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Sample records for 23na nmr imaging

  1. The molecular environment of intracellular sodium: 23Na NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rooney, W D; Springer, C S

    1991-10-01

    The comprehensive approach described in the accompanying paper is illustrated here with the 23Na signal of a concentrated solution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in saline and the intracellular (Nai) 23Na resonance of a dense suspension of Na(+)-loaded yeast cells. We use frequency shift reagents to discriminate the latter from the extracellular resonance. We find that the Nai signal corresponds to that of an effective single population of Na+ ions exhibiting a single type c spectrum. This is true despite the fact that the yeast protoplasm is too large and too compartmentalized for a given Na+ ion to sample its entirety on the relevant NMR timescale. Our results show clearly that, in addition to the decay of transverse magnetization, the recovery of longitudinal magnetization is biexponential. This is required for a type c spectrum but has not often been detected. The temperature dependence of the relaxation rate constants of the Nai resonance is not consistent with either a simple Debye process or a discrete exchange mechanism connecting two sites in the fast limit. We have fitted the data using an asymmetric continuous distribution of correlation times for the fluctuations of electric field gradients sensed by the Nai nuclei. The analogous distribution function for the Na+ in a 44% (w/w) BSA solution is quite similar to that of the Nai at the same temperature. This suggests that while the macromolecular environment of the Nai ions is quite congested, it is also isotropic on quite a small spatial scale. Also, one can use the correlation time distribution function, obtained from fitting the relaxation data, to calculate a relaxometry curve. This is useful because experimental 23Na relaxometry is difficult. The calculated curve may be a reasonable model for the mostly extracellular 23Na resonance encountered in vivo. PMID:1751346

  2. 23Na NMR study of the effect of organic osmolytes on DNA counterion atmosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Flock, S; Labarbe, R; Houssier, C

    1996-01-01

    The effect of different organic osmolytes on the DNA counterion condensation layer has been investigated by 23Na NMR relaxation measurements. The zwitterionic compounds glycine, beta-alanine, 4-aminobutyric acid, and 6-aminocaproic acid have shown an increasing capacity to decrease the amount of sodium ions in the vicinity of the macromolecule. The experimental data have been correlated with the dielectric constant increase in their corresponding solutions and have been compared with the prediction of counterion condensation theory. Polyols (sorbitol and mannitol) did not display the same effect. These compounds largely increase the relaxation rate of sodium ions in the proximity of DNA, unlike the zwitterionic compounds. This probably results from a perturbation of the water dynamic around the macromolecule, of the primary or secondary hydration shell of the sodium nuclei involved, or both. PMID:8874025

  3. Sepsis does not alter red blood cell glucose metabolism or Na+ concentration: A 2H-, 23Na-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, R.S.; Song, S.K.; Ling, C.S.; Ackerman, J.J.; Karl, I.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of sepsis on intracellular Na+ concentration ((Na+)i) and glucose metabolism were examined in rat red blood cells (RBCs) by using 23Na- and 2H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Sepsis was induced in 15 halothane-anesthetized female Sprague-Dawley rats by using the cecal ligation and perforation technique; 14 control rats underwent cecal manipulation without ligation. The animals were fasted for 36 h, but allowed free access to water. At 36 h postsurgery, RBCs were examined by 23Na-NMR by using dysprosium tripolyphosphate as a chemical shift reagent. Human RBCs from 17 critically ill nonseptic patients and from 7 patients who were diagnosed as septic were also examined for (Na+)i. Five rat RBC specimens had (Na+)i determined by both 23Na-NMR and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). For glucose metabolism studies, RBCs from septic and control rats were suspended in modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing (6,6-2H2)glucose and examined by 2H-NMR. No significant differences in (Na+)i or glucose utilization were found in RBCs from control or septic rats. There were no differences in (Na+)i in the two groups of patients. The (Na+)i determined by NMR spectroscopy agreed closely with measurements using ICP-AES and establish that 100% of the (Na+)i of the RBC is visible by NMR. Glucose measurements determined by 2H-NMR correlated closely (correlation coefficient = 0.93) with enzymatic analysis. These studies showed no evidence that sepsis disturbed RBC membrane function or metabolism.

  4. Solid-state 23Na and 7Li NMR investigations of sodium- and lithium-reduced mesoporous titanium oxides.

    PubMed

    Lo, Andy Y H; Schurko, Robert W; Vettraino, Melissa; Skadtchenko, Boris O; Trudeau, Michel; Antonelli, David M

    2006-02-20

    Mesoporous titanium oxide synthesized using a dodecylamine template was treated with 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0 equiv of Li- or Na-naphthalene. The composite materials were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state 23Na and 7Li NMR spectroscopy. In all cases the wormhole mesoporosity was retained as evidenced by BET surface areas from 400 to 700 m(2)/g, Horvath-Kawazoe pore sizes in the 20 Angstroms range, and a lack of hysteresis in the nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Variable-temperature conductivity studies show that the Li-reduced materials are semiconductors, with conductivity values 3 orders of magnitude higher than those of the Na-reduced materials. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate reversible intercalation/deintercalation of Li+ ions into pristine mesoporous Ti oxides with good cycling capacity. Solid-state 23Na NMR reveals two distinct Na environments: one corresponding to sodium ions in the mesoporous channels and the other corresponding to sodium ions intercalated into the metal framework. 23Na NMR spectra also indicate that the relative population of the framework site increases with increased reduction levels. Solid-state 7Li NMR spectra display a single broad resonance, which increases in breadth with increased reduction levels, though individual resonances inferring the presence of channel and framework Li species are not resolved. Comparisons of the lithium chemical shifts with published values suggests an "anatase-like structure" with no long-range order in the least-reduced samples but a "lithium titanate-like structure" with no long-range order in the higher reduced materials. PMID:16472000

  5. Time course of myocardial sodium accumulation after burn trauma: a (31)P- and (23)Na-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Sikes, P J; Zhao, P; Maass, D L; Horton, J W

    2001-12-01

    In this study, (23)Na- and (31)P- nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were examined in perfused rat hearts harvested 1, 2, 4, and 24 h after 40% total body surface area burn trauma and lactated Ringer resuscitation, 4 ml. kg(-1). %(-1) burn. (23)Na-NMR spectroscopy monitored myocardial intracellular Na+ using the paramagnetic shift reagent thulium 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetra(methylenephosphonic acid). Left ventricular function, cardiac high-energy phosphates (ATP/PCr), and myocyte intracellular pH were studied by using (31)P NMR spectroscopy to examine the hypothesis that burn-mediated acidification of cardiomyocytes contributes to subsequent Na+ accumulation by this cell population. Intracellular Na+ accumulation was confirmed by sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate loading and fluorescence spectroscopy in cardiomyocytes isolated 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h postburn. This myocyte Na+ accumulation as early as 2 h postburn occurred despite no changes in cardiac ATP/PCr and intracellular pH. Left ventricular function progressively decreased after burn trauma. Cardiomyocyte Na+ accumulation paralleled cardiac contractile dysfunction, suggesting that myocardial Na+ overload contributes, in part, to the progressive postburn decrease in ventricular performance. PMID:11717236

  6. 23Na NMR and FT-IR studies of sodium complexes with the ionophore lasalocid in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, G.; Gierczyk, B.; Brzezinski, B.; Różalski, B.; Bartl, F.; Zundel, G.; Sośnicki, J.; Grech, E.

    2000-01-01

    Lasalocid forms 1:1 or 2:2 complexes with sodium ions. The process of complexation was studied in different solvents at various temperatures by 23Na NMR. The formation constants and Δ G values were determined. The nature of the complex between lasalocid and Na + ions was also studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. In chloroform, a 2:2 complex of lasalocid and Na + ions is formed. A continuous absorption is observed in the far FT-IR spectrum of this complex. It indicates the large Na + polarizability due to fast fluctuations of the Na + ions in multiminima potentials, in the dimeric structure.

  7. Four-dimensional 1H and 23Na imaging using continuously oscillating gradients.

    PubMed

    Star-Lack, J M; Roos, M S; Wong, S T; Schepkin, V D; Budinger, T F

    1997-02-01

    A class of fast magnetic spectroscopic imaging methods using continuously oscillating gradients for four-dimensional (three spatial and one spectral) localization is introduced. Sampling may start immediately following the application of an RF excitation pulse, thus enabling measurement of spin density, chemical shift, and relaxation rates of short-T2 species. For spatial localization, steady-state sinusoidal gradient waveforms are used to sample a ball in k space. The two types of trajectories presented include: (1) continuously oscillating gradients with continuously rotating direction used for steady-state free-precession imaging and (2) continuously oscillating gradients followed by a spoiler directed along discrete projections. Design criteria are given and spatial-spectral and spatial-temporal reconstruction methods are developed. Theoretical point-spread functions and signal-to-noise ratios are derived while considering T2*, off-resonance effects, and RF excitation options. Experimental phantom, in vivo, and in vitro 1H and 23Na images collected at 2.35 T are presented. The 1H images were acquired with isotropic spatial resolution ranging from 0.03 to 0.27 cm3 and gradient-oscillation frequencies ranging from 600 to 700 Hz, thus allowing for the separation of water and lipid signals within a voxel. The 23Na images, acquired with 500 and 800 Hz gradient waveforms and 0.70 cm3 isotropic resolution, were resolved in the time domain, yielding spatially localized FIDs. PMID:9169223

  8. Interface Induced Growth and Transformation of Polymer-Conjugated Proto-Crystalline Phases in Aluminosilicate Hybrids: A Multiple-Quantum (23)Na-(23)Na MAS NMR Correlation Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Brus, Jiri; Kobera, Libor; Urbanova, Martina; Doušová, Barbora; Lhotka, Miloslav; Koloušek, David; Kotek, Jiří; Čuba, Pavel; Czernek, Jiri; Dědeček, Jiří

    2016-03-22

    Nanostructured materials typically offer enhanced physicochemical properties because of their large interfacial area. In this contribution, we present a comprehensive structural characterization of aluminosilicate hybrids with polymer-conjugated nanosized zeolites specifically grown at the organic-inorganic interface. The inorganic amorphous Al-O-Si framework is formed by alkali-activated low-temperature transformation of metakaoline, whereas simultaneous copolymerization of organic comonomers creates a secondary epoxide network covalently bound to the aluminosilicate matrix. This secondary epoxide phase not only enhances the mechanical integrity of the resulting hybrids but also introduces additional binding sites accessible for compensating negative charge on the aluminosilicate framework. This way, the polymer network initiates growth and subsequent transformation of protocrystalline short-range ordered zeolite domains that are located at the organic-inorganic interface. By applying an experimental approach based on 2D (23)Na-(23)Na double-quantum (DQ) MAS NMR spectroscopy, we discovered multiple sodium binding sites in these protocrystalline domains, in which immobilized Na(+) ions form pairs or small clusters. It is further demonstrated that these sites, the local geometry of which allows for the pairing of sodium ions, are preferentially occupied by Pb(2+) ions during the ion exchange. The proposed synthesis protocol thus allows for the preparation of a novel type of geopolymer hybrids with polymer-conjugated zeolite phases suitable for capturing and storage of metal cations. The demonstrated (23)Na-(23)Na DQ MAS NMR combined with DFT calculations represents a suitable approach for understanding the role of Na(+) ions in aluminositicate solids and related inorganic-organic hybrids, particularly their specific arrangement and clustering at interfacial areas. PMID:26931131

  9. Lanthanide complexes of aminophosphonates as shift reagents for 7Li and 23Na NMR studies in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, R; Castro, M M; de Freitas, D M; Geraldes, C F

    1992-01-01

    A systematic NMR characterization of various Dy(III) complexes of linear and macrocyclic aminophosphonates as 7Li and 23Na NMR shift reagents for biological systems was undertaken. Their efficacy as shift reagents (SR) was tested under constant aqueous solution ionic strength conditions at pH 7.5 as a function of rho = [SR]/[M+]. Further characterization of the two best SRs, Dy(PcPcP)2(7-) and Dy(DOTP)5-, led to the conclusion that, although quite sensitive to solution pH and the presence of alkali metal ions and Mg2+ and Ca2+, these complexes were stable towards hydrolysis by phosphatases. The lack of precipitation of its solutions in the presence of Ca2+, allowed the choice of Dy(DOTP)5- as the best overall SR for biological studies. Other SRs, like Dy(TTHA)3-, although less sensitive to pH and to divalent ions, require significantly higher concentrations to yield the same shifts, leading to large bulk susceptibility artifacts in perfused tissues and organs. PMID:1467337

  10. Positive and Negative Mixed Glass Former Effects in Sodium Borosilicate and Borophosphate Glasses Studied by (23)Na NMR.

    PubMed

    Storek, Michael; Adjei-Acheamfour, Mischa; Christensen, Randilynn; Martin, Steve W; Böhmer, Roland

    2016-05-19

    Glasses with varying compositions of constituent network formers but constant mobile ion content can display minima or maxima in their ion transport which are known as the negative or the positive mixed glass former effect, MGFE, respectively. Various nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used to probe the ion hopping dynamics via the (23)Na nucleus on the microscopic level, and the results are compared with those from conductivity spectroscopy, which are more sensitive to the macroscopic charge carrier mobility. In this way, the current work examines two series of sodium borosilicate and sodium borophosphate glasses that display positive and negative MGFEs, respectively, in the composition dependence of their Na(+) ion conductivities at intermediate compositions of boron oxide substitution for silicon oxide and phosphorus oxide, respectively. A coherent theoretical analysis is performed for these glasses which jointly captures the results from measurements of spin relaxation and central-transition line shapes. On this basis and including new information from (11)B magic-angle spinning NMR regarding the speciation in the sodium borosilicate glasses, a comparison is carried out with predictions from theoretical approaches, notably from the network unit trap model. This comparison yields detailed insights into how a variation of the boron oxide content and thus of either the population of silicon or phosphorus containing network-forming units with different charge-trapping capabilities leads to nonlinear changes of the microscopic transport properties. PMID:27092392

  11. Aggregation of double-tail sulfonate surfactants probed by /sup 23/Na NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, P.K.; Miller, W.G.

    1984-04-12

    Analysis of sodium-23 NMR chemical shift and line-width data on sodium 4-(1-heptylnonyl)benzenesulfonate (SHBS) in water at 47/sup 0/C indicates the surfactant continuously aggregates in an anti- or weakly cooperative manner up to the surfactant solubility limit, a point beyond which a hydrated lamellar phase is in equilibrium with the surfactant-saturated isotropic solution. By contrast, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT) shows little if any aggregation up to the point of a highly cooperative micellization. Both chemical shift and line-width data indicate the presence of an isotropic solution-liquid crystal phase boundary; the line shape of a biphasic mixture of isotropic solution and lamellar liquid crystal is not motionally averaged, in contrast to a micellar solution, and thus differentiation between micelle formation and solubility boundary is possible. A multiple equilibrium treatment of stepwise amphiphile aggregate formation is used to model both highly cooperative surfactant association, i.e., micellization, and anti- or noncooperative association. The sodium counterion binding to surfactant aggregates was modelled by assuming the oligomers are spherical and have a constant surface charge density with all anionic head groups residing at the surface of the sphere. It was then assumed that the sodium ion exists in one of two environments: free or bound, each having a characteristic chemical shift and transverse relaxation rate. On the basis of a comparison of the model with experimental data, it was concluded that SHBS aggregate concentration decreases with increasing aggregate size; i.e., the aggregation is non- or weakly anticooperative, while Aerosol OT associates very cooperatively, the large degree of cooperativity being an indication of micelle formation.

  12. 23Na and 35/37Cl as NMR probes of growth and shape of sodium taurodeoxycholate micellar aggregates in the presence of NaCl.

    PubMed

    Asaro, Fioretta; Feruglio, Luigi; Galantini, Luciano; Nardelli, Alessia

    2013-02-15

    The growth of the aggregates of the dihydroxylated bile salt sodium taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC) upon NaCl addition and the involvement of the counterion were investigated by NMR spectroscopy of monoatomic ionic species. (23)Na T(1) values from 0.015, 0.100, and 0.200 mol kg(-1) NaTDC solutions in D(2)O, at variable NaCl content, proved to be sensitive to the transition from primary to secondary aggregates, which occurs in the former sample, and to intermicellar interaction. Some (79)Br NMR measurements were performed on a 0.100 mol kg(-1) NaTDC sample added by NaBr in place of NaCl for comparison purposes. The (23)Na, (35)Cl, and (37)Cl double quantum filtered (DQF) patterns, from the 0.100 mol kg(-1) NaTDC sample, and (23)Na ones also from the 0.200 mol kg(-1) NaTDC one, in the presence of 0.750 mol kg(-1) NaCl, are a clear manifestation of motional anisotropy. Moreover, the DQF spectra of (23)Na and (37)Cl, which possess close quadrupole moments, display a striking similarity. The DQF lineshapes were simulated exploiting the Scilab environment to obtain an estimate of the residual quadrupole splitting magnitude. These results support the description of NaTDC micelles as cylindrical aggregates, strongly interacting at high ionic strengths, and capable of association with added electrolytes. PMID:23127873

  13. Lead exchange into zeolite and clay minerals: A [sup 29]Si, [sub 27]Al, [sup 23]Na solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J.J.; Sherriff, B.L. )

    1993-08-01

    Chabazite, vermiculite, montmorillonite, hectorite, and kaolinite were used to remove Pb, through ion exchange, from 0.01 M aqueous Pb(NO[sub 3])[sub 2] solutions. These minerals contained 27 (Na-chabazite), 16, 9, 9, and 0.5 wt % of Pb, respectively, after equilibration with the solutions. Ion exchange reached equilibrium within 24 h for Na-chabazite and vermiculite, but in less than 5 min for montmorillonite and hectorite. Na-chabazite took up more Pb than natural (Ca, Na)-chabazite (7 wt % Pb), whereas no such difference was observed in different cation forms of the clay minerals. Calcite impurities, associated with the clay minerals, effectively removed Pb from the aqueous solutions by the precipitation of cerussite (PbCO[sub 3]). [sup 29]Si, [sup 27]Al, and [sup 23]Na magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), [sup 23]Na double rotation (DOR) NMR, and [sup 23]Na variable-temperature MAS NMR were used to study the ion exchange mechanisms. In Na-chabazite, cations in all three possible sites take part in the fast chemical exchange. The chemical exchange passes from the fast exchange regime to the slow regime at [minus]80 to [minus]100[degrees]C. One site contains a relatively low population of exchangeable cations. The other two more shielded sites contain most of the exchangeable cation. The exchangeable cations in chabazite and vermiculite were found to be close to the SiO[sub 4] and AlO[sub 4] tetrahedra, while those in the other clay minerals were more distant. Two sites (or groups of sites) for exchangeable cations were observed in hectorite. Lead tended to occupy the one which corresponds to the [minus]8 ppM peak on the [sup 23]Na MAS NMR spectrum. The behavior of the exchangeable cations in the interlayer sites was similar in all the clay minerals studied. 27 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Multiple quantum filtered 23Na NMR in the Langendorff perfused mouse heart: Ratio of triple/double quantum filtered signals correlates with [Na]i

    PubMed Central

    Eykyn, Thomas R.; Aksentijević, Dunja; Aughton, Karen L.; Southworth, Richard; Fuller, William; Shattock, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the potential of multiple quantum filtered (MQF) 23Na NMR to probe intracellular [Na]i in the Langendorff perfused mouse heart. In the presence of Tm(DOTP) shift reagent the triple quantum filtered (TQF) signal originated largely from the intracellular sodium pool with a 32 ± 6% contribution of the total TQF signal arising from extracellular sodium, whilst the rank 2 double-quantum filtered signal (DQF), acquired with a 54.7° flip-angle pulse, originated exclusively from the extracellular sodium pool. Given the different cellular origins of the 23Na MQF signals we propose that the TQF/DQF ratio can be used as a semi-quantitative measure of [Na]i in the mouse heart. We demonstrate a good correlation of this ratio with [Na]i measured with shift reagent at baseline and under conditions of elevated [Na]i. We compare the measurements of [Na]i using both shift reagent and TQF/DQF ratio in a cohort of wild type mouse hearts and in a transgenic PLM3SA mouse expressing a non-phosphorylatable form of phospholemman, showing a modest but measurable elevation of baseline [Na]i. MQF filtered 23Na NMR is a potentially useful tool for studying normal and pathophysiological changes in [Na]i, particularly in transgenic mouse models with altered Na regulation. PMID:26196304

  15. In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of Supercritical CO2 Incorporation in Smectite-Natural Organic Matter Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Hoyt, David W.; Burton, Sarah D.; Ferguson, Brennan O.; Varga, Tamas; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2014-01-29

    This paper presents an in situ NMR study of clay-natural organic polymer systems (a hectoritehumic acid [HA] composite) under CO2 storage reservoir conditions (90 bars CO2 pressure, 50°C). The 13C and 23Na NMR data show that supercritical CO2 interacts more strongly with the composite than with the base clay and does not react to form other C-containing species over several days at elevated CO2. With and without organic matter, the data suggest that CO2 enters the interlayer space of Na-hectorite equilibrated at 43% relative humidity. The presence of supercritical CO2 also leads to increased 23Na signal intensity, reduced line width at half height, increased basal width, more rapid 23Na T1 relaxation rates, and a shift to more positive resonance frequencies. Larger changes are observed for the hectorite-HA composite than for the base clay. In light of recently reported MD simulations of other polymer-Na-smectite composites, we interpret the observed changes as an increase in the rate of Na+ site hopping in the presence of supercritical CO2, the presence of potential new Na+ sorption sites when the humic acid is present, and perhaps an accompanying increase in the number of Na+ ions actively involved in site hopping. The results suggest that the presence of organic material either in clay interlayers or on external particle surfaces can significantly affect the behavior of supercritical CO2 and the mobility of metal ions in reservoir rocks.

  16. 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO2 selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-01

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO2 adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium.

  17. Thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. II. 1H and 23Na NMR study of the smectic mesophase of molten sodium n-butyrate and sodium isovalerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonekamp, J. E.; Eguchi, T.; Plesko, S.; Jonas, J.

    1983-08-01

    The 1H and 23Na NMR studies of smectic ionic mesophases of molten sodium n-butyrate and sodium isovalerate are reported over the temperature range of the stability of the liquid crystalline phases. The 1H spin-lattice relaxation times T1 at ν0=9.2, 24.3, and 60 MHz for the anions of both the systems are interpreted in terms of diffusion intermolecular relaxation mechanism. The predicted anion diffusion coefficients are in agreement with those measured directly by spin-echo technique and indicate that the anion diffuses rapidly. In contrast to the T1 relaxation mechanism the results obtained for the proton relaxation times in the rotating coordinate frame T1ρ indicate that the order-fluctuation relaxation mechanism determines the frequency dispersion of T1ρ. The analysis of the T1ρ data provides an approximate measure of the order parameter S as a function of temperature. Fourier transform spectra of the 23Na transitions show that the electric field gradient (EFG) at the Na+ ion is nonaveraged and of such a strength as to produce a second order quadrupole effect in the spectra of the central transition. From the first-order splitting, the quadrupole coupling constant (QCC) is obtained as a function of temperature. The gradual temperature change of QCC demonstrates that only a single liquid crystalline phase exists over the temperature interval of the stability of the smectic mesophase. Using approximate analysis the correlation time τc for the EFG fluctuation is obtained from the 23Na T1 data for the melts of both sodium n-butyrate and sodium isovalerate.

  18. Competition between Na + and Li + for Unsealed and Cytoskeleton-Depleted Human Red Blood Cell Membrane: A 23Na Multiple Quantum Filtered and 7Li NMR Relaxation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Chandra; Minadeo, Nicole; Toon, Jason; Graham, Daniel; Mota de Freitas, Duarte; Geraldes, Carlos F. G. C.

    1999-09-01

    Evidence for competition between Li+ and Na+ for binding sites of human unsealed and cytoskeleton-depleted human red blood cell (csdRBC) membranes was obtained from the effect of added Li+ upon the 23Na double quantum filtered (DQF) and triple quantum filtered (TQF) NMR signals of Na+-containing red blood cell (RBC) membrane suspensions. We found that, at low ionic strength, the observed quenching effect of Li+ on the 23Na TQF and DQF signal intensity probed Li+/Na+ competition for isotropic binding sites only. Membrane cytoskeleton depletion significantly decreased the isotropic signal intensity, strongly affecting the binding of Na+ to isotropic membrane sites, but had no effect on Li+/Na+ competition for those sites. Through the observed 23Na DQF NMR spectra, which allow probing of both isotropic and anisotropic Na+ motion, we found anisotropic membrane binding sites for Na+ when the total ionic strength was higher than 40 mM. This is a consequence of ionic strength effects on the conformation of the cytoskeleton, in particular on the dimer-tetramer equilibrium of spectrin. The determinant involvement of the cytoskeleton in the anisotropy of Na+ motion at the membrane surface was demonstrated by the isotropy of the DQF spectra of csdRBC membranes even at high ionic strength. Li+ addition initially quenched the isotropic signal the most, indicating preferential Li+/Na+ competition for the isotropic membrane sites. High ionic strength also increased the intensity of the anisotropic signal, due to its effect on the restructuring of the membrane cytoskeleton. Further Li+ addition competed with Na+ for those sites, quenching the anisotropic signal. 7Li T1 relaxation data for Li+-containing suspensions of unsealed and csdRBC membranes, in the absence and presence of Na+ at low ionic strength, showed that cytoskeleton depletion does not affect the affinity of Na+ for the RBC membrane, but increases the affinity of Li+ by 50%. This clearly indicates that cytoskeleton

  19. Triple-quantum filtered NMR imaging of sodium in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Keltner, J.R.

    1993-04-01

    In the past multiple-quantum filtered imaging of biexponential relaxation sodium-23 nuclei in the human brain has been limited by low signal to noise ratios; this thesis demonstrates that such imaging is feasible when using a modified gradient-selected triple-quantum filter at a repetition time which maximizes the signal to noise ratio. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of biexponential relaxation sodium-23 ({sup 23}Na) nuclei in the human brain may be useful for detecting ischemia, cancer, and pathophysiology related to manic-depression. Conventional single-quantum NMR imaging of in vivo biexponential relaxation {sup 23}Na signals is complicated by the presence of single-exponential relaxation {sup 23}Na signals. Multiple-quantum filters may be used to selectively image biexponential relaxation {sup 23}Na signals since these filters suppress single-exponential relaxation {sup 23}Na signals. In this thesis, the typical repetition times (200--300 ms) used for in vivo multiple-quantum filtered {sup 23}Na experiments are shown to be approximately 5 times greater than the optimal repetition time which maximizes multiple-quantum filtered SNR. Calculations and experimental verification show that the gradient-selected triple-quantum (GS3Q) filtered SNR for {sup 23}Na in a 4% agarose gel increases by a factor of two as the repetition time decreases from 300 ms to 55 ms. The measured relaxation times of the {sup 23}Na in the 4% agarose gel were similar to in vivo {sup 23}Na relaxation times.

  20. The effects of pre-salting methods on salt and water distribution of heavily salted cod, as analyzed by (1)H and (23)Na MRI, (23)Na NMR, low-field NMR and physicochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Gudjónsdóttir, María; Traoré, Amidou; Jónsson, Ásbjörn; Karlsdóttir, Magnea Gudrún; Arason, Sigurjón

    2015-12-01

    The effect of different pre-salting methods (brine injection with salt with/without polyphosphates, brining and pickling) on the water and salt distribution in dry salted Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) fillets was studied with proton and sodium NMR and MRI methods, supported by physicochemical analysis of salt and water content as well as water holding capacity. The study indicated that double head brine injection with salt and phosphates lead to the least heterogeneous water distribution, while pickle salting had the least heterogeneous salt distribution. Fillets from all treatments contained spots with unsaturated brine, increasing the risk of microbial denaturation of the fillets during storage. Since a homogeneous water and salt distribution was not achieved with the studied pre-salting methods, further optimizations of the salting process, including the pre-salting and dry salting steps, must be made in the future. PMID:26041245

  1. Short-T2 Imaging for Quantifying Concentration of Sodium (23Na) of Bi-Exponential T2 Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yongxian; Panigrahy, Ashok; Laymon, Charles M.; Lee, Vincent K.; Drappatz, Jan; Lieberman, Frank S.; Boada, Fernando E.; Mountz, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This work intends to demonstrate a new method for quantifying concentration of sodium (23Na) of bi-exponential T2 relaxation in patients on MRI scanners at 3.0 Tesla. Theory Two single-quantum (SQ) sodium images acquired at very-short and short echo times (TE=0.5 and 5.0ms) are subtracted to produce an image of the short-T2 component of the bi-exponential (or bound) sodium. An integrated calibration on the SQ and short-T2 images quantifies both total and bound sodium concentrations. Methods Numerical models were used to evaluate signal response of the proposed method to the short-T2 components. MRI scans on agar phantoms and brain tumor patients were performed to assess accuracy and performance of the proposed method, in comparison with a conventional method of triple-quantum filtering. Results A good linear relation (R2=0.98) was attained between the short-T2 image intensity and concentration of bound sodium. A reduced total scan time of 22min was achieved under the SAR restriction for human studies in quantifying both total and bound sodium concentrations. Conclusion The proposed method is feasible for quantifying bound sodium concentration in routine clinical settings at 3.0 Tesla. PMID:25078966

  2. Quantification of the Contribution of Extracellular Sodium to 23Na Multiple-Quantum-Filtered NMR Spectra of Suspensions of Human Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knubovets, Tatyana; Shinar, Hadassah; Navon, Gil

    1998-03-01

    23Na double-quantum-filtered (DQF) NMR enables the detection of anisotropic motion of sodium ions due to their interaction with ordered structures in biological tissues. Using the technique, anisotropic motion was found for sodium ions in mammalian red blood cell suspensions (RBC) and the effect was shown to correlate with the integrity of membrane cytoskeleton. In the present study relative contributions to the DQF and triple-quantum-filtered (TQF) spectra of sodium bound to anisotropic and isotropic binding sites in the intra- and extracellular sodium pools (Na content being 15 and 150 mM, respectively) of human RBC were quantified for different hematocrits. DQF spectra were measured by a modified Jeener-Broekaert pulse sequence which enabled exclusive detection of anisotropically moving sodium ions. The relative contributions of the extracellular sodium to the TQF and DQF spectra decreased as the hematocrit increased, but their efficiency relative to the sodium content increased. The contribution of the extracellular sodium to the TQF signal was found to dominate the spectrum of the RBC suspension at all hematocrits studied. The contribution of the extracellular sodium to the DQF was significantly smaller than that to the TQF and was only 22% at a high hematocrit of about 90%.

  3. Application of 1H and 23Na magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy to define the HRBC up-taking of MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabi, Luisella; Paleari, Lino; Biondi, Luca; Linati, Laura; De Miranda, Mario; Ghelli, Stefano

    2003-09-01

    The up-take of Gd(III) complexes of BOPTA, DTPA, DOTA, EDTP, HPDO3A, and DOTP in HRBC has been evaluated by measuring the lanthanide induced shift (LIS) produced by the corresponding dysprosium complexes (DC) on the MAS-NMR resonances of water protons and free sodium ions. These complexes are important in their use as MRI contrast agents (MRI-CA) in diagnostics. 1H and 23Na MAS-NMR spectra of HRBC suspension, collected at 9.395 T, show only one signal due to extra- and intra-cellular water (or sodium). In MAS spectra, the presence of DC in a cellular compartment produces the LIS of only the nuclei (water proton or sodium) in that cellular compartment and this LIS can be related to the DC concentrations (by the experimental curves of LIS vs. DC concentrations) collected in the physiological solution. To obtain correct results about LIS, the use of MAS technique is mandatory, because it guarantees the only the nuclei staying in the same cellular compartment where the LC is present show the LIS. In all the cases considered, the addition of the DC to HRBC (100% hematocrit) produced a shift of only the extra-cellular water (or sodium) signal and the gradient of concentration ( GC) between extra- and intra-cellular compartments resulted greater than 100:1, when calculated by means of sodium signals. These high values of GC are direct proofs that none of the tested dysprosium complexes crosses the HRBC membrane. Since the DC are iso-structural to the gadolinium complexes the corresponding gadolinium ones (MRI-CA) do not cross the HRBC membrane and, consequently, they are not up-taken in HRBC. The GC values calculated by means of water proton signals resulted much lower than those obtained by sodium signals. This proves that the choice of the isotope is a crucial step in order to use this method in the best way. In fact, GC value depends on the lowest detectable LIS which, in turn, depends on the nature of the LC (lanthanide complex) and the observed isotopes.

  4. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  5. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  6. Molecular and electron-spin structures of a ring-shaped mixed-valence polyoxovanadate (IV, V) studied by (11)B and (23)Na solid-state NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takahiro; Yamase, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    (11)B and (23)Na solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of ring-shaped paramagnetic crystals of H15[V7(IV)V5(V)B32O84Na4]·13H2O containing seven d(1) electrons from V(IV) were studied. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum MAS NMR experiments were performed at moderate (9.4T) and ultrahigh magnetic fields (21.6T). The NMR parameters for quadrupole and isotropic chemical shift interactions were estimated by simulation of the NMR spectra and from relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Four Na ions incorporated into the framework were found to occupy four distinct sites with different populations. The DFT calculation showed that d(1) electrons with effectively one up-spin caused by strong antiferromagnetic interactions were delocalized over the 12V ions. PMID:27018827

  7. NMR relaxation behavior and quadrupole coupling constants of 39K and 23Na ions in glycerol. Comparisons with 39K tissue data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellard, R. Mark; Shehan, B. Philip; Craik, David J.; Adam, William R.

    The quadrupole coupling constants (qcc) for 39K and 23Na ions in glycerol have been calculated from linewidths measured as a function of temperature (which in turn results in changes in solution viscosity). The qcc of 39K in glycerol is found to be 1.7 MHz, and that of 23Na is 1.6 MHz. The relaxation behavior of 39K and 23Na ions in glycerol shows magnetic field and temperature dependence consistent with the equations for transverse relaxation more commonly used to describe the reorientation of nuclei in a molecular framework with intramolecular field gradients. It is shown, however, that τ c is not simply proportional to the ratio of viscosity/temperature (η T). The 39K qcc in glycerol and the value of 1.3 MHz estimated for this nucleus in aqueous solution are much greater than values of 0.075 to 0.12 MHz calculated from T 2 measurements of 39K in freshly excised rat tissues. This indicates that, in biological samples, processes such as exchange of potassium between intracellular compartments or diffusion of ions through locally ordered regions play a significant role in determining the effective quadrupole coupling constant and correlation time governing 39K relaxation. T1 and T2 measurements of rat muscle at two magnetic fields also indicate that a more complex correlation function may be required to describe the relaxation of 39K in tissue. Similar results and conclusions are found for 23Na.

  8. 23Na Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Lower Leg of Acute Heart Failure Patients during Diuretic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hammon, Matthias; Grossmann, Susan; Linz, Peter; Kopp, Christoph; Dahlmann, Anke; Garlichs, Christoph; Janka, Rolf; Cavallaro, Alexander; Luft, Friedrich C.; Uder, Michael; Titze, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Objective Na+ can be stored in muscle and skin without commensurate water accumulation. The aim of this study was to assess Na+ and H2O in muscle and skin with MRI in acute heart failure patients before and after diuretic treatment and in a healthy cohort. Methods Nine patients (mean age 78 years; range 58–87) and nine age and gender-matched controls were studied. They underwent 23Na/1H-MRI at the calf with a custom-made knee coil. Patients were studied before and after diuretic therapy. 23Na-MRI gray-scale measurements of Na+-phantoms served to quantify Na+-concentrations. A fat-suppressed inversion recovery sequence was used to quantify H2O content. Results Plasma Na+-levels did not change during therapy. Mean Na+-concentrations in muscle and skin decreased after furosemide therapy (before therapy: 30.7±6.4 and 43.5±14.5 mmol/L; after therapy: 24.2±6.1 and 32.2±12.0 mmol/L; p˂0.05 and p˂0.01). Water content measurements did not differ significantly before and after furosemide therapy in muscle (p = 0.17) and only tended to be reduced in skin (p = 0.06). Na+-concentrations in calf muscle and skin of patients before and after diuretic therapy were significantly higher than in healthy subjects (18.3±2.5 and 21.1±2.3 mmol/L). Conclusions 23Na-MRI shows accumulation of Na+ in muscle and skin in patients with acute heart failure. Diuretic treatment can mobilize this Na+-deposition; however, contrary to expectations, water and Na+-mobilization are poorly correlated. PMID:26501774

  9. Spin dynamics in Na4-x Ir3O8 (x  =  0.3 and 0.7) investigated by 23Na NMR and μSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sungwon; Baek, S.-H.; Balodhi, Ashiwini; Lee, W.-J.; Choi, K.-Y.; Watanabe, I.; Lord, J. S.; Büchner, B.; Suh, B. J.; Singh, Yogesh

    2015-12-01

    We report 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and zero-field (ZF) and longitudinal-field (LF) muon spin relaxation (μSR) measurements of the depleted hyperkagome compounds Na4-x Ir3O8 (x  =  0.3 and 0.7), which undergo an insulator-semimetal transition as a function of x. The 23Na spin-lattice relaxation rates, T1-1 , follow a T 2.5 power law behavior at accessible temperatures of T  =  120-350 K. A substantial temperature dependence of T1-1 indicates the presence of gapped excitations at elevated temperatures through the transition to a semimetallic phase. ZF-μSR results reveal that hole-doping leads to a melting of quasi-static order to a dynamically fluctuating state. The very slow muon depolarization rate which varies hardly with temperature indicates that spins are close to an itinerant limit in the largest doping x  =  0.7. The dynamic relaxation rates extracted from the LF-μSR spectra show a three-dimensional diffusive transport. Our combined NMR and μSR results suggest the occurrence of intriguing spin and charge excitations across the insulator-semimetal transition.

  10. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  11. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  12. X-ray CT and NMR imaging of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    In little more than a decade, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging have become the premier modalities of medical radiology. Both of these imaging techniques also promise to be useful tools in petrophysics and reservoir engineering, because CT and NMR can nondestructively image a host of physical and chemical properties of porous rocks and multiple fluid phases contained within their pores. The images are taken within seconds to minutes, at reservoir temperatures and pressures, with spatial resolution on the millimeter and submillimeter level. The physical properties imaged by the two techniques are complementary. CT images bulk density and effective atomic number. NMR images the nuclide concentration, M/sub 0/, of a variety of nuclei (/sup 1/H, /sup 19/F, /sup 23/Na, /sup 31/P, etc.), their longitudinal and transverse relaxation-time curves (t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/), and their chemical shift spectra. In rocks, CT images both rock matrix and pore fluids, while NMR images only mobile fluids and the interactions of these mobile fluids with the confining surfaces of the pores.

  13. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  14. NMR Imaging: Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingle, Jeremy Mark

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis presents three original contributions to the field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR): the experimental framework and analysis for the measurement of a new imaging parameter to describe perfusion; the measurement and analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity and a practical correction system for their reduction; a novel system for the synchronous control of NMR experiments based on the microprogrammed concept. The thesis begins with an introduction to the theory of NMR. The application of NMR to imaging is also introduced with emphasis on the techniques which developed into those in common use today. Inaccurate determination of the traditional NMR parameters (T_1 and T_2 and the molecular diffusion coefficient) can be caused by non-diffusive fluid movement within the sample. The experimental basis for determining a new imaging parameter --the Perfusion coefficient--is presented. This provides a measure of forced isotropic fluid motion through an organ or tissue. The instrumentation required for conducting NMR experiments is described in order to introduce the contribution made in this area during this research: A sequence controller. The controller is based on the concept of microprogramming and enables completely synchronous output of 128 bits of data. The software for the generation and storage of control data and the regulation of the data to provide experimental control is microcomputer based. It affords precise and accurate regulation of the magnetic field gradients, the rf synthesizer and the spectrometer for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Fundamental to the science of NMR is the presence of a magnetic field. A detailed study of the analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity in terms of spherical harmonics is presented. The field of a whole body imaging system with poor inhomogeneity was measured and analyzed to determine and describe the components of the inhomogeneity. Finally a

  15. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR and powder x-ray diffraction studies of sodium aluminate speciation and the mechanistics of aluminum hydroxide precipitation upon acid hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, S.M.; Hanna, J.V.

    1994-08-24

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR, powder X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopic investigations of freeze-dried sodium aluminates and aluminum hydroxides formed through acid hydrolysis have been undertaken, with OH/Al hydrolysis ratios between 5.3 and 2.8 being analyzed. Numerous {sup 27}AlNMR resonances were observed, the intensities of which vary as a function of OH/Al ratio, and these have been assigned to four-, five-, and six-coordinate aluminum species constituting a variety of structural moieties. The dominant species at an OH/Al ratio above 4.4 appears to be a Q{sup o}Na[Al(OH);{sub 4}] salt, as indicated by a {sup 27}Al resonance at 86.6 ppm. In addition, a second, broader resonance at 71.3 ppm demonstrates the simultaneous existence of further four-coordinate aluminum species linked thorough oxo bonds to other four-coordinate aluminums (e.g., Q{sup 2} [Al(OH);{sub 2}(OAl){sub 2}];{sup x-}). At an OH/Al ratio between 4.4 and 4.1, a water-soluble phase forms that contains both four- and six-coordinate aluminum. At OH/Al ratios fo 4.0 and below, a water-soluble phase forms that contains both four-and six-coordinate aluminum. AT OH/Al ratios of 4.0 and below, a water-insoluble phase exists possessing four-, five-, and six-coordinate aluminum. At OH/Al{le}3.9 range exhibits {sup 27}Al chemical shifts similar to those reported for transitional aluminas such as {gamma}-, {eta}-, and 0-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and an infrared spectrum similar to pseudo-spinel gels, suggesting that a pseudo-spinel intermediate is the first phase involved in the crystallization of gibbsite. The resonance assigned to five-coordinate aluminum probably results from species involved in the transformation of the pseudo-spinal phase to pseudo-boehmite. The formation of gibbssite on the acid hydrolysis of alkaline sodium aluminate solutions thus appears to follow the pathway pseudo-spinel {r_arrow} pseudo-boehmite {r_arrow} bayerite {r_arrow} gibbsite. 82 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Nanoscale phase quantification in lead-free (Bi1 /2Na1 /2) TiO3-BaTiO3 relaxor ferroelectrics by means of 23Na NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groszewicz, Pedro B.; Breitzke, Hergen; Dittmer, Robert; Sapper, Eva; Jo, Wook; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Rödel, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    We address the unsolved question on the structure of relaxor ferroelectrics at the atomic level by characterizing lead-free piezoceramic solid solutions (100 -x ) (Bi1 /2Na1 /2) TiO3-x BaTiO3 (BNT -x BT ) (for x =1 ,4 ,6 , and 15). Based on the relative intensity between spectral components in quadrupolar perturbed 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance, we present direct evidence of the coexistence of cubic and polar local symmetries in these relaxor ferroelectrics. In addition, we demonstrate how the cubic phase vanishes whenever a ferroelectric state is induced, either by field cooling or changing the dopant amount, supporting the relation between this cubic phase and the relaxor state.

  18. Application of 23Na MRI to Monitor Chemotherapeutic Response in RIF-1 Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Babsky, Andriy M; Hekmatyar, Shahryar K; Zhang, Hong; Solomon, James L; Bansal, Navin

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Effects of an alkylating anticancer drug, cyclophosphamide (Cp), on 23Na signal intensity (23Na SI) and water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were examined in subcutaneously-implanted radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumors by in vivo 23Na and 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI experiments were performed on untreated control (n = 5) and Cp-treated (n = 6) C3H mice, once before Cp injection (300 mg/kg) then daily for 3 days after treatment. Tumor volumes were significantly lower in treated animals 2 and 3 days posttreatment. At the same time points, MRI experiments showed an increase in both 23Na SI and water ADC in treated tumors, whereas control tumors did not show any significant changes. The correlation between 23Na SI and water ADC changes was dramatically increased in the Cp-treated group, suggesting that the observed increases in 23Na SI and water ADC were caused by the same mechanism. Histologic sections showed decreased cell density in the regions of increased 23Na and water ADC SI. Destructive chemical analysis showed that Cp treatment increased the relative extracellular space and tumor [Na+]. We conclude that the changes in water ADC and 23Na SI were largely due to an increase in extracellular space. 23Na MRI and 1H water ADC measurements may provide valuable noninvasive techniques for monitoring chemotherapeutic responses. PMID:16026645

  19. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Dieckman, Stephen L.; Ellingson, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  20. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  1. 7-T (35)Cl and (23)Na MR Imaging for Detection of Mutation-dependent Alterations in Muscular Edema and Fat Fraction with Sodium and Chloride Concentrations in Muscular Periodic Paralyses.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marc-André; Nagel, Armin M; Marschar, Anja M; Glemser, Philip; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Wolf, Maya B; Ladd, Mark E; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To determine whether altered sodium (Na(+)) and chloride (Cl(-)) homeostasis can be visualized in periodic paralyses by using 7-T sodium 23 ((23)Na) and chlorine 35 ((35)Cl) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and informed consent of all participants were obtained. (23)Na (repetition time msec/echo time msec, 160/0.35) and (35)Cl (40/0.6) MR imaging of both lower legs was performed with a 7-T whole-body system in patients with genetically confirmed hypokalemic periodic paralysis (Cav1.1-R1239H mutation, n = 5; Cav1.1-R528H mutation, n = 8) and Andersen-Tawil syndrome (n = 3) and in 16 healthy volunteers. Additionally, each participant underwent 3-T proton MR imaging on the same day by using T1-weighted, short-tau inversion-recovery, and Dixon-type sequences. Muscle edema was assessed on short-tau inversion-recovery images, fatty degeneration was assessed on T1-weighted images, and muscular fat fraction was quantified with Dixon-type imaging. Na(+) and Cl(-) were quantified in the soleus muscle by using three phantoms that contained 10-, 20-, and 30-mmol/L NaCl solution and 5% agarose gel as a reference. Parametric data for all subpopulations were tested by using one-way analysis of variance with the Dunnett test, and correlations were assessed with the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Median muscular (23)Na concentration was higher in patients with Cav1.1-R1239H (34.7 mmol/L, P < .001), Cav1.1-R528H (32.0 mmol/L, P < .001), and Kir2.1 (24.3 mmol/L, P = .035) mutations than in healthy volunteers (19.9 mmol/L). Median muscular normalized (35)Cl signal intensity was higher in patients with Cav1.1-R1239H (27.6, P < .001) and Cav1.1-R528H (23.6, P < .001) than in healthy volunteers (12.6), but not in patients with the Kir2.1 mutation (14.3, P = .517). When compared with volunteers, patients with Cav1.1-R1239H and Cav1.1-R528H showed increased muscular edema (P < .001 and P = .003, respectively

  2. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  3. Information preserving image compression for archiving NMR images.

    PubMed

    Li, C C; Gokmen, M; Hirschman, A D; Wang, Y

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a result on information preserving compression of NMR images for the archiving purpose. Both Lynch-Davisson coding and linear predictive coding have been studied. For NMR images of 256 x 256 x 12 resolution, the Lynch-Davisson coding with a block size of 64 as applied to prediction error sequences in the Gray code bit planes of each image gave an average compression ratio of 2.3:1 for 14 testing images. The predictive coding with a third order linear predictor and the Huffman encoding of the prediction error gave an average compression ratio of 3.1:1 for 54 images under test, while the maximum compression ratio achieved was 3.8:1. This result is one step further toward the improvement, albeit small, of the information preserving image compression for medical applications. PMID:1913579

  4. (39) K and (23) Na relaxation times and MRI of rat head at 21.1 T.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Armin M; Umathum, Reiner; Rösler, Manuela B; Ladd, Mark E; Litvak, Ilya; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Schepkin, Victor D

    2016-06-01

    At ultrahigh magnetic field strengths (B0  ≥ 7.0 T), potassium ((39) K) MRI might evolve into an interesting tool for biomedical research. However, (39) K MRI is still challenging because of the low NMR sensitivity and short relaxation times. In this work, we demonstrated the feasibility of (39) K MRI at 21.1 T, determined in vivo relaxation times of the rat head at 21.1 T, and compared (39) K and sodium ((23) Na) relaxation times of model solutions containing different agarose gel concentrations at 7.0 and 21.1 T. (39) K relaxation times were markedly shorter than those of (23) Na. Compared with the lower field strength, (39) K relaxation times were up to 1.9- (T1 ), 1.4- (T2S ) and 1.9-fold (T2L ) longer at 21.1 T. The increase in the (23) Na relaxation times was less pronounced (up to 1.2-fold). Mono-exponential fits of the (39) K longitudinal relaxation time at 21.1 T revealed T1  = 14.2 ± 0.1 ms for the healthy rat head. The (39) K transverse relaxation times were 1.8 ± 0.2 ms and 14.3 ± 0.3 ms for the short (T2S ) and long (T2L ) components, respectively. (23) Na relaxation times were markedly longer (T1  = 41.6 ± 0.4 ms; T2S  = 4.9 ± 0.2 ms; T2L  = 33.2 ± 0.2 ms). (39) K MRI of the healthy rat head could be performed with a nominal spatial resolution of 1 × 1 × 1 mm(3) within an acquisition time of 75 min. The increase in the relaxation times with magnetic field strength is beneficial for (23) Na and (39) K MRI at ultrahigh magnetic field strength. Our results demonstrate that (39) K MRI at 21.1 T enables acceptable image quality for preclinical research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27061712

  5. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  6. NMR imaging of components and materials for DOE application

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.R.

    1993-12-01

    The suitability for using NMR imaging to characterize liquid, polymeric, and solid materials was reviewed. The most attractive applications for NMR imaging appear to be liquid-filled porous samples, partially cured polymers, adhesives, and potting compounds, and composite polymers/high explosives containing components with widely varying thermal properties. Solid-state NMR line-narrowing and signal-enhancing markedly improve the imaging possibilities of true solid and materials. These techniques provide unique elemental and chemical shift information for highly complex materials and complement images with similar spatial resolution, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  7. NMR velocity imaging of single liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, A.; Stapf, S.; Bluemich, B.

    2007-03-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction processes are often found in industrial applications when a bulk phase needs to be purified from dissolved components. The extraction strategy consists of dissolving the impurities into a second, carrier phase, with optimal performance being guaranteed by maximizing both contact interface area and mass transfer rate, in the shape of a swarm of dispersed droplets. Their buoyancy-driven flow within the continuous medium induces internal fluid motion driven by momentum transfer at the drop surface. This convective transport enhances mass transfer and the efficiency of an extraction column. However, understanding mass transfer depends on a proper description of the flow field inside and outside the drops. For that purpose, a cell was built that enables the levitation of a single drop within a counterstream of water. NMR velocity imaging was then applied to drops of different fluids to monitor the internal dynamics as a function of drop size, age, and interface tension. Vortex-type patterns in at least part of the drop were observed where their size and velocity magnitude depended on the system impurity concentration.

  8. A Demonstration of Imaging on an NMR Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a simple demonstration that relates the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used in medicine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Included are materials, procedures, and probable results. (KR)

  9. Laundering and Deinking Applications of 1H NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutunjian, P. N.; Borchardt, J. K.; Prieto, N. E.; Raney, K. H.; Ferris, J. A.

    One-dimensional 1H NMR imaging techniques are used to visualize oil removal from fabrics and paper fibers immersed in aqueous solutions of nonionic detergents. The method provides a unique approach to the study of oil-removal kinetics in nonionic detergent systems where traditional optical techniques fail due to solution turbidity. The only requirement of the NMR experiment is the use of deuterated water in order to selectively image the hydrocarbon phase. Preliminary applications to laundering and paper deinking are discussed.

  10. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  11. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging.

    PubMed

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles. PMID:27078384

  12. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles.

  13. NMR imaging of fluid dynamics in reservoir core.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B A; Yamanashi, W S

    1988-01-01

    A medical NMR imaging instrument has been modified to image water and oil in reservoir rocks by the construction of a new receiving coil. Both oil and water inside the core produced readily detectable proton NMR signals, while the rock matrix produced no signal. Because of similar T2 NMR relaxation times, the water was doped with a paramagnetic ion, Mn+2, to reduce its T2 relaxation time. This procedure enhanced the separation between the oil and water phases in the resulting images. Sequential measurements, as water imbibed into one end and oil was expelled from the other end of a core plug, produced a series of images which showed the dynamics of the fluids. For water-wet Berea Sandstone a flood front was readily observed, but some of the oil was apparently left behind in small, isolated pockets which were larger than individual pores. After several additional pore volumes of water flowed through the plug the NMR image indicated a homogeneous distribution of oil. The amount of residual oil, as determined from the ratio of NMR intensities, closely approximated the residual oil saturation of fully flooded Berea samples measured by Dean-Stark extraction. A Berea sandstone core treated to make it partially oil-wet, did not show a definitive flood front, but appeared to channel the water around the perimeter of the core plug. The relative ease with which these images were made indicates that NMR imaging can be a useful technique to follow the dynamics of oil and water through a core plug for a variety of production processes. PMID:3226235

  14. Determination of fat content in NMR images of meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballerini, Lucia

    2000-12-01

    In this paper we present an application to food science of image processing technique. We describe a method for determining fat content in beef meat. The industry of meat faces a permanent need for improved methods for meat quality evaluation. Researchers want improved techniques to deepen their understanding of meat features. Expectations of consumers for meat quality grow constantly, which induces the necessity of quality control. Recent advances in the area of computer and video processing have created new ways to monitor quality in the food industry. We investigate the use of a new technology to control the quality of food: NMR imaging. The inherent advantages of NMR images are many. Chief among these unprecedented contrasts between the various structures present in meat like muscle, fat, and connective tissue. Moreover, the three-dimensional nature of the NMR method allow us to analyze isolated cross-sectional slices of the meat and to measure the volumetric content of fat, not only the fat visible on the surface. We propose a segmentation algorithm for the detection of fat together with a filtering technique to remove intensity inhomogeneities in NMR images caused by non-uniformities of the magnetic field during acquisition. Measurements have been successfully correlated with chemical analysis and digital photography. Results show that the NMR technique is a promising non-invasive method to determine the fat content in meat.

  15. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devience, Stephen J.; Pham, Linh M.; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1 T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ˜100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species (1H, 19F, 31P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (˜20 mT) using two complementary sensor modalities.

  16. Hepatic cancer: Correlative imaging with radioimmunodetection, NMR, and TCT

    SciTech Connect

    De Lund, F.H.; Lieber, A.; Ram, M.D.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of radioimmunodetection (RAID) imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of hepatic tumors. Twelve consecutive patients with metastatic (11) or primary (1) carcinoma of the liver were imaged concurrently with labeled antibodies-to-tumor antigens and by nuclear magnetic resonance. Evidence of hepatic tumors was corrected with other diagnostic procedures including TCT. Eleven patients were imaged with I-131 labeled antibodies to CEA, CSAP and one with I-131 labeled antibodies to AFP. Polyclonal, monoclonal, and Fab'/sub 2/ antibodies were used. The preparation and labeling of the antibodies have been described previously. Each patient received 2-3 mCi of labeled antibodies and was imaged at 24 to 48 hrs. Nontarget radioactivity was diminished by other radionuclides simulating nontumor distribution using a computer subtraction technique. NMR images were obtained with a 0.15T resistive instrument. In all twelve patients hepatic tumor was diagnosed by RAID. Nine of the hepatic tumors were confirmed by other methods. NMR demonstrated four positive findings in these nine. Computerized tomography detected tumors in three of the nine patients at the time of the first RAID examination, and subsequently in one more patient when RAID and NMR examinations were performed concurrently. In this series of patients the detection of hepatic cancer by RAID showed twice the sensitivity of NMR or TCT.

  17. Measurement of a wide range of intracellular sodium concentrations in erythrocytes by 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Y; Vinay, P; Desroches, M

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of the 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the sodium concentration in erythrocytes was tested by comparing the NMR results to those obtained by emission-flame photometry. Comparisons were made on aqueous solutions, hemolysates, gels, ghosts, and intact erythrocytes. The intra- and extracellular 23Na NMR signals were distinguished by addition of the dysprosium tripolyphosphate [Dy(PPP)7-2] shift reagent to the extracellular fluid. The intra- and extracellular volumes of ghosts and cells were determined by the isotope dilution method. Our results indicate that greater than 20% of the intracellular signal remains undetected by NMR in ghosts and cells. When the cells are hemolyzed, the amount of NMR-detectable sodium varies depending on the importance of gel formation. In hemolysates prepared by water addition, the NMR and flame photometry results are identical. The loss of signal in ghosts, cells, and undiluted hemolysates is attributed to partial binding of the Na+ ion to intracellular components, this binding being operative only when these components exist in a gel state. In a second part, 31P NMR was used to monitor the penetration of the shift reagent into the cells during incubation. Our data demonstrate that free Dy3+ can slowly accumulate inside the red cell. PMID:3986283

  18. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  19. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  20. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, David H.; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  1. Mobile sensor for high resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Mauler, Jörg; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2009-05-01

    In this work we describe the construction of a mobile NMR tomograph with a highly homogeneous magnetic field. Fast MRI techniques as well as NMR spectroscopy measurements were carried out. The magnet is based on a Halbach array built from identical permanent magnet blocks generating a magnetic field of 0.22 T. To shim the field inhomogeneities inherent to magnet arrays constructed from these materials, a shim strategy based on the use of movable magnet blocks is employed. With this approach a reduction of the line-width from ˜20 kHz to less than 0.1 kHz was achieved, that is by more than two orders of magnitude, in a volume of 21 cm 3. Implementing a RARE sequence, 3D images of different objects placed in this volume were obtained in short experimental times. Moreover, by reducing the sample size to 1 cm 3, sub ppm resolution is obtained in 1H NMR spectra.

  2. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, David H; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  3. In situ assessment of tumor vascularity using fluorine NMR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ceckler, T L; Gibson, S L; Hilf, R; Bryant, R G

    1990-03-01

    In situ fluorine NMR imaging has been used to measure vascularity in subcutaneously implanted mammary tumors. Oxyferol, a perfluorinated blood substitute comprised of an emulsion of 25% w/v perfluorotributylamine, was used as a tracer. Following iv administration, this perfluorocarbon emulsion remains primarily in the vasculature during the image acquisition period. The distribution of the PFTA in the 19F NMR image gives a map of tissue regions with intact vascularity. This technique has been used to demonstrate decreased blood flow in necrotic regions of R3230AC mammary tumors in which vasculature had been damaged either as a result of spontaneous necrosis or by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Damage to tumor vascularity following PDT was observed prior to the development of necrosis. PMID:2325542

  4. (22)Ne(proton, gamma)(23)Na, (23)Na(proton, gamma)(24)Mg, and globular cluster abundance anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Stephen Earl, Jr.

    Anticorrelations between sodium and oxygen have been observed in red giant stars in globular clusters, contrary to expectations from the standard theory of stellar evolution. It has been proposed that the 23Na is being produced through the NeNa cycle operating in layers above the main hydrogen-burning shell. The (p, γ) reactions that produce and destroy sodium have large uncertainties because of the possible influence of several resonances. We have carried out measurements of the ( 3He, d) proton-stripping reaction on 22Ne and 23Na in order to study these resonances. The upper limits on the resonance strengths of two possible resonances at Ecm = 68 and 100 keV, that account for most of the uncertainty in 22Ne( p, γ)23Na, have been reduced by factors of 10 and 4, respectively. The reaction rate of 23Na(p, γ) 24Mg has been increased dramatically with the observation of the resonance at Ecm = 136 keV with an increased strength from 10 to 6300 times stronger than the previously used value. The effect of these changes is to establish the nuclear reactions that can produce sodium in the red giant hydrogen-burning shell. The production of sodium is seen to coincide with the destruction of oxygen, through the NeNa and the CNO cycle respectively.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance of 23Na ions interacting with the gramicidin channel.

    PubMed Central

    Monoi, H.

    1985-01-01

    Basic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) features of 23Na ions bound to the gramicidin channel (packaged into lecithin liposomes) were studied. The first binding constant K1 of Na+ was not significantly dependent on channel models employed. With the two-identical-site model (Model I), K1 was 13.7 (+/- 1.4) molal-1 (in the activity basis) at 25 degrees C; when the binding of a third ion was included (Model II), it was 13.0 (+/- 2.0) molal-1. The second binding constant K2 was model dependent; it was 1.6 (+/- 0.2) and 3-4 molal-1 for Models I and II, respectively. The rate constants, k-1 and k-2, of Na+ for exit from singly and doubly loaded channels, respectively, were 8 X 10(5) s-1 less than or equal to k-1 less than or equal to 3 X 10(6) s-1 and 8 X 10(5) s-1 less than or equal to k-2 less than or equal to 1.0 X 10(7) s-1 at 25 degrees C; the lower bound represents a rough approximation of k-1. The ratio k-2/k-1 was greater than one and did not greatly exceed 20. From the competition experiment, K1 of T1+ was 5.7 (+/- 0.6) X 10(2) molal-1. The longitudinal relaxation time T1 of bound 23Na in the state of single occupancy (T 1B sing) was virtually independent of models, 0.56 (+/- 0.03) and 0.55 (+/- 0.04) ms at 25 degrees C for Models I and II, respectively. For the state of double occupancy, T1 of bound 23Na (T 1B doub) was model dependent: 0.27 (+/- 0.01) and 0.4-0.6 ms for Models I and II. The correlation time tau c of bound 23Na was 2.2 (+/- 0.2) ns at 25 degrees C for single occupancy; tau c for double occupancy was not significantly different from this value. The estimated tau c was found to involve no appreciable contribution of the exchange of 23Na between the channel and the bulk solution. Thé quadrupole coupling constant chi was 1.0 (+/- 0.1) MHz for 23Na in single occupancy; chi for double occupancy was 0.9-1.4 MHz, depending on models. A lower bound of the average quadrupole coupling constant chi alpha was 0.13-0.26 MHz at 25 degrees C for 23Na in single

  6. Time-of-flight flow imaging using NMR remote detection

    SciTech Connect

    Granwehr, Josef; Harel, Elad; Han, Song-I; Garcia, Sandra; Pines,Alex; Sen, Pabitra N.; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2005-05-05

    A time-of-flight imaging technique is introduced to visualize fluid flow and dispersion through porous media using NMR. As the fluid flows through a sample, the nuclear spin magnetization is modulated by RF pulses and magnetic field gradients to encode the spatial coordinates of the fluid. When the fluid leaves the sample, its magnetization is recorded by a second RF coil. This scheme not only facilitates a time-dependent imaging of fluid flow, it also allows a separate optimization of encoding and detection subsystems to enhance overall sensitivity. The technique is demonstrated by imaging gas flow through a porous rock.

  7. Improvements in Technique of NMR Imaging and NMR Diffusion Measurements in the Presence of Background Gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianyu

    In this work, modification of the cosine current distribution rf coil, PCOS, has been introduced and tested. The coil produces a very homogeneous rf magnetic field, and it is inexpensive to build and easy to tune for multiple resonance frequency. The geometrical parameters of the coil are optimized to produce the most homogeneous rf field over a large volume. To avoid rf field distortion when the coil length is comparable to a quarter wavelength, a parallel PCOS coil is proposed and discussed. For testing rf coils and correcting B _1 in NMR experiments, a simple, rugged and accurate NMR rf field mapping technique has been developed. The method has been tested and used in 1D, 2D, 3D and in vivo rf mapping experiments. The method has been proven to be very useful in the design of rf coils. To preserve the linear relation between rf output applied on an rf coil and modulating input for an rf modulating -amplifying system of NMR imaging spectrometer, a quadrature feedback loop is employed in an rf modulator with two orthogonal rf channels to correct the amplitude and phase non-linearities caused by the rf components in the rf system. The modulator is very linear over a large range and it can generate an arbitrary rf shape. A diffusion imaging sequence has been developed for measuring and imaging diffusion in the presence of background gradients. Cross terms between the diffusion sensitizing gradients and background gradients or imaging gradients can complicate diffusion measurement and make the interpretation of NMR diffusion data ambiguous, but these have been eliminated in this method. Further, the background gradients has been measured and imaged. A dipole random distribution model has been established to study background magnetic fields Delta B and background magnetic gradients G_0 produced by small particles in a sample when it is in a B_0 field. From this model, the minimum distance that a spin can approach a particle can be determined by measuring

  8. Exploiting Image Registration for Automated Resonance Assignment in NMR

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Stephens, Thomas; Liu, Jian; Tjandra, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Summary Analysis of protein NMR data involves the assignment of resonance peaks in a number of multidimensional data sets. To establish resonance assignment a three-dimensional search is used to match a pair of common variables, such as chemical shifts of the same spin system, in different NMR spectra. We show that by displaying the variables to be compared in two-dimensional plots the process can be simplified. Moreover, by utilizing a fast Fourier transform (FFT) cross-correlation algorithm, more common to the field of image registration or pattern matching, we can automate this process. Here, we use sequential NMR backbone assignment as an example to show that the combination of correlation plots and segmented pattern matching establishes fast backbone assignment in fifteen proteins of varying sizes. For example, the 265-residue RalBP1 protein was 95.4% correctly assigned in 10 seconds. The same concept can be applied to any multidimensional NMR data set where analysis comprises the comparison of two variables. This modular and robust approach offers high efficiency with excellent computational scalability and could be easily incorporated into existing assignment software. PMID:25828257

  9. Multinuclear NMR Imaging of Fluid Phases in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S. N.; Dechter, J. J.; Komoroski, R. A.

    Multinuclear NMR of 7Li, 19F, and 1H has been investigated as a method for discriminating multiple fluid phases in porous rock. Good 7Li NMR images from LiCl brine in saturated Berea sandstone were obtained within a few hours at 1 × 1 × 5 mm 3 resolution using a low-TE, 3D volume imaging sequence. At 4.7 T, the 7Li T1 was 750 ms, and T2 was 10 ms. High-quality 19F and 1H images of a model fluorinated injectant (trifluorotoluene) in Berea were obtained at 0.4 × 0.4 × 3 mm 3 resolution in a few hours. Fluorine-19 imaging was found to be easier than 1H imaging due to the narrower 19F resonance and comparable T1 and T2 in Berea sandstone. Lithium-7 and 19F imaging offer alternatives for discriminating aqueous and organic phases unambiguously in flooded oil cores, especially where 1H signals for the two phases are unresolved.

  10. A double-tuned 1H/23Na dual resonator system for tissue sodium concentration measurements in the rat brain via Na-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Tabbert, Martin; Junge, Sven; Gallagher, Lindsay; Mhairi Macrae, I.; Fagan, Andrew J.

    2010-12-01

    A method for quantifying the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the rat brain from 23Na-MR images was developed. TSC is known to change in a variety of common human diseases and holds considerable potential to contribute to their study; however, its accurate measurement in small laboratory animals has been hindered by the extremely low signal to noise ratio (SNR) in 23Na images. To address this, the design, construction and characterization of a double-tuned 1H/23Na dual resonator system for 1H-guided quantitative 23Na-MRI are described. This system comprises an SNR-optimized surface detector coil for 23Na image acquisition, and a volume resonator producing a highly homogeneous B1 field (<5% inhomogeneity) for the Na channel across the rat head. The resonators incorporated channel-independent balanced matching and tuning capabilities with active decoupling circuitry at the 23Na resonance frequency. A quantification accuracy of TSC of <10 mM was achieved in Na-images with 1.2 µl voxel resolution acquired in 10 min. The potential of the quantification technique was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment of a rat model of cerebral stroke, where the evolution of the TSC was successfully monitored for 8 h after the stroke was induced.

  11. Time resolved spectroscopic NMR imaging using hyperpolarized 129Xe.

    PubMed

    Han, S; Kühn, H; Häsing, F W; Münnemann, K; Blümich, B; Appelt, S

    2004-04-01

    We have visualized the melting and dissolution processes of xenon (Xe) ice into different solvents using the methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, imaging, and time resolved spectroscopic imaging by means of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Starting from the initial condition of a hyperpolarized solid Xe layer frozen on top of an ethanol (ethanol/water) ice block we measured the Xe phase transitions as a function of time and temperature. In the pure ethanol sample, pieces of Xe ice first fall through the viscous ethanol to the bottom of the sample tube and then form a thin layer of liquid Xe/ethanol. The xenon atoms are trapped in this liquid layer up to room temperature and keep their magnetization over a time period of 11 min. In the ethanol/water mixture (80 vol%/20%), most of the polarized Xe liquid first stays on top of the ethanol/water ice block and then starts to penetrate into the pores and cracks of the ethanol/water ice block. In the final stage, nearly all the Xe polarization is in the gas phase above the liquid and trapped inside the pores. NMR spectra of homogeneous samples of pure ethanol containing thermally polarized Xe and the spectroscopic images of the melting process show that very high concentrations of hyperpolarized Xe (about half of the density of liquid Xe) can be stored or delivered in pure ethanol. PMID:15040986

  12. NMR imaging of immiscible displacements in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, P.D.; Li, P.; Peters, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    We introduce a rapid, quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) technique to resolve and measure multiple fluid phases in porous media. Liquids are resolved on the basis of their NMR spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxation times, and their intensities are corrected via attenuation analysis. The spatially resolved and corrected NMRI intensities are normalized to yield fluid saturations. In-situ saturation measurements are presented for three immiscible (oil and water) displacements in the same Berea sandstone core. NMRI and effluent recovery methods were compared. T{sub 2} of the displacement fluids were observed to be sensitive to displacement conditions.

  13. Coherent Microwave Control of Ultracold 23Na 4K Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Sebastian A.; Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe Z.; Loh, Huanqian; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate coherent microwave control of rotational and hyperfine states of trapped, ultracold, and chemically stable 23Na 40K molecules. Starting with all molecules in the absolute rovibrational and hyperfine ground state, we study rotational transitions in combined magnetic and electric fields and explain the rich hyperfine structure. Following the transfer of the entire molecular ensemble into a single hyperfine level of the first rotationally excited state, J =1 , we observe lifetimes of more than 3 s, comparable to those in the rovibrational ground state, J =0 . Long-lived ensembles and full quantum state control are prerequisites for the use of ultracold molecules in quantum simulation, precision measurements, and quantum information processing.

  14. Using an NMR Spectrometer to Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Wayne E.; Maher, M. Cyrus

    2007-01-01

    A conventional Fourier-transform NMR spectrometer with a triple-axis gradient probe can function as a MRI imager. In this experiment students gain hands-on experience with MRI while they learn about important principles underlying the practice of NMR, such as gradients, multi-dimensional spectroscopy, and relaxation. Students image a biological…

  15. Practical design of a 4 Tesla double-tuned RF surface coil for interleaved 1H and 23Na MRI of rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecci, M.; Romanzetti, S.; Kaffanke, J.; Celik, A.; Wegener, H. P.; Shah, N. J.

    2006-08-01

    MRI is proving to be a very useful tool for sodium quantification in animal models of stroke, ischemia, and cancer. In this work, we present the practical design of a dual-frequency RF surface coil that provides 1H and 23Na images of the rat head at 4 T. The dual-frequency RF surface coil comprised of a large loop tuned to the 1H frequency and a smaller co-planar loop tuned to the 23Na frequency. The mutual coupling between the two loops was eliminated by the use of a trap circuit inserted in the smaller coil. This independent-loop design was versatile since it enabled a separate optimisation of the sensitivity and RF field distributions of the two coils. To allow for an easy extension of this simple double-tuned coil design to other frequencies (nuclei) and dimensions, we describe in detail the practical aspects of the workbench design and MRI testing using a phantom that mimics in vivo conditions. A comparison between our independent-loop, double-tuned coil and a single-tuned 23Na coil of equal size obtained with a phantom matching in vivo conditions, showed a reduction of the 23Na sensitivity (about 28 %) because of signal losses in the trap inductance. Typical congruent 1H and 23Na rat brain images showing good SNR ( 23Na: brain 7, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid 11) and spatial resolution ( 23Na: 1.25 × 1.25 × 5 mm 3) are also reported. The in vivo SNR values obtained with this coil were comparable to, if not better than, other contemporary designs in the literature.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  17. Consortium to develop the medical uses of NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pohost, G.M.

    1998-06-01

    The goal of this work is to, perform clinically relevant studies using a new whole-body 4.1 T NMR imaging spectrometer. Initially we will develop and approach for the assessment of the severity of skeletal muscle involvement in ischemic peripheral vascular disease.

  18. Estimating radiofrequency power deposition in body NMR imaging.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, P A; Redington, R W; Edelstein, W A; Schenck, J F

    1985-08-01

    Simple theoretical estimates of the average, maximum, and spatial variation of the radiofrequency power deposition (specific absorption rate) during hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are deduced for homogeneous spheres and for cylinders of biological tissue with a uniformly penetrating linear rf field directed axially and transverse to the cylindrical axis. These are all simple scalar multiples of the expression for the cylinder in an axial field published earlier (Med. Phys. 8, 510 (1981]. Exact solutions for the power deposition in the cylinder with axial (Phys. Med. Biol. 23, 630 (1978] and transversely directed rf field are also presented, and the spatial variation of power deposition in head and body models is examined. In the exact models, the specific absorption rates decrease rapidly and monotonically with decreasing radius despite local increases in rf field amplitude. Conversion factors are provided for calculating the power deposited by Gaussian and sinc-modulated rf pulses used for slice selection in NMR imaging, relative to rectangular profiled pulses. Theoretical estimates are compared with direct measurements of the total power deposited in the bodies of nine adult males by a 63-MHz body-imaging system with transversely directed field, taking account of cable and NMR coil losses. The results for the average power deposition agree within about 20% for the exact model of the cylinder with axial field, when applied to the exposed torso volume enclosed by the rf coil. The average values predicted by the simple spherical and cylindrical models with axial fields, the exact cylindrical model with transverse field, and the simple truncated cylinder model with transverse field were about two to three times that measured, while the simple model consisting of an infinitely long cylinder with transverse field gave results about six times that measured. The surface power deposition measured by observing the incremental power as a function of external

  19. Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) for NMR and MRI Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Goodwill, Patrick W.; Croft, Laura R.; Konkle, Justin J.; Lu, Kuan; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new tracer imaging modality that is gaining significant interest from NMR and MRI researchers. While the physics of MPI differ substantially from MRI, it employs hardware and imaging concepts that are familiar to MRI researchers, such as magnetic excitation and detection, pulse sequences, and relaxation effects. Furthermore, MPI employs the same superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agents that are sometimes used for MR angiography and are often used for MRI cell tracking studies. These SPIOs are much safer for humans than iodine or gadolinium, especially for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The weak kidneys of CKD patients cannot safely excrete iodine or gadolinium, leading to increased morbidity and mortality after iodinated X-ray or CT angiograms, or after gadolinium MRA studies. Iron oxides, on the other hand, are processed in the liver, and have been shown to be safe even for CKD patients. Unlike the “black blood” contrast generated by SPIOs in MRI due to increased T2* dephasing, SPIOs in MPI generate positive, “bright blood” contrast. With this ideal contrast, even prototype MPI scanners can already achieve fast, high-sensitivity, and high-contrast angiograms with millimeter-scale resolutions in phantoms and in animals. Moreover, MPI shows great potential for an exciting array of applications, including stem cell tracking in vivo, first-pass contrast studies to diagnose or stage cancer, and inflammation imaging in vivo. So far, only a handful of prototype small-animal MPI scanners have been constructed worldwide. Hence, MPI is open to great advances, especially in hardware, pulse sequence, and nanoparticle improvements, with the potential to revolutionize the biomedical imaging field. PMID:23305842

  20. Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) for NMR and MRI researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Croft, Laura R.; Konkle, Justin J.; Lu, Kuan; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new tracer imaging modality that is gaining significant interest from NMR and MRI researchers. While the physics of MPI differ substantially from MRI, it employs hardware and imaging concepts that are familiar to MRI researchers, such as magnetic excitation and detection, pulse sequences, and relaxation effects. Furthermore, MPI employs the same superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agents that are sometimes used for MR angiography and are often used for MRI cell tracking studies. These SPIOs are much safer for humans than iodine or gadolinium, especially for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. The weak kidneys of CKD patients cannot safely excrete iodine or gadolinium, leading to increased morbidity and mortality after iodinated X-ray or CT angiograms, or after gadolinium-MRA studies. Iron oxides, on the other hand, are processed in the liver, and have been shown to be safe even for CKD patients. Unlike the “black blood” contrast generated by SPIOs in MRI due to increased T2∗ dephasing, SPIOs in MPI generate positive, “bright blood” contrast. With this ideal contrast, even prototype MPI scanners can already achieve fast, high-sensitivity, and high-contrast angiograms with millimeter-scale resolutions in phantoms and in animals. Moreover, MPI shows great potential for an exciting array of applications, including stem cell tracking in vivo, first-pass contrast studies to diagnose or stage cancer, and inflammation imaging in vivo. So far, only a handful of prototype small-animal MPI scanners have been constructed worldwide. Hence, MPI is open to great advances, especially in hardware, pulse sequence, and nanoparticle improvements, with the potential to revolutionize the biomedical imaging field.

  1. Targeted Molecular Imaging of Cancer Cells Using MS2-Based (129)Xe NMR.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Keunhong; Netirojjanakul, Chawita; Munch, Henrik K; Sun, Jinny; Finbloom, Joel A; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alexander; Francis, Matthew B

    2016-08-17

    We have synthesized targeted, selective, and highly sensitive (129)Xe NMR nanoscale biosensors using a spherical MS2 viral capsid, Cryptophane A molecules, and DNA aptamers. The biosensors showed strong binding specificity toward targeted lymphoma cells (Ramos line). Hyperpolarized (129)Xe NMR signal contrast and hyper-CEST (129)Xe MRI image contrast indicated its promise as highly sensitive hyperpolarized (129)Xe NMR nanoscale biosensor for future applications in cancer detection in vivo. PMID:27454679

  2. Miniaturized multi-coil arrays for functional planar imaging with a single-sided NMR sensor.

    PubMed

    Oligschläger, Dirk; Lehmkuhl, Sören; Watzlaw, Jan; Benders, Stefan; de Boever, Eva; Rehorn, Christian; Vossel, Manuel; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays most low-field NMR sensors, such as the single-sided Profile NMR-MOUSE®, still suffer from poor sensitivity, either resulting from low magnetic field strengths and correspondingly low NMR frequencies, or lack of sensitivity. Generally, micro-coils can improve sensitivity, but due to their small size, and thus small inductance, they are mainly used for high-field NMR. Their main application field is parallel imaging, where those coils are typically assembled to receive-only coil-arrays and increase the field-of-view. Prominent signal combination techniques such as GRAPPA and SENSE are used to combine the spatially independent NMR signals to images in order to increase acquisition speed. A decisive disadvantage of today's single-sided NMR probes is the limited accessibility for NMR imaging. Although it is possible to use flat gradient coils on top of the NMR-MOUSE® to apply imaging techniques, such images can only be recorded with very long acquisition times, excluding the NMR-MOUSE® for lateral imaging of time-dependent processes. In this study sensitivity improved micro-structured RF coils, optimized for low frequencies, and correspondingly arrays of these coils, were employed to improve sensitivity and gave access to lateral spatial resolution within the sensitive plane at several observation points at the same time. Recently developed three- and four-coil arrays were combined with a Profile NMR-MOUSE® and characterized in terms of coil coupling, noise correlation and signal combination. The three-coil array was used for lateral imaging of moisture transport in travertine rock samples and to study the one-dimensional drying of paint. PMID:25771358

  3. Miniaturized multi-coil arrays for functional planar imaging with a single-sided NMR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oligschläger, Dirk; Lehmkuhl, Sören; Watzlaw, Jan; Benders, Stefan; de Boever, Eva; Rehorn, Christian; Vossel, Manuel; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays most low-field NMR sensors, such as the single-sided Profile NMR-MOUSE®, still suffer from poor sensitivity, either resulting from low magnetic field strengths and correspondingly low NMR frequencies, or lack of sensitivity. Generally, micro-coils can improve sensitivity, but due to their small size, and thus small inductance, they are mainly used for high-field NMR. Their main application field is parallel imaging, where those coils are typically assembled to receive-only coil-arrays and increase the field-of-view. Prominent signal combination techniques such as GRAPPA and SENSE are used to combine the spatially independent NMR signals to images in order to increase acquisition speed. A decisive disadvantage of today's single-sided NMR probes is the limited accessibility for NMR imaging. Although it is possible to use flat gradient coils on top of the NMR-MOUSE® to apply imaging techniques, such images can only be recorded with very long acquisition times, excluding the NMR-MOUSE® for lateral imaging of time-dependent processes. In this study sensitivity improved micro-structured RF coils, optimized for low frequencies, and correspondingly arrays of these coils, were employed to improve sensitivity and gave access to lateral spatial resolution within the sensitive plane at several observation points at the same time. Recently developed three- and four-coil arrays were combined with a Profile NMR-MOUSE® and characterized in terms of coil coupling, noise correlation and signal combination. The three-coil array was used for lateral imaging of moisture transport in travertine rock samples and to study the one-dimensional drying of paint.

  4. Line-Integral Projection Reconstruction (LPR) with Slice Encoding Techniques: Multislice Regional Imaging in NMR Tomography.

    PubMed

    Oh, C H; Park, H W; Cho, Z H

    1984-01-01

    Line-integral projection reconstruction (LPR) in NMR imaging was found to be useful and has several advantages such as the imaging capability of objects having short T2 and compensation of phase fluctuations arising from the system instability. Although single slice LPR is found to be inefficient and poor in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the multislice encoded LPR method is of interest since it has a high SNR and also the capability of selected regional volume or multislice imaging. The latter, i.e., regional volume imaging capability, is a unique property of NMR imaging and offers a variety of imaging capabilities such as simultaneous multislice imaging of sagittal, transaxial, or coronal views. In this paper, we have investigated two basic forms of the multislice encoded imaging methods using LPR, i.e., Fourier and Hadamard-like encoding matrices. Applications of the methods to the experimented NMR imaging show good agreement with predicted behavior. PMID:18234626

  5. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, B.deB. |

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

  6. High frequency volume coils for clinical NMR imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J T; Hetherington, H P; Otu, J O; Pan, J W; Pohost, G M

    1994-08-01

    A tuned transmission line resonator has been developed in theory and in practical design for the clinical NMR volume coil application at 4.1 tesla. The distributed circuit transmission line resonator was designed for high frequency, large conductive volume applications where conventional lumped element coil designs perform less efficiently. The resonator design has made use of a resonant coaxial cavity, which could be variably tuned to the Larmor frequency of interest by tunable transmission line elements. Large head- and body-sized volumes, high efficiencies, and broad tuning ranges have been shown to be characteristic of the transmission line resonator to frequencies of 500 MHz. The B1 homogeneity of the resonator has been demonstrated to be a function of the electromagnetic properties of the load itself. By numerically solving Maxwell's equations for the fully time-dependent B1 field, coil homogeneity was predicted with finite-element models of anatomic structure, and inhomogeneities corrected for. A how-to exposition of coil design and construction has been included. Simple methods of quadrature driving and double tuning the transmission line resonator have also been presented. Human head images obtained with a tuned transmission line resonator at 175 MHz have clearly demonstrated uncompromised high field advantages of signal-to-noise and spatial resolution. PMID:7968443

  7. The application of NMR imaging to the studies of enhanced oil recovery in China.

    PubMed

    Weimin, W; Dongjiang, L; Wei, L

    1996-01-01

    The advantages of the application of NMR imaging to the studies of enhanced oil recovery methods that include polymer slug flooding, combination slug flooding, and thermal soaking are described. PMID:8970120

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of Arnold-Chiari type I malformation with hydromyelia

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaPaz, R.L.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; New, P.F.; Kistler, J.P.; McGinnis, B.D.; Pykett, I.L.; Taveras, J.M.

    1983-02-01

    Saturation recovery nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images and metrizamide computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained in an adult patient with a clinical history suggestive of syringomyelia. Both NMR and CT studies showed low lying cerebellar tonsils. The CT study demonstrated central cavitation of the spinal cord from the midthoracic to midcervical levels but could not exclude an intramedullary soft tissue mass at the cervico-medullary junction. The NMR images in transverse, coronal, and sagittal planes demonstrated extension of an enlarged central spinal cord cerebrospinal fluid space to the cervico-medullary junction. This was felt to be strong evidence for exclusion of an intramedullary soft tissue mass and in favor of a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari Type I malformation with hydromyelia. The noninvasive nature of spinal cord and cervico-medullary junction evaluation with NMR is emphasized.

  9. In vivo observation of tree drought response with low-field NMR and neutron imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee T.; Nelson, Ron O.; Vogel, Sven C.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-05-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature inmore » the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. Lastly, these results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment.« less

  10. In vivo Observation of Tree Drought Response with Low-Field NMR and Neutron Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee T.; Nelson, Ron O.; Vogel, Sven C.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature in the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. These results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment. PMID:27200037

  11. In vivo Observation of Tree Drought Response with Low-Field NMR and Neutron Imaging.

    PubMed

    Malone, Michael W; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F; Espy, Michelle A; Dickman, Lee T; Nelson, Ron O; Vogel, Sven C; Sandin, Henrik J; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature in the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. These results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment. PMID:27200037

  12. High resolution 23Na-nuclear magnetic resonance study of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kwan, C Y; Seo, Y; Ito, H; Murakami, M; Watari, H

    1987-06-01

    The intracellular Na+ content of washed erythrocytes from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) and Wistar-Kyoto normotensive rats (WKY) was measured by a high resolution 23Na-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique using a non-permeant aqueous shift reagent, dysprosium triethylenetetramine hexaacetic acid, Dy(TTHA)3-. The initial intracellular Na+ of freshly isolated and washed erythrocytes was very low (approximately 5 mmol/l) and increased progressively with prolonged incubation in isotonic salt solution at 37 degrees C. There was no significant difference in the erythrocyte Na+ concentration between SHRSP and WKY over the entire period of measurement, nor was any difference detected in their osmotic fragility or total cellular volume, although the osmotic fragility decreased with incubation time. The high energy phosphate metabolites were also studied in the same erythrocytes by 31P-NMR. The level of intracellular ATP decreased with incubation at 37 degrees C but showed no difference between the SHRSP and WKY samples. Inclusion of 1 mmol/l ouabain in the incubation medium substantially retarded the breakdown of intracellular ATP and resulted in a concomitant increase in intracellular Na+. However, neither the ouabain-sensitive nor the ouabain-insensitive component of Na+ influx altered in SHRSP erythrocytes compared with WKY erythrocytes in paired experiments. Our results do not support the hypothesis that altered Na+ transport, resulting in an increase in erythrocyte Na+ concentration, is associated with spontaneous hypertension. PMID:3611783

  13. Gated cardiac NMR imaging and 2D echocardiography in the detection of intracardial neoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Go, R.T.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Salcedo, E.E.; Feiglin, D.H.; Underwood, D.A.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Meaney, T.F.

    1985-05-01

    Noninvasive 2D echocardiography has replaced contrast angiography as the procedure of choice in the diagnosis of intracardiac neoplasm. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intracardiac neoplasm can be detected as well by gated cardiac NMR. Four patients with known intracardiac neoplasm previously diagnosed by 2D echocardiography had gated cardiac NMR imaging using a superconductive 0.6 Tesla magnet. All patients were performed using a Tl weighted spin echo pulse sequence with a TE of 30 msec and TR of one R-R interval. Two-dimensional planar single or multiple slice techniques were used. In one patient, imaging at different times along the R-R interval were performed for cine display. The results of the present study show detection of the intracardiac neoplasm in all four cases by gated cardiac NMR imaging and the results were comparable to 2D echocardiography. The former imaging technique showed superior spatial resolution. Despite its early stage of development, gated cardiac NMR imaging appears at least equal to 2D echocardiography in the detection of intracardiac neoplasm. The availability of multislice coupled with multiframe acquisition techniques now being developed will provide a cinematic display that will be more effective in the display of the tumor in motion within the cardiac chamber involved and facilitate visualization of the relationship of the tumor to adjacent cardiac structures.

  14. Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization amplification of NMR flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingwood, Mark D.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Mantle, Mick D.; Gladden, Lynn F.; Han, Songi

    2012-03-01

    We describe the first study comparing the ability of phase shift velocity imaging and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced imaging to generate contrast for visualizing the flow of water. Prepolarization of water by the Overhauser DNP mechanism is performed in the 0.35 T fringe field of an unshielded 2.0 T non-clinical MRI magnet, followed by the rapid transfer of polarization-enhanced water to the 2.0 T imaging location. This technique, previously named remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC), produces a continuous flow of hyperpolarized water and gives up to an -8.2-fold enhanced signal within the image with respect to thermally polarized signal at 2.0 T. Using flow through a cylindrical expansion phantom as a model system, spin-echo intensity images with DNP are compared to 3D phase shift velocity images to illustrate the complementary information available from the two techniques. The spin-echo intensity images enhanced with DNP show that the levels of enhancement provide an estimate of the transient propagation of flow, while the phase shift velocity images quantitatively measure the velocity of each imaging voxel. Phase shift velocity images acquired with and without DNP show that DNP weights velocity values towards those of the inflowing (DNP-enhanced) water, while velocity images without DNP more accurately reflect the average steady-state velocity of each voxel. We conclude that imaging with DNP prepolarized water better captures the transient path of water shortly after injection, while phase shift velocity imaging is best for quantifying the steady-state flow of water throughout the entire phantom.

  15. Elastic Scattering between Ultracold 23Na and 85Rb Atoms in the Triplet State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiu-Bo; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Sun, Jin-Feng; Yu, Ke

    2011-04-01

    The elastic scattering properties between ultracold 23Na and 85Rb atoms for the triplet state (a3 Σ+u) are researched. The s-wave scattering lengths of 23Na and 85Rb are calculated by the Numerov and semiclassical method with two kinds of interatomic potentials, which are the interpolation potential and Lennard—Jones potential (LJ12,6) by the same phase Φ. Shape resonances appear clearly in the l = 5 partial waves for the a3 Σ+u state. Moreover, the s-wave scattering cross section, total cross section and energy positions of shape resonances are also discussed.

  16. Cross Polarization for 1H NMR Image Contrast in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Toshihito; Fukunaga, Yasuhiro; Nonaka, Masayuki; Matsui, Shigeru; Inouye, Tamon

    1998-09-01

    A novel1H imaging method for solids, yielding images reflecting1H-13C dipolar interactions through cross relaxation timeTIS, is presented. Phase-alternating multiple-contact cross polarization (PAMC CP) was incorporated into the magic-echo frequency-encoding imaging scheme; the PAMC CP sequence may partly but efficiently destroy the initial1H magnetization depending on theTISvalues. A theory describing the effects of the PAMC CP sequence was developed, which was used for the assessment of the sequence as well as the analysis for the experimental results. It was demonstrated that theTIS-weighted1H image and theTISmapping for a phantom, constituted of adamantane and ferrocene, can distinguish these compounds clearly.

  17. Lithium Visibility in Rat Brain and Muscle in Vivoby 7Li NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoroski, Richard A.; Pearce, John M.; Newton, Joseph E. O.

    1998-07-01

    The apparent concentration of lithium (Li)in vivowas determined for several regions in the brain and muscle of rats by7Li NMR imaging at 4.7 T with inclusion of an external standard of known concentration and visibility. The average apparent concentrations were 10.1 mM for muscle, and 4.2-5.3 mM for various brain regions under the dosing conditions used. The results were compared to concentrations determinedin vitroby high-resolution7Li NMR spectroscopy of extracts of brain and muscle tissue from the same rats. The comparison provided estimates of the7Li NMR visibility of the Li cation in each tissue region. Although there was considerable scatter of the calculated visibilities among the five rats studied, the results suggested essentially full visibility (96%) for Li in muscle, and somewhat reduced visibility (74-93%) in the various brain regions.

  18. Spatial Mapping of Flow-Induced Molecular Alignment in a Noncrystalline Biopolymer Fluid Using Double Quantum Filtered (DQF) (23)Na MRI.

    PubMed

    Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Flow-induced molecular alignment was observed experimentally in a non-liquid-crystalline bioplymeric fluid during developed tubular flow. The fluid was comprised of rigid rods of the polysaccharide xanthan and exhibited shear-thinning behavior. Without a requirement for optical transparency or the need for an added tracer, (23)Na magic angle (MA) double quantum filtered (DQF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enabled the mapping of the anisotropic molecular arrangement under flow conditions. A regional net molecular alignment was found in areas of high shear values in the vicinity of the tube wall. Furthermore, the xanthan molecules resumed random orientations after the cessation of flow. The observed flow-induced molecular alignment was correlated with the rheological properties of the fluid. The work demonstrates the ability of (23)Na MA DQF magnetic resonance to provide a valuable molecular-mechanical link. PMID:26277955

  19. Creation of a strongly dipolar gas of ultracold ground-state 23 Na87 Rb molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mingyang; Zhu, Bing; Lu, Bo; Ye, Xin; Wang, Fudong; Wang, Dajun; Vexiau, Romain; Bouloufa-Maafa, Nadia; Quéméner, Goulven; Dulieu, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    We report on successful creation of an ultracold sample of ground-state 23 Na87 Rb molecules with a large effective electric dipole moment. Through a carefully designed two-photon Raman process, we have successfully transferred the magneto-associated Feshbach molecules to the singlet ground state with high efficiency, obtaining up to 8000 23 Na87 Rb molecules with peak number density over 1011 cm-3 in their absolute ground-state level. With an external electric field, we have induced an effective dipole moment over 1 Debye, making 23 Na87 Rb the most dipolar ultracold particle ever achieved. Contrary to the expectation, we observed a rather fast population loss even for 23 Na87 Rb in the absolute ground state with the bi-molecular exchange reaction energetically forbidden. The origin for the short lifetime and possible ways of mitigating it are currently under investigation. Our achievements pave the way toward investigation of ultracold bosonic molecules with strong dipolar interactions. This work is supported by the Hong Kong RGC CUHK404712 and the ANR/RGC Joint Research Scheme ACUHK403/13.

  20. Two-dimensional imaging with a single-sided NMR probe.

    PubMed

    Casanova, F; Blümich, B

    2003-07-01

    A new low field unilateral NMR sensor equipped with a two-dimensional gradient coil system was built. A new NMR-MOUSE concept using a simple bar magnet instead of the classical U-shaped geometry was used to produce magnetic field profiles comparatively homogeneous in extended lateral planes defining a suitable field of view for 2D spatial localization. Slice selection along the depth direction is obtained by means of the highly constant static magnetic field gradient produced by this magnet geometry. Implementing a two-dimensional phase-encoding imaging method 2D cross sections of objects were obtained with high spatial resolution. By retuning the probe it was possible to change the depth of the selected slice obtaining a 3D imaging method. The details of the construction of the new device are presented together with imaging tests to show the quality of space encoding. PMID:12852905

  1. 1H Solid-State NMR Imaging by TREV-CRAMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buszko, M. L.; Maciel, G. E.

    A proton NMR imaging experiment based on line narrowing by TREV-CRAMPS with a time-dependent magnetic field gradient has been demonstrated on a solid adamantane phantom. With the magnetic field gradient applied as 16 μs pulses in the windows of the RF pulse sequence, a spatial resolution of about 100 μm is experimentally achieved (based on linewidth and gradient strength), with a digital resolution of 40 μm, qualitatively similar to what is achieved in liquid-sample NMR imaging. The technique benefits from a favorable time average of the magnetic field gradient, relatively wide windows between the magic-echo sandwiches, and the good off-resonance line-narrowing characteristics of the TREV technique. High-resolution chemical-shift information is retained and hence potentially attainable. The low MAS rate, compared to what is used in imaging experiments in which MAS is the only line-narrowing procedure used, may be of importance if one wishes to apply 1H NMR imaging to certain types of samples, e.g., biological tissue.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of energetic materials via NMR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamiya, J. H.; Sinton, S. W.; Callahan, J.; Drobny, G. P.

    The present discussion of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) notes that the use of standard spin-echo techniques can yield the spatial distribution of a rocket propellant or explosive charge's polymer matrix spatial distribution. For detailed NMRI studies of the solid particles embedded in the matrix, the use of either extremely large magnetic field gradients or line-narrowing methods appear promising. While the stray-field NMRI technique is currently technically difficult, it offers advantages associated with sample size and conceptual simplicity.

  3. PUPA: a pulse programming assistant for NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Foxvog, D.; Li, X.; Vargas, J.E.; Bourne, J.R.; Sztipanovits, J.; Mushlin, R.; Harrison, C.G.

    1987-12-01

    The design of pulse programs for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments is tedious and complex, requiring a deep understanding of the interactions that exist between magnetic fields generated during an MRI experiment. This paper describes an intelligent system that understands how to construct the multichannel temporal sequences of pulses needed to control an MRI experiment. PUPA, the PUlse Programmers Assistant, provides assistance to a relatively naive user of MRI systems. Knowledge is coded in the form of rules and semantic networks. A natural language facility and menu system are provided for communication with the user.

  4. An instrument control and data analysis program for NMR imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, M.S.; Mushlin, R.A.; Veklerov, E.; Port, J.D.; Ladd, C.; Harrison, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a software environment created to support real-time instrument control and signal acquisition as well as array-processor based signal and image processing in up to five dimensions. The environment is configured for NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. It is designed to provide flexible tools for implementing novel NMR experiments in the research laboratory. Data acquisition and processing operations are programmed in macros which are loaded in assembled from to minimize instruction overhead. Data arrays are dynamically allocated for efficient use of memory and can be mapped directly into disk files. The command set includes primitives for real-time control of data acquisition, scalar arithmetic, string manipulation, branching, a file system and vector operations carried out by an array processor. 6 figs.

  5. Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  6. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures.

  7. 23Na (α,p )26Mg Reaction Rate at Astrophysically Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, A. M.; Munch, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Laursen, K. L.; Diget, C. Aa.; Hubbard, N. J.

    2015-07-01

    The production of 26Al in massive stars is sensitive to the 23Na (α,p )26Mg cross section. Recent experimental data suggest the currently recommended cross sections are underestimated by a factor of ˜40 . We present here differential cross sections for the 23Na (α,p )26Mg reaction measured in the energy range Ec .m .=1.7 - 2.5 MeV . Concurrent measurements of Rutherford scattering provide absolute normalizations that are independent of variations in target properties. Angular distributions are measured for both p0 and p1 permitting the determination of total cross sections. The results show no significant deviation from the statistical model calculations upon which the recommended rates are based. We therefore retain the previous recommendation without the increase in cross section and resulting stellar reaction rates by a factor of 40, impacting the 26Al yield from massive stars by more than a factor of 3.

  8. Three New Low-Energy Resonances in the 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanna, F.; Depalo, R.; Aliotta, M.; Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Best, A.; Boeltzig, A.; Broggini, C.; Bruno, C. G.; Caciolli, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; di Leva, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ferraro, F.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Mossa, V.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Prati, P.; Scott, D. A.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Trezzi, D.; LUNA Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    The 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400 keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7 keV are reported. Their resonance strengths are derived with 2%-7% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances are greatly reduced. Data are taken using a windowless 22Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Italy, taking advantage of the ultralow background observed deep underground. The new reaction rate is a factor of 20 higher than the recent evaluation at a temperature of 0.1 GK, relevant to nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars.

  9. Creation of an Ultracold Gas of Ground-State Dipolar 23Na 87 Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mingyang; Zhu, Bing; Lu, Bo; Ye, Xin; Wang, Fudong; Vexiau, Romain; Bouloufa-Maafa, Nadia; Quéméner, Goulven; Dulieu, Olivier; Wang, Dajun

    2016-05-01

    We report the successful production of an ultracold sample of absolute ground-state 23Na 87Rb molecules. Starting from weakly bound Feshbach molecules formed via magnetoassociation, the lowest rovibrational and hyperfine level of the electronic ground state is populated following a high-efficiency and high-resolution two-photon Raman process. The high-purity absolute ground-state samples have up to 8000 molecules and densities of over 1011 cm-3 . By measuring the Stark shifts induced by external electric fields, we determined the permanent electric dipole moment of the absolute ground-state 23Na 87Rb and demonstrated the capability of inducing an effective dipole moment over 1 D. Bimolecular reaction between ground-state 23Na 87Rb molecules is endothermic, but we still observed a rather fast decay of the molecular sample. Our results pave the way toward investigation of ultracold molecular collisions in a fully controlled manner and possibly to quantum gases of ultracold bosonic molecules with strong dipolar interactions.

  10. Three New Low-Energy Resonances in the ^{22}Ne(p,γ)^{23}Na Reaction.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, F; Depalo, R; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Boeltzig, A; Broggini, C; Bruno, C G; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Davinson, T; di Leva, A; Elekes, Z; Ferraro, F; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Menegazzo, R; Mossa, V; Pantaleo, F R; Prati, P; Scott, D A; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Szücs, T; Takács, M P; Trezzi, D

    2015-12-18

    The ^{22}Ne(p,γ)^{23}Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between ^{20}Ne and ^{27}Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The ^{22}Ne(p,γ)^{23}Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400 keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the ^{22}Ne(p,γ)^{23}Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7 keV are reported. Their resonance strengths are derived with 2%-7% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances are greatly reduced. Data are taken using a windowless ^{22}Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Italy, taking advantage of the ultralow background observed deep underground. The new reaction rate is a factor of 20 higher than the recent evaluation at a temperature of 0.1 GK, relevant to nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars. PMID:26722918

  11. Towards a study of 22Ne(pγ)23Na at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalo, R.; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction is involved in the NeNa cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle plays an important role for nucleosynthesis in the Red Giant Branch and Asymptotic Giant Branch phases of stellar evolution, as well as in classical novae and type Ia supernovae explosions. The 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction rate is highly uncertain because of a large number of resonances lying in the energy region of the Gamow peak. Several of these resonances have never been studied in either direct or indirect experiments, and only upper limits exist for their strengths. A measurement of the 2Ne(p,γ)23Na cross section is on-going at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) in Gran Sasso. With the LUNA setup, it will be possible to study the 22Ne+p reaction inside the Gamow window. The results of a feasibility test, as well as the measurement strategy and the setup for the first experimental campaign are discussed

  12. Neuronal Tracing with Magnetic Labels: NMR Imaging Methods, Preliminary Results, and New Optimized Coils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pratik

    1992-01-01

    The investigations focussed on in vivo NMR imaging studies of magnetic particles with and within neural cells. NMR imaging methods, both Fourier transform and projection reconstruction, were implemented and new protocols were developed to perform "Neuronal Tracing with Magnetic Labels" on small animal brains. Having performed the preliminary experiments with neuronal tracing, new optimized coils and experimental set-up were devised. A novel gradient coil technology along with new rf-coils were implemented, and optimized for future use with small animals in them. A new magnetic labelling procedure was developed that allowed labelling of billions of cells with ultra -small magnetite particles in a short time. The relationships among the viability of such cells, the amount of label and the contrast in the images were studied as quantitatively as possible. Intracerebral grafting of magnetite labelled fetal rat brain cells made it possible for the first time to attempt monitoring in vivo the survival, differentiation, and possible migration of both host and grafted cells in the host rat brain. This constituted the early steps toward future experiments that may lead to the monitoring of human brain grafts of fetal brain cells. Preliminary experiments with direct injection of horse radish peroxidase-conjugated magnetite particles into neurons, followed by NMR imaging, revealed a possible non-invasive alternative, allowing serial study of the dynamic transport pattern of tracers in single living animals. New gradient coils were built by using parallel solid-conductor ribbon cables that could be wrapped easily and quickly. Rapid rise times provided by these coils allowed implementation of fast imaging methods. Optimized rf-coil circuit development made it possible to understand better the sample-coil properties and the associated trade -offs in cases of small but conducting samples.

  13. New pulse sequences for T1- and T1/T2-contrast enhancing in NMR imaging.

    PubMed

    Andreev, N K; Hakimov, A M; Idiyatullin, D S

    1998-10-01

    Improved pulse sequences DIFN (abbreviation of the words: DIFferentiation by N pulses), 90 degrees - tau1 - 180 degrees tau1 - . . . 180 degrees - tau1 with optimised time intervals tau1- for T1 measurement and contrast enhancing in NMR imaging are presented. The pulse sequences DIFN have a better sensitivity to T1 than the well-known pulse sequence SR. In contrast to the IR pulse sequence, the information given by the DIFN pulse sequence is more reliable, because the NMR signal does not change its sign. For a given time interval tau0 < or = (0.1 - 0.3) T(1) the DIFN pulse sequences serve as T1-filters. They pass the signal components with relatively short T1 < T(1) and suppress the components with relatively long T1 < T(1). The effects of the radiofrequency field inhomogeneity and inaccurate adjusting of pulse lengths are also considered. It is also proposed in this work to use the joint T1T2-contrast in NMR imaging obtained as a result of applying the DIFN pulse sequences in combination with the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence. The region of interest, where the contrast should be especially enhanced, is specified by the two times at which measurements are performed, which allow the amplitudes of pixels to reach some defined levels by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation. PMID:9814781

  14. NMR study in sodium-hydrogen-C{sub 60} superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, H.; Miyajima, S.; Imaeda, K.; Inokuchi, H.

    1998-12-31

    {sup 23}Na and {sup 1}H NMR studies have been carried out for a Na{sub x}H{sub y}C{sub 60} superconductor. The peak position of the {sup 23}Na NMR spectrum exhibits discontinuous upfield shift of 30 ppm at about 250 K, indicates a first order phase transition. From the line shape of the {sup 23}Na spectrum obtained at 7 K, the quadrupole coupling constant tensor is evaluated to be {vert_bar}e{sup 2}Qq/h{vert_bar} = 3.7 MHz with the asymmetry parameter {eta} = 0.95. The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum suggests an anionic hydrogen state with weakly delocalized nature.

  15. (7)Li in situ 1D NMR imaging of a lithium ion battery.

    PubMed

    Klamor, S; Zick, K; Oerther, T; Schappacher, F M; Winter, M; Brunklaus, G

    2015-02-14

    The spatial distribution of charge carriers in lithium ion batteries during current flow is of fundamental interest for a detailed understanding of transport properties and the development of strategies for future improvements of the electrolyte-electrode interface behaviour. In this work we explored the potential of (7)Li 1D in situ NMR imaging for the identification of concentration gradients under constant current load in a battery cell. An electrochemical cell based on PTFE body and a stack of glass microfiber discs that are soaked with a technically relevant electrolyte suitable for high-temperature application and squeezed between a Li metal and a nano-Si-graphite composite electrode was assembled to acquire (7)Li 1D in situ NMR profiles with an improved NMR pulse sequence as function of time and state of charge, thereby visualizing the course of ion concentration during charge and discharge. Surface localized changes of Li concentration were attributed to processes such as solid electrolyte interphase formation or full lithiation of the composite electrode. The method allows the extraction of lithium ion transport properties. PMID:25578436

  16. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Investigating the Dissolution Performance of Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Proton NMR.

    PubMed

    Tres, Francesco; Coombes, Steven R; Phillips, Andrew R; Hughes, Leslie P; Wren, Stephen A C; Aylott, Jonathan W; Burley, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the dissolution performance of amorphous solid dispersions of poorly water-soluble bicalutamide in a Kollidon VA64 polymeric matrix as a function of the drug loading (5% vs. 30% bicalutamide). A combined suite of state-of-the-art analytical techniques were employed to obtain a clear picture of the drug release, including an integrated magnetic resonance imaging UV-Vis flow cell system and 1H-NMR. Off-line 1H-NMR was used for the first time to simultaneously measure the dissolution profiles and rates of both the drug and the polymer from a solid dispersion. MRI and 1H-NMR data showed that the 5% drug loading compact erodes linearly, and that bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64 are released at approximately the same rate from the molecular dispersion. For the 30% extrudate, data indicated a slower water ingress into the compact which corresponds to a slower dissolution rate of both bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64. PMID:26378506

  18. Imaging of multiphase fluid saturation within a porous material via sodium NMR.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Kathryn E; Madelin, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    We present in this paper a method to monitor multiphase fluid core saturation through measurement of the sodium NMR signal. In a rock core saturated with water and oil, sodium will be present only in the water phase, and therefore can be used to separate the two fluids. Two dimensional sodium images were taken to monitor the movement of brine into oil saturated rock cores. The measured fluid exchange agrees well with expected behavior from traditional core analysis methods. Indications of damage to the rock structure can be seen from the patterns of fluid imbibition. PMID:19864169

  19. NMR imaging of heavy metal absorption in alginate, immobilized cells, and kombu algal biosorbents.

    PubMed

    Nestle, N F; Kimmich, R

    1996-09-01

    In this contribution, an NMR imaging study of heavy metal absorption in alginate, immobilized-cell biosorbents, and kombu (Laminaria japonica) algal biomass is presented. This method provides the good possibility of directly monitoring the time evolution of the spatial distribution of the ions in the materials. From these results, we demonstrate that rare earth ions are absorbed with a steep reaction front that can be described very well with a modified shrinking core model, while copper ions are absorbed with a more diffuse front. PMID:18629817

  20. NMR imaging of the chest at 0.12 T: initial clinical experience with a resistive magnet.

    PubMed

    Axel, L; Kressel, H Y; Thickman, D; Epstein, D M; Edelstein, W; Bottomley, P; Redington, R; Baum, S

    1983-12-01

    The chests of 40 subjects were imaged with an experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imager operating at a magnetic field of 0.12 T. There were six normal volunteers and 34 patients with abnormalities affecting different areas, including the chest wall, pleura, hila, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma, and including benign and malignant processes. In this initial clinical experience, NMR imaging provided useful information on the presence and extent of disease by its ability to distinguish different tissues and by the excellent demonstration of vascular structures. PMID:6606311

  1. Geometric Hall Effect of ^{23}Na Condensate in a Time- and Space-Dependent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Gong-Ping; Yang, Ling-Ling; Chang, Gao-Zhan; Wu, Zhe

    2016-04-01

    We simulate numerically the dynamics of ^{23}Na condensate in a time- and space-dependent magnetic field with a variational approach. It is shown to be an efficient method to describe the complex dynamics of the system, which may excite the breather mode, the scissor mode, and the dipole mode simultaneously. Our results agree with the experimental observations of Choi et al. (Phys Rev Lett 111:245301, 2013). We reproduce qualitatively the geometric Hall effect and resonance behavior. We also find that the condensate shows a scissor-mode-like motion, which may play the shearing force to deform the condensate and consequently leads to the dynamical nucleation of quantized vortices.

  2. Use of multi-coil parallel-gap resonators for co-registration EPR/NMR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Yuuki; Hirata, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hirodata

    2007-01-01

    This article reports experimental investigations on the use of RF resonators for continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (cw-EPR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. We developed a composite resonator system with multi-coil parallel-gap resonators for co-registration EPR/NMR imaging. The resonance frequencies of each resonator were 21.8 MHz for NMR and 670 MHz for EPR. A smaller resonator (22 mm in diameter) for use in EPR was placed coaxially in a larger resonator (40 mm in diameter) for use in NMR. RF magnetic fields in the composite resonator system were visualized by measuring a homogeneous 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidinooxy (4-hydroxy-TEMPO) solution in a test tube. A phantom of five tubes containing distilled water and 4-hydroxy-TEMPO solution was also measured to demonstrate the potential usefulness of this composite resonator system in biomedical science. An image of unpaired electrons was obtained for 4-hydroxy-TEMPO in three tubes, and was successfully mapped on the proton image for five tubes. Technical problems in the implementation of a composite resonator system are discussed with regard to co-registration EPR/NMR imaging for animal experiments.

  3. The Dependence Of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Image Contrast On Intrinsic And Operator-Selectable Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrli, F. W.; MacFall, J. R.; Glover, G. H.

    1983-12-01

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) the image pixel value is governed by four intrinsic parameters: the spin density ρ, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1, the spin-spin relaxation time T2 and, for non-stationary spins, the flow velocity v. The extent to which the signal is weighted toward one or several parameters is related to the history of the spin system preceding the detection pulse. In the present work T1 and T2 were determined in vivo for several regions in the CNS from inversion-recovery (T1) And multiple-echo (T2) images, using least-squares fitting procedures. From averaged values of T1 and T2 in grey matter, white matter and CSF, the signal intensity was calculated on the basis of the Bloch equations and plotted as a function of the intrinsic parameters for the three most common imaging pulse sequences. These data are in excellent agreement with images, recorded from normal volunteers on an experimental whole-body imaging system operating at 12.8 MHz (0.3T). The graphical presentation of contrast further will provide the radiologist with a straightforward tool for image interpretation.

  4. Direct measurement of the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction cross section at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Federico; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction takes part in the NeNa cycle of hydrogen burning, influencing the production of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in red giant stars, asymptotic giant stars and classical novae. The 22Ne(p,γ)27Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of tentative resonances in the Gamow window, where only upper limits were quoted in literature. A direct measurement of the 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction cross section has been carried out at LUNA using a windowless differential-pumping gas target with two high- purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. A new measurement with a 4π bismuth germanate (BGO) summing detector is ongoing. During the HPGe phase of the experiment the strengths of the resonances at 156.2 keV, 189.5 keV and 259.7 keV have been directly measured for the first time and their contribution to the reaction rate has been calculated. The decay scheme of the newly discovered resonances has been established as well and some improved upper limits on the unobserved resonances have been put. The BGO detector with its 70% γ-detection efficiency allows to measure the cross section at lower energy. In order to further investigate the resonances at 71 keV and 105 keV and the direct-capture component, the data taking is ongoing.

  5. Rotational Spectroscopy on Ultracold 23 Na40 K Ground State Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Sebastian; Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe; Loh, Huanqian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold molecules with controllable dipolar long-range interactions will open up new routes for quantum simulation and the creation of novel states of matter. In particular, the molecules' rich internal degrees of freedom allow for versatile control of intermolecular interactions by applying static electric and microwave fields. Starting from an ultracold, spin-polarized ensemble of trapped fermionic 23 Na40 K molecules in the absolute ground state, we perform microwave spectroscopy on the first rotationally excited state for a range of magnetic and electric fields. Extracting the rotational and hyperfine coupling constants, we comprehensively understand the observed spectra. Following the coherent transfer of the entire ensemble of chemically stable 23 Na40 K molecules to the first rotationally excited state, we observe a lifetime of more than 3 sec, comparable to the lifetime in the rovibrational ground state. The collisional stability of excited rotational states opens up intriguing prospects for the control of intermolecular van-der-Waals interactions via electric fields.

  6. Creating Fermionic Ground State Molecules of 23Na40K with Strong Dipolar Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Schloss, Jennifer; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2013-05-01

    In our experiment, we work towards creating fermionic ground state molecules of 23Na40K with strong dipolar interactions. These molecules will be chemically stable in the rovibrational ground state, and will carry a large induced dipole moment of 2.72 Debye. Building up on our previous work, we have done photoassociation spectroscopy on the 23Na-40K mixture in order to understand the molecular excited state potentials and identify possible intermediate states for efficient STIRAP transfer of Feshbach molecules down to the absolute rovibrational ground state. In addition, our recent effort in doing two-photon spectroscopy to locate the absolute rovibrational ground state will be presented. Our work paves the way towards creating stable dipolar quantum gases, which will open up new avenues to quantum many-body phases with intriguing properties such as supersolidity and topological phases. This work was supported by the NSF, AFOSR-MURI and -PECASE, ARO-MURI, ONR YIP, DARPA YFA, a grant from the Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program and the David and Lucille Packard Foundation.

  7. Solid-state C-13 and H-1 NMR imaging stdies of the accelerated-sulfur cured high vinyl polybutadiene. [NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C NMR and [sup 1]H Imaging methods have been used to follow the progress of accelerated-sulfur vulcanization of unfilled high vinyl polybutadiene. Different NMR pulse sequences have been used to characterize the micro-network structures present in the bulk of the finally cured rubber samples. These studies were made as a function of formulation and processing variables. The time-resolved, integrated rubber network. Mono-sulfidic as well as the residual accelerator fragments were differentiated from the polysulfidic crosslinks in a finally cured material. Dynamic studies of these network structures were made using spin-spin relaxation (T[sub 2c]) measurements. The activation energies calculated based on T[sub 2] were used to verify different carbons, directly attached to the sulfur atoms. A swelling method based on Flory-Rehner's equation was also used to determine the crosslink densities and the number-average molecular weight between the nodal junctions in different formulations. Different spatially resolved structural features have been detected in the swollen samples using NMR imaging method. The voids, no-voids and other impurities were differentiated on the basis of magnetic susceptibility differences. Cyclohexane was used as a swelling solvent to probe the morphological defects in these materials. The T[sub 2]-weighted images were used to evaluate the crosslink densities in different samples. The quantitative estimations based on histogram was also employed to determine the average volume per crosslink region. The contrast based on H-1 spin-density or mobility was highlighted in T[sub 2]-weighted images. The variations were found to be closely related to variation in both concentration and mobility of the network.

  8. 23Na and 39K nuclear magnetic resonance studies of perfused rat hearts. Discrimination of intra- and extracellular ions using a shift reagent.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, M M; Frazer, J C; Dedrick, D F; Ingwall, J S; Allen, P D; Springer, C S; Smith, T W

    1985-01-01

    High-resolution 23Na and 39K nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of perfused, beating rat hearts have been obtained in the absence and presence of the downfield shift reagent Dy(TTHA)3- in the perfusing medium. Evidence indicates that Dy(TTHA)3- enters essentially all extracellular spaces but does not enter intracellular spaces. It can thus be used to discriminate the resonances of the ions in these spaces. Experiments supporting this conclusion include interventions that inhibit the Na+/K+ pump such as the inclusion of ouabain in and the exclusion of K+ from the perfusing medium. In each of these experiments, a peak corresponding to intracellular sodium increased in intensity. In the latter experiment, the increase was reversed when the concentration of K+ in the perfusing medium was returned to normal. When the concentration of Ca2+ in the perfusing medium was also returned to normal, the previously quiescent heart resumed beating. In the beating heart where the Na+/K+ pump was not inhibited, the intensity of the intracellular Na+ resonance was less than 20% of that expected. Although the data are more sparse, the NMR visibility of the intracellular K+ signal appears to be no more than 20%. PMID:4016206

  9. Neutron Elastic and Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections on ^NatFe and ^23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersting, Luke; Lueck, Collin J.; Hicks, S. F.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2010-10-01

    Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering angular distributions from ^NatFe and ^23Na at incident neutron energies of 3.57 and 3.81 MeV have been measured at the University of Kentucky 7 MV Van de Graaff laboratory using neutron time-of-flight techniques. The neutron beam was produced using the ^3H(p,n)He^3reaction. The scattered neutrons were detected at angles between 20 and 150 in 10 intervals with a hexafluorbenzene detector located approximately 3 m from the scattering samples. Neutron scattering differential cross sections were deduced. These cross sections and their uncertainties are important for understanding neutron-induced reactions in fission reactors and are important for fission reactor criticality calculations.

  10. Point sensitive NMR imaging system using a magnetic field configuration with a spatial minimum

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, Philippe H.

    1985-01-01

    A point-sensitive NMR imaging system (10) in which a main solenoid coil (11) produces a relatively strong and substantially uniform magnetic field and a pair of perturbing coils (PZ1 and PZ2) powered by current in the same direction superimposes a pair of relatively weak perturbing fields on the main field to produce a resultant point of minimum field strength at a desired location in a direction along the Z-axis. Two other pairs of perturbing coils (PX1, PX2; PY1, PY2) superimpose relatively weak field gradients on the main field in directions along the X- and Y-axes to locate the minimum field point at a desired location in a plane normal to the Z-axes. An RF generator (22) irradiates a tissue specimen in the field with radio frequency energy so that desired nuclei in a small volume at the point of minimum field strength will resonate.

  11. Point sensitive NMR imaging system using a magnetic field configuration with a spatial minimum

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, P.H.

    A point-sensitive NMR imaging system in which a main solenoid coil produces a relatively strong and substantially uniform magnetic field and a pair of perturbing coils powered by current in the same direction superimposes a pair of relatively weak perturbing fields on the main field to produce a resultant point of minimum field strength at a desired location in a direction along the Z-axis. Two other pairs of perturbing coils superimpose relatively weak field gradients on the main field in directions along the X- and Y-axes to locate the minimum field point at a desired location in a plane normal to the Z-axes. An rf generator irradiates a tissue specimen in the field with radio frequency energy so that desired nuclei in a small volume at the point of minimum field strength will resonate.

  12. NMR imaging and hydrodynamic analysis of neutrally buoyant non-Newtonian slurry flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bouillard, J.X.; Sinton, S.W.

    1995-02-01

    The flow of solids loaded suspension in cylindrical pipes has been the object of intense experimental and theoretical investigations in recent years. These types of flows are of great interest in chemical engineering because of their important use in many industrial manufacturing processes. Such flows are for example encountered in the manufacture of solid-rocket propellants, advanced ceramics, reinforced polymer composites, in heterogenous catalytic reactors, and in the pipeline transport of liquid-solids suspensions. In most cases, the suspension microstructure and the degree of solids dispersion greatly affect the final performance of the manufactured product. For example, solid propellant pellets need to be extremely-well dispersed in gel matrices for use as rocket engine solid fuels. The homogeneity of pellet dispersion is critical to allow good uniformity of the burn rate, which in turn affects the final mechanical performance of the engine. Today`s manufacturing of such fuels uses continuous flow processes rather than batch processes. Unfortunately, the hydrodynamics of such flow processes is poorly understood and is difficult to assess because it requires the simultaneous measurements of liquid/solids phase velocities and volume fractions. Due to the recent development in pulsed Fourier Transform NMR imaging, NMR imaging is now becoming a powerful technique for the non intrusive investigation of multi-phase flows. This paper reports and exposes a state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical methodology that can be used to study such flows. The hydrodynamic model developed for this study is a two-phase flow shear thinning model with standard constitutive fluid/solids interphase drag and solids compaction stresses. this model shows good agreement with experimental data and the limitations of this model are discussed.

  13. DUAL FREQUENCY RESONATOR FOR 1.2 GHZ EPR/16.2 MHZ NMR CO-IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Petryakov, Sergey; Samouilov, Alexandre; Kesselring, Eric; Caia, George L.; Sun, Ziqi; Zweier, Jay L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a dual frequency resonator that enables both EPR and proton NMR imaging within the same resonator, magnet and gradient system is described. A novel design allows the same resonator to perform both EPR and proton NMR operation without moving resonator cables or switches. The resonator is capable of working at frequencies of 16.18 MHz for proton NMR and 1.2 GHz for EPR and is optimized for isolated rat heart experiments, measuring 22 mm in inner diameter and 19 mm in length. In EPR mode, the resonator functions as a one loop two gap resonator, electrically coupled through a half wavelength inverter. In NMR mode, it functions a single turn coil. Using the same loop for both modalities maximizes filling factor at both frequencies. Placing the tuning and switching controls away from the resonator prevents any inadvertent movement that would cause errors of EPR and NMR co-imaging registration. The resonator enabled good quality EPR and proton MRI of isolated rat hearts with precise registration. PMID:20434379

  14. Low-Energy resonances in the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction directly observed at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalo, Rosanna; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning influences the synthesis of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in AGB stars and classical novae explosions. The 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. A new direct study of the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction has been performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) using a windowless gas target and two HPGe detectors. Several resonances have been observed for the first time in a direct experiment.

  15. Cryptate 13C and 23Na nuclear magnetic relaxation as a probe of counterion dynamics in aqueous polyacrylate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Maarel, J. R. C.; Van Duijn, D.; De Bleijser, J.; Leyte, J. C.

    1987-03-01

    In a series of fully alkali neutralized polyacrylate solutions the counterions are included by a macrobicyclic ligand (cryptand) to form a well-defined coordination shell. Vapor pressure experiments show the polyacrylate-cryptate system to behave osmotically as an ordinary polyelectrolyte solution. Cryptate 13C and 23Na relaxation show that the influence of polyions on the counter-ion reorientational mobility is moderate. The main 23Na relaxation mechanism is found to be the fluctuating electric field gradient caused by the surrounding ligand.

  16. NMR imaging of fluid exchange between macropores and matrix in eogenetic karst

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Florea, L.J.; Cunningham, K.J.; Altobelli, S.

    2009-01-01

    Sequential time-step images acquired using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) show the displacement of deuterated water (D2O) by fresh water within two limestone samples characterized by a porous and permeable limestone matrix of peloids and ooids. These samples were selected because they have a macropore system representative of some parts of the eogenetic karst limestone of the Biscayne Aquifer in southeastern Florida. The macroporosity, created by the trace fossil Ophiomorpha, is principally well connected and of centimeter scale. These macropores occur in broadly continuous stratiform zones that create preferential flow layers within the hydrogeologic units of the Biscayne. This arrangement of porosity is important because in coastal areas, it could produce a preferential pathway for salt water intrusion. Two experiments were conducted in which samples saturated with D2O were placed in acrylic chambers filled with fresh water and examined with NMR. Results reveal a substantial flux of fresh water into the matrix porosity with a simultaneous loss of D 2O. Specifically, we measured rates upward of 0.001 mL/h/g of sample in static conditions, and perhaps as great as 0.07 mL/h/g of sample when fresh water continuously flows past a sample at velocities less than those found within stressed areas of the Biscayne. These experiments illustrate how fresh water and D2O, with different chemical properties, migrate within one type of matrix porosity found in the Biscayne. Furthermore, these experiments are a comparative exercise in the displacement of sea water by fresh water in the matrix of a coastal, karst aquifer since D2O has a greater density than fresh water. ?? 2008 National Ground Water Association.

  17. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow in cat brain using intracarotid 2H2O and 2H NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Detre, J.A.; Subramanian, V.H.; Mitchell, M.D.; Smith, D.S.; Kobayashi, A.; Zaman, A.; Leigh, J.S. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured in cat brain in vivo at 2.7 T using 2H NMR to monitor the washout of deuterated saline injected into both carotid arteries via the lingual arteries. In anesthetized cats, global CBF varied directly with PaCO{sub 2} over a range of 20-50 mm Hg, and the corresponding global CBF values ranged from 25 to 125 ml.100 g-1.min-1. Regional CBF was measured in a 1-cm axial section of cat brain using intracarotid deuterated saline and gradient-echo 2H NMR imaging. Blood flow images with a maximum pixel resolution of 0.3 x 0.3 x 1.0 cm were generated from the deuterium signal washout at each pixel. Image derived values for CBF agreed well with other determinations, and decreased significantly with hypocapnia.

  18. Differential Cross Sections for Neutron Elastic and Inelastic Scattering on 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; Chakraborty, A.; Champine, B. R.; Combs, B.; Crider, B. P.; Kersting, L. J.; Kumar, A.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A.; Watts, D. W.; Yates, S. W.

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from 23Na have been performed for sixteen incident neutron energies above 1.5 MeV with the 7-MV University of Kentucky Accelerator using the 3H(p,n) reaction as the neutron source. These measurements were complemented by γ-ray excitation functions using the (n,n'γ) reaction. The time-of-flight technique is employed for background reduction in both neutron and γ- ray measurements and for determining the energy of the scattered neutrons. Cross section determinations support fuel cycle and structural materials research and development. Previous reaction model evaluations [1] relied primarily on total cross sections and four (n,n0) and (n,n1) angular distributions in the En = 5 to 9 MeV range. The inclusion of more inelastic channels at lower neutron energies provides additional information on direct couplings between elastic and inelastic scattering as a function of angular momentum transfer. Reaction model calculations examining direct collective and statistical properties were performed.

  19. Measurement of (23)Na(n,2n) cross section in well-defined reactor spectra.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Švadlenková, Marie; Baroň, Petr; Milčák, Ján; Mareček, Martin; Uhlíř, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The present paper aims to compare the calculated and experimental reaction rates of (23)Na(n,2n)(22)Na in a well-defined reactor spectra of a special core assembled in the LR-0 reactor. The experimentally determined reaction rate, derived using gamma spectroscopy of irradiated NaF sample, is used for average cross section determination. The resulting value averaged in spectra is 0.91±0.02µb. This cross-section is important as it is included in International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File and is also relevant to the correct estimation of long-term activity of Na coolant in Sodium Fast Reactors. The calculations were performed with the MCNP6 code using ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, ROSFOND-2010 and CENDL-3.1 nuclear data libraries. Generally the best C/E agreement, within 2%, was found using the ROSFOND-2010 data set, whereas the worst, as high as 40%, was found using the ENDF/B-VII.0. PMID:26894323

  20. Long Hyperfine Coherence Time of Ultracold Fermionic 23 Na40 K Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold molecules created and trapped at sub uK temperatures allow the full control of the molecule's external and internal degrees of freedom down to a single hyperfine state. In particular, an ensemble of molecules all initialized in a single rotational and hyperfine state can be prepared and be coherently addressed using microwave fields. In this talk, we report on the observation of long coherence time between two hyperfine states of fermionic 23 Na40 K molecules in the ro-vibronic ground state (v = 0 , J = 0). A direct two-photon microwave transition via the J = 1 state is used to prepare a superposition of two lowest hyperfine states of J = 0 , and we perform Ramsey spectroscopy as a direct probe of phase coherence between these states. The fermionic nature of the molecules and the lack of electronic angular momentum in the ro-vibronic ground state heavily suppress the decoherence from collisions and external fields, respectively, and we observe long coherence times upto 0.5 sec for this hyperfine superposition state. The observed long coherence time is a crucial step for applications of trapped dipolar molecules in quantum information processing schemes.

  1. NMR imaging of chitosan and carboxymethyl starch tablets: swelling and hydration of the polyelectrolyte complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y J; Assaad, E; Ispas-Szabo, P; Mateescu, M A; Zhu, X X

    2011-10-31

    The hydration and swelling properties of the tablets made of chitosan, carboxymethyl starch, and a polyelectrolyte complex of these two polysaccharides have been studied by NMR imaging. We studied the effect of pH and ionic strength on the swelling of the tablets and on the diffusion of fluid into the tablets in water and simulated physiological fluids. The pH value of the fluids exerts a more significant effect than their ionic strengths on the swelling of the tablets. The tablets are compared also with those made of cross-linked high amylose starch. The formation of complex helps to keep the integrity of the tablets in various media and render a slow and restricted swelling similar to that of the tablets of the cross-linked high amylase starch, which is significantly lower than the swelling of chitosan and of carboxymethyl starch. The capacities to modulate the release rate of drugs in different media are discussed by comparing the matrices and evaluating the preparation process of the complex. A sustained release of less soluble drugs such as aspirin in gastrointestinal fluids can be provided by the complex, due to the ionic interaction and hydrogen bonding between the drug and the biopolymer complex. PMID:21864660

  2. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  3. Accurate Characterization of Ion Transport Properties in Binary Symmetric Electrolytes Using In Situ NMR Imaging and Inverse Modeling.

    PubMed

    Sethurajan, Athinthra Krishnaswamy; Krachkovskiy, Sergey A; Halalay, Ion C; Goward, Gillian R; Protas, Bartosz

    2015-09-17

    We used NMR imaging (MRI) combined with data analysis based on inverse modeling of the mass transport problem to determine ionic diffusion coefficients and transference numbers in electrolyte solutions of interest for Li-ion batteries. Sensitivity analyses have shown that accurate estimates of these parameters (as a function of concentration) are critical to the reliability of the predictions provided by models of porous electrodes. The inverse modeling (IM) solution was generated with an extension of the Planck-Nernst model for the transport of ionic species in electrolyte solutions. Concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients and transference numbers were derived using concentration profiles obtained from in situ (19)F MRI measurements. Material properties were reconstructed under minimal assumptions using methods of variational optimization to minimize the least-squares deviation between experimental and simulated concentration values with uncertainty of the reconstructions quantified using a Monte Carlo analysis. The diffusion coefficients obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) fall within the 95% confidence bounds for the diffusion coefficient values obtained by the MRI+IM method. The MRI+IM method also yields the concentration dependence of the Li(+) transference number in agreement with trends obtained by electrochemical methods for similar systems and with predictions of theoretical models for concentrated electrolyte solutions, in marked contrast to the salt concentration dependence of transport numbers determined from PFG-NMR data. PMID:26247105

  4. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  5. Exploring the {sup 22}Ne(p,γ){sup 23}Na reaction at LUNA and at HZDR

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanna, Francesca; Collaboration: LUNA Collaboration

    2014-05-09

    The {sup 22}Ne(p,γ){sup 23}Na reaction is involved in the hydrogen burning NeNa cycle. This determines the nucleosynthesis of the Ne and Na isotopes in the Red Giant Branch and Asymptotic Giant Branch phases of stellar evolution. In the energy range relevant for astrophysics (20 keV < E < 600 keV), the {sup 22}Ne(p,γ){sup 23}Na reaction rate is highly uncertain because of the contribution of a large number of resonances never measured directly. A related study is under preparation at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA), in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, and it will cover the energy range 100 keV < E < 400 keV. Meanwhile, a measurement at higher energies (i.e. 436 keV) has been carried out at the Tandetron accelerator of the HZDR (Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf) in Germany. Some preliminary results will be presented.

  6. Discrimination of intra- and extracellular 23Na + signals in yeast cell suspensions using longitudinal magnetic resonance relaxography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yajie; Poirer-Quinot, Marie; Springer, Charles S.; Balschi, James A.

    2010-07-01

    This study tested the ability of MR relaxography (MRR) to discriminate intra- (Nai+) and extracellular (Nae+)23Na + signals using their longitudinal relaxation time constant ( T1) values. Na +-loaded yeast cell ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suspensions were investigated. Two types of compartmental 23Na +T1 differences were examined: a selective Nae+T1 decrease induced by an extracellular relaxation reagent (RR e), GdDOTP 5-; and, an intrinsic T1 difference. Parallel studies using the established method of 23Na MRS with an extracellular shift reagent (SR e), TmDOTP 5-, were used to validate the MRR measurements. With 12.8 mM RR e, the 23Nae+T1 was 2.4 ms and the 23Nai+T1 was 9.5 ms (9.4T, 24 °C). The Na + amounts and spontaneous efflux rate constants were found to be identical within experimental error whether measured by MRR/RR e or by MRS/SR e. Without RR e, the Na +-loaded yeast cell suspension 23Na MR signal exhibited two T1 values, 9.1 (±0.3) ms and 32.7 (±2.3) ms, assigned to 23Nai+ and 23Nae+, respectively. The Nai+ content measured was lower, 0.88 (±0.06); while Nae+ was higher, 1.43 (±0.12) compared with MRS/SR e measures on the same samples. However, the measured efflux rate constant was identical. T1 MRR potentially may be used for Nai+ determination in vivo and Na + flux measurements; with RR e for animal studies and without RR e for humans.

  7. Computational Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based on Time-Dependent Bloch NMR Flow Equation and Bessel Functions.

    PubMed

    Awojoyogbe, Bamidele O; Dada, Michael O; Onwu, Samuel O; Ige, Taofeeq A; Akinwande, Ninuola I

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field along with radio waves and a computer to produce highly detailed "slice-by-slice" pictures of virtually all internal structures of matter. The results enable physicians to examine parts of the body in minute detail and identify diseases in ways that are not possible with other techniques. For example, MRI is one of the few imaging tools that can see through bones, making it an excellent tool for examining the brain and other soft tissues. Pulsed-field gradient experiments provide a straightforward means of obtaining information on the translational motion of nuclear spins. However, the interpretation of the data is complicated by the effects of restricting geometries as in the case of most cancerous tissues and the mathematical concept required to account for this becomes very difficult. Most diffusion magnetic resonance techniques are based on the Stejskal-Tanner formulation usually derived from the Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation by including additional terms to accommodate the diffusion effect. Despite the early success of this technique, it has been shown that it has important limitations, the most of which occurs when there is orientation heterogeneity of the fibers in the voxel of interest (VOI). Overcoming this difficulty requires the specification of diffusion coefficients as function of spatial coordinate(s) and such a phenomenon is an indication of non-uniform compartmental conditions which can be analyzed accurately by solving the time-dependent Bloch NMR flow equation analytically. In this study, a mathematical formulation of magnetic resonance flow sequence in restricted geometry is developed based on a general second order partial differential equation derived directly from the fundamental Bloch NMR flow equations. The NMR signal is obtained completely in terms of NMR experimental parameters. The process is described based on Bessel functions and properties that can make it

  8. Use of NMR Imaging to Determine the Diffusion Coefficient of Water in Bio-based Hydrogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diffusion of liquid in a hydrogel material is a fundamental property which must be controlled in order to create effective delivery systems for the agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine the diffusion of water and deuterium oxide in a bio-based h...

  9. Organ specific mapping of in vivo redox state in control and cigarette smoke-exposed mice using EPR/NMR co-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caia, George L.; Efimova, Olga V.; Velayutham, Murugesan; El-Mahdy, Mohamed A.; Abdelghany, Tamer M.; Kesselring, Eric; Petryakov, Sergey; Sun, Ziqi; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-03-01

    In vivo mapping of alterations in redox status is important for understanding organ specific pathology and disease. While electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) enables spatial mapping of free radicals, it does not provide anatomic visualization of the body. Proton MRI is well suited to provide anatomical visualization. We applied EPR/NMR co-imaging instrumentation to map and monitor the redox state of living mice under normal or oxidative stress conditions induced by secondhand cigarette smoke (SHS) exposure. A hybrid co-imaging instrument, EPRI (1.2 GHz)/proton MRI (16.18 MHz), suitable for whole-body co-imaging of mice was utilized with common magnet and gradients along with dual EPR/NMR resonators that enable co-imaging without sample movement. The metabolism of the nitroxide probe, 3-carbamoyl-proxyl (3-CP), was used to map the redox state of control and SHS-exposed mice. Co-imaging allowed precise 3D mapping of radical distribution and reduction in major organs such as the heart, lungs, liver, bladder and kidneys. Reductive metabolism was markedly decreased in SHS-exposed mice and EPR/NMR co-imaging allowed quantitative assessment of this throughout the body. Thus, in vivo EPR/NMR co-imaging enables in vivo organ specific mapping of free radical metabolism and redox stress and the alterations that occur in the pathogenesis of disease.

  10. A double species 23Na and 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate with tunable miscibility via an interspecies Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fudong; Li, Xiaoke; Xiong, Dezhi; Wang, Dajun

    2016-01-01

    We have realized a dual-species Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 23Na and 87Rb atoms and observed its immiscibility. Because of the favorable background intra- and inter-species scattering lengths, stable condensates can be obtained via efficient evaporative cooling and sympathetic cooling without the need for fine tuning of the interactions. Our system thus provides a clean platform for studying inter-species interactions-driven effects in superfluid mixtures. With a Feshbach resonance, we have successfully created double BECs with largely tunable inter-species interactions and studied the miscible-immiscible phase transition.

  11. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using 23Na and proton MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Milton L.; Harrington, Michael G.; Schepkin, Victor D.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1 T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 × 0.8 mm3 and imaging matrices of 60 × 60 × 60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/.

  12. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using (23)Na and proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Truong, Milton L; Harrington, Michael G; Schepkin, Victor D; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8×0.8×0.8 mm(3) and imaging matrices of 60×60×60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/. PMID:25261742

  13. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) Using 23Na and Proton MRI

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Milton L.; Harrington, Michael G.; Schepkin, Victor D.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-01-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/hour concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1 T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8×0.8×0.8 mm3 and imaging matrices of 60×60×60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/ PMID:25261742

  14. Measurement of 23Na(α,p)26Mg at Energies Relevant to 26Al Production in Massive Stars.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, J R; Fallis, J; Laird, A M; Fox, S P; Akers, C; Alcorta, M; Bentley, M A; Christian, G; Davids, B; Davinson, T; Fulton, B R; Galinski, N; Rojas, A; Ruiz, C; de Séréville, N; Shen, M; Shotter, A C

    2015-07-31

    26Al is an important radioisotope in astrophysics that provides evidence of ongoing nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy. The 23Na(α, p)26Mg reaction has been identified by a sensitivity study as being one of the most important reactions for the production of 26Al in the convective C/Ne burning shell of massive stars. Owing to large uncertainties in previous experimental data, model calculations are used for the reaction rate of 23Na(α, p)26Mg in this sensitivity study. Current experimental data suggest a reaction rate a factor of ∼40 higher than model calculations. However, a new measurement of this reaction cross section has been made in inverse kinematics in the energy range E(c.m.)=1.28-3.15  MeV at TRIUMF, and found to be in reasonable agreement with the model calculation. A new reaction rate is calculated and tight constraints on the uncertainty in the production of 26Al, due to this reaction, are determined. PMID:26274415

  15. Diagnostics of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source helium plasma with the injection of 23Na1+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Galatà, A.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Thuillier, T.; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the utilization of an injected 23Na1+ ion beam as a diagnostics of the helium plasma of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The obtained data allows estimating the upper limit for the ion-ion collision mean-free path of the incident sodium ions, the lower limit of ion-ion collision frequencies for all charge states of the sodium ions and the lower limit of the helium plasma density. The ion-ion collision frequencies of high charge state ions are shown to be at least on the order of 1-10 MHz and the plasma density is estimated to be on the order of 1011 cm-3 or higher. The experimental results are compared to simulations of the 23Na1+ capture into the helium plasma. The results indicate that the lower breeding efficiency of light ions in comparison to heavier elements is probably due to different capture efficiencies in which the in-flight ionization of the incident 1 + ions plays a vital role.

  16. Time-efficient interleaved human (23)Na and (1)H data acquisition at 7 T.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Paul W; Koken, Peter; Versluis, Maarten J; Aussenhofer, Sebastian A; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Börnert, Peter; Webb, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate a flexible and time-efficient interleaved imaging approach for the acquisition of proton and sodium images of the human knee at 7 T within a clinically relevant timescale. A flexible software framework was established which allowed the interleaving of multiple, different, fully specific absorption ratio (SAR)-validated scans. The system was able to switch between these different scans at flexible time points. The practical example presented consists of interleaved proton (Dixon imaging and T2* mapping) and sodium (mapping the sodium content and fluid-suppressed component separately) sequences with the key idea to perform proton MRI whilst the sodium nuclei relax towards thermal equilibrium, and vice versa. Comparisons were made between these four scans being acquired sequentially in the normal mode of scanner operation and those acquired in an interleaved fashion. Images acquired in the interleaved mode were very similar to those acquired in sequential scans with no image artifacts produced by the slight intra-sequence variation in steady-state magnetization. A reduction in scanning time of almost a factor of two was established using the interleaved scans, allowing such a protocol to be completed within 30 min. Phantom experiments and in vivo scans performed in healthy volunteers and in one patient proved the basic feasibility of this approach. This approach for the interleaving of multiple proton and sodium scans, each with different contrasts, is an efficient method for the design of new practical clinical protocols for sodium MRI. PMID:26269329

  17. Longitudinal NMR parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit during the growing process using a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geya, Yuto; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Hirotaka; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai, Kosui) were performed using an electrically mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.2 T and 16 cm gap permanent magnet. To measure the relaxation times and apparent diffusion coefficients of the pear fruit in relation to their weight, seven pear fruits were harvested almost every week during the cell enlargement period and measured in a research orchard. To evaluate the in situ relaxation times, six pear fruits were longitudinally measured for about two months during the same period. The measurements for the harvested samples showed good agreement with the in situ measurements. From the measurements of the harvested samples, it is clear that the relaxation rates of the pear fruits linearly change with the inverse of the linear dimension of the fruits, demonstrating that the relaxation mechanism is a surface relaxation. We therefore conclude that the mobile MRI system is a useful device for measuring the NMR parameters of outdoor living plants.

  18. Development of an antibody-based, modular biosensor for 129Xe NMR molecular imaging of cells at nanomolar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Rose, Honor M; Witte, Christopher; Rossella, Federica; Klippel, Stefan; Freund, Christian; Schröder, Leif

    2014-08-12

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is seriously limited when aiming for visualization of targeted contrast agents. Images are reconstructed from the weak diamagnetic properties of the sample and require an abundant molecule like water as the reporter. Micromolar to millimolar concentrations of conventional contrast agents are needed to generate image contrast, thus excluding many molecular markers as potential targets. To address this limitation, we developed and characterized a functional xenon NMR biosensor that can identify a specific cell surface marker by targeted (129)Xe MRI. Cells expressing the cell surface protein CD14 can be spatially distinguished from control cells with incorporation of as little as 20 nM of the xenon MRI readout unit, cryptophane-A. Cryptophane-A serves as a chemical host for hyperpolarized nuclei and facilitates the sensitivity enhancement achieved by xenon MRI. Although this paper describes the application of a CD14-specific biosensor, the construct has been designed in a versatile, modular fashion. This allows for quick and easy adaptation of the biosensor to any cell surface target for which there is a specific antibody. In addition, the modular design facilitates the creation of a multifunctional probe that incorporates readout modules for different detection methods, such as fluorescence, to complement the primary MRI readout. This modular antibody-based approach not only offers a practical technique with which to screen targets, but one which can be readily applied as the xenon MRI field moves closer to molecular imaging applications in vivo. PMID:25071165

  19. Development of an antibody-based, modular biosensor for 129Xe NMR molecular imaging of cells at nanomolar concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Honor M.; Witte, Christopher; Rossella, Federica; Klippel, Stefan; Freund, Christian; Schröder, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is seriously limited when aiming for visualization of targeted contrast agents. Images are reconstructed from the weak diamagnetic properties of the sample and require an abundant molecule like water as the reporter. Micromolar to millimolar concentrations of conventional contrast agents are needed to generate image contrast, thus excluding many molecular markers as potential targets. To address this limitation, we developed and characterized a functional xenon NMR biosensor that can identify a specific cell surface marker by targeted 129Xe MRI. Cells expressing the cell surface protein CD14 can be spatially distinguished from control cells with incorporation of as little as 20 nM of the xenon MRI readout unit, cryptophane-A. Cryptophane-A serves as a chemical host for hyperpolarized nuclei and facilitates the sensitivity enhancement achieved by xenon MRI. Although this paper describes the application of a CD14-specific biosensor, the construct has been designed in a versatile, modular fashion. This allows for quick and easy adaptation of the biosensor to any cell surface target for which there is a specific antibody. In addition, the modular design facilitates the creation of a multifunctional probe that incorporates readout modules for different detection methods, such as fluorescence, to complement the primary MRI readout. This modular antibody-based approach not only offers a practical technique with which to screen targets, but one which can be readily applied as the xenon MRI field moves closer to molecular imaging applications in vivo. PMID:25071165

  20. On the suppression of background signals originating from NMR hardware components. Application to zero echo time imaging and relaxation time analysis.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Wolfgang; Bardenhagen, Ingo; Huang, Li; Bäumer, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Modern NMR imaging systems used for biomedical research are equipped with B0 gradient systems with strong maximum gradient strength and short switching time enabling (1)H NMR measurements of samples with very short transverse relaxation times. However, background signal originating from non-optimized RF coils may hamper experiments with ultrashort delays between RF excitation and signal reception. We demonstrate that two simple means, outer volume suppression and the use of shaped B0 fields produced by higher-order shim coils, allow a considerable suppression of disturbing background signals. Thus, the quality of NMR images acquired at ultrashort or zero echo time is improved and systematic errors in quantitative data evaluation are avoided. Fields of application comprise MRI with ultrashort echo time or relaxation time analysis, for both biomedical research and characterizing porous media filled with liquids or gases. PMID:26597837

  1. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  2. Fast production of large {sup 23}Na Bose-Einstein condensates in an optically plugged magnetic quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Myoung-Sun; Choi, Jae-yoon; Shin, Yong-il

    2011-01-15

    We demonstrate a fast production of large {sup 23}Na Bose-Einstein condensates in an optically plugged magnetic quadrupole trap. A single global minimum of the trapping potential is generated by slightly displacing the plug beam from the center of the quadrupole field. With a dark magneto-optical trap and a simple rf evaporation, our system produces a condensate with N{approx_equal}10{sup 7} atoms every 17 s. The Majorana loss rates and the resultant heating rates for various temperatures are measured with and without plugging. The average energy of a spin-flipped atom is almost linearly proportional to temperature and determined to be about 60% of the average energy of a trapped atom. We present a numerical study of the evaporation dynamics in a plugged linear trap.

  3. Neutron scattering differential cross sections for 23Na from 1.5 to 4.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; Chakraborty, A.; Champine, B. R.; Combs, B. M.; Crider, B. P.; Kersting, L. J.; Kumar, A.; Lueck, C. J.; Liu, S. H.; McDonough, P. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Sidwell, L. C.; Sigillito, A. J.; Watts, D. W.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections from 23Na have been performed for sixteen incident neutron energies between 1.5 and 4.5 MeV. These measurements were complemented by γ-ray excitation functions using the (n ,n‧ γ) reaction to include excited levels not resolved in the neutron detection measurements. The time-of-flight (TOF) technique was employed for background reduction in both neutron and γ-ray measurements and for energy determination in neutron detection measurements. Previous reaction model evaluations relied primarily on neutron total cross sections and four (n, n0) and (n, n1) angular distributions in the 5 to 9 MeV range. The inclusion of more inelastic channels and measurements at lower incident neutron energies provide additional information on direct couplings between elastic and inelastic scattering as a function of angular momentum transfer. Reaction model calculations examining collective direct-coupling and compound absorption components were performed.

  4. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Sample Susceptibility on Measured Diffusion Anisotropy Using NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, J. D.; Dixon, W. T.; Hawkins, J.

    1995-07-01

    Water diffusion measurements in white matter of freshly excised pig spinal cord and in parenchyma of fresh celery (excluding the fibers along the edge of the stalk) were performed using NMR at 200 MHz. In white matter of pig spinal cord, the measured diffusion coefficient is anisotropic and independent of sample orientation with respect to the magnetic field, In celery parenchyma, diffusion is isotropic and independent of orientation in the magnetic field when using a diffusion sequence that gives results independent of self-induced magnetic-held gradients. However, when the standard diffusion pulse sequence that gives results dependent upon self-induced magnetic-field gradients is used, diffusion in celery appears isotropic when the stalk is oriented parallel to the magnetic field but anisotropic when oriented perpendicular. Susceptibility variations leading to anisotropic self-induced magnetic-field gradients approximately 3 kHz/cm in magnitude when the celery is oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can explain this apparent anisotropic diffusion. A study of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in celery as a function of diffusion times ranging from 8 to 22 ms indicates that the motion is at most only slightly restricted. Therefore, although the effect is not seen in all types of samples, one must be aware that self-induced gradients may affect the ADC and may cause isotropic diffusion to appear anisotropic. In addition, NMR experiments that change diffusion-sensitizing gradient timings to study restricted diffusion change the effects of the self-induced gradients as well as the effect of barriers on the ADC, complicating interpretation.

  5. Chemically selective NMR imaging of a 3-component (solid-solid-liquid) sedimenting system.

    PubMed

    Beyea, Steven D; Altobelli, Stephen A; Mondy, Lisa A

    2003-04-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique which resolves the separate components of the evolving vertical concentration profiles of 3-component non-colloidal suspensions is described. This method exploits the sensitivity of MRI to chemical differences between the three phases to directly image the fluid phase and one of the solid phases, with the third phase obtained by subtraction. 19F spin-echo imaging of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) oil was interlaced with 1H SPRITE imaging of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) particles. The third phase was comprised of borosilicate glass spheres, which were not visible while imaging the PTFE or LDPE phases. The method is demonstrated by performing measurements on 2-phase materials containing only the floating (LDPE) particles, with the results contrasted to the experimental behaviour of the individual phases in the full 3-phase system. All experiments were performed using nearly monodisperse particles, with initial suspension volume fractions, phi(i), of 0.1. PMID:12713970

  6. Direct measurement of the (23)Na(α,p)(26)Mg reaction cross section at energies relevant for the production of galactic (26)Al.

    PubMed

    Almaraz-Calderon, S; Bertone, P F; Alcorta, M; Albers, M; Deibel, C M; Hoffman, C R; Jiang, C L; Marley, S T; Rehm, K E; Ugalde, C

    2014-04-18

    The 1809-keV γ ray from the decay of (26)Al(g) is an important target for γ-ray astronomy. In the convective C/Ne burning shell of massive presupernova stars, the (23)Na(α,p)(26)Mg reaction directly influences the production of (26)Al. We have performed a direct measurement of the (23)Na(α,p)(26)Mg reaction cross section at the appropriate astrophysically important energies. The stellar rate calculated in the present work is larger than the recommended rate by nearly a factor of 40 and could strongly affect the production of (26)Al in massive stars. PMID:24785033

  7. Stray-field NMR diffusion q-space diffraction imaging of monodisperse coarsening foams.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kieron; Burbidge, Adam; Apperley, David; Hodgkinson, Paul; Markwell, Fraser A; Topgaard, Daniel; Hughes, Eric

    2016-08-15

    The technique of stray field diffusion NMR is adapted to study the diffusion properties of water in monodisperse wet foams. We show for the first time, that the technique is capable of observing q-space diffusion diffraction peaks in monodisperse aqueous foams with initial bubble sizes in the range of 50-85μm. The position of the peak maximum can be correlated simply to the bubble size in the foam leading to a technique that can investigate the stability of the foam over time. The diffusion technique, together with supplementary spin-spin relaxation analysis of the diffusion data is used to follow the stability and coarsening behaviour of monodisperse foams with a water fraction range between 0.24 and 0.33. The monodisperse foams remain stable for a period of hours in terms of the initial bubble size. The duration of this stable period correlates to the initial size of the bubbles. Eventually the bubbles begin to coarsen and this is observed in changes in the position of the diffusion diffraction maxima. PMID:27179175

  8. Imaging of the B1 distribution and background signal in a MAS NMR probehead using inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields.

    PubMed

    Odedra, Smita; Wimperis, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Several widely used methods for suppressing the "background" signal in (1)H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy are based on the assumption of a significant difference between the B1 radiofrequency field experienced by the sample (within the MAS rotor) and that felt by static components of the probehead (where the background signal is believed to originate). In this work, a two-dimensional correlation experiment employing inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields is used to image the B1 distribution in a MAS NMR probehead. The experiment, which can be performed on any spectrometer, allows the distribution of the B1 field to be measured and also correlated with the spatial location of the NMR signal within the probehead. The method can also readily be combined with various "depth pulse" techniques for background suppression, allowing their performances to be more rigorously evaluated. PMID:23644349

  9. Clinical NMR imaging of the brain in children: normal and neurologic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.A,; Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.; Steiner, R.E.; Thomas, D.J.; Hayward, R.; Bryant, D.R.T.; Payne, J.A.; Levene, M.I.; Whitelaw, A.; Dubowitz, L.M.S.; Dubowitz, V.

    1983-11-01

    The results of initial clinical nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in eight normal and 52 children with a wide variety of neurologic diseases were reviewed. The high level of gray-white matter contrast available with inversion-recovery sequences provided a basis for visualizing normal myelination as well as delays or deficits in this process. The appearances seen in cases of parenchymal hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and proencephalic cysts are described. Ventricular enlargement was readily identified and marginal edema was demonstrated with spin-echo sequences. Abnormalities were seen in cerebral palsy, congenital malformations, Hallervorden-Spatz disease, aminoaciduria, and meningitis. Space-occupying lesions were identified by virtue of their increased relaxation times and mass effects. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has considerable potential in pediatric neuroradiologic practice, in some conditions supplying information not available by computed tomography or sonography.

  10. Integration of biaxial planar gradient coils and an RF microcoil for NMR flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshevsky, A. G.; Walton, J. H.; Shutov, M. V.; de Ropp, J. S.; Collins, S. D.; McCarthy, M. J.

    2005-02-01

    A package of two planar gradient coils combined with an RF coil was microfabricated for low-field MRI measurements of velocity flow profiles. The package generates orthogonal gradients in the radial and velocity encoding directions for standard flow imaging experiments. A commercial 0.6 T superconductive magnet was used to test coil performance. For comparison flow imaging was also performed using a commercial set of gradient coils. Velocity profiles were obtained for several volumetric flow rates of water in tubes with inner diameters of 1.02 mm and 1.4 mm. Velocity resolution was 0.13 mm s-1, comparable to that achieved with commercial gradient coils. The quality of the velocity profile was sufficient for viscosity calculations, and thus permits future utilization of this coil package in the design of a portable MRI viscometer.

  11. Multiphase imaging of gas flow in a nanoporous material usingremote detection NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Harel, Elad; Granwehr, Josef; Seeley, Juliette A.; Pines, Alex

    2005-10-03

    Pore structure and connectivity determine how microstructured materials perform in applications such as catalysis, fluid storage and transport, filtering, or as reactors. We report a model study on silica aerogel using a recently introduced time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance imaging technique to characterize the flow field and elucidate the effects of heterogeneities in the pore structure on gas flow and dispersion with Xe-129 as the gas-phase sensor. The observed chemical shift allows the separate visualization of unrestricted xenon and xenon confined in the pores of the aerogel. The asymmetrical nature of the dispersion pattern alludes to the existence of a stationary and a flow regime in the aerogel. An exchange time constant is determined to characterize the gas transfer between them. As a general methodology, this technique provides new insights into the dynamics of flow in porous media where multiple phases or chemical species may be present.

  12. Software and hardware integration of a microprogrammable state machine for NMR imaging.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B K; Pratt, R G; Thomas, S R; Dieckman, S L; Ridgway, T H

    1991-01-01

    We have integrated a commercially available microprogrammable state machine (Tecmag PULSkit) for use as a magnetic resonance pulse programmer. Providing the capability for active research environment imaging protocols, it features timing resolution of 100 nsec, ten 16-bit loop counters, and individually addressable look-up tables. This integration involved hardware and software integration with a VAX 11/750 at several levels. Hardware: Each of the three gradient channels employs three digital-to-analog converters (DACs). An 8-bit, 4-quadrant, multiplying DAC generates the gradient waveform shape. A 12-bit DAC generates the multiplying DAC scaling voltage, controlling gradient amplitude and sign. A third 12-bit DAC produces a gradient offset (shim) voltage. An eddy current compensation network is present for each gradient channel. Software: The software design philosophy was to create a flexible interface (interactive window environment), while not constraining complex manipulation of the hardware (direct use of the pulse-sequence compiler primitives and microprogramming). The software levels include (a) pulse-sequence microprogramming, (b) pulse-sequence compiler, (c) interactive parameter specification, and (d) canned pulse-sequence microcode library. PMID:1779734

  13. Chromatographic NMR in NMR solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Caroline; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Ziarelli, Fabio; Excoffier, Grégory; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pseudo-chromatographic NMR experiments could be performed using typical chromatographic solids and solvents. This first setup yielded improved separation of the spectral components of the NMR spectra of mixtures using PFG self-diffusion measurements. The method (dubbed Chromatographic NMR) was successively shown to possess, in favorable cases, superior resolving power on non-functionalized silica, compared to its LC counterpart. To further investigate the applicability of the method, we studied here the feasibility of Chromatographic NMR in common deuterated solvents. Two examples are provided, using deuterated chloroform and water, for homologous compounds soluble in these solvents, namely aromatic molecules and alcohols, respectively.

  14. Experimental determination of the {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na reaction cross section and calculation of the Maxwellian averaged cross section at stellar temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smet, L. de; Wagemans, C.; Wagemans, J.; Heyse, J.; Gils, J. van

    2007-10-15

    The {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na reaction cross section has been studied at the linear accelerator GELINA of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements in Geel, Belgium, and has been determined up to a neutron energy of about 100 keV using the time-of-flight technique. Six resonances could be observed in this energy region, whereas before only one had been identified experimentally. For four of them, resonance parameters such as resonance energy, total width, area, and spin of the state could be determined. From the obtained {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na cross section data, Maxwellian averaged cross section (MACS) values were calculated by numerical integration. Since neutron induced reactions are among the major destruction mechanisms of {sup 26}Al in our Galaxy, these new MACS values contribute to a better understanding of the observed {sup 26}Al abundance.

  15. The 12C(12C,α)20Ne and 12C(12C,p)23Na reactions at the Gamow peak via the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Guardo, L.; Gulino, M.; Indelicato, I.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Spartá, R.

    2016-05-01

    A measurement of the 12C(14N,α20Ne)2H and 12C(14N,p23Na)2Hreactions has been performed at a 14N beam energy of 30.0 MeV. The experiment aims to explore the extent to which contributing 24Mg excited states can be populated in the quasi-free reaction off the deuteron in 14N. In particular, the 24Mg excitation region explored in the measurement plays a key role in stellar carbon burning whose cross section is commonly determined by extrapolating high-energy fusion data. From preliminary results, α and proton channels are clearly identified. In particular, ground and first excited states of 20Ne and 23Na play a major role.

  16. Measurement of the Absolute Elastic and Inelastic Differential Neutron Cross Sections for 23Na Between 2 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Yates, S. W.; Hicks, S. F.; Kersting, L. J.; Luke, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; Sigillito, A. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2013-03-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering angular distributions have been measured from 23Na for incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV at the University of Kentucky using neutron time-of-flight techniques. The cross sections obtained are important for applications in nuclear reactor development and other areas, and they are an energy region in which existing data are very sparse. Absolute cross sections were obtained by normalizing Na angular distributions to the well-known np cross sections.

  17. Application of NMR spectroscopy and multidimensional imaging to the gelcasting process and in-situ real-time monitoring of cross-linking polyacrylamide gels

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Dieckman, S.L.; Gopalsami, N.

    1995-04-01

    In the gelcasting process, a slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers is cast in a mold. The process is different from injection molding in that it separates mold-filling from setting during conversion of the ceramic slurry to a formed green part. In this work, NMR spectroscopy and imaging have been conducted for in-situ monitoring of the gelation process and for mapping the polymerization. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra have been obtained during polymerization of a premix of soluble reactive methacrylamide (monomer) and N, N`-methylene bisacrylamide (cross-linking molecules). The premix was polymerized by adding ammonium persulfate (initiator) and tetramethyl-ethylene-diamine (accelerator) to form long-chain, cross-linked polymers. The time-varying spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} during polymerization have been studied at 25 and 35{degrees}C, and the variation of spectra and T{sub 1} with respect to extent of polymerization has been determined. To verify homogeneous polymerization, multidimensional NMR imaging was utilized for in-situ monitoring of the process. The intensities from the images are modeled and the correspondence shows a direct extraction of T{sub 1} data from the images.

  18. Multinuclear Solid-State NMR Investigation of Hexaniobate and Hexatantalate Compounds.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gérard; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Iuga, Dinu; Bonhomme, Christian

    2016-06-20

    This work determines the potential of solid-state NMR techniques to probe proton, alkali, and niobium environments in Lindqvist salts. Na7HNb6O19·15H2O (1), K8Nb6O19·16H2O (2), and Na8Ta6O19·24.5H2O (3) have been studied by solid-state static and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR at high and ultrahigh magnetic field (16.4 and 19.9 T). (1)H MAS NMR was found to be a convenient and straightforward tool to discriminate between protonated and nonprotonated clusters AxH8-xM6O19·nH2O (A = alkali ion; M = Nb, Ta). (93)Nb MAS NMR studies at different fields and MAS rotation frequencies have been performed on 1. For the first time, the contributions of NbO5Oμ2H sites were clearly distinguished from those assigned to NbO6 sites in the hexaniobate cluster. The strong broadening of the resonances obtained under MAS was interpreted by combining chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) with quadrupolar effects and by using extensive fitting of the line shapes. In order to obtain the highest accuracy for all NMR parameters (CSA and quadrupolar), (93)Nb WURST QCPMG spectra in the static mode were recorded at 16.4 T for sample 1. The (93)Nb NMR spectra were interpreted in connection with the XRD data available in the literature (i.e., fractional occupancies of the NbO5Oμ2H sites). 1D (23)Na MAS and 2D (23)Na 3QMAS NMR studies of 1 revealed several distinct sodium sites. The multiplicity of the sites was again compared to structural details previously obtained by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The (23)Na MAS NMR study of 3 confirmed the presence of a much larger distribution of sodium sites in accordance with the 10 sodium sites predicted by XRD. Finally, the effect of Nb/Ta substitutions in 1 was also probed by multinuclear MAS NMR ((1)H, (23)Na, and (93)Nb). PMID:27245403

  19. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  20. Multispectral Analysis of NMR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Vannier, M. W. And Associates; Jordan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses initial efforts to adapt multispectral satellite-image analysis to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of human body. Flexibility of these techniques makes it possible to present NMR data in variety of formats, including pseudocolor composite images of pathological internal features. Techniques do not have to be greatly modified from form in which used to produce satellite maps of such Earth features as water, rock, or foliage.

  1. A 23Na magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, XANES, and high-temperature X-ray diffraction study of NaUO3, Na4UO5, and Na2U2O7.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Raison, P E; Martel, L; Charpentier, T; Farnan, I; Prieur, D; Hennig, C; Scheinost, A C; Konings, R J M; Cheetham, A K

    2014-01-01

    The valence state of uranium has been confirmed for the three sodium uranates NaU(V)O3/[Rn](5f(1)), Na4U(VI)O5/[Rn](5f(0)), and Na2U(VI)2O7/[Rn](5f(0)), using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Solid-state (23)Na magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) measurements have been performed for the first time, yielding chemical shifts at -29.1 (NaUO3), 15.1 (Na4UO5), and -14.1 and -19 ppm (Na1 8-fold coordinated and Na2 7-fold coordinated in Na2U2O7), respectively. The [Rn]5f(1) electronic structure of uranium in NaUO3 causes a paramagnetic shift in comparison to Na4UO5 and Na2U2O7, where the electronic structure is [Rn]5f(0). A (23)Na multi quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) study on Na2U2O7 has confirmed a monoclinic rather than rhombohedral structure with evidence for two distinct Na sites. DFT calculations of the NMR parameters on the nonmagnetic compounds Na4UO5 and Na2U2O7 have permitted the differentiation between the two Na sites of the Na2U2O7 structure. The linear thermal expansion coefficients of all three compounds have been determined using high-temperature X-ray diffraction: αa = 22.7 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 12.9 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 16.2 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = 52.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) for NaUO3 in the range 298-1273 K; αa = 37.1 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 6.2 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = 81.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) for Na4UO5 in the range 298-1073 K; αa = 6.7 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 14.4 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 26.8 × 10(-6) K(-1), αβ = -7.8 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = -217.6 × 10(-6) K(-1) for Na2U2O7 in the range 298-573 K. The α to β phase transition reported for the last compound above about 600 K was not observed in the present studies, either by high-temperature X-ray diffraction or by differential scanning calorimetry. PMID:24350659

  2. Status of the direct measurements of 18O(p,γ)19F and 23Na(p,γ)24Mg cross sections at astrophysical energies at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeltzig, A.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Best, A.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.

    2016-04-01

    18O(p, γ)19F and 23Na(p,γ)24Mg are reactions of astrophysical interest for example in AGB star scenarios. The rates of both reactions are potentially influenced by low-energy resonances for whose strengths either exist only values with large uncertainties, upper limits or even contradictory claims. Measurements at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) aim at a direct observation of these low-energy resonances, and additional cross section measurements to aid a more precise determination of the reaction rates in astrophysical scenarios. We report the experimental setup and the status of the ongoing measurements of the two reactions at LUNA.

  3. Atomic masses of {sup 6}Li,{sup 23}Na,{sup 39,41}K,{sup 85,87}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, Brianna J.; Redshaw, Matthew; Myers, Edmund G.

    2010-10-15

    The atomic masses of the alkali-metal isotopes {sup 6}Li,{sup 23}Na,{sup 39,41}K,{sup 85,87}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs have been obtained from measurements of cyclotron frequency ratios of pairs of ions simultaneously trapped in a Penning trap. The results, with one standard deviation uncertainty, are: M({sup 6}Li)=6.015 122 887 4(16)u,M({sup 23}Na)=22.989769 282 8(26)u,M({sup 39}K)=38.963 706 485 6(52)u,M({sup 41}K)=40.961 825 257 4(48)u,M({sup 85}Rb)=84.911 789739(9)u,M({sup 87}Rb)=86.909 180 535(10)u, and M({sup 133}Cs)=132.905 451 963(13)u. Our mass of {sup 6}Li yields an improved neutron separation energy for {sup 7}Li of 7251.1014(45) keV.

  4. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the 22Ne(p ,γ ) 23Na reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalo, Rosanna; Cavanna, Francesca; Ferraro, Federico; Slemer, Alessandra; Al-Abdullah, Tariq; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Anders, Michael; Bemmerer, Daniel; Elekes, Zoltán; Mattei, Giovanni; Reinicke, Stefan; Schmidt, Konrad; Scian, Carlo; Wagner, Louis

    2015-10-01

    The 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominate the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with 22Ne. The strengths ω γ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479- and 1279-keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479- and 1279-keV resonances were determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which is found to be less intense by one order of magnitude. In addition, improved branching ratios have been determined for the gamma decay of the resonances at 436, 479, and 639 keV.

  5. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  6. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  7. Double rotation NMR studies of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, R. |

    1993-07-01

    Goal is to study the organization and structures of guest atoms and molecules and their reactions on internal surfaces within pores of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na double rotation NMR (DOR) is used since it removes the anisotropic broadening in NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, thus increasing resolution. This work concentrates on probing aluminum framework atoms in aluminophosphate molecular sieves and sodium extra framework cations in porous aluminosilicates. In aluminophosphates, ordering and electronic environments of the framework {sup 27}Al nuclei are modified upon adsorption of water molecules within the channels; a relation is sought between the sieve channel topology and the organization of adsorbed water, as well as the interaction between the Al nuclei and the water molecules. Extra framework Na{sup +} cations are directly involved in adsorption processes and reactions in zeolite cavities.

  8. Applications of high resolution NMR to geochemistry: crystalline, glass, and molten silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear spin interactions and the associated quantum mechanical dynamics which are present in solid state NMR are introduced. A brief overview of aluminosilicate structure is presented and crystalline structure is then reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions made by /sup 29/Si NMR spectroscopy. The local structure of glass aluminosilicates as observed by NMR, is presented with analysis of the information content of /sup 29/Si spectra. A high-temperature (to 1300/sup 0/C) NMR spectroscopic investigation of the local environment and dynamics of molecular motion in molten aluminosilicates is described. A comparison is made of silicate liquid, glass, and crystalline local structure. The atomic and molecular motions present in a melt are investigated through relaxation time (T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/) measurements as a function of composition and temperature for /sup 23/Na and /sup 29/Si.

  9. Using "On/Off" (19)F NMR/Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signals to Sense Tyrosine Kinase/Phosphatase Activity in Vitro and in Cell Lysates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Sun, Hongbin; Hu, Chen; Li, Gongyu; Liu, Xiaomei; Chen, Peiyao; Cui, Yusi; Liu, Jing; Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-03-15

    Tyrosine kinase and phosphatase are two important, antagonistic enzymes in organisms. Development of noninvasive approach for sensing their activity with high spatial and temporal resolution remains challenging. Herein, we rationally designed a hydrogelator Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr-Ile-OH (1a) whose supramolecular hydrogel (i.e., Gel 1a) can be subjected to tyrosine kinase-directed disassembly, and its phosphate precursor Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr(H2PO3)-Ile-OH (1b), which can be subjected to alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-instructed self-assembly to form supramolecular hydrogel Gel 1b, respectively. Mechanic properties and internal fibrous networks of the hydrogels were characterized with rheology and cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Disassembly/self-assembly of their corresponding supramolecular hydrogels conferring respective "On/Off" (19)F NMR/MRI signals were employed to sense the activity of these two important enzymes in vitro and in cell lysates for the first time. We anticipate that our new (19)F NMR/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method would facilitate pharmaceutical researchers to screen new inhibitors for these two enzymes without steric hindrance. PMID:26901415

  10. Spin-labeled gel for the production of radical-free dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced molecules for NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarney, Evan R.; Han, Songi

    2008-02-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently received much attention as a viable approach to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and the contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where the significantly higher electron spin polarization of stable radicals is transferred to nuclear spins. In order to apply DNP-enhanced NMR and MRI signal to biological and in vivo systems, it is crucial to obtain highly polarized solution samples at ambient temperatures. As stable radicals are employed as the source for the DNP polarization transfer, it is also crucial that the highly polarized sample lacks residual radical concentration because the polarized molecules will be introduced to a biological system that will be sensitive to the presence of radicals. We developed an agarose-based porous media that is covalently spin-labeled with stable radicals. The loading of solvent accessible radical is sufficiently high and their mobility approximates that in solution, which ensures high efficiency for Overhauser mechanism induced DNP without physically releasing any measurable radical into the solution. Under ambient conditions at 0.35 T magnetic field, we measure the DNP enhancement efficiency of 1H signal of stagnant and continuously flowing water utilizing immobilized stable nitroxide radicals that contain two or three ESR hyperfine splitting lines and compare them to the performance of freely dissolved radicals.

  11. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    the connectivity of the pore system. Examples are given for T1-T2 correlation of some soil samples (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010). Third, relaxometric information forms the basis of understanding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. The general difficulty of imaging in soils are the inherent fast T2 relaxation times due to i) the small pore sizes, ii) presence of paramagnetic ions in the solid matrix, and iii) diffusion in internal gradients. The last point is important, since echo times can not set shorter than about 1ms for imaging purposes. The way out is either the usage of low fields for imaging in soils or special ultra-short pulse sequences, which do not create echoes. In this presentation we will give examples on conventional imaging of macropore fluxes in soil cores (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010), and the combination with relaxometric imaging, as well as the advantages and drawbacks of low-field and ultra-fast pulse imaging. Also first results on the imaging of soil columns measured by SIP in Project A3 are given. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Waterflow Monitored by Tracer Transport in Natural Porous Media Using MRI." Vadose Zone J.: submitted. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Relaxation in a Natural soil: Comparison of Relaxometric Imaging, T1 - T2 Correlation and Fast-Field Cycling NMR." The Open Magnetic Resonance Journal: in print. Pohlmeier, A., S. Haber-Pohlmeier, et al. (2009). "A Fast Field Cycling NMR Relaxometry Study of Natural Soils." Vadose Zone J. 8: 735-742. Stingaciu, L. R., A. Pohlmeier, et al. (2009). "Characterization of unsaturated porous media by high-field and low-field NMR relaxometry." Water Resources Research 45: W08412

  12. Arterial metabolism as studied in vitro by NMR: preliminary results in normotensive and hypertensive aortas.

    PubMed

    Carlier, P G; Grandjean, J; Michel, P; D'Orio, V; Rorive, G L

    1985-12-01

    Arterial tissue has been analysed by 31P-, 13C-, 23Na- and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Rabbit thoracic aortas were mounted on a system with perfusate circulation and studied in basal conditions. Phosphorus spectra remained stable for hours and showed low levels of phosphocreatine (PCr) compared to skeletal, cardiac or even to nonvascular smooth muscle. Significant levels of sugar-phosphates (SP), phosphodiesters (PDE) were detected, as well as occasionnally a peak in the diphosphodiester region. Experiments with phosphate-free perfusate demonstrated a very low level of intracellular inorganic phosphate. As expected from previous data, free ADP levels in tonic arterial tissue were found much higher than in any other muscle. Addition of norepinephrine into the perfusate induced transient decrease in ATP and PCr levels, associated with an increased production of phosphorylated intermediates. At the early stage of renovascular hypertension, aortic energetic pattern was characterized by an increased ADP/ATP ratio. Natural abundant 13C spectra were recorded from dog aortic fragments and showed mainly resonances attributed to fatty components. After addition of a shift-reagent, dysprosium tripolyphosphate, 23Na-NMR allowed separation of intra- and extracellular Na of perfused rabbits aortas. Proton NMR of lyophilized aortic fragments revealed several peaks originating from biologically relevant molecules, lactate, creatine, taurine... These preliminary data demonstrate the feasability of multinuclear NMR spectroscopy of vascular tissue and are suggestive of the potential of the method when it will be combined with monitoring of functional parameters. PMID:2424380

  13. Measurement of the Absolute Elastic and Inelastic Differential Neutron Cross Sections for 23Na between 2 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; McEllistrem, M. T.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevez, F. M.; Chakraborty, A.; Yates, S. W.; Sigillito, A.; McDonough, P. J.; Kersting, L. J.; Luke, C. J.; Hicks, S. F.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2011-10-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering angular distributions for 23Na sample were measured at the University of Kentucky using the time-of-flight (ToF) technique, between 2 and 4 MeV incident neutron energies.Normalization of yields into scattering cross sections was accomplished by comparison of Na yields to the yields obtained from hydrogen in polyethylene samples via the well-known n-p scattering cross sections.The 3H(p,n) differential cross sections are used to determine the energy-dependent efficiency of the main detector. Because the efficiency of this detector appears as a ratio in the comparison of scattered yields from different samples, the absolute values of the 3H(p,n) cross sections are not critical, but their energy dependence is. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE contract no. DE-AC07-051D14517.

  14. Theoretical evaluation of the reaction rates for {sup 26}Al(n,p){sup 26}Mg and {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Oginni, B. M.; Iliadis, C.; Champagne, A. E.

    2011-02-15

    The reactions that destroy {sup 26}Al in massive stars have significance in a number of astrophysical contexts. We evaluate the reaction rates of {sup 26}Al(n,p){sup 26}Mg and {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na using cross sections obtained from the codes empire and talys. These have been compared to the published rates obtained from the non-smoker code and to some experimental data. We show that the results obtained from empire and talys are comparable to those from non-smoker. We also show how the theoretical results vary with respect to changes in the input parameters. Finally, we present recommended rates for these reactions using the available experimental data and our new theoretical results.

  15. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  16. Magic-angle spinning solid-state multinuclear NMR on low-field instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Morten K.; Bakharev, Oleg; Jensen, Ole; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jørgen; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile and cost-effective NMR spectroscopy exploiting low-field permanent magnets is a field of tremendous development with obvious applications for arrayed large scale analysis, field work, and industrial screening. So far such demonstrations have concentrated on relaxation measurements and lately high-resolution liquid-state NMR applications. With high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy being increasingly important in a broad variety of applications, we here introduce low-field magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state multinuclear NMR based on a commercial ACT 0.45 T 62 mm bore Halbach magnet along with a homebuilt FPGA digital NMR console, amplifiers, and a modified standard 45 mm wide MAS probe for 7 mm rotors. To illustrate the performance of the instrument and address cases where the low magnetic field may offer complementarity to high-field NMR experiments, we demonstrate applications for 23Na MAS NMR with enhanced second-order quadrupolar coupling effects and 31P MAS NMR where reduced influence from chemical shift anisotropy at low field may facilitate determination of heteronuclear dipole-dipole couplings.

  17. RF interference suppression in a cardiac synchronization system operating in a high magnetic field NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Damji, A.A.; Snyder, R.E.; Ellinger, D.C.; Witkowski, F.X.; Allen, P.S.

    1988-11-01

    An electrocardiographic (ECG) unit suitable for cardiac-synchronized nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in high magnetic fields is presented. The unit includes lossy transmission lines as ECG leads in order to suppress radio frequency (RF) interference in the electrocardiogram. The unit's immunity to RF interference is demonstrated.

  18. NMR quadrupolar system described as Bose-Einstein-condensate-like system

    SciTech Connect

    Auccaise, R.; Oliveira, I. S.; Sarthour, R. S.; Teles, J.; Bonagamba, T. J.; Azevedo, E. R. de

    2009-04-14

    This paper presents a description of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of quadrupolar systems using the Holstein-Primakoff (HP) formalism and its analogy with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) system. Two nuclear spin systems constituted of quadrupolar nuclei I=3/2 ({sup 23}Na) and I=7/2 ({sup 133}Cs) in lyotropic liquid crystals were used for experimental demonstrations. Specifically, we derived the conditions necessary for accomplishing the analogy, executed the proper experiments, and compared with quantum mechanical prediction for a Bose system. The NMR description in the HP representation could be applied in the future as a workbench for BEC-like systems, where the statistical properties may be obtained using the intermediate statistic, first established by Gentile. The description can be applied for any quadrupolar systems, including new developed solid-state NMR GaAS nanodevices.

  19. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  20. Water speciation in sodium silicate glasses (quenched melts): A comprehensive NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X.; Kanzaki, M.; Eguchi, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution mechanism of water is an important factor governing how the dissolved water affects the physical and thermodynamic properties of silicate melts and glasses. Our previous studies have demonstrated that 1H MAS NMR in combination with 29Si-1H and 27Al-1H double-resonance NMR experiments is an effective approach for unambiguously differentiating and quantifying different water species in quenched silicate melts (glasses). Several contrasting dissolution mechanisms have been revealed depending on the melt composition: for relatively polymerized melts, the formation of SiOH/AlOH species (plus molecular H2O) and depolymerization of the network structure dominate; whereas for depolymerized Ca-Mg silicate melts, free OH (e.g. MgOH) become increasingly important (cf. [1]). The proportion of free OH species has been shown to decrease with both increasing melt polymerization (silica content) and decreasing field strength of the network modifying cations (from Mg to Ca). Our previous 1H and 29Si MAS NMR results for hydrous Na silicate glasses of limited compositions (Na2Si4O9 and Na2Si2O5) were consistent with negligible free OH (NaOH) species and depolymerizing effect of water dissolution [2]. On the other hand, there were also other studies that proposed the presence of significant NaOH species in hydrous glasses near the Na2Si2O5 composition. The purpose of this study is apply the approach of combined 1H MAS NMR and double-resonance (29Si-1H and 23Na-1H) NMR to gain unambiguous evidence for the OH speciation in Na silicate glasses (melts) as a function of composition. Hydrous Na silicate glasses containing mostly ≤ 1 wt% H2O for a range of Na/Si ratios from 0.33 to 1.33 have been synthesized by rapidly quenching melts either at 0.2 GPa using an internally heated gas pressure vessel or at 1 GPa using a piston cylinder high-pressure apparatus. NMR spectra have been acquired using a 9.4 T Varian Unity-Inova spectrometer. The 29Si and 1H chemical shifts are

  1. Multinuclear high-resolution NMR study of compounds from the ternary system NaF-CaF2-AlF3: from determination to modeling of NMR parameters.

    PubMed

    Martineau, C; Body, M; Legein, C; Silly, G; Buzaré, J-Y; Fayon, F

    2006-12-11

    27Al and 23Na NMR satellite transition spectroscopy and 3Q magic-angle-spinning spectra are recorded for three compounds from the ternary NaF-CaF2-AlF3 system. The quadrupolar frequency nuQ, asymmetry parameter etaQ, and isotropic chemical shift deltaiso are extracted from the spectrum reconstructions for five aluminum and four sodium sites. The quadrupolar parameters are calculated using the LAPW-based ab initio code WIEN2k. It is necessary to perform a structure optimization of all compounds to ensure a fine agreement between experimental and calculated parameters. By a comparison of experimental and calculated values, an attribution of all of the 27Al and 23Na NMR lines to the crystallographic sites is achieved. High-speed 19F NMR MAS spectra are recorded and reconstructed for the same compounds, leading to the determination of 18 isotropic chemical shifts. The superposition model developed by Bureau et al. is used, allowing a bijective assignment of the 19F NMR lines to the crystallographic sites. PMID:17140229

  2. Probing the calcium and sodium local environment in bones and teeth using multinuclear solid state NMR and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laurencin, Danielle; Wong, Alan; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Knowles, Jonathan C; Qiu, Dong; Pickup, David M; Newport, Robert J; Gan, Zhehong; Duer, Melinda J; Smith, Mark E

    2010-02-01

    Despite the numerous studies of bone mineral, there are still many questions regarding the exact structure and composition of the mineral phase, and how the mineral crystals become organised with respect to each other and the collagen matrix. Bone mineral is commonly formulated as hydroxyapatite, albeit with numerous substitutions, and has previously been studied by (31)P and (1)H NMR, which has given considerable insight into the complexity of the mineral structure. However, to date, there has been no report of an NMR investigation of the other major component of bone mineral, calcium, nor of common minority cations like sodium. Here, direct analysis of the local environment of calcium in two biological apatites, equine bone (HB) and bovine tooth (CT), was carried out using both (43)Ca solid state NMR and Ca K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, revealing important structural information about the calcium coordination shell. The (43)Ca delta(iso) in HB and CT is found to correlate with the average Ca-O bond distance measured by Ca K-edge EXAFS, and the (43)Ca NMR linewidths show that there is a greater distribution in chemical bonding around calcium in HB and CT, compared to synthetic apatites. In the case of sodium, (23)Na MAS NMR, high resolution 3Q-MAS NMR, as well as (23)Na{(31)P} REDOR and (1)H{(23)Na} R(3)-HMQC correlation experiments give the first direct evidence that some sodium is located inside the apatite phase in HB and CT, but with a greater distribution of environments compared to a synthetic sodium substituted apatite (Na-HA). PMID:20094673

  3. Hepatocarcinogenesis tumor grading correlated with in vivo image-guided {sup 1}H-NMR spectroscopy in a rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Towner, Rheal A. . E-mail: Rheal-Towner@omrf.ouhsc.edu; Foley, Lesley M.; Painter, Dorothy M.

    2005-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy worldwide, the occurrence of which is unevenly distributed. Most hepatocellular carcinoma cases present late and have a poor prognosis; therefore, early diagnosis is essential to prolong survival. Differential diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is difficult. We studied the feasibility of using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 7.0 T for the diagnosis and grading of liver tumors. An animal model of hepatocarcinogenesis was used, which allowed tumor progression from precancerous lesions to hepatocellular carcinomas. This study was focused primarily on the grading of the tumors and its correlation with the ratio between the MRS peaks arising from MRS-detected lipid hydrogens (0.9, 1.3 and 5.3 ppm) and compared to the {gamma}-methylene hydrogens of glutamate (Glu) and glutamine (Gln) which was used as an internal reference (2.4 ppm). The lipid methylene hydrogen (1.3 ppm) to (Glu + Gln) ratio was found to correlate with the formation of differentiated small foci and (precancerous) hepatic nodules, whereas the unsaturated olefinic lipid hydrogen (5.3 ppm) to (Glu + Gln) ratio was able to correlate with the formation of late stage tumors such as adenomas and hepatocellular carcinomas. The results of our study suggest that MRS-detected alterations in lipid metabolism can be correlated with the grading of liver tumor tissue at different stages during the carcinogenesis process.

  4. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  5. 7Li double quantum filtered NMR and multinuclear relaxation rates of clay suspensions: the effect of clay concentration and nonionic surfactants

    PubMed

    Grandjean; Robert

    1999-05-01

    7Li double quantum NMR spectra were used to investigate ordering process of synthetic Li+-saponites dispersed in water. Synthetic clays suspended in aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene glycol) monoalkyl ethers were also studied by 7Li, 23Na, and 13C NMR techniques. The strongest surfactant-Li+-saponite interaction occurs with the lowest charged clay. Laponite interacts more strongly with organic molecules than does a similarly charged saponite. The number of oxyethylene units rather than the chain length seems to govern the solid-surfactant interaction. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10329224

  6. NMR imaging estimates of muscle volume and intramuscular fat infiltration in the thigh: variations with muscle, gender, and age.

    PubMed

    Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Barnouin, Yoann; Azzabou, Noura; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Voit, Thomas; Moraux, Amélie; Leroux, Gaëlle; Behin, Anthony; McPhee, Jamie S; Carlier, Pierre G

    2015-06-01

    Muscle mass is particularly relevant to follow during aging, owing to its link with physical performance and autonomy. The objectives of this work were to assess muscle volume (MV) and intramuscular fat (IMF) for all the muscles of the thigh in a large population of young and elderly healthy individuals using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to test the effect of gender and age on MV and IMF and to determine the best representative slice for the estimation of MV and IMF. The study enrolled 105 healthy young (range 20-30 years) and older (range 70-80 years) subjects. MRI scans were acquired along the femur length using a three-dimension three-point Dixon proton density-weighted gradient echo sequence. MV and IMF were estimated from all the slices. The effects of age and gender on MV and IMF were assessed. Predictive equations for MV and IMF were established using a single slice at various femur levels for each muscle in order to reduce the analysis process. MV was decreased with aging in both genders, particularly in the quadriceps femoris. IMF was largely increased with aging in men and, to a lesser extent, in women. Percentages of MV decrease and IMF increase with aging varied according to the muscle. Predictive equations to predict MV and IMF from single slices are provided and were validated. This study is the first one to provide muscle volume and intramuscular fat infiltration in all the muscles of the thigh in a large population of young and elderly healthy subjects. PMID:26040416

  7. Fabrication of homogeneously cross-linked, functional alginate microcapsules validated by NMR-, CLSM- and AFM-imaging.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, H; Hillgärtner, M; Manz, B; Feilen, P; Brunnenmeier, F; Leinfelder, U; Weber, M; Cramer, H; Schneider, S; Hendrich, C; Volke, F; Zimmermann, U

    2003-05-01

    Cross-linked alginate microcapsules of sufficient mechanical strength can immunoisolate cells for the long-term treatment of hormone and other deficiency diseases in human beings. However, gelation of alginate by external Ba(2+) (or other divalent cations) produces non-homogeneous cross-linking of the polymeric mannuronic (M) and guluronic (G) acid chains. The stability of such microcapsules is rather limited. Here, we show that homogeneous cross-linking can be achieved by injecting BaCl(2) crystals into alginate droplets before they come into contact with external BaCl(2). The high effectiveness of this crystal gun method is demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy and by advanced nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Both techniques gave clear-cut evidence that homogeneous cross-linkage throughout the microcapsule is only obtained with simultaneous internal and external gelation. Atomic force microscopy showed a very smooth surface topography for microcapsules made by the crystal gun method, provided that excess Ba(2+) ions were removed immediately after gelation. In vitro experiments showed greatly suppressed swelling for crystal gun microcapsules. Even alginate extracted from Lessonia nigrescens (highly biocompatible) yielded microcapsules with long-term mechanical stability not hitherto possible. Encapsulation of rat islets, human monoclonal antibodies secreting hybridoma cells and murine mesenchymal stem cells transfected with cDNA encoding for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-4) revealed that injection of BaCl(2) crystals has no adverse side effects on cell viability and function. However, the release of low-molecular weight factors (such as insulin) may be delayed when using alginate concentrations in the usual range. PMID:12628829

  8. A multinuclear static NMR study of geopolymerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Aurélie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-09-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic binders obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicates. While the structure of geopolymers is now well understood, the details of the geopolymerisation reaction and their impact on the rheology of the paste remain uncertain. In this work, we follow the elastic properties of a paste made with metakaolin and sodium silicate solution. After the first sharp increase of elastic modulus occurring a few hundred of seconds after mixing and related to the heterogeneous formation of an alumina–silicate gel with a molar ratio Si/Al < 4 located at the grains boundaries, we focus on the progressive increase in elastic modulus on a period of few hours during the setting of the geopolymer. In this study, we combine the study of rheological properties of the paste with {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si static NMR measurement in order to better understand the origin of this second increase in elastic modulus. Our results show that, after a few hours, Al and Na evolution in the liquid phase are concomitant. This suggests the precipitation of an aluminosilicate phase where Al is in tetrahedral position and Na compensates the charge. Furthermore, Si speciation confirms this result and allows us to identify the precipitation of a product, which has a chemical composition close to the final composition of geopolymer. This study provides strong evidence for a heterogeneous formation of an aluminosilicate glass directly from the first gel and the silicate solution without the need for a reorganisation of Gel 1 into Gel 2.

  9. In situ microscopic studies on the structures and phase behaviors of SF/PEG films using solid-state NMR and Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Congheng; Yao, Ting; Tu, Sidong; Xu, Weijie; Han, Yi; Zhou, Ping

    2016-06-28

    In order to overcome the drawbacks of silk fibroin (SF)-based materials, SF has been blended with some polymers. Before using the blend material, understanding of the structures and phase behaviors of the blend is thought to be essential. In this study, solid-state (13)C CP-MAS NMR and Raman imaging techniques were used to study the structures and phase behaviors of blends of SF with polyethylene glycol (PEG) at a molecular weight that varied from 2 to 20 kDa and a blend ratio of SF/PEG from 95/5 to 70/30 (w/w%) at the molecular and microscopic levels. It is found that the conformational transition of SF to the β-sheet increased as the PEG content increased, while the amount of the formed β-sheet conformers was decreased as the PEG molecular weight increased for a given content. It is also observed that SF was incompatible with PEG to some extent. The phase separation into "sea" and "island" domains took place in the SF/PEG blend films. SF was dominantly present in the "sea" domain, while PEG in the "island" domains. The conformation of SF in the interface between SF and PEG was changed to the β-sheet, while that in the protein-rich domain remained in the random coil and/or helix conformation. These observations suggest that the specifically expected materials, for example, the silk-based microspheres or scaffold materials can be manufactured by controlling the molecular weight and content of PEG in the blend system. PMID:27255417

  10. NMR study of new ruthenates with high magnetic ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulose, P. L.; Chakrabarty, Tanmoy

    The Ru based compounds, Ca3LiRuO6 and Ca3NaRuO6 show unusually high magnetic ordering temperature. Extended super exchange model is invoked to explain the magnetic behavior in the isostructural compound Ca3LiOsO6. We have carried out NMR investigation on these two Ru-based compounds. Ca3LiRuO6 is a weak ferromagnet with a magnetic ordering temperature (TC) of 115 K which is explored by the temperature dependence of 7Li NMR line shift, line-width and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) . Above TC, a broad maximum is observed in the evolution of line-width of the spectra. We speculate that this feature might be attributed to some low-dimensional magnetic behavior. Contrastingly, Ca3NaRuO6 with similar structure and local geometry of the Ru5+ ions is a conventional antiferromagnet with a transition temperature of 90 K. The temperature dependence of 23Na NMR line shift and 1/T1 is studied across magnetic transition in Ca3NaRuO6. The temperature variation of line-width is found to be different compared to Ca3LiRuO6. In both these systems, 1/T1 decreases significantly below ordering temperature, characteristic of many antiferromagnetic systems.

  11. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  12. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  13. 19F-decoupling of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei in solid-state NMR: application of frequency-swept decoupling methods.

    PubMed

    Chandran, C Vinod; Hempel, Günter; Bräuniger, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    In solid-state NMR studies of minerals and ion conductors, quadrupolar nuclei like (7)Li, (23)Na or (133)Cs are frequently situated in close proximity to fluorine, so that application of (19)F decoupling is beneficial for spectral resolution. Here, we compare the decoupling efficiency of various multi-pulse decoupling sequences by acquiring (19)F-decoupled (23)Na-NMR spectra of cryolite (Na(3)AlF(6)). Whereas the MAS spectrum is only marginally affected by application of (19)F decoupling, the 3Q-filtered (23)Na signal is very sensitive to it, as the de-phasing caused by the dipolar interaction between sodium and fluorine is three-fold magnified. Experimentally, we find that at moderate MAS speeds, the decoupling efficiencies of the frequency-swept decoupling schemes SW(f)-TPPM and SW(f)-SPINAL are significantly better than the conventional TPPM and SPINAL sequences. The frequency-swept sequences are therefore the methods of choice for efficient decoupling of quadrupolar nuclei with half-integer spin from fluorine. PMID:21856132

  14. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  15. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  16. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  17. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  18. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectly predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.

  19. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  20. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schram, J.; Bellama, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two dimensional NMR represents a significant achievement in the continuing effort to increase solution in NMR spectroscopy. This book explains the fundamentals of this new technique and its analytical applications. It presents the necessary information, in pictorial form, for reading the ''2D NMR,'' and enables the practicing chemist to solve problems and run experiments on a commercial spectrometer by using the software provided by the manufacturer.

  1. Structural implications of water dissolution in haplogranitic glasses from NMR spectroscopy: influence of total water content and mixed alkali effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. C.; Riemer, T.; Kohn, S. C.; Holtz, F.; Dupree, R.

    2001-09-01

    To study the effects of total water content and alkali substitution on the structure of aluminosilicate glasses, two series of glasses belonging to the ternary system Quartz (Qz)-Albite (Ab)-Orthoclase (Or) were synthesized and investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Series I consisted of seven glasses with normative composition Ab 39Or 32Qz 29 (AOQ) and water contents ranging from 0 to 6 wt%. Series II consisted of dry and hydrous glasses (˜2.0 wt% H 2O) with five compositions along the join Qz 37Ab 63-Qz 34Or 66 (AQ-OQ) varying the alkali content (Na/K) at constant Si/Al ratio. All glasses were investigated with 1H, 23Na, 27Al and 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. 29Si MAS spectra of AOQ glasses showed no change upon hydration, suggesting little variation of the Si environments although the large linewidth of the 29Si signal may hide the presence of some Si Q 3-OH. The isotropic chemical shift (δ iso) of 27Al showed no change upon hydration, regardless of the amount of dissolved water. The 27Al mean quadrupolar coupling constant (C q) decreased with increasing water content, indicating a general increase of symmetry of the charge distribution around Al, which suggests the absence of significant amounts of Al Q 3-OH. Nonetheless, the evolution of C q upon hydration suggests a correlation with OH concentration in the quenched glass. The evolution of 23Na isotropic chemical shifts upon hydration appears to be correlated with total water content or with the concentration of dissolved H 2O molecules. In general, the NMR data are consistent with the water solubility model of Kohn et al. (1989), involving the exchange of charge balancing cations by protons. However, in addition to the presence of molecular water, 1H-NMR results showed at least two types of OH groups of which one may be related to Al-OH. Although the small intensity of this signal indicates that only a minor fraction of OH groups is present in this species, it demonstrates

  2. Decay Properties of {sup 266}Bh and {sup 262}Db Produced in the {sup 248}Cm+{sup 23}Na Reaction - Further Confirmation of the {sup 278}113 Decay Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Morimoto, K.; Kaji, D.; Haba, H.; Ozeki, K.; Kudou, Y.; Yoneda, A.; Ichikawa, T.; Katori, K.; Yoshida, A.; Sato, N.; Sumita, T.; Fujimori, Y.; Tokanai, F.; Goto, S.; Ideguchi, E.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Koura, H.; Tsukada, K.; Komori, Y.

    2010-06-01

    Decay properties of an isotope {sup 266}Bh and its daughter nucleus {sup 262}Db produced by the {sup 248}Cm({sup 23}Na,5n) reaction were studied by using a gas-filled recoil separator coupled with a position-sensitive semiconductor detector. {sup 266}Bh was clearly identified from the correlation of the known nuclide, {sup 262}Db. The obtained decay properties of {sup 266}Bh and {sup 262}Db are consistent with those observed in the {sup 278}113 chain by RIKEN collaboration, which provided further confirmation of the discovery of {sup 278}113.

  3. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  4. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  5. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  6. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  7. Silver and Gold NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zangger, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Silver and gold, together with copper, form the transition metal group IB elements in the periodic table and possess very different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic properties. While there is only one gold isotope (197Au), which has a spin of 3/2 and therefore a quadrupole moment, silver occurs in two isotopic forms (109Ag and 109Au), both of which have a spin 1/2 and similar NMR spectroscopic properties. The unfavorable properties of gold have prevented its NMR spectroscopic investigation thus far. On the other hand, there are several reports of silver NMR. However, the low sensitivity of silver, combined with its long relaxation times have rendered the direct detection of silver possible only with concentrations greater than a few tenth molar. Reviewed here are the general limitations of silver NMR and some techniques to partially overcome these limitations, as well as a summary of currently available chemical shift and scalar coupling data on 109Ag. PMID:18475898

  8. Using NMR chemical shift imaging to monitor swelling and molecular transport in drug-loaded tablets of hydrophobically modified poly(acrylic acid): methodology and effects of polymer (in)solubility.

    PubMed

    Knöös, Patrik; Topgaard, Daniel; Wahlgren, Marie; Ulvenlund, Stefan; Piculell, Lennart

    2013-11-12

    A new technique has been developed using NMR chemical shift imaging (CSI) to monitor water penetration and molecular transport in initially dry polymer tablets that also contain small low-molecular weight compounds to be released from the tablets. Concentration profiles of components contained in the swelling tablets could be extracted via the intensities and chemical shift changes of peaks corresponding to protons of the components. The studied tablets contained hydrophobically modified poly(acrylic acid) (HMPAA) as the polymer component and griseofulvin and ethanol as hydrophobic and hydrophilic, respectively, low-molecular weight model compounds. The water solubility of HMPAA could be altered by titration with NaOH. In the pure acid form, HMPAA tablets only underwent a finite swelling until the maximum water content of the polymer-rich phase, as confirmed by independent phase studies, had been reached. By contrast, after partial neutralization with NaOH, the polyacid became fully miscible with water. The solubility of the polymer affected the water penetration, the polymer release, and the releases of both ethanol and griseofulvin. The detailed NMR CSI concentration profiles obtained highlighted the clear differences in the disintegration/dissolution/release behavior for the two types of tablet and provided insights into their molecular origin. The study illustrates the potential of the NMR CSI technique to give information of importance for the development of pharmaceutical tablets and, more broadly, for the general understanding of any operation that involves the immersion and ultimate disintegration of a dry polymer matrix in a solvent. PMID:24106807

  9. Solid-state NMR in the analysis of drugs and naturally occurring materials.

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wawer, Iwona

    2014-05-01

    This article presents some of the solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques used in the pharmaceutical and biomedical research. Solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR provides structural information on powder amorphous solids for which single-crystal diffraction structures cannot be obtained. NMR is non-destructive; the powder sample may be used for further studies. Quantitative results can be obtained, although solid-state NMR spectra are not normally quantitative. As compared with other techniques, MAS NMR is insensitive and requires a significant amount of the powder sample (2-100mg) to fill the 1.3-7 mm ZrO2 rotor. This is its main drawback, since natural compounds isolated from plants, microorganisms or cell cultures are difficult to obtain in quantities higher than a few milligrams. Multinuclear MAS NMR routinely uses (1)H and (13)C nuclei, less frequently (15)N, (19)F, (31)P, (77)Se, (29)Si, (43)Ca or (23)Na. The article focuses on the pharmaceutical applications of SSNMR, the studies were aimed to control over manufacturing processes (e.g. crystallization and milling) investigation of chemical and physical stability of solid forms both as pure drug and in a formulated product. SSNMR is used in combination with some other analytical methods (DSC, XRD, FT-IR) and theoretical calculations of NMR parameters. Biologically active compounds, such as amino acids and small peptides, steroids and flavonoids were studied by SSNMR methods (part 4) providing valuable structural information. The SSNMR experiments performed on biopolymers and large natural products like proteins, cellulose and lipid layers are commented upon briefly in part 5. PMID:24173236

  10. Off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation spectra of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei in static samples.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Deng, F; Ye, C

    1995-12-01

    The off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei are demonstrated with perturbation theory and numerical calculation in static samples. The off-resonant (delta omega) rf field (omega 1) enlarges a nutation frequency and consequently increases the measurement range of nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters. When omega e > omega Qmax, and arctg(omega 1/delta omega) = +/- 54.7 degrees (magic angle), the satellite lines (produced by coherence transfers) in a nutation spectrum are superimposed with the line of central transition, and hence the nutation spectrum is simplified and its sensitivity is enhanced. The nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters of 23Na nuclei in Na omega molecular sieve are obtained using 2D NMR nutation. PMID:9053113

  11. Two-dimensional MAS NMR correlation protocols involving double-quantum filtering of quadrupolar spin-pairs.

    PubMed

    Edén, Mattias

    2010-05-01

    Three two-dimensional (2D) NMR homonuclear correlation techniques invoking double-quantum (2Q) filtration of the central transitions of half-integer spins are evaluated numerically and experimentally. They correlate directly detected single-quantum (1Q) coherences in the t(2) domain with either of 1Q, two-spin 2Q or single-spin multiple-quantum coherence-evolutions in the indirect (t(1)) dimension. We employ experimental (23)Na and (27)Al NMR on sodium sulfite and the natural mineral sillimanite (SiAl(2)O(5)), in conjunction with simulated 2D spectra from pairs of dipolar-recoupled spins-3/2 and 5/2 at different external magnetic fields, to compare the correlation strategies from the viewpoints of 2D spectral resolution, signal sensitivity, implementational aspects and their relative merits for establishing internuclear proximities and quadrupolar tensor orientations. PMID:20202872

  12. Na/Ca Intermixing around Silicate and Phosphate Groups in Bioactive Phosphosilicate Glasses Revealed by Heteronuclear Solid-State NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Renny; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias

    2015-04-30

    We characterize the intermixing of network-modifying Na(+)/Ca(2+) ions around the silicate (QSi(n)) and phosphate (QP(n)) tetrahedra in a series of 16 Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 glasses, whose P content and silicate network connectivity were varied independently. The set includes both bioactive and bioinactive compositions and also encompasses two soda-lime-silicate members devoid of P, as well as two CaO–SiO2 glasses and one Na2O–SiO2–P2O5 glass. The various Si/P↔Na/Ca contacts were probed by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations together with heteronuclear magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimentation utilizing (23)Na{(31)P} and (23)Na{(29)Si} REDOR, as well as (31)P{ (23)Na} and (29)Si{(23)Na} REAPDOR. We introduce an approach for quantifying the extent of Na(+)/Ca(2+) ordering around a given QP(n) or QSi(n) group, encoded by the preference factor 0⩽ PM ⩽ 1 conveying the relative weights of a random cation intermixing (PM = 0) and complete preference/ordering (PM = 1) for one of the species M, which represents either Na(+) or Ca(2+). The MD-derived preference factors reveal phosphate and silicate species surrounded by Na(+)/Ca(2+) ions intermixed nearly randomly (PM ≲ 0.15), except for the QSi(4) and QSi(1) groups, which manifest more significant cation ordering with preference for Na+ and Ca2+, respectively. The overall weak preferences are essentially independent of the Si and P contents of the glass, whereas PM primarily correlates with the total amount of network modifiers: as the latter is increased, the Na/Ca distribution around the {QP(0), QSi(1), QSi(2)} groups with preference for Ca2(+ )tend to randomize (i.e., PCa decreases), while the PNa-values grow slightly for the {QP(1), QSi(3), QSi(4)} species already preferring coordination of Na. The set of experimental preference factors {PCa} for the orthophosphate (QP(0)) groups extracted from (31)P{(23)Na} REAPDOR NMR-derived M2(P–Na) dipolar second moments agrees

  13. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  14. On the microscopic fluctuations driving the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Carof, Antoine; Salanne, Mathieu; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-11-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation is sensitive to the local structure and dynamics around the probed nuclei. The Electric Field Gradient (EFG) is the key microscopic quantity to understand the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions, such as {sup 7}Li{sup +}, {sup 23}Na{sup +}, {sup 25}Mg{sup 2+}, {sup 35}Cl{sup −}, {sup 39}K{sup +}, or {sup 133}Cs{sup +}. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the statistical and dynamical properties of the EFG experienced by alkaline, alkaline Earth, and chloride ions at infinite dilution in water. Specifically, we analyze the effect of the ionic charge and size on the distribution of the EFG tensor and on the multi-step decay of its auto-correlation function. The main contribution to the NMR relaxation time arises from the slowest mode, with a characteristic time on the picosecond time scale. The first solvation shell of the ion plays a dominant role in the fluctuations of the EFG, all the more that the ion radius is small and its charge is large. We propose an analysis based on a simplified charge distribution around the ion, which demonstrates that the auto-correlation of the EFG, hence the NMR relaxation time, reflects primarily the collective translational motion of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the cations. Our findings provide a microscopic route to the quantitative interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements and open the way to the design of improved analytical theories for NMR relaxation for small ionic solutes, which should focus on water density fluctuations around the ion.

  15. Correlations between 11B NMR parameters and structural characters in borate and borosilicate minerals investigated by high-resolution MAS NMR and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bing; Sun, Zhaohua; Yao, Yefeng; Pan, Yuanming

    2012-05-01

    Borates consisting of diverse fundamental building blocks (FBB) formed from complex polymerization of planar triangular [Bϕ3] groups and tetrahedral [Bϕ4] groups, where ϕ = O and OH, provide an excellent opportunity for investigation of correlations between the NMR parameters and local structures. However, previous studies suggested that the 11B NMR parameters in borates are insensitive to local structural environments other than the B coordination number, in contrast to those documented for 29Si, 23Na and 27Al in silicates, and no correlation between 11B chemical shifts and the sum of bond valences has been established for borate minerals with hydroxyl groups or molecular water in the structures. In this study, high-resolution NMR spectra have been acquired at the ultra high field of 21 T as well as at 14 T for selected borate and borosilicate minerals, and have been used to extract high-precision NMR parameters by using combined ab initio theoretical calculations and spectral simulations. These new NMR parameters reveal subtle correlations with various structural characters, especially the effects of the 11B chemical shifts from the bridging oxygen atom(s), site symmetry, symmetry of FBB, the sum of bond valences, as well as the next-nearest-neighbor cations and hydrogen bonding. Also, these results provide new insights into the shielding mechanism for 11B in borate and borosilicate minerals. In particular, this study demonstrates that the small variation in 11B chemical shifts can still be used to probe the local structural environments and that the established correlations can be used to investigate the structural details in borates and amorphous materials.

  16. ECG gated NMR-CT for cardiovascular diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, J.; Machida, K.; Iio, M.; Yoshimoto, N.; Sugimoto, T.; Kawaguchi, H.; Mano, H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors applied NMR-CT to cardiac study with ECG gated technique to evaluate the left ventricular (LV) function and compared it with cardiovascular nuclear medicine study (NM). The NMR-CT machine has resistive air-core magnet with 0.15 Tesla. The saturation recovery image or inversion recovery image were obtained as 256 x 256 matrix and 15 mm in thickness. The study population was ten patients who were evaluated both by NMR image and by NM performed within one week interval. The heart muscle was able to be visualized without any contrast material nor radioisotopes in inversion recovery images, whereas saturation recovery images failed to separate heart muscle from blood pool. The wall motions of LV in both methods were well correlated except for inferior wall. The values of ejection fraction in NMR image were moderately low, but two modalities showed satisfactory correlation (r=0.85). The region of myocardial infarction was revealed as wall thinning and/or wall motion abnormality. It is still preliminary to draw a conclusion, however, it can be said that in the evaluation of LV function, method by NMR might be of equal value to those of NM. It can be certain that eventually gated NMR-CT will become more effective method for various aspects of cardiovascular evaluation.

  17. Frozen State and Spin Liquid Physics in Na4 Ir3 O8 : An NMR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shockley, A. C.; Bert, F.; Orain, J.-C.; Okamoto, Y.; Mendels, P.

    2015-07-01

    Na4Ir3 O8 is a unique case of a hyperkagome 3D corner sharing triangular lattice that can be decorated with quantum spins. It has spurred a lot of theoretical interest as a spin liquid candidate. We present a comprehensive set of NMR data taken on both the 23Na and 17O sites. We show that disordered magnetic freezing of all Ir sites sets in below Tf˜7 K , well below J =300 K , with a drastic slowing down of fluctuations to a static state revealed by our T1 measurements. Above typically 2 Tf, physical properties are relevant to the spin liquid state induced by this exotic geometry. While the shift data show that the susceptibility levels off below 80 K, 1 /T1 has little variation from 300 K to 2 Tf. We discuss the implication of our results in the context of published experimental and theoretical work.

  18. Feasibility of high-resolution one-dimensional relaxation imaging at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner applied to articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2015-02-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance increases the contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate in many biological tissues; one prominent example is hyaline articular cartilage. In order to take advantage of this increased contrast and to profile the depth-dependent variations, high resolution parameter measurements are carried out which can be of critical importance in an early diagnosis of cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the maximum achievable spatial resolution of parameter profiles is limited by factors such as sensor geometry, sample curvature, and diffusion limitation. In this work, we report on high-resolution single-sided NMR scanner measurements with a commercial device, and quantify these limitations. The highest achievable spatial resolution on the used profiler, and the lateral dimension of the sensitive volume were determined. Since articular cartilage samples are usually bent, we also focus on averaging effects inside the horizontally aligned sensitive volume and their impact on the relaxation profiles. Taking these critical parameters into consideration, depth-dependent relaxation time profiles with the maximum achievable vertical resolution of 20 μm are discussed, and are correlated with diffusion coefficient profiles in hyaline articular cartilage in order to reconstruct T2 maps from the diffusion-weighted CPMG decays of apparent relaxation rates.

  19. Whole body sodium MRI at 3T using an asymmetric birdcage resonator and short echo time sequence: first images of a male volunteer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Corteville, Dominique M.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Rennings, Andreas; Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M.; Stark, Helmut; Schad, Lothar R.

    2012-07-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (23Na MRI) is a non-invasive technique which allows spatial resolution of the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the human body. TSC measurements could potentially serve to monitor early treatment success of chemotherapy on patients who suffer from whole body metastases. Yet, the acquisition of whole body sodium (23Na) images has been hampered so far by the lack of large resonators and the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved with existing resonator systems. In this study, a 23Na resonator was constructed for whole body 23Na MRI at 3T comprising of a 16-leg, asymmetrical birdcage structure with 34 cm height, 47.5 cm width and 50 cm length. The resonator was driven in quadrature mode and could be used either as a transceiver resonator or, since active decoupling was included, as a transmit-only resonator in conjunction with a receive-only (RO) surface resonator. The relative B1-field profile was simulated and measured on phantoms, and 3D whole body 23Na MRI data of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in five segments with a nominal isotropic resolution of (6 × 6 × 6) mm3 and a 10 min acquisition time per scan. The measured SNR values in the 23Na-MR images varied from 9 ± 2 in calf muscle, 15 ± 2 in brain tissue, 23 ± 2 in the prostate and up to 42 ± 5 in the vertebral discs. Arms, legs, knees and hands could also be resolved with applied resonator and short time-to-echo (TE) (0.5 ms) radial sequence. Up to fivefold SNR improvement was achieved through combining the birdcage with local RO surface coil. In conclusion, 23Na MRI of the entire human body provides sub-cm spatial resolution, which allows resolution of all major human body parts with a scan time of less than 60 min.

  20. Advanced NMR approaches in the characterization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    A considerable effort in this project during the past few months has been focussed on the development of [sup 1]H and [sup 13]C NMR imaging techniques to yield spatially-resolved chemical shift (structure) information on coal. In order to yield the chemical shift information, a solid-state NMR imaging technique must include magic-angle spinning, so rotating gradient capabilities are indicated. A [sup 13]C MAS imaging probe and a [sup 1]H MAS imaging probe and the circuitry necessary for rotating gradients have been designed and constructed. The [sup 1]H system has already produced promising preliminary results, which are briefly described in this report.

  1. Novel electrolytes for use in new and improved batteries: An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marc B.

    This thesis focuses on the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in order to study materials for use as electrolytes in batteries. The details of four projects are described in this thesis as well as a brief theoretical background of NMR. Structural and dynamics properties were determined using several NMR techniques such as static, MAS, PFG diffusion, and relaxation to understand microscopic and macroscopic properties of the materials described within. Nuclei investigate were 1H, 2H, 7Li, 13C, 19F, 23Na, and 27Al. The first project focuses on an exciting new material to be used as a solid electrolyte membrane. T. The second project focuses on the dynamics of ionic liquid-solvent mixtures and their comparison to molecular dynamics computer simulations. The third project involves a solvent-free film containing NaTFSI salt mixed in to PEO for use in sodium-ion batteries. This final project focuses on a composite electrolyte consisting of a ceramic and solid: LiI:PEO:LiAlO2.

  2. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  3. NMR analysis on microfluidic devices by remote detection

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, Erin E.; Han, SongI; Hilty, Christian; Pierce,Kimberly; Pines, Alexander

    2005-08-15

    We present a novel approach to perform high-sensitivity NMR imaging and spectroscopic analysis on microfluidic devices. The application of NMR, the most information rich spectroscopic technique, to microfluidic devices remains a challenge because the inherently low sensitivity of NMR is aggravated by small fluid volumes leading to low NMR signal, and geometric constraints resulting in poor efficiency for inductive detection. We address the latter by physically separating signal detection from encoding of information with remote detection. Thereby, we use a commercial imaging probe with sufficiently large diameter to encompass the entire device, enabling encoding of NMR information at any location on the chip. Because large-diameter coils are too insensitive for detection, we store the encoded information as longitudinal magnetization and flow it into the outlet capillary. There, we detect the signal with optimal sensitivity using a solenoidal microcoil, and reconstruct the information encoded in the fluid. We present a generally applicable design for a detection-only microcoil probe that can be inserted into the bore of a commercial imaging probe. Using hyperpolarized 129Xe gas, we show that this probe enables sensitive reconstruction of NMR spectroscopic information encoded by the large imaging probe while keeping the flexibility of a large coil.

  4. Screening proteins for NMR suitability

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Adelinda A.; Semesi, Anthony; Garcia, Maite; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NMR spectroscopy is an invaluable tool in structural genomics. Identification of protein samples that are amenable to structure determination by NMR spectroscopy requires efficient screening. Here, we describe how we prepare multiple samples in parallel and screen by NMR. The method described here is applicable to large structural genomics projects but can easily be scaled down for application to small structural biology projects since all the equipments used are those commonly found in any NMR structural biology laboratory. PMID:24590717

  5. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  6. Enantiodiscrimination by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Salvadori, Piero

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of enantiorecognition processes involves the detection of enantiomeric species as well as the study of chiral discrimination mechanisms. In both fields Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays a fundamental role, providing several tools, based on the use of suitable chiral auxiliaries, for observing distinct signals of enantiomers and for investigating the complexation phenomena involved in enantiodiscrimination processes. PMID:17100610

  7. Physical and Chemical Effects of Two-Phase Brine/Supercritical-CO2 Fluid Flow on Clastic Rocks: Real-Time Monitoring and NMR Imaging of Flow-Through Core Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, C. A.; Vogt, S.; Maneval, J. E.; Brox, T.; Skidmore, M. L.; Codd, S. L.; Seymour, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Sandstone core samples were challenged with a supercritical CO2-saturated brine mixture in a laboratory flow-through core reactor system over a range of temperatures and brine strengths. Cores of quartz arenite from the Berea formation were selected to represent ideal ‘clean’ sandstone These laboratory experiments potentially provide an analog for the acidification of pore fluids near the brine/CO2 interface during CO2 flooding of depleted clastic hydrocarbon reservoirs for carbon sequestration. Flow in the reactor was perpendicular to bedding. Initial experiments were run at 50°C and 100°C with brine concentrations of 1g/L and 10g/L (TDS) to test effects of different temperatures and brine compositions. Real-time monitoring of fluid pH and conductivity provided a measure of reaction rates. Introduction of supercritical CO2 into the brine-saturated cores initiated a reduction in pH accompanied by an increase in conductivity. NMR images of fresh cores were compared with images of challenged cores using a protocol for pixel-by-pixel comparison to determine the effects on bulk pore volume and geometry. Two types of imaging experiments were conducted: multi-slice spin echo and 3-D spin echo images. Multi-slice experiments had a slice thickness of 1.5 mm and an in-plane resolution of 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm, and 3-D experiments had a resolution of 0.47 mm x 0.55 mm x 0.55mm. Imaging results reflected the observed changes in the physical and chemical structure post-challenge. Two-dimensional relaxation correlation experiments were also conducted to probe the pore sizes, connectivity and fluid saturation of the rock cores before and after challenging. Chemical analyses and microscopic examination of the challenged cores will provide a better understanding of alteration in the cores and the changes in the volume, geometry and connectivity of pore space.

  8. SQUID detected NMR in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Espy, Michelle A.; George, John S.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2004-09-01

    We have built an NMR system that employs a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector and operates in measurement fields of 2-25 μT. The system uses a pre-polarizing field from 4 to 30 mT generated by simple room-temperature wire-wound coils that are turned off during measurements. The instrument has an open geometry with samples located outside the cryostat at room-temperature. This removes constraints on sample size and allows us to obtain signals from living tissue. We have obtained 1H NMR spectra from a variety of samples including water, mineral oil, and a live frog. We also acquired gradient encoded free induction decay (FID) data from a water-plastic phantom in the μT regime, from which simple projection images were reconstructed. NMR signals from samples inside metallic containers have also been acquired. This is possible because the penetration skin depth is much greater at the low operating frequencies of this system than for conventional systems. Advantages to ultra-low field NMR measurements include lower susceptibility artifacts caused by high strength polarizing and measurement fields, and negligible line width broadening due to measurement field inhomogeneity, reducing the burden of producing highly homogeneous fields.

  9. 224} studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y; Fang, X; Kögerler, P

    2014-05-14

    7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been performed to investigate magnetic properties and spin dynamics of Mn3+ (S = 2) spins in the giant polyoxometalate molecule {Mn40W224}. The 7Li-NMR line width is proportional to the external magnetic field H as expected in a paramagnetic state above 3 K. Below this temperature the line width shows a sudden increase and is almost independent of H, which indicates freezing of the local Mn3+ spins. The temperature dependence of T1 for both 1H and 7Li reveals slow spin dynamics at low temperatures, consistent with spin freezing. The slow spin dynamics is also evidenced by the observation of a peak of 1/T2 around 3 K, where the fluctuation frequency of spins is of the order of ~200 kHz. An explicit form of the temperature dependence of the fluctuation frequency of Mn3+ spins is derived from the nuclear relaxation data.

  10. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectlymore » predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.« less

  11. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  12. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and NLO properties of a new mixed crystal potassium sodium ammonium dihydrogenphosphate K0.23Na0.23(NH4)0.54H2PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, G.; Meenakshisundaram, Subbiah

    2012-08-01

    Potassium sodium ammonium dihydrogenphosphate K0.23Na0.23(NH4)0.54H2PO4 (KSADP), a new mixed crystal has been grown in aqueous medium by the slow evaporation of equimolar mixture of ammonium dihydrogenphosphate (ADP), potassium dihydrogenphosphate (KDP) and sodium dihydrogenphosphate (SDP). Crystal composition as determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that it belongs to the tetragonal system with noncentrosymmetric space group I-42d and it is structurally similar to ADP with cell parameter values, a=7.4794(4) Å; b=7.4794(4) Å; c=7.2974(11) Å; υ=408.23(7) Å3; z=4. The presence of sodium and potassium in ADP matrix was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The partial cationic substitution results in defect centers influencing the physical properties. Slight shifts in vibrational patterns could be attributed to strains in the lattice. Refinement of structure by single crystal XRD analysis reveals that potassium, sodium and ammonium coexist in the mixed crystal. The surface morphology of the as-grown specimen, which is changed as a result of cationic incorporation, was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The relative second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency measurements revealed that the mixed crystal has a superior NLO activity than ADP.

  13. Parahydrogen Induced Polarization of 1-13C-Phospholactate-d2 for Biomedical Imaging with >30,000,000-fold NMR Signal Enhancement in Water

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic protocol for preparation of 1-13C-phosphoenolpyruvate-d2, precursor for parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) of 1-13C-phospholactate-d2, is reported. 13C nuclear spin polarization of 1-13C-phospholactate-d2 was increased by >30,000,000-fold (5.75 mT) in water. The reported 13C polarization level approaching unity (>15.6%), long lifetime of 13C hyperpolarized 1-13C-phospholactate-d2 (58 ± 4 s versus 36 ± 2 s for nondeuterated form at 47.5 mT), and large production quantities (52 μmoles in 3 mL) in aqueous medium make this compound useful as a potential contrast agent for the molecular imaging of metabolism and other applications. PMID:24738968

  14. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  15. Physical And Medical Attributes Of Six Contemporary Noninvasive Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    1981-11-01

    tomography. 6) Nuclear magnetic resonance procedures measure the concentration of some nuclei (e.g., 1H, 23Na, 32P) as well as their chemical state and the local physical-chemical environment of the resolution volume. Velocity and diffusion are also potential measurements. Two unique capabilities of contemporary interest are the ability to image the spatial distribu-tion of relaxation parameters which give information about the local tissue characteristics, and the ability of NMR spectroscopy to sample (not image) the energy state of phosphorous in selected regions of the body. A third attribute of importance is that possible tissue heating seems to be the only hazard and this can be controlled.

  16. NMR with excitation modulated by Frank sequences.

    PubMed

    Blümich, Bernhard; Gong, Qingxia; Byrne, Eimear; Greferath, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Miniaturized NMR is of growing importance in bio-, chemical, and -material sciences. Other than the magnet, bulky components are the radio-frequency power amplifier and the power supply or battery pack. We show that constant flip-angle excitation with phase modulation following a particular type of polyphase perfect sequences results in low peak excitation power at high response peak power. It has ideal power distribution in both the time domain and the frequency domain. A savings in peak excitation power of six orders of magnitude has been realized compared to conventionally pulsed excitation. Among others, the excitation promises to be of use for button-cell operated miniature NMR devices as well as for complying with specific-absorption-rate regulations in high-field medical imaging. PMID:19386525

  17. Multifunctional pulse sequence generator for pulse NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongsheng

    1988-06-01

    A new multifunctional pulse sequence generator has been designed and constructed. It can conveniently generate various pulse sequences used in nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) to measure the spin-lattice relaxation time T1, the spin-spin relaxation time T2, and the spin-locking relaxation time T1 ρ. It can also be used in pulse Fourier transform NMR and double resonance. The intervals of pulses can increase automatically with sequence repetitions and the generator can be used in two-dimensional spectrum measurement and spin-density imaging research. The sequences can be generated through four different triggering methods and there are two synchronous pulse outputs and fifteen auxiliary pulse outputs, so the generator can be conveniently interfaced with a computer or other instruments. The circuitry, functions, and features of the generator are described in this article.

  18. Summary of Miniature NMR Development

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Gennady; Feinerman, Alan

    2000-12-31

    The effort in this project has been in 3 distinct directions: (1) First, they focused on development of miniature microfabricated micro-coil NMR detectors with maximum Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio. (2) Secondly, they focused on design of miniature micro-coil NMR detectors that have minimal effect on the NMR spectrum distortions. (3) Lastly they focused on the development of a permanent magnet capable of generating fields on the order of 1 Tesla with better than 10 ppm uniformity.

  19. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  20. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  1. A multinuclear solid-state NMR study of alkali metal ions in tetraphenylborate salts, M[BPh4] (M = Na, K, Rb and Cs): what is the NMR signature of cation-pi interactions?

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Terskikh, Victor

    2008-10-16

    We report a multinuclear solid-state ( (23)Na, (39)K, (87)Rb, (133)Cs) NMR study of tetraphenylborate salts, M[BPh 4] (M = Na, K, Rb, Cs). These compounds are isostructural in the solid state with the alkali metal ion surrounded by four phenyl groups resulting in strong cation-pi interactions. From analyses of solid-state NMR spectra obtained under stationary and magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions at 11.75 and 21.15 T, we have obtained the quadrupole coupling constants, C Q, and the chemical shift tensor parameters for the alkali metal ions in these compounds. We found that the observed quadrupole coupling constant for M (+) in M[BPh 4] is determined by a combination of nuclear quadrupole moment, Sternheimer antishielding factor, and unit cell dimensions. On the basis of a comparison between computed paramagnetic and diamagnetic contributions to the total chemical shielding values for commonly found cation-ligand interactions, we conclude that cation-pi interactions give rise to significantly lower paramagnetic shielding contributions than other cation-ligand interactions. As a result, highly negative chemical shifts are expected to be the NMR signature for cations interacting exclusively with pi systems. PMID:18816043

  2. Automatic Tuning Matching Cycler (ATMC) in situ NMR spectroscopy as a novel approach for real-time investigations of Li- and Na-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, Oliver; Bayley, Paul M.; Liu, Hao; Liu, Zigeng; Trease, Nicole M.; Grey, Clare P.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed and explored the use of a new Automatic Tuning Matching Cycler (ATMC) in situ NMR probe system to track the formation of intermediate phases and investigate electrolyte decomposition during electrochemical cycling of Li- and Na-ion batteries (LIBs and NIBs). The new approach addresses many of the issues arising during in situ NMR, e.g., significantly different shifts of the multi-component samples, changing sample conditions (such as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity) during cycling, signal broadening due to paramagnetism as well as interferences between the NMR and external cycler circuit that might impair the experiments. We provide practical insight into how to conduct ATMC in situ NMR experiments and discuss applications of the methodology to LiFePO4 (LFP) and Na3V2(PO4)2F3 cathodes as well as Na metal anodes. Automatic frequency sweep 7Li in situ NMR reveals significant changes of the strongly paramagnetic broadened LFP line shape in agreement with the structural changes due to delithiation. Additionally, 31P in situ NMR shows a full separation of the electrolyte and cathode NMR signals and is a key feature for a deeper understanding of the processes occurring during charge/discharge on the local atomic scale of NMR. 31P in situ NMR with "on-the-fly" re-calibrated, varying carrier frequencies on Na3V2(PO4)2F3 as a cathode in a NIB enabled the detection of different P signals within a huge frequency range of 4000 ppm. The experiments show a significant shift and changes in the number as well as intensities of 31P signals during desodiation/sodiation of the cathode. The in situ experiments reveal changes of local P environments that in part have not been seen in ex situ NMR investigations. Furthermore, we applied ATMC 23Na in situ NMR on symmetrical Na-Na cells during galvanostatic plating. An automatic adjustment of the NMR carrier frequency during the in situ experiment ensured on-resonance conditions for the Na metal and

  3. Automatic Tuning Matching Cycler (ATMC) in situ NMR spectroscopy as a novel approach for real-time investigations of Li- and Na-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Pecher, Oliver; Bayley, Paul M; Liu, Hao; Liu, Zigeng; Trease, Nicole M; Grey, Clare P

    2016-04-01

    We have developed and explored the use of a new Automatic Tuning Matching Cycler (ATMC) in situ NMR probe system to track the formation of intermediate phases and investigate electrolyte decomposition during electrochemical cycling of Li- and Na-ion batteries (LIBs and NIBs). The new approach addresses many of the issues arising during in situ NMR, e.g., significantly different shifts of the multi-component samples, changing sample conditions (such as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity) during cycling, signal broadening due to paramagnetism as well as interferences between the NMR and external cycler circuit that might impair the experiments. We provide practical insight into how to conduct ATMC in situ NMR experiments and discuss applications of the methodology to LiFePO4 (LFP) and Na3V2(PO4)2F3 cathodes as well as Na metal anodes. Automatic frequency sweep (7)Li in situ NMR reveals significant changes of the strongly paramagnetic broadened LFP line shape in agreement with the structural changes due to delithiation. Additionally, (31)P in situ NMR shows a full separation of the electrolyte and cathode NMR signals and is a key feature for a deeper understanding of the processes occurring during charge/discharge on the local atomic scale of NMR. (31)P in situ NMR with "on-the-fly" re-calibrated, varying carrier frequencies on Na3V2(PO4)2F3 as a cathode in a NIB enabled the detection of different P signals within a huge frequency range of 4000ppm. The experiments show a significant shift and changes in the number as well as intensities of (31)P signals during desodiation/sodiation of the cathode. The in situ experiments reveal changes of local P environments that in part have not been seen in ex situ NMR investigations. Furthermore, we applied ATMC (23)Na in situ NMR on symmetrical Na-Na cells during galvanostatic plating. An automatic adjustment of the NMR carrier frequency during the in situ experiment ensured on-resonance conditions for the Na metal and

  4. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  5. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  6. Rheology of Blood by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Song-I.; Marseille, Oliver; Gehlen, Christa; Blümich, Bernhard

    2001-09-01

    Pipe flow of blood in tubes of 1 and 7 mm inner diameter, respectively, was investigated employing two-dimensional NMR velocity imaging and PFG propagator measurements at different Reynolds numbers between 10 and 3500. The results are compared to flow of a water/glycerol mixture of matching viscosity under identical conditions. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow is observed by both a flattening of the velocity profile and a change of the propagator shape. For blood flow this transition is found to be shifted toward higher Reynolds numbers as compared to the transition of the water/glycerol mixture. This observation is in agreement with predictions from hydraulic measurements and is a consequence of the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood as a suspension of erythrocytes and plasma. Likewise, a deviation from the laminar flow condition is observed for blood at low Reynolds numbers between 10 and 100. This phenomenon is unknown for Newtonian liquids and is explained by the onset of a geometrical arrangement of the erythrocytes, the so-called rouleaux effect.

  7. Rheology of blood by NMR.

    PubMed

    Han, S I; Marseille, O; Gehlen, C; Blümich, B

    2001-09-01

    Pipe flow of blood in tubes of 1 and 7 mm inner diameter, respectively, was investigated employing two-dimensional NMR velocity imaging and PFG propagator measurements at different Reynolds numbers between 10 and 3500. The results are compared to flow of a water/glycerol mixture of matching viscosity under identical conditions. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow is observed by both a flattening of the velocity profile and a change of the propagator shape. For blood flow this transition is found to be shifted toward higher Reynolds numbers as compared to the transition of the water/glycerol mixture. This observation is in agreement with predictions from hydraulic measurements and is a consequence of the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood as a suspension of erythrocytes and plasma. Likewise, a deviation from the laminar flow condition is observed for blood at low Reynolds numbers between 10 and 100. This phenomenon is unknown for Newtonian liquids and is explained by the onset of a geometrical arrangement of the erythrocytes, the so-called rouleaux effect. PMID:11531367

  8. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  9. NMR methodologies for studying mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago C; Jarak, Ivana; Carvalho, Rui A

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique with an increasing importance in the study of metabolic diseases. Its initial important role in the determination of chemical structures (1, 2) has been considerably overcome by its potential for the in vivo study of metabolism (3-5). The main characteristic that makes this technique so attractive is its noninvasiveness. Only nuclei capable of transitioning between energy states, in the presence of an intense and constant magnetic field, are studied. This includes abundant nuclei such as proton ((1)H) and phosphorous ((31)P), as well as stable isotopes such as deuterium ((2)H) and carbon 13 ((13)C). This allows a wide range of applications that vary from the determination of water distribution in tissues (as obtained in a magnetic resonance imaging scan) to the calculation of metabolic fluxes under ex vivo and in vivo conditions without the need to use radioactive tracers or tissue biopsies (as in a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) scan). In this chapter, some technical aspects of the methodology of an NMR/MRS experiment as well as how it can be used to study mitochondrial bioenergetics are overviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo MRS versus high-resolution NMR using proton high rotation magic angle spinning (HRMAS) of tissue biopsies and tissue extracts are also discussed. PMID:22057574

  10. NMR quantitation: influence of RF inhomogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John; Raftery, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The NMR peak integral is ideally linearly dependent on the sine of excitation angle (θ), which has provided unsurpassed flexibility in quantitative NMR by allowing the use of a signal of any concentration as the internal concentration reference. Controlling the excitation angle is particularly critical for solvent proton concentration referencing to minimize the negative impact of radiation damping, and to reduce the risk of receiver gain compression. In practice, due to the influence of RF inhomogeneity for any given probe, the observed peak integral is not exactly proportional to sin θ. To evaluate the impact quantitatively, we introduce a RF inhomogeneity factor I(θ) as a function of the nominal pulse excitation angle and propose a simple calibration procedure. Alternatively, I(θ) can be calculated from the probe’s RF profile, which can be readily obtained as a gradient image of an aqueous sample. Our results show that without consideration of I(θ), even for a probe with good RF homogeneity, up to 5% error can be introduced due to different excitation pulse angles used for the analyte and the reference. Hence, a simple calibration of I(θ) can eliminate such errors and allow an accurate description of the observed NMR signal’s dependence on the excitation angle in quantitative analysis. PMID:21919056

  11. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR.II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. T. S.; Rods, M. S.; Newmark, R. D.; Budinger, T. F.

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high-field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies where the peak RF power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. A stochastic NMR experiment excites the spin system with a sequence of RF pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. In a previous paper the stochastic experiment was analyzed and analytic expressions for the input-output cross-correlations, average signal power, and signal spectral density were obtained for a general stochastic RF excitation. In this paper specific cases of excitation with random phase, fixed flip angle, and excitation with two random components in quadrature are analyzed. The input-output cross-correlation for these two types of excitations is shown to be Lorentzian. Line broadening is the only spectral distortion as the RF excitation power is increased. The systematic noise power is inversely proportional to the number of data points N used in the spectral reconstruction. The use of a complete maximum length sequence (MLS) may improve the signal-to-systematic-noise ratio by 20 dB relative to random binary excitation, but peculiar features in the higher-order autocorrelations of MLS cause noise-like distortion in the reconstructed spectra when the excitation power is high. The amount of noise-like distortion depends on the choice of the MLS generator.

  12. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress. PMID:20189854

  13. Spin dynamics in Na(4-x)Ir₃O₈ (x  =  0.3 and 0.7) investigated by ²³Na NMR and μSR.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sungwon; Baek, S-H; Balodhi, Ashiwini; Lee, W-J; Choi, K-Y; Watanabe, I; Lord, J S; Büchner, B; Suh, B J; Singh, Yogesh

    2015-12-01

    We report (23)Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and zero-field (ZF) and longitudinal-field (LF) muon spin relaxation (μSR) measurements of the depleted hyperkagome compounds Na(4-x)Ir3O8 (x  =  0.3 and 0.7), which undergo an insulator-semimetal transition as a function of x. The (23)Na spin-lattice relaxation rates, T1(-1), follow a T(2.5) power law behavior at accessible temperatures of T  =  120-350 K. A substantial temperature dependence of T1(-1) indicates the presence of gapped excitations at elevated temperatures through the transition to a semimetallic phase. ZF-μSR results reveal that hole-doping leads to a melting of quasi-static order to a dynamically fluctuating state. The very slow muon depolarization rate which varies hardly with temperature indicates that spins are close to an itinerant limit in the largest doping x  =  0.7. The dynamic relaxation rates extracted from the LF-μSR spectra show a three-dimensional diffusive transport. Our combined NMR and μSR results suggest the occurrence of intriguing spin and charge excitations across the insulator-semimetal transition. PMID:26571207

  14. Tracking Sodium-Antimonide Phase Transformations in Sodium-Ion Anodes: Insights from Operando Pair Distribution Function Analysis and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allan, Phoebe K; Griffin, John M; Darwiche, Ali; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Wiaderek, Kamila M; Chapman, Karena W; Morris, Andrew J; Chupas, Peter J; Monconduit, Laure; Grey, Clare P

    2016-02-24

    Operando pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and ex situ (23)Na magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS ssNMR) spectroscopy are used to gain insight into the alloying mechanism of high-capacity antimony anodes for sodium-ion batteries. Subtraction of the PDF of crystalline NaxSb phases from the total PDF, an approach constrained by chemical phase information gained from (23)Na ssNMR in reference to relevant model compounds, identifies two previously uncharacterized intermediate species formed electrochemically; a-Na(3-x)Sb (x ≈ 0.4-0.5), a structure locally similar to crystalline Na3Sb (c-Na3Sb) but with significant numbers of sodium vacancies and a limited correlation length, and a-Na(1.7)Sb, a highly amorphous structure featuring some Sb-Sb bonding. The first sodiation breaks down the crystalline antimony to form first a-Na(3-x)Sb and, finally, crystalline Na3Sb. Desodiation results in the formation of an electrode formed of a composite of crystalline and amorphous antimony networks. We link the different reactivity of these networks to a series of sequential sodiation reactions manifesting as a cascade of processes observed in the electrochemical profile of subsequent cycles. The amorphous network reacts at higher voltages reforming a-Na(1.7)Sb, then a-Na(3-x)Sb, whereas lower potentials are required for the sodiation of crystalline antimony, which reacts to form a-Na(3-x)Sb without the formation of a-Na(1.7)Sb. a-Na(3-x)Sb is converted to crystalline Na3Sb at the end of the second discharge. We find no evidence of formation of NaSb. Variable temperature (23)Na NMR experiments reveal significant sodium mobility within c-Na3Sb; this is a possible contributing factor to the excellent rate performance of Sb anodes. PMID:26824406

  15. Tracking Sodium-Antimonide Phase Transformations in Sodium-Ion Anodes: Insights from Operando Pair Distribution Function Analysis and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Operando pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and ex situ 23Na magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS ssNMR) spectroscopy are used to gain insight into the alloying mechanism of high-capacity antimony anodes for sodium-ion batteries. Subtraction of the PDF of crystalline NaxSb phases from the total PDF, an approach constrained by chemical phase information gained from 23Na ssNMR in reference to relevant model compounds, identifies two previously uncharacterized intermediate species formed electrochemically; a-Na3–xSb (x ≈ 0.4–0.5), a structure locally similar to crystalline Na3Sb (c-Na3Sb) but with significant numbers of sodium vacancies and a limited correlation length, and a-Na1.7Sb, a highly amorphous structure featuring some Sb–Sb bonding. The first sodiation breaks down the crystalline antimony to form first a-Na3–xSb and, finally, crystalline Na3Sb. Desodiation results in the formation of an electrode formed of a composite of crystalline and amorphous antimony networks. We link the different reactivity of these networks to a series of sequential sodiation reactions manifesting as a cascade of processes observed in the electrochemical profile of subsequent cycles. The amorphous network reacts at higher voltages reforming a-Na1.7Sb, then a-Na3–xSb, whereas lower potentials are required for the sodiation of crystalline antimony, which reacts to form a-Na3–xSb without the formation of a-Na1.7Sb. a-Na3–xSb is converted to crystalline Na3Sb at the end of the second discharge. We find no evidence of formation of NaSb. Variable temperature 23Na NMR experiments reveal significant sodium mobility within c-Na3Sb; this is a possible contributing factor to the excellent rate performance of Sb anodes. PMID:26824406

  16. NMR Methods, Applications and Trends for Groundwater Evaluation and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D. O.; Grunewald, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have a tremendous potential for improving groundwater characterization, as they provide direct detection and measurement of groundwater and unique information about pore-scale properties. NMR measurements, commonly used in chemistry and medicine, are utilized in geophysical investigations through non-invasive surface NMR (SNMR) or downhole NMR logging measurements. Our recent and ongoing research has focused on improving the performance and interpretation of NMR field measurements for groundwater characterization. Engineering advancements have addressed several key technical challenges associated with SNMR measurements. Susceptibility of SNMR measurements to environmental noise has been dramatically reduced through the development of multi-channel acquisition hardware and noise-cancellation software. Multi-channel instrumentation (up to 12 channels) has also enabled more efficient 2D and 3D imaging. Previous limitations in measuring NMR signals from water in silt, clay and magnetic geology have been addressed by shortening the instrument dead-time from 40 ms to 4 ms, and increasing the power output. Improved pulse sequences have been developed to more accurately estimate NMR relaxation times and their distributions, which are sensitive to pore size distributions. Cumulatively, these advancements have vastly expanded the range of environments in which SNMR measurements can be obtained, enabling detection of groundwater in smaller pores, in magnetic geology, in the unsaturated zone, and nearby to infrastructure (presented here in case studies). NMR logging can provide high-resolution estimates of bound and mobile water content and pore size distributions. While NMR logging has been utilized in oil and gas applications for decades, its use in groundwater investigations has been limited by the large size and high cost of oilfield NMR logging tools and services. Recently, engineering efforts funded by the US Department of

  17. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Butcher, Samuel E; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ). PMID:27023095

  18. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  19. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  20. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  1. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  2. Localized double-quantum-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. A.; Hetherington, H. P.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Twieg, D. B.

    The image-guided in vivo spectroscopic (ISIS) pulse sequence has been combined with a double-quantum-filter scheme in order to obtain localized and water-suppressed 1H NMR spectra of J-coupled metabolites. The coherence-transfer efficiency associated with the DQ filter for AX and A 3X spin systems is described. Phantom results of carnosine, alanine, and ethanol in aqueous solution are presented. For comparison, the 1H NMR spectrum of alanine in aqueous solution with the binomial (1331, 2662) spin-echo sequence is also shown.

  3. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  4. NMR Relaxation and Petrophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Marc

    2011-03-01

    NMR relaxation is routinely used in the field of geosciences to give basic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution, saturation etc. In this tutorial, we focus on the pore size distribution deduced from NMR. We recall the basic principle used in the interpretation of the NMR signal and compare the results with other standard petrophysical techniques such as mercury pore size distribution, BET specific surface measurements, thin section visualizations. The NMR pore size distribution is a unique information available on water saturated porous media and can give similar results as MICP in certain situations. The scaling of NMR relaxation time distribution (s) into pore sizes (μm) requires the knowledge of the surface relaxivity (μm/s) and we recommend using specific surface measurements as an independent determination of solid surface areas. With usual surface relaxivities, the NMR technique can explore length-scales starting from nano-meters and ending around 100 μm. Finally, we will introduce briefly recent techniques sensitive to the pore to pore diffusional exchange, providing new information on the connectivity of the pore network, but showing another possibility of discrepancy in the determination of pore size distribution with standard techniques.

  5. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using tapered stripline NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijssen, Koen C. H.; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, J. W. G. (Hans); Kentgens, Arno P. M.; van Bentum, P. Jan M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field B0 gradients are essential in modern Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Although RF/B1 gradients can be used to fulfill a similar role, this is not used in common practice because of practical limitations in the design of B1 gradient coils. Here we present a new method to create B1 gradients using stripline RF coils. The conductor-width of a stripline NMR chip and the strength of its radiofrequency field are correlated, so a stripline chip can be tapered to produce any arbitrary shaped B1 field gradient. Here we show the characterization of this tapered stripline configuration and demonstrate three applications: magnetic resonance imaging on samples with nL-μL volumes, reaction monitoring of fast chemical reactions (10-2-101 s) and the compensation of B0 field gradients to obtain high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  6. Nondestructive NMR technique for moisture determination in radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeier, S.; Gerald, R.E. II; Growney, E.; Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.

    1998-12-04

    This progress report focuses on experimental and computational studies used to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting, quantifying, and monitoring hydrogen and other magnetically active nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu) in Spent nuclear fuels and packaging materials. The detection of moisture by using a toroid cavity NMR imager has been demonstrated in SiO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} systems. The total moisture was quantified by means of {sup 1}H NMR detection of H{sub 2}O with a sensitivity of 100 ppm. In addition, an MRI technique that was used to determine the moisture distribution also enabled investigators to discriminate between bulk and stationary water sorbed on the particles. This imaging feature is unavailable in any other nondestructive assay (NDA) technique. Following the initial success of this program, the NMR detector volume was scaled up from the original design by a factor of 2000. The capacity of this detector exceeds the size specified by DOE-STD-3013-96.

  7. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  8. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  9. Computer systems for laboratory networks and high-performance NMR.

    PubMed

    Levy, G C; Begemann, J H

    1985-08-01

    Modern computer technology is significantly enhancing the associated tasks of spectroscopic data acquisition and data reduction and analysis. Distributed data processing techniques, particularly laboratory computer networking, are rapidly changing the scientist's ability to optimize results from complex experiments. Optimization of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experimental results requires use of powerful, large-memory (virtual memory preferred) computers with integrated (and supported) high-speed links to magnetic resonance instrumentation. Laboratory architectures with larger computers, in order to extend data reduction capabilities, have facilitated the transition to NMR laboratory computer networking. Examples of a polymer microstructure analysis and in vivo 31P metabolic analysis are given. This paper also discusses laboratory data processing trends anticipated over the next 5-10 years. Full networking of NMR laboratories is just now becoming a reality. PMID:3840171

  10. jsNMR: an embedded platform-independent NMR spectrum viewer.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    jsNMR is a lightweight NMR spectrum viewer written in JavaScript/HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which provides a cross-platform spectrum visualizer that runs on all computer architectures including mobile devices. Experimental (and simulated) datasets are easily opened in jsNMR by (i) drag and drop on a jsNMR browser window, (ii) by preparing a jsNMR file from the jsNMR web site, or (iii) by mailing the raw data to the jsNMR web portal. jsNMR embeds the original data in the HTML file, so a jsNMR file is a self-transforming dataset that may be exported to various formats, e.g. comma-separated values. The main applications of jsNMR are to provide easy access to NMR data without the need for dedicated software installed and to provide the possibility to visualize NMR spectra on web sites. PMID:25641013

  11. Development of a superconducting bulk magnet for NMR and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Tamada, Daiki; Yanagi, Yousuke; Itoh, Yoshitaka; Nemoto, Takahiro; Utumi, Hiroaki; Kose, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    A superconducting bulk magnet composed of six vertically stacked annular single-domain c-axis-oriented Eu-Ba-Cu-O crystals was energized to 4.74 T using a conventional superconducting magnet for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Shim coils, gradient coils, and radio frequency coils for high resolution NMR and MRI were installed in the 23 mm-diameter room-temperature bore of the bulk magnet. A 6.9 ppm peak-to-peak homogeneous region suitable for MRI was achieved in the central cylindrical region (6.2 mm diameter, 9.1 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a single layer shim coil. A 21 Hz spectral resolution that can be used for high resolution NMR spectroscopy was obtained in the central cylindrical region (1.3 mm diameter, 4 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a multichannel shim coil. A clear 3D MR image dataset of a chemically fixed mouse fetus with (50 μm)3 voxel resolution was obtained in 5.5 h. We therefore concluded that the cryogen-free superconducting bulk magnet developed in this study is useful for high-resolution desktop NMR, MRI and mobile NMR device.

  12. Development of a superconducting bulk magnet for NMR and MRI.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Tamada, Daiki; Yanagi, Yousuke; Itoh, Yoshitaka; Nemoto, Takahiro; Utumi, Hiroaki; Kose, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    A superconducting bulk magnet composed of six vertically stacked annular single-domain c-axis-oriented Eu-Ba-Cu-O crystals was energized to 4.74 T using a conventional superconducting magnet for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Shim coils, gradient coils, and radio frequency coils for high resolution NMR and MRI were installed in the 23 mm-diameter room-temperature bore of the bulk magnet. A 6.9 ppm peak-to-peak homogeneous region suitable for MRI was achieved in the central cylindrical region (6.2 mm diameter, 9.1 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a single layer shim coil. A 21 Hz spectral resolution that can be used for high resolution NMR spectroscopy was obtained in the central cylindrical region (1.3 mm diameter, 4 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a multichannel shim coil. A clear 3D MR image dataset of a chemically fixed mouse fetus with (50 μm)(3) voxel resolution was obtained in 5.5 h. We therefore concluded that the cryogen-free superconducting bulk magnet developed in this study is useful for high-resolution desktop NMR, MRI and mobile NMR device. PMID:26295170

  13. Development of a Hybrid EPR/NMR Coimaging System

    PubMed Central

    Samouilov, Alexandre; Caia, George L.; Kesselring, Eric; Petryakov, Sergey; Wasowicz, Tomasz; Zweier, Jay L.

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a powerful technique that enables spatial mapping of free radicals or other paramagnetic compounds; however, it does not in itself provide anatomic visualization of the body. Proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well suited to provide anatomical visualization. A hybrid EPR/NMR coimaging instrument was constructed that utilizes the complementary capabilities of both techniques, superimposing EPR and proton-MR images to provide the distribution of paramagnetic species in the body. A common magnet and field gradient system is utilized along with a dual EPR and proton-NMR resonator assembly, enabling coimaging without the need to move the sample. EPRI is performed at ~1.2 GHz/~40 mT and proton MRI is performed at 16.18 MHz/~380 mT; hence the method is suitable for whole-body coimaging of living mice. The gradient system used is calibrated and controlled in such a manner that the spatial geometry of the two acquired images is matched, enabling their superposition without additional postprocessing or marker registration. The performance of the system was tested in a series of phantoms and in vivo applications by mapping the location of a paramagnetic probe in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mice. This hybrid EPR/NMR coimaging instrument enables imaging of paramagnetic molecules along with their anatomic localization in the body. PMID:17659621

  14. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  15. Structural investigations of borosilicate glasses containing MoO 3 by MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.; Majérus, O.; Fadel, E.; Quintas, A.; Gervais, C.; Charpentier, T.; Neuville, D.

    2010-01-01

    High molybdenum concentration in glass compositions may lead to alkali and alkaline-earth molybdates crystallization during melt cooling that must be controlled particularly during the preparation of highly radioactive nuclear glassy waste forms. To understand the effect of molybdenum addition on the structure of a simplified nuclear glass and to know how composition changes can affect molybdates crystallization tendency, the structure of two glass series belonging to the SiO 2-B 2O 3-Na 2O-CaO-MoO 3 system was studied by 29Si, 11B, 23Na MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies by increasing MoO 3 or B 2O 3 concentrations. Increasing MoO 3 amount induced an increase of the silicate network reticulation but no significant effect was observed on the proportion of BO4- units and on the distribution of Na + cations in glass structure. By increasing B 2O 3 concentration, a strong evolution of the distribution of Na + cations was observed that could explain the evolution of the nature of molybdate crystals (CaMoO 4 or Na 2MoO 4) formed during melt cooling.

  16. Sensitivity enhancement of remotely coupled NMR detectors using wirelessly powered parametric amplification.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chunqi; Murphy-Boesch, Joseph; Dodd, Stephen; Koretsky, Alan

    2012-09-01

    A completely wireless detection coil with an integrated parametric amplifier has been constructed to provide local amplification and transmission of MR signals. The sample coil is one element of a parametric amplifier using a zero-bias diode that mixes the weak MR signal with a strong pump signal that is obtained from an inductively coupled external loop. The NMR sample coil develops current gain via reduction in the effective coil resistance. Higher gain can be obtained by adjusting the level of the pumping power closer to the oscillation threshold, but the gain is ultimately constrained by the bandwidth requirement of MRI experiments. A feasibility study here shows that on a NaCl/D(2) O phantom, (23) Na signals with 20 dB of gain can be readily obtained with a concomitant bandwidth of 144 kHz. This gain is high enough that the integrated coil with parametric amplifier, which is coupled inductively to external loops, can provide sensitivity approaching that of direct wire connection. PMID:22246567

  17. Sensitivity Enhancement of Remotely Coupled NMR Detectors using Wirelessly Powered Parametric Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chunqi; Murphy-Boesch, Joseph; Dodd, Stephen; Koretsky, Alan

    2011-01-01

    A completely wireless detection coil with an integrated parametric amplifier has been constructed to provide local amplification and transmission of MR signals. The sample coil is one element of a parametric amplifier using a zero-bias diode that mixes the weak MR signal with a strong pump signal that is obtained from an inductively coupled external loop. The NMR sample coil develops current gain via reduction in the effective coil resistance. Higher gain can be obtained by adjusting the level of the pumping power closer to the oscillation threshold, but the gain is ultimately constrained by the bandwidth requirement of MRI experiments. A feasibility study here shows that on a NaCl/D2O phantom, 23Na signals with 20 dB of gain can be readily obtained with a concomitant bandwidth of 144 kHz. This gain is high enough that the integrated coil with parametric amplifier, which is coupled inductively to external loops, can provide sensitivity approaching that of direct wire connection. PMID:22246567

  18. Improving NMR Structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that modern solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base-pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority of cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  19. Advanced NMR approaches in the characterization of coal. [Quarterly] report No. 9

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1992-12-31

    A considerable effort in this project during the past few months has been focussed on the development of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR imaging techniques to yield spatially-resolved chemical shift (structure) information on coal. In order to yield the chemical shift information, a solid-state NMR imaging technique must include magic-angle spinning, so rotating gradient capabilities are indicated. A {sup 13}C MAS imaging probe and a {sup 1}H MAS imaging probe and the circuitry necessary for rotating gradients have been designed and constructed. The {sup 1}H system has already produced promising preliminary results, which are briefly described in this report.

  20. Dynamic effects in MAS and MQMAS NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei: calculations and an application to the double perovskite cryolite.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Mrignayani; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Grey, Clare P; Frydman, Lucio

    2005-11-30

    Dynamic processes such as chemical exchange or rotations between inequivalent orientations can affect the magic-angle spinning (MAS) and the multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. The present paper discusses such dynamic multisite MAS and MQMAS effects and applies them to study the dynamic processes that occur in the double perovskite cryolite, Na3AlF6. Dynamic line shape simulations invoking a second-order broadening of the central transition and relying on the semiclassical Bloch-McConnell formalism for chemical exchange were performed for a variety of exchange models possessing different symmetries. Fitting experimental variable-temperature cryolite 23Na NMR data with this formalism revealed that the two inequivalent sodium sites in this mineral undergo an exchange characterized by a broad distribution of rates. To further assess this dynamic process a variety of 27Al and 19F MAS NMR studies were also undertaken; quantitative 27Al-19F dipolar coupling measurements then revealed a dynamic motion of the AlF6 octahedra that were qualitatively consistent with predictions stemming from molecular dynamic simulations on this double perovskite. PMID:16305261

  1. Quantitative Sodium MR Imaging at 7 T: Initial Results and Comparison with Diffusion-weighted Imaging in Patients with Breast Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zaric, Olgica; Pinker, Katja; Zbyn, Stefan; Strasser, Bernhard; Robinson, Simon; Minarikova, Lenka; Gruber, Stephan; Farr, Alex; Singer, Christian; Helbich, Thomas H; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bogner, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical feasibility of a quantitative sodium 23 ((23)Na) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol developed for breast tumor assessment and to compare it with 7-T diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Materials and Methods Written informed consent in this institutional review board-approved study was obtained from eight healthy volunteers and 17 patients with 20 breast tumors (five benign, 15 malignant). To achieve the best image quality and reproducibility, the (23)Na sequence was optimized and tested on phantoms and healthy volunteers. For in vivo quantification of absolute tissue sodium concentration (TSC), an external phantom was used. Static magnetic field, or B0, and combined transmit and receive radiofrequency field, or B1, maps were acquired, and image quality, measurement reproducibility, and accuracy testing were performed. Bilateral (23)Na and DWI sequences were performed before contrast material-enhanced MR imaging in patients with breast tumors. TSC and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated and correlated for healthy glandular tissue and benign and malignant lesions. Results The (23)Na MR imaging protocol is feasible, with 1.5-mm in-plane resolution and 16-minute imaging time. Good image quality was achieved, with high reproducibility (mean TSC values ± standard deviation for the test, 36 mmol per kilogram of wet weight ± 2 [range, 34-37 mmol/kg]; for the retest, 37 mmol/kg ± 1 [range, 35-39 mmol/kg]; P = .610) and accuracy (r = 0.998, P < .001). TSC values in normal glandular and adipose breast tissue were 35 mmol/kg ± 3 and 18 mmol/kg ± 3, respectively. In malignant lesions (mean size, 31 mm ± 24; range, 6-92 mm), the TSC of 69 mmol/kg ± 10 was, on average, 49% higher than that in benign lesions (mean size, 14 mm ± 12; range, 6-35 mm), with a TSC of 47 mmol/kg ± 8 (P = .002). There were similar ADC differences between benign ([1.78 ± 0.23] × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec) and malignant ([1.03 ± 0.23] × 10(-3) mm

  2. ECG gated NMR-CT for cardiovascular diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, J.; Ohtake, T.; Machida, K.; Iio, M.; Yoshimoto, N.; Sugimoto, T.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have been applying ECG gated NMR-CT to mainly patients with myocardial infarction (MI), and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Thirteen patients with MI, 8 with HCM and 5 without any heart diseases were studied by ECG gated NMR imaging (spin-echo technique, TR: depends on patient heart rate, TE: 35 and 70 msec.) with 0.35 T superconducting magnet. On NMR images (MRI), the authors examined the wall thickness, wall motion and T/sub 2/ relaxation time in the area of diseased myocardium. The lesions of old MI were depicted as the area of thin wall and T/sub 2/ relaxation time of those lesions were similar to the area of non-infarcted myocardium. The lesions of recent MI (up to 3.5 months from the recent attack) were shown as the same wall thickness as the non-infarcted myocardium and the area of prolonged T/sub 2/ relaxation time compared with that of non-infarcted myocardium. MRI demonstrated diffusely thick myocardium in all patients with HCM. T/sub 2/ relaxation time of the areas of HCM was almost the same as that of normal myocardium, and it's difference among each ventricular wall in patients with HCM was not statistically significant. The authors conclude that ECG gated NMR-CT offers 3-D morphological information of the heart without any contrast material nor radioisotopes. ECG gated MRI provides the useful informations to diagnose MI, especially in the differential diagnosis between old and recent MI.

  3. Diffusional Properties of Methanogenic Granular Sludge: 1H NMR Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Lens, Piet N. L.; Gastesi, Rakel; Vergeldt, Frank; van Aelst, Adriaan C.; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Van As, Henk

    2003-01-01

    The diffusive properties of anaerobic methanogenic and sulfidogenic aggregates present in wastewater treatment bioreactors were studied using diffusion analysis by relaxation time-separated pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and NMR imaging. NMR spectroscopy measurements were performed at 22°C with 10 ml of granular sludge at a magnetic field strength of 0.5 T (20 MHz resonance frequency for protons). Self-diffusion coefficients of H2O in the investigated series of mesophilic aggregates were found to be 51 to 78% lower than the self-diffusion coefficient of free water. Interestingly, self-diffusion coefficients of H2O were independent of the aggregate size for the size fractions investigated. Diffusional transport occurred faster in aggregates growing under nutrient-rich conditions (e.g., the bottom of a reactor) or at high (55°C) temperatures than in aggregates cultivated in nutrient-poor conditions or at low (10°C) temperatures. Exposure of aggregates to 2.5% glutaraldehyde or heat (70 or 90°C for 30 min) modified the diffusional transport up to 20%. In contrast, deactivation of aggregates by HgCl2 did not affect the H2O self-diffusion coefficient in aggregates. Analysis of NMR images of a single aggregate shows that methanogenic aggregates possess a spin-spin relaxation time and self-diffusion coefficient distribution, which are due to both physical (porosity) and chemical (metal sulfide precipitates) factors. PMID:14602624

  4. A SENSITIVE NMR THERMOMETER FOR MULTINUCLEI FT NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pernicious problem in multinuclei FT NMR is accurate measurement of sample temperature. This arises from several factors including widespread use of high-power decoupling, large sample tubes (with potentially large temperature gradients across the sample volume), and lack of su...

  5. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  6. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  7. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  8. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  9. NMR local coil with adjustable spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Dembinski, G.T.

    1988-03-22

    A local coil assembly for use in NMR imaging is described which comprises: a base; a first local coil module mounted to the base and extending upward therefrom; sockets disposed in the base, each at a different distance from the first local coil module; a second local coil module having a connector therein which mates with each of the sockets to enable the second local coil module to be connected to the base at any one of the sockets; and a set of reactive components. The values of the respective reactive components are selected such that the second local oil module may be connected to any of the sockets without any substantial change in the resonant frequency of the assembly.

  10. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  11. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  12. New formulation of Magnetization Equation for Flowing Nuclear Spin under NMR/MRI Excitation(I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Dilip; Emetere, Moses; Omotosho, Victor

    2015-03-01

    We have obtained for the first time from the Bloch NMR equations the correct dependence of the single component of magnetization, My and Mz at resonance (NMR/MRI) on relaxation times, rf B1 field (pulsed or continuous), blood(nuclear spin) flow velocity, etc. in the rotating frame of reference. The equations are applicable for both CW and pulsed NMR experiments with or without flow of spins. Our approaches can be extended easily to include gradient fields and diffusion of spins, if needed in NMR/MRI experiments. We also discuss the application of our equations to a specific case of MR excitation scheme: Free induction decay. The first time new equations of single component of MR magnetization and further equations that can be derived with the methodologies used here, can be applied towards accurate simulation of MR images/signals and extraction of parameters of clinical importance through comparison of the measured and the simulated images/signals.

  13. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  14. NMR studies of selective population inversion and spin clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.S.

    1986-02-01

    This work describes the development and application of selective excitation techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Composite pulses and multiple-quantum methods are used to accomplish various goals, such as broadband and narrowband excitation in liquids, and collective excitation of groups of spins in solids. These methods are applied to a variety of problems, including non-invasive spatial localization, spin cluster size characterization in disordered solids and solid state NMR imaging.

  15. Studies of electrolyte penetration in carbon anodes by NMR techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, G.

    1998-12-09

    A toroid cavity nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detector capable of recording radial concentration profiles, diffusion constants, and displacements of charge carriers was employed to investigate the lithium ion distribution in an electrochemical cell containing a carbonaceous material synthesized from pyrene and pillared clays as inorganic templates. A carbon rod was used in a control experiment to assign the Li{sup +} spectrum and to calibrate the one dimensional radial images.

  16. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  17. Applications of Nanoscale NMR Using Ensembles of NV Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Dominik; Glenn, David; Walsworth, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    Ensembles of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are now the frontier modality for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals at length-scales of microns to Angstroms. Promising applications including NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy in sub-nanoliter volumes, studies of diffusion and transport in small samples of biological tissue, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of individual biological cells and molecules. Here, we describe recent progress toward such applications.

  18. Work in progress: NMR anatomy of the larynx and tongue base

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.B.; Larsson, S.G.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1983-07-01

    The normal anatomy of the larynx and base of the tongue as seen on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images was studied. Scans of normal volunteers were obtained using a 3.5 kilogauss (0.35 T) superconductive magnet and a 3.0 kilogauss (0.3 T) permanent magnet. The NMR images were compared with images obtained by CT and with anatomical sections of these regions. Although resolution is not comparable to that seen on scans obtained with modern CT equipment, there are some advantages to NMR imaging. These include availability of multiple projections, ease of identifying blood vessels and differentiating them from lymph nodes, and the possibility of improved tissue specificity.

  19. Solution NMR of large molecules and assemblies†

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mark P.; McElroy, Craig A.; Amero, Carlos D.

    2008-01-01

    Solution NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for examining the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The advent of multidimensional (2D–4D) NMR, together with the widespread use of uniform isotopic labeling of proteins and RNA with the NMR-active isotopes, 15N and 13C, opened the door to detailed analyses of macromolecular structure, dynamics and interactions of smaller macromolecules (< ~25 kDa). Over the past 10 years, advances in NMR and isotope labeling methods have expanded the range of NMR-tractable targets by at least an order of magnitude. Here we briefly describe the methodological advances that allow NMR spectroscopy of large macromolecules and their complexes, and provide a perspective on the wide range of applications of NMR to biochemical problems. PMID:17209543

  20. Amplification of Xenon NMR and MRI by remote detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moule, Adam J.; Spence, Megan M.; Han, Song-I.; Seeley, JulietteA.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Saxena, Sunil; Pines, Alexander

    2003-03-31

    A novel technique is proposed in which a nuclear magneticresonance (NMR) spectrum or magnetic resonance image (MRI) is encoded andstored as spin polarization and is then moved to a different physicallocation to be detected. Remote detection allows the separateoptimization of the encoding and detection steps, permitting theindependent choice of experimental conditions, and excitation anddetection methodologies. In the first experimental demonstration of thistechnique, we show that NMR signal can be amplified by taking diluted129Xe from a porous sample placed inside a large encoding coil, andconcentrating it into a smaller detection coil. In general, the study ofNMR active molecules at low concentration that have low physical fillingfactor is facilitated by remote detection. In the second experiment, MRIinformation encoded in a very low field magnet (4-7mT) is transferred toa high field magnet (4.2 T) in order to be detected under optimizedconditions. Furthermore, remote detection allows the utilization ofultra-sensitive optical or superconducting detection techniques, whichbroadens the horizon of NMR experimentation.

  1. NMR of thin layers using a meanderline surface coil

    DOEpatents

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature meanderline sensor coil which extends the capabilities of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to provide analysis of thin planar samples and surface layer geometries. The sensor coil allows standard NMR techniques to be used to examine thin planar (or curved) layers, extending NMRs utility to many problems of modern interest. This technique can be used to examine contact layers, non-destructively depth profile into films, or image multiple layers in a 3-dimensional sense. It lends itself to high resolution NMR techniques of magic angle spinning and thus can be used to examine the bonding and electronic structure in layered materials or to observe the chemistry associated with aging coatings. Coupling this sensor coil technology with an arrangement of small magnets will produce a penetrator probe for remote in-situ chemical analysis of groundwater or contaminant sediments. Alternatively, the sensor coil can be further miniaturized to provide sub-micron depth resolution within thin films or to orthoscopically examine living tissue. This thin-layer NMR technique using a stationary meanderline coil in a series-resonant circuit has been demonstrated and it has been determined that the flat meanderline geometry has about he same detection sensitivity as a solenoidal coil, but is specifically tailored to examine planar material layers, while avoiding signals from the bulk.

  2. NMR in rotating magnetic fields: Magic angle field spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariou, D.; Meriles, C.; Martin, R.; Pines, A.

    2004-09-10

    Magic angle sample spinning has been one of the cornerstones in high-resolution solid state NMR. Spinning frequencies nowadays have increased by at least one order of magnitude over the ones used in the first experiments and the technique has gained tremendous popularity. It is currently a routine procedure in solid-state NMR, high-resolution liquid-state NMR and solid-state MRI. The technique enhances the spectral resolution by averaging away rank 2 anisotropic spin interactions thereby producing isotropic-like spectra with resolved chemical shifts and scalar couplings. Andrew proposed that it should be possible to induce similar effects in a static sample if the direction of the magnetic field is varied, e.g., magic-angle rotation of the B0 field (B0-MAS) and this has been recently demonstrated using electromagnetic field rotation. Here we discuss on the possibilities to perform field rotation using alternative hardware, together with spectroscopic methods to recover isotropic resolution even in cases where the field is not rotating at the magic angle. Extension to higher magnetic fields would be beneficial in situations where the physical manipulation of the sample is inconvenient or impossible. Such situations occur often in materials or biomedical samples where ''ex-situ'' NMR spectroscopy and imaging analysis is needed.

  3. Role of NMR in diagnosis and evaluation of stroke: 303 studies of 152 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, R.L.; Kertesz, A.; Black, S.; Carr, T.; McFadden, L.; Cooper, P.E.; Stewart, S.

    1985-05-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) proton imaging of 158 patients with clinical stroke was done over 18 months (0.15T Technicare resistive prototype imager). Spin echo (TR250-2150, TE30-240 m sec.) and inversion spin echo (TR1600, TI450, TE30 m sec.) sequences were used. Early sensitivity of NMR was superior to CT and 24 and 48 hours but not at 48-72 hours from clinical onset. Cerebral hemorrhage was studied by NMR in 18 patients (7 within 72 hours); all could be diagnosed as hemorrhage within 72 hours though findings were more subtle than CT. NMR findings became striking by 5 days and persisted longer than CT on late follow-up. Increased NMR signal on spin echo imaging in acute stroke correlated with tissue oedema and necrosis on pathologic study, while high signal in sub-acute stroke corresponded to gliosis, microcystic change, and macrophage infiltration. Zones of altered TI-weighted signal are presently under comparison by digitizer to pathologic zones in a patient with cerebral hemorrhage. NMR convincingly demonstrates superior early sensitivity in diagnoses of stroke but uncertainty remains concerning reliable detection of early hemorrhage.

  4. 2H transmit-receive NMR probes for magnetic field monitoring in MRI.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Pekka; Greding, Sebastian; Wachutka, Gerhard; Wiesinger, Florian

    2011-05-01

    Measuring image encoding fields in real time and applying the information in postprocessing offer improved image quality for MRI, particularly for applications that are intrinsically sensitive to gradient imperfections. For this task, a stand-alone magnetometer system based on multiple (2)H transmit-receive NMR probes has been developed. The conceptual advantages of changing to (2)H NMR probes for (1)H magnetic field monitoring are elucidated here, and the practical design of the probes is described. In comparison to previous (1)H NMR probe-based designs, (2)H probes are perfectly decoupled from standard (1)H imaging. Utilization of RF shielding or other nonoptimal decoupling schemes is therefore not needed. Probes based on (2)H nuclei are also more easily miniaturized for high-resolution imaging. This is particularly important for diffusion tensor and phase-contrast imaging, which rely on strong motion-sensitizing gradients. The presented (2)H NMR probes have been shown to fulfill the requirements for accurate (1)H imaging down to image resolutions of 0.2 mm. Using susceptibility matching techniques, the probe's B(0) inhomogeneity-induced signal dephasing is reduced and monitoring periods beyond 200 msec are achieved. The benefit of real time magnetic field monitoring is highlighted for phase-contrast and non-Cartesian multishot imaging. PMID:21254204

  5. Two-dimensional NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, T.C.

    1987-06-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series. In part one (ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, May 15) the authors discussed one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and some relatively advanced nuclear spin gymnastics experiments that provide a capability for selective sensitivity enhancements. In this article and overview and some applications of two-dimensional NMR experiments are presented. These powerful experiments are important complements to the one-dimensional experiments. As in the more sophisticated one-dimensional experiments, the two-dimensional experiments involve three distinct time periods: a preparation period, t/sub 0/; an evolution period, t/sub 1/; and a detection period, t/sub 2/.

  6. NMR investigation of Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwanghyo; Jang, Zeehoon

    2013-01-01

    109Ag nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation measurements have been performed on two powder samples of Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of 20 nm and 80 nm. The measurements have been done in an external field of 9.4 T and in the temperature range 10 K < T < 280 K. The 109Ag NMR spectra for both samples have close to Lorentzian shapes and turn out to be mixtures of homogeneous and inhomogeneous lines. The linewidth Δ ν at room temperature is 1.3 kHz for both samples and gradually increases with decreasing temperature. Both the Knight shift ( K) and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/ T 1) are observed to be almost identical to the values reported for the bulk Ag metal, whereby the Korringa ratio R(= K 2 T 1 T/S) is found to be 2.0 for both samples in the investigated temperature range.

  7. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  8. Measurement of deformations by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytchenkoff, Dimitri; Rodts, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Two NMR data acquisition protocols together with corresponding data processing algorithms for locating macroscopic objects, measuring distances between them or monitoring their displacements or deformations with microscopic precision are presented and discussed. The performance of the methods is demonstrated by applying them to the measurement of deformations of a freely supported beam under loading. We believe that our methods will find their applications in mechanics, civil engineering and medicine.

  9. Image

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-08-31

    The computer side of the IMAGE project consists of a collection of Perl scripts that perform a variety of tasks; scripts are available to insert, update and delete data from the underlying Oracle database, download data from NCBI's Genbank and other sources, and generate data files for download by interested parties. Web scripts make up the tracking interface, and various tools available on the project web-site (image.llnl.gov) that provide a search interface to the database.

  10. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  11. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  12. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  13. Investigation of Ti-doped NaAlH4 by solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Majzoub, E; Herberg, J

    2003-11-24

    In recent years, the development of Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4} as a hydrogen storage material has gained attention because of its large weight percentage of hydrogen ({approx}5%) compared to traditional interstitial hydrides. The addition of transition-metal dopants, in the form of Ti-halides, such as TiCl{sub 3}, dramatically improves the kinetics of the absorption and desorption of hydrogen from NaAlH{sub 4}. However, the role that Ti plays in enhancing the absorption and desorption of H{sub 2} is still unknown. In the present study, {sup 27}Al, {sup 23}Na, and {sup 1}H MAS (Magic Angle Spinning) NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) has been performed to understand the titanium speciation in Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}. All experiments were performed on a sample of crushed single crystals exposed to Ti during growth, a sample of solvent-mixed 4TiCl{sub 3} + 112NaAlH{sub 4}, a reacted sample of solvent-mixed TiCl{sub 3} + {sup 3}NaAlH{sub 4} with THF, and a reacted sample of ball-milled TiCl3 + 3NaAlH{sub 4}. The {sup 27}Al MAS NMR has shown differences in compound formation between solvent-mixed TiCl{sub 3} + 3NaAlH{sub 4} with THF and the mechanically ball-milled TiCl{sub 3} + 3NaAlH{sub 4}. {sup 27}Al MAS NMR of the mechanically ball-milled mixture of fully-reacted TiCl{sub 3} + 3NaAlH{sub 4} showed spectral signatures of TiAl{sub 3} while, the solvent-mixed 4TiCl{sub 3} + 112NaAlH{sub 4}, which is totally reacted, does not show the presences of TiAl{sub 3}, but shows the existence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  14. ODIN-object-oriented development interface for NMR.

    PubMed

    Jochimsen, Thies H; von Mengershausen, Michael

    2004-09-01

    A cross-platform development environment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments is presented. It allows rapid prototyping of new pulse sequences and provides a common programming interface for different system types. With this object-oriented interface implemented in C++, the programmer is capable of writing applications to control an experiment that can be executed on different measurement devices, even from different manufacturers, without the need to modify the source code. Due to the clear design of the software, new pulse sequences can be created, tested, and executed within a short time. To post-process the acquired data, an interface to well-known numerical libraries is part of the framework. This allows a transparent integration of the data processing instructions into the measurement module. The software focuses mainly on NMR imaging, but can also be used with limitations for spectroscopic experiments. To demonstrate the capabilities of the framework, results of the same experiment, carried out on two NMR imaging systems from different manufacturers are shown and compared with the results of a simulation. PMID:15324759

  15. Development and Characterization of NMR Measurements for Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Zachary; Whitney, Heather

    2012-03-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are systems of water, gelatin, and monomers which form polymers upon irradiation. The gelatin matrix retains dose distribution in 3D form, facilitating truly integrated measurements of complex dose plans for radiation therapy. Polymer gels have two proton pools coupled by exchange: free solvent protons and bound polymerized macromolecular protons. Measuring magnetization transfer (MT) and relaxation affords useful insights into particle rigidity and chemical exchange effects on relaxation in polymer gels. Polymer gel dose response has been previously quantified with several techniques, most often in terms of MRI parameters, usually at field strengths of 1.5 T and below. The research described here investigates the dose response of a revised MAGIC gel dosimeter via both high-field imaging and simpler nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This includes both transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates (R2 and R1) and quantitative MT parameters. We investigated estimating polymer molecular weight for a given applied dose using the Rouse model and R2 data from the imaging study. Finally, we began development of NMR methods for studying dose response, requiring adaption of NMR experiments to accommodate for radiation damping.

  16. Portable, Low-cost NMR with Laser-Lathe Lithography Produced

    SciTech Connect

    Herberg, J L; Demas, V; Malba, V; Bernhardt, A; Evans, L; Harvey, C; Chinn, S; Maxwell, R; Reimer, J; Pines, A

    2006-12-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is unsurpassed in its ability to non-destructively probe chemical identity. Portable, low-cost NMR sensors would enable on-site identification of potentially hazardous substances, as well as the study of samples in a variety of industrial applications. Recent developments in RF microcoil construction (i.e. coils much smaller than the standard 5 mm NMR RF coils), have dramatically increased NMR sensitivity and decreased the limits-of-detection (LOD). We are using advances in laser pantographic microfabrication techniques, unique to LLNL, to produce RF microcoils for field deployable, high sensitivity NMR-based detectors. This same fabrication technique can be used to produce imaging coils for MRI as well as for standard hardware shimming or 'ex-situ' shimming of field inhomogeneities typically associated with inexpensive magnets. This paper describes a portable NMR system based on a laser-fabricated microcoil and homebuilt probe design. For testing this probe, we used a hand-held 2 kg Halbach magnet that can fit into the palm of a hand, and an RF probe with laser-fabricated microcoils. The focus of the paper is on the evaluation of the microcoils, RF probe, and first generation gradient coils. The setup of this system, initial results, sensitivity measurements, and future plans are discussed. The results, even though preliminary, are promising and provide the foundation for developing a portable, inexpensive NMR system for chemical analysis. Such a system will be ideal for chemical identification of trace substances on site.

  17. Development of LC-13C NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, H. C.; Wang, J. S.; Glass, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study involves the development of C-13 nuclear resonance as an on-line detector for liquid chromatography (LC-C-13 NMR) for the chemical characterization of aviation fuels. The initial focus of this study was the development of a high sensitivity flow C-13 NMR probe. Since C-13 NMR sensitivity is of paramount concern, considerable effort during the first year was directed at new NMR probe designs. In particular, various toroid coil designs were examined. In addition, corresponding shim coils for correcting the main magnetic field (B sub 0) homogeneity were examined. Based on these initial probe design studies, an LC-C-13 NMR probe was built and flow C-13 NMR data was obtained for a limited number of samples.

  18. Pseudogap in Fe2VGa: NMR evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; Ross, Joseph H.

    2001-02-01

    We report the results of a 51V and 69Ga nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of Fe2VGa at temperatures between 4 and 450 K. The presence of magnetic antisite defects is deduced from the NMR linewidth, which displays a Curie-law temperature dependence. The absence of associated NMR shifts indicates the material to be intrinsically nonmagnetic. At low temperatures the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate exhibits Korringa behavior, indicating a small carrier density at the Fermi level. At elevated temperatures, the Knight shifts and NMR relaxation rates go over to a thermally activated response, a semiconductor-like behavior. These results are consistent with pseudogap features identified by recent band structure calculations. The Fermi level density of states deduced from NMR is considerably smaller than given by the specific heat coefficient, γ. The electronic properties are compared to the isostructural semimetal Fe2VAl.

  19. Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Catherine, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this month's issue is "Images"--from early paintings and statuary to computer-generated design. Resources on the theme include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and others. A page of reproducible activities is also provided. Features include photojournalism, inspirational Web sites, art history, pop art, and myths. (AEF)

  20. Accelerating multidimensional NMR and MRI experiments using iterated maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Sean; Frey, Merideth; Sethna, Zachary; Manley, Gregory; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Zilm, Kurt; Loria, J. Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Techniques that accelerate data acquisition without sacrificing the advantages of fast Fourier transform (FFT) reconstruction could benefit a wide variety of magnetic resonance experiments. Here we discuss an approach for reconstructing multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and MR images from sparsely-sampled time domain data, by way of iterated maps. This method exploits the computational speed of the FFT algorithm and is done in a deterministic way, by reformulating any a priori knowledge or constraints into projections, and then iterating. In this paper we explain the motivation behind this approach, the formulation of the specific projections, the benefits of using a `QUasi-Even Sampling, plus jiTter' (QUEST) sampling schedule, and various methods for handling noise. Applying the iterated maps method to real 2D NMR and 3D MRI of solids data, we show that it is flexible and robust enough to handle large data sets with significant noise and artifacts.

  1. Accelerating multidimensional NMR and MRI experiments using iterated maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Merideth A.; Sethna, Zachary M.; Manley, Gregory A.; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Zilm, Kurt W.; Loria, J. Patrick; Barrett, Sean E.

    2013-12-01

    Techniques that accelerate data acquisition without sacrificing the advantages of fast Fourier transform (FFT) reconstruction could benefit a wide variety of magnetic resonance experiments. Here we discuss an approach for reconstructing multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and MR images from sparsely-sampled time domain data, by way of iterated maps. This method exploits the computational speed of the FFT algorithm and is done in a deterministic way, by reformulating any a priori knowledge or constraints into projections, and then iterating. In this paper we explain the motivation behind this approach, the formulation of the specific projections, the benefits of using a ‘QUasi-Even Sampling, plus jiTter' (QUEST) sampling schedule, and various methods for handling noise. Applying the iterated maps method to real 2D NMR and 3D MRI of solids data, we show that it is flexible and robust enough to handle large data sets with significant noise and artifacts.

  2. Applications of NMR in Dairy Research

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Anthony D.; Rochfort, Simone J.

    2014-01-01

    NMR is a robust analytical technique that has been employed to investigate the properties of many substances of agricultural relevance. NMR was first used to investigate the properties of milk in the 1950s and has since been employed in a wide range of studies; including properties analysis of specific milk proteins to metabolomics techniques used to monitor the health of dairy cows. In this brief review, we highlight the different uses of NMR in the dairy industry. PMID:24958391

  3. Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: combining NMR with NIR, GPC/SEC and rheometry.

    PubMed

    Räntzsch, Volker; Wilhelm, Manfred; Guthausen, Gisela

    2016-06-01

    Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques are promising characterization methods for online process analytics and comprehensive offline studies of soft materials. By combining different analytical methods with low-field NMR, information on chemical and physical properties can be correlated with molecular dynamics and complementary chemical information. In this review, we present three hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: a combination of near-infrared spectroscopy and time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) relaxometry, online (1) H-NMR spectroscopy measured directly after size exclusion chromatographic (SEC, also known as GPC) separation and a combination of rheometry and TD-NMR relaxometry for highly viscous materials. Case studies are reviewed that underline the possibilities and challenges of the different hyphenated low-field NMR methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854997

  4. Probing surface interactions by combining NMR cryoporometry and NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Stark, S. C.; Strange, J. H.

    2005-06-01

    To further expand on the understanding of surface interactions at the liquid/solid interface on pore walls, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of cryoporometry and relaxometry have been combined. The combination of these techniques allows variations in NMR relaxation parameters from pore surface to volume ratio changes and from surface interaction changes to be distinguished. By studying a range of sol-gel silicas from two different sources, it was noted that the relaxation time measurements were not consistent with the pore diameters determined by cryoporometry and N2 gas adsorption. Instead distinctly different relaxivity constants were determined for each absorbate in each of the two brands of silica. It was clear that the relaxation times were modified by more than just the pore geometry. Independent experiments on the two brands of silica suggested that the relaxometry results were heavily influenced by the concentration of paramagnetic relaxation centres in the silica gels. The strength of surface interaction, and hence surface affinity, was seen to depend on the liquid in the pores. Using this difference in surface affinities, binary mixtures of alkanes placed in sol-gel silicas were separated via preferential absorption and their components identified using cryoporometry, whereas the components could not be distinguished in the bulk liquid.

  5. Spin-Exchange-Pumped NMR Gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. G.; Larsen, M. S.

    We present the basic theory governing spin-exchange pumped NMR gyros. We review the basic physics of spin-exchange collisions and relaxation as they pertain to precision NMR. We present a simple model of operation as an NMR oscillator and use it to analyze the dynamic response and noise properties of the oscillator. We discuss the primary systematic errors (differential alkali fields, quadrupole shifts, and offset drifts) that limit the bias stability, and discuss methods to minimize them. We give with a brief overview of a practical implementation and performance of an NMR gyro built by Northrop-Grumman Corporation, and conclude with some comments about future prospects.

  6. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  7. Solid-state NMR and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:25681966

  8. Inverse problem for in vivo NMR spatial localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenfeld, A.C.

    1985-11-01

    The basic physical problem of NMR spatial localization is considered. To study diseased sites, one must solve the problem of adequately localizing the NMR signal. We formulate this as an inverse problem. As the NMR Bloch equations determine the motion of nuclear spins in applied magnetic fields, a theoretical study is undertaken to answer the question of how to design magnetic field configurations to achieve these localized excited spin populations. Because of physical constraints in the production of the relevant radiofrequency fields, the problem factors into a temporal one and a spatial one. We formulate the temporal problem as a nonlinear transformation, called the Bloch Transform, from the rf input to the magnetization response. In trying to invert this transformation, both linear (for the Fourier Transform) and nonlinear (for the Bloch Transform) modes of radiofrequency excitation are constructed. The spatial problem is essentially a statics problem for the Maxwell equations of electromagnetism, as the wavelengths of the radiation considered are on the order of ten meters, and so propagation effects are negligible. In the general case, analytic solutions are unavailable, and so the methods of computer simulation are used to map the rf field spatial profiles. Numerical experiments are also performed to verify the theoretical analysis, and experimental confirmation of the theory is carried out on the 0.5 Tesla IBM/Oxford Imaging Spectrometer at the LBL NMR Medical Imaging Facility. While no explicit inverse is constructed to ''solve'' this problem, the combined theoretical/numerical analysis is validated experimentally, justifying the approximations made. 56 refs., 31 figs.

  9. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  10. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  11. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-01

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach. PMID:20681586

  12. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  13. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    DOEpatents

    Kraus, Robert H.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Espy, Michelle A.; Volegov, Petr L.

    2010-03-30

    An ultra-low magnetic field NMR system can non-invasively examine containers. Database matching techniques can then identify hazardous materials within the containers. Ultra-low field NMR systems are ideal for this purpose because they do not require large powerful magnets and because they can examine materials enclosed in conductive shells such as lead shells. The NMR examination technique can be combined with ultra-low field NMR imaging, where an NMR image is obtained and analyzed to identify target volumes. Spatial sensitivity encoding can also be used to identify target volumes. After the target volumes are identified the NMR measurement technique can be used to identify their contents.

  14. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  15. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  16. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  17. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  18. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  19. Large NMR signals and polarization asymmetries.

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S. I.

    1998-11-25

    A large modulation in the series Q-meter can lead to nonlinear NMR signals and asymmetric polarization values. With a careful circuit analysis the nonlinearity can be estimated and corrections to polarization can be determined as a function of the strength of the modulation. We describe the recent LAMPF polarized proton target experiment, its NMR measurement and corrections to the measured polarizations.

  20. A structural investigation of the alkali metal site distribution within bioactive glass using neutron diffraction and multinuclear solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Martin, Richard A; Twyman, Helen L; Rees, Gregory J; Smith, Jodie M; Barney, Emma R; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Newport, Robert J

    2012-09-21

    The atomic-scale structure of Bioglass and the effect of substituting lithium for sodium within these glasses have been investigated using neutron diffraction and solid state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Applying an effective isomorphic substitution difference function to the neutron diffraction data has enabled the Na-O and Li-O nearest-neighbour correlations to be isolated from the overlapping Ca-O, O-(P)-O and O-(Si)-O correlations. These results reveal that Na and Li behave in a similar manner within the glassy matrix and do not disrupt the short range order of the network former. Residual differences are attributed solely to the variation in ionic radius between the two species. Successful simplification of the 2 < r (Å) < 3 region via the difference method has enabled all the nearest neighbour correlations to be deconvolved. The diffraction data provides the first direct experimental evidence of split Na-O nearest-neighbour correlations in these melt quench bioactive glasses, and an analogous splitting of the Li-O correlations. The observed correlations are attributed to the metal ions bonded either to bridging or to non-bridging oxygen atoms. (23)Na triple quantum MAS (3QMAS) NMR data corroborates the split Na-O correlations. The structural sites present will be intimately related to the release properties of the glass system in physiological fluids such as plasma and saliva, and hence to the bioactivity of the material. Detailed structural knowledge is therefore a prerequisite for optimizing material design. PMID:22868255

  1. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches. PMID:22427982

  2. Two Phase Flow Measurements by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, Stephen A; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2006-08-14

    In concentrated suspensions, there is a tendency for the solid phase to migrate from regions of high shear rate to regions of low shear (Leighton & Acrivos, 1987). In the early years that our effort was funded by the DOE Division of Basic Energy Science, quantitative measurement of this process in neutrally buoyant suspensions was a major focus (Abbott, et al., 1991; Altobelli, et al., 1991). Much of this work was used to improve multi-phase numerical models at Sandia National Laboratories. Later, our collaborators at Sandia and the University of New Mexico incorporated body forces into their numerical models of suspension flow (Rao, Mondy, Sun, et al., 2002). We developed experiments that allow us to study flows driven by buoyancy, to characterize these flows in well-known and useful engineering terms (Altobelli and Mondy, 2002) and to begin to explore the less well-understood area of flows with multiple solid phases (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003). We also studied flows that combine the effects of shear and buoyancy, and flows of suspensions made from non-Newtonian liquids (Rao, Mondy, Baer, et al, 2002). We were able to demonstrate the usefulness of proton NMR imaging of liquid phase concentration and velocity and produced quantitative data not obtainable by other methods. Fluids flowing through porous solids are important in geophysics and in chemical processing. NMR techniques have been widely used to study liquid flow in porous media. We pioneered the extension of these studies to gas flows (Koptyug, et al, 2000, 2000, 2001, 2002). This extension allows us to investigate a wider range of Peclet numbers, and to gather data on problems of interest in catalysis. We devised two kinds of NMR experiments for three-phase systems. Both experiments employ two NMR visible phases and one phase that gives no NMR signal. The earlier method depends on the two visible phases differing in a NMR relaxation property. The second method (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003) uses two

  3. Probing Cancer Cell Metabolism Using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Kate E R; Williams, Debbie S; Tennant, Daniel A; Ludwig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is now accepted to be at the core of many diseases including cancer. Over the past 20 years, NMR has become a core technology to study these metabolic perturbations in detail. This chapter reviews current NMR-based methods for steady-state metabolism and, in particular, the use of non-radioactive stable isotope-enriched tracers. Opportunities and challenges for each method, such as 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy and (13)C carbon-based NMR spectroscopic methods, are discussed. Ultimately, the combination of NMR and mass spectra as orthogonal technologies are required to compensate for the drawbacks of each technique when used singly are discussed. PMID:27325263

  4. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    PubMed

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K. PMID:9650797

  5. Nanoscale Catalysts for NMR Signal Enhancement by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fan; Coffey, Aaron M.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Two types of nanoscale catalysts were created to explore NMR signal enhancement via reversible exchange (SABRE) at the interface between heterogeneous and homogeneous conditions. Nanoparticle and polymer comb variants were synthesized by covalently tethering Ir-based organometallic catalysts to support materials comprised of TiO2/PMAA (poly methacrylic acid) and PVP (polyvinyl pyridine), respectively, and characterized by AAS, NMR, and DLS. Following parahydrogen (pH2) gas delivery to mixtures containing one type of “nano-SABRE” catalyst particles, a target substrate, and ethanol, up to ~(−)40-fold and ~(−)7-fold 1H NMR signal enhancements were observed for pyridine substrates using the nanoparticle and polymer comb catalysts, respectively, following transfer to high field (9.4 T). These enhancements appear to result from intact particles and not from any catalyst molecules leaching from their supports; unlike the case with homogeneous SABRE catalysts, high-field (in situ) SABRE effects were generally not observed with the nanoscale catalysts. The potential for separation and reuse of such catalyst particles is also demonstrated. Taken together, these results support the potential utility of rational design at molecular, mesoscopic, and macroscopic/engineering levels for improving SABRE and HET-SABRE (heterogeneous-SABRE) for applications varying from fundamental studies of catalysis to biomedical imaging. PMID:26185545

  6. Advanced NMR approaches in the characterization of coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1993-09-30

    This project addressed two main goals and one much smaller one. The main goals were (1) to improve the significance, reliability and information content in high-resolution NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) characterization of coal samples and (2) to develop chemically informative NMR imaging techniques for coal. The minor goal was to explore advanced features of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) as a technique for coal characterization; this included the development of two DNP probes and the examination of DNP characteristics of various carbonaceous samples, including coals. {sup 13}C NMR advances for coal depended on large-sample MAS devices, employing either cross-polarization (CP) or direct polarization (DP) approaches. CP and DP spin dynamics and their relationships to quantitation and spin counting were elucidated. {sup 1}H NMR studies, based on CRAMPS, dipolar dephasing and saturation with perdeuteropyridine, led to a {sup 1}H NMR-based elucidation of chemical functionality in coal. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR imaging techniques, based on magic-angle spinning and rotating magnetic field gradients, were developed for introducing chemical shift information (hence, chemical detail) into the spatial imaging of coal. The TREV multiple-pulse sequence was found to be useful in the {sup 1}H CRAMPS imaging of samples like coal.

  7. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    Nanoscience is an emerging field that can provide potential routes towards addressing critical issues such as clean and sustainable energy, environmental remediation and human health. Specifically, porous nanomaterials, such as zeolites and mesoporous silica, are found in a wide range of applications including catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, environmental protection, and sensing. The characterization of the physical and chemical properties of nanocrystalline materials is essential to the realization of these innovative applications. The great advantage of porous nanocrystals is their increased external surface area that can control their biological, chemical and catalytic activities. Specific functional groups synthesized on the surface of nanoparticles are able to absorb heavy metals from the solution or target disease cells, such as cancer cells. In these studies, three main issues related to functionalized nanomaterials will be addressed through the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques including: 1) surface composition and structure of functionalized nanocrystalline particles; 2) chemical properties of the guest molecules on the surface of nanomaterials, and 3) adsorption and reactivity of surface bound functional groups. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the major spectroscopic techniques available for the characterization of molecular structure and conformational dynamics with atomic level detail. This thesis deals with the application of 1H solution state NMR to porous nanomaterial in an aqueous environment. Understanding the aqueous phase behavior of functionalized nanomaterials is a key factor in the design and development of safe nanomaterials because their interactions with living systems are always mediated through the aqueous phase. This is often due to a lack of fundamental knowledge in interfacial chemical and physical phenomena that occur on the surface of nanoparticles. The use of solution NMR spectroscopy results

  8. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  9. NMR solution structure of butantoxin.

    PubMed

    Holaday, S K; Martin, B M; Fletcher, P L; Krishna, N R

    2000-07-01

    The NMR structure of a new toxin, butantoxin (BuTX), which is present in the venoms of the three Brazilian scorpions Tityus serrulatus, Tityus bahiensis, and Tityus stigmurus, has been investigated. This toxin was shown to reversibly block the Shaker B potassium channels (K(d) approximately 660 nM) and inhibit the proliferation of T-cells and the interleukin-2 production of antigen-stimulated T-helper cells. BuTX is a 40 amino acid basic protein stabilized by the four disulfide bridges: Cys2-Cys5, Cys10-Cys31, Cys16-Cys36, and Cys20-Cys38. The latter three are conserved among all members of the short-chain scorpion toxin family, while the first is unique to BuTX. The three-dimensional structure of BuTX was determined using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. NOESY, phase sensitive COSY (PH-COSY), and amide hydrogen exchange data were used to generate constraints for molecular modeling calculations. Distance geometry and simulated annealing calculations were performed to generate a family of 49 structures free of constraint violations. The secondary structure of BuTX consists of a short 2(1/2) turn alpha-helix (Glu15-Phe23) and a beta-sheet. The beta-sheet is composed of two well-defined antiparallel strands (Gly29-Met32 and Lys35-Cys38) connected by a type-I' beta-turn (Asn33-Asn34). Residues Cys5-Ala9 form a quasi-third strand of the beta-sheet. The N-terminal C2-C5 disulfide bridge unique to this toxin does not appear to confer stability to the protein. PMID:10864437

  10. NMR relaxometry measurements of Fricke gel dosimeters exposed to neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Brai, Maria; Longo, Anna; Gallo, Salvatore; Tomarchio, Elio; Tranchina, Luigi; Gagliardo, Cesare; D'Errico, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Fricke infused gel matrices offer several features making them suitable for dosimetric applications; among these there are tissue equivalence, low cost and ease of preparation. Their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties can be used as a radiation detector for the dosimetry of beams used in cancer therapy. In recent years neutron capture therapy has been resumed for the treatment of various types of cancer and it requires three-dimensional mapping of the neutron fields. In this work, we investigated this particular application through NMR relaxometry and MR imaging of Fricke gels exposed to neutrons. We analyzed both the R1 and R2 relaxation rates, which relate to the longitudinal T1 and transversal T2 relaxation times. In particular, we found that the relaxation rate R2 does not depend on the neutron fluence, whereas the relaxation rate R1 increases linearly with the fluence. The magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions showed that T1-weighted images allow the characterization of samples exposed to different neutron fluences.

  11. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    Bioactive materials such as BioglassRTM 45S5 (45% SiO 2, 24.5% CaO, 24.5% Na2O, and 6% P2O5 by weight) are sodium-phosphosilicate glasses containing independent three-dimensional silicate and phosphate networks and Na+ and Ca2+ ions as modifying cations. Due to their bioactivity, these materials are currently used as implants and for other surgical and clinical applications. The bioactivity of BioglassesRTM is due to their unique capability to form chemical bonds to tissues through an octacalciumphosphate (OCP)- and/or hydroxyapatite-like (HA) "interfacial" matrix. The formation of OCP and/or HA is preceded by the formation of a silica-rich surface layer and the subsequent growth of an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CP) layer. Structural characterization of a series of commercial and synthesized Bioglass materials 45S5 52S, 55S, 60S, and synthesized 17O-labelled "Bioglass materials 45S, 52S, 55S and 60S" have been obtained using solid-state single-pulse magic-angle spinning (SP/MAS) 17O, 23Na, 29Si and 31P NMR. The 17O NMR isotropic chemical shifts and estimates of the quadrupole coupling constants (Cq) [at fixed asymmetry parameter ( hQ ) values of zero] have been obtained from solid-state spin-echo 17O SP/MAS NMR spectra of 17O-labelled "Bioglasses". The simulation results of these spectra reveal the presence of both bridging-oxygens (BO, i.e. ≡ Si-17OSi ≡ ) and non-bridging oxygens (NBO, i.e. ≡ Si-17O-Na+/Ca2+ ) in the silicate networks in these materials. 17O NMR spectra of these Bioglass materials do not show any direct evidence for the presence of BO and NBO atoms in the phosphate units; however, they are expected to be present in small amounts. In vitro reactions of BioglassRTM 45S5, 60S and 77S powders have been used to study the "interfacial" surface chemistry of these materials in simulated body-fluid (SBF, Kyoto or K9 solution) and/or 17O-enriched tris-buffer solution. 29Si and 31P SP/MAS NMR have been used to identify and quantify the extent of

  12. Macroscopic orientation effects in broadline NMR-spectra of model membranes at high magnetic field strength

    PubMed Central

    Brumm, T.; Möps, A.; Dolainsky, C.; Brückner, S.; Bayerl, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The partial orientation of multilamellar vesicles (MLV) in high magnetic fields has been studied and a method to prevent such effects is herewith proposed. The orientation effect was measured with 2H-, 31P-NMR and electron microscopy on MLVs of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine with 30 mol% cholesterol. We present the first freeze—etch electron microscopy data obtained from MLV samples that were frozen directly in the NMR magnet at a field strength of 9.4 Tesla. These experiments clearly show that the MLVs adopt an ellipsoidal (but not a cylindrical) shape in the magnetic field. Best fit 31P-NMR lineshape calculations assuming an ellipsoidal distribution of molecular director axes to the experimentally obtained spectra provide a quantitative measure of the average semiaxis ratio of the ellipsoidal MLVs and its change with temperature. The application of so-called spherical supported vesicles (SSV) is found to prevent any partial orientation effects so that undistorted NMR powder pattern of the bilayer can be measured independently of magnetic field strength and temperature. The usefulness of SSVs is further demonstrated by a direct comparison of spectral data such as 31P-and 2H-NMR lineshapes and relaxation times as well as 2H-NMR dePaked spectra obtained for both model systems. These experiments show that spectral data obtained from partially oriented MLVs are not unambiguous to interpret, in particular, if an external parameter such as temperature is varied. ImagesFIGURE 1 PMID:19431822

  13. New applications and perspectives of fast field cycling NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Steele, Rebecca M; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Ferrante, Gianni; Bubici, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    The field cycling NMR relaxometry method (also known as fast field cycling (FFC) when instruments employing fast electrical switching of the magnetic field are used) allows determination of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 ) continuously over five decades of Larmor frequency. The method can be exploited to observe the T1 frequency dependence of protons, as well as any other NMR-sensitive nuclei, such as (2) H, (13) C, (31) P, and (19) F in a wide range of substances and materials. The information obtained is directly correlated with the physical/chemical properties of the compound and can be represented as a 'nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion' curve. We present some recent academic and industrial applications showing the relevance of exploiting FFC NMR relaxometry in complex materials to study the molecular dynamics or, simply, for fingerprinting or quality control purposes. The basic nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion features are outlined in representative examples of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, porous media, proteins, and food stuffs. We will focus on the new directions and perspectives for the FFC technique. For instance, the introduction of the latest Wide Bore FFC NMR relaxometers allows probing, for the first time, of the dynamics of confined surface water contained in the macro-pores of carbonate rock cores. We also evidence the use of the latest field cycling technology with a new cryogen-free variable-field electromagnet, which enhances the range of available frequencies in the 2D T1 -T2 correlation spectrum for separating oil and water in crude oil. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25855084

  14. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  15. Producing >60,000-fold room-temperature 89Y NMR signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumata, Lloyd; Jindal, Ashish; Merritt, Matthew; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, A. Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    89 Y in chelated form is potentially valuable in medical imaging because its chemical shift is sensitive to local factors in tumors such as pH. However, 89 Y has a low gyromagnetic ratio γn thus its NMR signal is hampered by low thermal polarization. Here we show that we can enhance the room-temperature NMR signal of 89 Y up to 65,000 times the thermal signal, which corresponds to 10 % nuclear polarization, via fast dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The relatively long spin-lattice relaxation time T1 (~ 500 s) of 89 Y translates to a long polarization lifetime. The 89 Y NMR enhancement is optimized by varying the glassing matrices and paramagnetic agents as well as doping the samples with a gadolinium relaxation agent. Co-polarization of 89 Y-DOTA with a 13 C sample shows that both nuclear spin species acquire the same spin temperature Ts , consistent with thermal mixing mechanism of DNP. The high room-temperature NMR signal enhancement places 89 Y, one of the most challenging nuclei to detect by NMR, in the list of viable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents when hyperpolarized under optimized conditions. This work is supported in part by the National Institutes of Health grant numbers 1R21EB009147-01 and RR02584.

  16. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  17. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  18. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Wong, G P; Hoffmann, D; Hurlimann, M D; Patz, S; Schwartz, L M; Walsworth, R L

    1999-10-18

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks. PMID:11543587

  19. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Suiter, Christopher L; Quinn, Caitlin M; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates. PMID:25797001

  20. On electrophoretic NMR. Exploring high conductivity samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielejewski, Michał; Giesecke, Marianne; Furó, István

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a new electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) method that uses a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train with repeated electric field reversal is investigated. We show that this pulse sequence, with acronym CPMGER, yields strongly reduced artifacts from convective flow effects caused by the simultaneous presence of electroosmotic and thermal driving forces. We demonstrate the achieved improvements in various aqueous solutions. Ultimately, the method can be used for obtaining electrophoretic mobilities by eNMR without relying on uncharged reference molecules, otherwise a significant limitation for electrophoretic experiments performed with nuclei other than 1H.

  1. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Wong, G. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Schwartz, L. M.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks.

  2. NMR data handbook for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, P.T.; Amtey, S.R.; Kasturi, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The text is divided into 10 chapters, each of which covers a specific block of material and has its own references. The volume is meant to serve as a laboratory handbook and a desk reference, containing basic NMR theory, useful formulae and physical constants, and compiled data from the NMR literature. The volume attempts to cover the development of biological NMR through several decades of in vitro experiments that have laid the groundwork for and pointed to profitable areas of investigation for new in vivo techniques.

  3. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  4. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  5. Epitope mapping by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, M; Livoti, E; Simonelli, L; Pedotti, M; Moraes, A; Valente, A P; Varani, L

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies play an ever more prominent role in basic research as well as in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors. Characterizing their epitopes, that is, the region that they recognize on their target molecule, is useful for purposes ranging from molecular biology research to vaccine design and intellectual property protection. Solution NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited to the atomic level characterization of intermolecular interfaces and, as a consequence, to epitope discovery. Here, we illustrate how NMR epitope mapping can be used to rapidly and accurately determine protein antigen epitopes. The basic concept is that differences in the NMR signal of an antigen free or bound by an antibody will identify epitope residues. NMR epitope mapping provides more detailed information than mutagenesis or peptide mapping and can be much more rapid than X-ray crystallography. Advantages and drawbacks of this technique are discussed together with practical considerations. PMID:25726811

  6. Quantitative analysis of NMR spectra with chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winning, H.; Larsen, F. H.; Bro, R.; Engelsen, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    The number of applications of chemometrics to series of NMR spectra is rapidly increasing due to an emerging interest for quantitative NMR spectroscopy e.g. in the pharmaceutical and food industries. This paper gives an analysis of advantages and limitations of applying the two most common chemometric procedures, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR), to a designed set of 231 simple alcohol mixture (propanol, butanol and pentanol) 1H 400 MHz spectra. The study clearly demonstrates that the major advantage of chemometrics is the visualisation of larger data structures which adds a new exploratory dimension to NMR research. While robustness and powerful data visualisation and exploration are the main qualities of the PCA method, the study demonstrates that the bilinear MCR method is an even more powerful method for resolving pure component NMR spectra from mixtures when certain conditions are met.

  7. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  8. NMR and optical studies of piezoelectric polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, V.H.; Tuthill, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported in several areas dealing with piezoelectric (electroactive) polymers (mostly vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene, copolymers, PVF[sub 2]) and liquid crystals. Optical studies, neutron scattering, NMR, thermal, theory and modeling were done.

  9. NMR-Assisted Molecular Docking Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Sturlese, Mattia; Bellanda, Massimo; Moro, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular docking are regularly being employed as helpful tools of drug discovery research. Molecular docking is an extremely rapid method to evaluate possible binders from a large chemical library in a fast and cheap manner. NMR techniques can directly detect a protein-ligand interaction, can determine the corresponding association constant, and can consistently identify the ligand binding cavity. Consequently, molecular docking and NMR techniques are naturally complementary techniques where the combination of the two has the potential to improve the overall efficiency of drug discovery process. In this review, we would like to summarize the state of the art of docking methods which have been recently bridged to NMR experiments to identify novel and effective therapeutic drug candidates. PMID:27490497

  10. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  11. Modern NMR spectroscopy: a guide for chemists

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, J.K.M.; Hunter, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the authors of Modern NMR Spectroscopy is to bridge the communication gap between the chemist and the spectroscopist. The approach is nonmathematical, descriptive, and pictorial. To illustrate the ideas introduced in the text, the authors provide original spectra obtained specially for this purpose. Examples include spectroscopy of protons, carbon, and less receptive nuclei of interest to inorganic chemists. The authors succeed in making high-resolution NMR spectroscopy comprehensible for the average student or chemist.

  12. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  13. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  14. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  15. Integrated microchip incorporating atomic magnetometer and microfluidic channel for NMR and MRI

    DOEpatents

    Ledbetter, Micah P.; Savukov, Igor M.; Budker, Dmitry; Shah, Vishal K.; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Michalak, David J.; Xu, Shoujun; Pines, Alexander

    2011-08-09

    An integral microfluidic device includes an alkali vapor cell and microfluidic channel, which can be used to detect magnetism for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Small magnetic fields in the vicinity of the vapor cell can be measured by optically polarizing and probing the spin precession in the small magnetic field. This can then be used to detect the magnetic field of in encoded analyte in the adjacent microfluidic channel. The magnetism in the microfluidic channel can be modulated by applying an appropriate series of radio or audio frequency pulses upstream from the microfluidic chip (the remote detection modality) to yield a sensitive means of detecting NMR and MRI.

  16. Apparatus for preparing a solution of a hyperpolarized noble gas for NMR and MRI analysis

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-06-10

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  17. Enhancement of NMR and MRI in the presence of hyperpolarized noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2004-11-16

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  18. NMR-based metabolomics of prostate cancer: a protagonist in clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Gupta, Ashish; Nath, Kavindra

    2016-06-01

    Advances in the application of NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomic profiling of prostate cancer comprises a potential tactic for understanding the impaired biochemical pathways arising due to a disease evolvement and progression. This technique involves qualitative and quantitative estimation of plethora of small molecular weight metabolites of body fluids or tissues using state-of-the-art chemometric methods delivering an important platform for translational research from basic to clinical, to reveal the pathophysiological snapshot in a single step. This review summarizes the present arrays and recent advancements in NMR-based metabolomics and a glimpse of currently used medical imaging tactics, with their role in clinical diagnosis of prostate cancer. PMID:26959614

  19. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in a single scan.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-11-01

    Multidimensional NMR has become one of the most widespread spectroscopic tools available to study diverse structural and functional aspects of organic and biomolecules. A main feature of multidimensional NMR is the relatively long acquisition times that these experiments demand. For decades, scientists have been working on a variety of alternatives that would enable NMR to overcome this limitation, and deliver its data in shorter acquisition times. Counting among these methodologies is the so-called ultrafast (UF) NMR approach, which in principle allows one to collect arbitrary multidimensional correlations in a single sub-second transient. By contrast to conventional acquisitions, a main feature of UF NMR is a spatiotemporal manipulation of the spins that imprints the chemical shift and/or J-coupling evolutions being sought, into a spatial pattern. Subsequent gradient-based manipulations enable the reading out of this information and its multidimensional correlation into patterns that are identical to those afforded by conventional techniques. The current review focuses on the fundamental principles of this spatiotemporal UF NMR manipulation, and on a few of the methodological extensions that this form of spectroscopy has undergone during the years. PMID:26249041

  20. Noise properties of a NMR transceiver coil array.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Robert G; Barberi, Enzo A; Menon, Ravi S

    2004-11-01

    The use of multiple radiofrequency (RF) surface coil elements has applications in both fast parallel imaging and conventional imaging techniques. Through implementation of a simple magnetic decoupling network, 50 Omega matching can be achieved in both the transmitter and receiver chains, enabling the use of conventional RF power amplifiers and preamplifiers for transceive applications. Unlike phased array coil arrangements using low impedance preamplifiers for decoupling, the noise correlation between 50 Omega coils decoupled with discrete components has not been characterized. We have measured the dependence of coil quality factor (Q-factor) and noise correlation on coil separation and shown these quantities to be consistent with theoretical arguments, at least at 4 T (170 MHz). Our results suggest that a coil system for transmission and reception of NMR signals with 50 Omega coils can be built to take advantage of all the benefits of conventional array coils and with the added advantages of using conventional amplifiers. PMID:15504694

  1. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  2. Sensitivity of nonuniform sampling NMR.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Melissa R; Suiter, Christopher L; Henry, Geneive E; Rovnyak, James; Hoch, Jeffrey C; Polenova, Tatyana; Rovnyak, David

    2015-06-01

    Many information-rich multidimensional experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can benefit from a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement of up to about 2-fold if a decaying signal in an indirect dimension is sampled with nonconsecutive increments, termed nonuniform sampling (NUS). This work provides formal theoretical results and applications to resolve major questions about the scope of the NUS enhancement. First, we introduce the NUS Sensitivity Theorem in which any decreasing sampling density applied to any exponentially decaying signal always results in higher sensitivity (SNR per square root of measurement time) than uniform sampling (US). Several cases will illustrate this theorem and show that even conservative applications of NUS improve sensitivity by useful amounts. Next, we turn to a serious limitation of uniform sampling: the SNR by US decreases for extending evolution times, and thus total experimental times, beyond 1.26T2 (T2 = signal decay constant). Thus, SNR and resolution cannot be simultaneously improved by extending US beyond 1.26T2. We find that NUS can eliminate this constraint, and we introduce the matched NUS SNR Theorem: an exponential sampling density matched to the signal decay always improves the SNR with additional evolution time. Though proved for a specific case, broader classes of NUS densities also improve SNR with evolution time. Applications of these theoretical results are given for a soluble plant natural product and a solid tripeptide (u-(13)C,(15)N-MLF). These formal results clearly demonstrate the inadequacies of applying US to decaying signals in indirect nD-NMR dimensions, supporting a broader adoption of NUS. PMID:25901905

  3. SCAM-STMAS: satellite-transition MAS NMR of quadrupolar nuclei with self-compensation for magic-angle misset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Wimperis, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    Several methods are available for the acquisition of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei with half-integer spin quantum number. Satellite-transition MAS (STMAS) offers an approach that employs only conventional MAS hardware and can yield substantial signal enhancements over the widely used multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) experiment. However, the presence of the first-order quadrupolar interaction in the satellite transitions imposes the requirement of a high degree of accuracy in the setting of the magic angle on the NMR probehead. The first-order quadrupolar interaction is only fully removed if the sample spinning angle, χ, equals cos-1(1/ 3) exactly and rotor synchronization is performed. The required level of accuracy is difficult to achieve experimentally, particularly when the quadrupolar interaction is large. If the magic angle is not set correctly, the first-order splitting is reintroduced and the spectral resolution is severely compromised. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel STMAS method (SCAM-STMAS) that is self-compensated for angle missets of up to ±1° via coherence transfer between the two different satellite transitions ST +( mI=+3/2↔+1/2) and ST -( mI=-1/2↔-3/2) midway through the t1 period. In this work we describe in more detail the implementation of SCAM-STMAS and demonstrate its wider utility through 23Na ( I=3/2), 87Rb ( I=3/2), 27Al ( I=5/2), and 59Co ( I=7/2) NMR. We discuss linewidths in SCAM-STMAS and the limits over which angle-misset compensation is achieved and we demonstrate that SCAM-STMAS is more tolerant of temporary spinning rate fluctuations than STMAS, resulting in less " t1 noise" in the two-dimensional spectrum. In addition, alternative correlation experiments, for example involving the use of double-quantum coherences, that similarly display self-compensation for angle misset are investigated. The use of SCAM-STMAS is also considered in systems where other high-order interactions, such as third

  4. Optical hyperpolarization and NMR detection of 129Xe on a microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Kennedy, Daniel J.; Rosenbluh, Michael; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Knappe, Svenja; Seltzer, Scott J.; Ring, Hattie L.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Kitching, John

    2014-05-01

    Optically hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has become a powerful contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging, with applications ranging from studies of the human lung to the targeted detection of biomolecules. Equally attractive is its potential use to enhance the sensitivity of microfluidic NMR experiments, in which small sample volumes yield poor sensitivity. Unfortunately, most 129Xe polarization systems are large and non-portable. Here we present a microfabricated chip that optically polarizes 129Xe gas. We have achieved 129Xe polarizations >0.5% at flow rates of several microlitres per second, compatible with typical microfluidic applications. We employ in situ optical magnetometry to sensitively detect and characterize the 129Xe polarization at magnetic fields of 1 μT. We construct the device using standard microfabrication techniques, which will facilitate its integration with existing microfluidic platforms. This device may enable the implementation of highly sensitive 129Xe NMR in compact, low-cost, portable devices.

  5. Preparation of isotopically labeled ribonucleotides for multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Batey, R T; Inada, M; Kujawinski, E; Puglisi, J D; Williamson, J R

    1992-01-01

    A general method for large scale preparation of uniformly isotopically labeled ribonucleotides and RNAs is described. Bacteria are grown on isotopic growth medium, and their nucleic acids are harvested and degraded to mononucleotides. These are enzymatically converted into ribonucleoside triphosphates, which are used in transcription reactions in vitro to prepare RNAs for NMR studies. For 15N-labeling, E.coli is grown on 15N-ammonium sulfate, whereas for 13C-labeling, Methylophilus methylotrophus is grown on 13C-methanol, which is more economical than 13C-glucose. To demonstrate the feasibility and utility of this method, uniformly 13C-labeled ribonucleotides were used to synthesize a 31 nucleotide HIV TAR RNA that was analyzed by 3D-NMR. This method should find widespread use in the structural analysis of RNA by NMR. Images PMID:1383928

  6. Portable, low-cost NMR with laser-lathe lithography produced microcoils.

    PubMed

    Demas, Vasiliki; Herberg, Julie L; Malba, Vince; Bernhardt, Anthony; Evans, Lee; Harvey, Christopher; Chinn, Sarah C; Maxwell, Robert S; Reimer, Jeffrey

    2007-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is unsurpassed in its ability to non-destructively probe chemical identity. Portable, low-cost NMR sensors would enable on-site identification of potentially hazardous substances, as well as the study of samples in a variety of industrial applications. Recent developments in RF microcoil construction (i.e. coils much smaller than the standard 5mm NMR RF coils), have dramatically increased NMR sensitivity and decreased the limits-of-detection (LOD). We are using advances in laser pantographic microfabrication techniques, unique to LLNL, to produce RF microcoils for field deployable, high sensitivity NMR-based detectors. This same fabrication technique can be used to produce imaging coils for MRI as well as for standard hardware shimming or "ex-situ" shimming of field inhomogeneities typically associated with inexpensive magnets. This paper describes a portable NMR system based on the use of a 2 kg hand-held permanent magnet, laser-fabricated microcoils, and a compact spectrometer. The main limitations for such a system are the low resolution and sensitivity associated with the low field values and quality of small permanent magnets, as well as the lack of large amounts of sample of interest in most cases. The focus of the paper is on the setting up of this system, initial results, sensitivity measurements, discussion of the limitations and future plans. The results, even though preliminary, are promising and provide the foundation for developing a portable, inexpensive NMR system for chemical analysis. Such a system will be ideal for chemical identification of trace substances on site. PMID:17897853

  7. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  8. AEM and NMR: Tools for the Future of Groundwater Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. D.; Cannia, J. C.; Lawrie, K.

    2012-12-01

    nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen (protons) in the water. These measurements are the basis of the familiar MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in medical applications. NMR is also widely used in logging applications within the petroleum industry. Effective porosity values were derived directly from the borehole and surface NMR data, and hydraulic conductivity values were calculated using empirical relationships calibrated and verified with few laboratory permeameter and aquifer tests. NMR provides measurements of the effective porosity and hydraulic conductivity at a resolution not possible using traditional methods. Unlike aquifer tests, NMR logs are not unique in design and are applied in similar fashion from borehole to borehole providing a standard way of measuring hydraulic properties. When the hydraulic properties from the NMR are integrated with hydrogeological framework interpretations of AEM data large areas can be characterized. This allows a much more robust method for conceptualizing groundwater models then simply using previously published data for assigning effective porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Examples from the North Platte River Basin in Nebraska and the Murray Darling Basin of Australia illustrate that borehole and surface NMR allows superior, rapid measurements of the complexities of aquifers within when integrated with AEM.

  9. Theoretical NMR correlations based Structure Discussion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The actual difficulty of the structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. The moment HMBC data is involved in the process or a large number of heteroatoms is present, a possibility of multiple solutions fitting the same data set exists. A structure elucidation software can be used to find such alternative constitutional assignments and help in the discussion in order to find the correct solution. But this is rarely done. This article describes the use of theoretical NMR correlation data in the structure elucidation process with WEBCOCON, not for the initial constitutional assignments, but to define how well a suggested molecule could have been described by NMR correlation data. The results of this analysis can be used to decide on further steps needed to assure the correctness of the structural assignment. As first step the analysis of the deviation of carbon chemical shifts is performed, comparing chemical shifts predicted for each possible solution with the experimental data. The application of this technique to three well known compounds is shown. Using NMR correlation data alone for the description of the constitutions is not always enough, even when including 13C chemical shift prediction. PMID:21797997

  10. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice. PMID:9923697

  11. SPECTRAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR GRAIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three spectral imaging techniques were employed for the purpose of assessing the quality of cereal grains. Each of these techniques provided unique, yet complementary, information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), also called magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was used to detect mobile components ...

  12. Wide-line NMR and protein hydration.

    PubMed

    Tompa, K; Bokor, M; Tompa, P

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the reader is introduced to the basics of wide-line NMR, with particular focus on the following: (1) basic theoretical and experimental NMR elements, necessary before switching the spectrometer and designing the experiment, (2) models/theories for the interpretation of measured data, (3) definition of wide-line NMR spectrometry, the description of the measurement and evaluation variants, useful hints for the novice, (4) advice on selecting the solvent, which is not a trivial task, (5) a note of warning that not all data are acceptable in spite of the statistical confidence. Finally, we wrap up the chapter with the results on two proteins (a globular and an intrinsically disordered). PMID:22760320

  13. Remote tuning of NMR probe circuits.

    PubMed

    Kodibagkar, V D; Conradi, M S

    2000-05-01

    There are many circumstances in which the probe tuning adjustments cannot be located near the rf NMR coil. These may occur in high-temperature NMR, low-temperature NMR, and in the use of magnets with small diameter access bores. We address here circuitry for connecting a fixed-tuned probe circuit by a transmission line to a remotely located tuning network. In particular, the bandwidth over which the probe may be remotely tuned while keeping the losses in the transmission line acceptably low is considered. The results show that for all resonant circuit geometries (series, parallel, series-parallel), overcoupling of the line to the tuned circuit is key to obtaining a large tuning bandwidth. At equivalent extents of overcoupling, all resonant circuit geometries have nearly equal remote tuning bandwidths. Particularly for the case of low-loss transmission line, the tuning bandwidth can be many times the tuned circuit's bandwidth, f(o)/Q. PMID:10783273

  14. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Adhikari, Sushil; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterizationmore » and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.« less

  15. A modularized pulse programmer for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenping; Bao, Qingjia; Yang, Liang; Chen, Yiqun; Liu, Chaoyang; Qiu, Jianqing; Ye, Chaohui

    2011-02-01

    A modularized pulse programmer for a NMR spectrometer is described. It consists of a networked PCI-104 single-board computer and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The PCI-104 is dedicated to translate the pulse sequence elements from the host computer into 48-bit binary words and download these words to the FPGA, while the FPGA functions as a sequencer to execute these binary words. High-resolution NMR spectra obtained on a home-built spectrometer with four pulse programmers working concurrently demonstrate the effectiveness of the pulse programmer. Advantages of the module include (1) once designed it can be duplicated and used to construct a scalable NMR/MRI system with multiple transmitter and receiver channels, (2) it is a totally programmable system in which all specific applications are determined by software, and (3) it provides enough reserve for possible new pulse sequences.

  16. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  17. NMR experiments on a three-dimensional vibrofluidized granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Chao; Yang, Xiaoyu; Candela, D.; Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2004-04-01

    A three-dimensional granular system fluidized by vertical container vibrations was studied using pulsed field gradient NMR coupled with one-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. The system consisted of mustard seeds vibrated vertically at 50 Hz, and the number of layers Nl⩽4 was sufficiently low to achieve a nearly time-independent granular fluid. Using NMR, the vertical profiles of density and granular temperature were directly measured, along with the distributions of vertical and horizontal grain velocities. The velocity distributions showed modest deviations from Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, except for the vertical velocity distribution near the sample bottom, which was highly skewed and non-Gaussian. Data taken for three values of Nl and two dimensionless accelerations Γ=15,18 were fitted to a hydrodynamic theory, which successfully models the density and temperature profiles away from the vibrating container bottom. A temperature inversion near the free upper surface is observed, in agreement with predictions based on the hydrodynamic parameter μ which is nonzero only in inelastic systems.

  18. Paramagnetic relaxation of long-lived coherences in solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Maninder; Srinivas, Chinthalapalli; Deb, Mayukh; Kurur, Narayanan D

    2013-12-01

    Long-lived coherences (LLCs) are known to have lifetimes much longer than transverse magnetization or single quantum coherences (SQCs). The effect of paramagnetic ions on the relaxation of LLCs is not known. This is particularly important, as LLCs have potential applications in various fields like analytical NMR, in vivo NMR and MR imaging methods. We study here the behaviour of LLCs in the presence of paramagnetic relaxation agents. The stepwise increase in the concentration of the metal ion is followed by measuring various relaxation rates. The effect of paramagnetic ions is analysed in terms of the external random field's contribution to the relaxation of two coupled protons in 2,3,6-trichlorobenzaldehyde. The LLCs relax faster than ordinary SQCs in the presence of paramagnetic ions of varying character. This is explained on the basis of an increase in the contribution of the external random field to relaxation due to a paramagnetic relaxation mechanism. Comparison is also made with ordinary Zeeman relaxation rates like R1, R2, R1ρ and also with rate of relaxation of long-lived states RLLS which are known to be less sensitive to paramagnetically induced relaxation. Also, the extent of correlation of random fields at two proton sites is studied and is found to be strongly correlated with each other. The obtained correlation constant is found to be independent of the nature of added paramagnetic impurities. PMID:24151221

  19. An optical NMR spectrometer for Larmor-beat detection and high-resolution POWER NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, J. G.; Marohn, J. A.; Carson, P. J.; Shykind, D. A.; Hwang, J. Y.; Miller, M. A.; Weitekamp, D. P.

    2008-06-01

    Optical nuclear magnetic resonance (ONMR) is a powerful probe of electronic properties in III-V semiconductors. Larmor-beat detection (LBD) is a sensitivity optimized, time-domain NMR version of optical detection based on the Hanle effect. Combining LBD ONMR with the line-narrowing method of POWER (perturbations observed with enhanced resolution) NMR further enables atomically detailed views of local electronic features in III-Vs. POWER NMR spectra display the distribution of resonance shifts or line splittings introduced by a perturbation, such as optical excitation or application of an electric field, that is synchronized with a NMR multiple-pulse time-suspension sequence. Meanwhile, ONMR provides the requisite sensitivity and spatial selectivity to isolate local signals within macroscopic samples. Optical NMR, LBD, and the POWER method each introduce unique demands on instrumentation. Here, we detail the design and implementation of our system, including cryogenic, optical, and radio-frequency components. The result is a flexible, low-cost system with important applications in semiconductor electronics and spin physics. We also demonstrate the performance of our systems with high-resolution ONMR spectra of an epitaxial AlGaAs /GaAs heterojunction. NMR linewidths down to 4.1Hz full width at half maximum were obtained, a 103-fold resolution enhancement relative any previous optically detected NMR experiment.

  20. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  1. 14 N NMR of tetrapropylammonium based crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, E.; Mineva, T.; Gaveau, P.; Alonso, B.

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated using 14N NMR different types of materials containing tetrapropylammonium cations. We consider the tetrapropylammonium bromide crystal as well as two different microporous materials silicalite-1 and AlPO-5, with MFI and AFI topology respectively, where the tetrapropylammonium cation plays the role of structure directing agent. 14N NMR quadrupolar coupling parameters were determined experimentally for all the crystals. In addition calculations based on Density Functional Theory with empirical dispersion (DFT-D) were performed on the MFI type zeolite. The sensitivity of the 14N quadrupolar coupling parameters to the spatial distribution of the anions in the zeolite's framework is emphasized.

  2. 1H NMR relaxation in urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Bacher, Alfred D.; Dybowski, C.

    2007-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times T1 were measured for urea as a function of temperature. An activation energy of 46.3 ± 4.7 kJ/mol was extracted and compared with the range of 38-65 kJ/mol previously reported in the literature as measured by different magnetic resonance techniques. In addition, proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame T1 ρ were measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide acquisition conditions for the 13C and 15N CP/MAS spectra of pure urea in the crystalline phase.

  3. Tritiation methods and tritium NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, D.K.; Morimoto, H.; Salijoughian, M.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-09-01

    We have used a simple process for the production of highly tritiated water and characterized the product species by {sup 1}H and {sup 3}H NMR spectroscopy. The water is readily manipulated and used in subsequent reactions either as T{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}COOT or CF{sub 3}COOT. Development of tritiated diimide has progressed to the point where cis-hydrogenated products at 1-20 Ci/mmole S.A. are possible. Tri-n-butyl tin tritide has been produced at >95% tritium content and well characterized by multinuclear NMR techniques. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  4. NMR investigation of the quantum pigeonhole effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. S., Anjusha; Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    NMR quantum simulators have been used for studying various quantum phenomena. Here, using a four-qubit NMR quantum simulator, we investigate the recently postulated quantum pigeonhole effect. In this phenomenon, a set of three particles in a two-path interferometer often appears to be in such a superposition that no two particles can be assigned a single path, thus exhibiting the nonclassical behavior. In our experiments, quantum pigeons are emulated by three nuclear qubits whose states are probed jointly and noninvasively by an ancillary spin. The experimental results are in good agreement with quantum theoretical predictions.

  5. Magic Angle Spinning NMR of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Caitlin; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L.; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  6. Sensitive detection of NMR for thin films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soonchil

    2015-10-01

    NMR can provide valuable information about thin films, but its relatively low sensitivity allows data acquisition only from bulk samples. The sensitivity problem is circumvented by detection schemes with higher sensitivity and/or enhanced polarization. In most of these ingenious techniques, electrons play a central role through hyperfine interactions with the nuclei of interest or the conversion of the spin orientation to an electric charge. The state of the art in NMR is the control of a single nuclear spin state, the complete form of which is one of the ultimate goals of nanotechnology. PMID:26549846

  7. The Quiet Renaissance of Protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Paul J.; Chen, Jiang; Cho, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Hun; Lu, Zhenwei; Mathew, Sijo; Peng, Dungeng; Song, Yuanli; Van Horn, Wade D.; Zhuang, Tiandi; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    From roughly 1985 through the start of the new millennium, the cutting edge of solution protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was to a significant extent driven by the aspiration to determine structures. Here we survey recent advances in protein NMR that herald a renaissance in which a number of its most important applications reflect the broad problem-solving capability displayed by this method during its classical era during the 1970s and early 80s. “Without receivers fitted and kept in order, the air may tingle and thrill with the message, but it will not reach my spirit and consciousness.” Mary Slessor, Calabar, circa 1910 PMID:23368985

  8. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  9. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t = 0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t = 0 to - tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory

  10. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t=0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t=0 to -tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory enables

  11. Simulation of selective pulse techniques for localized NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwood, Michael; Schleich, Thomas; Robin Bendall, M.

    The results of a computer simulation investigation delineating the limits of resolution, sensitivity, and accuracy of the depth- resolved suface-coil spectroscopy (DRESS), volume-selective excitation (VSE), and image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) methods for achieving spatially localized NMR spectroscopy are presented. A computer program, which numerically solves the Bloch equations for variable input parameters, is used to simulate the spatial localization afforded by each technique. Because the numerical solution of the Bloch equations describes the behavior of the bulk magnetization with great precision, the simulations provide an objective and realistic means of evaluating the performance of the individual localization schemes and reveal nuances and limitations not discussed in the original experimental papers. The results of this computer simulation study should encourage the optimization of localization methodology for use in specific applications.

  12. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  13. A Primer of Fourier Transform NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macomber, Roger S.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a new spectroscopic technique that is often omitted from undergraduate curricula because of lack of instructional materials. Therefore, information is provided to introduce students to the technique of data collection and transformation into the frequency domain. (JN)

  14. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  15. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  16. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  17. NMR analysis of a fluorocarbon copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-10-01

    Vinylidene fluoride (VF/sub 2/) can be copolymerized with chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE) in an aqueous emulsion using a peroxide chain initiator. The physical properties of the resulting fluorocarbon polymer depend on the ratio of VF/sub 2/ to CTFE and the randomness of the copolymerization. When CTFE and VF are polymerized in an approximately 3:1 mole ratio, the resulting polymer is soluble in acetone (and other solvents) at room temperature. Using proton and fluorine-19 NMR, the mole ratio of CTFE to VF/sub 2/, the emulsifier (perfluorodecanoate) concentration, and the randomness of copolymerization can be determined. A trifluorotoluene internal standard is added to a d/sub 6/-acetone solution of the fluoropolymer. Proton NMR is used to determine the amount of VF/sub 2/. Fluorine-19 NMR is used to measure the amount of emulsifier and the randomness of copolymerization. Each analysis requires about 5 minutes, and is quite precise, with relative standard deviations from 3 to 10% (10 replicates analyzed). In addition, the results from NMR analyses agree well with wet chemical analyses. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  19. NMR as a method to determine water content changes in the upper soil layer during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, Steffen; Pohlmeier, Andreas; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Water exchange between bare soil and atmosphere is controlled by evaporation. In the topmost soil layer moisture content and hydraulic conductivity may change strongly and capillary film flow (stage I) from saturated regions to the surface discontinues. Evaporation is now mainly driven by vapor diffusion through a dry layer (stage II). Water vaporizes in the unsaturated zone inside the soil what strongly reduces the evaporation rate and also soil surface temperature to a considerable amount. The dynamics of the transition from stage I to stage II as well as film flow and vapor diffusion at low water contents have received little attention. In this study we investigated water content changes in the uppermost soil layer with high spatial resolution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). NMR is a feasible noninvasive method where the received signal of hydrogen protons allows conclusions on moisture and pore size distribution. The overall aim is to apply a mobile nuclear magnetic resonance surface sensor (NMR-MOUSE) directly for field measurements. This sensor has a max. measurement depth of 25 mm and operates at a Larmor frequency of 13.4 MHz. The general challenges of NMR in soils are the inherent fast transversal relaxation times of the soil matrix especially next to the residual moisture content. Therefore, as a first step of validation we applied and compared NMR-MOUSE measurements with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an initially saturated sand column. The column was evaporated over 67 days and water content profiles were recorded by 1D-T2 relaxation measurements using the NMR-MOUSE as well as different 3D-MRI sequences during drying. Firstly, we report on the sensitivities and limits of the different devices and measurement sequences. Considering these data, we could monitor that over a period of 58 days the moisture decreased rather uniform until the onset of stage II. Thereafter, a dry surface layer developed and a retreating drying front was observed.

  20. Combining solid-state NMR spectroscopy with first-principles calculations - a guide to NMR crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; McKay, David

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in the application of first-principles calculations of NMR parameters to periodic systems have resulted in widespread interest in their use to support experimental measurement. Such calculations often play an important role in the emerging field of "NMR crystallography", where NMR spectroscopy is combined with techniques such as diffraction, to aid structure determination. Here, we discuss the current state-of-the-art for combining experiment and calculation in NMR spectroscopy, considering the basic theory behind the computational approaches and their practical application. We consider the issues associated with geometry optimisation and how the effects of temperature may be included in the calculation. The automated prediction of structural candidates and the treatment of disordered and dynamic solids are discussed. Finally, we consider the areas where further development is needed in this field and its potential future impact. PMID:27117884

  1. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  2. Studies of Lung Micromechanics via Hyperpolarized Helium-3 Diffusion NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajari, Adam James

    While high quality MR Images of lungs are difficult to obtain with conventional proton MRI due to the organ's low tissue density, the advent of techniques in noble gas polarization have enabled MR investigations of the lung's more abundant air space rather than its tissue. In addition to high-resolution images of lung ventilation, lung morphometry via gas diffusion NMR provides information about the size and shape of the microscopic airways that account for over 95% of the lung's airspace. Consequently, gas diffusion NMR provides an important new tool for investigating changes in lung microstructure during macroscopic changes in lung volume. Despite decades of research into the mechanisms of lung inflation and deflation, there is little consensus about whether macroscopic changes in lung volume occur due to changes in the size and/or shape of alveoli and alveolar ducts or by alveolar recruitment and derecruitment. In this dissertation lung morphometry is performed via 3He diffusion MRI in order to measure the average alveolar depth and alveolar duct radius at multiple levels of both inspiration and expiration in in vivo human subjects and in explanted human and canine lungs. Average alveolar volume, surface area, and the total number of alveoli at each lung volume are calculated from the 3He morphometric parameters. The results suggest that human lungs inflate/deflate primarily by recruitment/derecruitment of alveoli, and that individual alveolar ducts in both human and canine lungs increase in volume non-isotropically by accordion-like extension. The results further suggest that this change in alveolar duct volume is the primary mechanism of lung volume change in canine lungs but is secondary to alveolar recruitment/derecruitment in humans.

  3. Applications of Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffusion-ordered NMR (DOSY-NMR) is a powerful, but under-utilized, technique for the investigation of mixtures based on translational diffusion rates. DOSY spectra allow for determination by NMR of components that may differ in molecular weight, geometry or complexation. Typical applications coul...

  4. A low-power high-sensitivity single-chip receiver for NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Anders, Jens; Handwerker, Jonas; Ortmanns, Maurits; Boero, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a fully-integrated receiver for NMR microscopy applications manufactured in a 0.13μm CMOS technology. The design co-integrates a 10-turn planar detection coil together with a complete quadrature, low-IF downconversion receiver on a single chip, which operates from a single 1.5V supply with a total power dissipation of 18mW. The detector's measured time-domain spin sensitivity is 3×10(13)(1)Hspins/Hz at 7T. Additionally, the paper discusses two important aspects of NMR microscopy using planar detection coils: the link between the detection coil's spin sensitivity and the achievable image SNR and the correction of image artifacts induced by the inhomogeneous sensitivity profile of planar detection coils. More specifically, we derive analytical expressions for both the theoretical image SNR as a function of the coil's spin sensitivity and the sensitivity correction for a known coil sensitivity profile in CTI MR imaging experiments. Both expressions are validated using measured data in the imaging section of the paper. Thanks to the improved spin sensitivity of the utilized integrated receiver chip compared to a previously presented design, we were able to obtain sensitivity corrected images in a 7T spectroscopy magnet with isotropic resolutions of 9.6μm and 5μm with single-shot SNRs of 37 and 15 in relatively short imaging times of 4.4h and 24h, respectively. PMID:27011023

  5. A low-power high-sensitivity single-chip receiver for NMR microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Jens; Handwerker, Jonas; Ortmanns, Maurits; Boero, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a fully-integrated receiver for NMR microscopy applications manufactured in a 0.13 μm CMOS technology. The design co-integrates a 10-turn planar detection coil together with a complete quadrature, low-IF downconversion receiver on a single chip, which operates from a single 1.5 V supply with a total power dissipation of 18 mW. The detector's measured time-domain spin sensitivity is 3 ×1013 1Hspins /√{Hz } at 7 T. Additionally, the paper discusses two important aspects of NMR microscopy using planar detection coils: the link between the detection coil's spin sensitivity and the achievable image SNR and the correction of image artifacts induced by the inhomogeneous sensitivity profile of planar detection coils. More specifically, we derive analytical expressions for both the theoretical image SNR as a function of the coil's spin sensitivity and the sensitivity correction for a known coil sensitivity profile in CTI MR imaging experiments. Both expressions are validated using measured data in the imaging section of the paper. Thanks to the improved spin sensitivity of the utilized integrated receiver chip compared to a previously presented design, we were able to obtain sensitivity corrected images in a 7 T spectroscopy magnet with isotropic resolutions of 9.6 μm and 5 μm with single-shot SNRs of 37 and 15 in relatively short imaging times of 4.4 h and 24 h, respectively.

  6. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  7. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint. PMID:20513646

  8. OPENCORE NMR: open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments. PMID:18374613

  9. Metabolite localization in living drosophila using High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Joudiou, Nicolas; Louat, Fanny; Yon, Maxime; Szeremeta, Frédéric; Même, Sandra; Massiot, Dominique; Decoville, Martine; Fayon, Franck; Beloeil, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    We have developed new methods enabling in vivo localization and identification of metabolites through their 1H NMR signatures, in a drosophila. Metabolic profiles in localized regions were obtained using HR-MAS Slice Localized Spectroscopy and Chemical Shift Imaging at high magnetic fields. These methods enabled measurement of metabolite contents in anatomic regions of the fly, demonstrated by a decrease in β-alanine signals in the thorax of flies showing muscle degeneration. PMID:25892587

  10. Metabolite localization in living drosophila using High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Joudiou, Nicolas; Louat, Fanny; Yon, Maxime; Szeremeta, Frédéric; Même, Sandra; Massiot, Dominique; Decoville, Martine; Fayon, Franck; Beloeil, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    We have developed new methods enabling in vivo localization and identification of metabolites through their (1)H NMR signatures, in a drosophila. Metabolic profiles in localized regions were obtained using HR-MAS Slice Localized Spectroscopy and Chemical Shift Imaging at high magnetic fields. These methods enabled measurement of metabolite contents in anatomic regions of the fly, demonstrated by a decrease in β-alanine signals in the thorax of flies showing muscle degeneration. PMID:25892587

  11. Ultra-wide bore 900 MHz high-resolution NMR at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R.; Brey, W. W.; Shetty, K.; Gor'kov, P.; Saha, S.; Long, J. R.; Grant, S. C.; Chekmenev, E. Y.; Hu, J.; Gan, Z.; Sharma, M.; Zhang, F.; Logan, T. M.; Brüschweller, R.; Edison, A.; Blue, A.; Dixon, I. R.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Cross, T. A.

    2005-11-01

    Access to an ultra-wide bore (105 mm) 21.1 T magnet makes possible numerous advances in NMR spectroscopy and MR imaging, as well as novel applications. This magnet was developed, designed, manufactured and tested at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and on July 21, 2004 it was energized to 21.1 T. Commercial and unique homebuilt probes, along with a standard commercial NMR console have been installed and tested with many science applications to develop this spectrometer as a user facility. Solution NMR of membrane proteins with enhanced resolution, new pulse sequences for solid state NMR taking advantage of narrowed proton linewidths, and enhanced spatial resolution and contrast leading to improved animal imaging have been documented. In addition, it is demonstrated that spectroscopy of single site 17O labeled macromolecules in a hydrated lipid bilayer environment can be recorded in a remarkably short period of time. 17O spectra of aligned samples show the potential for using this data for orientational restraints and for characterizing unique details of cation binding properties to ion channels. The success of this NHMFL magnet illustrates the potential for using a similar magnet design as an outsert for high temperature superconducting insert coils to achieve an NMR magnet with a field >25 T.

  12. Toward cardiac electrophysiological mapping based on micro-Tesla NMR: a novel modality for localizing the cardiac reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiwoong

    2012-06-01

    Matching the proton magnetic resonance frequency to the frequency of a periodic electrophysiological excitation of myocardium enables direct localization of the cardiac reentry by magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The feasibility of this new idea has been demonstrated by conducting a numerical simulation based on a realistic heart model and experimental parameters in SQUID-based micro-Tesla NMR.

  13. Towards Single Biomolecule Imaging via Optical Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Alberto; Rosa, Lorenzo; Castelletto, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a physical marvel in which electromagnetic radiation is charged and discharged by nuclei in a magnetic field. In conventional NMR, the specific nuclei resonance frequency depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the magnetic properties of the isotope of the atoms. NMR is routinely utilized in clinical tests by converting nuclear spectroscopy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and providing 3D, noninvasive biological imaging. While this technique has revolutionized biomedical science, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules is still an intangible aspiration, due to MRI resolution being limited to tens of micrometers. MRI and NMR have, however, recently greatly advanced, with many breakthroughs in nano-NMR and nano-MRI spurred by using spin sensors based on an atomic impurities in diamond. These techniques rely on magnetic dipole-dipole interactions rather than inductive detection. Here, novel nano-MRI methods based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond are highlighted, that provide a solution to the imaging of single biomolecules with nanoscale resolution in-vivo and in ambient conditions. PMID:26113221

  14. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  15. Multiecho scheme advances surface NMR for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David

    2013-12-01

    nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is increasingly used as a method to noninvasively characterize aquifers. This technology follows a successful history of NMR logging, applied over decades to estimate hydrocarbon reservoir properties. In contrast to logging, however, surface methods have utilized relatively simple acquisition sequences, from which pore-scale properties may not be reliably and efficiently estimated. We demonstrate for the first time the capability of sophisticated multiecho measurements to rapidly record a surface NMR response that more directly reflects aquifer characteristics. Specifically, we develop an adaptation of the multipulse Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence, widely used in logging, to measure the T2 relaxation response in a single scan. We validate this approach in a field surface NMR data set and by direct comparison with an NMR log. Adoption of the CPMG marked a landmark advancement in the history of logging NMR; we have now realized this same advancement in the surface NMR method.

  16. A system to obtain radiotracer uptake data simultaneously with NMR spectra in a high field magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, M.; Marsden, P.K.; Garlick, P.B.; Mielke, C.H.

    1996-06-01

    Radiotracer techniques and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are two complementary methods that are widely used to investigate cardiac metabolism. The authors have now developed a novel gamma photon detector system that will operate within a wide-bore, 9.4 T magnet. With this detector in position, it is possible to acquire radiotracer uptake data while simultaneously collecting NMR spectra. The advantages of this new system are firstly, that it enables correlations between radiotracer and NMR data to be made on individual rat hearts, and secondly that it allows the number of experiments required to obtain results of statistical significance to be greatly decreased. The extension of the system, to one in which positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data are acquired simultaneously, clearly has enormous clinical potential. The detector consists of a NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal coupled to a magnetic field-insensitive photomultiplier tube by a 72.5 cm long, acrylic light pipe. This detector configuration satisfies the two, conflicting requirements of the crystal being near the sample, and thus in a high magnetic field, and the PMT being in a low magnetic field and thus far from the sample. In this paper the authors present the technical specifications of their new system together with what they believe are the first examples of simultaneously acquired NMR spectra and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG) uptake data, obtained from isolated, perfused rat hearts.

  17. Theory of NMR signal behavior in magnetically inhomogeneous tissues: the static dephasing regime.

    PubMed

    Yablonskiy, D A; Haacke, E M

    1994-12-01

    This paper is devoted to a theory of the NMR signal behavior in biological tissues in the presence of static magnetic field inhomogeneities. We have developed an approach that analytically describes the NMR signal in the static dephasing regime where diffusion phenomena may be ignored. This approach has been applied to evaluate the NMR signal in the presence of a blood vessel network (with an application to functional imaging), bone marrow (for two specific trabecular structures, asymmetrical and columnar) and a ferrite contrast agent. All investigated systems have some common behavior. If the echo time TE is less than a known characteristic time tc for a given system, then the signal decays exponentially with an argument which depends quadratically on TE. This is equivalent to an R2* relaxation rate which is a linear function of TE. In the opposite case, when TE is greater than tc, the NMR signal follows a simple exponential decay and the relaxation rate does not depend on the echo time. For this time interval, R2* is a linear function of a) volume fraction sigma occupied by the field-creating objects, b) magnetic field Bo or just the objects' magnetic moment for ferrite particles, and c) susceptibility difference delta chi between the objects and the medium. PMID:7869897

  18. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    PubMed

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors. PMID:12470051

  19. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  20. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  1. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  2. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  3. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  4. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Huber, Gaspard; Luong, Michel; Desvaux, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a "bump" or as a "dip" superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  5. Highly flexible pulse programmer for NMR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dart, J.; Burum, D. P.; Rhim, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    A pulse generator for NMR application is described. Eighteen output channels are provided to allow use in single and double resonance experiments. Complex pulse sequences may be generated by loading instructions into a 256-word by 16-bit program memory. Features of the pulse generator include programmable time delays from 0.5 micros to 1000 s, branching and looping instructions, and the ability to be loaded and operated either manually or from a PDP-11/10 computer.

  6. Quantitative calibration of radiofrequency NMR Stark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.; Kempf, James G.

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Stark responses can occur in quadrupolar nuclei for an electric field oscillating at twice the usual NMR frequency (2ω0). Calibration of responses to an applied E field is needed to establish nuclear spins as probes of native E fields within material and molecular systems. We present an improved approach and apparatus for accurate measurement of quadrupolar Stark effects. Updated values of C14 (the response parameter in cubic crystals) were obtained for both 69Ga and 75As in GaAs. Keys to improvement include a modified implementation of voltage dividers to assess the 2ω0 amplitude, |E|, and the stabilization of divider response by reduction of stray couplings in 2ω0 circuitry. Finally, accuracy was enhanced by filtering sets of |E| through a linear response function that we established for the radiofrequency amplifier. Our approach is verified by two types of spectral results. Steady-state 2ω0 excitation to presaturate NMR spectra yielded C14 = (2.59 ± 0.06) × 1012 m-1 for 69Ga at room-temperature and 14.1 T. For 75As, we obtained (3.1 ± 0.1) × 1012 m-1. Both values reconcile with earlier results from 77 K and below 1 T, whereas current experiments are at room temperature and 14.1 T. Finally, we present results where few-microsecond pulses of the 2ω0 field induced small (tens of Hz) changes in high-resolution NMR line shapes. There too, spectra collected vs |E| agree with the model for response, further establishing the validity of our protocols to specify |E|.

  7. Theory of NMR in Superconducting Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Kazuhiro; Fukuyama, Hidetoshi

    1988-09-01

    Motivated by experiments of NMR on superconductor(S)-normal-metal(N) multi-layer system, we have calculated the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, T1-1, for both N and S layers based on the bilayer model of McMillan for the proximity effect. The results of calculation are in essential agreement with experiments by Aoki et al. and Imai et al.

  8. Theory of NMR for superconducting superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Kazuhiro; Fukuyama, Hidetoshi

    1988-06-01

    Motivated by experiments of NMR on superconductor(S)-normal-metal(N) multilayer system, we have calculated the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate,T1-1, for both N and S metals based on the bilayer model of McMillan for the proximity effect. The results of calculations are in essential agreement with experiments by Aoki et al. and Imai et al.

  9. Multiple-quantum NMR in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Yu-Sze; Pines, A.

    1983-03-01

    Multiple-quantum NMR has typically been observed in small groups of spins in isolated molecules. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation of high quantum transitions by normal schemes is thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum 1H absorption in solid adamantane is observed.

  10. Multiple-quantum NMR in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y.; Pines, A.

    1983-03-15

    Multiple-quantum NMR has typically been observed in small groups of spins in isolated molecules. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation of high quantum transitions by normal schemes is thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum /sup 1/H absorption in solid adamantane is observed.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging.

  12. Nonclassical correlation in NMR quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Soares-Pinto, D. O.; Auccaise, R.; Azevedo, E. R. de; Bonagamba, T. J.; Celeri, L. C.; Maziero, J.; Serra, R. M.; Fanchini, F. F.

    2010-06-15

    The existence of quantum correlation (as revealed by quantum discord), other than entanglement and its role in quantum-information processing (QIP), is a current subject for discussion. In particular, it has been suggested that this nonclassical correlation may provide computational speedup for some quantum algorithms. In this regard, bulk nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been successfully used as a test bench for many QIP implementations, although it has also been continuously criticized for not presenting entanglement in most of the systems used so far. In this paper, we report a theoretical and experimental study on the dynamics of quantum and classical correlations in an NMR quadrupolar system. We present a method for computing the correlations from experimental NMR deviation-density matrices and show that, given the action of the nuclear-spin environment, the relaxation produces a monotonic time decay in the correlations. Although the experimental realizations were performed in a specific quadrupolar system, the main results presented here can be applied to whichever system uses a deviation-density matrix formalism.

  13. Statistical filtering for NMR based structure generation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The difficulty of a structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. Saturated compounds can usually be assigned unambiguously by hand using only COSY and 13C-HMBC data, whereas condensed heterocycles are problematic due to their lack of protons that could show interatomic connectivities. Different computer programs were developed to aid in the structural assignment process, one of them COCON. In the case of unsaturated and substituted molecules structure generators frequently will generate a very large number of possible solutions. This article presents a "statistical filter" for the reduction of the number of results. The filter works by generating 3D conformations using smi23d, a simple MD approach. All molecules for which the generation of constitutional restraints failed were eliminated from the result set. Some structural elements removed by the statistical filter were analyzed and checked against Beilstein. The automatic removal of molecules for which no MD parameter set could be created was included into WEBCOCON. The effect of this filter varies in dependence of the NMR data set used, but in no case the correct constitution was removed from the resulting set. PMID:21835037

  14. Sol-gel kinetics by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, R.A.; Kay, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of advanced ceramic and glass materials by the sol-gel process has become an area of increasing activity in the field of material science. The sol-gel process provides a means to prepare homogeneous, high purity materials with tailored chemical and physical properties. This paper surveyed the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of silicon-based sol-gel kinetics. A review of the various models which have been used to analyze the chemical kinetics of various sol-gel systems was presented. The utility of NMR spectroscopy was demonstrated in investigating the influence that various reaction conditions have on the reaction pathways by which sol-gel derived materials are synthesized. By observing in a direct fashion the chemical pathway of the sol-gel, it is often possible to relate the final properties of the material to the formulation and reaction conditions of the sol-gel. The study of reaction kinetics by NMR is expected to play an increasingly important role in understanding sol-gel processing and material properties. 15 refs. (DP)

  15. DFT and NMR parameterized conformation of valeranone.

    PubMed

    Torres-Valencia, J Martín; Meléndez-Rodríguez, Myriam; Alvarez-García, Rocío; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2004-10-01

    A Monte Carlo random search using molecular mechanics, followed by geometry optimization of each minimum energy structure employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* level and a Boltzmann analysis of the total energies, generated accurate molecular models which describe the conformational behavior of the antispasmodic bicyclic sesquiterpene valeranone (1). The theoretical H-C-C-H dihedral angles gave the corresponding 1H, 1H vicinal coupling constants using a generalized Karplus-type equation. In turn, the 3J(H,H) values were used as initial input data for the spectral simulation of 1, which after iteration provided an excellent correlation with the experimental 1H NMR spectrum. The calculated 3J(H,H) values closely predicted the experimental values, excepting the coupling constant between the axial hydrogen alpha to the carbonyl group and the equatorial hydrogen beta to the carbonyl group (J(2beta, 3beta)). The difference is explained in terms of the electron density distribution found in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 1. The simulated spectrum, together with 2D NMR experiments, allowed the total assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 1. PMID:15366065

  16. Rhodopsin-lipid interactions studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200-nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60μm yields on the order of 500cm(2) of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated, and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By (2)H NMR order parameter measurements, it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by (1)H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic angle spinning, we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. PMID:23374188

  17. Earth's field NMR; a surface moisture detector?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Altobelli, Stephen; McDowell, Andrew; Zhang, Tongsheng

    2012-10-01

    Earth's field NMR (EFNMR), being free of magnets, would be an ideal teaching medium as well as a mobile NMR technique except for its weak S/N. The common EFNMR apparatus uses a powerful prepolarization field to enhance the spin magnetization before the experiment. We introduce a coil design geared to larger but manageable samples with sufficient sensitivity without prepolarization to move EFNMR closer to routine use and to provide an inexpensive teaching tool. Our coil consists of parallel wires spread out on a plywood to form a current sheet with the current return wires separated so they will not influence the main part of the coil assembly. The sensitive region is a relatively thin region parallel to the coil and close to it. A single turn of the coil is wound to be topologically equivalent to a figure-8. The two crossing segments in the center of a figure-8 form two of the parallel wires of the flat coil. Thus, a two-turn figure-8 has four crossing wires so its topologically equivalent coil will have four parallel wires with currents in phase. Together with the excellent sensitivity, this coil offers outstanding interference rejection because of the figure-8 geometry. An example of such a coil has 328 parallel wires covering a ˜1 meter square plywood which yields a good NMR signal from 26 liters of water spread out roughly over the area of the coil in less than one minute in a nearby park.

  18. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  19. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2015-08-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases (15)N-(1)H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  20. Rotaxane-mediated suppression and activation of cucurbit[6]uril for molecular detection by (129)Xe hyperCEST NMR.

    PubMed

    Finbloom, Joel A; Slack, Clancy C; Bruns, Carson J; Jeong, Keunhong; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alexander; Francis, Matthew B

    2016-02-21

    We report a method for blocking interactions between (129)Xe and cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) until activation by a specific chemical event. We synthesized a CB6-rotaxane that allowed no (129)Xe interaction with the CB6 macrocycle component until a cleavage event released the CB6, which then produced a (129)Xe@CB6 NMR signal. This contrast-upon-activation (129)Xe NMR platform allows for modular synthesis and can be expanded to applications in detection and disease imaging. PMID:26795714

  1. Direct synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles from iron(II) carboxymethylcellulose and their performance as NMR contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Delmarcio Gomes; Hiroshi Toma, Sergio; de Melo, Fernando Menegatti; Carvalho, Larissa Vieira C.; Magalhães, Alvicler; Sabadini, Edvaldo; dos Santos, Antônio Domingues; Araki, Koiti; Toma, e. Henrique E.

    2016-01-01

    Iron(II) carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) has been successfully employed in the synthesis of hydrophylic magnetite nanoparticles stabilized with a biopolymer coating, aiming applications in NMR imaging. The new method encompasses a convenient one-step synthetic procedure, allowing a good size control and yielding particles of about 10 nm (core size). In addition to the biocompatibility, the nanoparticles have promoted a drastic reduction in the transverse relaxation time (T2) of the water protons. The relaxivity rates have been investigated as a function of the nanoparticles concentration, showing a better performance in relation to the common NMR contrast agents available in the market.

  2. In vivo two-dimensional NMR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Robert A.

    1999-10-01

    The poor resolution of in-vivo one- dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has limited its clinical potential. Currently, only the large singlet methyl resonances arising from N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine are quantitated in a clinical setting. Other metabolites such as myo- inositol, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, and γ- amino butyric acid (GABA) are of clinical interest but quantitation is difficult due to the overlapping resonances and limited spectral resolution. To improve the spectral resolution and distinguish between overlapping resonances, a series of two- dimensional chemical shift correlation spectroscopy experiments were developed for a 1.5 Tesla clinical imaging magnet. Two-dimensional methods are attractive for in vivo spectroscopy due to their ability to unravel overlapping resonances with the second dimension, simplifying the interpretation and quantitation of low field NMR spectra. Two-dimensional experiments acquired with mix-mode line shape negate the advantages of the second dimension. For this reason, a new experiment, REVOLT, was developed to achieve absorptive mode line shape in both dimensions. Absorptive mode experiments were compared to mixed mode experiments with respect to sensitivity, resolution, and water suppression. Detailed theoretical and experimental calculations of the optimum spin lock and radio frequency power deposition were performed. Two-dimensional spectra were acquired from human bone marrow and human brain tissue. The human brain tissue spectra clearly reveal correlations among the coupled spins of NAA, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, GABA, aspartate and myo-inositol obtained from a single experiment of 23 minutes from a volume of 59 mL. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  3. Development of Halbach magnet for portable NMR device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, N.; Topkaya, R.; Subaşi, H.; Yerli, Y.; Rameev, B.

    2009-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has enormous potential for various applications in industry as the on-line or at-line test/control device of process environments. Advantage of NMR is its non-destructive nature, because it does not require the measurement probe to have a contact with the tested media. Despite of the recent progress in this direction, application of NMR in industry is still very limited. This is related to the technical and analytical complications of NMR as a method, and high cost of NMR analyzers available at the market. However in many applications, NMR is a very useful technique to test various products and to monitor quantitatively industrial processes. Fortunately usually there is no need in a high-field superconducting magnets to obtain the high-resolution spectra with the detailed information on chemical shifts and coupling-constant. NMR analyzers are designed to obtain the relaxation parameters by measuring the NMR spectra in the time domain rather than in frequency domain. Therefore it is possible to use small magnetic field (and low frequency of 2-60 MHz) in NMR systems, based on permanent magnet technology, which are specially designed for specific at-line and on-line process applications. In this work we present the permanent magnet system developed to use in the portative NMR devices. We discuss the experimental parameters of the designed Halbach magnet system and compare them with results of theoretical modelling.

  4. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  5. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  6. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  7. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Bryan, R. N.; Johnson, P.; Schonfeld, E.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A number of physiological changes have been demonstrated in bone, muscle and blood after exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long duration space missions is an important NASA goal. The advent of tomographic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR or MRI) gives NASA a way to greatly extend early studies of this phenomena in ways not previously possible; NMR is also noninvasive and safe. NMR provides both superb anatomical images for volume assessments of individual organs and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. The feasibility of NMR as a tool for human physiological research as it is affected by microgravity is demonstrated. The animal studies employed the rear limb suspended rat as a model of mucle atrophy that results from microgravity. And bedrest of normal male subjects was used to simulate the effects of microgravity on bone and muscle.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  9. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: The NMR-CUFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, Carel W.; Soltner, Helmut; Dusschoten, Dagmar van; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5 mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings.

  10. In situ analysis of copper electrodeposition reaction using unilateral NMR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, B. F.; Nunes, L. M. S.; Lobo, C. M. S.; Carvalho, A. S.; Cabeça, L. F.; Colnago, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The uses of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) to study electrochemical reactions in situ have greatly increased in the last decade. However, most of these applications are limited to specialized NMR laboratories and not feasible for routine analysis. Recently we have shown that a bench top, time domain NMR spectrometer can be used to monitor in situ copper electrodeposition reaction and the effect of Lorentz force in the reaction rate. However these spectrometers limit the cell size to the magnet gap and cannot be used with standard electrochemical cells. In this paper we are demonstrating that unilateral NMR sensor (UNMR), which does not limit sample size/volume, can be used to monitor electrodeposition of paramagnetic ions in situ. The copper electrodeposition reaction was monitored remotely and in situ, placing the electrochemical cell on top of the UNMR sensor. The Cu2+ concentration was measured during three hours of the electrodeposition reactions, by using the transverse relaxation rate (R2) determined with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence. The reaction rate increased fourfold when the reaction was performed in the presence of a magnetic field (in situ), in comparison to the reactions in the absence of the magnetic field (ex situ). The increase of reaction rate, in the presence of the UNMR magnet, was related to the magneto hydrodynamic force (FB) and magnetic field gradient force (F∇B). F∇B was calculated to be one order of magnitude stronger than FB. The UNMR sensor has several advantages for in situ measurements when compared to standard NMR spectrometers. It is a low cost, portable, open system, which does not limit sample size/volume and can be easily be adapted to standard electrochemical cells or large industrial reactors.

  11. In situ analysis of copper electrodeposition reaction using unilateral NMR sensor.

    PubMed

    Gomes, B F; Nunes, L M S; Lobo, C M S; Carvalho, A S; Cabeça, L F; Colnago, L A

    2015-12-01

    The uses of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) to study electrochemical reactions in situ have greatly increased in the last decade. However, most of these applications are limited to specialized NMR laboratories and not feasible for routine analysis. Recently we have shown that a bench top, time domain NMR spectrometer can be used to monitor in situ copper electrodeposition reaction and the effect of Lorentz force in the reaction rate. However these spectrometers limit the cell size to the magnet gap and cannot be used with standard electrochemical cells. In this paper we are demonstrating that unilateral NMR sensor (UNMR), which does not limit sample size/volume, can be used to monitor electrodeposition of paramagnetic ions in situ. The copper electrodeposition reaction was monitored remotely and in situ, placing the electrochemical cell on top of the UNMR sensor. The Cu(2+) concentration was measured during three hours of the electrodeposition reactions, by using the transverse relaxation rate (R2) determined with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence. The reaction rate increased fourfold when the reaction was performed in the presence of a magnetic field (in situ), in comparison to the reactions in the absence of the magnetic field (ex situ). The increase of reaction rate, in the presence of the UNMR magnet, was related to the magneto hydrodynamic force (FB) and magnetic field gradient force (F∇B). F∇B was calculated to be one order of magnitude stronger than FB. The UNMR sensor has several advantages for in situ measurements when compared to standard NMR spectrometers. It is a low cost, portable, open system, which does not limit sample size/volume and can be easily be adapted to standard electrochemical cells or large industrial reactors. PMID:26540649

  12. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  13. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  14. NMR Wool Tube: a novel method for NMR solution analysis of derivatized glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Olivia Maria

    2004-08-13

    Glass wool was placed within an NMR tube as a solid support for the covalent attachment of a molecule to allow for a simple one-dimensional 1H FT NMR solution analysis. This novel procedure avoids the use of expensive sample tubes or platforms, as required for magic angle or fast spinning, exotic pulse sequences, isotopic labeling or the use of a large number of scans to provide the ability to analyze the structure, mobility, ligand binding, and solvent interactions of the surface bound molecule. PMID:15387199

  15. Spatially resolved D-T(2) correlation NMR of porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Within the past decade, 2D Laplace nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been developed to analyze pore geometry and diffusion of fluids in porous media on the micrometer scale. Many objects like rocks and concrete are heterogeneous on the macroscopic scale, and an integral analysis of microscopic properties provides volume-averaged information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolves this spatial average on the contrast scale set by the particular MRI technique. Desirable contrast parameters for studies of fluid transport in porous media derive from the pore-size distribution and the pore connectivity. These microscopic parameters are accessed by 1D and 2D Laplace NMR techniques. It is therefore desirable to combine MRI and 2D Laplace NMR to image functional information on fluid transport in porous media. Because 2D Laplace resolved MRI demands excessive measuring time, this study investigates the possibility to restrict the 2D Laplace analysis to the sum signals from low-resolution pixels, which correspond to pixels of similar amplitude in high-resolution images. In this exploratory study spatially resolved D-T2 correlation maps from glass beads and mortar are analyzed. Regions of similar contrast are first identified in high-resolution images to locate corresponding pixels in low-resolution images generated with D-T2 resolved MRI for subsequent pixel summation to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of contrast-specific D-T2 maps. This method is expected to contribute valuable information on correlated sample heterogeneity from the macroscopic and the microscopic scales in various types of porous materials including building materials and rock. PMID:24607821

  16. Oil droplet size determination in complex flavor delivery systems by diffusion NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Wolfgang; Hafner, Valeria; Normand, Valéry

    2011-04-15

    Droplet size distribution of flavor oils in two different solid flavor delivery systems were determined with pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy: yeast encapsulation system, a spray dried flavor encapsulation system based on empty yeast cells, and glassy encapsulation system, an extruded solid water soluble carbohydrate delivery system. The oil droplet sizes are limited by the yeast cell walls in the yeast encapsulation system and the size distribution is unimodal according to images from transmission electron microscopy. The droplet size determination with diffusion NMR is based on the Murday and Cotts theory of restricted diffusion of liquids in geometrical confinements. Good fits of the diffusion data could be obtained by applying a unimodal, log-normal size distribution model and average droplet sizes of about 2 μm were found that correspond approximately to the inner diameter of the yeast cells. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a multimodal droplet size distribution in the glassy extruded delivery systems. To fit the NMR data a bimodal log-normal distribution function with five independent fitting parameters was implemented that yielded consistent and robust results. The two size populations were found in the micron and sub-micron range, respectively. The method was sufficiently accurate to depict variation of droplet size distributions in glassy encapsulation systems of different formulation. PMID:21316700

  17. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  18. Molecular mobility in fixed-bed reactors investigated by multiscale NMR techniques.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaohong; Stapf, Siegfried; Kühn, Holger; Demco, Dan E; Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    The complex problem of a fixed-bed reactor consisting of catalytically active particles provides an exceptional opportunity of combining a wide range of NMR methods which have become available over time as tools to probe porous media. This work demonstrates the feasibility of different NMR techniques for the investigation of the intra- and interparticle pore space over length scales from nanometers up to centimeters. Many industrially relevant cracking reactions leave a coke residue on the inner surface of the porous catalyst particles so that the active sites become inaccessible to the reactants. Moreover, the pore space shrinks due to the formation of coke, thereby hindering molecular transport. The presence of the coke residue and its influence on the mobility of adsorbed fluid molecules are probed by 129Xe spectroscopy, NMR cryoporometry, relaxation dispersion measurements, and investigations of the reduced diffusivity in the intraporous space. The voids surrounding the random arrangement of catalyst pellets represent another pore space of much larger dimensions, the properties of which can be more directly investigated by mapping the fluid density and the velocity distribution from velocity-encoded imaging. Propagator representations averaged over large sample volumes are discussed and compared to velocity images obtained in selected axial slices of the reactor. PMID:12850717

  19. [The new applications of NMR technology in the field of characterization of surface properties of the material].

    PubMed

    Liang, Ni; Zhang, Di; Wei, Chao-xian

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology has been developed continuely because of its rapid, accurate and high resolution advantages, The technology has become an important method to analyze the soil properties, and to identify the structure of matters, food analysis, medical imaging fields. This study summarized two aspects of the important applications of NMR in the characterization of the surface properties of materials. First, the use of NMR techniques for the adsorption, desorption and diffusion behaviors of polymer on solid particles (mainly SiO2 particles). Sencond, to investigate the wettability and water uptake progress of contaminated soils using NMR techniques. This study summarized the important applications of NMR techniques in the characterization of surface properties. It also showed the unique application in the field of polymer materials and environment. This study introduced the measured method for the relaxation time of substance using acorn surface area analyzer in the liquid environment. It reflect the surface properties and structural features of substance. It also provided data support for the explanation of environmental behaviors of contaminants and thus, it played an important role in the environmental field. Compared to the conventional BET method, acorn surface area analyzer showed the advantages in terms of conditions and time measurement. Especially, traditional BET method cannot get the information of the specific surface area of substances in the liquid directly, but acorn surface area analyzer solved the difficult problem. It is a new breakthrough in the field of characterization of the surface properties of materials by NMR in the liquid. We analyzed the application of acorn surface area analyzer in pharmaceuticals, cosmetic materials, electronic products because acorn surface area analyzer could reflects the important characteristics of the surface properties and structural features of substance. And we provide the prospective

  20. Tripodal tris(hydroxypyridinone) ligands for immunoconjugate PET imaging with 89Zr4+: comparison with desferrioxamine-B† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: 1H and 13C NMR data, reverse phase HPLC and size exclusion HPLC chromatograms, phosphoimages of ITLC plates, ex vivo biodistribution data. See DOI: 10.1039/c4dt02978j Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Meszaros, Levente K.; Paterson, Brett M.; Berry, David J.; Cooper, Maggie S.; Ma, Yongmin; Hider, Robert C.; Blower, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its long half-life (78 h) and decay properties (77% electron capture, 23% β+, E max = 897 keV, E av = 397 keV, Eγ = 909 keV, Iγ = 100%) 89Zr is an appealing radionuclide for immunoPET imaging with whole IgG antibodies. Derivatives of the siderophore desferrioxamine-B (H3DFO) are the most widely used bifunctional chelators for coordination of 89Zr4+ because the radiolabeling of the resulting immunoconjugates is rapid under mild conditions. 89Zr-DFO complexes are reportedly stable in vitro but there is evidence that 89Zr4+ is released in vivo, and subsequently taken up by the skeleton. We have evaluated a novel tripodal tris(hydroxypyridinone) chelator, H3CP256 and its bifunctional maleimide derivative, H3YM103, for coordination of Zr4+ and compared the NMR spectra, and the 89Zr4+ radiolabeling, antibody conjugation, serum stability and in vivo distribution of radiolabelled immunoconjugates with those of H3DFO and its analogues. H3CP256 coordinates 89Zr4+ at carrier-free concentrations forming [89Zr(CP256)]+. Both H3DFO and H3CP256 were efficiently radiolabelled using [89Zr(C2O4)4]4– at ambient temperature in quantitative yield at pH 6–7 at millimolar concentrations of chelator. Competition experiments demonstrate that 89Zr4+ dissociates from [89Zr(DFO)]+ in the presence of one equivalent of H3CP256 (relative to H3DFO) at pH 6–7, resulting largely in [89Zr(CP256)]+. To assess the stability of H3DFO and H3YM103 immunoconjugates radiolabelled with 89Zr, maleimide derivatives of the chelators were conjugated to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab via reduced cysteine side chains. Both immunoconjugates were labelled with 89Zr4+ in >98% yield at high specific activities and the labeled immunoconjugates were stable in serum with respect to dissociation of the radiometal. In vivo studies in mice indicate that 89Zr4+ dissociates from YM103-trastuzumab with significant amounts of activity becoming associated with bones and joints (25.88 ± 0.58% ID g–1 7