of the residual quadrupole splitting magnitude. These results support the description of NaTDC micelles as cylindrical aggregates, strongly interacting at high ionic strengths, and capable of association with added electrolytes. PMID:23127873

  14. Lanthanide complexes of aminophosphonates as shift reagents for 7Li and 23Na NMR studies in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, R; Castro, M M; de Freitas, D M; Geraldes, C F

    1992-01-01

    A systematic NMR characterization of various Dy(III) complexes of linear and macrocyclic aminophosphonates as 7Li and 23Na NMR shift reagents for biological systems was undertaken. Their efficacy as shift reagents (SR) was tested under constant aqueous solution ionic strength conditions at pH 7.5 as a function of rho = [SR]/[M+]. Further characterization of the two best SRs, Dy(PcPcP)2(7-) and Dy(DOTP)5-, led to the conclusion that, although quite sensitive to solution pH and the presence of alkali metal ions and Mg2+ and Ca2+, these complexes were stable towards hydrolysis by phosphatases. The lack of precipitation of its solutions in the presence of Ca2+, allowed the choice of Dy(DOTP)5- as the best overall SR for biological studies. Other SRs, like Dy(TTHA)3-, although less sensitive to pH and to divalent ions, require significantly higher concentrations to yield the same shifts, leading to large bulk susceptibility artifacts in perfused tissues and organs. PMID:1467337

  15. Positive and Negative Mixed Glass Former Effects in Sodium Borosilicate and Borophosphate Glasses Studied by (23)Na NMR.

    PubMed

    Storek, Michael; Adjei-Acheamfour, Mischa; Christensen, Randilynn; Martin, Steve W; Böhmer, Roland

    2016-05-19

    Glasses with varying compositions of constituent network formers but constant mobile ion content can display minima or maxima in their ion transport which are known as the negative or the positive mixed glass former effect, MGFE, respectively. Various nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used to probe the ion hopping dynamics via the (23)Na nucleus on the microscopic level, and the results are compared with those from conductivity spectroscopy, which are more sensitive to the macroscopic charge carrier mobility. In this way, the current work examines two series of sodium borosilicate and sodium borophosphate glasses that display positive and negative MGFEs, respectively, in the composition dependence of their Na(+) ion conductivities at intermediate compositions of boron oxide substitution for silicon oxide and phosphorus oxide, respectively. A coherent theoretical analysis is performed for these glasses which jointly captures the results from measurements of spin relaxation and central-transition line shapes. On this basis and including new information from (11)B magic-angle spinning NMR regarding the speciation in the sodium borosilicate glasses, a comparison is carried out with predictions from theoretical approaches, notably from the network unit trap model. This comparison yields detailed insights into how a variation of the boron oxide content and thus of either the population of silicon or phosphorus containing network-forming units with different charge-trapping capabilities leads to nonlinear changes of the microscopic transport properties. PMID:27092392

  16. Short-T2 Imaging for Quantifying Concentration of Sodium (23Na) of Bi-Exponential T2 Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yongxian; Panigrahy, Ashok; Laymon, Charles M.; Lee, Vincent K.; Drappatz, Jan; Lieberman, Frank S.; Boada, Fernando E.; Mountz, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This work intends to demonstrate a new method for quantifying concentration of sodium (23Na) of bi-exponential T2 relaxation in patients on MRI scanners at 3.0 Tesla. Theory Two single-quantum (SQ) sodium images acquired at very-short and short echo times (TE=0.5 and 5.0ms) are subtracted to produce an image of the short-T2 component of the bi-exponential (or bound) sodium. An integrated calibration on the SQ and short-T2 images quantifies both total and bound sodium concentrations. Methods Numerical models were used to evaluate signal response of the proposed method to the short-T2 components. MRI scans on agar phantoms and brain tumor patients were performed to assess accuracy and performance of the proposed method, in comparison with a conventional method of triple-quantum filtering. Results A good linear relation (R2=0.98) was attained between the short-T2 image intensity and concentration of bound sodium. A reduced total scan time of 22min was achieved under the SAR restriction for human studies in quantifying both total and bound sodium concentrations. Conclusion The proposed method is feasible for quantifying bound sodium concentration in routine clinical settings at 3.0 Tesla. PMID:25078966

  17. High resolution 23Na-nuclear magnetic resonance study of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kwan, C Y; Seo, Y; Ito, H; Murakami, M; Watari, H

    1987-06-01

    The intracellular Na+ content of washed erythrocytes from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) and Wistar-Kyoto normotensive rats (WKY) was measured by a high resolution 23Na-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique using a non-permeant aqueous shift reagent, dysprosium triethylenetetramine hexaacetic acid, Dy(TTHA)3-. The initial intracellular Na+ of freshly isolated and washed erythrocytes was very low (approximately 5 mmol/l) and increased progressively with prolonged incubation in isotonic salt solution at 37 degrees C. There was no significant difference in the erythrocyte Na+ concentration between SHRSP and WKY over the entire period of measurement, nor was any difference detected in their osmotic fragility or total cellular volume, although the osmotic fragility decreased with incubation time. The high energy phosphate metabolites were also studied in the same erythrocytes by 31P-NMR. The level of intracellular ATP decreased with incubation at 37 degrees C but showed no difference between the SHRSP and WKY samples. Inclusion of 1 mmol/l ouabain in the incubation medium substantially retarded the breakdown of intracellular ATP and resulted in a concomitant increase in intracellular Na+. However, neither the ouabain-sensitive nor the ouabain-insensitive component of Na+ influx altered in SHRSP erythrocytes compared with WKY erythrocytes in paired experiments. Our results do not support the hypothesis that altered Na+ transport, resulting in an increase in erythrocyte Na+ concentration, is associated with spontaneous hypertension. PMID:3611783

  18. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors pro...

  19. Analysis of prompt fission neutrons in 235U(nth,f) and fission fragment distributions for the thermal neutron induced fission of 234U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Tarrío, D.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Göök, A.; Jansson, K.; Solders, A.; Rakopoulos, V.; Gustafsson, C.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Vidali, M.; Österlund, M.; Pomp, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the ongoing analysis of two fission experiments. Both projects are part of the collaboration between the nuclear reactions group at Uppsala and the JRC-IRMM. The first experiment deals with the prompt fission neutron multiplicity in the thermal neutron induced fission of 235U(n,f). The second, on the fission fragment properties in the thermal fission of 234U(n,f). The prompt fission neutron multiplicity has been measured at the JRC-IRMM using two liquid scintillators in coincidence with an ionization chamber. The first experimental campaign focused on 235U(nth,f) whereas a second experimental campaign is foreseen later for the same reaction at 5.5 MeV. The goal is to investigate how the so-called sawtooth shape changes as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Some harsh experimental conditions were experienced due to the large radiation background. The solution to this will be discussed along with preliminary results. In addition, the analysis of thermal neutron induced fission of 234U(n,f) will be discussed. Currently analysis of data is ongoing, originally taken at the ILL reactor. The experiment is of particular interest since no measurement exist of the mass and energy distributions for this system at thermal energies. One main problem encountered during analysis was the huge background of 235U(nth,f). Despite the negligible isotopic traces in the sample, the cross section difference is enormous. Solution to this parasitic background will be highlighted.

  20. Neutron Induced Capture and Fission Processes on 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprea, Cristiana; Oprea, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear data on Uranium isotopes are of crucial interest for new generation of nuclear reactors. Processes of interest are the nuclear reactions induced by neutrons and in this work mainly the capture and the fission process on 238U will be analyzed in a wide energy interval. For slow and resonant neutrons the many levels Breit - Wigner formalism is necessary. In the case of fast and very fast neutrons up to 200 MeV the nuclear reaction mechanism implemented in Talys will be used. The present evaluations are necessary in order to obtain the field of neutrons in the design of nuclear reactors and they are compared with experimental data from literature obtained from capture and (n,xn) processes.

  1. Neutron-induced peaks in Ge detectors from evaporation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gete, E.; Measday, D. F.; Moftah, B. A.; Saliba, M. A.; Stocki, T. J.

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the peak shapes at 596 and 691 keV resulting from fast neutron interactions inside germanium detectors. We have used neutrons from a 252Cf source, as well as from the 28Si(μ -, nv), and 209Bi(π -, xn) reactions to compare the peaks and to check for a dependence of peak shape on the incoming neutron energy. In our investigation, no difference between these three measurements has been observed. In a comparison of these peak shapes with other studies, we found similar results to ours except for those measurements using monoenergetic neutrons in which a significant variation with neutron energy has been observed.

  2. T invariance and T-odd asymmetries for the cold-polarized-neutron-induced fission of nonoriented nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G.; Bunakov, V. E.; Titova, L. V.

    2014-12-15

    It is shown that the coefficients D{sup exp} for all T-odd asymmetries observed experimentally in the cross sections for the reactions of cold-polarized-neutron-induced fission of nonoriented target nuclei (which involves the emission of prescission and evaporated particles) comply in shape and scale with the coefficients D{sup theor} calculated for the analogous asymmetries on the basis of quantum-mechanical nuclear-fission theory for T-invariant Hamiltonians of fissile systems. It is also shown that the asymmetries in question arise upon taking into account the effect of (i) the interference between the fission amplitudes of s- and p-wave resonances of a polarized fissile compound nucleus formed in the aforementioned reactions; (ii) the collective rotation of the compound nucleus in question (this rotation entails a change in the angular distributions of fission fragments and third particles); and (iii) the wriggling vibrations of this compound nucleus in the vicinity of its scission point, which lead to the appearance of high aligned spins of fission fragments, with the result that the emission of neutrons and photons evaporated from these fragments becomes anisotropic. The possible contribution of T-noninvariant interactions to the formation of the T-odd asymmetries under analysis is estimated by using the results obtained in experimentally testing the detailed-balance principle, (P-A) theorem, and T invariance of cross sections for elastic proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering.

  3. Spatial Mapping of Flow-Induced Molecular Alignment in a Noncrystalline Biopolymer Fluid Using Double Quantum Filtered (DQF) (23)Na MRI.

    PubMed

    Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Flow-induced molecular alignment was observed experimentally in a non-liquid-crystalline bioplymeric fluid during developed tubular flow. The fluid was comprised of rigid rods of the polysaccharide xanthan and exhibited shear-thinning behavior. Without a requirement for optical transparency or the need for an added tracer, (23)Na magic angle (MA) double quantum filtered (DQF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enabled the mapping of the anisotropic molecular arrangement under flow conditions. A regional net molecular alignment was found in areas of high shear values in the vicinity of the tube wall. Furthermore, the xanthan molecules resumed random orientations after the cessation of flow. The observed flow-induced molecular alignment was correlated with the rheological properties of the fluid. The work demonstrates the ability of (23)Na MA DQF magnetic resonance to provide a valuable molecular-mechanical link. PMID:26277955

  4. Measurement of the Absolute Elastic and Inelastic Differential Neutron Cross Sections for 23Na Between 2 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Yates, S. W.; Hicks, S. F.; Kersting, L. J.; Luke, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; Sigillito, A. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2013-03-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering angular distributions have been measured from 23Na for incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV at the University of Kentucky using neutron time-of-flight techniques. The cross sections obtained are important for applications in nuclear reactor development and other areas, and they are an energy region in which existing data are very sparse. Absolute cross sections were obtained by normalizing Na angular distributions to the well-known np cross sections.

  5. Lead exchange into zeolite and clay minerals: A [sup 29]Si, [sub 27]Al, [sup 23]Na solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J.J.; Sherriff, B.L. )

    1993-08-01

    Chabazite, vermiculite, montmorillonite, hectorite, and kaolinite were used to remove Pb, through ion exchange, from 0.01 M aqueous Pb(NO[sub 3])[sub 2] solutions. These minerals contained 27 (Na-chabazite), 16, 9, 9, and 0.5 wt % of Pb, respectively, after equilibration with the solutions. Ion exchange reached equilibrium within 24 h for Na-chabazite and vermiculite, but in less than 5 min for montmorillonite and hectorite. Na-chabazite took up more Pb than natural (Ca, Na)-chabazite (7 wt % Pb), whereas no such difference was observed in different cation forms of the clay minerals. Calcite impurities, associated with the clay minerals, effectively removed Pb from the aqueous solutions by the precipitation of cerussite (PbCO[sub 3]). [sup 29]Si, [sup 27]Al, and [sup 23]Na magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), [sup 23]Na double rotation (DOR) NMR, and [sup 23]Na variable-temperature MAS NMR were used to study the ion exchange mechanisms. In Na-chabazite, cations in all three possible sites take part in the fast chemical exchange. The chemical exchange passes from the fast exchange regime to the slow regime at [minus]80 to [minus]100[degrees]C. One site contains a relatively low population of exchangeable cations. The other two more shielded sites contain most of the exchangeable cation. The exchangeable cations in chabazite and vermiculite were found to be close to the SiO[sub 4] and AlO[sub 4] tetrahedra, while those in the other clay minerals were more distant. Two sites (or groups of sites) for exchangeable cations were observed in hectorite. Lead tended to occupy the one which corresponds to the [minus]8 ppM peak on the [sup 23]Na MAS NMR spectrum. The behavior of the exchangeable cations in the interlayer sites was similar in all the clay minerals studied. 27 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Neutron-induced soft error rate measurements in semiconductor memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlü, Kenan; Narayanan, Vijaykrishnan; Çetiner, Sacit M.; Degalahal, Vijay; Irwin, Mary J.

    2007-08-01

    Soft error rate (SER) testing of devices have been performed using the neutron beam at the Radiation Science and Engineering Center at Penn State University. The soft error susceptibility for different memory chips working at different technology nodes and operating voltages is determined. The effect of 10B on SER as an in situ excess charge source is observed. The effect of higher-energy neutrons on circuit operation will be published later. Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor was used as the neutron source in the experiments. The high neutron flux allows for accelerated testing of the SER phenomenon. The experiments and analyses have been performed only on soft errors due to thermal neutrons. Various memory chips manufactured by different vendors were tested at various supply voltages and reactor power levels. The effect of 10B reaction caused by thermal neutron absorption on SER is discussed.

  7. Multiple quantum filtered 23Na NMR in the Langendorff perfused mouse heart: Ratio of triple/double quantum filtered signals correlates with [Na]i

    PubMed Central

    Eykyn, Thomas R.; Aksentijević, Dunja; Aughton, Karen L.; Southworth, Richard; Fuller, William; Shattock, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the potential of multiple quantum filtered (MQF) 23Na NMR to probe intracellular [Na]i in the Langendorff perfused mouse heart. In the presence of Tm(DOTP) shift reagent the triple quantum filtered (TQF) signal originated largely from the intracellular sodium pool with a 32 ± 6% contribution of the total TQF signal arising from extracellular sodium, whilst the rank 2 double-quantum filtered signal (DQF), acquired with a 54.7° flip-angle pulse, originated exclusively from the extracellular sodium pool. Given the different cellular origins of the 23Na MQF signals we propose that the TQF/DQF ratio can be used as a semi-quantitative measure of [Na]i in the mouse heart. We demonstrate a good correlation of this ratio with [Na]i measured with shift reagent at baseline and under conditions of elevated [Na]i. We compare the measurements of [Na]i using both shift reagent and TQF/DQF ratio in a cohort of wild type mouse hearts and in a transgenic PLM3SA mouse expressing a non-phosphorylatable form of phospholemman, showing a modest but measurable elevation of baseline [Na]i. MQF filtered 23Na NMR is a potentially useful tool for studying normal and pathophysiological changes in [Na]i, particularly in transgenic mouse models with altered Na regulation. PMID:26196304

  8. Studies of neutron induced fission and nuclear reaction for AHWR and ADS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Paresh M.

    The rapidly expanding oil sands of western Canada, the third largest reserves in the world, are creating serious challenges, such as ecological harm, labour shortages, and extensive natural gas consumption. This thesis develops three practical real options models to evaluate the feasibility of oil sands projects and to estimate the optimal rate of oil sands expansion, while accounting for the stated concerns. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  9. Experimental Evaluation of Neutron Induced Noise on Gated X-ray Framing Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Stone, G; Hagmann, C; Sorce, C; Bradley, D K; Moran, M; Landen, O L; Stoeffl, W; Springer, P; Tommasini, R; Hermann, H W; Kyrala, G A; Glebov, V Y; Sangster, T C; Koch, J A

    2009-10-08

    A micro-channel plate based temporally-gated x-ray camera (framing camera) is one of the most versatile diagnostic tools of inertial confinement fusion experiments; particularly for observation of the shape of x-ray self emission from compressed core of imploded capsules. However, components used in an x-ray framing camera have sensitivity to neutrons induced secondary radiations. On early low-yield capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the expected neutron production is about 5 x 10{sup 14}. Therefore, the expected neutron fluence at a framing camera located {approx} 150 cm from the object is 2 x 10{sup 9} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. To obtain gated x-ray images in such harsh neutron environments, quantitative understanding of neutron-induced backgrounds is crucial.

  10. Neutron-Induced Fission Measurements at the Dance and Lsds Facilities at Lanl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Fowler, M. M.; Haight, R. C.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A. C.; Rundberg, R. S.; Rusev, G. Y.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Alexander, C. W.; Belier, G.

    2014-09-01

    New results from neutron-induced fission measurements performed at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) and Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS) are presented. New correlated data on promptfission γ-ray (PFG) distributions were measured using the DANCE array for resonant neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U and 239Pu. The deduced properties of PFG emission are presented using a simple parametrization. An accurate knowledge of fission γ-ray spectra enables us to analyze the isomeric states of 236U created after neutron capture on 235U. We briefly discuss these new results. Finally, we review details and preliminary results of the challenging 237U(n,f) cross section measurement at the LSDS facility.

  11. Enrico Fermi's Discovery of Neutron-Induced Artificial Radioactivity: Neutrons and Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Francesco; Leone, Matteo; Robotti, Nadia

    2006-09-01

    We reconstruct and analyze the path leading from James Chadwick’s discovery of the neutron in February 1932 through Frédéric Joliot and Irène Curie’s discovery of artificial radioactivity in January 1934 to Enrico Fermi’s discovery of neutron-induced artificial radioactivity in March 1934. We show, in particular, that Fermi’s innovative construction and use of radon-beryllium neutron sources permitted him to make his discovery.

  12. Neutron-induced fission measurements at the time-of-flight facility nELBE

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kögler, T.; Beyer, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2015-05-18

    Neutron-induced fission of ²⁴²Pu is studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The relative fast neutron fission cross section was determined using actinide fission chambers in a time-of-flight experiment. A good agreement of present nuclear data with evalua- tions has been achieved in the range of 100 keV to 10 MeV.

  13. Explosive Material Identification via Neutron-Induced Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiberg, David; Litz, Marc

    2014-09-01

    With the increase in the usage of improvised explosive devices, both vehicle-borne and buried, it has become increasingly important to quickly identify potentially explosive materials before they can be detonated. In a field test performed in January of 2014, 14 MeV neutrons generated in a deuterium-tritium reaction induced gamma emissions in explosive material targets. The resulting gamma rays were counted in LaBr3 detectors in both a time-binned associated particle imaging (API) mode and a repetitively pulsed mode. The details of the resulting data sets were analyzed, and gamma lines for carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen were identified in the spectra produced by both modes. Post-test noise reduction techniques included empty hole background subtraction, Compton background subtraction, peak area integration, and time-of-flight gating. The induced C, O, and N gamma line intensities and ratios were compared to the elemental weight ratios expected for each type of material. The composition results are indicative of the known elemental weights in the target materials. The statistics are limited because of the short, 20 second data collection periods, and would improve greatly with longer exposure times in the future.

  14. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections of Nuclei in the Vicinity of 208Pb at Incident Energies below 60 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, Igor V.; Tutin, Gennady A.; Eismont, Vilen P.; Mitryukhin, Andrey G.; Oplavin, Valery S.; Soloviev, Sergey M.; Meulders, Jean-Pierre; El Masri, Youssef; Keutgen, Thomas; Prieels, René; Nolte, Ralf

    2005-05-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 205Tl, 204, 206, 207, 208Pb, and 209Bi have been measured at incident energies of 32.8, 45.3, and 59.9 MeV. The measurements were performed at the Louvain-la-Neuve neutron beam facility using the 7Li (p, n) reaction as neutron source. Fission fragments were detected with a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber (MFGIC). Neutron fluence measurements were based on the 238U(n, f) reaction. The neutron fluence monitoring procedure was asserted by crosscheck measurement, in which the 59.9-MeV neutron beam fluence was simultaneously determined with the MFGIC and with a fission chamber monitor calibrated relative to a proton-recoil telescope.

  15. Neutron-induced fission cross section of Np237 in the keV to MeV range at the CERN n_TOF facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Diakaki, M.; Karadimos, D.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Demetriou, P.; Skordis, E.; Tsinganis, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; et al

    2016-03-17

    We experimentally determined the neutron-induced fission cross section of Np-237 at the high-resolution and high-intensity facility n_TOF, at CERN, in the energy range 100 keV to 9 MeV, using the U-235(n, f) and U-238(n, f) cross section standards below and above 2 MeV, respectively. Moreover, a fast ionization chamber was used in order to detect the fission fragments from the reactions and the targets were characterized as far as their mass and homogeneity are concerned by means of a spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy respectively. Finally, theoretical calculations within the Hauser-Feshbach formalism have been performed, employing the EMPIRE code, andmore » the model parameters were tuned in order to successfully reproduce the experimental fission cross-sectional data and simultaneously all the competing reaction channels.« less

  16. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 237Np in the keV to MeV range at the CERN n_TOF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakaki, M.; Karadimos, D.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Demetriou, P.; Skordis, E.; Tsinganis, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; David, S.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dorochenko, A.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, Ch.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fuji, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gallino, R.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Ioannidis, K.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Kolokolov, D.; Konovalov, V.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Sedysheva, M.; Stamoulis, K.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Voss, F.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.; n TOF Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross section of 237Np was experimentally determined at the high-resolution and high-intensity facility n_TOF, at CERN, in the energy range 100 keV to 9 MeV, using the 235U(n ,f ) and 238U(n ,f ) cross section standards below and above 2 MeV, respectively. A fast ionization chamber was used in order to detect the fission fragments from the reactions and the targets were characterized as far as their mass and homogeneity are concerned by means of α spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy respectively. Theoretical calculations within the Hauser-Feshbach formalism have been performed, employing the empire code, and the model parameters were tuned in order to successfully reproduce the experimental fission cross-sectional data and simultaneously all the competing reaction channels.

  17. Neutron induced radio-isotopes and background for Ge double beta decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Pinghan; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Environmental neutrons, mostly produced by muons in the cosmic rays, might contribute backgrounds to the search for neutrinoless double beta decays. These neutrons can interact with materials and generate radio-isotopes, which can decay and produce radioactive backgrounds. Some of these neutron-induced isotopes have a signature of a time-delayed coincidence, allowing us to study these infrequent events. For example, such isotopes can decay by beta decay to metastable states and then decay by gamma decay to the ground state. Considering the time-delayed coincidence of these two processes, we can determine candidates for these neutron-induced isotopes in the data and estimate the flux of neutrons in the deep underground environment. In this report, we will list possible neutron-induced isotopes and the methodology to detect them, especially those that can affect the search for neutrinoless double beta decays in 76Ge. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  18. New JEFF-3.2 Sodium Neutron Induced Cross-sections Evaluation for Neutron Fast Reactors Applications: from 0 to 20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archier, P.; Noguère, G.; De Saint Jean, C.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Rouki, C.

    2014-04-01

    In the framework of the ASTRID project, a new 23Na evaluation, containing re-evaluated nuclear data and associated covariances, has been prepared to be submitted for the future JEFF-3.2 library. This work has been motivated mainly because the current JEFF-3.1.1 sodium evaluation showed large differences with microscopic measurements and does not have covariances data. Recent experimental data from IRMM and high resolution measurements from Larson have been simultaneously analyzed with the data assimilation code CONRAD and a good agreement with the evaluated cross-sections has been achieved. Experimental systematic uncertainties have been propagated to the nuclear reaction model parameters in order to produce a coherent set of covariance data. Several figures are provided in this paper to illustrate the new features of this evaluation.

  19. In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of Supercritical CO2 Incorporation in Smectite-Natural Organic Matter Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Hoyt, David W.; Burton, Sarah D.; Ferguson, Brennan O.; Varga, Tamas; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2014-01-29

    This paper presents an in situ NMR study of clay-natural organic polymer systems (a hectoritehumic acid [HA] composite) under CO2 storage reservoir conditions (90 bars CO2 pressure, 50°C). The 13C and 23Na NMR data show that supercritical CO2 interacts more strongly with the composite than with the base clay and does not react to form other C-containing species over several days at elevated CO2. With and without organic matter, the data suggest that CO2 enters the interlayer space of Na-hectorite equilibrated at 43% relative humidity. The presence of supercritical CO2 also leads to increased 23Na signal intensity, reduced line width at half height, increased basal width, more rapid 23Na T1 relaxation rates, and a shift to more positive resonance frequencies. Larger changes are observed for the hectorite-HA composite than for the base clay. In light of recently reported MD simulations of other polymer-Na-smectite composites, we interpret the observed changes as an increase in the rate of Na+ site hopping in the presence of supercritical CO2, the presence of potential new Na+ sorption sites when the humic acid is present, and perhaps an accompanying increase in the number of Na+ ions actively involved in site hopping. The results suggest that the presence of organic material either in clay interlayers or on external particle surfaces can significantly affect the behavior of supercritical CO2 and the mobility of metal ions in reservoir rocks.

  20. Thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. II. 1H and 23Na NMR study of the smectic mesophase of molten sodium n-butyrate and sodium isovalerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonekamp, J. E.; Eguchi, T.; Plesko, S.; Jonas, J.

    1983-08-01

    The 1H and 23Na NMR studies of smectic ionic mesophases of molten sodium n-butyrate and sodium isovalerate are reported over the temperature range of the stability of the liquid crystalline phases. The 1H spin-lattice relaxation times T1 at ν0=9.2, 24.3, and 60 MHz for the anions of both the systems are interpreted in terms of diffusion intermolecular relaxation mechanism. The predicted anion diffusion coefficients are in agreement with those measured directly by spin-echo technique and indicate that the anion diffuses rapidly. In contrast to the T1 relaxation mechanism the results obtained for the proton relaxation times in the rotating coordinate frame T1ρ indicate that the order-fluctuation relaxation mechanism determines the frequency dispersion of T1ρ. The analysis of the T1ρ data provides an approximate measure of the order parameter S as a function of temperature. Fourier transform spectra of the 23Na transitions show that the electric field gradient (EFG) at the Na+ ion is nonaveraged and of such a strength as to produce a second order quadrupole effect in the spectra of the central transition. From the first-order splitting, the quadrupole coupling constant (QCC) is obtained as a function of temperature. The gradual temperature change of QCC demonstrates that only a single liquid crystalline phase exists over the temperature interval of the stability of the smectic mesophase. Using approximate analysis the correlation time τc for the EFG fluctuation is obtained from the 23Na T1 data for the melts of both sodium n-butyrate and sodium isovalerate.

  1. Tables of Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section for Various Pu, U, and Th Isotopes, Deduced from Measured Fission Probabilites

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Britt, H C

    2003-03-31

    Cross sections for neutron-induced fission of {sup 231,233}Th, {sup 234,235,236,237,239}U, and {sup 240,241,243}Pu are presented in tabular form for incident neutron energies of 0.1 {le} E{sub n}(MeV) {le} 2.5. The cross sections were obtained by converting measured fission probabilities from (t,pf) reactions on mass-A targets to (n,f) cross sections on mass-A + 1 neutron targets, by using modeling to compensate for the differences in the reaction mechanisms. Data from Britt et al. were used for the {sup 234}U(t,pf) reaction, from Cramer et al. for the {sup 230,232}Th(t,pf), {sup 236,238}U(t,pf), and {sup 240,242}Pu(t,pf) reactions, and from Britt et al. for the {sup 233,235}U(t,pf) and {sup 239}Pu(t,pf) reactions. The fission probabilities P{sub (t,pf)}(E{sub x}), measured as a function of excitation energy E{sub x} of the compound system formed by the (t,p) reaction, are listed in the tables with the corresponding deduced cross sections as a function of incident neutron energy E{sub n}, {sigma}{sub (n,f)}(E{sub n}). The excitation energy and incident neutron energy are related by E{sub x} = E{sub n} + B{sub n}, where B{sub n}, where B{sub n} is the neutron binding energy. Comparison with ENDF/B-VI evaluations of the well-measured {sup 234,235,236}U(n,f) and {sup 240,241}Pu(n,f) cross sections confirms the accuracy of the present results within a 10% standard deviation above E{sub n} = 1 MeV. Below E{sub n} = 1 MeV, localized deviations of at most {+-} 20% are observed.

  2. Experimental study of neutron induced background noise on gated x-ray framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N.; Hagmann, C.; Stone, G.; Hey, D.; Glenn, S.; Conder, A.; Teruya, A.; Sorce, C.; Tommasini, R.; Stoeffl, W.; Springer, P.; Landen, O. L.; Eckart, M.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Koch, J. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bahukutumbi, R.; and others

    2010-10-15

    A temporally gated x-ray framing camera based on a proximity focus microchannel plate is one of the most important diagnostic tools of inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, fusion neutrons produced in imploded capsules interact with structures surrounding the camera and produce background to x-ray signals. To understand the mechanisms of this neutron induced background, we tested several gated x-ray cameras in the presence of 14 MeV neutrons produced at the Omega laser facility. Differences between background levels observed with photographic film readout and charge-coupled-device readout have been studied.

  3. Neutron-induced latch-up immunity in metal gate CMOS integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.E.; Rollins, J.G.; Hachey, D.

    1987-12-01

    Neutron-induced latch-up immunity has been studied in metal gate CMOS integrated circuits as a function of neutron fluence by measuring both the current gain products (beta product) of parasitic NPN and PNP transistors, and the flash x-ray latch-up thresholds prior to and following irradiation and subsequent stabilization anneal. Correlations between the actual latch-up thresholds and the measured beta products are established for the three part types investigated. These correlations indicate that the measurement of beta products on judiciously chosen parasitic transistors is a viable technique for estimating latch-up susceptibility when the observed margin is substantial.

  4. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Kavetskiy, A; Yakubova, G; Torbert, H A; Prior, S A

    2015-02-01

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors produced measurements in agreement with theoretical considerations. The continuous NGA mode was twice as fast and just as accurate as the pulse mode, thus this mode was preferable for routine soil carbon analysis. PMID:25497322

  5. Atomic masses of {sup 6}Li,{sup 23}Na,{sup 39,41}K,{sup 85,87}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, Brianna J.; Redshaw, Matthew; Myers, Edmund G.

    2010-10-15

    The atomic masses of the alkali-metal isotopes {sup 6}Li,{sup 23}Na,{sup 39,41}K,{sup 85,87}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs have been obtained from measurements of cyclotron frequency ratios of pairs of ions simultaneously trapped in a Penning trap. The results, with one standard deviation uncertainty, are: M({sup 6}Li)=6.015 122 887 4(16)u,M({sup 23}Na)=22.989769 282 8(26)u,M({sup 39}K)=38.963 706 485 6(52)u,M({sup 41}K)=40.961 825 257 4(48)u,M({sup 85}Rb)=84.911 789739(9)u,M({sup 87}Rb)=86.909 180 535(10)u, and M({sup 133}Cs)=132.905 451 963(13)u. Our mass of {sup 6}Li yields an improved neutron separation energy for {sup 7}Li of 7251.1014(45) keV.

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities in neutron-induced acute myeloid leukemias in CBA/H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bouffler, S.D.; Meijne, E.I.M.; Huiskamp, R.

    1996-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) induced in CBA/H mice by 1 MeV fission neutrons have been examined for chromosomal abnormalities by G-band analysis. In common with X-ray- and {alpha}-particle-induced AMLs in CBA/H mice, more than 90% (16/17) of the myeloid leukemias had chromosome 2 abnormalities, in this case, all interstitial deletions. Chromosome 2 breakpoints were not wholly consistent, but clustering in three specific G-band regions was observed. Very distal (H-region) breakpoints were more common in the neutron AMLs than in X-ray- or {alpha}-particle-induced leukemias. These data indicate that neutron-induced AMLs in CBA/H mice are not characterized by a specific chromosome deletion but that a variety of chromosome 2 deletion types are associated with the disease. Trisomy of chromosome 1 (12.5% AMLs) and aneusomy of chromosomes 6 (31% AMLs) and Y (37.5% AMLs) were noted. While chromatid breakage was observed occasionally in neutron-induced AML, no clear indications of persistent chromosomal instability or high levels of stable chromosomal change were apparent. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Reducing Uncertainties in Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections Using a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Brett; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections for actinides have long been of great interest for nuclear energy and stockpile stewardship. Traditionally, measurements were performed using fission chambers which provided limited information about the detected fission events. For the case of 239Pu(n,f), sensitivity studies have shown a need for more precise measurements. Recently the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure fission cross sections to better than 1% uncertainty by providing 3D tracking of fission fragments. The fissionTPC collected data to calculate the 239Pu(n,f) cross section at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center during the 2014 run cycle. Preliminary analysis has been focused on studying particle identification and target and beam non-uniformities to reduce the uncertainty on the cross section. Additionally, the collaboration is investigating other systematic errors that could not be well studied with a traditional fission chamber. LA-UR-15-24906.

  8. Use of PuBe source to simulate neutron-induced single event upsets in static RAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.; Wert, J.L.; Doherty, W.R.; Oberg, D.L.; Measel, P.R.; Criswell, T.L.

    1988-12-01

    Neutron induced single event upsets were measured in static memory devices using a 10 curie PuBe source. The PuBe source conservatively overestimates the spectrum of fast neutrons emitted by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). For the 93L422, the neutron-induced upset rate compared favorably with calculated values derived using the burst generation concept. By accounting for the production of the ionizing particles by the PuBe and RTG neutron spectra, convenient upper bound SEU upset rates for memory devices near an RTG can be derived.

  9. Competition between Na + and Li + for Unsealed and Cytoskeleton-Depleted Human Red Blood Cell Membrane: A 23Na Multiple Quantum Filtered and 7Li NMR Relaxation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Chandra; Minadeo, Nicole; Toon, Jason; Graham, Daniel; Mota de Freitas, Duarte; Geraldes, Carlos F. G. C.

    1999-09-01

    Evidence for competition between Li+ and Na+ for binding sites of human unsealed and cytoskeleton-depleted human red blood cell (csdRBC) membranes was obtained from the effect of added Li+ upon the 23Na double quantum filtered (DQF) and triple quantum filtered (TQF) NMR signals of Na+-containing red blood cell (RBC) membrane suspensions. We found that, at low ionic strength, the observed quenching effect of Li+ on the 23Na TQF and DQF signal intensity probed Li+/Na+ competition for isotropic binding sites only. Membrane cytoskeleton depletion significantly decreased the isotropic signal intensity, strongly affecting the binding of Na+ to isotropic membrane sites, but had no effect on Li+/Na+ competition for those sites. Through the observed 23Na DQF NMR spectra, which allow probing of both isotropic and anisotropic Na+ motion, we found anisotropic membrane binding sites for Na+ when the total ionic strength was higher than 40 mM. This is a consequence of ionic strength effects on the conformation of the cytoskeleton, in particular on the dimer-tetramer equilibrium of spectrin. The determinant involvement of the cytoskeleton in the anisotropy of Na+ motion at the membrane surface was demonstrated by the isotropy of the DQF spectra of csdRBC membranes even at high ionic strength. Li+ addition initially quenched the isotropic signal the most, indicating preferential Li+/Na+ competition for the isotropic membrane sites. High ionic strength also increased the intensity of the anisotropic signal, due to its effect on the restructuring of the membrane cytoskeleton. Further Li+ addition competed with Na+ for those sites, quenching the anisotropic signal. 7Li T1 relaxation data for Li+-containing suspensions of unsealed and csdRBC membranes, in the absence and presence of Na+ at low ionic strength, showed that cytoskeleton depletion does not affect the affinity of Na+ for the RBC membrane, but increases the affinity of Li+ by 50%. This clearly indicates that cytoskeleton

  10. Measurement of the Absolute Elastic and Inelastic Differential Neutron Cross Sections for 23Na between 2 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; McEllistrem, M. T.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevez, F. M.; Chakraborty, A.; Yates, S. W.; Sigillito, A.; McDonough, P. J.; Kersting, L. J.; Luke, C. J.; Hicks, S. F.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2011-10-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering angular distributions for 23Na sample were measured at the University of Kentucky using the time-of-flight (ToF) technique, between 2 and 4 MeV incident neutron energies.Normalization of yields into scattering cross sections was accomplished by comparison of Na yields to the yields obtained from hydrogen in polyethylene samples via the well-known n-p scattering cross sections.The 3H(p,n) differential cross sections are used to determine the energy-dependent efficiency of the main detector. Because the efficiency of this detector appears as a ratio in the comparison of scattered yields from different samples, the absolute values of the 3H(p,n) cross sections are not critical, but their energy dependence is. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE contract no. DE-AC07-051D14517.

  11. 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO2 selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-01

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO2 adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium.

  12. Fast neutrons-induced apoptosis is Fas-independent in lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Barbara; Benzina, Sami; Jeannequin, Pierre; Dufour, Patrick; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Denis, Jean-Marc; Gueulette, John; Bischoff, Pierre L. . E-mail: Pierre.Bischoff@ircad.u-strasbg.fr

    2005-08-26

    We have previously shown that ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoblastoid cells differs according to their p53 status, and that caspase 8-mediated cleavage of BID is involved in the p53-dependent pathway. In the present study, we investigated the role of Fas signaling in caspase 8 activation induced by fast neutrons irradiation in these cells. Fas and FasL expression was assessed by flow cytometry and by immunoblot. We also measured Fas aggregation after irradiation by fluorescence microscopy. We found a decrease of Fas expression after irradiation, but no change in Fas ligand expression. We also showed that, in contrast to the stimulation of Fas by an agonistic antibody, Fas aggregation did not occur after irradiation. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that fast neutrons induced-apoptosis is Fas-independent, even in p53-dependent apoptosis.

  13. Measurement of the 240,242Pu Neutron-induced Fission Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bevilacqua, R.; Bryś, T.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Pretel, C.; Vidali, M.

    The neutron-induced fission cross section of 240,242Pu has been measured at the Van de Graaff facility of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (JRC-IRMM). A Twin-Frisch Grid Ionization Chamber (TFGIC) has been used in a back-to-back geometry with the secondary standards 237Np and 238U to normalize the cross section. The energy range measured is from 0.2 keV up to 3 MeV. Preliminary results show some discrepancies around 1 MeV for the 242Pu with the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation. The spontaneous fission half-life has been measured for both isotopes, too. Preliminary results show reasonable agreement with the recommended values.

  14. Neutron-induced Fission Cross Section of 240242Pu up to En = 3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Pretel, C.; Vidali, M.

    2014-05-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross sections of 240,242Pu have been measured at JRC-IRMM with incident neutron energy from 0.2 MeV up to 3 MeV. A Twin-Frisch Grid Ionization Chamber (TFGIC) has been used in a back-to-back geometry. The measurements have been performed using the secondary standards 237Np and 238U as a reference. The purity of the plutonium samples was 99.89% for 240Pu and 99.97% for 242Pu. The results obtained follow the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation for 240Pu, but some discrepancies are visible around E/n = 1 MeV for 242Pu. In addition, the spontaneous fission half-life has been measured for both isotopes.

  15. Determination of the 243,246,248Cm thermal neutron induced fission cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serot, O.; Wagemans, C.; Vermote, S.; Heyse, J.; Soldner, T.; Geltenbort, P.

    2005-11-01

    The minor actinide waste produced in nuclear power plants contains various Cm-isotopes, and transmutation scenarios require improved fission cross section data. The available thermal neutron induced fission cross section data for 243Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm are not very accurate, so new cross section measurements have been performed at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble (France) under better experimental conditions (highly enriched samples, very intense and clean neutron beam). The measurements were performed at a neutron energy of 5.38 meV, yielding fission cross section values of (1240±28)b for 243Cm, (25±47)mb for 246Cm and (685±84)mb for 248Cm. From these results, thermal fission cross section values of (572±14)b; (12±25)mb and (316±43)mb have been deduced for 243Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm, respectively.

  16. Studies of Neutron-Induced Fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dana; TKE Team

    2014-09-01

    A Frisch-gridded ionization chamber and the double energy (2E) analysis method were used to study mass yield distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release from neutron-induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. Despite decades of fission research, little or no TKE data exist for high incident neutron energies. Additional average TKE information at incident neutron energies relevant to defense- and energy-related applications will provide a valuable observable for benchmarking simulations. The data can also be used as inputs in theoretical fission models. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center-Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) provides a neutron beam from thermal to hundreds of MeV, well-suited for filling in the gaps in existing data and exploring fission behavior in the fast neutron region. The results of the studies on 238U, 235U, and 239Pu will be presented. LA-UR-14-24921.

  17. Neutron kinetics in moderators and SNM detection through epithermal-neutron-induced fissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; King, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Extension of the well-established Differential Die Away Analysis (DDAA) into a faster time domain, where more penetrating epithermal neutrons induce fissions, is proposed and demonstrated via simulations and experiments. In the proposed method the fissions stimulated by thermal, epithermal and even higher-energy neutrons are measured after injection of a narrow pulse of high-energy 14 MeV (d,T) or 2.5 MeV (d,D) source neutrons, appropriately moderated. The ability to measure these fissions stems from the inherent correlation of neutron energy and time ("E-T" correlation) during the process of slowing down of high-energy source neutrons in common moderating materials such as hydrogenous compounds (e.g., polyethylene), heavy water, beryllium and graphite. The kinetic behavior following injection of a delta-function-shaped pulse (in time) of 14 MeV neutrons into such moderators is studied employing MCNPX simulations and, when applicable, some simple "one-group" models. These calculations served as a guide for the design of a source moderator which was used in experiments. Qualitative relationships between slowing-down time after the pulse and the prevailing neutron energy are discussed. A laboratory system consisting of a 14 MeV neutron generator, a polyethylene-reflected Be moderator, a liquid scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and a two-parameter E-T data acquisition system was set up to measure prompt neutron and delayed gamma-ray fission signatures in a 19.5% enriched LEU sample. The measured time behavior of thermal and epithermal neutron fission signals agreed well with the detailed simulations. The laboratory system can readily be redesigned and deployed as a mobile inspection system for SNM in, e.g., cars and vans. A strong pulsed neutron generator with narrow pulse (<75 ns) at a reasonably high pulse frequency could make the high-energy neutron induced fission modality a realizable SNM detection technique.

  18. Enrico Fermi's Discovery of Neutron-Induced Artificial Radioactivity:The Recovery of His First Laboratory Notebook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, Giovanni; Guerra, Francesco; Robotti, Nadia

    . We give a short description of the discovery of the first experimental notebook of Enrico Fermi (1901-1954) on his researches during March and April of 1934 on neutron-induced artificial radioactivity, and we point out its relevance for a proper historical and conceptual understanding of those researches.

  19. Measurement of Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections of {sup 229}Th and {sup 231}Pa Using Linac-Driven Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Yamamoto, Shuji; Lee, Samyol; Cho, Hyun-Je; Yamana, Hajimu; Moriyama, Hirotake; Fujita, Yoshiaki; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki

    2001-11-15

    Use is made of a back-to-back type of double fission chamber and an electron linear accelerator-driven lead slowing-down spectrometer to measure the neutron-induced fission cross sections of {sup 229}Th and {sup 231}Pa below 10 keV relative to that of {sup 235}U. A measurement relative to the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}) reaction is also made using a BF{sub 3} counter at energies below 1 keV and normalized to the absolute value obtained by using the cross section of the {sup 235}U(n,f) reaction between 200 eV and 1 keV.The experimental data of the {sup 229}Th(n,f) reaction, which was measured by Konakhovich et al., show higher cross-section values, especially at energies of 0.1 to 0.4 eV. The data by Gokhberg et al. seem to be lower than the current measurement above 6 keV. Although the evaluated data in JENDL-3.2 are in general agreement with the measurement, the evaluation is higher from 0.25 to 5 eV and lower above 10 eV. The ENDF/B-VI data evaluated above 10 eV are also lower. The current thermal neutron-induced fission cross section at 0.0253 eV is 32.4 {+-} 10.7 b, which is in good agreement with results of Gindler et al., Mughabghab, and JENDL-3.2.The mean value of the {sup 231}Pa(n,f) cross sections between 0.37 and 0.52 eV, which were measured by Leonard and Odegaarden, is close to the current measurement. The evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI are lower below 0.15 eV and higher above {approx}30 eV. The ENDF/B-VI and the JEF-2.2 are extremely higher above 1 keV. The JENDL-3.2 data are in general agreement with the measurement, although they are lower above {approx}100 eV.

  20. Fragment-mass distributions in neutron-induced fission of Th232 and U238 at 33, 45, and 60 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, I. V.; Yavshits, S. G.; Tutin, G. A.; Kovalev, N. V.; Saulski, A. V.; Kudryashev, N. A.; Onegin, M. S.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Gavrikov, Yu. A.; Grudzevich, O. T.; Simutkin, V. D.; Pomp, S.; Blomgren, J.; Österlund, M.; Andersson, P.; Bevilacqua, R.; Meulders, J. P.; Prieels, R.

    2011-05-01

    We have measured fission fragment-mass yields for neutron-induced fission of Th232 and U238 at energies 32.8, 45.3, and 59.9 MeV. The experiments were done at quasimonoenergetic neutron beams of the Cyclotron Research Center at Louvain-la-Neuve. To detect the fission fragments, a multisection Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used. The measurement and data analysis techniques are discussed in detail. The obtained mass yields are compared to model calculations with the intermediate-energy nuclear reaction code MCFX. The MCFX code is used to calculate the fraction of fissioning nuclei after cascade, preequilibrium, and statistical reaction stages. The formation of mass distributions is considered as a result of oscillations of the mass-asymmetry degree of freedom in the potential well calculated with the temperature-dependent shell correction method. The experimental results as well as the results of the model calculations demonstrate that the probability of symmetric fission increases with incident neutron energy for both nuclei. The comparison also shows that the symmetric fission is more enhanced for thorium than for uranium with increasing neutron energy. We also compare U238 results with available experimental data; the Th232 data were measured for the first time.

  1. 23Na and 39K nuclear magnetic resonance studies of perfused rat hearts. Discrimination of intra- and extracellular ions using a shift reagent.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, M M; Frazer, J C; Dedrick, D F; Ingwall, J S; Allen, P D; Springer, C S; Smith, T W

    1985-01-01

    High-resolution 23Na and 39K nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of perfused, beating rat hearts have been obtained in the absence and presence of the downfield shift reagent Dy(TTHA)3- in the perfusing medium. Evidence indicates that Dy(TTHA)3- enters essentially all extracellular spaces but does not enter intracellular spaces. It can thus be used to discriminate the resonances of the ions in these spaces. Experiments supporting this conclusion include interventions that inhibit the Na+/K+ pump such as the inclusion of ouabain in and the exclusion of K+ from the perfusing medium. In each of these experiments, a peak corresponding to intracellular sodium increased in intensity. In the latter experiment, the increase was reversed when the concentration of K+ in the perfusing medium was returned to normal. When the concentration of Ca2+ in the perfusing medium was also returned to normal, the previously quiescent heart resumed beating. In the beating heart where the Na+/K+ pump was not inhibited, the intensity of the intracellular Na+ resonance was less than 20% of that expected. Although the data are more sparse, the NMR visibility of the intracellular K+ signal appears to be no more than 20%. PMID:4016206

  2. Quantification of the Contribution of Extracellular Sodium to 23Na Multiple-Quantum-Filtered NMR Spectra of Suspensions of Human Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knubovets, Tatyana; Shinar, Hadassah; Navon, Gil

    1998-03-01

    23Na double-quantum-filtered (DQF) NMR enables the detection of anisotropic motion of sodium ions due to their interaction with ordered structures in biological tissues. Using the technique, anisotropic motion was found for sodium ions in mammalian red blood cell suspensions (RBC) and the effect was shown to correlate with the integrity of membrane cytoskeleton. In the present study relative contributions to the DQF and triple-quantum-filtered (TQF) spectra of sodium bound to anisotropic and isotropic binding sites in the intra- and extracellular sodium pools (Na content being 15 and 150 mM, respectively) of human RBC were quantified for different hematocrits. DQF spectra were measured by a modified Jeener-Broekaert pulse sequence which enabled exclusive detection of anisotropically moving sodium ions. The relative contributions of the extracellular sodium to the TQF and DQF spectra decreased as the hematocrit increased, but their efficiency relative to the sodium content increased. The contribution of the extracellular sodium to the TQF signal was found to dominate the spectrum of the RBC suspension at all hematocrits studied. The contribution of the extracellular sodium to the DQF was significantly smaller than that to the TQF and was only 22% at a high hematocrit of about 90%.

  3. Towards high accurate neutron-induced fission cross sections of 240,242Pu: Spontaneous fission half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Pretel, C.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.

    2013-12-01

    Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross sections of transuranic isotopes are being of special demand in order to provide accurate data for the new GEN-IV nuclear power plants. To minimize the uncertainties on these measurements accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives and detector efficiencies are a key point. High α-active actinides need special attention since the misinterpretation of detector signals can lead to low efficiency values or underestimation in fission fragment detection. In that context, 240,242Pu isotopes have been studied by means of a Twin Frisch-Grid Ionization Chamber (TFGIC) for measurements of their neutron-induced fission cross section. Gases with different drift velocities have been used, namely P10 and CH4. The detector efficiencies for both samples have been determined and improved spontaneous fission half-life values were obtained.

  4. TEM observation of neutron-induced collision cascades in Bi-2212 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksa, M.; Pongratz, P.; Eibl, O.; Sauerzopf, F. M.; Weber, H. W.; Li, T. W.; Kes, P. H.

    1998-03-01

    Several high-quality single crystals of the superconductor Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8 (Bi-2212) were exposed to three different neutron fluences in the central irradiation facility of the Triga Mark II reactor in Vienna in the form of pre-prepared and pre-characterized transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples as well as in full crystalline form. We find that the radiation damage produced in Bi-2212 is very similar to that found previously in YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (Y-123) single crystals. The diameter of the amorphous cascade volume is 3.5 nm, the inwardly directed strain field is of approximately the same size, the density of cascades is 3.7×10 22 m -3 per 10 22 neutrons m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) and their concentration scales linearly with neutron fluence. Based on these results and in view of the similar displacement cross-sections of the constituents of other high temperature superconductors, we conclude that the neutron-induced defects in high- Tc materials will generally have a diameter (including the strain field) of 5-7 nm.

  5. Prompt fission neutron spectra in fast-neutron-induced fission of 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, V. V.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Capote, R.

    2015-07-01

    Prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) measurements for the neutron-induced fission of 238U are carried out at incident neutron energies of 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 MeV, respectively. The time-of-flight technique is employed to determine the energy of fission neutrons. The prompt fission neutron energy spectra so obtained are analyzed using Watt parametrization to derive the neutron multiplicity and average prompt fission neutron energy. The present experimental PFNS data are compared with the evaluated spectra taken from the ENDF/B-VII.1 library and the predictive calculations carried out using the empire-3.2 (Malta) code with built-in Los Alamos (LA) and Kornilov PFNS models. The sensitivity of the empire-3.2 LA model-calculated PFNS to the nuclear level density parameter of the average fission fragment and to the total kinetic energy is investigated. empire-3.2 LA model PFNS calculations that use Madland 2006-recommended values [D. G. Madland, Nucl. Phys. A 772, 113 (2006), 10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2006.03.013] of the total kinetic energy and the level density parameter a =A /(10 ±0.5 ) compare very well to measured data at all incident neutron incident energies.

  6. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Haslett, R. J.; Henderson, R. A.

    2009-01-28

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 10 eV and 250 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, a Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) events from (n,f) events. The first direct observation of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  7. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, Marian

    2008-01-01

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 35 eV and 200 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented, where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, the Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) from (n,f) events. The first evidence of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  8. Reliability Design for Neutron Induced Single-Event Burnout of IGBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Tomoyuki; Nishida, Shuichi; Ohnishi, Toyokazu; Fujikawa, Touma; Nose, Noboru; Hamada, Kimimori; Ishiko, Masayasu

    Single-event burnout (SEB) caused by cosmic ray neutrons leads to catastrophic failures in insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). It was found experimentally that the incident neutron induced SEB failure rate increases as a function of the applied collector voltage. Moreover, the failure rate increased sharply with an increase in the applied collector voltage when the voltage exceeded a certain threshold value (SEB cutoff voltage). In this paper, transient device simulation results indicate that impact ionization at the n-drift/n+ buffer boundary is a crucially important factor in the turning-on of the parasitic pnp transistor, and eventually latch-up of the parasitic thyristor causes SEB. In addition, the device parameter dependency of the SEB cutoff voltage was analytically derived from the latch-up condition of the parasitic thyristor. As a result, it was confirmed that reducing the current gain of the parasitic transistor, such as by increasing the n-drift region thickness d was effective in increasing the SEB cutoff voltage. Furthermore, `white' neutron-irradiation experiments demonstrated that suppressing the inherent parasitic thyristor action leads to an improvement of the SEB cutoff voltage. It was confirmed that current gain optimization of the parasitic transistor is a crucial factor for establishing highly reliable design against chance failures.

  9. Neutron induced background in the COMPTEL detector on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. J.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Busetta, M.; Byrd, R.; Collmar, W.; Connors, A.; Diehl, R.; Eymann, G.; Foster, C.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions of neutrons in a prototype of the Compton imaging telescope (COMPTEL) gamma ray detector for the Gamma Ray Observatory were studied to determine COMPTEL's sensitivity as a neutron telescope and to estimate the gamma ray background resulting from neutron interactions. The IUCF provided a pulsed neutron beam at five different energies between 18 and 120 MeV. These measurements showed that the gamma ray background from neutron interactions is greater than previously expected. It was thought that most such events would be due to interactions in the upper detector modules of COMPTEL and could be distinguished by pulse shape discrimination. Rather, the bulk of the gamma ray background appears to be due to interactions in passive material, primarily aluminum, surrounding the D1 modules. In a considerable fraction of these interactions, two or more gamma rays are produced simultaneously, with one interacting in the D1 module and the other interacting in the module of the lower (D2) detector. If the neutron interacts near the D1 module, the D1 D2 time of flight cannot distinguish such an event from a true gamma ray event. In order to assess the significance of this background, the flux of neutrons in orbit has been estimated based on observed events with neutron pulse shape signature in D1. The strength of this neutron induced background is estimated. This is compared with the rate expected from the isotropic cosmic gamma ray flux.

  10. Experimental study of some important characteristics of the thermal neutron induced fission of 237Np

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, C.; Allaert, E.; Caïtucoli, F.; D'hondt, P.; Barreau, G.; Perrin, P.

    1981-10-01

    Fission fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions and their correlations have been studied for the thermal neutron induced fission of 237Np. The global mass distribution is rather smooth, apart from a weak shoulder at μH = 140-141. When low excitation events are selected, fine structures associated with the charge of the fragments are observed. Furthermore, there is a sudden increase in Ek for μH > 155, which is probably due to a spherical shell N = 50 in the light fragment and the corresponding deformed (but stable) heavy fragments with masses in the rare earth region. For the average (pre-neutron emission) total fragment kinetic energy, a value of 176.4 ± 0.6 MeV has been obtained, in agreement with the systematics. Also the prompt neutron emission curve v(m ∗) has been calculated, which shows the well-known saw-tooth shape. Finally, the energy distribution and the emission probability of the ternary α-particles have been determined.

  11. Probing energy dissipation, γ-ray and neutron multiplicity in the thermal neutron-induced fission of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Mirfathi, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    The incorporation of the four-dimensional Langevin equations led to an integrative description of fission cross-section, fragment mass distribution and the multiplicity and energy distribution of prompt neutrons and γ-rays in the thermal neutron-induced fission of 239Pu. The dynamical approach presented in this paper thoroughly reproduces several experimental observables of the fission process at low excitation energy.

  12. Experimental Neutron-induced Fission Fragment Mass Yields of 232Th and 238U at Energies from 10 to 33 Me

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutkin, V. D.; Pomp, S.; Blomgren, J.; Österlund, M.; Bevilacqua, R.; Andersson, P.; Ryzhov, I. V.; Tutin, G. A.; Yavshits, S. G.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Onegin, M. S.; Meulders, J. P.; Prieels, R.

    2014-05-01

    Development of nuclear energy applications requires data for neutron-induced reactions for actinides in a wide neutron energy range. Here we describe measurements of pre-neutron emission fission fragment mass yields of 232Th and 238U at incident neutron energies from 10 to 33 MeV. The measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE; a multi-section twin Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used to detect fission fragments. For the peak neutron energies at 33, 45 and 60 MeV, the details of the data analysis and the experimental results were published in Ref. [I.V. Ryzhov, S.G. Yavshits, G.A. Tutin et al., Phys. Rev. C 83, 054603 (2011)]. In this work we present data analysis in the low-energy tail of the neutron energy spectra. The preliminary measurement results are compared with available experimental data and theoretical predictions.

  13. Neutron induced fission of U isotopes up to 100 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lestone, J.P.; Gavron, A.

    1993-10-01

    We have developed a statistical model description of the neutron induced fission of U isotopes using densities of intrinsic states and spin cut off parameters obtained directly from appropriate Nilsson model single particle levels. The first chance fission cross sections are well reproduced when the rotational contributions to the nuclear level densities are taken into account. In order to fit the U(n,f) cross sections above the threshold of second chance fission, we need to: (1) assume that the triaxial level density enhancement is washed out at an excitation energy of {approximately}7 MeV above the triaxial barriers with a width of {approximately}1 MeV, implying a {gamma} deformation for the first barriers of 10{degree} < {gamma} < 20{degree}; and (2) include pre-equilibrium particle emission in the calculations. Above an incoming neutron kinetic energy of {approximately}17 MeV our statistical model U(n,f) cross sections increasingly overestimate the experimental data when so called ``good`` optical model potentials are used to calculate the compound nucleus formation cross sections. This is not surprising since at these high energies little data exists on the scattering of neutrons to help guide the choice of optical model parameters. A satisfactory reproduction of all the available U(n,f) cross sections above 17 MeV is obtained by a simple scaling of our calculated compound nucleus formation cross sections. This scaling factor falls from 1.0 at 17 MeV to 0.82 at 100 MeV.

  14. Influence of secondary neutrons induced by proton radiotherapy for cancer patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although proton radiotherapy is a promising new approach for cancer patients, functional interference is a concern for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of secondary neutrons induced by proton radiotherapy on ICDs. Methods The experimental set-up simulated proton radiotherapy for a patient with an ICD. Four new ICDs were placed 0.3 cm laterally and 3 cm distally outside the radiation field in order to evaluate the influence of secondary neutrons. The cumulative in-field radiation dose was 107 Gy over 10 sessions of irradiation with a dose rate of 2 Gy/min and a field size of 10 × 10 cm2. After each radiation fraction, interference with the ICD by the therapy was analyzed by an ICD programmer. The dose distributions of secondary neutrons were estimated by Monte-Carlo simulation. Results The frequency of the power-on reset, the most serious soft error where the programmed pacing mode changes temporarily to a safety back-up mode, was 1 per approximately 50 Gy. The total number of soft errors logged in all devices was 29, which was a rate of 1 soft error per approximately 15 Gy. No permanent device malfunctions were detected. The calculated dose of secondary neutrons per 1 Gy proton dose in the phantom was approximately 1.3-8.9 mSv/Gy. Conclusions With the present experimental settings, the probability was approximately 1 power-on reset per 50 Gy, which was below the dose level (60-80 Gy) generally used in proton radiotherapy. Further quantitative analysis in various settings is needed to establish guidelines regarding proton radiotherapy for cancer patients with ICDs. PMID:22284700

  15. Residual Nuclide Production from Iron, Lead, and Uranium by Neutron-Induced Reactions up to 180 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.; Glasser, W.; Herpers, U.; Schuhmacher, H.; Brede, H.J.; Dangendorf, V.; Nolte, R.; Malmborg, P.; Prokofiev, A.V.; Smirnov, A.N.; Rishkov, I.; Kollar, D.; Meulders, J.P.; Duijvestijn, M.; Koning, A.

    2005-05-24

    Within the HINDAS project, activation experiments with quasi mono-energetic neutrons were performed at UCL and TSL. Cross sections for the production of residual radionuclides were derived from the measured activities by unfolding, based on the neutron spectra inside the target stacks and starting from 'guess' excitation functions. Exemplary results are presented and are compared with theoretical calculations using the TALYS code.

  16. Application of 1H and 23Na magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy to define the HRBC up-taking of MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabi, Luisella; Paleari, Lino; Biondi, Luca; Linati, Laura; De Miranda, Mario; Ghelli, Stefano

    2003-09-01

    The up-take of Gd(III) complexes of BOPTA, DTPA, DOTA, EDTP, HPDO3A, and DOTP in HRBC has been evaluated by measuring the lanthanide induced shift (LIS) produced by the corresponding dysprosium complexes (DC) on the MAS-NMR resonances of water protons and free sodium ions. These complexes are important in their use as MRI contrast agents (MRI-CA) in diagnostics. 1H and 23Na MAS-NMR spectra of HRBC suspension, collected at 9.395 T, show only one signal due to extra- and intra-cellular water (or sodium). In MAS spectra, the presence of DC in a cellular compartment produces the LIS of only the nuclei (water proton or sodium) in that cellular compartment and this LIS can be related to the DC concentrations (by the experimental curves of LIS vs. DC concentrations) collected in the physiological solution. To obtain correct results about LIS, the use of MAS technique is mandatory, because it guarantees the only the nuclei staying in the same cellular compartment where the LC is present show the LIS. In all the cases considered, the addition of the DC to HRBC (100% hematocrit) produced a shift of only the extra-cellular water (or sodium) signal and the gradient of concentration ( GC) between extra- and intra-cellular compartments resulted greater than 100:1, when calculated by means of sodium signals. These high values of GC are direct proofs that none of the tested dysprosium complexes crosses the HRBC membrane. Since the DC are iso-structural to the gadolinium complexes the corresponding gadolinium ones (MRI-CA) do not cross the HRBC membrane and, consequently, they are not up-taken in HRBC. The GC values calculated by means of water proton signals resulted much lower than those obtained by sodium signals. This proves that the choice of the isotope is a crucial step in order to use this method in the best way. In fact, GC value depends on the lowest detectable LIS which, in turn, depends on the nature of the LC (lanthanide complex) and the observed isotopes.

  17. Radioactive ion beams produced by neutron-induced fission at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isolde Collaboration; Catherall, R.; Lettry, J.; Gilardoni, S.; Köster, U.

    2003-05-01

    The production rates of neutron-rich fission products for the next-generation radioactive beam facility EURISOL [EU-RTD Project EURISOL (HPRI-CT-1999-50001)] are mainly limited by the maximum amount of power deposited by protons in the target. An alternative approach is to use neutron beams to induce fission in actinide targets. This has the advantage of reducing: the energy deposited by the proton beam in the target; contamination from neutron-deficient isobars that would be produced by spallation; and mechanical stress on the target. At ISOLDE CERN [E. Kugler, Hyperfine Interact. 129 (2000) 23], tests have been made on standard ISOLDE actinide targets using fast-neutron bunches produced by bombarding thick, high-/Z metal converters with 1 and 1.4 GeV proton pulses. This paper reviews the first applications of converters used at ISOLDE. It highlights the different geometries and the techniques used to compare fission yields produced by the proton beam directly on the target with neutron-induced fission. Results from the six targets already tested, namely UC2/graphite and ThO2 targets with tungsten and tantalum converters, are presented. To gain further knowledge for the design of a dedicated target as required by the TARGISOL project [EU-RTD Project TARGISOL (HPRI-CT-2001-50033)], the results are compared to simulations, using the MARS [N.V. Mokhov, S.I. Striganov, A. Van Ginneken, S.G. Mashnik, A.J. Sierk, J. Ranft, MARS code developments, in: 4th Workshop on Simulating Accelerator Radiation Environments, SARE-4, Knoxville, USA, 14-15.9.1998, FERMILAB-PUB-98-379, nucl-th/9812038; N.V. Mokhov, The Mars Code System User's Guide, Fermilab-FN-628, 1995; N.V. Mokhov, MARS Code Developments, Benchmarking and Applications, Fermilab-Conf-00-066, 2000; O.E. Krivosheev, N.V. Mokhov, A New MARS and its Applications, Fermilab-Conf-98/43, 1998] code interfaced with MCNP [J.S. Hendrics, MCNP4C LANL Memo X-5; JSH-2000-3; J.F. Briemesteir (Ed.), MCNP - A General Montecarlo N

  18. a Study of Prompt Neutron Emission in Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission of URANIUM-235.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklyn, Christopher Barry

    An original experiment was performed to measure the angular correlation of fission neutrons from thermal -neutron-induced fission of ('235)U, with respect to the light fission fragment direction, as a function of fragment mass division and neutron energy. A Monte Carlo model, with a realistic description of the fission fragment de -excitation process, was developed to simulate the observed neutron-fragment angular correlation data. The model was capable of investigating various possible forms of neutron emission which were classified into emission before, during and after full fragment acceleration, and correspondingly named scission acceleration and prompt neutron emission. Simulated neutron-fragment angular correlations displaying similar distributions with respect to the light fragment direction for different forms of neutron emission are shown to exhibit differing distributions when examined as a function of fragment mass division or neutron energy, thus illustrating the sensitivity of the experiment to the forms of neutron emission occurring in fission. A primary conclusion of the investigation was that neutron emission solely from fully accelerated fragments, whether isotropically or anisotropically emitted in the fragment centre of mass system, was unable to adequately describe the observed neutron-fragment angular correlations. Simulation of the fission process with some neutron emission before or during fragment acceleration exhibited a closer correspondence with observed phenomena. Within the scope of this work the form of neutron emission that produced the closest overall correspondence with experimental data was a simulation in which 20% of the emitted neutrons were isotropically emitted scission neutrons with a Maxwellian energy distribution of temperature 1.0 MeV. The remaining neutrons were emitted from fully accelerated fragments, being isotropic in the fragment centre of mass frame, except for the n-th(n > 1) neutrons from the light fragment, which

  19. RECENT APPLICATIONS OF THE GREENSPAN AND TSCHIEGG DATA ON NEUTRON INDUCED CAVITATION THRESHOLDS

    SciTech Connect

    West, Colin D

    2007-03-01

    In 1967 Greenspan and Tschiegg published a paper on radiation induced acoustic cavitation. They researched the thresholds for cavitation induced in various liquids by fast neutrons, {alpha}-decay recoils and fission fragments. It turns out that these data can be used to verify predictions of a more recent theory of radiation induced cavitation nucleation. In 1979, in a report to their sponsor (The Office of Naval Research) they published new details of their results on neutron induced cavitation thresholds, including tables of the thresholds at different temperatures for various liquids. They were also some fission fragment results, but none of the {alpha}-decay recoil data. By that time Greenspan had evidently retired while I had left the field of cavitation research and did not know of the existence of their report [which also contains the only published record of some cavitation threshold measurements made by West and Howlett at Harwell, England]. Later still, in 1982, Greenspan and Tschiegg published the graphical data--but not the tables--in a more easily accessible form. In the late 1990s I revisited the problem of calculating radiation induced cavitation thresholds. There was interest in this because the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, then just beginning, planned to use a liquid mercury target to produce intense bursts of neutrons when irradiated by a pulsed, high energy proton beam. It was known that the pressure waves produced by local heating when the proton pulse struck the target could, upon reflection at the walls of the mercury container, give rise to very high, although brief, negative pressure waves in the mercury. There was concern that cavitation might result and, if it did, might lead to undesirable effects. With the encouragement of the SNS target team this author managed further to develop an earlier method of calculating the threshold for such cavitation, and the SNS project kindly provided funding to publish the work in two ORNL

  20. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 233Pa between 1.0 and 3.0 MeV.

    PubMed

    Tovesson, F; Hambsch, F J; Oberstedt, A; Fogelberg, B; Ramström, E; Oberstedt, S

    2002-02-11

    The energy dependent neutron-induced fission cross section of 233Pa has for the first time been measured directly with monoenergetic neutrons. This nuclide is an important intermediary in a thorium based fuel cycle, and its fission cross section is a key parameter in the modeling of future advanced fuel and reactor concepts. A first experiment resulted in four cross section values between 1.0 and 3.0 MeV, establishing a fission threshold in excess of 1 MeV. Significant discrepancies were found with a previous indirect experimental determination and with model estimates. PMID:11863801

  1. A Monte Carlo simulation of the fission chambers neutron-induced pulse shape using the GARFIELD suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Geslot, B.; Veenhof, R.

    2012-06-01

    A computation route that simulates the neutron-induced charge spectrum and pulse shape of a fission chamber is presented. It is based on the GARFIELD suite, and makes use of the MAGBOLTZ and SRIM codes. It allows the simulation of the signal in the current and Campbelling modes. Computations made with several fission chambers exemplify the possibilities of the route. A good qualitative agreement is obtained when comparing the results with the scarce experimental data available to date. After a further experimental qualification, this route will improve the design of fission chambers by assessing its overall sensitivity.

  2. Study of Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections of U, Am, and Cm at n{sub T}OF

    SciTech Connect

    Milazzo, P. M.; Abbondanno, U.; Belloni, F.; Fujii, K.; Aerts, G.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.; Ferrant, L.; Gunsing, F.; Pancin, J.; Perrot, L.; Plukis, A.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Cano-Ott, D.

    2010-08-04

    Neutron induced fission cross sections of several isotopes have been measured at the CERN n{sub T}OF spallation neutron facility. Between them some measurements involve isotopes ({sup 233}U, {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 245}Cm) relevant for applications to nuclear technologies. The n{sub T}OF facility delivers neutrons with high instantaneous flux and in a wide energy range, from thermal up to 250 MeV. The experimental apparatus consists of an ionization chamber that discriminates fission fragments and {alpha} particles coming from natural radioactivity of the samples. All the measurements were performed referring to the standard cross section of {sup 235}U.

  3. Prompt γ-rays from the Fast Neutron Induced Fission on 235,238U and 232Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebois, M.; Wilson, J. N.; Halipré, P.; Leniau, B.; Matea, I.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Verney, D.

    Preliminary results from the first experiment using the LICORNE neutron source at the IPN Orsay are presented. Prompt fission gamma rays from fast-neutron induced fission of 238U, 232Th and 235U were detected. Thick samples of around 50 g of 238U and 232Th are used for the first part of the experiment. An ionisation chamber containing ∼ 10 mg samples of 238U and 235U to provide a fission trigger is used for the second part of the experiment. Gamma rays have been detected using 17 high efficiency BaF2 detectors and 6 LaBr3 scintillator detectors.

  4. 10.1142/9789813109636_fmatter + BaF2 Reaction Studied by TALYS1.4 Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Cui-Juan; Ma, Chun-Wang

    The neutron induced reactions on the 138Ba and 19F nuclei are investigated by using the optical model implanted in the Talys1.4 toolkit. The results of the n + 138Ba and n + 19F reactions within the incident energy ranging from 1 keV to 30MeV are calculated and compared to the measured results.

  5. Comparative measurement of prompt fission γ -ray emission from fast-neutron-induced fission of 235U and 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebois, M.; Wilson, J. N.; Halipré, P.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Marini, P.; Schmitt, C.; Rose, S. J.; Siem, S.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Zakari, A.-A.

    2015-09-01

    Prompt fission γ -ray (PFG) spectra have been measured in a recent experiment with the novel directional fast-neutron source LICORNE at the ALTO facility of the IPN Orsay. These first results from the facility involve the comparative measurement of prompt γ emission in fast-neutron-induced fission of 235U and 238U . Characteristics such as γ multiplicity and total and average radiation energy are determined in terms of ratios between the two systems. Additionally, the average photon energies were determined and compared with recent data on thermal-neutron-induced fission of 235U . PFG spectra are shown to be similar within the precision of the present measurement, suggesting that the extra incident energy does not significantly impact the energy released by prompt γ rays. The origins of some small differences, depending on either the incident energy or the target mass, are discussed. This study demonstrates the potential of the present approach, combining an innovative neutron source and new-generation detectors, for fundamental and applied research on fission in the near future.

  6. Fission Cross Sections and Fission-Fragment Mass Yields via the Surrogate Reaction Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jurado, B.; Kessedjian, G.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Bidaud, A.; Czajkowski, S.; Dassie, D.; Haas, B.; Mathieu, L.; Osmanov, B.; Ahmad, I.

    2008-04-17

    The surrogate reaction method is a powerful tool to infer neutron-induced data of short-lived nuclei. After a short overview of the experimental techniques employed in the present surrogate experiments, we will concentrate on a recent measurement to determine neutron-induced fission cross sections for the actinides {sup 242,243}Cm and {sup 241}Am. The latest direct neutron-induced measurement for the {sup 243}Cm fission cross section is questioned by our results, since there are differences of more than 60% in the 0.7 to 7 MeV neutron energy range. Our experimental set-up has also enabled us to measure for the first time the fission fragment ''pseudo-mass'' distributions of {sup 243,244,245}Cm and {sup 242}Am compound nuclei in the excitation energy range from a few MeV to about 25 MeV.

  7. Extensions of the burst generation rate method for wider application to proton/neutron-induced single event effects

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.

    1998-12-01

    The Burst Generation Rate (BGR) method, originally developed to calculate single event upset (SEU) rates in microelectronics due to neutrons and protons, has been extended for wider application, allowing cross sections for both SEU and single event latchup (SEL) to be calculated, and comparisons to be made with measured data. The method uses the Weibull fit to accurately represent the behavior of the heavy ion SEU cross section. Proton SEU cross sections in RAMs, microprocessors and FPGAs are calculated, with agreement generally to within a factor of 2--3, and similar results are obtained for neutron cross sections for both cosmic ray and fission spectra. The BGR method is also modified to calculate cross sections for proton/neutron induced SEL. Agreement is generally good for SEL for most devices, but there are also limitations, since some very modern devices are shown to have unusually high susceptibility to SEL by protons/neutrons.

  8. Experimental and simulation studies of neutron-induced single-event burnout in SiC power diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Tomoyuki; Nishida, Shuichi; Hamada, Kimimori; Tadano, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Neutron-induced single-event burnouts (SEBs) of silicon carbide (SiC) power diodes have been investigated by white neutron irradiation experiments and transient device simulations. It was confirmed that a rapid increase in lattice temperature leads to formation of crown-shaped aluminum and cracks inside the device owing to expansion stress when the maximum lattice temperature reaches the sublimation temperature. SEB device simulation indicated that the peak lattice temperature is located in the vicinity of the n-/n+ interface and anode contact, and that the positions correspond to a hammock-like electric field distribution caused by the space charge effect. Moreover, the locations of the simulated peak lattice temperature agree closely with the positions of the observed destruction traces. Furthermore, it was theoretically demonstrated that the period of temperature increase of a SiC power device is two orders of magnitude less than that of a Si power device, using a thermal diffusion equation.

  9. Neutron Transfer Reactions: Surrogates for Neutron Capture for Basic and Applied Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A.; Allen, J.; Hatarik, R.; Matthews, C.; O'Malley, P.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Howard, J.; Patterson, N.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Rogers, J.; Sissom, D. J.; Pain, S. D.; Adekola, A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Liang, F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pittman, S. T.

    2009-03-10

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  10. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Allen, J.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Becker, J.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Erikson, Luke; Gaddis, A. L.; Harlin, Christopher W; Hatarik, Robert; Howard, Joshua A; Jandel, M.; Johnson, Micah; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Matei, Catalin; Matthews, C.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Patterson, N. P.; Paulauskas, Stanley; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-04-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  11. Spin dynamics in Na4-x Ir3O8 (x  =  0.3 and 0.7) investigated by 23Na NMR and μSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sungwon; Baek, S.-H.; Balodhi, Ashiwini; Lee, W.-J.; Choi, K.-Y.; Watanabe, I.; Lord, J. S.; Büchner, B.; Suh, B. J.; Singh, Yogesh

    2015-12-01

    We report 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and zero-field (ZF) and longitudinal-field (LF) muon spin relaxation (μSR) measurements of the depleted hyperkagome compounds Na4-x Ir3O8 (x  =  0.3 and 0.7), which undergo an insulator-semimetal transition as a function of x. The 23Na spin-lattice relaxation rates, T1-1 , follow a T 2.5 power law behavior at accessible temperatures of T  =  120-350 K. A substantial temperature dependence of T1-1 indicates the presence of gapped excitations at elevated temperatures through the transition to a semimetallic phase. ZF-μSR results reveal that hole-doping leads to a melting of quasi-static order to a dynamically fluctuating state. The very slow muon depolarization rate which varies hardly with temperature indicates that spins are close to an itinerant limit in the largest doping x  =  0.7. The dynamic relaxation rates extracted from the LF-μSR spectra show a three-dimensional diffusive transport. Our combined NMR and μSR results suggest the occurrence of intriguing spin and charge excitations across the insulator-semimetal transition.

  12. Neutron-induced Fission Cross Section of 240,242Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Göök, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Pretel, C.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.

    A sensitivity analysis for the new generation of fast reactors [Salvatores (2008)] has shown the importance of improved cross section data for several actinides. Among them, the 240,242Pu(n,f) cross sections require an accuracy improvement to 1-3% and 3-5%, respectively, from the current level of 6% and 20%. At the Van de Graaff facility of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (JRC-IRMM) the fission cross section of the two isotopes was measured relative to two secondary standard reactions, 237Np(n,f) and 238U(n,f), using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber. The secondary standard reactions were benchmarked through measurements against the primary standard reaction 235U(n,f) in the same geometry. Sample masses were determined by means of low-geometry alpha counting or/and a 2π Frisch-grid ionization chamber, with an uncertainty lower than 2%. The neutron flux and the impact of scattering from material between source and target was examined, the largest effect having been found in cross section ratio measurements between a fissile and a fertile isotope. Our 240,242Pu(n,f) cross sections are in agreement with previous experimental results and slightly lower than present evaluations. In case of the 242Pu(n,f) reaction no evidence for a resonance at En=1.1 MeV was found.

  13. Dependence on neutron energy of neutron-induced peaks in Ge detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gete, E.; Measday, David F.; Moftah, B. A.; Saliba, M. A.; Stocki, Trevor J.

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the peak shapes at 596 and 691 KeV resulting from fast neutron interactions inside germanium detectors. We have used neutrons from a 252Cf source, as well as from the 28Si((mu) -, nv), and 209Bi((pi) -, xn) reactions to compare the peaks and to check for any dependence of peak shape on the incoming neutron energy. In our investigation, no dependence of these peak shapes on the neutron energy spectra has been observed. In a comparison of these peak shapes with other studies we found similar results to ours except for monoenergetic neutron irradiations from 1 to 8 MeV.

  14. Time features of delayed neutrons and partial emissive-fission cross sections for the neutron-induced fission of {sup 232}Th nuclei in the energy range 3.2-17.9 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Roshchenko, V. A. Piksaikin, V. M. Korolev, G. G.; Egorov, A. S.

    2010-06-15

    The energy dependence of the relative abundances of delayed neutrons and the energy dependence of the half-lives of their precursors in the neutron-induced fission of {sup 232}Th nuclei in the energy range 3.2-17.9 MeV were measured for the first time. A systematics of the time features of delayed neutrons is developed. This systematics makes it possible to estimate the half-life of delayed-neutron precursors as a function of the nucleonic composition of fissile nuclei by using a single parameter set for all nuclides. The energy dependence of the partial cross sections for emissive fission in the reaction {sup 232}Th(n, f) was analyzed on the basis of data obtained for the relative abundances of delayed neutrons and the aforementioned half-lives and on the basis of the created systematics of the time features of delayed neutrons. It was shown experimentally for the first time that the decrease in the cross section after the reaction threshold in the fission of {sup 232}Th nuclei (it has a pronounced first-chance plateau) is not an exclusion among the already studied uranium, plutonium, and curium isotopes and complies with theoretical predictions obtained for the respective nuclei with allowance for shell, superfluid, and collective effects in the nuclear-level density and with allowance for preequilibrium neutron emission

  15. An ionization chamber with Frisch grids for studies of high-energy neutron-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutin, G. A.; Ryzhov, I. V.; Eismont, V. P.; Kireev, A. V.; Condé, H.; Elmgren, K.; Olsson, N.; Renberg, P.-U.

    2001-01-01

    A gridded ionization chamber for fission fragment detection is described. The chamber has been specially designed for use at the quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p, n) neutron source at the The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden. The detector permits measurements of fission fragment energy and emission angle for two targets with diameter of up to 10 cm. The time response of the chamber (⩽5 ns FWHM) is adequate to apply time-of-flight discrimination against background events induced by non-peak neutrons. Results of angular anisotropy measurements for the 232Th (n, f) and 238U(n, f) reactions in the 20-160 MeV energy range are given.

  16. Predicting long-lived, neutron-induced activation of concrete in a cyclotron vault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, L. R.

    2001-07-01

    Many elements in concrete can become activated by neutrons in a cyclotron vault, but only a few of the activation products are long-lived. The most prominent of these are Eu-152, Eu-154, Co-60, and Cs-134 which build up over time from (n, γ) reactions in trace amounts of stable Europium, Cobalt, and Cesium that are normally present in concrete in concentrations of a few parts per million, or less, by weight. A retrospective analysis of data taken in connection with a previous decommissioning of a cyclotron vault, coupled with independent published data, gives us an estimate of the concentrations of these elements in concrete. With that estimate as a benchmark, we then employ a Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code to estimate the long-term activation profile in concrete for arbitrary irradiation conditions.

  17. Modeling of neutron induced backgrounds in x-ray framing cameras.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, C; Izumi, N; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Conder, A; Eckart, M; Khater, H; Koch, J; Moody, J; Stone, G

    2010-10-01

    Fast neutrons from inertial confinement fusion implosions pose a severe background to conventional multichannel plate (MCP)-based x-ray framing cameras for deuterium-tritium yields >10(13). Nuclear reactions of neutrons in photosensitive elements (charge coupled device or film) cause some of the image noise. In addition, inelastic neutron collisions in the detector and nearby components create a large gamma pulse. The background from the resulting secondary charged particles is twofold: (1) production of light through the Cherenkov effect in optical components and by excitation of the MCP phosphor and (2) direct excitation of the photosensitive elements. We give theoretical estimates of the various contributions to the overall noise and present mitigation strategies for operating in high yield environments. PMID:21034042

  18. Nanoscale phase quantification in lead-free (Bi1 /2Na1 /2) TiO3-BaTiO3 relaxor ferroelectrics by means of 23Na NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groszewicz, Pedro B.; Breitzke, Hergen; Dittmer, Robert; Sapper, Eva; Jo, Wook; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Rödel, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    We address the unsolved question on the structure of relaxor ferroelectrics at the atomic level by characterizing lead-free piezoceramic solid solutions (100 -x ) (Bi1 /2Na1 /2) TiO3-x BaTiO3 (BNT -x BT ) (for x =1 ,4 ,6 , and 15). Based on the relative intensity between spectral components in quadrupolar perturbed 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance, we present direct evidence of the coexistence of cubic and polar local symmetries in these relaxor ferroelectrics. In addition, we demonstrate how the cubic phase vanishes whenever a ferroelectric state is induced, either by field cooling or changing the dopant amount, supporting the relation between this cubic phase and the relaxor state.

  19. Molecular and electron-spin structures of a ring-shaped mixed-valence polyoxovanadate (IV, V) studied by (11)B and (23)Na solid-state NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takahiro; Yamase, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    (11)B and (23)Na solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of ring-shaped paramagnetic crystals of H15[V7(IV)V5(V)B32O84Na4]·13H2O containing seven d(1) electrons from V(IV) were studied. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum MAS NMR experiments were performed at moderate (9.4T) and ultrahigh magnetic fields (21.6T). The NMR parameters for quadrupole and isotropic chemical shift interactions were estimated by simulation of the NMR spectra and from relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Four Na ions incorporated into the framework were found to occupy four distinct sites with different populations. The DFT calculation showed that d(1) electrons with effectively one up-spin caused by strong antiferromagnetic interactions were delocalized over the 12V ions. PMID:27018827

  20. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  1. Measurement of Fragment Mass Yields in Neutron-Induced Fission of 232TH and 238U at 33, 45 and 60 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutkin, V. D.; Pomp, S.; Blomgren, J.; Österlund, M.; Andersson, P.; Bevilacqua, R.; Ryzhov, I. V.; Tutin, G. A.; Khlopin, V. G.; Onegin, M. S.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Meulders, J. P.; Prieels, R.

    2011-10-01

    Over the past years, a significant effort has been devoted to measurements of neutron-induced fission cross-sections at intermediate energies but there is a lack of experimental data on fission yields. Here we describe recent measurements of pre-neutron emission fragment mass distributions from intermediate energy neutron-induced fission of 232Th and 238U. The measurements have been done at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE and neutron peak energies at 32.8, 45.3 and 59.9 MeV. A multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The measurement results are compared with available experimental data. Some TALYS code modifications done to describe the experimental results are discussed.

  2. Post irradiation experiment analysis using the APOLLO2 deterministic tool. Validation of JEFF-3.1.1 thermal and epithermal actinides neutron induced cross sections through MELUSINE experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.; Fabbris, O.

    2012-07-01

    Two different experiments performed in the 8 MWth MELUSINE experimental power pool reactor aimed at analyzing 1 GWd/t spent fuel pellets doped with several actinides. The goal was to measure the averaged neutron induced capture cross section in two very different neutron spectra (a PWR-like and an under-moderated one). This paper summarizes the combined deterministic APOLLO2-stochastic TRIPOLI4 analysis using the JEFF-3.1.1 European nuclear data library. A very good agreement is observed for most of neutron induced capture cross section of actinides and a clear underestimation for the {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}) as an accurate validation of its associated isomeric ratio are emphasized. Finally, a possible huge resonant fluctuation (factor of 2.7 regarding to the 1=0 resonance total orbital momenta) is suggested for isomeric ratio. (authors)

  3. Characterization of neutron induced damage effect in several types of metallic multilayer nanocomposites based on Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feida; Tang, Xiaobin; Yang, Yahui; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2015-09-01

    Metallic multilayer nanocomposites are known to have excellent interface self-healing performance when it comes to repairing irradiation damages, thus showing promise as structural materials for advanced nuclear power systems. The present study investigated the neutron irradiation displacement damage rate, spectra of the primary knocked-on atoms (PKAs) produced in the cascade collision, and the H/He ratio in four kinds of metallic multilayer nanocomposites (Cu/Nb, Ag/V, Fe/W, and Ti/Ta) versus neutrons' energy. Results suggest that the three neutron induced damage effects in all multilayer systems increased with the increasing of incident neutrons' energy. For fission reactor environment (1 MeV), multilayer's displacement damage rate is 5-10 × 1022 dpa/(n/cm2) and the mean PKAs energy is about 16 keV, without any noteworthy H/He produced. Fe/W multilayer seems very suitable among these four systems. For fusion reactor environment (14 MeV), the dominant damage effect varies in different multilayer systems. Fe/W multilayer has the lowest displacement damage under the same neutron flux but its gaseous transmutation production is the highest. Considering the displacement damage and transmutation, the irradiation resistance of Ag/V and Ti/Ta systems seems much greater than those of the other two.

  4. Neutron induced pion production on C, Al, Cu, and W at neutron energies of 200--600 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    Inclusive double differential neutron induced {pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup {minus}} production cross sections were measured for four separate targets: C, Al, Cu and W. The neutron energy range was 200--600 MeV and the pion angular range was 25{degrees}--125{degrees}. The charge, scattering angle and energy of the pions were measured using a magnetic spectrometer. The measurements are compared with intranuclear cascade (INC) calculations and a previous experiment that measured the sum of the {pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup {minus}} cross sections. Our data agree with the measured data, but the INC calculations give only moderate agreement with the double differential cross sections as well as with angular distributions and total cross sections as a function of neutron energy. The ratio of {pi}{sup {minus}}:{pi}{sup +} was found to increase rapidly with decreasing neutron energy and the pion production was found to increase approximately as A{sup 2/3} for the different targets. 31 refs., 55 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Protactinium neutron-induced fission up to 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V.

    2010-03-01

    The theoretical evaluation of 230-233Pa(n,F) cross sections is based on direct data, 230-234Pa fission probabilities and ratios of fission probabilities in first-chance and emissive fission domains, surrogate for neutroninduced fission. First chance fission cross sections trends of Pa are based on consistent description of 232Th(n,F), 232Th(n,2n) and 238U(n,F), 238U(n,xn) data, supported by the ratio surrogate data by Burke et al., 2006, for the 237U(n,F) reaction. Ratio surrogate data on fission probabilities of 232Th(6 Li,4 He)234Pa and 232 Th(6 Li,d)236U by Nayak et al., 2008, support the predicted 233Pa(n, F) cross section at En=11.5-16.5 MeV. The predicted trends of 230-232Pa(n, F) cross section up to En=20 MeV, are consistent with fissilities of Pa nuclides, extracted by 232Th(p,F) (Isaev et al., 2008) and 232Th(p,3n) (Morgenstern et al., 2008) data analysis. The excitation energy and nucleon composition dependence of the transition from asymmetric to symmetric scission for fission observables of Pa nuclei is defined by analysis of p-induced fission of 232Th at Ep=1-200 MeV. Predominantly symmetric fission in 232Th(p,F) at En( p)=200 MeV as revealed by experimental branching ratios (Dujvestijn et al., 1999) is reproduced. Steep transition from asymmetric to symmetric fission with increase of nucleon incident energy is due to fission of neutron-deficient Pa (A≤229) nuclei. A structure of the potential energy surface (a drop of f f symmetric and asymmetric fission barriers difierence (EfSYM - EfASYM) from ~3.5 MeV to ~1 MeV) of N-deficient Pa nuclides (A≤226) and available phase space at outer fission saddles, are shown to be responsible for the sharp increase with En( p) of the symmetric fission component contribution for 232Th(p,F) and 230-233 Pa(n, F) reactions. That is a strong evidence of emissive fission nature of moderately excited Pa nuclides, reliably quantified only up to En( p)~20(30) MeV. Predicted fission cross section of 232Pa(n,F) coincides

  6. Dynamics of neutron-induced fission of 235U using four-dimensional Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Mirfathi, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    Background: Langevin equations have been suggested as a key approach to the dynamical analysis of energy dissipation in excited nuclei, formed during heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions. Recently, a few researchers theoretically reported investigations of fission for light nuclei in a low excitation energy using the Langevin approach, without considering the contribution of pre- and post-scission particles and γ -ray emission. Purpose: We study the dynamical evolution of mass distribution of fission fragments, and neutron and γ -ray multiplicity for 236U as compound nuclei that are constructed after fusion of a neutron and 235U. Method: Energy dissipation of the compound nucleus through fission is calculated using the Langevin dynamical approach combined with a Monte Carlo method. Also the shape of the fissioning nucleus is restricted to "funny hills" parametrization. Results: Fission fragment mass distribution, neutron and γ -ray multiplicity, and the average kinetic energy of emitted neutrons and γ rays at a low excitation energy are calculated using a dynamical model, based on the four-dimensional Langevin equations. Conclusions: The theoretical results show reasonable agreement with experimental data and the proposed dynamical model can well explain the energy dissipation in low energy induced fission.

  7. Neutron-neutron angular correlations in spontaneous and neutron-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Jorgen

    2015-04-01

    For many years, the state of the art for treating fission in radiation transport codes has involved sampling from average distributions. However, such average fission models have limited interaction-by-interaction capabilities. Energy is not explicitly conserved and no correlations are available because all particles are emitted isotropically and independently. However, in a true fission event, the energies, momenta and multiplicities of emitted particles are correlated. Such correlations are interesting for many modern applications, including detecting small amounts of material and detector development. Event-by-event generation of complete fission events are particularly useful because it is possible to obtain the fission products as well as the prompt neutrons and photons emitted during the fission process, all with complete kinematic information. It is therefore possible to extract any desired correlation observables. Such codes, when included in broader Monte Carlo transport codes, like MCNP, can be made broadly available. We compare results from our fast event-by-event fission code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) with available neutron-neutron angular correlation data and study the sensitivities of these observables to the model inputs. This work was done under the auspices of the US DOE by (RV) LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and by (JR) LBNL, Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. We acknowledge support of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development in DOE/NNSA.

  8. Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for 239Pu thermal neutron induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Köster, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2011-09-01

    Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the 239Pu(nth,f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on γ-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

  9. Benchmarking of activation reaction distribution in an intermediate energy neutron field.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Morev, Mikhail N; Hirota, Masahiro; Abe, Takuya; Koike, Yuya; Iwai, Satoshi; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    Neutron-induced reaction rate depth profiles inside concrete shield irradiated by intermediate energy neutron were calculated using a Monte-Carlo code and compared with an experiment. An irradiation field of intermediate neutron produced in the forward direction from a thick (stopping length) target bombarded by 400 MeV nucleon(-1) carbon ions was arranged at the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba. Ordinary concrete shield of 90 cm thickness was installed 50 cm downstream the iron target. Activation detectors of aluminum, gold and gold covered with cadmium were inserted at various depths. Irradiated samples were extracted after exposure and gamma-ray spectrometry was performed for each sample. Comparison of experimental and calculated shows good agreement for both low- and high-energy neutron-induced reaction except for (27)Al(n,X)(24)Na reaction at the surface. PMID:21515619

  10. Measurements of fission product yield in the neutron-induced fission of 238U with average energies of 9.35 MeV and 12.52 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukerji, Sadhana; Krishnani, Pritam Das; Shivashankar, Byrapura Siddaramaiah; Mulik, Vikas Kaluram; Suryanarayana, Saraswatula Venkat; Naik, Haladhara; Goswami, Ashok

    2014-07-01

    The yields of various fission products in the neutron-induced fission of 238U with the flux-weightedaveraged neutron energies of 9.35 MeV and 12.52 MeV were determined by using an off-line gammaray spectroscopic technique. The neutrons were generated using the 7Li(p, n) reaction at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre-Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Pelletron facility, Mumbai. The gamma- ray activities of the fission products were counted in a highly-shielded HPGe detector over a period of several weeks to identify the decaying fission products. At both the neutron energies, the fission-yield values are reported for twelve fission product. The results obtained from the present work have been compared with the similar data for mono-energetic neutrons of comparable energy from the literature and are found to be in good agreement. The peak-to-valley (P/V) ratios were calculated from the fission-yield data and were found to decreases for neutron energy from 9.35 to 12.52 MeV, which indicates the role of excitation energy. The effect of the nuclear structure on the fission product-yield is discussed.

  11. Interlaboratory reaction rate program. 12th progress report, November 1976-October 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.; Preston, C.C.

    1980-09-01

    The Interlaboratory Reaction Rate UILRR) program is establishing the capability to accurately measure neutron-induced reactions and reaction rates for reactor fuels and materials development programs. The goal for the principal fission reactions, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U and /sup 239/Pu, is an accuracy to within +- 5% at the 95% confidence level. Accurate measurement of other fission and nonfission reactions is also required, but to a lesser accuracy, between +- 5% and 10% at the 95% confidence level. A secondary program objective is improvement in knowledge of the nuclear parameters involved in the standarization of fuels and materials dosimetry measurements of neutron flux, spectra, fluence and burnup.

  12. 7-T (35)Cl and (23)Na MR Imaging for Detection of Mutation-dependent Alterations in Muscular Edema and Fat Fraction with Sodium and Chloride Concentrations in Muscular Periodic Paralyses.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marc-André; Nagel, Armin M; Marschar, Anja M; Glemser, Philip; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Wolf, Maya B; Ladd, Mark E; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To determine whether altered sodium (Na(+)) and chloride (Cl(-)) homeostasis can be visualized in periodic paralyses by using 7-T sodium 23 ((23)Na) and chlorine 35 ((35)Cl) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and informed consent of all participants were obtained. (23)Na (repetition time msec/echo time msec, 160/0.35) and (35)Cl (40/0.6) MR imaging of both lower legs was performed with a 7-T whole-body system in patients with genetically confirmed hypokalemic periodic paralysis (Cav1.1-R1239H mutation, n = 5; Cav1.1-R528H mutation, n = 8) and Andersen-Tawil syndrome (n = 3) and in 16 healthy volunteers. Additionally, each participant underwent 3-T proton MR imaging on the same day by using T1-weighted, short-tau inversion-recovery, and Dixon-type sequences. Muscle edema was assessed on short-tau inversion-recovery images, fatty degeneration was assessed on T1-weighted images, and muscular fat fraction was quantified with Dixon-type imaging. Na(+) and Cl(-) were quantified in the soleus muscle by using three phantoms that contained 10-, 20-, and 30-mmol/L NaCl solution and 5% agarose gel as a reference. Parametric data for all subpopulations were tested by using one-way analysis of variance with the Dunnett test, and correlations were assessed with the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Median muscular (23)Na concentration was higher in patients with Cav1.1-R1239H (34.7 mmol/L, P < .001), Cav1.1-R528H (32.0 mmol/L, P < .001), and Kir2.1 (24.3 mmol/L, P = .035) mutations than in healthy volunteers (19.9 mmol/L). Median muscular normalized (35)Cl signal intensity was higher in patients with Cav1.1-R1239H (27.6, P < .001) and Cav1.1-R528H (23.6, P < .001) than in healthy volunteers (12.6), but not in patients with the Kir2.1 mutation (14.3, P = .517). When compared with volunteers, patients with Cav1.1-R1239H and Cav1.1-R528H showed increased muscular edema (P < .001 and P = .003, respectively

  13. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and NLO properties of a new mixed crystal potassium sodium ammonium dihydrogenphosphate K0.23Na0.23(NH4)0.54H2PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, G.; Meenakshisundaram, Subbiah

    2012-08-01

    Potassium sodium ammonium dihydrogenphosphate K0.23Na0.23(NH4)0.54H2PO4 (KSADP), a new mixed crystal has been grown in aqueous medium by the slow evaporation of equimolar mixture of ammonium dihydrogenphosphate (ADP), potassium dihydrogenphosphate (KDP) and sodium dihydrogenphosphate (SDP). Crystal composition as determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that it belongs to the tetragonal system with noncentrosymmetric space group I-42d and it is structurally similar to ADP with cell parameter values, a=7.4794(4) Å; b=7.4794(4) Å; c=7.2974(11) Å; υ=408.23(7) Å3; z=4. The presence of sodium and potassium in ADP matrix was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The partial cationic substitution results in defect centers influencing the physical properties. Slight shifts in vibrational patterns could be attributed to strains in the lattice. Refinement of structure by single crystal XRD analysis reveals that potassium, sodium and ammonium coexist in the mixed crystal. The surface morphology of the as-grown specimen, which is changed as a result of cationic incorporation, was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The relative second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency measurements revealed that the mixed crystal has a superior NLO activity than ADP.

  14. A 23Na magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, XANES, and high-temperature X-ray diffraction study of NaUO3, Na4UO5, and Na2U2O7.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Raison, P E; Martel, L; Charpentier, T; Farnan, I; Prieur, D; Hennig, C; Scheinost, A C; Konings, R J M; Cheetham, A K

    2014-01-01

    The valence state of uranium has been confirmed for the three sodium uranates NaU(V)O3/[Rn](5f(1)), Na4U(VI)O5/[Rn](5f(0)), and Na2U(VI)2O7/[Rn](5f(0)), using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Solid-state (23)Na magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) measurements have been performed for the first time, yielding chemical shifts at -29.1 (NaUO3), 15.1 (Na4UO5), and -14.1 and -19 ppm (Na1 8-fold coordinated and Na2 7-fold coordinated in Na2U2O7), respectively. The [Rn]5f(1) electronic structure of uranium in NaUO3 causes a paramagnetic shift in comparison to Na4UO5 and Na2U2O7, where the electronic structure is [Rn]5f(0). A (23)Na multi quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) study on Na2U2O7 has confirmed a monoclinic rather than rhombohedral structure with evidence for two distinct Na sites. DFT calculations of the NMR parameters on the nonmagnetic compounds Na4UO5 and Na2U2O7 have permitted the differentiation between the two Na sites of the Na2U2O7 structure. The linear thermal expansion coefficients of all three compounds have been determined using high-temperature X-ray diffraction: αa = 22.7 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 12.9 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 16.2 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = 52.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) for NaUO3 in the range 298-1273 K; αa = 37.1 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 6.2 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = 81.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) for Na4UO5 in the range 298-1073 K; αa = 6.7 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 14.4 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 26.8 × 10(-6) K(-1), αβ = -7.8 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = -217.6 × 10(-6) K(-1) for Na2U2O7 in the range 298-573 K. The α to β phase transition reported for the last compound above about 600 K was not observed in the present studies, either by high-temperature X-ray diffraction or by differential scanning calorimetry. PMID:24350659

  15. Measurements of neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 205Tl, 204,206,207,208Pb and 209Bi with a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, I. V.; Tutin, G. A.; Mitryukhin, A. G.; Oplavin, V. S.; Soloviev, S. M.; Blomgren, J.; Renberg, P.-U.; Meulders, J. P.; El Masri, Y.; Keutgen, Th.; Prieels, R.; Nolte, R.

    2006-06-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 205Tl, 204,206,207,208Pb and 209Bi have been measured in the energy range from 30 to 180 MeV. The measurements were performed with quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams using a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. The neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 238U were used as reference data. The experimental techniques are described in detail as well as the data processing. The results are compared with existing experimental data.

  16. Measurements of Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections of 205Tl, 204, 206, 207, 208Pb, and 209Bi using Quasi-Monoenergetic Neutrons in the Energy Range 35 - 174 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutin, Gennady A.; Ryzhov, Igor V.; Eismont, Vilen P.; Mitryukhin, Andrey G.; Oplavin, Valery S.; Soloviev, Sergey M.; Blomgren, Jan; Condè, Henri; Olsson, Nils; Renberg, Per-Ulf

    2005-05-01

    Cross sections for neutron-induced fission of 205Tl, 204, 206, 207, 208Pb, and 209Bi were measured in the energy range from 35 MeV to 174 MeV. The experiments were done at the neutron beam facility of The Svedberg Laboratory, using a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber for detection of the fission fragments. The neutron-induced fission cross section of 238U was employed as a reference. The results of the measurements are compared with existing experimental data.

  17. Specific radioactivity of neutron induced radioisotopes: assessment methods and application for medically useful 177Lu production as a case.

    PubMed

    Le, Van So

    2011-01-01

    The conventional reaction yield evaluation for radioisotope production is not sufficient to set up the optimal conditions for producing radionuclide products of the desired radiochemical quality. Alternatively, the specific radioactivity (SA) assessment, dealing with the relationship between the affecting factors and the inherent properties of the target and impurities, offers a way to optimally perform the irradiation for production of the best quality radioisotopes for various applications, especially for targeting radiopharmaceutical preparation. Neutron-capture characteristics, target impurity, side nuclear reactions, target burn-up and post-irradiation processing/cooling time are the main parameters affecting the SA of the radioisotope product. These parameters have been incorporated into the format of mathematical equations for the reaction yield and SA assessment. As a method demonstration, the SA assessment of 177Lu produced based on two different reactions, 176Lu (n,γ)177Lu and 176Yb (n,γ) 177Yb (β- decay) 177Lu, were performed. The irradiation time required for achieving a maximum yield and maximum SA value was evaluated for production based on the 176Lu (n,γ)177Lu reaction. The effect of several factors (such as elemental Lu and isotopic impurities) on the 177Lu SA degradation was evaluated for production based on the 176Yb (n,γ) 177Yb (β- decay) 177Lu reaction. The method of SA assessment of a mixture of several radioactive sources was developed for the radioisotope produced in a reactor from different targets. PMID:21248665

  18. Determination of Minor Actinides Fission Cross Sections by Means of Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Boyer, S.; Czajkowski, S.; Dassié, D.; Grosjean, C.; Guiral, A.; Haas, B.; Jurado, B.; Osmanov, B.; Bauge, E.; Petit, M.; Berthoumieux, E.; Gunsing, F.; Perrot, L.; Theisen, C.; Michel-Sendis, F.; Billebaud, A.; Wilson, J. N.; Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.

    2006-04-01

    An inventive method that allows to determine neutron-induced cross sections of very short-lived minor actinides is presented. We have successfully applied this method, based on the use of transfer reactions, to 233Pa, a key nucleus in the 232Th-233U fuel cycle. A recent experiment using this technique has also been performed in order to obtain the neutron-induced fission cross sections of 242, 243, 244Cm and 241Am which are present in the nuclear waste of the current U-Pu fuel cycle. These cross sections are highly relevant for the design of reactors capable to incinerate minor actinides. Preliminary experimental results will be presented.

  19. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR and powder x-ray diffraction studies of sodium aluminate speciation and the mechanistics of aluminum hydroxide precipitation upon acid hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, S.M.; Hanna, J.V.

    1994-08-24

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR, powder X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopic investigations of freeze-dried sodium aluminates and aluminum hydroxides formed through acid hydrolysis have been undertaken, with OH/Al hydrolysis ratios between 5.3 and 2.8 being analyzed. Numerous {sup 27}AlNMR resonances were observed, the intensities of which vary as a function of OH/Al ratio, and these have been assigned to four-, five-, and six-coordinate aluminum species constituting a variety of structural moieties. The dominant species at an OH/Al ratio above 4.4 appears to be a Q{sup o}Na[Al(OH);{sub 4}] salt, as indicated by a {sup 27}Al resonance at 86.6 ppm. In addition, a second, broader resonance at 71.3 ppm demonstrates the simultaneous existence of further four-coordinate aluminum species linked thorough oxo bonds to other four-coordinate aluminums (e.g., Q{sup 2} [Al(OH);{sub 2}(OAl){sub 2}];{sup x-}). At an OH/Al ratio between 4.4 and 4.1, a water-soluble phase forms that contains both four- and six-coordinate aluminum. At OH/Al ratios fo 4.0 and below, a water-soluble phase forms that contains both four-and six-coordinate aluminum. AT OH/Al ratios of 4.0 and below, a water-insoluble phase exists possessing four-, five-, and six-coordinate aluminum. At OH/Al{le}3.9 range exhibits {sup 27}Al chemical shifts similar to those reported for transitional aluminas such as {gamma}-, {eta}-, and 0-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and an infrared spectrum similar to pseudo-spinel gels, suggesting that a pseudo-spinel intermediate is the first phase involved in the crystallization of gibbsite. The resonance assigned to five-coordinate aluminum probably results from species involved in the transformation of the pseudo-spinal phase to pseudo-boehmite. The formation of gibbssite on the acid hydrolysis of alkaline sodium aluminate solutions thus appears to follow the pathway pseudo-spinel {r_arrow} pseudo-boehmite {r_arrow} bayerite {r_arrow} gibbsite. 82 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup nat}Pb and {sup 209}Bi from threshold to 1 GeV: An improved parametrization

    SciTech Connect

    Tarrio, D.; Duran, I.; Paradela, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Berthier, B.; Ferrant, L.; Isaev, S.; Le Naour, C.; Stephan, C.; Trubert, D.; David, S.; Aerts, G.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.

    2011-04-15

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup nat}Pb and {sup 209}Bi were measured with a white-spectrum neutron source at the CERN Neutron Time-of-Flight (n{sub T}OF) facility. The experiment, using neutrons from threshold up to 1 GeV, provides the first results for these nuclei above 200 MeV. The cross sections were measured relative to {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U in a dedicated fission chamber with parallel plate avalanche counter detectors. Results are compared with previous experimental data. Upgraded parametrizations of the cross sections are presented, from threshold energy up to 1 GeV. The proposed new sets of fitting parameters improve former results along the whole energy range.

  1. Effects of Neutron Emission on Fragment Mass and Kinetic Energy Distribution from Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission of {sup 235}U

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Saetone, E.

    2007-10-26

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening in the standard deviation of the kinetic energy at the final fragment mass number around m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. and other results on yield of mass. We conclude that the obtained results are a consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the sharp variation in the primary fragment kinetic energy and mass yield curves. We show that because neutron emission is hazardous to make any conclusion on primary quantities distribution of fragments from experimental results on final quantities distributions.

  2. The CCONE Code System and its Application to Nuclear Data Evaluation for Fission and Other Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, O.; Iwamoto, N.; Kunieda, S.; Minato, F.; Shibata, K.

    2016-01-01

    A computer code system, CCONE, was developed for nuclear data evaluation within the JENDL project. The CCONE code system integrates various nuclear reaction models needed to describe nucleon, light charged nuclei up to alpha-particle and photon induced reactions. The code is written in the C++ programming language using an object-oriented technology. At first, it was applied to neutron-induced reaction data on actinides, which were compiled into JENDL Actinide File 2008 and JENDL-4.0. It has been extensively used in various nuclear data evaluations for both actinide and non-actinide nuclei. The CCONE code has been upgraded to nuclear data evaluation at higher incident energies for neutron-, proton-, and photon-induced reactions. It was also used for estimating β-delayed neutron emission. This paper describes the CCONE code system indicating the concept and design of coding and inputs. Details of the formulation for modelings of the direct, pre-equilibrium and compound reactions are presented. Applications to the nuclear data evaluations such as neutron-induced reactions on actinides and medium-heavy nuclei, high-energy nucleon-induced reactions, photonuclear reaction and β-delayed neutron emission are mentioned.

  3. Measurement of fission products yields in the quasi-mono-energetic neutron-induced fission of 232Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, H.; Mukherji, Sadhana; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Jagadeesan, K. C.; Thakare, S. V.; Sharma, S. C.

    2016-08-01

    The cumulative yields of various fission products in the 232Th(n, f) reaction at average neutron energies of 5.42, 7.75, 9.35 and 12.53 MeV have been determined by using an off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The neutron beam was produced from the 7Li(p, n) reaction by using the proton energies of 7.8, 12, 16 and 20 MeV. The mass chain yields were obtained from the cumulative fission yields by using the charge distribution correction of medium energy fission. The fine structure in the mass yield distribution was interpreted from the point of nuclear structure effect. On the other hand, the higher yield around mass number 133-134 and 143-144 as well as their complementary products were explained based on the standard I and standard II asymmetric mode of fission. From the mass yield data, the average value of light mass (), heavy mass (), the average number of neutrons (< ν >) and the peak-to-valley (P / V) ratios at different neutron energies of present work and literature data were obtained in the 232Th(n, f) reaction. The different parameters of the mass yield distribution in the 232Th(n, f) reaction were compared with the similar data in the 232Th(γ, f) reaction at comparable excitation energy and a surprising difference was observed.

  4. First simultaneous measurement of fission and gamma probabilities of 237U and 239Np via surrogate reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, P.; Ducasse, Q.; Jurado, B.; Aiche, M.; Mathieu, L.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Moro, A.; Lei, J.; Giacoppo, F.; Gorgen, A.; Tornyi; Audouin, L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Wilson, J. N.; Gunsing, F.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Lebois, M.; Renstrom, T.; Rose, S.; Siem, S.; Tveten, G. M.; Wiedeking, M.; Serot, O.; Boutoux, G.; Méot, V.; Morillon, B.; Denis-Petit, D.; Roig, O.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.

    2016-06-01

    Fission and gamma decay probabilities of 237U and 239Np have been measured, for the first time simultaneously in dedicated experiments, via the surrogate reactions 238U(3He, 4He) and 238U(3He,d), respectively. While a good agreement between our data and neutron-induced data is found for fission probabilities, gamma decay probabilities are several times higher than the corresponding neutron-induced data for each studied nucleus. We study the role of the different spin distributions populated in the surrogate and neutron-induced reactions. The compound nucleus spin distribution populated in the surrogate reaction is extracted from the measured gamma-decay probabilities, and used as input parameter in the statistical model to predict fission probabilities to be compared to our data. A strong disagreement between our data and the prediction is obtained. Preliminary results from an additional dedicated experiment confirm the observed discrepancies, indicating the need of a better understanding of the formation and decay processes of the compound nucleus.

  5. Empirical formula on (n,(3)He) reaction cross sections at 14.6MeV neutrons.

    PubMed

    Yiğit, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    The systematic behavior of the cross sections of (n,(3)He) nuclear reactions has been studied by various researches at neutron energy of 14.6MeV. A new empirical formula based on the Q-value dependence of the cross sections of the investigated reaction has been proposed. The cross sections obtained from the new formula are compared with the other proposed formulae results and the experimental data. It seems that the present formula based on the Q-value dependence provides the good description for cross sections of neutron-induced (n,(3)He) nuclear reactions at 14.6MeV. PMID:26218596

  6. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Watanabe, Takehito; Chadwick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Event-by-Event Fission Modeling of Prompt Neutrons and Photons from Neutron-Induced and Spontaneous Fission with FREYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Jorgen

    2013-04-01

    The event-by-event fission Monte Carlo code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) generates large samples of complete fission events. Using FREYA, it is possible to obtain the fission products as well as the prompt neutrons and photons emitted during the fission process, all with complete kinematic information. We can therefore extract any desired correlation observables. Concentrating on ^239Pu(n,f), ^240Pu(sf) and ^252Cf(sf), we compare our FREYA results with available data on prompt neutron and photon emission and present predictions for novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of transfer reactions using extended R-matrix theory picturing surrogate-type WFCF features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouland, Olivier H.

    2016-03-01

    This article supplies an overview of issues related to the interpretation of surrogate measurement results for neutron-incident cross section predictions; difficulties that are somehow masked by the historical conversion route based on Weisskopf-Ewing approximation. Our proposal is to handle the various difficulties by using a more rigorous approach relying on Monte Carlo simulation of transfer reactions with extended R-matrix theory. The multiple deficiencies of the historical surrogate treatment are recalled but only one is examined in some details here; meaning the calculation of in-out-going channel Width Fluctuation Correction Factors (WFCF) which behavior witness partly the failure of Niels Bohr's compound nucleus theoretical landmark. Relevant WFCF calculations according to neutron-induced surrogate- and cross section-types as a function of neutron-induced fluctuating energy range [0 - 2.1 MeV] are presented and commented in the case of the 240Pu* and 241Pu* compound nucleus isotopes.

  9. Fast-neutron-induced potential background near the Q value of neutrinoless double-β decay of 76Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, W.; Bhike, Megha; Fallin, B.; Krishichayan

    2016-01-01

    The 76Ge (n,p)76Ga reaction and the subsequent β decay of 76Ga to 76Ge has been used to excite the 3951.89-keV state of 76Ge , which decays by the emission of a 2040.70-keV γ ray. Using high-purity germanium detectors, the associated pulse-height signal may be undistinguishable from the potential signal produced in neutrinoless double-β decay of 76Ge with its Q value of 2039.0 keV. At 20-MeV neutron energy the production cross section of the 2040.70-keV γ ray is approximately 0.1 mb.

  10. Effects of rotation of fissioning nuclei in the angular distributions of prompt neutrons and gamma rays originating from the polarized-neutron-induced fission of 233U and 235U nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2014-06-01

    The results of an experiment devoted to searches for effects of rotation of fissioning nuclei in the angular distributions of prompt neutrons and gamma rays originating from the polarized-neutron-induced fission of 233U nuclei are presented. The effects discovered in these angular distributions are opposite in sign to their counterparts in the polarized-neutron-induced fission of 235U nuclei. This is at odds with data on the relative signs of respective effects in the angular distribution of alpha particles from the ternary fission of the same nuclei and may be indicative of problems in the model currently used to describe the effect in question. The report on which this article is based was presented at the seminar held at the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics and dedicated to the 90th anniversary of the birth of Yu.G. Abov, corresponding member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Editor in Chief of the journal Physics of Atomic Nuclei.

  11. Neutron-Induced Partial Cross-Section Measurements on ^76Ge Motivated by The Majorana Project 0νββ Decay Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilderbrand, S.; Kwan, E.; Angell, C.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Masters, D. B.; Pedroni, R. S.; Weisel, G. J.

    2007-10-01

    The goal of the Majorana Collaboration is to study 0νββ in order to verify that the neutrino is its own anti-particle; and if so, what is the mass ofthe electron neutrino. Observation of a sharp peak at the ββ endpoint energy will confirm 0νββ as a decay mode, and determination of the partial width will determine the matrix element which depends directly on the electron neutrino mass. In order to observe and verify the existence of 0νββ, it is important to reduce intrinsic, extrinsic,& cosmogenic backgrounds. The Majorana Project will operate with HPGe detectors deep underground to achieve a low-background environment. Recent advances in signal processing and detector design have also enabled scientists to further understand background sources. γ-ray spectra from the interaction of pulsed mono-energetic neutrons with ^76Ge were measured at TUNL using segmented HPGe clover detectors. The neutron-induced partial cross-sections for γ transitions in ^76Ge were measured at En = 8 and 12MeV.

  12. Role of dynamical effects in the formation of T-Odd asymmetries for products of polarized-neutron-induced ternary fission of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G.; Bunakov, V. E.; Titova, L. V.

    2015-07-15

    Basic dynamical effects that accompany the cold-polarized-neutron-induced binary and ternary fission of actinide nuclei and which determine the properties of T -odd asymmetries in angular distributions of various prescission and evaporated light third particles emitted in true and delayed ternary fission are analyzed on the basis of quantum-mechanical fission theory. It is emphasized that effects associated with the conservation of axial symmetry of the fissioning system under study at all stages of its evolution from the formation of neutron resonance states of the fissile compound nucleus to the separation of its fission fragments, including the appearance of zero wriggling vibrations of the cold compound nucleus in the vicinity of its scission point, are of particular importance, the influence of quantum collective rotation of the polarized fissile system on the asymmetry of the angular distribution of both fission fragments and third particles being taken into account. It is shown that the difference in the behavior of the coefficients characterizing the T -odd asymmetries under analysis for the target nuclei being studied can be explained, upon taking into account the interference between the fission amplitudes for the neutron resonance states of fissile compound nuclei, by the difference in the contributions of even and odd components of the amplitudes of angular distributions of third particles to the coefficients in question.

  13. Investigation of neutron-induced background in Magnetic-Recoil-Spectrometer CR-39 data using a DT neutron source and MCNP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanese, Lucio M.; Frenje, Johan; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Lahmann, Brandon; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard

    2015-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometers (MRS) installed on the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are routinely used to measure neutron yield, areal density and ion temperatures from DT implosions. The observed background in the lower-energy part of MRS spectra is significantly higher than expected from analysis of neutron-induced background data obtained in stand-alone CR-39 experiments at OMEGA. A possible explanation relates to the scattering of neutrons in the MRS housing vessel, which is not accounted for in current modeling. To test experimentally the impact of individual vessel components on the observed background, parts of the MRS housing have been mocked up and CR-39 data have been collected employing a DT neutron source. The experimental results are contrasted to MCNP simulations to improve our understanding of the mechanism behind the enhanced neutron background. The results will be used to correct measured spectra from OMEGA and the NIF to allow detailed analysis of lower energy data. This work was supported in part by NLUF, US DOE, and LLE.

  14. Cross sections of α-induced reactions for targets with masses A ≈ 20-50 at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Peter

    2015-05-01

    A simple reduction scheme using so-called reduced energies and reduced cross sections allows the comparison of heavy-ion-induced reaction cross sections for a broad range of masses of projectile and target and over a wide energy range. A global behavior has been found for strongly bound projectiles whereas much larger reduced cross sections have been observed for weakly bound and halo projectiles. It has been shown that this simple reduction scheme works also well for -particle-induced reactions on heavy target nuclei, but very recently significant deviations have been seen for + 33S and + 23Na. Motivated by these unexpected discrepancies, the present study analyses -induced reaction cross sections for targets with masses 20-50. The study shows that the experimental data for -induced reactions on nuclei with 20-50 deviate slightly from the global behavior of reduced cross sections. However, in general the deviations evolve smoothly towards lower masses. The only significant outliers are the recent data for 33S and 23Na which are far above the general systematics, and some very old data may indicate that 36Ar and 40Ar are below the general trend. As expected, also the doubly magic 40Ca nucleus lies slightly below the results for its neighboring nuclei. Overall, the experimental data are nicely reproduced by a statistical model calculation utilizing the simple -nucleus potential by McFadden and Satchler. Simultaneously with the deviation of reduced cross sections from the general behavior, the outliers 23Na, 33S, 36Ar, and 40Ar also show significant disagreement between experiment and statistical model calculation.

  15. Monitoring reactions for the calibration of relativistic hadron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, A.; La Torre, F. P.; Manessi, G. P.; Pozzi, F.; Silari, M.

    2014-11-01

    The well-known foil activation technique was used to calibrate an ionisation chamber employed for the on-line beam monitoring of a 120 GeV c-1 mixed proton/pion beam at CERN. Two monitoring reactions were employed: the standard 27Al(p,3pn)24Na and the alternative natCu(p,x)24Na. The parameters on which the technique critically depends and the adopted solutions are thoroughly analysed are the cross-section, the contribution of the competing reactions to the induced activity and the recoil nuclei effect. The experimental results are compared with FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations and with past results obtained with various calibration techniques. The comparison confirms that both reactions can be effectively employed. The natCu(p,x)24Na reaction shows advantages because its cross-section is known at very high energies with a low uncertainty and the production of 24Na is not affected by competing low energy neutron-induced reactions. The contribution of the competing reactions in the case of the 27Al(p,3pn)24Na reaction has been estimated to be 4.3%/100 mg cm-2, whereas the effect of recoil nuclei is negligible.

  16. Measurement of Absolute Fission Yields in the Fast Neutron-Induced Fission of Actinides: {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm by Track-Etch-cum-Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, R.H.; Naik, H.; Pandey, A.K.; Kalsi, P.C.; Singh, R.J.; Ramaswami, A.; Nair, A.G.C.

    2000-07-15

    The absolute fission yields of 46 fission products in {sup 238}U (99.9997 at.%), 46 fission products in {sup 237}Np, 27 fission products in {sup 238}Pu (99.21 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 240}Pu (99.48 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 243}Am (99.998 at.%), and 32 fission products in {sup 244}Cm (99.43 at.%) induced by fast neutrons were determined using a fission track-etch-cum-gamma spectrometric technique. In the case of highly alpha-active and sparingly available actinides - e.g., {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm - a novel recoil catcher technique to collect the fission products on a Lexan polycarbonate foil followed by gamma-ray spectrometry was developed during the course of this work. This completely removed interferences from (a) gamma rays of daughter products in secular equilibrium with the target nuclide (e.g., {sup 243}Am-{sup 239}Np), (b) activation products of the catcher foil [e.g., {sup 24}Na from Al(n,{alpha})], and (c) activation products of the target [e.g., {sup 238}Np from {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) and {sup 239}Np from {sup 238}U(n,{gamma})] reactions, making the gamma spectrometric analysis very simple and accurate. The high-yield asymmetric fission products were analyzed by direct gamma spectrometry, whereas the low-yield symmetric products (e.g., Ag, Cd, and Sb) as well as some of the asymmetric fission products (e.g., Br) and rare earths (in the case of {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np) were radiochemically separated and then analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry. The neutron spectra in the irradiation positions of the reactors were measured and delineated in the thermal to 10-MeV region using threshold activation detectors. The present data were compared with the ENDF/VI and UKFY2 evaluated data files. From the measured cumulative yields, the mass-chain yields have been deduced using charge distribution systematics. The mass yields, along with similar data for other fast neutron-induced fissioning systems, show several

  17. r-PROCESS Reaction Rates for the Actinides and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, I. V.; Korneev, I. Yu.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the importance of different fission rates for the formation of heavy and superheavy nuclei in the astrophysical r-process. Neutron-induced reaction rates, including fission and neutron capture, are calculated in the temperature range 108 ≤ T(K) ≤ 1010 within the framework of the statistical model for targets with the atomic number 84 ≤ Z ≤ 118 (from Po to Uuo) from the neutron to the proton drip-line for different mass and fission barrier predictions based on Thomas-Fermi (TF), Extended Thomas-Fermi plus Strutinsky Integral (ETFSI), Finite-Range Droplet Model (FRDM) and Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) approaches. The contribution of spontaneous fission as well as beta-delayed fission to the recycling r-process is discussed. We also discuss the possibility of rate tests, based on mini r-processed yields in nuclear explosions.

  18. New integral formula for obtaining analytical Legendre expansion coefficients and its applications to light-nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jingshang

    2015-12-01

    A new integral formula, which has not been compiled in any integral tables or mathematical softwares, is proposed to obtain the analytical energy-angular spectra of the particles that are sequentially emitted from the discrete energy levels of the residual nuclei in the statistical theory of light nucleus reaction (STLN). In the cases of the neutron induced light nucleus reactions, the demonstration of the kinetic energy conservation in the sequential emission processes becomes straightforward thanks to this new integral formula and it is also helpful to largely reduce the volume of file-6 in nuclear reaction databases. Furthermore, taking p + 9Be reaction at 18 MeV as an example, this integral formula is extended to calculate the energy-angular spectra of the sequentially emitted neutrons for proton induced light nucleus reactions in the frame of STLN.

  19. Pion absorption in nuclei: The (. pi. /sup + -/,p) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.S.

    1987-05-01

    Reported here is the first experiment to measure the excitation of discrete final states following the (..pi../sup -/,p) reaction. The Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the High Resolution Pion Channel and Spectrometer (..pi..M1-SUSI) at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Physics were used for this high resolution study of (..pi../sup + -/,p) reactions. An average energy resolution of 500 KeV and 700 KeV was achieved at EPICS and ..pi..M1-SUSI respectively. At EPICS these reactions were measured at T/sub ..pi../ = 120 MeV and theta/sub lab/ = 25/sup 0/ on /sup 24/Mg, /sup 27/Al, /sup 40/Ca and /sup 58/Ni; /sup 12/C(..pi../sup -/,p) was measured at T/sub ..pi../ = 145 MeV. At ..pi..M1-SUSI these reactions were measured at T/sub ..pi../ = 90 MeV and at theta/sub lab/ = 20/sup 0/ on /sup 23/Na and /sup 24/Mg. The measurement includes both the differential cross sections and continuum up to an excitation energy of 40 MeV. In /sup 23/Na, /sup 24/Mg, and /sup 27/Al there are peaks in the low excitation region. The shape of the continuum in an excitation energy range of 10 to 40 MeV was found to be independent of pion charge and target mass. The magnitude of proton yield from all the targets at T/sub ..pi../ = 120 MeV is more than twenty four times larger for ..pi../sup +/ than for ..pi../sup -/. Also, the cross sections for both reactions on /sup 24/Mg is slightly enhanced compared to other nuclei. At T/sub ..pi../ = 90 MeV the ratio of the proton yield for ..pi../sup +/ to ..pi../sup -/ absorption drops down to fourteen. This high ratio and its energy dependence supports the idea of a two nucleon pion absorption model. Pion absorption in the context of both the reaction mechanism and nuclear structure is discussed. 99 refs., 64 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Estimation of (n,f) Cross-Sections by Measuring Reaction Probability Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, C; Ai, H; Beausang, C W; Bernstein, L A; Ahle, L; Amro, H; Babilon, M; Burke, J T; Caggiano, J A; Casten, R F; Church, J A; Cooper, J R; Crider, B; Gurdal, G; Heinz, A; McCutchan, E A; Moody, K; Punyon, J A; Qian, J; Ressler, J J; Schiller, A; Williams, E; Younes, W

    2005-04-21

    Neutron-induced reaction cross-sections on unstable nuclei are inherently difficult to measure due to target activity and the low intensity of neutron beams. In an alternative approach, named the 'surrogate' technique, one measures the decay probability of the same compound nucleus produced using a stable beam on a stable target to estimate the neutron-induced reaction cross-section. As an extension of the surrogate method, in this paper they introduce a new technique of measuring the fission probabilities of two different compound nuclei as a ratio, which has the advantage of removing most of the systematic uncertainties. This method was benchmarked in this report by measuring the probability of deuteron-induced fission events in coincidence with protons, and forming the ratio P({sup 236}U(d,pf))/P({sup 238}U(d,pf)), which serves as a surrogate for the known cross-section ratio of {sup 236}U(n,f)/{sup 238}U(n,f). IN addition, the P({sup 238}U(d,d{prime}f))/P({sup 236}U(d,d{prime}f)) ratio as a surrogate for the {sup 237}U(n,f)/{sup 235}U(n,f) cross-section ratio was measured for the first time in an unprecedented range of excitation energies.

  1. An improved method for estimating the neutron background in measurements of neutron capture reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žugec, P.; Bosnar, D.; Colonna, N.; Gunsing, F.

    2016-08-01

    The relation between the neutron background in neutron capture measurements and the neutron sensitivity related to the experimental setup is examined. It is pointed out that a proper estimate of the neutron background may only be obtained by means of dedicated simulations taking into account the full framework of the neutron-induced reactions and their complete temporal evolution. No other presently available method seems to provide reliable results, in particular under the capture resonances. An improved neutron background estimation technique is proposed, the main improvement regarding the treatment of the neutron sensitivity, taking into account the temporal evolution of the neutron-induced reactions. The technique is complemented by an advanced data analysis procedure based on relativistic kinematics of neutron scattering. The analysis procedure allows for the calculation of the neutron background in capture measurements, without requiring the time-consuming simulations to be adapted to each particular sample. A suggestion is made on how to improve the neutron background estimates if neutron background simulations are not available.

  2. The {sup 59}Co(n,{alpha}) reaction from threshold to 30 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.M.; Sterbenz, S.M.; Bateman, F.B.

    1994-06-01

    Neutron-induced reactions that result in alpha-particle emission have been investigated for the target nucleus {sup 59}Co over the neutron energy range from threshold to 30 MeV with the spallation neutron source at WNR/LAMPF. Double-differential cross sections were measured at alpha-particle emission angles of 30, 60, 90 and 135{degree}. Integrated cross sections agree well with activation data below 14 MeV where only the {sup 59}Co(n,{alpha}){sup 56}Mn reaction contributes to alpha-particle emission. At higher energies, the integrated alpha-particle emission cross section exceeds the activation data. The results will be interpreted in terms of statistical and pre-compound reaction mechanisms. The sensitivity to nuclear level density parameters will be discussed.

  3. A Study on 19F( n,α) Reaction Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uğur, F. A.; Tel, E.; Gökçe, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, cross sections of neutron induced reactions have been investigated for fluorine target nucleus. The calculations have been made on the excitation functions of 19F ( n,α), 19F( n,xα) reactions. Fluorine (F) and its molten salt compounds (LiF) can serve as a coolant which can be used at high temperatures without reaching a high vapor pressure and also the molten salt compounds are also a good neutron moderator. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the full exciton model and the cascade exciton model. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, reaction cross sections have calculated by using evaluated empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data.

  4. 196Pt(n,xn yp γ) reactions using spallation neutrons from En=1 to 250 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavukcu, E.; Bernstein, L. A.; Hauschild, K.; Becker, J. A.; Garrett, P. E.; McGrath, C. A.; McNabb, D. P.; Younes, W.; Chadwick, M. B.; Nelson, R. O.; Johns, G. D.; Mitchell, G. E.

    2001-11-01

    Neutron-induced reactions on 196Pt were studied over the neutron energy range from 1 to 250 MeV. A ``white'' neutron beam was provided by the spallation neutron source of the Weapons Neutron Research facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The prompt reaction γ rays were measured with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Ge spectrometer GEANIE. The incident neutron energy was determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions for γ-ray transitions in 184,186,188,190-196Pt and 189,191,193Ir isotopes are compared with enhanced Hauser-Feshbach reaction modeling, as implemented in the reaction code GNASH. Overall, the model predictions agree well with the measured γ-ray yields. Discrepancies appear, however, due to inadequate discrete-level information in the calculations describing the preequilibrium process.

  5. {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C reactions at astrophysical energies: Tests of targets behaviour under beam bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Morales-Gallegos, L.; Aliotta, M.; Davinson, T.; Di Leva, A.; Imbriani, G.; Romano, M.; Romoli, M.; Gialanella, L.; Schürmann, D.; De Cesare, M.; Strieder, F.

    2014-05-09

    {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,α){sup 20}Ne and {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,p){sup 23}Na are the most important reactions during the carbon burning phase in stars. Direct measurements at the relevant astrophysical energy (E=1.5±0.3MeV) are very challenging because of the extremely small cross sections involved and of the high beam-induced background originating from impurities in the targets. In addition, persistent resonant structures at low energies are not well understood and make the extrapolation of the cross section from high energy data very uncertain. As a preliminary step towards the measurements of the {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,α){sup 20}Ne and {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,p){sup 23}Na reactions we intend to investigate the behaviour of targets under beam bombardment, specifically the quantitative measurement of hydrogen and deuterium content of highly pure stable carbon targets in relation to target temperature. Experiments are taking place at the CIRCE accelerator in Caserta, Italy and preliminary results are presented here.

  6. Neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup 234}U and {sup 237}Np measured at the CERN Neutron Time-of-Flight (n{sub T}OF) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paradela, C.; Duran, I.; Tarrio, D.; Alvarez, H.; Tassan-Got, L.; Berthier, B.; Ferrant, L.; Isaev, S.; Le Naour, C.; Stephan, C.; Trubert, D.; David, S.; Abbondanno, U.; Fujii, K.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Aerts, G.

    2010-09-15

    A high-resolution measurement of the neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup 234}U and {sup 237}Np has been performed at the CERN Neutron Time-of-Flight facility. The cross sections have been determined in a wide energy range from 1 eV to 1 GeV using the evaluated {sup 235}U cross section as reference. In these measurements the energy determination for the {sup 234}U resonances could be improved, whereas previous discrepancies for the {sup 237}Np resonances were confirmed. New cross-section data are provided for high neutron energies that go beyond the limits of prior evaluations, obtaining important differences in the case of {sup 237}Np.

  7. Measurement of reaction cross-sections for 89Y at average neutron energies of 7.24-24.83 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Naik, Haladhara; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shahid, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    We measured neutron-induced reaction cross-sections for 89Y(n,γ)90mY and 89Y(n,α)86Rb reactions with the average neutron energy region from 7.45 to 24.83 MeV by an activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique using the MC-50 Cyclotron at Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The neutron-induced reaction cross-sections of 89Y as a function of neutron energy were taken from the TENDL-2013 library. The flux-weighted average cross-sections for 89Y(n,γ)90mY and 89Y(n,α)86Rb reactions were calculated from the TENDL-2013 values based on mono-energetic neutron and by using the neutron energy spectrum from MCNPX 2.6.0 code. The present results are compared with the flux-weighted values of TENDL-2013 and are found to be in good agreement

  8. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is ...

  9. Calculation of pre-equilibrium effects in neutron-induced cross section on 32,34S isotopes using the EMPIRE 3.2 code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yettou, Leila; Belgaid, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    In this study, a new version EMPIRE 3.2 code was used in the cross section calculations of (n,p) reactions and in the calculation of proton emission spectra produced by (n,xp) reactions. Exciton model predictions combined with the Kalbach angular distribution systematics were used and some parameters such as those of mean free path, cluster emission in terms of Iwamoto-Harada model, optical model potentials of Morillon for neutrons and protons in the energy range up to 20 MeV, level density for spherical nuclei of Gilbert-Cameron model and width fluctuation correction in terms of compound nucleus have been investigated our calculations. The excitation functions and the proton emission spectra for 32,34S nuclei were calculated, discussed and found in good agreement with available experimental data.

  10. Prospects for further studies of effects of T-odd asymmetry in the emission of light particles in the polarized-neutron-induced ternary fission of heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. A.; Gagarskii, A. M.; Guseva, I. S.; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Gönnenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.

    2008-07-01

    Prospects for further studies of TRI and ROT effects of T-odd asymmetry in the emission of light particles in the ternary and binary fission of heavy nuclei that is induced by slow polarized neutrons are considered with a view to studying the mechanism for the formation of these effects and using them to get new information about fission dynamics. It is planned to investigate the dependence of the corresponding T-odd-asymmetry coefficients on the main characteristics of the fission reaction.

  11. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... using any of these products. Some types of food may also cause adverse drug reactions. For example, grapefruit and grapefruit juice, as well as alcohol and caffeine, may affect how drugs work. Every time your doctor ... interactions with any foods or beverages. What about medicines I've used ...

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis of Ni 2FeBO 5 in near-supercritical PWR coolant and possible effects of neutron-induced 10B fission in fuel crud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Jerzy A.

    2011-08-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis of a nickel-iron oxyborate, Ni 2FeBO 5, known as bonaccordite, was investigated at pressures and temperatures that might occur at the surface of high-power fuel rods in PWR cores and in supercritical water reactors, especially during localized departures from nucleate boiling and dry-outs. The tests were performed using aqueous mixtures of nickel and iron oxides with boric acid or boron oxide, and as a function of lithium hydroxide addition, temperature and time of heating. At subcritical temperatures nickel ferrite NiFe 2O 4 was always the primary reaction product. High yield of Ni 2FeBO 5 synthesis started near critical water temperature and was strongly promoted by additions of LiOH up to Li/Fe and Li/B molar ratios in a range 0.1-1. The synthesis of bonaccordite was also promoted by other alkalis such as NaOH and KOH. The bonaccordite particles were likely formed by dissolution and re-crystallization by means of an intermediate nickel ferrite phase. It is postulated that the formation of Ni 2FeBO 5 in deposits of borated nickel and iron oxides on PWR fuel cladding can be accelerated by lithium produced in thermal neutron capture 10B(n,α) 7Li reactions. The process may also be aided in the reactor core by kinetic energy of α-particles and 7Li ions dissipated in the crud layer.

  13. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 240Pu from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Göök, A.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.; Pretel, C.

    2015-07-01

    240Pu has recently been pointed out by a sensitivity study of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) to be one of the isotopes whose fission cross section lacks accuracy to meet the upcoming needs for the future generation of nuclear power plants (GEN-IV). In the High Priority Request List (HPRL) of the OECD, it is suggested that the knowledge of the 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section should be improved to an accuracy within 1-3 %, compared to the present 5%. A measurement of the 240Pu cross section has been performed at the Van de Graaff accelerator of the Joint Research Center (JRC) Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) using quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (TFGIC) has been used in a back-to-back configuration as fission fragment detector. The 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section has been normalized to three different isotopes: 237Np(n ,f ) , 235U (n ,f ) , and 238U (n ,f ) . Additionally, the secondary standard reactions were benchmarked through measurements against the primary standard reaction 235U (n ,f ) in the same geometry. A comprehensive study of the corrections applied to the data and the associated uncertainties is given. The results obtained are in agreement with previous experimental data at the threshold region. For neutron energies higher than 1 MeV, the results of this experiment are slightly lower than the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, but in agreement with the experiments of Laptev et al. (2004) as well as Staples and Morley (1998).

  14. Nucleon-induced reactions at intermediate energies: New data at 96 MeV and theoretical status

    SciTech Connect

    Blideanu, V.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lefort, T.; Marie, N.; Ban, G.; Louvel, M.; Dangtip, S.; Tippawan, U.; Elmgren, K.; Eudes, Ph.; Guertin, A.

    2004-07-01

    Double-differential cross sections for light charged particle production (up to A=4) were measured in 96 MeV neutron-induced reactions, at the TSL Laboratory Cyclotron in Uppsala (Sweden). Measurements for three targets, Fe, Pb, and U, were performed using two independent devices, SCANDAL and MEDLEY. The data were recorded with low-energy thresholds and for a wide angular range (20 deg. -160 deg. ). The normalization procedure used to extract the cross sections is based on the np elastic scattering reaction that we measured and for which we present experimental results. A good control of the systematic uncertainties affecting the results is achieved. Calculations using the exciton model are reported. Two different theoretical approaches proposed to improve its predictive power regarding the complex particle emission are tested. The capabilities of each approach is illustrated by comparison with the 96 MeV data that we measured, and with other experimental results available in the literature.

  15. Neutron-induced fission cross section measurement of 233U, 241Am and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 MeV En 20 MeV at nTOF at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Calviani, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastinu, P. F.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P. A.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Cerutti, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Koehler, Paul; The n_TOF Collaboration,

    2012-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross section measurements of 233U, 243Am and 241Am relative to 235U have been carried out at the neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF at CERN. A fast ionization chamber has been employed. All samples were located in the same detector; therefore the studied elements and the reference 235U target are subject to the same neutron beam.

  16. Neutron induced fission of 238U at incident neutron energies from 1.2 to 5.8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivès, F.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Barreau, G.; Bax, H.

    1998-10-01

    The reaction 238U(n,f) has been studied at IRMM at different incident neutron energies ranging from En=1.2 to 5.8 MeV. The existence of vibrational resonances in the region of the threshold of the fission cross-section and the proton pairing effect should induce variations in the fission fragment properties. The fission fragment mass, mean total kinetic energy (TKE¯) and angular distributions have been investigated with a double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. For each incident neutron energy, more than 105 events have been accumulated. The TKE¯ shows an increasing trend up to En=3.5 MeV with a sudden drop at roughly En=3.8 MeV which might be related to the onset of pair breaking. Above En=3.8 MeV TKE¯ is again continually increasing. The two-dimensional mass-TKE distributions have been compared by means of a fit with theoretical calculations performed recently in the frame of the multi-modal random neck-rupture model. Actually, two solutions are possible with assuming either two or three Gaussians for the asymmetric part of the mass distribution. However, both solutions lead to the same physical interpretation. The solution with three Gaussians is more in line with the theoretical predictions. In any case the super-long symmetric mode has to be included, in order to explain the dip in TKE¯ close to symmetry.

  17. Monte-Carlo simulations of neutron-induced activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma-Based Cargo Inspection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberger, B.; Bar, D.; Brandis, M.; Dangendorf, V.; Goldberg, M. B.; Kaufmann, F.; Mor, I.; Nolte, R.; Schmiedel, M.; Tittelmeier, K.; Vartsky, D.; Wershofen, H.

    2012-03-01

    An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. The induced activity was determined by analyzing the gamma spectra. Based on the calculated radioactive inventory in the container, the dose levels due to the induced gamma radiation were calculated at several distances from the container and in relevant time windows after the irradiation, in order to evaluate the radiation exposure of the cargo handling staff, air crew and passengers during flight. The possibility of remanent long-lived radioactive inventory after cargo is delivered to the client is also of concern and was evaluated.

  18. A Comparison Between the Burn Condition of Deuterium-Tritium and Deuterium-Helium-3 Reaction and Stability Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Fereshteh

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear reaction of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion by the usual magnetic or inertial confinement suffers from a number of difficulties and problems caused by tritium handling, neutron damage to materials and neutron-induced radioactivity, etc. The study of the nuclear synthesis reaction of deuterium-helium-3 (D-3He) at low collision energies (below 1 keV) is of interest for its applications in nuclear physics and astrophysics. Spherical tokamak (ST) reactors have a low aspect ratio and can confine plasma with β≈1. These capabilities of ST reactors are due to the use of the alternative D-3He reaction. In this work, the burn condition of D-3He reaction was calculated by using zero-dimensional particles and power equations, and, with the use of the parameters of the ST reactor, the stability limit of D-3He reaction was calculated and then the results were compared with those of D-T reaction. The obtained results show that the burn conditions of D-3He reaction required a higher temperature and had a much more limited temperature range in comparison to those of D-T reaction.

  19. Reaction cross sections on carbon for neutron energies from 11. 5 to 19 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Antolkovic, B. ); Dietze, G.; Klein, H. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on neutron-induced reaction cross sections for carbon measured in the 11.5- to 19-MeV energy range. The response of an NE-213 scintillation detector is measured in steps of at least 0.5 MeV for monoenergetic neutrons, applying suitable time-of-flight techniques, and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The total cross sections of all reactions with charged particles (except carbon recoil protons) in the exit channel are determined with respect to the n-p scattering cross section. In addition, the {sup 12}C(n,n{prime}3{alpha}) reaction is investigated for neutron energies of 11.9, 12.9, 14.0, 14.8, 17.0, and 19.0 MeV using the nuclear emulsion technique. As it is kinematically complete, this measurement yields the total and partial cross sections for the various channels of the {sup 12}C(n,n{prime}3{alpha}) reaction. The experimental data show deviations of up to {plus minus}25% from those recommended in ENDF/B-V, while a recent evaluation by Axton is partially confirmed. Reasonable agreement is found with most of the recent scattering experiments; thus, this data set represents a valuable constraint for further evaluations. The analysis performed, however, has shown that additional data from some partial reaction cross sections are needed.

  20. Neutron-induced 63Ni in copper samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki: a comprehensive presentation of results obtained at the Munich Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Carroll, K L; Egbert, S D; Faestermann, T; Knie, K; Korschinek, G; Martinelli, R E; Marchetti, A A; McAninch, J E; Rugel, G; Straume, T; Wallner, A; Wallner, C; Fujita, S; Hasai, H; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K

    2007-11-01

    Those inhabitants of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were affected by the A-bomb explosions, were exposed to a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field. Few years later about 120,000 survivors of both cities were selected, and since then radiation-induced late effects such as leukemia and solid tumors are being investigated in this cohort. When the present study was initiated, the fast neutron fluences that caused the neutron doses of these survivors had never been determined experimentally. In principle, this would have been possible if radioisotopes produced by fast neutrons from the A-bomb explosions had been detected in samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki at distances where the inhabitants survived. However, no suitable radioisotope had so far been identified. As a contribution to a large international effort to re-evaluate the A-bomb dosimetry, the concentration of the radionuclide (63)Ni (half-life 100.1 years) has been measured in copper samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements were mainly performed at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory in Munich, Germany, by means of accelerator mass spectrometry. Because the (63)Ni had been produced in these samples by fast A-bomb neutrons via the reaction (63)Cu(n,p)(63)Ni, these measurements allow direct experimental validation of calculated neutron doses to the members of the LSS cohort, for the first time. The results of these efforts have already been published in a compact form. A more detailed discussion of the methodical aspects of these measurements and their results are given in the present paper. Eight copper samples that had been significantly exposed to fast neutrons from the Hiroshima A-bomb explosion were investigated. In general, measured (63)Ni concentrations decreased in these samples with increasing distance to the hypocenter, from 4 x 10(6 ) (63)Ni nuclei per gram copper at 391 m, to about 1 x 10(5 ) (63)Ni nuclei per gram copper at about 1,400 m. Additional measurements performed on three large

  1. The Effects of Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Variations on 26Al Production in Massive Stars: A Sensitivity Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliadis, Christian; Champagne, Art; Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the effects of thermonuclear reaction rate variations on 26Al production in massive stars. The dominant production sites in such events were recently investigated by using stellar model calculations: explosive neon-carbon burning, convective shell carbon burning, and convective core hydrogen burning. Post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations are performed for each of these sites by adopting temperature-density-time profiles from recent stellar evolution models. For each profile, we individually multiplied the rates of all relevant reactions by factors of 10, 2, 0.5, and 0.1, and analyzed the resulting abundance changes of 26Al. In total, we performed ≈900 nuclear reaction network calculations. Our simulations are based on a next-generation nuclear physics library, called STARLIB, which contains a recent evaluation of Monte Carlo reaction rates. Particular attention is paid to quantifying the rate uncertainties of those reactions that most sensitively influence 26Al production. For stellar modelers our results indicate to what degree predictions of 26Al nucleosynthesis depend on currently uncertain nuclear physics input, while for nuclear experimentalists our results represent a guide for future measurements. We also investigate equilibration effects of 26Al. In all previous massive star investigations, either a single species or two species of 26Al were taken into account, depending on whether thermal equilibrium was achieved or not. These are two extreme assumptions, and in a hot stellar plasma the ground and isomeric states may communicate via γ-ray transitions involving higher-lying 26Al levels. We tabulate the results of our reaction rate sensitivity study for each of the three distinct massive star sites referred to above. It is found that several current reaction rate uncertainties influence the production of 26Al. Particularly important reactions are 26Al(n,p)26Mg, 25Mg(α,n)28Si, 24Mg(n,γ)25Mg, and 23Na(α,p)26Mg. These reactions

  2. Calculation of the Reaction Cross Section for Several Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Oberstedt, Stephan; Vladuca, Gheorghita; Tudora, Anabella; Filipescu, Dan

    2005-05-24

    New, self-consistent, neutron-induced reaction cross-section calculations for 235,238U, 237Np, and 231,232,233Pa have been performed. The statistical model code STATIS was extended to take into account the multi-modality of the fission process. The three most dominant fission modes, the two asymmetric standard I (S1) and standard II (S2) modes, and the symmetric superlong (SL) mode have been taken into account. De-convoluted fission cross sections for these modes in 235,238U(n,f) and 237Np(n,f) based on experimental branching ratios, were calculated for the first time up to the second chance fission threshold. For 235U(n,f) and 233Pa(n,f), the calculations being made up to 50 MeV and 20 MeV incident neutron energy, respectively, higher fission chances have been considered. This implied the need for additional calculations for the neighbouring isotopes.As a side product also mass yield distributions could be calculated at energies hitherto not accessible by experiment. Experimental validation of the predictions is being envisaged.

  3. Measurement of 235U(n,n'γ) and 235U(n,2nγ) reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerveno, M.; Thiry, J. C.; Bacquias, A.; Borcea, C.; Dessagne, P.; Drohé, J. C.; Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Jericha, E.; Karam, H.; Negret, A.; Pavlik, A.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Romain, P.; Rouki, C.; Rudolf, G.; Stanoiu, M.

    2013-02-01

    The design of generation IV nuclear reactors and the studies of new fuel cycles require knowledge of the cross sections of various nuclear reactions. Our research is focused on (n,xnγ) reactions occurring in these new reactors. The aim is to measure unknown cross sections and to reduce the uncertainty on present data for reactions and isotopes of interest for transmutation or advanced reactors. The present work studies the 235U(n,n'γ) and 235U(n,2nγ) reactions in the fast neutron energy domain (up to 20 MeV). The experiments were performed with the Geel electron linear accelerator GELINA, which delivers a pulsed white neutron beam. The time characteristics enable measuring neutron energies with the time-of-flight (TOF) technique. The neutron induced reactions [in this case inelastic scattering and (n,2n) reactions] are identified by on-line prompt γ spectroscopy with an experimental setup including four high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. A fission ionization chamber is used to monitor the incident neutron flux. The experimental setup and analysis methods are presented and the model calculations performed with the TALYS-1.2 code are discussed.

  4. Isomeric yield ratios of 87m,gY from different nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K.; Zaman, M.; Sahid, M.; Yang, S.-C.; Lee, M. W.; Kang, Y. R.; Shin, S. G.; Cho, M.-H.; Goswami, A.; Song, T. Y.

    2014-07-01

    The independent isomeric yield ratios of 87m,gY produced from the 93Nb( γ, α2n) and natZr( γ, p xn) reactions with the end-point bremsstrahlung energy of 45-70 MeV have been determined by an off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique using 100 MeV electron linac at the Pohang accelerator laboratory, Korea. The isomeric yield ratios of 87m,gY were also determined from the natZr(p, αxn) and the 89Y(p,p2n) reactions with E P = 15-45 MeV as well as those from the 89Y( α, α2n) reaction with E α = 32-43 MeV using the MC-50 cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Korea. The isomeric yield ratios of 87m,gY from the present work in the 93Nb( γ, α2n), natZr( γ, p xn), natZr(p, αxn), 89Y(p,p2n), and 89Y( α, α2n) reactions were compared with those of the literature data in the 85Rb( α, 2n), the 86,87,88Sr(d, xn), 89Y(n,3n), and the 89Y( γ, 2n) reactions to examine the role of target, projectiles, and ejectiles through compound nucleus excitation energy and input angular momentum. The isomeric yield ratios of 87m,gY in the above eleven reactions were also calculated using the computer code TALYS 1.4 and compared with the experimental data. The different behaviors between photon- and neutron-induced reactions and charged-particle-induced reactions are discussed from the viewpoint of compound and non-compound (pre-equilibrium) process.

  5. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969. As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  6. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  7. Neutron capture cross-section measurement for the 186W(n,gamma)187W reaction at 0.0536eV energy.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M S; Chowdhury, M H; Hossain, S M; Latif, Sk A; Hafiz, M A; Islam, M A; Zakaria, A K M; Azharul Islam, S M

    2008-09-01

    The thermal neutron-induced activation cross section for the (186)W(n,gamma)(187)W reaction was measured at 0.0536eV neutron energy using TRIGA Mark-II research reactor, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The (197)Au(n,gamma)(198)Au monitor reaction induced in a high-purity gold foil was used to determine the effective neutron beam intensity. The activities induced in sample and monitor foils were measured nondestructively by a high-resolution HPGe gamma-ray detector. The present experimental cross-section value is the first one at 0.0536eV. The obtained new cross section that amounts to 26.6+/-1.6b is 2% higher than the recently reported data in ENDF/B-VII and 5% lower than that of JENDL-3.3. PMID:18325774

  8. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S.F.

    2012-12-15

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  9. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  10. Spin distribution in preequilibrium reactions for 48Ti + n.

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D

    2005-04-06

    Cross section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for transitions in {sup 45-48}Ti, {sup 44-48}Sc, and {sup 42-45}Ca have been determined. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the LANSCE/WNR facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed germanium array for neutron induced excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). The data are presented for neutron energies E{sub n} between 1 to 200 MeV. These results are compared with model calculations which include compound nuclear and pre-equilibrium emission. The model calculations are performed using the STAPRE reaction code for E{sub n} up to 20 MeV and the GNASH reaction code for E{sub n} up to 120 MeV. Using the GNASH reaction code the effect of the spin distribution in preequilibrium reactions has been investigated. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshbach, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct (MSD) part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The contribution from higher steps is estimated to be small. The spin distribution of the multistep compound (MSC) part of FKK theory is assumed to be the same as in the compound nucleus. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without

  11. Calculations of Compound Nucleus Spin-Parity Distributions Populated via the (p,t) Reaction in Support of Surrogate Neutron Capture Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benstead, J.; Tostevin, J. A.; Escher, J. E.; Burke, J. T.; Hughes, R. O.; Ota, S.; Casperson, R. J.; Thompson, I. J.

    2016-06-01

    The surrogate reaction method may be used to determine the cross section for neutron induced reactions not accessible through standard experimental techniques. This is achieved by creating the same compound nucleus as would be expected in the desired reaction, but through a different incident channel, generally a direct transfer reaction. So far, the surrogate technique has been applied with reasonable success to determine the fission cross section for a number of actinides, but has been less successful when applied to other reactions, e.g. neutron capture, due to a `spin-parity mismatch'. This mismatch, between the spin and parity distributions of the excited levels of the compound nucleus populated in the desired and surrogate channels, leads to differing decay probabilities and hence reduces the validity of using the surrogate method to infer the cross section in the desired channel. A greater theoretical understanding of the expected distribution of levels excited in both the desired and surrogate channels is therefore required in order to attempt to address this mismatch and allow the method to be utilised with greater confidence. Two neutron transfer reactions, e.g. (p,t), which allow the technique to be utilised for isotopes further removed from the line of stability, are the subject of this study. Results are presented for the calculated distribution of compound nucleus states populated in 90Zr, via the 90Zr(p,t)90Zr reaction, and are compared against measured data at an incident proton energy of 28.56 MeV.

  12. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  13. Measurement of 55Fe(n ,p ) cross sections by the surrogate-reaction method for fusion technology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Bhawna; Desai, V. V.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Mirgule, E. T.; Santra, S.; Mahata, K.; Makawana, R.; Abhangi, M.; Basu, T. K.; Rao, C. V. S.; Jakhar, S.; Vala, S.; Sarkar, B.; Agrawal, H. M.; Kaur, G.; Prajapati, P. M.; Pal, Asim; Sarkar, D.; Kundu, A.

    2016-02-01

    We have measured the proton decay probabilities of the *56Fe and *47Ti compound systems which are populated by the transfer reactions 52Cr(6Li,d ) *56Fe (surrogate of n +55Fe→*56Fe→p +55Mn ) and 45Sc(6Li,α ) *47Ti (surrogate of n +46Ti→47Ti*→p +46Sc ) reactions, respectively. The 55Fe(n ,p ) cross sections were then obtained in the equivalent neutron energy range of 7.9 to 20.1 MeV within the framework of the surrogate-reaction method. The measured results were compared with predictions of the empire-3.2.3 statistical model code and various recent evaluated data libraries. The experimental cross-section data on 55Fe(n ,p ) are in reasonable agreement with EAF-2010, while the TENDL-2014 and ROSFOND-2010 data show some discrepancies. This study demonstrates the possibility of determining neutron-induced charged particle emission cross sections for unstable radionuclides relevant to fusion technology applications by the surrogate-reaction method.

  14. Neutron Capture Reactions for Stockpile Stewardship and Basic Science

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Wilk, P; Wu, C; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Haight, R; Jandel, M; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R; Ullmann, J; Vieira, D; Wouters, J; Sheets, S; Mitchell, G; Becvar, F; Krticka, M

    2007-08-04

    present in neutron induced reactions. To reduce the background of scattered neutrons, a lithium hyd

  15. Practice Gaps: Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wolverton, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    The term "drug reactions" is relevant to dermatology in three categories of reactions: cutaneous drug reactions without systemic features, cutaneous drug reactions with systemic features, and systemic drugs prescribed by the dermatologist with systematic adverse effects. This article uses examples from each of these categories to illustrate several important principles central to drug reaction diagnosis and management. The information presented will help clinicians attain the highest possible level of certainty before making clinical decisions. PMID:27363888

  16. Cross Section Measurements of the 76Ge (n ,n' γ) Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ross, T. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    Neutrinoless double-beta decay (0 νββ) is a topic of great current interest and, as such, is the focus of several experiments and international collaborations. Two of these experiments, Majorana and GERDA, are seeking evidence of 0 νββ in the decay of 76Ge, where the signal would appear as a sharp peak in the energy spectrum at the Q-value of the reaction plus a small amount of recoil energy, or 2039 keV. Due to the high sensitivity of such a measurement, knowledge of background lines is critical. A study of 76Ga β- decay into 76Ge revealed a 2040.70(25)-keV transition from the 3951.70(14)-keV level, which, if populated, could potentially be a background line of concern. In addition to β- decay from 76Ga, a potential population mechanism could be cosmic-ray-induced inelastic neutron scattering. Measurements of the neutron-induced cross section of the 3951.70-keV level have been performed utilizing the 76 Ge (n ,n' γ) reaction at the University of Kentucky at neutron energies ranging from 4.3 to 4.9 MeV. This material is based upon work is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under grant no. PHY-0956310.

  17. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  18. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  19. Continuous detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principles of a controlled condensed detonation rather than on the principles of gas expansion. The detonation results in reaction products that are expelled at a much higher velocity.

  20. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  1. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  2. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  3. Reaction coordinates for electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Zhu Jianjun

    2008-12-07

    The polarization fluctuation and energy gap formulations of the reaction coordinate for outer sphere electron transfer are linearly related to the constant energy constraint Lagrangian multiplier m in Marcus' theory of electron transfer. The quadratic dependence of the free energies of the reactant and product intermediates on m and m+1, respectively, leads to similar dependence of the free energies on the reaction coordinates and to the same dependence of the activation energy on the reorganization energy and the standard reaction free energy. Within the approximations of a continuum model of the solvent and linear response of the longitudinal polarization to the electric field in Marcus' theory, both formulations of the reaction coordinate are expected to lead to the same results.

  4. Catalytic diastereoselective petasis reactions.

    PubMed

    Muncipinto, Giovanni; Moquist, Philip N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-22

    Multicomponent Petasis reactions: the first diastereoselective Petasis reaction catalyzed by chiral biphenols that enables the synthesis of syn and anti β-amino alcohols in pure form has been developed. The reaction exploits a multicomponent approach that involves boronates, α-hydroxy aldehydes, and amines. PMID:21751322

  5. Reaction efficiency effects on binary chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, Filippos; Savara, Aditya; Argyrakis, Panos

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the variation of reaction efficiency in binary reactions. We use the well-known A + B → 0 model, which has been extensively studied in the past. We perform simulations on this model where we vary the efficiency of reaction, i.e., when two particles meet they do not instantly react, as has been assumed in previous studies, but they react with a probability γ, where γ is in the range 0 < γ < 1. Our results show that at small γ values the system is reaction limited, but as γ increases it crosses over to a diffusion limited behavior. At early times, for small γ values, the particle density falls slower than for larger γ values. This fall-off goes over a crossover point, around the value of γ = 0.50 for high initial densities. Under a variety of conditions simulated, we find that the crossover point was dependent on the initial concentration but not on the lattice size. For intermediate and long times simulations, all γ values (in the depleted reciprocal density versus time plot) converge to the same behavior. These theoretical results are useful in models of epidemic reactions and epidemic spreading, where a contagion from one neighbor to the next is not always successful but proceeds with a certain probability, an analogous effect with the reaction probability examined in the current work.

  6. EMPIRE: Nuclear Reaction Model Code System for Data Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M. Capote, R.; Carlson, B.V.; Oblozinsky, P.; Sin, M.; Trkov, A.; Wienke, H.; Zerkin, V.

    2007-12-15

    EMPIRE is a modular system of nuclear reaction codes, comprising various nuclear models, and designed for calculations over a broad range of energies and incident particles. A projectile can be a neutron, proton, any ion (including heavy-ions) or a photon. The energy range extends from the beginning of the unresolved resonance region for neutron-induced reactions ({approx} keV) and goes up to several hundred MeV for heavy-ion induced reactions. The code accounts for the major nuclear reaction mechanisms, including direct, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus ones. Direct reactions are described by a generalized optical model (ECIS03) or by the simplified coupled-channels approach (CCFUS). The pre-equilibrium mechanism can be treated by a deformation dependent multi-step direct (ORION + TRISTAN) model, by a NVWY multi-step compound one or by either a pre-equilibrium exciton model with cluster emission (PCROSS) or by another with full angular momentum coupling (DEGAS). Finally, the compound nucleus decay is described by the full featured Hauser-Feshbach model with {gamma}-cascade and width-fluctuations. Advanced treatment of the fission channel takes into account transmission through a multiple-humped fission barrier with absorption in the wells. The fission probability is derived in the WKB approximation within the optical model of fission. Several options for nuclear level densities include the EMPIRE-specific approach, which accounts for the effects of the dynamic deformation of a fast rotating nucleus, the classical Gilbert-Cameron approach and pre-calculated tables obtained with a microscopic model based on HFB single-particle level schemes with collective enhancement. A comprehensive library of input parameters covers nuclear masses, optical model parameters, ground state deformations, discrete levels and decay schemes, level densities, fission barriers, moments of inertia and {gamma}-ray strength functions. The results can be converted into ENDF-6 formatted

  7. Anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, B. H.; Slagboom, G.; Demaeseneer, R.; Slootmaekers, V.; Thijs, I.; Olsson, S.

    1988-01-01

    During 1981 to mid-1988 three cases of anaphylactic shock after treatment with the quinolone derivative cinoxacin were reviewed by the Netherlands Centre for Monitoring of Adverse Reactions to Drugs and 17 cases of an anaphylactic type of reaction notified to the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring. In five out of six patients for whom data were available the reaction began shortly after taking a single capsule of a second or next course of treatment. Cinoxacin is related to nalidixic acid, and one patient previously treated with that agent subsequently had an anaphylactoid reaction to cinoxacin and later developed a skin reaction to nalidixic acid. There were no deaths, and patients treated as an emergency with plasma expanders or with adrenaline and corticosteroids generally recovered promptly and uneventfully. In view of the potentially fatal consequences of anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin and other quinolones doctors should take care when prescribing these drugs. PMID:3147004

  8. Reactions to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sandra J; Wong, Johnson T; Bloch, Kurt J

    2002-01-01

    Adverse reactions to radiocontrast media (RCM) occur unexpectedly and may be life-threatening. This article describes an anaphylactoid reaction (AR) in one patient. The term AR refers to a syndrome clinically similar to anaphylaxis, but these reactions are independent of immunoglobulin E antibody-mediated mast cell or basophil degranulation. This article briefly reviews the literature regarding RCMs and types of reactions to RCM. The risk factors for AR to RCM infusions will be discussed along with current concepts of the pathogenesis of RCM-induced ARs. This article also describes the therapeutic management of patients who have had a previous adverse reaction to RCM and provides an approach to patients who have breakthrough reactions despite adequate premedication, but require additional radiographic studies. PMID:12476546

  9. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates. PMID:23203060

  10. Mechanisms in Knockout Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Charity, R. J.; de Souza, R. T.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W. G.; McDaniel, S.; Mocko, M.; Obertelli, A.; Rogers, A. M.; Sobotka, L. G.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.

    2009-06-01

    We report the first detailed study of the relative importance of the stripping and diffraction mechanisms involved in nucleon knockout reactions, by the use of a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton following one-proton knockout reactions. The measurements used the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results for the reactions Be9(C9,B8+X)Y and Be9(B8,Be7+X)Y are presented and compared with theoretical predictions for the two reaction mechanisms calculated using the eikonal model. The data show a clear distinction between the stripping and diffraction mechanisms and the measured relative proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement adds support to the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes.

  11. EXTENSION OF THE NUCLEAR REACTION MODEL CODE EMPIRE TO ACTINIDES NUCLEAR DATA EVALUATION.

    SciTech Connect

    CAPOTE,R.; SIN, M.; TRKOV, A.; HERMAN, M.; CARLSON, B.V.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2007-04-22

    Recent extensions and improvements of the EMPIRE code system are outlined. They add new capabilities to the code, such as prompt fission neutron spectra calculations using Hauser-Feshbach plus pre-equilibrium pre-fission spectra, cross section covariance matrix calculations by Monte Carlo method, fitting of optical model parameters, extended set of optical model potentials including new dispersive coupled channel potentials, parity-dependent level densities and transmission through numerically defined fission barriers. These features, along with improved and validated ENDF formatting, exclusive/inclusive spectra, and recoils make the current EMPIRE release a complete and well validated tool for evaluation of nuclear data at incident energies above the resonance region. The current EMPIRE release has been used in evaluations of neutron induced reaction files for {sup 232}Th and {sup 231,233}Pa nuclei in the fast neutron region at IAEA. Triple-humped fission barriers and exclusive pre-fission neutron spectra were considered for the fission data evaluation. Total, fission, capture and neutron emission cross section, average resonance parameters and angular distributions of neutron scattering are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data.

  12. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  13. Metal-mullite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.; Tomsia, A.P.

    1993-11-01

    Mullite was reacted with pure Al and with Ti or Zr dissolved in Ag-Cu eutectic alloys at 1100 C in Ar. Analysis of the Ti and Zr-containing specimens showed reaction zones with compositions of Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 3O}O{sub 20} and ZrO{sub 2}, respectively. The Al-mullite specimen showed much more extensive penetration into the ceramic and a more diffuse reaction zone than the other two systems. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Si were the main reaction products for Al-mullite reaction.

  14. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  15. Chemical Reaction Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of chemical-equation problem solving in helping students predict reaction products. Methods for helping students learn this process must be taught to students and future teachers by using pedagogical skills within the content of chemistry. Emphasizes that solving chemical reactions should involve creative cognition where…

  16. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  17. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  18. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  20. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  1. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  2. Chemical burn or reaction

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000059.htm Chemical burn or reaction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ...

  3. Measurement of fission yields from the 241Am(2nth,f) reaction at the Lohengrin Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouroux, Ch.; Blanc, A.; Bidaud, A.; Capellan, N.; Chabod, S.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Kessedjian, G.; Köster, U.; Lemaitre, J.-F.; Letourneau, A.; Martin, F.; Materna, T.; Panebianco, S.; Sage, Ch.; Serot, O.

    2013-12-01

    The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. While the yields are known for the major actinides (235U, 239Pu) in the thermal neutron-induced fission, only few measurements have been performed on 242Am. This paper presents the results of a measurement at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer (ILL, France) on the reaction 241Am(2nth,f): a total of 41 mass yields in the light and the heavy peaks have been measured and compared with the fission process simulation code GEF. Modus operandi and first results of a second experiment performed in May 2013 on the same reaction but with the goal of extracting the isotopic yields are presented as well: 8 mass yields were re-measured and 18 isotopic yields have been investigated and are being analyzed. Results concerning the kinetic energy and its comparison with the GEF Code are also presented in this paper.

  4. Lipases in lipophilization reactions.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Lipases are used in various sectors, as pharmaceutical, food or detergency industry. Their advantage versus classical chemical catalysts is that they exhibit a better selectivity and operate in milder reaction conditions. Theses enzymes can also be used in lipophilization reactions corresponding to the grafting of a lipophilic moiety to a hydrophilic one such as sugar, amino acids and proteins, or phenolic compounds. The major difficulty to overcome in such enzyme-catalyzed reaction resides in the fact that the two involved substrates greatly differ in term of polarity and solvent affinity. Therefore, several key parameters are to be considered in order to achieve the reaction in satisfactory kinetics and yields. The present review discusses the nature of such parameters (eg solvent nature, water activity, chemical modification of substrates) and illustrates their effect with examples of lipase-catalyzed lipophilization reactions of various sugar, amino acids or phenolic derivatives. PMID:17681737

  5. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  6. Reactions of oriented molecules.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P R

    1976-07-01

    Beams of oriented molecules have been used to directly study geometrical requirements in chemical reactions. These studies have shown that reactivity is much greater in some orientations than others and demonstrated the existence of steric effects. For some reactions portions of the orientation results are in good accord with traditional views of steric hindrance, but for others it is clear that our chemical intuition needs recalibrating. Indeed, the information gained from simultaneously orienting the reactants and observing the scattering angle of the products may lead to new insights about the detailed mechanism of certain reactions. Further work must be done to extend the scope and detail of the studies described here. More detailed information is needed on the CH(3)I reaction and the CF(3)I reaction. The effects of alkyl groups of various sizes and alkali metals of various sizes are of interest. In addition, reactions where a long-lived complex is formed should be studied to see if orientation is important. Finally, it would be of interest to apply the technique to the sort of reactions that led to our interest in the first place: the S(N)2 displacements in alkyl halides where the fascinating Walden inversion occurs. PMID:17793988

  7. Mechanisms in knockout reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Charity, R. J.; de Souza, R. T.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W. G.; McDaniel, S.; Mocko, M.; Obertelli, A.; Rogers, A. M.; Sobotka, L. G.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.

    2009-10-01

    We report on the first detailed study of the mechanisms involved in knockout reactions, via a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton in one-proton knockout reactions, using the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results on the reactions ^9Be(^9C,^8B+X)Y and ^9Be(^8B,^7Be+X)Y are presented. They are compared with theoretical predictions for both the diffraction (elastic breakup) and stripping (inelastic breakup) reaction mechanisms, as calculated in the eikonal model. The data shows a clear distinction between the two reaction mechanisms, and the observed respective proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement supports the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes. In particular, this add considerable support to the use of the eikonal model as a quantitative tool, able, for example, to determine single-particle spectroscopic strengths in rare isotopes.

  8. Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Vatti, Rani R; Ali, Fatima; Teuber, Suzanne; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-08-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids (CS) are rare in the general population, but they are not uncommon in high-risk groups such as patients who receive repeated doses of CS. Hypersensitivity reactions to steroids are broadly divided into two categories: immediate reactions, typically occurring within 1 h of drug administration, and non-immediate reactions, which manifest more than an hour after drug administration. The latter group is more common. We reviewed the literature using the search terms "hypersensitivity to steroids, adverse effects of steroids, steroid allergy, allergic contact dermatitis, corticosteroid side effects, and type I hypersensitivity" to identify studies or clinical reports of steroid hypersensitivity. We discuss the prevalence, mechanism, presentation, evaluation, and therapeutic options in corticosteroid hypersensitivity reactions. There is a paucity of literature on corticosteroid allergy, with most reports being case reports. Most reports involve non-systemic application of corticosteroids. Steroid hypersensitivity has been associated with type I IgE-mediated allergy including anaphylaxis. The overall prevalence of type I steroid hypersensitivity is estimated to be 0.3-0.5%. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the most commonly reported non-immediate hypersensitivity reaction and usually follows topical CS application. Atopic dermatitis and stasis dermatitis of the lower extremities are risk factors for the development of ACD from topical CS. Patients can also develop hypersensitivity reactions to nasal, inhaled, oral, and parenteral CS. A close and detailed evaluation is required for the clinician to confirm the presence of a true hypersensitivity reaction to the suspected drug and choose the safest alternative. Choosing an alternative CS is not only paramount to the patient's safety but also ameliorates the worry of developing an allergic, and potentially fatal, steroid hypersensitivity reaction. This evaluation becomes

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  10. Neutron capture reactions at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bredeweg, T. A.

    2008-05-12

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} array consisting of 160 active detector elements. The primary purpose of the array is to perform neutron capture cross section measurements on small (> or approx.100 {mu}g) and/or radioactive (< or approx. 100 mCi) species. The measurements made possible with this array will be useful in answering outstanding questions in the areas of national security, threat reduction, nuclear astrophysics, advanced reactor design and accelerator transmutation of waste. Since the commissioning of DANCE we have performed neutron capture cross section measurements on a wide array of medium to heavy mass nuclides. Measurements to date include neutron capture cross sections on {sup 241,243}Am, neutron capture and neutron-induced fission cross sections and capture-to-fission ratio ({alpha} = {sigma}{sub {gamma}}/{sigma}{sub f}) for {sup 235}U using a new fission-tagging detector as well as neutron capture cross sections for several astrophysics branch-point nuclei. Results from several of these measurements will be presented along with a discussion of additional physics information that can be extracted from the DANCE data.

  11. Neutron capture reactions at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredeweg, T. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 4π BaF2 array consisting of 160 active detector elements. The primary purpose of the array is to perform neutron capture cross section measurements on small (>~100 μg) and/or radioactive (<~100 mCi) species. The measurements made possible with this array will be useful in answering outstanding questions in the areas of national security, threat reduction, nuclear astrophysics, advanced reactor design and accelerator transmutation of waste. Since the commissioning of DANCE we have performed neutron capture cross section measurements on a wide array of medium to heavy mass nuclides. Measurements to date include neutron capture cross sections on 241,243Am, neutron capture and neutron-induced fission cross sections and capture-to-fission ratio (α = σγ/σf) for 235U using a new fission-tagging detector as well as neutron capture cross sections for several astrophysics branch-point nuclei. Results from several of these measurements will be presented along with a discussion of additional physics information that can be extracted from the DANCE data.

  12. Catalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2011-12-01

    We define catalytic networks as chemical reaction networks with an essentially catalytic reaction pathway: one which is "on" in the presence of certain catalysts and "off" in their absence. We show that examples of catalytic networks include synthetic DNA molecular circuits that have been shown to perform signal amplification and molecular logic. Recall that a critical siphon is a subset of the species in a chemical reaction network whose absence is forward invariant and stoichiometrically compatible with a positive point. Our main theorem is that all weakly-reversible networks with critical siphons are catalytic. Consequently, we obtain new proofs for the persistence of atomic event-systems of Adleman et al., and normal networks of Gnacadja. We define autocatalytic networks, and conjecture that a weakly-reversible reaction network has critical siphons if and only if it is autocatalytic. PMID:21503834

  13. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  14. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  15. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  16. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  17. Untoward penicillin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, T.; Idsöe, O.; Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    The literature on untoward reactions following the administration of penicillin is reviewed. These reactions, including a certain number of deaths which have been reported, are of particular interest to health administrations and to WHO in view of the large-scale programmes for controlling the treponematoses which are now under way—programmes affecting millions of people in many parts of the world. The most serious problems are anaphylactic sensitivity phenomena and superinfection or cross-infection with penicillin-resistant organisms, and the reactions involved range in intensity from the mildest to the fatal; the incidence of the latter is estimated at 0.1-0.3 per million injections. The authors point out that with increasing use of penicillin, more persons are likely to become sensitized and the number of reactions can therefore be expected to rise. The best prevention against such an increase is the restriction of the unnecessary use of penicillin. PMID:13596877

  18. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  19. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  20. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons. PMID:25245394

  1. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  2. Jets in hadronic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the properties of jets in hadronic reactions are reviewed and compared with theoretical expectations. Jets are clearly established as the dominant process for high E/sub T/ events in hadronic reactions. The cross section and the other properties of these events are in qualitative and even semiquantitative agreement with expectations based on perturbative QCD. However, we can not yet make precise tests of QCD, primarily because there are substantial uncertainties in the theoretical calculations. 45 references. (WHK)

  3. The 76Ge(n,p)76Ga reaction and its relevance to searches for the neutrino-less double-beta decay of 76Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, W.; Bhike, Megha; Fallin, B.; Krishichayan, Fnu

    2015-10-01

    The 76Ge(n,p)76Ga reaction and the subsequent β decay of 76Ga to 76Ge has been used to excite the 3951.9 keV state of 76Ge, which decays by emission of a 2040.7 keV γ ray. Using HPGe detectors, the associated pulse-height signal may be undistinguishable from the potential signal produced in neutrino-less double-beta decay of 76Ge with its Q-value of 2039.0 keV. In the neutron energy range between 10 and 20 MeV the production cross section of the 2040.7 keV γ ray is approximately 0.1 mb. In the same experiment γ rays of energy 2037.9 keV resulting from the 76Ge(n, γ)77Ge reaction were clearly observed. Adding the 76Ge(n,n' γ)76Ge reaction, which also produces the 2040.7 keV γ ray with a cross section value of the order of 0.1 mb clearly shows that great care has to be taken to eliminate neutron-induced backgrounds in searches for neutrino-less double-beta decay of 76Ge. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Grant NO. DE-FG02-97ER41033.

  4. Theoretical and experimental cross sections for neutron reactions on /sup 64/Zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    Accurate measurements of the /sup 64/Zn (n,2n)/sup 63/Zn and /sup 64/Zn (n,p)/sup 64/Cu cross sections at 14.8 MeV have been made using a Texas Nuclear Neutron Generator and the activation technique. A NaI(Tl) spectrometer (using two 6'' x 6'' NaI detectors/crystals) was ued to measure the gamma radiation emitted in coincidence from the positron-emitting decay products. The measurements were made relative to /sup 65/Cu (n,2n)/sup 64/Cu and /sup 63/Cu (n,2n)/sup 62/Cu cross sections, which have similar half-lives, radiation emission, and were previously measured to high accuracy (2%). The value obtained for the (n,2n) measurement was 199 +- 6 millibarns, and a value of 176 +- 4.5 millibarns was obtained for the (n,p) measurement. In concert, a theoretical analysis of neutron induced reactions on /sup 64/Zn was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory in the GNASH code over an energy range of 100 keV to 20 MeV. Calculations included width fluctuation corrections, direct reaction contributions, and preequilibrium corrections above 6 MeV. Neutron optical model potentials were determined for zinc. The theoretical values agree with the new 14.8 MeV measurements approximately within experimental error, with calculations of 201 millibarns for the (n,2n) cross section and 170 millibarns for the (n,p) cross section. Results from the analysis will be made available in National Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF/B) for fusion energy applications. 50 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions. PMID:25458866

  6. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using 23Na and proton MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Milton L.; Harrington, Michael G.; Schepkin, Victor D.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1 T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 × 0.8 mm3 and imaging matrices of 60 × 60 × 60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/.

  7. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using (23)Na and proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Truong, Milton L; Harrington, Michael G; Schepkin, Victor D; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8×0.8×0.8 mm(3) and imaging matrices of 60×60×60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/. PMID:25261742

  8. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) Using 23Na and Proton MRI

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Milton L.; Harrington, Michael G.; Schepkin, Victor D.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-01-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/hour concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1 T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8×0.8×0.8 mm3 and imaging matrices of 60×60×60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/ PMID:25261742

  9. Time-efficient interleaved human (23)Na and (1)H data acquisition at 7 T.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Paul W; Koken, Peter; Versluis, Maarten J; Aussenhofer, Sebastian A; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Börnert, Peter; Webb, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate a flexible and time-efficient interleaved imaging approach for the acquisition of proton and sodium images of the human knee at 7 T within a clinically relevant timescale. A flexible software framework was established which allowed the interleaving of multiple, different, fully specific absorption ratio (SAR)-validated scans. The system was able to switch between these different scans at flexible time points. The practical example presented consists of interleaved proton (Dixon imaging and T2* mapping) and sodium (mapping the sodium content and fluid-suppressed component separately) sequences with the key idea to perform proton MRI whilst the sodium nuclei relax towards thermal equilibrium, and vice versa. Comparisons were made between these four scans being acquired sequentially in the normal mode of scanner operation and those acquired in an interleaved fashion. Images acquired in the interleaved mode were very similar to those acquired in sequential scans with no image artifacts produced by the slight intra-sequence variation in steady-state magnetization. A reduction in scanning time of almost a factor of two was established using the interleaved scans, allowing such a protocol to be completed within 30 min. Phantom experiments and in vivo scans performed in healthy volunteers and in one patient proved the basic feasibility of this approach. This approach for the interleaving of multiple proton and sodium scans, each with different contrasts, is an efficient method for the design of new practical clinical protocols for sodium MRI. PMID:26269329

  10. Aggregation of double-tail sulfonate surfactants probed by /sup 23/Na NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, P.K.; Miller, W.G.

    1984-04-12

    Analysis of sodium-23 NMR chemical shift and line-width data on sodium 4-(1-heptylnonyl)benzenesulfonate (SHBS) in water at 47/sup 0/C indicates the surfactant continuously aggregates in an anti- or weakly cooperative manner up to the surfactant solubility limit, a point beyond which a hydrated lamellar phase is in equilibrium with the surfactant-saturated isotropic solution. By contrast, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT) shows little if any aggregation up to the point of a highly cooperative micellization. Both chemical shift and line-width data indicate the presence of an isotropic solution-liquid crystal phase boundary; the line shape of a biphasic mixture of isotropic solution and lamellar liquid crystal is not motionally averaged, in contrast to a micellar solution, and thus differentiation between micelle formation and solubility boundary is possible. A multiple equilibrium treatment of stepwise amphiphile aggregate formation is used to model both highly cooperative surfactant association, i.e., micellization, and anti- or noncooperative association. The sodium counterion binding to surfactant aggregates was modelled by assuming the oligomers are spherical and have a constant surface charge density with all anionic head groups residing at the surface of the sphere. It was then assumed that the sodium ion exists in one of two environments: free or bound, each having a characteristic chemical shift and transverse relaxation rate. On the basis of a comparison of the model with experimental data, it was concluded that SHBS aggregate concentration decreases with increasing aggregate size; i.e., the aggregation is non- or weakly anticooperative, while Aerosol OT associates very cooperatively, the large degree of cooperativity being an indication of micelle formation.

  11. Immediate reaction to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, S; Ricciardi, L; Fedele, R; Isola, S; Purello-D'Ambrosio, F

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin had during a drug challenge test. Personal allergic history was negative for respiratory allergies and positive for adverse drug reactions to general and regional anesthesia and to ceftriaxone. After the administration of 1/4 of therapeutic dose of clarithromycin the patient showed dyspnea, cough and bronchospasm in all the lung fields. The positivity of the test was confirmed by the negativity to the administration of placebo. The quickness and the clinical characteristic of the adverse reaction suggest a pathogenic mechanism of immediate-type hypersensitivity. On reviewing the literature we have found no reports of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin. Macrolides are a class of antibiotics mainly used in the last years in place of beta-lactams because of a broad spectrum of action and a low allergic power. In fact, there are few reports on allergic reactions to these molecules. Clarithromycin is one of the latest macrolides, characterised by the presence of a 14-carbon-atom lactone ring as erythromycin, active on a wide spectrum of pathogens. PMID:11449533

  12. Find favorable reactions faster

    SciTech Connect

    Yaws, C.L.; Chiang, P.Y. )

    1988-11-01

    Now, equations are given to identify whether the reactions are thermodynamically favorable. The method uses Gibbs free energy of formation for the reactants and products. The equation for any 700 major organic compounds is given as temperature coefficients. Then the reaction can be tested at various temperature levels beyond the standard 298/sup 0/K conditions imposed by many other data tabulations. Data for the water and hydrogen chloride are also included. Gibbs free energy of formation of ideal gas (..delta..G/sub f/, jkoule/g-mol) is calculated from the tabulated coefficients (A, B, C) and the temperature (T, /sup 0/K) using the following equation: (1) ..delta..G/sub f/ = A + BT + CT/sup 2/. Chemical equilibrium for a reaction is associated with the change in Gibbs free energy (..delta..G/sub r/) calculated as follows: (2) ..delta..G/sub r/ = ..delta..G/sub f/, products - ..delta..G/sub f/, reactants. If the change in Gibbs free energy is negative, the thermodynamics for the reaction are favorable. On the other hand, if the change in Gibbs free energy is highly positive, the thermodynamics for the reaction are not favorable and may be feasible only under special circumstances.

  13. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  14. Hipersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Berbegal, L; DeLeon, F J; Silvestre, J F

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used drugs in the clinical practice, especially by topic application in dermatology. These substances may act as allergens and produce immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most frequent presentation of corticosteroid allergy and it should be studied by patch testing in specific units. The corticosteroids included in the Spanish standard battery are good markers but not ideal. Therefore, if those makers are positive, it is useful to apply a specific battery of corticosteroids and the drugs provided by patients. Immediate reactions are relatively rare but potentially severe, and it is important to confirm the sensitization profile and to guide the use of alternative corticosteroids, because they are often necessary in several diseases. In this article we review the main concepts regarding these two types of hypersensitivity reactions in corticosteroid allergy, as well as their approach in the clinical practice. PMID:26621334

  15. Cutaneous reactions to vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adena E; Stein, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations are important for infectious disease prevention; however, there are adverse effects of vaccines, many of which are cutaneous. Some of these reactions are due to nonspecific inflammation and irritation at the injection site, whereas other reactions are directly related to the live attenuated virus. Rarely, vaccinations have been associated with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The onset of certain inflammatory dermatologic conditions, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and pemphigoid, were reported to occur shortly after vaccine administration. Allergic contact dermatitis can develop at the injection site, typically due to adjuvant ingredients in the vaccine, such as thimerosal and aluminum. Vaccinations are important to promote development of both individual and herd immunity. Although most vaccinations are considered relatively safe, there may be adverse effects associated with any vaccine. Cutaneous manifestations make up a large portion of the types of reactions associated with vaccines. There are many different reasons for the development of a cutaneous reaction to a vaccination. Some are directly related to the injection of a live attenuated virus, such as varicella or vaccinia (for immunity to smallpox), whereas others cause more nonspecific erythema and swelling at the injection site, as a result of local inflammation or irritation. Vaccinations have also been associated in rare reports with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There have been case reports associating the administration of a vaccine with the new onset of a dermatologic condition, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and Sweet syndrome. Finally, allergic contact

  16. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  17. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  18. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  19. Quinoprotein-catalysed reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, C

    1996-01-01

    This review is concerned with the structure and function of the quinoprotein enzymes, sometimes called quinoenzymes. These have prosthetic groups containing quinones, the name thus being analogous to the flavoproteins containing flavin prosthetic groups. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is non-covalently attached, whereas tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ), topaquinone (TPQ) and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ) are derived from amino acid residues in the backbone of the enzymes. The mechanisms of the quinoproteins are reviewed and related to their recently determined three-dimensional structures. As expected, the quinone structures in the prosthetic groups play important roles in the mechanisms. A second common feature is the presence of a catalytic base (aspartate) at the active site which initiates the reactions by abstracting a proton from the substrate, and it is likely to be involved in multiple reactions in the mechanism. A third common feature of these enzymes is that the first part of the reaction produces a reduced prosthetic group; this part of the mechanism is fairly well understood. This is followed by an oxidative phase involving electron transfer reactions which remain poorly understood. In both types of dehydrogenase (containing PQQ and TTQ), electrons must pass from the reduced prosthetic group to redox centres in a second recipient protein (or protein domain), whereas in amine oxidases (containing TPQ or LTQ), electrons must be transferred to molecular oxygen by way of a redox-active copper ion in the protein. PMID:9003352

  20. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  1. Exocharmic Reactions up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    The exocharmic reactions that can be observed microscopically are discussed. The students can discover the optimal concentration of an acidic lead nitrate solution, so that a crystal of potassium iodide, nudged to the edge of a drop, results in glinting golden hexagons of lead iodide.

  2. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  3. Radiobiology of tissue reactions.

    PubMed

    Dörr, W

    2015-06-01

    Tissue effects of radiation exposure are observed in virtually all normal tissues, with interactions when several organs are involved. Early reactions occur in turnover tissues, where proliferative impairment results in hypoplasia; late reactions, based on combined parenchymal, vascular, and connective tissue changes, result in loss of function within the exposed volume; consequential late effects develop through interactions between early and late effects in the same organ; and very late effects are dominated by vascular sequelae. Invariably, involvement of the immune system is observed. Importantly, latent times of late effects are inversely dependent on the biologically equieffective dose. Each tissue component and--importantly--each individual symptom/endpoint displays a specific dose-effect relationship. Equieffective doses are modulated by exposure conditions: in particular, dose-rate reduction--down to chronic levels--and dose fractionation impact on late responding tissues, while overall exposure time predominantly affects early (and consequential late) reactions. Consequences of partial organ exposure are related to tissue architecture. In 'tubular' organs (gastrointestinal tract, but also vasculature), punctual exposure affects function in downstream compartments. In 'parallel' organs, such as liver or lungs, only exposure of a significant (organ-dependent) fraction of the total volume results in clinical consequences. Forthcoming studies must address biomarkers of the individual risk for tissue reactions, and strategies to prevent/mitigate tissue effects after exposure. PMID:25816259

  4. Reaction and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armento, Beverly J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Provides a reaction by three economic educators to an article by Raymond C. Miller calling for the elimination of economics. Contends that traditional economics does not necessarily lead to the degradation of the environment. Argues that economics should not promote any set of social values. (CFR)

  5. A Principal's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaretsky, Lindy

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a principal's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author applauds Marshall and Ward's efforts to address what is undoubtedly among the most fundamentally important issues facing principals today. Marshall and Ward illuminate the importance of…

  6. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  7. Reactions to Others' Intimacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeldt, David E.; Olinger, Evanelle J.

    Research using behavioral measures has indicated that men react less positively to the touch of a same sex individual than women, that both men and women react more positively to the touch of an opposite sex individual than to the touch of a same sex individual, and that men and women do not differ in their reactions to opposite sex touch. This…

  8. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  9. A Superintendent's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, James H.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a superintendent's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author states that there is a problem with Marshall and Ward's article which begins with the title, particularly with the word "training." The author contends that there is a significant…

  10. Enantioselective Vinylogous Organocascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Hamish B; Dell'Amico, Luca; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Cascade reactions are powerful tools for rapidly assembling complex molecular architectures from readily available starting materials in a single synthetic operation. Their marriage with asymmetric organocatalysis has led to the development of novel techniques, which are now recognized as reliable strategies for the one-pot enantioselective synthesis of stereochemically dense molecules. In recent years, even more complex synthetic challenges have been addressed by applying the principle of vinylogy to the realm of organocascade catalysis. The key to the success of vinylogous organocascade reactions is the unique ability of the chiral organocatalyst to transfer reactivity to a distal position without losing control on the stereo-determining events. This approach has greatly expanded the synthetic horizons of the field by providing the possibility of forging multiple stereocenters in remote positions from the catalyst's point of action with high selectivity, while simultaneously constructing multiple new bonds. This article critically describes the developments achieved in the field of enantioselective vinylogous organocascade reactions, charting the ideas, the conceptual advances, and the milestone reactions that have been essential for reaching highly practical levels of synthetic efficiency. PMID:27256039

  11. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  12. Azlactone Reaction Developments.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Pedro P; Carpanez, Arthur G; Amarante, Giovanni W

    2016-07-18

    Azlactones (also known as oxazolones) are heterocycles usually employed in the stereoselective synthesis of α,α-amino acids, heterocycles and natural products. The versatility of the azlactone scaffold arises from the numerous reactive sites, allowing its application in a diversity of transformations. This review aims to cover classical and recent applications of oxazolones, especially those involving stereoselective processes. After a short introduction on their structures and intrinsic reactivities, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) processes as well as reactions involving stereoselective formation of a new σ C-C bond, such as alkylation/allylation/arylation, aldol, ene, Michael and Mannich reactions will be exposed. Additionally, cycloadditions, Steglich rearrangement and sulfenylation reactions will also be discussed. Recent developments of the well-known Erlenmeyer azlactones will be described. For the most examples, the proposed mechanism, activation modes and/or key reaction intermediates will be exposed to rationalize both the final product and the observed stereochemistry. Finally, this review gives an overview of the synthetic utility of oxazolones. PMID:27245128

  13. Fission Mode Influence on Prompt Neutrons and γ-rays Emitted in the Reaction 239Pu(nth,f)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serot, O.; Litaize, O.; Regnier, D.

    Recently, a Monte-Carlo code, which simulates the fission fragment de-excitation process, has been developed at CEA- Cadarache. Our aim is to get a tool capable to predict spectra and multiplicities of prompt particles (neutron and gamma) and to investigate possible correlations between fission observables. One of the main challenges is to define properly the share of the available excitation energy at scission between the two nascent fission fragments. Initially, after the full acceleration of the fission fragments, these excitation energies were treated within a Fermi-gas approximation in aT2 (where a and T stand for the level density parameter and the nuclear temperature) and a mass dependent law of the temperature ratio (RT=TL/TH, with TL and TH the temperature of the light and heavy fragment) has been proposed. With this RT-law, the main fission observables of the 252Cf(sf) could be reproduced. Here, in order to take into account the fission modes by which the fissioning nucleus undergoes to fission, we have adopted a specific RT-law for each fission mode. For actinides, the main fission modes are called Standard I, Standard II and Super Long (following Brosa's terminology). This new procedure has been applied in the case of the thermal neutron induced fission of 239Pu, reaction for which fission modes are rather well known.

  14. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  15. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    A review covers the industrial applications of the water-gas shift reaction in hydrogen manufacturing, removing CO from ammonia synthesis feeds, and detoxifying town gas; and the catalyst characteristics, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanisms of the water-gas shift reactions catalyzed by iron-based, copper-based, or sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalysts.

  16. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  17. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  18. Dearomatization through Halofunctionalization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Wei; Zheng, Chao; You, Shu-Li

    2016-08-16

    Recent advances in dearomatization through halofunctionalization reactions are summarized in this Minireview. Two general categories of strategies are currently employed in this field. On one hand, the reaction can be initiated with electrophilic halogenation at an alkyne or alkene moiety. The resulting halonium ion intermediate is then captured by a pendant aromatic ring at the ipso position, affording the dearomatization product. On the other hand, electrophilic halogenation can directly take place at a substituted arene, and the final dearomatization product is furnished by deprotonation or intramolecular nucleophilic trap. Highly enantioselective variants have been realized in the latter case by organocatalysis or transition metal catalysis. By applying these methods, various valuable halogenated polycyclic molecular architectures have been obtained from readily available starting materials. PMID:27377184

  19. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  20. Magnetically suspended reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, A. V.; Stocking, G. L.; Dendy, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions offer several advantages over conventional bearings, arising because of the contactless nature of the load support. In application to spacecraft reaction wheels, the advantages are low drag torque, wearfree, unlubricated, vacuum-compatible operation, and unlimited life. By the provision of redundancy in the control electronics, single-point failures are eliminated. The rational for selection of a passive radial, active axial, dc magnetic suspension is presented, and the relative merits of 3-loop and single-loop magnetic suspensions are discussed. The design of a .678 N-m-sec (.5 ft-lb-sec) reaction wheel using the single loop magnetic suspension was developed; the design compares favorably with current ball bearing wheels in terms of weight and power.

  1. Polymerase chain displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Harris, Claire L; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma J; Olson, Ken E; Alphey, Luke; Fu, Guoliang

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative PCR assays are now the standard method for viral diagnostics. These assays must be specific, as well as sensitive, to detect the potentially low starting copy number of viral genomic material. We describe a new technique, polymerase chain displacement reaction (PCDR), which uses multiple nested primers in a rapid, capped, one-tube reaction that increases the sensitivity of normal quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Sensitivity was increased by approximately 10-fold in a proof-of-principle test on dengue virus sequence. In PCDR, when extension occurs from the outer primer, it displaces the extension strand produced from the inner primer by utilizing a polymerase that has strand displacement activity. This allows a greater than 2-fold increase of amplification product for each amplification cycle and therefore increased sensitivity and speed over conventional PCR. Increased sensitivity in PCDR would be useful in nucleic acid detection for viral diagnostics. PMID:23384180

  2. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  3. Nonhemolytic, noninfectious transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Barton, J C

    1981-04-01

    The delivery of optimal transfusion therapy requires that the physician first have a thorough understanding of his patient's disease and prior transfusion history. Sometimes the need for blood product administration is more apparent than real. In the selection of necessary therapy, particular blood components, their volumes, and the timing of their administration should be carefully planned. The transfusion of whole blood, particularly as single-unit transfusions, is rarely indicated. Often forgotten, autotransfusion represents a means whereby many subjects who have repeated, unusual, or severe reactions may receive safe treatment. An appreciation of the frequency and manifestations of transfusion-related problems permits effective treatment of ongoing reactions. The prophylactic measures which should be taken against future reactions in most patients are specific, and are the responsibility of the clinician, based upon his bedside observations and laboratory studies. Problems should be discussed with either a hematologist, pathologist, or blood banking expert without hesitation. These guidelines help conserve a precious resource and assure that safe, effective, and economical transfusion therapy is available for all patients in need. PMID:6164098

  4. On-surface reactions.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Kühnle, Angelika

    2015-06-01

    On-surface synthesis constitutes a rapidly growing field of research due to its promising application for creating stable molecular structures on surfaces. While self-assembled structures rely on reversible interactions, on-surface synthesis provides the potential for creating long-term stable structures with well-controlled properties, for example superior electron transport for future molecular electronic devices. On-surface synthesis holds the promise for preparing insoluble compounds that cannot be produced in solution. Another highly exciting aspect of on-surface synthesis is the chance to discover new reaction pathways due to the two-dimensional confinement of the reaction educts. In this review, we discuss the current state-of-the-art and classify the reactions that have been successfully performed so far. Special emphasis is put on electrically insulating surfaces, as these substrates pose particular challenges for on-surface synthesis while at the same time bearing high potential for future use, for example, in molecular electronics. PMID:25965579

  5. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  6. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-20

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  7. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-01

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  8. Procedures for Decomposing a Redox Reaction into Half-Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishtik, Ilie; Berka, Ladislav H.

    2005-01-01

    A simple algorithm for a complete enumeration of the possible ways a redox reaction (RR) might be uniquely decomposed into half-reactions (HRs) using the response reactions (RERs) formalism is presented. A complete enumeration of the possible ways a RR may be decomposed into HRs is equivalent to a complete enumeration of stoichiometrically…

  9. Reaction Extrema: Extent of Reaction in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandezande, Jonathon E.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago de Donder introduced the term "extent of reaction", ?. We build on that work by defining the concept of reagent extrema for an arbitrary chemical reaction, aA + bB [reversible reaction] yY + zZ. The central equation is ?^[subscript i] = -n[subscript i,0]/?[subscript i]. The symbol ?^[subscript i] represents the…

  10. Insect bite reactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Mann, Baldeep Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK) disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr) as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some serious adverse effects

  11. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters. PMID:26808300

  12. Electronegativity and redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Martínez González, Marco; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-08-10

    Using the maximum hardness principle, we show that the oxidation potential of a molecule increases as its electronegativity increases and also increases as its electronegativity in its oxidized state increases. This insight can be used to construct a linear free energy relation for the oxidation potential, which we train on a set of 31 organic redox couples and test on a set of 10 different redox reactions. Better results are obtained when the electronegativity of the oxidized/reduced reagents are adjusted to account for the reagents' interaction with their chemical environment. PMID:27451962

  13. Study of Neutron-Deuteron Reactions Using a Magnetic Quadrupole Triplet Spectrometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Vivek Dattatraya

    Neutron induced breakup of deuteron has been used to determine the value of neutron-neutron scattering length, a quantity of fundamental importance in low-energy nucleon -nucleon interaction. It is found that the value depends strongly on the details of the experiment and theoretical analysis. Various values lying between -16 fm and -24 fm have been derived in previous works. This work concerns the investigation of the final state interaction peak at the upper end of the proton energy spectrum at forward angles in the ('2)H(n,p)2n breakup reaction carried out at various incident neutron energies up to 25 MeV with good energy resolution. Most of the previous investigations of this reaction have been at 14 MeV. The scope of this work also includes the measurement of the angular distribution of ('2)H(n,d)n elastic scattering and the simultaneous theoretical analysis of breakup and elastic scattering data with the main intention of testing their sensitivity to the value of n-n scattering length. A new magnetic quadrupole triplet spectrometer has been constructed at Ohio University to investigate neutron induced charged particle reactions, and the experimental aspect of this work mainly involves the testing and debugging of this device and its use in the measurements of n-d breakup and elastic scattering. The quadrupole triplet spectrometer, which is based on an earlier design at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, consists of 3.4 m long transport tube with a diameter of 20 cm. The radiator is located close to the neutron source. The spectrometer allows placement of the detector 3.4 m away from the radiator while retaining a substantial solid angle. This reduces neutron induced background and improves signal -to-background ratio. The background is further reduced by placing brass shadow bars and collimators at appropriate locations inside the spectrometer. The device is a poor -resolution momentum spectrometer, and the energy resolution is regained by using a semiconductor

  14. Organic chemistry: Reactions triggered electrically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Limin; Tao, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule experiments have revealed that chemical reactions can be controlled using electric fields -- and that the reaction rate is sensitive to both the direction and the strength of the applied field. See Letter p.88

  15. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  16. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  17. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.

  18. Allergic reactions to medication (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A true allergy to a medication is different than a simple adverse reaction to the drug. The allergic reaction occurs when the immune system, having been exposed to the drug before, creates antibodies to ...

  19. ''Subthreshold'' reactions involving nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.; Shrock, R.

    2001-02-01

    We analyze reactions of several types that are naively below threshold but can proceed because of the release of binding energy from nuclear fission and occasionally the formation of Coulombic bound states. These reactions include (i) photofission with pion production and (ii) charged current neutrino-nucleus reactions that lead to fission and/or formation of a Coulomb bound state of a {mu}{sup -} with the nucleus of a fission fragment. We comment on the possible experimental observation of these reactions.

  20. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    An iodine clock reaction that gives a colorless to black result similar to that of the familiar Landolt iodate-bisulfite clock reaction is described. The vitamin C clock reaction uses chemicals that are readily available on the retail market: vitamin C, tincture of iodine, 3% hydrogen peroxide, and laundry starch. Orange juice may be used as the vitamin C source to give an orange to black reaction.

  1. More on Chemical Reaction Balancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinehart, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    A previous article stated that only the matrix method was powerful enough to balance a particular chemical equation. Shows how this equation can be balanced without using the matrix method. The approach taken involves writing partial mathematical reactions and redox half-reactions, and combining them to yield the final balanced reaction. (JN)

  2. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an iodine clock reaction that produces an effect similar to the Landolt clock reaction. This reaction uses supermarket chemicals and avoids iodate, bisulfite, and mercury compounds. Ascorbic acid and tincture of iodine are the main reactants with alternate procedures provided for vitamin C tablets and orange juice. (DDR)

  3. Development of detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principle of a controlled condensed detonation. In this engine the gas products that are expelled from the engine to produce thrust are generated by the condensed detonation reaction. The engine is constructed of two basic sections consisting of a detonation wave generator section and a condensed detonation reaction section.

  4. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  5. Hydrocracking reactions and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbear, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrocracking processes convert aromatic gas oils into high quality gasoline, diesel, and turbine stocks. In doing this, they saturate aromatic rings, crack naphthenes and paraffins, and saturate olefins formed during cracking. The organic chemistry of these steps is well known. Catalysts for hydrocracking contain components for both the hydrogenation and cracking reactions. Hydrogenation activity is provided by Pd or promoted molybdenum or tungsten sulfides. Cracking takes place on strong acid sites in zeolites or amorphous silica aluminas. Specialty catalysts including narrow pore zeolites are used in dewaxing tube oil stocks. Basic nitrogen compounds such as quinoline can poison the acid sites. They are usually removed in a pretreating step, typically with a nickel/molybdenum sulfide catalyst that also removes sulfur.

  6. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  7. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  8. Prebiotic photosynthetic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chittenden, G J; Schwartz, A W

    1981-01-01

    Historically, numerous attempts have been made to mimic - by means of inorganic model reactions - the photosynthetic fixation of CO2 by green plants. The literature in this field is strewn with claims and counter-claims. Two factors have led us to reexamine this subject: firstly; doubts concerning the highly reducing model for the atmosphere of the primitive Earth and secondly; recent results which demonstrate that photoreductive fixation is feasable on a suitable catalytic surface, for both CO2 and N2. The latter observation is of particular interest due to the well-known susceptibility of NH3 to photolytic destruction. Our review of the literature leads us to suggest that similar processes would have been plausible for the primitive Earth and could have been prebiotic precursors to an early development of CO2-fixing autotrophs. PMID:6791723

  9. Subdiffusion-reaction processes with A→B reactions versus subdiffusion-reaction processes with A+B→B reactions.

    PubMed

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Katarzyna D

    2014-09-01

    We consider the subdiffusion-reaction process with reactions of a type A+B→B (in which particles A are assumed to be mobile, whereas B are assumed to be static) in comparison to the subdiffusion-reaction process with A→B reactions which was studied by Sokolov, Schmidt, and Sagués [Phys. Rev. E 73, 031102 (2006)]. In both processes a rule that reactions can only occur between particles which continue to exist is taken into account. Although in both processes a probability of the vanishing of particle A due to a reaction is independent of both time and space variables (assuming that in the system with the A+B→B reactions, particles B are distributed homogeneously), we show that subdiffusion-reaction equations describing these processes as well as their Green's functions are qualitatively different. The reason for this difference is as follows. In the case of the former reaction, particles A and B have to meet with some probability before the reaction occurs in contradiction with the case of the latter reaction. For the subdiffusion process with the A+B→B reactions we consider three models which differ in some details concerning a description of the reactions. We base the method considered in this paper on a random walk model in a system with both discrete time and discrete space variables. Then the system with discrete variables is transformed into a system with both continuous time and continuous space variables. Such a method seems to be convenient in analyzing subdiffusion-reaction processes with partially absorbing or partially reflecting walls. The reason is that within this method we can determine Green's functions without a necessity of solving a fractional differential subdiffusion-reaction equation with boundary conditions at the walls. As an example, we use the model to find the Green's functions for a subdiffusive reaction system (with the reactions mentioned above), which is bounded by a partially absorbing wall. This example shows how the model

  10. Neutron-induced defects in the lithium tetraborate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burak, Y. V.; Padlyak, B. V.; Shevel, V. M.

    The X-band (nucongruent to9.4 GHz) electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of the un-doped isotopically enriched lithium tetraborate (LTB) Li2B4O7 single crystals, irradiated by thermal neutrons (fluences Phi(n) =2.74x 10(15) divided by 1.79 x 10(18) cm(-2) ) were investigated at 300 and 77 K. The LTB crystals of high chemical purity and optical quality with different isotope compositions (Li-6(2) (B4O7)-B-10 , Li-6(2) (B4O7)-B-11 , Li-7(2) (B4O7)-B-10 and Li-7(2) (B4O7)-B-11) were grown by Czochralski technique. The thermal neutrons (the total quantity >90%) with fluence near 10(18) cm(-2) induce at least 4 different types of stable paramagnetic centers in the Li and B isotopically enriched LTB crystals. The ESR spectra, electron structure and efficiency of generation for centers, induced by thermal neutrons, essentially depend on neutron fluence and isotope composition of the LTB crystals. The local symmetry and the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the observed paramagnetic centers were determined and their electron structure were established. The possible models and formation mechanism of the radiation defects, induced by thermal neutrons in the LTB lattice, are proposed.

  11. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. ); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following [gamma]-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of [beta]-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following [gamma]-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not [gamma]-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to [gamma] rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  12. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following {gamma}-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of {beta}-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following {gamma}-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not {gamma}-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to {gamma} rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  13. ACDOS2: an improved neutron-induced dose rate code

    SciTech Connect

    Lagache, J.C.

    1981-06-01

    To calculate the expected dose rate from fusion reactors as a function of geometry, composition, and time after shutdown a computer code, ACDOS2, was written, which utilizes up-to-date libraries of cross-sections and radioisotope decay data. ACDOS2 is in ANSI FORTRAN IV, in order to make it readily adaptable elsewhere.

  14. Neutron-induced single event burnout in high voltage electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.; Wert, J.L.; Oberg, D.L.; Majewski, P.P.; Voss, P.; Wender, S.A.

    1997-12-01

    Energetic neutrons with an atmospheric neutron spectrum, which were demonstrated to induce single event burnout in power MOSFETs, have been shown to induce burnout in high voltage (>3,000V) electronics when operated at voltages as low as 50% of rated voltage. The laboratory failure rates correlate well with field failure rates measured in Europe.

  15. (U) Neutron-Induced Gamma-Ray Calculations Using DMTK

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2015-09-09

    This memo describes the user interface, limitations of the implementation, and needs for the future. It should be noted up front that because of limited cross section data, the PARTISN capability cannot be used in the field.

  16. Neutron induced soft errors in CMOS memories under reduced bias

    SciTech Connect

    Hazucha, P.; Svensson, C.; Johansson, K.

    1998-12-01

    A custom designed 16 kbit CMOS memory was irradiated by 14 MeV neutrons and 100 MeV neutrons. SEU cross sections were evaluated under different supply voltages. The cross section values are compared to those predicted by the BGR model.

  17. Characterization of the CRESST detectors by neutron induced nuclear recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, C.; Ciemniak, C.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Gütlein, A.; Hagn, H.; Isaila, C.; Jochum, J.; Kimmerle, M.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Pfister, S.; Potzel, W.; Rau, W.; Roth, S.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Scholl, S.; Usherov, I.; Westphal, W.

    CRESST is an experiment for the direct detection of dark matter particles via nuclear recoils. The CRESST detectors, based on CaWO4 scintillating crystals, are able to discriminate γ and β background by simultaneously measuring the light and phonon signals produced by particle interactions. The discrimination of the background is possible because of the different light output (Quenching Factor, QF) for nuclear and electron recoils. In this article a measurement is shown, aimed at the determination of the QFs of the different nuclei (O, Ca, W) of the detector crystal at 40-60 mK using an 11 MeV neutron beam produced at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium in Garching (MLL).

  18. Nuclear Reactions on Unstable Nuclei and the Surrogate Reaction Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J

    2004-03-01

    Determining reaction cross sections on short-lived nuclear species is a major challenge for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. Many of these nuclei are too difficult to produce with currently available experimental techniques or too short-lived to serve as targets in present-day set-ups. Some nuclear reactions will remain immeasurable even at upcoming and planned radioactive beam facilities. It is therefore important to explore alternative methods for determining reaction cross sections on unstable nuclei.

  19. Communication: Resonance reaction in diffusion-influenced bimolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Jakob J; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-02-28

    We investigate the influence of a stochastically fluctuating step-barrier potential on bimolecular reaction rates by exact analytical theory and stochastic simulations. We demonstrate that the system exhibits a new "resonant reaction" behavior with rate enhancement if an appropriately defined fluctuation decay length is of the order of the system size. Importantly, we find that in the proximity of resonance, the standard reciprocal additivity law for diffusion and surface reaction rates is violated due to the dynamical coupling of multiple kinetic processes. Together, these findings may have important repercussions on the correct interpretation of various kinetic reaction problems in complex systems, as, e.g., in biomolecular association or catalysis. PMID:26931674

  20. Communication: Resonance reaction in diffusion-influenced bimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Jakob J.; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the influence of a stochastically fluctuating step-barrier potential on bimolecular reaction rates by exact analytical theory and stochastic simulations. We demonstrate that the system exhibits a new "resonant reaction" behavior with rate enhancement if an appropriately defined fluctuation decay length is of the order of the system size. Importantly, we find that in the proximity of resonance, the standard reciprocal additivity law for diffusion and surface reaction rates is violated due to the dynamical coupling of multiple kinetic processes. Together, these findings may have important repercussions on the correct interpretation of various kinetic reaction problems in complex systems, as, e.g., in biomolecular association or catalysis.

  1. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  2. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  3. Reactions at Oxygen Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Ana M.

    Synthetic protocols based on carbohydrates require the differentiation of their abundant hydroxyl groups, by and large, in order to expose just one single hydroxyl group to the selected reagent. This differentiation is usually carried out with the assistance of protecting groups that block the rest of the hydroxyl groups while being compatible with the given reaction conditions. By corollary, the knowledge and apt choice of the appropriate protecting groups is a key factor in successful synthetic endeavors. In this chapter, an overview of the most commonly employed protecting groups in carbohydrate chemistry is given. Alkyl ethers, being robust protecting groups, have a long history in synthetic carbohydrate chemistry and in related structural studies of polysaccharides. Acetals and ketals, which are of fundamental importance in carbohydrate chemistry, are then discussed. Acyl and silyl protecting groups, which also play an important role in modern monosaccharide transformations, are also presented. Finally, recent blocking strategies are described, including orthogonal strategies, by which the protecting groups are harmoniously combined in modern carbohydrate chemistry.

  4. Formaldehyde reactions in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Federman, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The low-pressure reactions of formaldehyde (H2CO) with D(+), D2(+), D3(+), and He(+) are studied by the ion-cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potential loss processes for formaldehyde in cores of dark interstellar clouds. The deuterated reactants represent direct analogs for protons. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels have been measured. Charge transfer is observed to be the dominant reaction of H2CO with D(+), D2(+), and He(+) ions. Only the D3(+) reaction exhibits a proton-transfer channel. All reactions proceed at rate coefficients near the collision limit. Proton-deuteron exchange reactions are found to be inefficient processes in the formaldehyde system.

  5. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    PubMed

    Dönertaş, Handan Melike; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  6. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  7. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasta, A. M.; Ramírez-Piscina, L.; Sancho, J. M.; Lindenberg, K.

    2013-04-01

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, and obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate ˜t-1/2 to very close to the perfect mixing rate, ˜t-1.

  8. Anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Sachiko T

    2005-01-01

    Adverse reactions to contrast material are a concern because iodinated contrast materials are commonly used drugs. The risk for adverse reaction is 4% to 12% with ionic contrast materials and 1% to 3% with nonionic contrast materials. The risk for severe adverse reaction is 0.16% with ionic contrast materials and 0.03% with nonionic contrast materials. The death rate, one to three per 100,000 contrast administrations, is similar for both ionic and nonionic agents. More than 90% of adverse reactions with nonionic contrast materials are anaphylactoid. The types of severe reactions seen with nonionic contrast administration were initially predominantly anaphylactoid. With the advent of helical CT angiography, the reactions are now predominantly attributable to cardiopulmonary decompensation. With the widespread use of nonionic contrast materials, adverse reactions are now seen less frequently. Skills involved in evaluating and treating adverse reactions are not as frequently used. Periodic reviews and updates of specific treatment plans for various reactions with the physicians and staff who use contrast material are very important to ensure optimal preparedness. The key to successful treatment is preparation and early intervention. PMID:15659260

  9. Dearomatization Reactions Using Phthaloyl Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Eliasen, Anders M; Christy, Mitchell; Claussen, Karin R; Besandre, Ronald; Thedford, Randal P; Siegel, Dionicio

    2015-09-18

    A new oxidative dearomatization reaction has been developed using phthaloyl peroxide to chemoselectively install two oxygen-carbon bonds into aromatic precursors. The oxidation reaction proceeds only once; addition of superstoichiometric equivalents of phthaloyl peroxide does not react further with the newly generated 1,3-cyclohexadiene. The reaction has been challenged by the addition of different functional groups and shown to maintain chemoselectivity. Due to the broad reactivity with 1,2-methylenedioxybenzene derivatives, linear free energy correlations were determined and support a mechanism proceeding through diradicals analogous to arene-hydroxylation reactions using phthaloyl peroxide. PMID:26333308

  10. (Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following research projects; decay of excited nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV; mass and charge distributions in Cl-induced heavy ion reactions; and mass and charge distributions in {sup 56}Fe + {sup 165}Ho at E/A = 12 MeV.

  11. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  12. Entropy Effects in Chelation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1984-01-01

    The entropy change for a reaction in aqueous solution can be evaluated as a combination of entropy factors. Valuable insight or understanding can be obtained from a detailed examination of these factors. Several entropy effects of inorganic chemical reactions are discussed as examples. (Author/JN)

  13. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  14. The Variance Reaction Time Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker

    2004-01-01

    The variance reaction time model (VRTM) is proposed to account for various recognition data on reaction time, the mirror effect, receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves, etc. The model is based on simple and plausible assumptions within a neural network: VRTM is a two layer neural network where one layer represents items and one layer…

  15. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  16. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  17. Enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, A-L

    2016-06-28

    This review highlights the use of the oxidative boron Heck reaction in enantioselective Heck-type couplings. The enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reaction overcomes several limitations of the traditional Pd(0)-catalysed Heck coupling and has subsequently allowed for intermolecular couplings of challenging systems such as cyclic enones, acyclic alkenes, and even site selectively on remote alkenes. PMID:26529247

  18. "Greening up" the Suzuki Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Chan, Elton; Edward, Amanda R.; Jarosz, Isabel; Lee, Vicki; Mui, Leo; Thatipamala, Sonya S.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rapid, green synthesis of a biaryl compound (4-phenylphenol) via a Pd(0)-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction in water. Mild reaction conditions and operational simplicity makes this experiment especially amenable to both mid- and upper-level undergraduates. The methodology exposes students to purely aqueous…

  19. Isosinglet approximation for nonelastic reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Group theoretic relations are derived between different combinations of projectile and secondary particles which appear to have a broad range of application in spacecraft shielding or radiation damage studies. These relations are used to reduce the experimental effort required to obtain nuclear reaction data for transport calculations. Implications for theoretical modeling are also noted, especially for heavy-heavy reactions.

  20. Statistical Factors in Complexation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1985-01-01

    Four cases which illustrate statistical factors in complexation reactions (where two of the reactants are monodentate ligands) are presented. Included are tables showing statistical factors for the reactions of: (1) square-planar complexes; (2) tetrahedral complexes; and (3) octahedral complexes. (JN)

  1. Tuff reaction vessel experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, F.; Rego, J.H.

    1986-06-01

    A laboratory leaching test has been performed as part of a project to evaluate the suitability of tuff rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Glass samples of the kind that will be used to store nuclear waste were placed in water inside tuff vessels, and then the tuff vessels were placed in water inside Teflon containers. Glass-component leach rates and migration through the tuff were measured for samples of the ATM-8 actinide glass, which is a PNL 76-68 based glass with low levels of {sup 99}Tc, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu to simulate wastes. Disc samples of this glass were leached at 90{sup 0}C to 30, 90, and 1983 days inside tuff vessels using a natural groundwater (J-13 well-water) as the leachant. Some samples were held by 304L stainless steel supports to evaluate the effect of this metal on the release rate of glass constituents. At the end of each leaching interval, the J-13 water present inside and outside the rock vessel was analyzed for glass components in solution. On the basis of these analyses, B, Mo, and Tc, appear to migrate through the rock at rates that depend on the porosity of each vessel and the time of reaction. U, Np, and Pu were found only in the inner leachate. Na, Si, and Sr are present in the rock as well as in the J-13 water, and the addition of these elements from the glass could not be determined. Normalized elemental mass loss values for B, Mo, and Tc were calculated using the combined concentrations of the inner and outer leachates and assuming a negligible retention on the rock. The maximum normalized release was 2.3 g/m{sup 2} for Tc. B, Mo, Tc, and Np were released linearly with respect to each other, with B and Mo released at about 85% of the Tc rate, and Np at 5-10% of the Tc rate. Plutonium was found at low levels in the inner leachate but was strongly sorbed on the steel and Teflon supports. Neptunium was sorbed to a lesser extent.

  2. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  3. [Anaphylactic reaction following hair bleaching].

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate is a potent bleach and oxidizing agent that is commonly present in hair bleaches. Because bleaching is so commonly performed, hairdressers often develop allergic contact dermatitis to ammonium persulphate. In addition to this delayed reaction, asthma and rhinitis may develop as immediate reactions in those exposed to the fumes. Severe anaphylactic reactions are rare. We report a 24-year-old woman who acquired dermatitis following contact with bleaching substances while working as a hairdresser. After changing her profession, the dermatitis disappeared. Following the private use of a hairdressing bleach containing ammonium persulphate, she suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction with unconsciousness. The patient also developed an anaphylactic reaction three hours following patch testing with the hairdresser battery. The rub test with ammonium persulphate (2.5%) in a 1:100 solution was positive. PMID:15688222

  4. [Skin reactions to tattoo ink].

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Hermanns, J-F; Piérard, G E

    2011-01-01

    Ritual and artistic tattoos rely on the use of numerous pigments which are not all entirely inert once placed in the dermis. The compositions of some tattoo inks are identified. However, new but less well identified compounds appear on the market. Allergic reactions can be present under different aspects. They may correspond to allergic contact dermatitis or to photodermatitis. Other reactions include allergic hypersensitivity reactions as well as lichenoid, granulomatous or pseudolymphoma reactions. Pulsed light and laser are typically used for regular tattoo removal. These procedures are not indicated in inflamed tattoos. Indeed, the pigment dispersed during photolysis may perpetuate the reaction. Pseudotattoos due to the stratum corneum staining are frequently responsible for photoeczema. PMID:21942077

  5. Fundamental reaction pathways during coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Gatsis, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the fundamental reaction pathways in coal petroleum residuum coprocessing. Once the reaction pathways are defined, further efforts can be directed at improving those aspects of the chemistry of coprocessing that are responsible for the desired results such as high oil yields, low dihydrogen consumption, and mild reaction conditions. We decided to carry out this investigation by looking at four basic aspects of coprocessing: (1) the effect of fossil fuel materials on promoting reactions essential to coprocessing such as hydrogen atom transfer, carbon-carbon bond scission, and hydrodemethylation; (2) the effect of varied mild conditions on the coprocessing reactions; (3) determination of dihydrogen uptake and utilization under severe conditions as a function of the coal or petroleum residuum employed; and (4) the effect of varied dihydrogen pressure, temperature, and residence time on the uptake and utilization of dihydrogen and on the distribution of the coprocessed products. Accomplishments are described.

  6. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems. PMID:27146955

  7. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  8. Allergic reactions, "spillover' reactions, and T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Bruynzeel, D P; Nieboer, C; Boorsma, D M; Scheper, R J; van Ketel, W G

    1983-01-01

    A strong positive, allergic patch-test reaction was elicited in 15 patients with an established allergy for a particular allergen. Patches with a marginally irritating concentration of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) were applied at fixed distances. The SLS patch situated adjacent to the allergic reaction was significantly enhanced in 12 of 15 patients (P less than 0.01) compared to more distant SLS reactions ("spillover'). Only quantitative differences were observed in the histologic pictures of the different types of reaction. The infiltrate consisted of lymphocytes and histiocytes, mainly located perivascular in the upper dermis. T-cell subsets were assessed with monoclonal antibodies using an immunoperoxidase technique. The distribution of the different T cells was the same for both reaction types. T cells located outside the perivascular infiltrates (e.g., in the epidermal vesicles) were OKT-8-positive (cytotoxic/suppressor T lymphocytes). Immunofluorescence examination did not show different patterns for the allergic or "enhanced toxic' reactions with regard to the presence of immunoglobulins and complement. The "spillover' phenomenon may cause false-positive patch-test reactions. PMID:6223603

  9. Integrated Microreactors for Reaction Automation: New Approaches to Reaction Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, Jonathan P.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2010-07-01

    Applications of microsystems (microreactors) in continuous-flow chemistry have expanded rapidly over the past two decades, with numerous reports of higher conversions and yields compared to conventional batch benchtop equipment. Synthesis applications are enhanced by chemical information gained from integrating microreactor components with sensors, actuators, and automated fluid handling. Moreover, miniaturized systems allow experiments on well-defined samples at conditions not easily accessed by conventional means, such as reactions at high pressure and temperatures. The wealth of synthesis information that could potentially be acquired through use of microreactors integrated with physical sensors and analytical chemistry techniques for online reaction monitoring has not yet been well explored. The increased efficiency resulting from use of continuous-flow microreactor platforms to automate reaction screening and optimization encourages a shift from current batchwise chemical reaction development to this new approach. We review advances in this new area and provide application examples of online monitoring and automation.

  10. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  11. Reactions and properties of clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1992-09-01

    The elucidation from a molecular point of view of the differences and similarities in the properties and reactivity of matter in the gaseous compared to the condensed state is a subject of considerable current interest. One of the promising approaches to this problem is to utilize mass spectrometry in conjunction with laser spectroscopy and fast-flow reaction devices to investigate the changing properties, structure and reactivity of clusters as a function of the degree of solvation under well-controlled conditions. In this regard, an investigation of molecular cluster ions has provided considerable new insight into the basic mechanisms of ion reactions within a cluster, and this paper reviews some of the recent advances in cluster production, the origin of magic numbers and relationship to cluster ion stabilities, and solvation effects on reactions. There have been some notable advances in the production of large cluster ions under thermal reaction conditions, enabling a systematic study of the influence of solvation on reactions to be carried out. These and other new studies of magic numbers have traced their origin to the thermochemical stability of cluster ions. There are several classes of reaction where solvation has a notable influence on reactivity. A particularly interesting example comes from recent studies of the reactions of the hydroxyl anion with CO2 and SO2, studied as a function of the degree of hydration of OH-. Both reactions are highly exothermic, yet the differences in reactivity are dramatic. In the case of SO2, the reaction occurs at near the collision rate. By contrast, CO2 reactivity plummets dramatically for clusters having more than four water molecules. The slow rate is in accord with observations in the liquid phase.

  12. Nuclear Structure and Reaction Mechanism Studies with Multinucleon Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, P. H.; Jones, G. A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Abdullah, M.; Gelletly, W.; Langdown, S. D.; Wollel, G.; De Angelis, G.; Gadea, A.; Kroell, Th.; Marginean, N.; Martinez, T.; Napoli, D. R.; Rusu, C.; Tonev, D.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ur, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.

    2006-08-14

    This contribution reports on the results of an experiment to study the near-yrast states in selenium- and osmium-like nuclei, following their population in thick-target, multinucleon transfer reactions between an 82Se beam and a 192Os target. The experimental results for the level scheme for 84Se are presented together with investigations into the use of multi-dimensional gamma-ray energy gating to investigate angular momentum population in such heavy-ion binary reactions.

  13. Tilting mode in nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dossing, T.; Randrup, J.

    1986-02-01

    The relation between tilting relaxation and the reaction plane dynamics is discussed, providing an intuitive understanding of the expression for the cross section close to the beam direction, which has recently been derived. Second, the tilting relaxation time and the related wriggling relaxation time are discussed, based upon nucleon exchange transport (window friction). Finally, recent experimental information on the tilting mode relaxation is discussed, and the dynamics of the tilting mode is discussed qualitatively for the three different types of nuclear reactions considered, compound nucleus fission, quasifission, and damped nuclear reactions. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Renormalized reaction and relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2016-06-01

    Impact of the non-equilibrium on the reaction and relaxation rates (called as generalized relaxation rates - GRR), for the spatially inhomogeneous gas mixture is considered. Discarding the assumption that the 'chemical' part of the collisional integral is a small correction to non-reactive part, the expression for the zero-order GRR is derived. They are represented as a renormalization of the traditional reaction and relaxation rates, which means mixing of all corresponding processes. Thus all reactions and relaxation processes are entangled.

  15. Leukemoid Reaction in Chikungunya Fever

    PubMed Central

    Charaniya, Riyaz; Sahoo, Ratnakar; Tansir, Ghazal; Sasmal, Gargi

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya is a viral illness caused by an arbovirus which is transmitted by Aedes mosquito. Fever and polyarthralgia are hallmark of this viral illness. Viral infections are generally associated with leucopenia and bacterial infections with leukocytosis. Leukemoid Reaction (LR) is defined by reactive increase in leukocyte count of more than 50,000/cu mm with increase in mature leukocytes on peripheral blood. Leukocytosis is common in Chikungunya but leukemoid reaction has not been reported in medical literature. Our patient presented with high grade fever and symmetrical polyarthritis. Blood investigation showed Leukemoid reaction and after extensive work up a diagnosis of chikungunya was made. PMID:27437276

  16. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  17. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with phenytoin

    PubMed Central

    Indu, T. H.; Basutkar, Roopa Satyanarayan

    2015-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are generally associated with aromatic AEDs. We present a case of hypersensitivity reactions followed by administration of phenytoin with diazepam and ranitidine in a patient with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Antigen-antibody reactions or decreased levels of epoxide hydrolase are well known with phenytoin. Increased level of serum phenytoin causing toxicities due to competitive inhibition with diazepam on co-administration was also reported in the literature. Prevention of the adverse effects with AEDs is a multi-stage process, which requires implementation of preventive measures through careful monitoring and prompts interventions. PMID:26692739

  18. Magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly (MSRWA) is the product of a development effort funded by the Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) at Wright Patterson AFB. The specific objective of the project was to establish the manufacturing processes for samarium cobalt magnets and demonstrate their use in a space application. The development was successful on both counts. The application portion of the program, which involves the magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly, is emphasized. The requirements for the reaction wheel were based on the bias wheel requirements of the DSP satellite. The tasks included the design, fabrication, and test of the unit to the DSP program qualification requirements.

  19. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Indu, T H; Basutkar, Roopa Satyanarayan

    2015-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are generally associated with aromatic AEDs. We present a case of hypersensitivity reactions followed by administration of phenytoin with diazepam and ranitidine in a patient with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Antigen-antibody reactions or decreased levels of epoxide hydrolase are well known with phenytoin. Increased level of serum phenytoin causing toxicities due to competitive inhibition with diazepam on co-administration was also reported in the literature. Prevention of the adverse effects with AEDs is a multi-stage process, which requires implementation of preventive measures through careful monitoring and prompts interventions. PMID:26692739

  20. Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, Radhey

    2016-05-01

    In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant αs is large enough (~ 0.3 - 0.5) to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss the application of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  1. Siloxy alkynes in annulation reactions.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hui; Zhao, Wanxiang; Sun, Jianwei

    2014-12-01

    Siloxy alkynes are a family of versatile species in organic synthesis. This account reviews the annulation reactions of siloxy alkynes for the synthesis of a variety of carbo- and heterocyclic products. With various dipolarophiles or dipolarophile-like reaction partners, siloxy alkynes are capable of forming small (three- to six-membered) rings. Recently, we have expanded the scope to the synthesis of medium- and large-ring lactones, enabled by the design of new amphoteric molecules as well as a new ring-expansion strategy. These annulation reactions provide not only practically useful syntheses of cyclic molecules, but also important understanding of the fundamental reactivity of siloxy alkynes. PMID:25171137

  2. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    PubMed

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27237470

  3. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  4. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  5. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  6. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  7. Solar-thermal reaction processing

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, Alan W; Dahl, Jaimee K; Lewandowski, Allan A; Bingham, Carl; Raska Buechler, Karen J; Grothe, Willy

    2014-03-18

    In an embodiment, a method of conducting a high temperature chemical reaction that produces hydrogen or synthesis gas is described. The high temperature chemical reaction is conducted in a reactor having at least two reactor shells, including an inner shell and an outer shell. Heat absorbing particles are included in a gas stream flowing in the inner shell. The reactor is heated at least in part by a source of concentrated sunlight. The inner shell is heated by the concentrated sunlight. The inner shell re-radiates from the inner wall and heats the heat absorbing particles in the gas stream flowing through the inner shell, and heat transfers from the heat absorbing particles to the first gas stream, thereby heating the reactants in the gas stream to a sufficiently high temperature so that the first gas stream undergoes the desired reaction(s), thereby producing hydrogen or synthesis gas in the gas stream.

  8. The Retro-Hydroformylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Shuhei; Tatsuki, Toshiumi; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2015-07-13

    Hydroformylation, a reaction that adds carbon monoxide and dihydrogen across an unsaturated carbon-carbon multiple bond, has been widely employed in the chemical industry since its discovery in 1938. In contrast, the reverse reaction, retro-hydroformylation, has seldom been studied. The retro-hydroformylation reaction of an aldehyde into an alkene and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and dihydrogen) in the presence of a cyclopentadienyl iridium catalyst is now reported. Aliphatic aldehydes were converted into the corresponding alkenes in up to 91% yield with concomitant release of carbon monoxide and dihydrogen. Mechanistic control experiments indicated that the reaction proceeds by retro-hydroformylation and not by a sequential decarbonylation-dehydrogenation or dehydrogenation-decarbonylation process. PMID:26089259

  9. Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just for Kids Library School Tools Videos Virtual Allergist Education & Training Careers in ... reaction to a medication. These include: genetics, body chemistry, frequent drug exposure or the presence of an ...

  10. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  11. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  12. Expert system for predicting reaction conditions: the Michael reaction case.

    PubMed

    Marcou, G; Aires de Sousa, J; Latino, D A R S; de Luca, A; Horvath, D; Rietsch, V; Varnek, A

    2015-02-23

    A generic chemical transformation may often be achieved under various synthetic conditions. However, for any specific reagents, only one or a few among the reported synthetic protocols may be successful. For example, Michael β-addition reactions may proceed under different choices of solvent (e.g., hydrophobic, aprotic polar, protic) and catalyst (e.g., Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, Lewis base, etc.). Chemoinformatics methods could be efficiently used to establish a relationship between the reagent structures and the required reaction conditions, which would allow synthetic chemists to waste less time and resources in trying out various protocols in search for the appropriate one. In order to address this problem, a number of 2-classes classification models have been built on a set of 198 Michael reactions retrieved from literature. Trained models discriminate between processes that are compatible and respectively processes not feasible under a specific reaction condition option (feasible or not with a Lewis acid catalyst, feasible or not in hydrophobic solvent, etc.). Eight distinct models were built to decide the compatibility of a Michael addition process with each considered reaction condition option, while a ninth model was aimed to predict whether the assumed Michael addition is feasible at all. Different machine-learning methods (Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayes, and Random Forest) in combination with different types of descriptors (ISIDA fragments issued from Condensed Graphs of Reactions, MOLMAP, Electronic Effect Descriptors, and Chemistry Development Kit computed descriptors) have been used. Models have good predictive performance in 3-fold cross-validation done three times: balanced accuracy varies from 0.7 to 1. Developed models are available for the users at http://infochim.u-strasbg.fr/webserv/VSEngine.html . Eventually, these were challenged to predict feasibility conditions for ∼50 novel Michael reactions from the eNovalys database (originally

  13. Polarization phenomena in collinear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravcsik, Michael J.; Arash, Firooz

    1985-06-01

    It is shown for a collinear reaction containing four particles with arbitrary spins which amplitudes remain nonzero and how they are related to the observables. In terms of primary observables all submatrices relating products of amplitudes to observables either vanish or turn into one-by-one submatrices, except the 8i types which may turn into three-by-three submatrices, but these latter submatrices are mostly avoidable when determining amplitudes. In terms of the secondary observables the 1M and 2i submatrices are slightly larger. Specifically, it is shown that in collinear reactions all observables in which only one particle is polarized (no matter how) vanish. Since reactions at very high energies are expected to be predominantly very close to being collinear, the smallness of such observables in such reactions can be expected on general grounds but polarization effects involving observables with more than one polarized particle can very well be very large. An iterative approximation method for the polarization analysis of reactions at very high energies is suggested. The results of this paper are also applicable to all models in which helicity conservation holds, since they are, for all t values, formally identical with collinear reactions.

  14. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  15. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  16. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    PubMed Central

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model, and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is on the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules. PMID:26871190

  17. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  18. Study of char gasification reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ballal, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Texas lignite, an anthracite and two bituminous coals, Pittsburgh number8 and Illinois number6, were pyrolyzed in a nitrogen atmosphere to prepare chars. Optical microscopy, mercury porosimetry and gas adsorption techniques using nitrogen, CO/sub 2/ and CO, were employed for pore structure characterization. The lignite char exhibited the fastest rates of gaseous diffusion, followed in order of decreasing diffusivities by the Illinois number6, Pittsburgh number8 and anthracite chars. The changes in reactivities and pore structures of chars were measured experimentally during their reaction with oxygen (400-550C) and CO/sub 2/ (800-1000C). For a particular char-gas system, the normalized rate-conversion pattern was invariant with respect to temperature and gaseous concentration. In the case of lignite and Pittsburgh number8 chars, the rate-conversion pattern was similar during reaction with oxygen and CO/sub 2/. Adsorption experiments on partially reacted chars indicated that the micropores in the lignite char were accessible to both reactants. The micropores in the Illinois number6 char were, however, not accessible during its reaction with oxygen. The evolution of pore structure during reaction was modeled by using a probabilistic approach which accounts for overlapping pores with different shapes and sizes. The kinetics of gasification of the lignite and the Pittsburgh number8 chars was studied using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetic expression to correlate the experimental data. CO was found to inhibit the reaction substantially. The effect of a potassium carbonate catalyst on the reaction of these two chars was also investigated. Substantial increases in reaction rates were observed, and the enhancement was approximately proportional to the catalyst loading.

  19. Reaction pathways of propene pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yena; Su, Kehe; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yan; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2010-05-01

    The gas-phase reaction pathways in preparing pyrolytic carbon with propene pyrolysis have been investigated in detail with a total number of 110 transition states and 50 intermediates. The structure of the species was determined with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level. The transition states and their linked intermediates were confirmed with frequency and the intrinsic reaction coordinates analyses. The elementary reactions were explored in the pathways of both direct and the radical attacking decompositions. The energy barriers and the reaction energies were determined with accurate model chemistry method at G3(MP2) level after an examination of the nondynamic electronic correlations. The heat capacities and entropies were obtained with statistical thermodynamics. The Gibbs free energies at 298.15 K for all the reaction steps were reported. Those at any temperature can be developed with classical thermodynamics by using the fitted (as a function of temperature) heat capacities. It was found that the most favorable paths are mainly in the radical attacking chain reactions. The chain was proposed with 26 reaction steps including two steps of the initialization of the chain to produce H and CH(3) radicals. For a typical temperature (1200 K) adopted in the experiments, the highest energy barriers were found in the production of C(3) to be 203.4 and 193.7 kJ/mol. The highest energy barriers for the production of C(2) and C were found 174.1 and 181.4 kJ/mol, respectively. These results are comparable with the most recent experimental observation of the apparent activation energy 201.9 +/- 0.6 or 137 +/- 25 kJ/mol. PMID:20082392

  20. Reactions in water: alkyl nitrile coupling reactions using Fenton's reagent.

    PubMed

    Keller, Christopher L; Dalessandro, James D; Hotz, Richard P; Pinhas, Allan R

    2008-05-01

    The coupling reaction of water-soluble alkyl nitriles using Fenton's reagent (Fe(II) and H2O2) is described. The best metal for the reaction is iron(II), and the greatest yields are obtained when the concentration of the metal is kept low. Hydrogen-atom abstraction is selective, preferentially producing the radical alpha to the nitrile. In order to increase the production of dinitrile, in situ reduction of iron(III) to iron(II), using a variety of reducing agents, was investigated. PMID:18363368

  1. Nonlocality in deuteron stripping reactions.

    PubMed

    Timofeyuk, N K; Johnson, R C

    2013-03-15

    We propose a new method for the analysis of deuteron stripping reactions, A(d,p)B, in which the nonlocality of nucleon-nucleus interactions and three-body degrees of freedom are accounted for in a consistent way. The model deals with equivalent local nucleon potentials taken at an energy shifted by ∼40  MeV from the "E(d)/2" value frequently used in the analysis of experimental data, where E(d) is the incident deuteron energy. The "E(d)/2" rule lies at the heart of all three-body analyses of (d, p) reactions performed so far with the aim of obtaining nuclear structure properties such as spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients that are crucial for our understanding of nuclear shell evolution in neutron- and proton-rich regions of the nuclear periodic table and for predicting the cross sections of stellar reactions. The large predicted shift arises from the large relative kinetic energy of the neutron and proton in the incident deuteron in those components of the n+p+A wave function that dominate the (d, p) reaction amplitude. The large shift reduces the effective d-A potentials and leads to a change in predicted (d, p) cross sections, thus affecting the interpretation of these reactions in terms of nuclear structure. PMID:25166525

  2. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  3. Thermal reactions of brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Bohner, M; Gbureck, U

    2008-02-01

    The thermal reactions of a brushite cement made of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), and an aqueous solution were followed in situ with an isothermal calorimeter at 37 degrees C. The investigated parameters were the beta-TCP/MCPM weight ratio, the liquid-to-powder ratio, the synthesis route and milling duration of the beta-TCP powder, as well as the presence of sulfate, citrate, and pyrophosphate ions in the mixing liquid. The thermograms were complex, particularly for mixtures containing an excess of MCPM or additives in the mixing solution. Results suggested that the endothermic MCPM dissolution and the highly exothermic beta-TCP dissolution occurred simultaneously, thereby leading to the formation of a large exothermic peak at early reaction time. Both reactions were followed by the exothermic crystallization of brushite and in the presence of an excess of MCPM by the endothermic crystallization of monetite. Additives generally widened the main exothermic reaction peak, or in some cases with pyrophosphate ions postponed the main exothermic peak at late reaction time. Generally, the results could be well explained and understood based on thermodynamic and solubility data. PMID:17618509

  4. [Recipients adverse reactions: guidance supports].

    PubMed

    Bazin, A

    2010-12-01

    Since 1994, adverse effects of transfusion transmitted to the French haemovigilance network are registered on "e-fit", the database of the French agency for the safety of health products (Afssaps). In order to improve their analysis, guidance supports have been made by Afssaps working groups. Each support deals with a blood transfusion side effect and is composed of five parts including pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnostic criteria, management recommendations, etiologic investigations and rules of filing the notification form on e-fit. The major characteristics of sheets published or soon-to-be published are presented: transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection, non-haemolytic febrile reaction, allergic reaction, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, hypotensive transfusion reaction, alloimmunization, erythrocyte incompatibility reaction and hemosiderosis. These new supports give relevant guidelines allowing a better analysis and evaluation of recipients' adverse reactions, particularly their diagnosis, gravity and accountability. They could also initiate studies in European and international haemovigilance and transfusion networks. PMID:21051267

  5. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion. PMID:26193994

  6. Surface reactions of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.F.

    1986-12-31

    Reactions at natural glass surfaces are important in studies involving nuclear waste transport due to chemical control on ground water in host rocks such as basalt and tuff, to potential diffusion into natural hydrated glass surfaces and as natural analogs for waste glass stability. Dissolution kinetics can be described by linear surface reaction coupled with cation interdiffusion with resulting rates similar to those of synthetic silicate glasses. Rates of Cs diffusion into hydrated obsidian surfaces between 25{sup 0} and 75{sup 0}C were determined by XPS depth profiles and loss rates from aqueous solutions. Calculated diffusion coefficients were ten others of magnitude more rapid than predicted from an Arrhenius extrapolation of high temperature tracer diffusion data due to surface hydration reactions.

  7. Catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R; Beutner, Gregory L

    2005-07-25

    In 1935, R. C. Fuson formulated the principle of vinylogy to explain how the influence of a functional group may be felt at a distant point in the molecule when this position is connected by conjugated double-bond linkages to the group. In polar reactions, this concept allows the extension of the electrophilic or nucleophilic character of a functional group through the pi system of a carbon-carbon double bond. This vinylogous extension has been applied to the aldol reaction by employing "extended" dienol ethers derived from gamma-enolizable alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Since 1994, several methods for the catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reaction have appeared, with which varying degrees of regio- (site), enantio-, and diastereoselectivity can be attained. In this Review, the current scope and limitations of this transformation, as well as its application in natural product synthesis, are discussed. PMID:15940727

  8. Anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Canter, Lauren M

    2005-01-01

    As the role for diagnostic and therapeutic contrast-enhanced imaging increases, review of the epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors, and pretreatment for radiocontrast-mediated anaphylactoid reactions becomes more and more pertinent. Ongoing research has failed to elucidate the precise mechanisms of both early and late reactions, though the current data point to a multifactorial pathogenesis. The risk of reactions has decreased over time as contrast media have evolved from ionic, high-osmolality to nonionic, low-osmolality formulations; however, the expense of the low-osmolality agents limit their universal use. Today, 1-12% of patients exhibit adverse responses ranging from mild to severe, with individual risk depending on the type of contrast administered and certain baseline patient characteristics. For those high-risk patients who must receive contrast, effective pretreatment guidelines have been established. PMID:16119034

  9. Spatial model of autocatalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Anna, Pietro; di Patti, Francesca; Fanelli, Duccio; McKane, Alan J.; Dauxois, Thierry

    2010-05-01

    Biological cells with all of their surface structure and complex interior stripped away are essentially vesicles—membranes composed of lipid bilayers which form closed sacs. Vesicles are thought to be relevant as models of primitive protocells, and they could have provided the ideal environment for prebiotic reactions to occur. In this paper, we investigate the stochastic dynamics of a set of autocatalytic reactions, within a spatially bounded domain, so as to mimic a primordial cell. The discreteness of the constituents of the autocatalytic reactions gives rise to large sustained oscillations even when the number of constituents is quite large. These oscillations are spatiotemporal in nature, unlike those found in previous studies, which consisted only of temporal oscillations. We speculate that these oscillations may have a role in seeding membrane instabilities which lead to vesicle division. In this way synchronization could be achieved between protocell growth and the reproduction rate of the constituents (the protogenetic material) in simple protocells.

  10. Reaction models in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We present different reaction models commonly used in nuclear astrophysics, in particular for the nucleosynthesis of light elements. Pioneering works were performed within the potential model, where the internal structure of the colliding nuclei is completely ignored. Significant advances in microscopic cluster models provided the first microscopic description of the 3He(α,&gamma)7 Be reaction more than thirty years ago. In this approach, the calculations are based on an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, but the cluster approximation should be made to simplify the calculations. Nowadays, modern microscopic calculations are able to go beyond the cluster approximation, and aim at finding exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. We discuss recent examples on the d+d reactions at low energies.

  11. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Belyshev, S. S.; Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Kuznetsov, A. A. Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  12. The effects of pre-salting methods on salt and water distribution of heavily salted cod, as analyzed by (1)H and (23)Na MRI, (23)Na NMR, low-field NMR and physicochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Gudjónsdóttir, María; Traoré, Amidou; Jónsson, Ásbjörn; Karlsdóttir, Magnea Gudrún; Arason, Sigurjón

    2015-12-01

    The effect of different pre-salting methods (brine injection with salt with/without polyphosphates, brining and pickling) on the water and salt distribution in dry salted Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) fillets was studied with proton and sodium NMR and MRI methods, supported by physicochemical analysis of salt and water content as well as water holding capacity. The study indicated that double head brine injection with salt and phosphates lead to the least heterogeneous water distribution, while pickle salting had the least heterogeneous salt distribution. Fillets from all treatments contained spots with unsaturated brine, increasing the risk of microbial denaturation of the fillets during storage. Since a homogeneous water and salt distribution was not achieved with the studied pre-salting methods, further optimizations of the salting process, including the pre-salting and dry salting steps, must be made in the future. PMID:26041245

  13. Unraveling reaction pathways and specifying reaction kinetics for complex systems.

    PubMed

    Vinu, R; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    Many natural and industrial processes involve a complex set of competing reactions that include several different species. Detailed kinetic modeling of such systems can shed light on the important pathways involved in various transformations and therefore can be used to optimize the process conditions for the desired product composition and properties. This review focuses on elucidating the various components involved in modeling the kinetics of pyrolysis and oxidation of polymers. The elementary free radical steps that constitute the chain reaction mechanism of gas-phase/nonpolar liquid-phase processes are outlined. Specification of the rate coefficients of the various reaction families, which is central to the theme of kinetics, is described. Construction of the reaction network on the basis of the types of end groups and reactive moieties in a polymer chain is discussed. Modeling frameworks based on the method of moments and kinetic Monte Carlo are evaluated using illustrations. Finally, the prospects and challenges in modeling biomass conversion are addressed. PMID:22468596

  14. Coupled Reactions "versus" Connected Reactions: Coupling Concepts with Terms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aledo, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    A hallmark of living matter is its ability to extract and transform energy from the environment. Not surprisingly, biology students are required to take thermodynamics. The necessity of coupling exergonic reactions to endergonic processes is easily grasped by most undergraduate students. However, when addressing the thermodynamic concept of…

  15. Reaction pathway for alkane dehydrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Buchang; Davis, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Naphtha reforming to produce high octane gasoline is an important process. Many reaction mechanisms are involved in this process. For example, the study of the fundamentals of this process led to the concept of bi- or poly-functional catalysis. The results of this study provide additional mechanistic information about the dehydrocyclization of an n-alkane to produce aromatics. The reaction coordinate diagram advanced to account for the observation of irreversible adsorption should be modified to account for the present results. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Learning to predict chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kayala, Matthew A; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-26

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles, respectively, are not high throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, and lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry data set consisting of 1630 full multistep reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top-ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of nonproductive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  17. Some Concepts in Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanyi, John C.

    1987-05-01

    The objective in this work has been one which I have shared with the two other 1986 Nobel lecturers in chemistry, D. R. Herschbach and Y. T. Lee, as well as with a wide group of colleagues and co-workers who have been responsible for bringing this field to its current state. That state is summarized in the title; we now have some concepts relevant to the motions of atoms and molecules in simple reactions, and some examples of the application of these concepts. We are, however, richer in vocabulary than in literature. The great epics of reaction dynamics remain to be written. I shall confine myself to some simple stories.

  18. Learning to Predict Chemical Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kayala, Matthew A.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles respectively are not high-throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, or lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry dataset consisting of 1630 full multi-step reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval, problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of non-productive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  19. Vision 2020. Reaction Engineering Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Klipstein, David H.; Robinson, Sharon

    2001-01-01

    The Reaction Engineering Roadmap is a part of an industry- wide effort to create a blueprint of the research and technology milestones that are necessary to achieve longterm industry goals. This report documents the results of a workshop focused on the research needs, technology barriers, and priorities of the chemical industry as they relate to reaction engineering viewed first by industrial use (basic chemicals; specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; and polymers) and then by technology segment (reactor system selection, design, and scale-up; chemical mechanism development and property estimation; dealing with catalysis; and new, nonstandard reactor types).

  20. Reaction theory: Status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, A. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    2016-05-01

    The current status of the reaction theory of nuclear collisions involving weakly-bound exotic nuclei is presented. The problem is addressed within the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel (CDCC) framework, recalling its foundations and applications, as well as its connection with the Faddeev formalism. Recent developments and improvements of the method, such as core and target excitations and the extension to three-body projectiles, are presented. The use of the CDCC wave function in the calculation of inclusive breakup reactions is also introduced.