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Sample records for 24-28 geomagnetic storm

  1. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  2. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  3. Satellite Vulnerability To Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, R. B.; Freemen, M. P.; Riley, D.; Daws, M.; Rutten, K.

    There are several examples where satellites on orbit have failed or partially failed during geomagnetic storms resulting in large insurance claims. Whether the storm is directly responsible for the failures is very controversial, commercially sensitive, and difficult to prove conclusively since there are so few examples. However, there are many non-fatal errors, or anomalies, that occur during the lifetime of spacecraft that enable a statistical analysis. Here we present an analysis of over 5000 satellite anomalies that shows for the first time a statistically significant link between satellite anomalies and geomagnetic storms. We find that the period of highest risk lasts for six days after the start of a magnetic storm. Approximately 40% of anomalies could be due to a random occurrence, but in addition there are between 0 and 35% of satellite anomalies that we attribute as being directly related to geomagnetic storms. We show that the risk depends on satellite prime contractor, orbit type, and age of satellite.

  4. Intense geomagnetic storms: A study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbergleit, Virginia

    In the pipes and the lines of the transmission of the electrical energy, the route of the currents through them, causes a diminution of the life utility of the same one. The intense storms are studied, because these are induced quickly to the ionospheric systems that they change, obtaining great induced telluric currents (or GICs). Also the Akasofús parameter based on the time for periods of strong and moderate magnetic storms during the last 10 years is calculated. The method also standardizes the parameters of the storm: electron flow between 30-300 KeV, z component of the magnetic field (Bz), the solar Wind velocity (v), indices AE and AL. Also, the decay time of the ring current (which is different during the main and the recovery phase from of the geomagnetic disturbances) are calculated.

  5. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms

    PubMed Central

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-01-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<−100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3–6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow. PMID:26167429

  6. Large Geomagnetic Storms: Introduction to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the accumulation of rich data sets that reveal various aspects of geomagnetic storms in unprecedented detail both at the Sun where the storm causing disturbances originate and in geospace where the effects of the storms are directly felt. During two recent coordinated data analysis workshops (CDAWs) the large geomagnetic storms (Dst < or = -100 nT) of solar cycle 23 were studied in order to understand their solar, interplanetary, and geospace connections. This special section grew out of these CDAWs with additional contributions relevant to these storms. Here I provide a brief summary of the results presented in the special section.

  7. Geomagnetic storms: historical perspective to modern view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The history of geomagnetism is more than 400 years old. Geomagnetic storms as we know them were discovered about 210 years ago. There has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs, and concomitant magnetic storms in recent times. Magnetic storms are the most important component of space weather effects on Earth. We give an overview of the historical aspects of geomagnetic storms and the progress made during the past two centuries. Super magnetic storms can cause life-threatening power outages and satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. The data for such super magnetic storms that occurred in the last 50 years during the space era is sparce. Research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a database for intense and super magnetic storms. New knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of magnetic storms gained from spaceage observations will be used to review the super magnetic storm of September 1-2, 1859. We discuss the occurrence probability of such super magnetic storms, and the maximum possible intensity for the effects of a perfect ICME: extreme super magnetic storm, extreme magnetospheric compression, and extreme magnetospheric electric fields.

  8. Geomagnetic storm forecasts several hours ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikova, Tatiana; Petrukovich, Anatoli

    In this study we present a service implemented at Space Research Institute, Russia, providing an advance warning about the future geomagnetic storm magnitude (the negative peak Dst) using first geomagnetic storm indications. We demonstrate a clear relation between the solar wind parameters in the beginning of the storm development with the ultimate storm strength. For suddenly developing major storms that have essential influence on susceptible technological systems such as satellites, pipelines, power systems, and radio communications we predict lower and upper limits of the negative peak Dst. The high predictive potential of the proposed technique was confirmed by testing it on geomagnetic storms during the period 1995-2013. The advance warning time about the future geomagnetic storm strength on average achieves 5-6 hours and varies from 1 to 22 hours. The error of the peak Dst prediction does not exceed 25% with probability of 0.96. The false prediction probability does not exceed 0.03. Real-time predictions of the geomagnetic storm magnitude are updated every hour and published at http://spaceweather.ru

  9. Geomagnetic storm fields near a synchronous satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawasaki, K.; Akasofu, S. I.

    1971-01-01

    An apparent early recovery of the main phase of geomagnetic storms at the distance of the synchronous satellite is examined in terms of changing electric current distributions in the magnetosphere during magnetic storms. It is suggested that a rapid recession of the edge of the plasma sheet (after the advance toward the earth during an early epoch of the main phase) is partly responsible for the early recovery. Relevant plasma sheet variations during geomagnetic storms are found to be in agreement with the inferred variations.

  10. The Causes of Geomagnetic Storms During Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine (1852).

  11. Enhancing model based forecasting of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Alla G.

    Modern society is increasingly dependent on the smooth operation of large scale technology supporting Earth based activities such as communication, electricity distribution, and navigation. This technology is potentially threatened by global geomagnetic storms, which are caused by the impact of plasma ejected from the Sun upon the protective magnetic field that surrounds the Earth. Forecasting the timing and magnitude of these geomagnetic storms is part of the emerging discipline of space weather. The most severe geomagnetic storms are caused by magnetic clouds, whose properties and characteristics are important variables in space weather forecasting systems. The methodology presented here is the development of a new statistical approach to characterize the physical properties (variables) of the magnetic clouds and to examine the extent to which theoretical models can be used in describing both of these physical properties, as well as their evolution in space and time. Since space weather forecasting is a complex system, a systems engineering approach is used to perform analysis, validation, and verification of the magnetic cloud models (subsystem of the forecasting system) using a model-based methodology. This research demonstrates that in order to validate magnetic cloud models, it is important to categorize the data by physical parameters such as velocity and distance travelled. This understanding will improve the modeling accuracy of magnetic clouds in space weather forecasting systems and hence increase forecasting accuracy of geomagnetic storms and their impact on earth systems.

  12. Geomagnetic storm forecasts and the power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappenman, John G.; Zanetti, Lawrence J.; Radasky, William A.

    There is a well-recognized link between solar activity, geomagnetic disturbances, and disruptions to man-made systems such as power grids, satellites, communications, and defense systems. As technology evolves, these systems become more susceptible to magnetic disturbances than their counterparts of previous solar cycles. Analysis suggests that these vulnerabilities will continue and perhaps even increase as these systems continue to evolve.Geomagnetic disturbances can cause geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) to flow through the power system, entering and exiting the many grounding points on a transmission network. This is generally of most concern at the latitudes of the northern United States, Canada, and Scandinavia, for example, but regions much farther south are also affected during intense magnetic storms.

  13. NOAA Plans for Geomagnetic Storm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, B. L.; Biesecker, D. A.; Mulligan, P.; Simpson, M.

    2012-12-01

    For many years, NOAA has issued geomagnetic storm watches and warnings based on coronal mass ejection (CME) imagery and in-situ solar wind measurements from research satellites. The NOAA Satellite and Information Service (NESDIS) recognizes the importance of this service to protecting technological infrastructure including power grids, polar air travel, and satellite navigation, so is actively planning to replace these assets to ensure their continued availability. NOAA, NASA, and the US Air Force are working on launching the first operational solar wind mission in 2014, the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), to follow NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in making solar wind measurements at the sun-Earth L1 for 15-60 minute geomagnetic storm warning. For continuing operations after the DSCOVR mission, one technology NOAA is looking at is solar sails that could greatly improve the lead time of geomagnetic storm warnings by stationkeeping closer to the sun than L1. We are working with NASA and private industry on the Sunjammer solar sail demonstration mission to test making solar wind measurements from a solar sail in the sun-Earth L1 region. NOAA uses CME imagery from the NASA/ESA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the NASA Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) satellites to issue 1-3 day geomagnetic storm watches. For the future, NOAA worked with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to develop a Compact Coronagraph (CCOR) through Phase A, and is studying ways to complete instrument development and test fly it for use in the future.

  14. AI techniques in geomagnetic storm forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstedt, Henrik

    This review deals with how geomagnetic storms can be predicted with the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques. Today many different Al techniques have been developed, such as symbolic systems (expert and fuzzy systems) and connectionism systems (neural networks). Even integrations of AI techniques exist, so called Intelligent Hybrid Systems (IHS). These systems are capable of learning the mathematical functions underlying the operation of non-linear dynamic systems and also to explain the knowledge they have learned. Very few such powerful systems exist at present. Two such examples are the Magnetospheric Specification Forecast Model of Rice University and the Lund Space Weather Model of Lund University. Various attempts to predict geomagnetic storms on long to short-term are reviewed in this article. Predictions of a month to days ahead most often use solar data as input. The first SOHO data are now available. Due to the high temporal and spatial resolution new solar physics have been revealed. These SOHO data might lead to a breakthrough in these predictions. Predictions hours ahead and shorter rely on real-time solar wind data. WIND gives us real-time data for only part of the day. However, with the launch of the ACE spacecraft in 1997, real-time data during 24 hours will be available. That might lead to the second breakthrough for predictions of geomagnetic storms.

  15. Correlative comparison of geomagnetic storms and auroral substorms using geomagnetic indeces. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cade, W.B.

    1993-06-01

    Partial contents include the following: (1) Geomagnetic storm and substorm processes; (2) Magnetospheric structure; (3) Substorm processes; (4) Data description; (5) Geomagnetic indices; and (6) Data period and data sets.

  16. Halo Coronal Mass Ejections and Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, I show that the discrepancies in the geoeffectiveness of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) reported in the literature arise due to the varied definitions of halo CMEs used by different authors. In particular, I show that the low geoeffectiveness rate is a direct consequence of including partial halo CMEs. The geoeffectiveness of partial halo CMEs is lower because they are of low speed and likely to make a glancing impact on Earth. Key words: Coronal mass ejections, geomagnetic storms, geoeffectiveness, halo CMEs.

  17. Relationship between Dst and solar wind conditions during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olusesan, Bakare; Chukwuma, Victor

    2012-07-01

    A study of 224 geomagnetic storms of which 83 intense and 141 moderate storms during 1996-2006 has been carried out to investigate the relationship between Dst and solar wind plasma parameters during geomagnetic storms. The geomagnetic storms are primarily associated with two classes of drivers: the magnetic cloud and complex ejecta. Out of 83 intense geomagnetic storms studied, it was found that magnetic cloud were drivers in 43 geomagnetic storm (~ 51.8%) while complex ejecta were responsible for 40 geomagnetic storms (~ 48.2%). The correlation between Dst and B; and between Dst and Bs was 0.76 and 0.90, respectively for geomagnetic storms resulting from magnetic clouds. The correlation between Dst and B; and between Dst and Bs was 0.71 and 0.64, respectively for geomagnetic storms resulting from complex ejecta. Furthermore, it was shown that the correlation between the Dst and V for magnetic cloud and complex ejecta was 0.58 and 0.57, respectively. It was observed that the correlation between Dst and VBs for magnetic cloud and complex ejecta were 0.77 and 0.71, respectively. Further study of 141 moderate geomagnetic storms shows that the magnetic cloud comprised nearly (33.3%) of the storms while the complex ejecta comprised of about 66.7%. The result shows that the number of magnetic cloud occurrence is nearly double that of complex ejecta. The correlation between Dst and B; and between Dst and Bs was 0.38 and 0.64, respectively for geomagnetic storms resulting from magnetic clouds. The correlation between Dst and B; and between Dst and Bs was 0.43 and 0.53, respectively for geomagnetic storms resulting from complex ejecta. In addition, it was shown that the relationship between the Dst and V for magnetic cloud and complex ejecta was 0.15 and 0.11, respectively. It was observed that the relationship between Dst and VBs for magnetic cloud and complex ejecta were 0.64 and 0.59 respectively. Finally, the present results suggest that though both classes of drivers

  18. Major geomagnetic storm due to solar activity (2006-2013).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Bhupendra Kumar

    Major geomagnetic storm due to solar activity (2006-2013). Bhupendra Kumar Tiwari Department of Physics, A.P.S.University, Rewa(M.P.) Email: - btiwtari70@yahoo.com mobile 09424981974 Abstract- The geospace environment is dominated by disturbances created by the sun, it is observed that coronal mass ejection (CME) and solar flare events are the causal link to solar activity that produces geomagnetic storm (GMS).CMEs are large scale magneto-plasma structures that erupt from the sun and propagate through the interplanetary medium with speeds ranging from only a few km/s to as large as 4000 km/s. When the interplanetary magnetic field associated with CMEs impinges upon the earth’s magnetosphere and reconnect occur geomagnetic storm. Based on the observation from SOHO/LASCO spacecraft for solar activity and WDC for geomagnetism Kyoto for geomagnetic storm events are characterized by the disturbance storm time (Dst) index during the period 2006-2013. We consider here only intense geomagnetic storm Dst <-100nT, are 12 during 2006-2013.Geomagnetic storm with maximum Dst< -155nT occurred on Dec15, 2006 associated with halo CME with Kp-index 8+ and also verify that halo CME is the main cause to produce large geomagnetic storms.

  19. Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Ina P.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Sibeck, David G.; Collier, Michael R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    On March 31st. 2001, a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 RE. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMe) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et aL then modeled the expected 50ft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  20. The geomagnetic storms of 2015: Statistical analysis and forecasting results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paouris, Evangelos; Gerontidou, Maria; Mavromichalaki, Helen

    2016-04-01

    The year 2015 was characterized by long geomagnetic quiet periods with a lot of geomagnetically active breaks although it is on the declining phase of the current solar cycle. As a result a number of geomagnetic storms in the G1 up to G4 scale were noticed. In this work the characteristics of these geomagnetic storms like the scale level, the origin of the storm (CME or CIR) and the duration have been studied. Furthermore, a statistical analysis of these events and a comparative study of the forecasting and the actual geomagnetic conditions are performed using data from the NOAA space weather forecasting center and from the Athens Space Weather Forecasting Center as well. These forecasting centers estimate and provide every day the geomagnetic conditions for the upcoming days giving the values of the geomagnetic index Ap. The forecasting values of Ap index for the year 2015 from these two centers and their comparison in terms of the actual values are discussed.

  1. Causes of the Sep. 12-13, 2014 geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Rooksoon; Park, Sung-Hong; Kim, Sujin

    2015-08-01

    Solar cycle 24 is very modest compared to previous solar cycles. The solar maximum phase may have been reached in the middle of 2014 and the sunspot number has decreased since the beginning of 2015. During this period, it has been reported that only few events produced strong X-class flares, solar proton events, and geomagnetic storms. In this study we have investigated causes of the multiple geomagnetic storms occurred on September 12-13, 2014. The geomagnetic storm forecast model based on the CME observations was used for identification of the causes of the geomagnetic storms. Details of the solar source region were investigated to give an answer why the geomagnetic storms were not so strong even though they were related to fast coronal mass ejections with large earth-ward direction. As a result, we found that the first weak storm was driven by the CME related to M4.6 flare and the second minor storm was driven by one of the fast CMEs related to strong X1.6 flare. Our result shows that the reason why the second storm was not strong is that it was caused by the CME with northward magnetic field. Therefore we suggest that one of the essential ingredients for geomagnetic storm forecasting is to find out the magnetic field direction of earth-ward CMEs, which can be accomplished by investigating magnetic fields of their solar source regions a few days before their arrival to the earth.

  2. Effects of strong geomagnetic storms on Northern railways in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroshenko, E. A.; Belov, A. V.; Boteler, D.; Gaidash, S. P.; Lobkov, S. L.; Pirjola, R.; Trichtchenko, L.

    2010-11-01

    Seventeen severe magnetic storms occurred in the period 2000 through 2005. In addition there was a major magnetic storm in March 1989. During each of these storms there was an anomaly in the operation of the system of Signalization, Centralization and Blockage (SCB) in some divisions of the high-latitude (˜58 to 64°N) Russian railways. This anomaly was revealed as false traffic light signals about the occupation of the railways. These signals on the Northern railways appeared exactly during the main phases of the strongest part of the geomagnetic storms characterized by high geomagnetic indices Dst and Kp (Ap). Moreover, the durations of these anomalies coincided with the period of the greatest geomagnetic disturbances in a given event. Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) during significant strengthening of geomagnetic activity are concluded as the obvious reasons for such kind of anomalies.

  3. Magnetospheric Energy Input during Intense Geomagnetic Storms in SC23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besliu-Ionescu, Diana; Maris Muntean, Georgeta; Dobrica, Venera; Mierla, Marilena

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic storm connections to solar eruptive phenomena in solar cycle 23 (SC23) have been intensively studied and it is a subject of great importance because of their various effects in our day-to-day life. We analyse the energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere during intense geomagnetic storms defined by Dst ≤ -150 nT. There were 29 intense storms during SC23. We will use the Akasofu parameter (Akasofu, 1981) to compute the ɛ function and study its time profile. We compute the energy input efficiency during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm. We compute the magnetospheric energy input using the formula introduced by Wang et al. (2014) and compare these results with the ɛ function for the geomagnetic storms of October 29-30, 2003.

  4. A comprehensive analysis of the geomagnetic storms occurred dur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamry, Essam; Lethy, Ahmed; Arafa-Hamed, Tareq; Abd Elaal, Esmat

    2016-06-01

    The Geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards. Egyptian geomagnetic observatories observed multiple geomagnetic storms during 18 February to 2 March 2014. During this period, four interplanetary shocks successively hit the Earth's magnetosphere, leading to four geomagnetic storms. The storm onsets occurred on 18, 20, 23 and 27 February. A non-substorm Pi2 pulsation was observed on 26 February. This Pi2 pulsation was detected in Egyptian observatories (Misallat and Abu Simbel), Kakioka station in Japan and Carson City station in US with nearly identical waveforms. Van Allen Probe missions observed non-compressional Pc4 pulsations on the recovery phase of the third storm. This Pc4 event is may be likely attributed to the decay of the ring current in the recovery phase.

  5. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.

    2015-12-01

    Past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst > -50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.

  6. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Brett R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Friedel, Reinhard Hans W.

    2015-12-02

    Past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst > –50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletionmore » than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. As a result, small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.« less

  7. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brett R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Friedel, Reinhard Hans W.

    2015-12-02

    Past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst > –50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. As a result, small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.

  8. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B. R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.

    2015-12-02

    We report that past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst >₋50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.

  9. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, B. R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.

    2015-12-02

    We report that past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst >₋50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result inmore » flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.« less

  10. Geomagnetic storms: Potential economic impacts on electric utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1991-03-20

    Geomagnetic storms associated with sunspot and solar flare activity can disturb communications and disrupt electric power. A very severe geomagnetic storm could cause a major blackout with an economic impact of several billion dollars. The vulnerability of electric power systems in the northeast United States will likely increase during the 1990s because of the trend of transmitting large amounts of power over long distance to meet the electricity demands of this region. A comprehensive research program and a warning satellite to monitor the solar wind are needed to enhance the reliability of electric power systems under the influence of geomagnetic storms. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Automated detection of geomagnetic storms with heightened risk of GIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Rachel L.; Leonhardt, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Automated detection of geomagnetic storms is of growing importance to operators of technical infrastructure (e.g., power grids, satellites), which is susceptible to damage caused by the consequences of geomagnetic storms. In this study, we compare three methods for automated geomagnetic storm detection: a method analyzing the first derivative of the geomagnetic variations, another looking at the Akaike information criterion, and a third using multi-resolution analysis of the maximal overlap discrete wavelet transform of the variations. These detection methods are used in combination with an algorithm for the detection of coronal mass ejection shock fronts in ACE solar wind data prior to the storm arrival on Earth as an additional constraint for possible storm detection. The maximal overlap discrete wavelet transform is found to be the most accurate of the detection methods. The final storm detection software, implementing analysis of both satellite solar wind and geomagnetic ground data, detects 14 of 15 more powerful geomagnetic storms over a period of 2 years.

  12. Estimation of interplanetary electric field conditions for historical geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Veenadhari, B.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Selvakumaran, R.; Mukherjee, Shyamoli; Singh, Rajesh; Kadam, B. D.

    2015-09-01

    Ground magnetic measurements provide a unique database in understanding space weather. The continuous geomagnetic records from Colaba-Alibag observatories in India contain historically longest and continuous observations from 1847 to present date. Some of the super intense geomagnetic storms that occurred prior to 1900 have been revisited and investigated in order to understand the probable interplanetary conditions associated with intense storms. Following Burton et al. (1975), an empirical relationship is derived for estimation of interplanetary electric field (IEFy) from the variations of Dst index and ΔH at Colaba-Alibag observatories. The estimated IEFy values using Dst and ΔHABG variations agree well with the observed IEFy, calculated using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite observations for intense geomagnetic storms in solar cycle 23. This study will provide the uniqueness of each event and provide important insights into possible interplanetary conditions for intense geomagnetic storms and probable frequency of their occurrence.

  13. Low Latitude Pulsations Associated with Different Phases of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, J.; Vankayala, R. C.; Sinha, A. K.; Vichare, G.; Thomas, N.

    2014-12-01

    During geomagnetic storm lot of free energy is available in the magnetosphere and this energy can act as feeder to electromagnetic waves in different frequency bands. A classical geomagnetic storm consists mainly of four phases i.e. SSC (Sudden Storm commencement), initial Phase, main phase and recovery phase. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of electromagnetic waves in ULF (ultra low frequency) band associated with different phases of geomagnetic storms. Electromagnetic waves in ULF band (Period~ 10-100s) in the Earth's magnetosphere are generally termed as geomagnetic pulsations. A detailed statistical analysis has been performed over ten years of geomagnetic data from low latitude ground stations in Indian and Japanese sectors. The study reveals that storms in general, are accompanied with continuous pulsations of different frequency bands during different phases. In particular, the main phase of 91 % of intense storms was accompanied with pulsations in Pc5 band (frequency~ 2-7 mHz). However, the occurrence of these pulsations was less frequent during main phase of weak to moderate storms. Further, the amplitude of these pulsations increased with the intensity of storm.

  14. The equatorial electrojet during geomagnetic storms and substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yosuke; Kosch, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    The climatology of the equatorial electrojet during periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity is examined using long-term records of ground-based magnetometers in the Indian and Peruvian regions. Equatorial electrojet perturbations due to geomagnetic storms and substorms are evaluated using the disturbance storm time (Dst) index and auroral electrojet (AE) index, respectively. The response of the equatorial electrojet to rapid changes in the AE index indicates effects of both prompt penetration electric field and disturbance dynamo electric field, consistent with previous studies based on F region equatorial vertical plasma drift measurements at Jicamarca. The average response of the equatorial electrojet to geomagnetic storms (Dst<-50 nT) reveals persistent disturbances during the recovery phase, which can last for approximately 24 h after the Dst index reaches its minimum value. This "after-storm" effect is found to depend on the magnitude of the storm, solar EUV activity, season, and longitude.

  15. Relativistic Electron Acceleration and Loss During Small Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.

    2014-12-01

    Relativistic electron precipitation events were detected by early BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation-belt Relativistic Electron Losses) payloads during small geomagnetic storms (minimum DST greater than -50nT), coincident with significant enhancement of relativistic electron fluxes at geosynchronous as measured by GOES. Such small geomagnetic storms have not been studied as in depth as larger storms, even though they are capable of pumping-up or depleting the radiation belts equally as extremely as their larger counterparts, this study finds. Since much of the past few years has been quiet, it is necessary to extend previous studies to include smaller storms. We perform a statistical analysis of relativistic electron flux response at geosynchronous to small geomagnetic storms over an 11 year period (1989-2000) using LANL satellite data, similar to previous studies of larger geomagnetic storms. We investigate changes in relativistic electron flux response with various solar wind parameters, as well as extend the statistical analysis of small and large geomagnetic storms with data sets now available from the Van Allen Probes.

  16. Effects of a geomagnetic storm on thermospheric circulation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The motions of the thermosphere and its interactions with the ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm are of current interest to space scientists. A two-dimensional model was used to simulate the thermospheric response to the impulsive high-latitude heating associated with a geomagnetic storm. The storm-induced motions can be characterized by an initial period of transient waves followed by the development of a mean circulation. These motions generate an electrical-current system that is on the same order of magnitude as, and in the opposite sense to the normal s/sub q/ current system. Model-simulated winds and electrical currents were then compared to observations.

  17. Geomagnetic storms, super-storms, and their impacts on GPS-based navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, E.; Yasyukevich, Yu.; Maksikov, A.; Zhivetiev, I.

    2014-07-01

    Using data of GPS receivers located worldwide, we analyze the quality of GPS performance during four geomagnetic storms of different intensity: two super-storms and two intense storms. We show that during super-storms the density of GPS Losses-of-Lock (LoL) increases up to 0.25% at L1 frequency and up to 3% at L2 frequency, and up to 0.15% (at L1) and 1% (at L2) during less intense storms. Also, depending on the intensity of the storm time ionospheric disturbances, the total number of total electron content (TEC) slips can exceed from 4 to 40 times the quiet time level. Both GPS LoL and TEC slips occur during abrupt changes of SYM-H index of geomagnetic activity, i.e., during the main phase of geomagnetic storms and during development of ionospheric storms. The main contribution in the total number of GPS LoL was found to be done by GPS sites located at low and high latitudes, whereas the area of numerous TEC slips seemed to mostly correspond to the boundary of the auroral oval, i.e., region with intensive ionospheric irregularities. Our global maps of TEC slips show where the regions with intense irregularities of electron density occur during geomagnetic storms and will let us in future predict appearance of GPS errors for geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

  18. SuperDARN backscatter during intense geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, J. L.; Waters, C. L.; Menk, F. W.; Sciffer, M. D.; Bristow, W. A.

    2016-06-01

    It is often stated that high-frequency radars experience a loss of backscatter during geomagnetic storm events. The occurrence of backscatter during 25 intense geomagnetic storms was examined using data from the Bruny Island and Kodiak radars and a superposed epoch analysis. It was found that while a reduction of backscatter occurred in the middle to far ranges, there was an increase in the amount of backscatter from close range following storm onset. Ray tracing showed that an enhanced charge density in the E region can reduce the chance of F region and increase the chance of E region backscatter. It was also shown that reduction in backscatter cannot be explained by D region absorption. Using a normalized SYM-H value, percentage time through recovery phase can be estimated during storm progression which allows a prediction of backscatter return in real time that accounts for varying storm recovery phase duration.

  19. F layer positive response to a geomagnetic storm - June 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, N. J.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Tulunay, Y. K.

    1979-01-01

    A circulation model of neutral thermosphere-ionosphere coupling is used to interpret in situ spacecraft measurements taken during a topside midlatitude ionospheric storm. The data are measurements of electron density taken along the circular polar orbit of Ariel 4 at 550 km during the geomagnetically disturbed period June 17-18, 1972. It is inferred that collisional momentum transfer from the disturbed neutral thermosphere to the ionosphere was the dominant midday process generating the positive F-layer storm phase in the summer hemisphere. In the winter hemisphere the positive storm phase drifted poleward in the apparent response to magnetospheric E x B drifts. A summer F-layer positive phase developed at the sudden commencement and again during the geomagnetic main phase; a winter F-layer positive phase developed only during the geomagnetic main phase. The observed seasonal differences in both the onsets and the magnitudes of the positive phases are attributed to the interhemispheric asymmetry in thermospheric dynamics.

  20. Geomagnetic storm environments and effects on electrical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tesche, F.M. , Dallas, TX ); Barnes, P.R. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the behavior of the earth's magnetic field during a geomagnetic storm. Temporal variations of the B-field on the earths surface can induce an electric field in the earth, and this E-field will induce currents to flow in long, grounded conductors. Previous experience with geomagnetic storms indicates that such geomagnetically-induced currents can cause damage to power system components, and at times, can cause power blackouts. This paper presents some recently measured geomagnetic field variations, and illustrates how the induced electric field can be calculated, assuming a simple model of the imperfectly conducting earth. This calculation may be performed either in the time or in the frequency domain. Approximations to the time dependence of the geomagnetic field permit an analytical evaluation of the corresponding E-field in the earth, and this results in a simple expression for the transient Enfield. A knowledge of this Enfield is important in understanding the effects of geomagnetic storms on the power system, and in devising protection methods.

  1. The causes of recurrent geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The causes of recurrent geomagnetic activity were studied by analyzing interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data from earth-orbiting spacecraft in the interval from November 1973 to February 1974. This interval included the start of two long sequences of geomagnetic activity and two corresponding corotating interplanetary streams. In general, the geomagnetic activity was related to an electric field which was due to two factors: (1) the ordered, mesoscale pattern of the stream itself, and (2) random, smaller-scale fluctuations in the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field Bz. The geomagnetic activity in each recurrent sequence consisted of two successive stages. The first stage was usually the most intense, and it occurred during the passage of the interaction region at the front of a stream. These large amplitudes of Bz were primarily produced in the interplanetary medium by compression of ambient fluctuations as the stream steepened in transit to 1 A.U. The second stage of geomagnetic activity immediately following the first was associated with the highest speeds in the stream.

  2. Estimation of cold plasma outflow during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaland, S.; Eriksson, A.; André, M.; Maes, L.; Baddeley, L.; Barakat, A.; Chappell, R.; Eccles, V.; Johnsen, C.; Lybekk, B.; Li, K.; Pedersen, A.; Schunk, R.; Welling, D.

    2015-12-01

    Low-energy ions of ionospheric origin constitute a significant contributor to the magnetospheric plasma population. Measuring cold ions is difficult though. Observations have to be done at sufficiently high altitudes and typically in regions of space where spacecraft attain a positive charge due to solar illumination. Cold ions are therefore shielded from the satellite particle detectors. Furthermore, spacecraft can only cover key regions of ion outflow during segments of their orbit, so additional complications arise if continuous longtime observations, such as during a geomagnetic storm, are needed. In this paper we suggest a new approach, based on a combination of synoptic observations and a novel technique to estimate the flux and total outflow during the various phases of geomagnetic storms. Our results indicate large variations in both outflow rates and transport throughout the storm. Prior to the storm main phase, outflow rates are moderate, and the cold ions are mainly emanating from moderately sized polar cap regions. Throughout the main phase of the storm, outflow rates increase and the polar cap source regions expand. Furthermore, faster transport, resulting from enhanced convection, leads to a much larger supply of cold ions to the near-Earth region during geomagnetic storms.

  3. New insights on geomagnetic storms from observations and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the response at Earth of the Sun's varying energy output and forecasting geomagnetic activity is of central interest to space science, since intense geomagnetic storms may cause severe damages on technological systems and affect communications. Episodes of southward (Bzgeomagnetic conditions are associated either with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and possess long and continuous negative IMF Bz excursions, or with high speed solar wind streams (HSS) whose geoeffectiveness is due to IMF Bz profiles fluctuating about zero with various amplitudes and duration. We show examples of ring current simulations during two geomagnetic storms representative of each interplanetary condition with our kinetic ring current atmosphere interactions model (RAM), and investigate the mechanisms responsible for trapping particles and for causing their loss. We find that periods of increased magnetospheric convection coinciding with enhancements of plasma sheet density are needed for strong ring current buildup. During the HSS-driven storm the convection potential is highly variable and causes small sporadic injections into the ring current. The long period of enhanced convection during the CME-driven storm causes a continuous ring current injection penetrating to lower L shells and stronger ring current buildup.

  4. Geomagnetic Storms and Acute Myocardial Infarctions Morbidity in Middle Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.; Babayev, E. S.; Mustafa, F. R.; Stoilova, I.; Taseva, T.; Georgieva, K.

    2009-12-01

    Results of collaborative studies on revealing a possible relationship between solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GMA) and pre-hospital acute myocardial infarction (AMI) morbidity are presented. Studies were based on medical data from Bulgaria and Azerbaijan. Bulgarian data, covering the period from 01.12.1995 to 31.12.2004, concerned daily distribution of number of patients with AMI diagnose (in total 1192 cases) from Sofia Region on the day of admission at the hospital. Azerbaijani data contained 4479 pre-hospital AMI incidence cases for the period 01.01.2003-31.12.2005 and were collected from 21 emergency and first medical aid stations in Grand Baku Area (including Absheron Economical Region with several millions of inhabitants). Data were "cleaned" as much as possible from social and other factors and were subjected to medical and mathematical/statistical analysis. Medical analysis showed reliability of the used data. Method of ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) was applied to check the significance of GMA intensity effect and the type of geomagnetic storms - those caused by magnetic clouds (MC) and by high speed solar wind streams (HSSWS) - on AMI incidences. Relevant correlation coefficients were calculated. Results were outlined for both considered data. Results obtained for the Sofia data showed statistically significant positive correlation between considered GMA indices and AMI occurrence. ANOVA revealed that AMI incidence number was significantly increased from the day before till the day after geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Geomagnetic storms caused by MC were related to significant increase of AMI number in comparison with the storms caused by HSSWS. There was a trend for such different effects even on -1st and +1st day for the period 1995-2004. Results obtained for the Baku data revealed trends similar to those obtained for Sofia data. AMI morbidity increment was observed on the days with higher GMA intensity and after these days

  5. Signatures of strong geomagnetic storms in the equatorial latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olawepo, A. O.; Adeniyi, J. O.

    2014-04-01

    Ionosonde data from two equatorial stations in the African sector have been used to study the signatures of four strong geomagnetic storms on the height - electron density profiles of the equatorial ionosphere with the objective of investigating the effects and extent of the effects on the three layers of the equatorial ionosphere. The results showed that strong geomagnetic storms produced effects of varying degrees on the three layers of the ionosphere. Effect of strong geomagnetic storms on the lower layers of the equatorial ionosphere can be significant when compared with effect at the F2-layer. Fluctuations in the height of ionization within the E-layer were as much as 0% to +20.7% compared to -12.5% to +8.3% for the F2-layer. The 2007 version of the International Reference Ionosphere, IRI-07 storm-time model reproduced responses at the E-layer but overestimated the observed storm profiles for the F1- and F2-layers.

  6. Geomagnetic Storms and EMIC waves: Van Allen Probe observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dedong; Yuan, Zhigang; Yu, Xiongdong; Huang, Shiyong; Deng, Xiaohua; Zhou, Meng; Li, Haimeng

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are believed to play a crucial role in the dynamics of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons, especially during geomagnetic storms. However, there is little consensus on which phase of the storm is more favorable for the generation of EMIC waves. Utilizing the data from magnetometer instrument of EMFISIS suite on board Van Allen Probe A, the occurrences of EMIC waves during geomagnetic storms are investigated in this paper. 76 storms were identified during the period under research, from 8 September 2012 to 30 April 2014, when the apogee of Van Allen Probe A covered all the MLT sectors. 50 of the 76 storms observed 124 EMIC wave events, of which 80 are found in the recovery phase, more than those observed in the main phase. Evolution of the distribution characteristics of EMIC waves respect to L and MLT in different geomagnetic phases is investigated, which is found to be consistent with that of the plasmasphere. These results are different from those derived by the observations of the CRRES satellite. The different results may result from the different orbit coverage of the two different satellite missions or from the different activity level of the magnetosphere during the different periods. Few EMIC waves in the dayside sector during the pre-onset periods are observed. It is implied that, to the generation of EMIC waves, the effect of solar wind dynamic pressure in the inner magnetosphere is not so significant as that in the outer magnetosphere.

  7. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Geomagnetic Storm Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) space environments community utilizes near real time space weather data to support a variety of ISS engineering and science activities. The team has operated the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) suite of plasma instruments (two Langmuir probes, a floating potential probe, and a plasma impedance probe) on ISS since 2006 to obtain in-situ measurements of plasma density and temperature along the ISS orbit and variations in ISS frame potential due to electrostatic current collection from the plasma environment (spacecraft charging) and inductive (vxB) effects from the vehicle motion across the Earth s magnetic field. An ongoing effort is to use FPMU for measuring the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms at ISS altitudes and investigate auroral charging of the vehicle as it passes through regions of precipitating auroral electrons. This work is challenged by restrictions on FPMU operations that limit observation time to less than about a third of a year. As a result, FPMU campaigns ranging in length from a few days to a few weeks are typically scheduled weeks in advance for ISS engineering and payload science activities. In order to capture geomagnetic storm data under these terms, we monitor near real time space weather data from NASA, NOAA, and ESA sources to determine solar wind disturbance arrival times at Earth likely to be geoeffective (including coronal mass ejections and high speed streams associated with coronal holes) and activate the FPMU ahead of the storm onset. Using this technique we have successfully captured FPMU data during a number of geomagnetic storm periods including periods with ISS auroral charging. This presentation will describe the strategies and challenges in capturing FPMU data during geomagnetic storms, the near real time space weather resources utilized for monitoring the space weather environment, and provide examples of auroral charging data obtained during storm operations.

  8. Interplanetary field and plasma during initial phase of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, V. L.; Wiskerchen, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-three geomagnetic storm events during 1966 to 1970 were studied by using simultaneous interplanetary magnetic field and plasma parameters. Explorer 33 and 35 field and plasma data were analyzed on large-scale (hourly) and small-scale (3 min.) during the time interval coincident with the initial phase of the geomagnetic storms. The solar-ecliptic Bz component turns southward at the end of the initial phase, thus triggering the main phase decrease in Dst geomagnetic field. The By component also shows large fluctuations along with Bz. When there are no clear changes in the Bz component, the By shows abrupt changes at the main phase onset. On the small-scale, behavior of the magnetic field and electric field were studied in detail for the three events; it is found that the field fluctuations in By, Bz and Ey and Ez are present in the initial phase. In the large-scale, the behavior field remains quiet because the small-scale variations are averaged out. It appears that large as well as small time scale fluctuations in the interplanetary field and plasma help to alter the internal electromagnetic state of the magnetosphere so that a ring current could causing a geomagnetic storm decrease.

  9. High latitude TEC fluctuations and irregularity oval during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagimuratov, I. I.; Krankowski, A.; Ephishov, I.; Cherniak, Yu.; Wielgosz, P.; Zakharenkova, I.

    2012-06-01

    GPS measurements obtained by the global IGS network were used to study the occurrence of TEC fluctuations in the northern and southern high-latitude ionosphere during severe geomagnetic storms. In the northern hemisphere, GPS stations located higher than 55N Corrected Geomagnetic Latitude (CGL) at different longitudes were selected. In the southern hemisphere, Antarctic permanent GPS stations were used. Dual-frequency GPS measurements for individual satellite passes served as raw data. As a measure of fluctuation activity the rate of TEC (ROT) was used, and the fluctuation intensity was evaluated using the ROTI index. Using daily GPS measurements from all selected stations, images of the spatial and temporal behavior of TEC fluctuations were formed (in Corrected Geomagnetic Coordinates—CGC and geomagnetic local time—GLT). Similarly to the auroral oval, these images demonstrate an irregularity oval. The occurrence of the irregularity oval relates to the auroral oval, cusp and polar cap. During a storm, the intensity of TEC fluctuations essentially increased. The irregularity oval expands equatorward with an increase of magnetic activity. The study showed that the existing high-latitude GPS stations can provide a permanent monitoring tool for the irregularity oval in near real-time. In this paper, the features of the development of phase fluctuations at the geomagnetic conjugate points, and inter-hemispheric differences and similarities during winter and summer conditions, are discussed.

  10. Estimation of cold plasma outflow during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaland, S.; Eriksson, A. I.; Andre, M.; Maes, L.; Baddeley, L. J.; Barakat, A. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Eccles, V.; Johnsen, C.; Lybekk, B.; Li, K.; Pedersen, A.; Schunk, R. W.; Welling, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    Low energy ions of ionospheric origin provide a significant contributon to the magnetospheric plasmapopulation. Measuring cold ions is difficult though. Observations have to be done at sufficiently high altitudes and typically in regions of space where spacecraft attain a positive charge due to solar illumination. Cold ions are therefore shielded from the satellite particle detectors. Furthermore, spacecraft can only cover key regions of ion outflow during segments of their orbit, so additional complications arise arise if continuous longtime observations such as the during a geomagnetic storms are needed. In this paper we suggest a new approach, based on a combination of synoptic observations and a novel technique to estimate the flux and total outflow during the various phases of geomagnetic storms. Our results indicate large variations in both outflow rates and transport throughout the storm. Prior to the storm main phase, outflow rates are moderate, and the cold ions are mainly emanating from moderately sized polar cap regions. Throughout the main phase of the storm, outflow rates increase and the polar cap source regions expand. Furthermore, faster transport, resulting from enhanced convection, leads to a much larger supply of cold ions to the near Earth region during gemagnetic storms.

  11. Power grid disturbances and polar cap index during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The strong geomagnetic storm in the evening of 30 October 2003 caused high-voltage power grid disturbances in Sweden that expanded to produce hour-long power line outage in Malmö located in the southern part of the country. This was not a unique situation. The geomagnetic storm on 13 March 1989 caused extensive disruptions of high-voltage power circuits especially in the Province of Quebec, Canada, but also to a lesser degree in Scandinavia. Similar events have occurred earlier, among others, during the great storms of 13-14 July 1982 and 8-9 February 1986. These high-voltage power grid disturbances were related to impulsive magnetic variations accompanying extraordinarily intense substorm events. The events were preceded by lengthy intervals of unusually high values of the Polar Cap (PC) index caused by enhanced transpolar ionospheric convection. The transpolar convection transports magnetic flux from the dayside to nightside which causes equatorward displacements of the region of auroral activity enabling the substorms to hit vital power grids. During the 30 October 2003 event the intense solar proton radiation disabled the ACE satellite observations widely used to provide forecast of magnetic storm events. Hence in this case the alarmingly high PC index could provide useful warning of the storm as a back-up of the missing ACE-based forecast. In further cases, monitoring the PC index level could provide supplementary storm warnings to the benefit of power grid operators.

  12. Linking CMEs-ICMEs-Geomagnetic Storms during 1996 - 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camelia Talpeanu, Dana; Stan, Lucian; Mierla, Marilena; Rodriguez, Luciano; Zhukov, Andrei; Besliu-Ionescu, Diana

    2014-05-01

    During the period 1996 - 2012 there were 401 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which arrived at the Earth (see the on-line catalogue of Richardson and Cane). The solar counterpart of these interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) was found for 379 events and for 22 the identification was not possible because of the data gaps. Out of the identified events, the CMEs with sources towards solar west are more numerous compared with the ones having sources at east. Also, there are more CMEs, correlated with ICMEs, that are coming from the northern hemisphere, compared with the ones coming from the southern hemisphere. It was found that majority of the ICMEs produced minor or no geomagnetic storms. The intense geomagnetic storms are associated with CMEs coming from regions closer to the central meridian as seen from the Earth. A study of these events separated on different phases of the solar cycle is also done.

  13. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nichole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 “Quebec” storm and the 2003 “Halloween” storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  14. Direct-driven mechanism for geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arykov, A. A.; Maltsev, Yu. P.

    We have obtained the injection function for the part of the storm-time depression which is related to the cross-tail current and corresponding currents on the magnetopause. This injection function is QTC=-κU/S, where U is the electric potential difference between the dawn and dusk sides of the magnetosphere, S is the equatorial cross-section of the stable trapping region, and κ is a coefficient varying from 0.5 to 1.5 depending on the state of the magnetosphere and solar wind pressure. The injection function QTC appeared to be close to the observed one for the Dst-variation.

  15. Comparison of Dst Forecast Models for Intense Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, Eun-Young; Moon, Y.-J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Lee, D.-H.

    2012-01-01

    We have compared six disturbance storm time (Dst) forecast models using 63 intense geomagnetic storms (Dst <=100 nT) that occurred from 1998 to 2006. For comparison, we estimated linear correlation coefficients and RMS errors between the observed Dst data and the predicted Dst during the geomagnetic storm period as well as the difference of the value of minimum Dst (Delta Dst(sub min)) and the difference in the absolute value of Dst minimum time (Delta t(sub Dst)) between the observed and the predicted. As a result, we found that the model by Temerin and Li gives the best prediction for all parameters when all 63 events are considered. The model gives the average values: the linear correlation coefficient of 0.94, the RMS error of 14.8 nT, the Delta Dst(sub min) of 7.7 nT, and the absolute value of Delta t(sub Dst) of 1.5 hour. For further comparison, we classified the storm events into two groups according to the magnitude of Dst. We found that the model of Temerin and Lee is better than the other models for the events having 100 <= Dst < 200 nT, and three recent models (the model of Wang et al., the model of Temerin and Li, and the model of Boynton et al.) are better than the other three models for the events having Dst <= 200 nT.

  16. The neutral thermosphere at Arecibo during geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Burnside, R.G.; Tepley, C.A.; Sulzer, M.P. ); Fuller-Rowell, T.J. ); Torr, D.G. ); Roble, R.G. )

    1991-02-01

    Over the past five years, simultaneous incoherent scatter and optical observations have been obtained at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, during two major geomagnetic storms. The first storm the authors examine occurred during the World Day campaign of 12-16 January 1988, where on 14 January 1988, Kp values greater than 7 were recorded. An ion-energy balance calculation shows that atomic oxygen densities at a fixed height on 14 January 1988 were about twice as large as they were on the quiet days in this period. Simultaneous radar and Fabry-Perot interferometer observations were used to infer nightime O densities on 14-15 January 1988 that were about twice as large as on adjacent quiet nights. On this night, unusually high westward ion velocities were observed at Arecibo. The Fabry-Perot measurements show that the normal eastward flow of the neutral wind was reversed on this night. The second storm they examine occured on the night of 13-14 July 1985, when Kp values reached only 4+, but the ionosphere and thermosphere responded in a similar manner as they did in January 1988. On the nights of both 13-14 July 1985 and 14-15 January 1988, the electron densities observed at Arecibo were significantly higher than they were on nearby geomagnetically quiet nights. These results indicate that major storm effects in thermospheric winds and composition propagate to low latitudes and have a pronounced effect on the ionospheric structure over Arecibo.

  17. VLF emissions and whistlers observed during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondoh, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Nishizaki, R.; Nagayama, M.

    1974-01-01

    Whistler-triggered emissions and a narrowband hiss are described which were observed over Japan by ISIS 2 during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm of August 9, 1972. The characteristics of the narrowband hiss and increases in the whistler rate during the storm are discussed, and the ISIS-2 data are compared with data on whistler cutoffs and VLF noise breakups obtained by OGO 4 and Alouette I. Since the whistlers and narrowband hiss are usually observed inside and outside the plasmapause, it is thought that the plasmapause may have been located near the low-latitude end of the narrowband hiss during the main phase of the storm. It is suggested that the increases in the whistler rate may have been caused by the formation of whistler ducts in the disturbed plasmapause.

  18. The flywheel effect: Ionospheric currents after a geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, W.; Killeen, T.L.; Burns, A.G. ); Roble, R.G. )

    1991-10-01

    In the period following a geomagnetic storm the high-latitude, magnetospheric-driven convection pattern is normally weak. However, the neutral circulation, set up by ion-neutral momentum coupling during the main phase of the storm, may continue for several hours after the storm has ended. This persistent neutral circulation has the potential to drive Hall currents for some hours. In this paper the authors investigate these flywheel' currents by simulating a storm which occurred on the 23rd of November 1982 using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere Ionosphere General Circulation Model (NCAR-TIGCM). The resulting high-latitude, height-integrated Hall currents are dominated by the neutral-wind-driven component for several hours after the end of main phase of the storm. The direction of these currents is reversed from normal. Analysis of the neutral and ion components of this current system indicates that the neutral component may drive as much as 80% of the high-latitude current system immediately after the storm has ended, and may continue to dominate this system for 4 to 5 hours.

  19. Statistical signatures of geomagnetic storms with reference to delay distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, A. M.; Gwal, Ashok Kumar

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a statistical study on the nature and association of time delay (between IMF Bz and Dst) with various solar wind parameters and Inter planetary Magnetic field components. The study integrally covers all (634 storms) the geomagnetic storms observed during 1996 to 2011. We have calculated the time delay (∆T) between the peak values of IMF Bz and minimum Dst for each event and statistically investigated its relation with various solar wind parameters and IMF. For this analysis we have taken Solar wind parameters; Velocity, Density, Plasma beta and Temperature as well as IMF Bz, into consideration. We have categorized the storms into three categories based on the Dst Index as weak (-30nT ≤ Dst ≤ -50nT), moderate (-50nT ≤ Dst ≤ -100nT) and intense (Dst ≤ -100nT) storms. The relation of delay with solar wind parameters and IMF components were studied separately for different classes of storms and for different delays viz. 0,1,2,3,4 (hours). From our analysis we are able to draw some interesting inferences. The fact, that the characteristic feature describing the geoeffectiveness of the IMF is its z-component; Bz, and the electric field component -V× Bz, stands true for all delay classes of the storms. The time delay (∆T) between peak values of IMF Bz and minimum Dst can vary in a wide range and mostly varies from 0-10 hours. However, it was found that a major percentage (~80 %) of the storms have a 0 - 4 hour delay. Meanwhile Temperature, density and plasma beta seems to have no significant association with the storm intensity.

  20. Geomagnetically Induced Currents, a space weather hazard. Case study - Europe under intense geomagnetic storms of the solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrica, V.; Demetrescu, Cr.; Stefan, C.; Greculeasa, R.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of the solar wind and heliospheric magnetic field with the magnetosphere and ionosphere results in variations of the geomagnetic field that induce hazardous electric currents in grounded technological systems (electric power and hydrocarbon transportation networks), the so-called geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). In order to evaluate the hazard induced on the European continent, we present a study of the surface electric field induced by 16 intense (Dst < -150 nT) geomagnetic storms, based on the analysis of the geomagnetic records from the European network of observatories, study that tend to solve the geophysical part of the problem. The evolution during storm development and the sources of the disturbance field are explored in case of the largest geomagnetic storm in the cycle 23 (Dst = -422 nT, November 20-21, 2003), and the geographical distribution of the maximum induced surface geoelectric field over Europe by the 16 storms considered in the study is presented. As source proxies, the Dst geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the magnetospheric ring current at the geomagnetic equator, the AL geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the ionospheric electrojet at auroral latitude, and the PC geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the polar cap current, were examined.

  1. Empirical Model of Subauroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Subauroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) are important electromagnetic phenomena associated with geomagnetic storms that affect the inner magnetosphere and ionosphere. They are characterized by strong sunward plasma flows caused by poleward-directed electric fields in the region of the ionosphere equatorword of the auroral zone. To examine the effects subauroral electric fields have on ITM coupling and magnetospheric-ionospheric convection we are developing an empirical model of SAPS using data acquired by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft which have made decades of in-situ measurements of ionospheric ion drifts, composition, and precipitating auroral particles. These measurements are used to characterize the subauroral electric fields relative to the location of the auroral boundary at varying magnetic local times and magnetic activity levels. As a critical component of this model, we have developed a model of the nightside zero energy electron precipitation boundary equatorward of the auroral oval parameterized by AE and MLT, using boundary identifications derived from DMSP data. We will use this model to create a global subauroral potential model and perform a superposed epoch study of SAPS fields in relationship to the auroral boundary during selected geomagnetic storms as a function of storm phase. A global empirical model of SAPS electric fields of this kind is required to realistically model thermosphere-ionosphere coupling and inner-magnetospheric convection.

  2. Thermospheric composition changes seen during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, A. G.; Kileen, T. L.; Roble, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    The largest magnitude winds observed using the instruments on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE-2) satellite were measured during the large geomagnetic storm that occurred on November 24, 1982. Neutral temperatures exceeded 2000 K during this storm, and these high temperatures, combined with the very large observed winds and the very full instrumental coverage available in both hemispheres, make it a unique event to study. This paper presents results obtained using these DE-2 data and a time dependent simulation of the event made using the NCAR Thermosphere/Ionosphere General Circulation Model (NCAR-TIGCM). In general, the agreement between model calculations and the data is very good, implying that most of the important physical processes controlling the energetics and dynamics of the thermosphere are reasonably well represented in the model. The modeled summer hemisphere changes in the mass mixing ratio of N2 (Psi(N2)) are in very good agreement with the averaged data in both hemispheres. This paper describes model-experiment comparisons for the November 24, 1982 geomagnetic storm changes.

  3. Global ionospheric dynamics and electrodynamics during geomagnetic storms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Tsurutani, B.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Komjathy, A.; Butala, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Globally distributed total electron content (TEC) data has become an important tool for exploring the consequences of storm-time electrodynamics. Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling during the main phase is responsible for the largest ionospheric effects observed during geomagnetic storms, mediated by global scale electrodynamics. Recent research using case studies reveals a complex picture of M-I coupling and its relationship to interplanetary drivers such as the solar wind electric field. Periods of direct coupling exist where the solar wind electric field is strongly correlated with prompt penetration electric fields, observed as enhanced vertical plasma drifts or an enhanced electrojet in the daytime equatorial ionosphere. Periods of decoupling between low latitude electric fields and the solar wind electric field are also observed, but the factors distinguishing these two types of response have not been clearly identified. Recent studies during superstorms suggest a role for the transverse (y-component) of the interplanetary magnetic field, which affects magnetospheric current systems and therefore may affect M-I coupling, with significant ionospheric consequences. Observations of the global ionospheric response to a range of geomagnetic storm intensities are presented. Scientific understanding of the different factors that affect electrodynamic aspects of M-I coupling are discussed.

  4. Ionospheric response to great geomagnetic storms during solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merline Matamba, Tshimangadzo; Bosco Habarulema, John

    2016-07-01

    The analyses of ionospheric responses due to great geomagnetic storms i.e. Dst index < 350 nT that occurred during solar cycle 23 are presented. The GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) and ionosonde data over Southern and Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes were used to study the ionospheric responses. A geomagnetic latitude region of ±30° to ±46° within a longitude sector of 15° to 40° was considered. Using a criteria of Dst < -350 nT, there were only four great storm periods (29 March - 02 April 2001, 27 - 31 October 2003, 18 - 23 November 2003 and 06 - 11 November 2004) in solar cycle 23. Analysis has shown that ionospheric dynamics during these disturbed conditions could be due to a number of dynamic and electrodynamics processes in both Hemispheres. In some instances the ionosphere responds differently to the same storm condition in both Hemispheres. Physical mechanisms related to (but not limited to) composition changes and electric fields will be discussed.

  5. Large geomagnetic storms of extreme solar event periods in solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruiguang

    During extreme solar events such as big flares or/and energetic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) high energy particles are accelerated by the shocks formed in front of fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The ICMEs (and their sheaths) also give rise to large geomagnetic storms which have significant effects on the Earth's environment and human life. Around 14 solar cosmic ray ground level enhancement (GLE) events in solar cycle 23 we examined the cosmic ray variation, solar wind speed, ions density, interplanetary magnetic field, and geomagnetic disturbance storm time index ( Dst). We found that all but one of GLEs are always followed by a geomagnetic storm with Dst ⩽ -50 nT within 1-5 days later. Most(10/14) geomagnetic storms have Dst index ⩽ -100 nT therefore generally belong to strong geomagnetic storms. This suggests that GLE event prediction of geomagnetic storms is 93% for moderate storms and 71% for large storms when geomagnetic storms preceded by GLEs. All Dst depressions are associated with cosmic ray decreases which occur nearly simultaneously with geomagnetic storms. We also investigated the interplanetary plasma features. Most geomagnetic storm correspond significant periods of southward Bz and in close to 80% of the cases that the Bz was first northward then turning southward after storm sudden commencement (SSC). Plasma flow speed, ion number density and interplanetary plasma temperature near 1 AU also have a peak at interplanetary shock arrival. Solar cause and energetic particle signatures of large geomagnetic storms and a possible prediction scheme are discussed.

  6. Study of Ring Current Dynamics During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordanova, Vania K.

    2000-01-01

    This research program considered modeling the dynamical evolution of the ring current during several geomagnetic storms. The first year (6/01/1997-5/31/1998) of this successful collaborative research between the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) was supported by NASA grant NAG5-4680. The second and third years (6/01/1998-5/31/2000) were funded at UNH under NASA grant NAG5-7368. Research work at UNH concentrated on further development of a kinetic model to treat all of the important physical processes that affect the ring current ion population during storm conditions. This model was applied to simulate ring current development during several International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) events, and the results were directly compared to satellite observations. A brief description of our major accomplishments and a list of the publications and presentations resulting from this effort are given.

  7. Long-duration positive ionospheric storm during the December 2006 geomagnetic storm: Ionizing effect of forbidden electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, A. V.; Huang, C.-M.; Tsai, L.-C.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Ratovsky, K. G.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at low latitudes was studied during the major geomagnetic storm on 14-16 December 2006. Data from NOAA/POES satellites were used to identify the enhancements of forbidden energetic electrons (FEE). Global Ionospheric Maps and COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 radio occultation measurements were used for studying positive ionospheric storm phases. We found that long-lasting positive ionospheric storms were concomitant with FEE enhancements. We discussed relative contributions of the FEE ionizing effect as well as other general mechanisms to the positive ionospheric storm at different phases of the geomagnetic storm.

  8. Large geomagnetic storms of extreme solar event periods in solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. G.; Wang, J. X.

    At the duration of extreme solar events solar eruption associated with big flares or and energetic coronal mass ejections CMEs can not only make high energy particles acceleration but also give rise to large geomagnetic storms which have significant effects on the Earth s environment and human life Around 14 solar cosmic ray ground level enhancement GLE events in solar cycle 23 we examine the cosmic ray variations solar wind speeds ion densities interplanetary magnetic fields and geomagnetic disturbance storm time indices Dst We find that all but one of GLEs are always followed by a geomagnetic storm with Dst leq -50 nT within 1-5 days later Most 10 14 geomagnetic storms have Dst index leq -100 nT suggesting that GLE event prediction of geomagnetic storms is 93 for moderate storms and 71 for large storms More than half 57 Dst depressions are simultaneously accompanied by cosmic ray decreases and other Dst variabilities are without clear cosmic ray deceases We also investigated the interplanetary plasma features during GLE events Most geomagnetic storm correspond significant periods of southward B z and in close to 80 of the cases that the B z was first northward then turning southward after storm sudden commencement SSC Plasma flow speed ion number density and interplanetary plasma temperature near 1 AU also have a peak at interplanetary shock arrival Solar cause and energetic particle signatures of large geomagnetic storms are discussed

  9. Vertical total electron content and geomagnetic perturbations at mid- and sub-auroral southern latitudes during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Amalia; Andrea van Zele, María; Claudio, Brunini; Rosalía Cabassi, Iris

    2005-03-01

    Several new space geodesy techniques allow us to analyze the behavior of the vertical total electron content (VTEC) with high spatial and temporal resolution. This study is based on the VTEC computed from global positioning system (GPS) satellite signals that are recorded from observatories located at mid- and sub-auroral southern latitudes. The geomagnetic disturbances are analyzed using the Dst and AL geomagnetic indices and geomagnetic field variations which are recorded from an observatory close to one of the GPS stations and from observatories located at equivalent geomagnetic latitudes but in the Northern Hemisphere. The study is focused on two consecutive geomagnetic storms, which happened on October 4 and 5, 2000, characterized by two flips of the interplanetary magnetic field. During this perturbed period, the substorms are evidenced by the AL index and by the field variations recorded by the geomagnetic observatories. We also analyze a substorm effect that occurred during a geomagnetic storm. Variations in f0F2 are currently considered to study the geomagnetic storm effects on the ionosphere. Our results show that at mid- and subauroral southern latitudes the behavior of the VTEC evidences the “dusk” effect (positive ionospheric storm after noon) in a similar way to f0F2 variations. Similar geomagnetic conditions can be inferred from the Dst index for both geomagnetic storms but a quick rise of the VTEC and the dusk effect is only observed on the first stormy day. The positive ionospheric storm is followed by a negative phase that lasts until October 6. The second geomagnetic storm starts when the negative phase of the first ionospheric storm is still deployed and the ionosphere/plasmasphere system conditions do not allow a new positive ionospheric storm. The AL index and the geomagnetic field variations allow us to recognize the expansion phase of the substorm due to the presence of the electromagnetic wedge that couples the magnetosphere and

  10. The disturbances of ionospheric Total Electron Content during great geomagnetic storm above Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ubaidi, Najat

    2016-07-01

    Several efforts have been made to study the behavior of Total Electron Content (TEC) with many types of geomagnetic storms; the purpose of this research is to study the disturbances of the ionosphere through the TEC parameter during great geomagnetic storm. TEC data selected for year 2003 (descending solar cycle 23), as available from (www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/IONO/USTEC/) for Iraq region (longitude 27-54 degree East, latitude 27-42 degree North) during great geomagnetic storm for 28-30 October 2003. To find out the type of geomagnetic storms the Disturbance storm time (Dst) index was selected for the days selected from Kyoto/Japan website. From data analysis, it is found that in general, there is a good proportionality between disturbance storm time index (Dst) and the total electron contents, the values of TEC in daytime greater than night time, but there is anomaly when the storm continued for several hours from the day.

  11. Global structure of ionospheric TEC anomalies driven by geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancheva, D.; Mukhtarov, P.; Andonov, B.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the structure and variability of the ionospheric TEC anomalies driven by geomagnetic storms. For this purpose the CODE global ionospheric TEC data from four geomagnetically disturbed periods (29 October-1 November 2003, 7-10 November 2004, 14-15 December 2006, and 5-6 August 2011) have been considered. By applying the tidal analysis to the geomagnetically forced TEC anomalies we made an attempt to identify the tidal or stationary planetary wave (SPW) signatures that may contribute to the generation of these anomalies. It has been found that three types of positive anomalies with different origin and different latitudinal appearance are observed. These are: (i) anomalies located near latitudes of ±40° and related to the enhancement and poleward moving of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crests; (ii) anomalies located near latitudes of ±60° and seen predominantly in the night-side ionosphere, and (iii) very high latitude anomalies having mainly zonally symmetric structure and related to the auroral heating and thermospheric expansion. The decomposition analysis revealed that these anomalies can be reconstructed as a result of superposition of the following components: zonal mean (ZM), diurnal migrating (DW1), zonally symmetric diurnal (D0), and stationary planetary wave 1 (SPW1).

  12. Ionospheric, protonospheric and total electron content in quiet geomagnetic conditions and during geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosikov, Igor; Klimenko, Maxim; Klimenko, Vladimir

    This report presents the results of studies the ionospheric, plasmaspheric and total electron content during recent minimum of solar activity in quiet geomagnetic condition and for geomagnetic storm on 26 September 2011. A comparison of the calculation results obtained using the GSM TIP model, with observational data of the mid- and high-latitude ionospheric sounding stations, as well as estimation of the plasmaspheric reservoir contribution into the total electron content obtained from GPS TEC measurements, COSMIC radio-occultation experiment and incoherent scatter radars were presented. The particular attention is given to the global distribution of the O+/H+ transition height in order to determine the top and low boundary for ionospheric and protonospheric electron content, respectively. This work was supported by Grant of Russian President №МК-4866.2014.5, №14-05-00578, and Program 22 RAS.

  13. Response of the thermosphere and ionosphere to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Codrescu, M. V.; Moffett, R. J.; Quegan, S.

    1994-01-01

    Four numerical simulations have been performed, at equinox, using a coupled thermosphere-ionosphere model, to illustrate the response of the upper atmosphere to geomagnetic storms. The storms are characterized by an increase in magnetospheric energy input at high latitude for a 12-hour period; each storm commences at a different universal time (UT). The initial response at high latitude is that Joule heating raises the temperature of the upper thermosphere and ion drag drives high-velocity neutral winds. The heat source drives a global wind surge, from both polar regions, which propagates to low latitudes and into the opposite hemisphere. The surge has the character of a large-scale gravity wave with a phase speed of about 600 m/s. Behind the surge a global circulation of magnitude 100 m/s is established at middle latitudes, indicating that the wave and the onset of global circulation are manifestations of the same phenomena. A dominant feature of the response is the penetration of the surge into the opposite hemisphere where it drives poleward winds for a few hours. The global wind surge has a preference for the night sector and for the longitude of the magnetic pole and therefore depends on the UT start time of the storm. A second phase of the meridional circulation develops after the wave interaction but is also restricted, in this case by the buildup of zonal winds via the Coriolis interaction. Conservation of angular momentum may limit the buildup of zonal wind in extreme cases. The divergent wind field drives upwelling and composition change on both height and pressure surfaces. The composition bulge responds to both the background and the storm-induced horizontal winds; it does not simply rotate with Earth. During the storm the disturbance wind modulates the location of the bulge; during the recovery the background winds induce a diurnal variation in its position. Equatorward winds in sunlight produce positive ionospheric changes during the main driving

  14. Ion Upflows in the Polar Magnetosphere During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, N.; Nishimura, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Shinbori, A.; Ono, T.; Iizima, M.; Kumamoto, A.; Abe, T.; Yamada, M.; Watanabe, S.; Yau, A.

    2008-12-01

    We performed a case study of ion upflows enhanced during a geomagnetic storm using data obtained by the Akebono satellite. Based on the location of intense upflows and their velocities, trajectories of the upflowing oxygen ions were traced using the single particle approach. Using these results, the importance of thermal oxygen ions with a large upward flux was discussed. We used electron density data observed by the PWS, and an ion composition ratio and field-aligned velocities observed by the SMS onboard Akebono. A numerical code developed by Ebihara et al. [2006] was used for calculations of oxygen ion trajectories. In the code, the Tsyganenko-89 and Weimer-2K models were used as magnetic and electric field models, under conditions of Kp = 7, nsw = 10 /cc, Vsw = 500 km/s, IMF By = 0 and Bz = -20 nT. We performed a case study for a geomagnetic storm which occurred on March 30, 1990, using data obtained by Akebono in an altitude range of 6000-10000 km in the dayside polar region. During the main phase of the storm, the electron density enhanced 3-30 times larger than the quiet-time level in the auroral zone and polar cap. The SMS instrument measured intense ion upflows in the entire polar cap along the satellite path. Eighty percents of the upflowing ions were composed of oxygen and the upward velocities of oxygen along the field lines ranged 4-10 km/s, which was comparable to the escape velocity. The upflow flux of the oxygen ion mapped to 1000 km altitude corresponded to 1-4×109 /cm2/s. Based on the observations, we calculated trajectories of the upflowing oxygen ions released at 9000 km altitude, which was near the altitude of the ion upflow observed by Akebono. Initial velocities of the oxygen ions were given in a range of 1-12 km/s, directed to the upward field-aligned direction in the electric field (E×B) drifting coordinate. The initial positions were 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 MLT at 75° ILAT, and 70°, 75°, and 80° ILAT at 12 MLT. At all of the initial

  15. Effects of magnetic fields produced by simulated and real geomagnetic storms on rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Bretón, J. L.; Mendoza, B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report experiments of arterial pressure (AP) measurements of ten Wistar rats subjected to geomagnetic field changes and to artificially stimulated magnetic field variations. Environmental electromagnetic effects were screened using a semianechoic chamber, which allowed us to discern the effects associated with geomagnetic storms. We stimulated the subjects with a linear magnetic profile constructed from the average changes of sudden storm commencement (SSC) and principal phases of geomagnetic storms measured between 1996 and 2008 with Dst ⩽ -100 nT. Although we found no statistically significant AP variations, statistically significant AP changes were found when a geomagnetic storm occurred during the experimental period. Using the observed geomagnetic storm variations to construct a geomagnetic profile to stimulate the rats, we found that the geomagnetic field variations associated to the SSC day were capable of increasing the subjects AP between 7% and 9% from the reference value. Under this magnetic variation, the subjects presented a notably restless behavior not seen under other conditions. We conclude that even very small changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm can produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response.

  16. Latitudinal variation of the polar cusp during a geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, C.

    1982-01-01

    Large amplitude latitudinal variation of the polar cusp position was observed during the intense geomagnetic storm of 15--16 February 1980. The observation of the polar cusp, identified as the region of intense but extremely soft electron precipitation, was made by two nearly noon-midnight orbit DMSP satellites over both northern and southern hemispheres. The latitudinal shift of the polar cusp is observed to be related to the intensity variation of the ring current indicated by the hourly Dst values. The polar cusp region moved from its normal location at approx.76/sup 0/ gm lat down to approx.62/sup 0/ gm lat at the peak of this storm. This movement took about 5 hours and was detected over both hemispheres. A drastic variation in the width of the cusp region was also observed; it is very narrow (approx.1/sup 0/) during the equatorial shift and expands to > or approx. =5/sup 0/ during the poleward recovery. Variation of the polar cusp latitude with that of the Dst index was also seen during the period before the intense storm.

  17. Moderate Geomagnetic Storms: Interplanetary Origins and Coupling Functions (ISEE3 Data)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendes, Odim, Jr.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Gonzalez, A. L. C.; Pinto, O., Jr.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1996-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are related to the ring current intensification, which is driven by energy injection primarily during energetic solar wind-magnetosphere coupling due to reconnection at the magnetopause. This work identified the interplanetary origins of moderate geomagnetic storms (-100nT is less or equal to Dst(sub peak) is less than or equal to -50 nT) and analyzed the coupling processes during the storm main phase at solar maximum (1978-1979).

  18. Study of the mid-latitude ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms in the European region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berényi, Kitti Alexandra; Barta, Veronika; Kis, Arpad

    2016-07-01

    Geomagnetic storms affect the ionospheric regions of the terrestrial upper atmosphere through different physical and atmospheric processes. The phenomena that can be regarded as a result of these processes, generally is named as "ionospheric storm". The processes depend on altitude, segment of the day, the geomagnetic latitude and longitude, strength of solar activity and the type of the geomagnetic storm. We examine the data of ground-based radio wave ionosphere sounding measurements of European ionospheric stations (mainly the data of Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory) in order to determine how and to what extent a geomagnetic disturbance of a certain strength affects the mid-latitude ionospheric regions in winter and in summer. For our analysis we used disturbed time periods between November 2012 and June 2015. Our results show significant changing of the ionospheric F2 layer parameters on strongly disturbed days compared to quiet ones. We show that the critical frequencies (foF2) increase compared to their quiet day value when the ionospheric storm was positive. On the other hand, the critical frequencies become lower, when the storm was negative. In our analysis we determined the magnitude of these changes on the chosen days. For a more complete analysis we compare also the evolution of the F2 layer parameters of the European ionosonde stations on a North-South geographic longitude during a full storm duration. The results present the evolution of an ionospheric storm over a geographic meridian. Furthermore, we compared the two type of geomagnetic storms, namely the CME caused geomagnetic storm - the so-called Sudden impulse (Si) storms- and the HSS (High Speed Solar Wind Streams) caused geomagnetic storms -the so-called Gradual storms (Gs)- impact on the ionospheric F2-layer (foF2 parameter). The results show a significant difference between the effect of Si and of the Gs storms on the ionospheric F2-layer.

  19. Database of ion temperature maps during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, Amy M.; Scime, Earl E.

    2015-02-01

    Ion temperatures as a function of the x and y axes in the geocentric solar magnetospheric (GSM) coordinate system and time are available for 76 geomagnetic storms that occurred during the period July 2008 to December 2013 on CDAWeb. The method for mapping energetic neutral atom data from the Two Wide-angle Imaging Spectrometers (TWINS) mission to the GSM equatorial plane and subsequent ion temperature calculation are described here. The ion temperatures are a measure of the average thermal energy of the bulk ion population in the 1-40 keV energy range. These temperatures are useful for studies of ion dynamics, for placing in situ measurements in a global context, and for establishing boundary conditions for models of the inner magnetosphere and the plasma sheet.

  20. Driving Plasmaspheric Electron Density Simulations During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.; Jordanova, V.; Goldstein, J.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We test global convection electric field models driving plasmaspheric electron density simulations (RAM-CPL) during geomagnetic storms with in situ measurements provided by the Van Allen Probes (RBSP). RAM-CPL is the cold plasma component of the ring-current atmosphere interactions suite (RAM-SCB) and describes the evolution of plasma density in the magnetic equatorial plane near Earth. Geomagnetic events observed by the RBSP satellites in different magnetic local time (MLT) sectors enable a comparison of local asymmetries in the input electric field and output densities of these simulations. Using a fluid MHD approach, RAM-CPL reproduces core plasmaspheric densities (L<4) to less than 1 order of magnitude difference. Approximately 80% of plasmapause crossings, defined by a low-density threshold, are reproduced to within a mean radial difference of 0.6 L. RAM-CPL, in conjunction with a best-fit driver, can be used in other studies as an asset to predict density conditions in locations distant from RBSP orbits of interest.

  1. Responses of equatorial F region to different geomagnetic storms observed by GPS in the African sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adewale, A. O.; Oyeyemi, E. O.; Adeloye, A. B.; Ngwira, C. M.; Athieno, R.

    2011-12-01

    This article presents the first results regarding the investigation of the response of the equatorial ionospheric F region in the African sector during geomagnetic storm periods between April 2000 and November 2007 using GPS-derived vertical total electron content observed at Libreville, Gabon (0.35°N, 9.67°E, dip latitude -8.05°S). We performed a superposed epoch analysis of the storms by defining the start time of the epoch as the storm onset time. During geomagnetic storms, the altered electric fields contribute significantly to the occurrence of negative and positive ionospheric storm effects. Our results showed that the positive storm effects are more prevalent than the negative storm effects and generally last longer irrespective of storm onset times. Also, the positive storm effects are most pronounced in the daytime than in the premidnight and postmidnight periods.

  2. Geomagnetic storms prediction from InterMagnetic Observatories data using the Multilayer Perceptron neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadfeul, S.; Aliouane, L.; Tourtchine, V.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a tentative of geomagnetic storms prediction is implanted by analyzing the International Real-Time Magnetic Observatory Network data using the Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The implanted method is based on the prediction of future horizontal geomagnetic field component using a Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) neural network model. The input is the time and the output is the X and Y magnetic field components. Application to geomagnetic data of Mai 2002 shows that the implanted ANN model can greatly help the geomagnetic storms prediction.

  3. Prediction of foF2 during geomagnetic storms - a global perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vickal; Parkinson, Murray

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms cause complex and difficult to predict changes in ionospheric electron density. The severity of density perturbations depends on various parameters including solar cycle phase, season, local time of storm onset, the intensity and duration of the storm, and the geomagnetic coordinates of the station. Superposed Epoch Analysis (SEA) was used to examine a 50-year period (years 1964-2014, solar cycles 20-24) of foF2 observations recorded using a world-wide database of over 160 ionosondes. The analysis was used to identify reoccurring patterns in the evolution of foF2 for various geomagnetic storm parameters. A total of 1356 storms were identified in the 50-year period using a Dst-index based temporal filter, namely Dst ≤‑30 nT for at least 5 consecutive hours. Before the SEA, diurnal and seasonal effects were accounted for by subtracting monthly median quiet-time values of foF2. The SEA identified and ranked the effects of various parameters on foF2. The analysis showed that storm-time foF2 perturbations are regulated mostly strongly by storm intensity and duration, geomagnetic latitude, season, phase of the solar cycle, and local time of storm onset. Solar cycle number and geomagnetic longitude had the least influence on foF2 perturbations. The most regularly observed storm feature was an increase in electron density (positive storm effect) at low magnetic latitudes during the post storm onset hours. Decreases in electron densities (negative storm effects) occurred at mid and high magnetic latitude regions, but with the depth of density decrease exhibiting a strong dependency on storm intensity, season and phase of solar cycle. This analysis forms the basis of empirical model which can be used to help predict storm-time variations of foF2.

  4. Geomagnetic sudden impulses and storm sudden commencements - A note on terminology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joselyn, J. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1990-01-01

    The definitions of and distinctions between storm sudden commencements (SSCs) and geomagnetic sudden impulses (SIs) are examined and present definitions of SIs and SSCs are modernized. Quantitative definitions of the two terms are recommended.

  5. Orientation Of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Associated With Filament Eruptions And Major Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Ye, P.; Zhou, G.; Wang, S.; Wang, J.

    2004-12-01

    As a major source of non-recurrent geomagnetic storms, more than half of magnetic clouds in the interplanetary medium are associated with filament eruptions [Subramanian and Dere, 2001]. The strength of south component of the magnetic field inside magnetic cloud and its duration are consider the very important factors in causing geomagnetic storm. Obviously, these factors are related to the orientation of magnetic cloud in terms of flux rope model. By investigating the observations of SOHO and ACE spacecraft from 2000 to 2003, the relationship between the orientation of interplanetary magnetic clouds which were associated with filament eruptions and major geomagnetic storms are studied. Two issues are discussed: (1) the effect of magnetic cloud's orientation on the intensity of geomagnetic storm, and (2) the possible factors in influencing the cloud's orientation. The results will be worked out.

  6. Substorms observations over Apatity during geomagnetic storms in the period 2012 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, Veneta; Werner, Rolf; Despirak, Irina; Kozelov, Boris

    2016-07-01

    In this work we studied substorms, generated during enhanced geomagnetic activity in the period 2012 - 2016. Observations of the Multiscale Aurora Imaging Network (MAIN) in Apatity have been used. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters were judged by the 1-min sampled OMNI data base. Substorm onset and further development were verified by the 10-s sampled data of IMAGE magnetometers and by data of the all-sky camera at Apatity. Subject of the study were substorms occurred during geomagnetic storms. The so-called "St. Patrick's day 2015 event" (17-21 March 2015), the events on 17-18 March 2013 and 7-17 March 2012 (a chain of events generated four consecutive storms) which were among the events of strongest geomagnetic activity during the current solar cycle 24, were part of the storms under consideration. The behavior of the substorms developed during different phases of the geomagnetic storms was discussed.

  7. Geomagnetic sudden impulses and storm sudden commencements - A note on terminology

    SciTech Connect

    Joselyn, J.A.; Tsurutani, B.T. JPL, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-11-01

    The definitions of and distinctions between storm sudden commencements (SSCs) and geomagnetic sudden impulses (SIs) are examined and present definitions of SIs and SSCs are modernized. Quantitative definitions of the two terms are recommended. 45 refs.

  8. A search for the interplanetary quantity controlling the development of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1979-01-01

    An historical account is presented concerning the evolution of our present concept of geomagnetic storms. The present concept was formulated by Chapman (1927) in his magnetic data statistical studies of 'the initial rise' (now termed the initial phase) 'and subsequent larger decrease' (now termed the main phase) in H, followed by 'slow recovery'. The concept introduced by Alfven in 1940 of guiding center motions of a charged particle in a nonuniform magnetic field (ring currents) is also discussed. By 1963 it became quite certain that the ring current, namely a storm-time Van Allen belt, is formed in the magnetosphere during the storm's main phase. The search then began for the solar wind quantity controlling the development of the main phase. The author then gives a personal account of how our concept of geomagnetic storms has advanced and how new findings based on satellite and ground-based observations have made it possible to arrive at a first-approximation expression for the interplanetary quantity controlling the development of geomagnetic storms. Since a geomagnetic storm is a magnetic manifestation of a magnetospheric storm, which is a nonlinear superposition of intense magnetospheric substorms, the main emphasis is shifted toward the understanding of magnetospheric substorms in order to arrive at the parameters controlling the development of geomagnetic storms.

  9. Geomagnetic storm's precursors observed from 2001 to 2007 with the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kuwabara, T.; Bieber, J.; Schuch, N. J.; Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E.; Al Jassar, H. K.; Sharma, M. M.; Sabbah, I.

    2011-08-01

    We use complementary observations from the prototype and expanded Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN) and the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite to identify precursors of geomagnetic storm events. The GMDN was completed and started operation in March 2006 with the addition of the Kuwait detector, complementing the detectors at Nagoya, Hobart, and São Martinho da Serra. Analyzed geomagnetic storms sorted by their intensity as measured by the Disturbance storm-time (Dst) index. Between March 2001 and December 2007, 122 Moderate Storms (MS), 51 Intense Storms (IS), and 8 Super Storms (SS) were monitored by the GMDN. The major conclusions are (i) the percentage of the events accompanied by the precursors prior to the Sudden Storm Commencement (SSC) increases with increasing peak Dst, (ii) 15% of MSs, 30% of ISs, and 86% of SSs are accompanied by cosmic ray precursors observed on average 7.2 hours in advance of the SSC.

  10. Total electron content variations observed at a low latitude GPS station in association to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes da Costa, A.; Fonseca Junior, E.; Vilas Boas, J.

    Total electron content (TEC) has been continuously monitored since January 1997, using a GPS dual frequency receiver located at Presidente Prudente (22o 07'S, 51o 22' W). In this paper the enhancements observed in the ionspheric TEC are associated with geomagnetic field variations for six geomagnetic storms that occurred from 1997 to 2000. The events were selected according to the integrity and availability of data. The purpose of this study is to provide a better knowledge of the low-latitude behavior of TEC in association to geomagnetic storms. Quiet-time TEC values were obtained by the average of the five magnetically less disturbed days of the month. These values were subtracted from the TEC hourly averages measured during the period of the magnetic storms. Magnetic field intensity measured on the ground was used for the identification of the storm time variations and the Dst indices were also included as a reference for the latitudes considered. The results showed that moderate geomagnetic storms produce small effects in TEC, intense and super intense (Dst < ~150 nT) geomagnetic storms produce well defined and long lasting TEC enhancements. The super intense storms cause the GPS signals to loose their track and the corresponding TEC values cannot be derived.

  11. Solar and Interplanetary Disturbances Causing Moderate Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap Yadav, Mahendra; Kumar, Santosh

    2003-07-01

    The effect of solar and interplanetary disturbances on geomagnetospheric conditions leading to one hundred twenty one moderate geomagnetic storms (MGSs) with planetary index, Ap ≥ 20 and horizontal component of earth's magnetic field, H ≤ 250γ have been investigated using solar geophysical data (SGD), solar wind plasma (SWP) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data during the period 1978-99. It is observed statistically that 64%, 36%, MGSs have occurred during maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle 21st and 22nd respectively. Further, it is observed that Hα, X-ray solar flares and active prominences and disapp earing filaments (APDFs) have occurred within lower helio latitude region associated with larger number of MGSs. No significant correlation between the intensity of GMSs and importance of Hα, X-ray solar flares have been observed. Maximum number of MGSs are associated with solar flares of lower importance of solar flare faint (SF). The lower importance in association with some specific characteristics i.e. location, region, duration of occurrence of event may also cause MGSs. The correlation coefficient between MGSs and sunspot numbers (SSNs) using Karl Pearson method, has been obtained 0.37 during 1978-99.

  12. Do geomagnetic storms change the behaviour of the stingless bee guiruçu (Schwarziana quadripunctata)?

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Darci M S; Wajnberg, E; do Nascimento, F S; Pinho, M B; Lins de Barros, H G P; Eizemberg, R

    2007-02-01

    Six behavioural experiments were carried out to investigate the magnetic field effects on the nest-exiting flight directions of the honeybee Schwarziana quadripunctata (Meliponini). No significant differences resulted during six experiment days under varying geomagnetic field and the applied static inhomogeneous field (about ten times the geomagnetic field) conditions. A surprising statistically significant response was obtained on a unique magnetic storm day. The magnetic nanoparticles in these bees, revealed by ferromagnetic resonance, could be involved in the observed effect of the geomagnetic storm. PMID:17028885

  13. Do geomagnetic storms change the behaviour of the stingless bee guiruçu ( Schwarziana quadripunctata)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, Darci M. S.; Wajnberg, E.; Do Nascimento, F. S.; Pinho, M. B.; de Barros, H. G. P. Lins; Eizemberg, R.

    2007-02-01

    Six behavioural experiments were carried out to investigate the magnetic field effects on the nest-exiting flight directions of the honeybee Schwarziana quadripunctata ( Meliponini). No significant differences resulted during six experiment days under varying geomagnetic field and the applied static inhomogeneous field (about ten times the geomagnetic field) conditions. A surprising statistically significant response was obtained on a unique magnetic storm day. The magnetic nanoparticles in these bees, revealed by ferromagnetic resonance, could be involved in the observed effect of the geomagnetic storm.

  14. Some properties of trans-equatorial ion whistlers observed by Isis satellites during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.; Ondoh, T.

    1986-01-01

    Several ion whistlers were observed by the polar orbiting satellites, Isis, during geomagnetic storms associated with large solar flares in 1982. It seems that the proton density ratio to the total ions deduced from the crossover frequency of the transequatorial ion whistlers observed at geomagnetic low latitudes during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm on July 14, 1982 was lower than the usual density ratio. An anomalous pattern seen on the time-compressed dynamic spectra of the ion whistlers on September 6, 1982 may suggest the existence of effects by the component He(3+) in a quite small amount.

  15. Detailed Analysis of Solar Data Related to Historical Extreme Geomagnetic Storms: 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Laure; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Dumbović, Mateja; Vršnak, Bojan; Sudar, Davor; Arlt, Rainer; Clette, Frédéric; Crosby, Norma

    2016-05-01

    An analysis of historical Sun-Earth connection events in the context of the most extreme space weather events of the last ˜150 years is presented. To identify the key factors leading to these extreme events, a sample of the most important geomagnetic storms was selected based mainly on the well-known aa index and on geomagnetic parameters described in the accompanying paper (Vennerstrøm et al., Solar Phys. in this issue, 2016, hereafter Paper I). This part of the analysis focuses on associating and characterizing the active regions (sunspot groups) that are most likely linked to these major geomagnetic storms.

  16. Ionospheric Behavior During the First Few Hours of Intense Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannucci, Anthony J.; Crowley, Geoff; Tsurutani, Bruce; Fuller-Rowell, Tim

    2006-01-01

    The behavior of the ionosphere during the first few hours of intense geomagnetic storms is presented. The topics include: 1) TEC Modification; 2) JASON TEC (1336 km altitude); 3) Multiple Storms; 4) CHAMP (greater than 400 km) November 20, 2003; 5) November 20, 1PM LT, Ground; 6) Role of Modeling; and 7) Composition-related increase.

  17. A study on precursors leading to geomagnetic storms using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gaurav; Singh, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    Space weather prediction involves advance forecasting of the magnitude and onset time of major geomagnetic storms on Earth. In this paper, we discuss the development of an artificial neural network-based model to study the precursor leading to intense and moderate geomagnetic storms, following halo coronal mass ejection (CME) and related interplanetary (IP) events. IP inputs were considered within a 5-day time window after the commencement of storm. The artificial neural network (ANN) model training, testing and validation datasets were constructed based on 110 halo CMEs (both full and partial halo and their properties) observed during the ascending phase of the 24th solar cycle between 2009 and 2014. The geomagnetic storm occurrence rate from halo CMEs is estimated at a probability of 79%, by this model.

  18. Auroral LSTIDs and SAR Arc Occurrences in Northern California During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, A.; Kendall, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    A 630nm allsky imager has been operated for two years in northern California at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory. F-region airglow data captured by the imager ranges from approximately L=1.7 -2.7. Since installation of the imager several geomagnetic storms have occurred with varying intensities. Two main manifestations of the geomagnetic storms are observed in the 630 nm airglow data: large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances that are launched from the auroral zone and Stable Auroral Red (SAR) arcs during more intense geomagnetic storms. We will present a statistical analysis of these storm-time phenomena in northern California for the past eighteen months. This imager is part of a larger all-sky imaging network across the continental United States, termed MANGO (Midlatitude All-sky-imaging Network for Geophysical Observations). Where available, we will add data from networked imagers located at similar L-shell in other states as well.

  19. A study on precursors leading to geomagnetic storms using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gaurav; Singh, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Space weather prediction involves advance forecasting of the magnitude and onset time of major geomagnetic storms on Earth. In this paper, we discuss the development of an artificial neural network-based model to study the precursor leading to intense and moderate geomagnetic storms, following halo coronal mass ejection (CME) and related interplanetary (IP) events. IP inputs were considered within a 5-day time window after the commencement of storm. The artificial neural network (ANN) model training, testing and validation datasets were constructed based on 110 halo CMEs (both full and partial halo and their properties) observed during the ascending phase of the 24th solar cycle between 2009 and 2014. The geomagnetic storm occurrence rate from halo CMEs is estimated at a probability of 79%, by this model.

  20. Comparison of CME and CIR driven geomagnetic storms using the artificial neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revallo, Milos; Valach, Fridrich; Hejda, Pavel; Bochnicek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    A model of geomagnetic storms based on the method of artificial neural networks (ANN) combined with an analytical approach is presented in the paper. Unlike our previous studies, here we focus on medium and weak geomagnetic storms caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and those caused by corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As the model input, the hourly solar wind parameters measured by the ACE satellite at the libration point L1 are used. The time series of the Dst index is obtained as the model output. The simulated Dst index series is compared with the corresponding observatory data. The resulting Dst index series are inspected and typical features of CME and CIR driven storms are isolated. The model reliabilty is assessed using the skill scores, namely the correlation coefficient CC and the prediction efficiency PE. The general observation is that in the case of medium and weak geomagnetic storms the model performance is worse than in the case of intense geomagnetic storms studied in our previous paper. Due to more complex Dst index record, the model response for CIR driven storms is worse than in the case of CME driven storms.

  1. Reduction of the field-aligned potential drop in the polar cap during large geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, N.; Seki, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Hori, T.; Terada, N.; Ono, T.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    We have studied photoelectron flows and the inferred field-aligned potential drop in the polar cap during 5 large geomagnetic storms that occurred in the periods when the photoelectron observations in the polar cap were available near the apogee of the FAST satellite (~4000 km) at solar maximum, and the footprint of the satellite paths in the polar cap was under sunlit conditions most of the time. In contrast to the ~20 V potential drop during geomagnetically quiet periods at solar maximum identified by Kitamura et al. [JGR, 2012], the field-aligned potential drop frequently became smaller than ~5 V during the main and early recovery phases of the large geomagnetic storms. Because the potential acts to inhibit photoelectron escape, this result indicates that the corresponding acceleration of ions by the field-aligned potential drop in the polar cap and the lobe region is smaller during the main and early recovery phases of large geomagnetic storms compared to during geomagnetically quiet periods. Under small field-aligned current conditions, the number flux of outflowing ions should be nearly equal to the net escaping electron number flux. Since ions with large flux originating from the cusp/cleft ionosphere convect into the polar cap during geomagnetic storms [e.g., Kitamura et al., JGR, 2010], the net escaping electron number flux should increase to balance the enhanced ion outflows. The magnitude of the field-aligned potential drop would be reduced to let a larger fraction of photoelectrons escape.

  2. Data-Model Comparisons of Plasma Sheet Ion Temperatures during Moderate Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, A. M.; Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Trigo, B.; Robison, G.; Carr, J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Ion heating occurs during geomagnetic storms as a result of many physical processes, including magnetic reconnection and adiabatic heating. Ion temperatures calculated from TWINS energetic neutral atom (ENA) data provide a global view of regions of heated ions in the plasma sheet. Two storms of similar, moderate magnitude are analyzed, a coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven storm that occurred on 26 September 2011 and a high speed stream (HSS)-driven storm on 13 October 2012. We present a comparison of the ion temperatures during the storms to patterns observed in a superposed epoch analysis of ion temperatures [Keesee et al., 2013] and compare the October storm to a previously analyzed HSS-driven storm [Keesee et al., 2012]. We also present a comparison of observed ion temperatures to those calculated from a simulation of each storm using the Space Weather Modeling Framework, including the BATS-R-US MHD model coupled with the HEIDI inner magnetosphere model.

  3. Fractal and wavelet analysis evaluation of the mid latitude ionospheric disturbances associated with major geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Montes, Rebeca; Pérez-Enríquez, Román; Araujo-Pradere, Eduardo A.; López Cruz-Abeyro, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Variations of the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere are mainly associated with major geomagnetic storms occurring with the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the Earth environment. The purpose of this paper is to show results of the analysis we made of the impact of all major geomagnetic storms (Dst < - 200 nT) on the ionosphere at mid latitudes, which have occurred since 2000. The analysis consists in the calculation of TEC of the ionosphere using data from several Mexican GPS stations, with the purpose of quantifying the impact into the ionosphere to these latitudes, through the variations in amplitude, Hurst index, that is roughness, and wavelet transform of the time series of TEC. Indeed, during the geomagnetic storms of April 7, 2000, July 16, 2000, October 30, 2003, November 20, 2003 and November 8, 2004, major ionospheric disturbances at mid latitudes took place with changes in amplitude of TEC going from 3.29 to 8.82 sigmas. These ionospheric disturbances were probably associated with prompt penetration electric fields (PPEFs) and equatorward neutral winds. On the other hand, during four geomagnetic storms (August 12, 2000, March 31, 2001, April 11, 2001 and May 15, 2005), there were negative ionospheric storms that pushed the TEC to significantly lower values. This has been interpreted as the presence of regions in which the neutral composition is changed. Also, in some cases during the disturbed days, the Hurst values were smaller than during the undisturbed days, i.e. during these geomagnetic storms, the roughness of the time series of TEC increased. The wavelet analysis showed a strong influence of the diurnal variation on TEC values (periodicities of 12 h), and periodicities characteristics of ionospheric disturbances of 1-8 h. It is found that large geomagnetic storms produce significant ionospheric disturbances at mid latitudes, as shown by the wavelet analysis and, in some cases, changes in the roughness of the time series of

  4. Responses of relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Pu, Zuyin; Fu, Suiyan; Chen, Lunjin; Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen; Li, Jinxing; Guo, Ruilong; Parks, G. K.

    2015-11-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies, while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3-2.5 MeV electron fluxes show an increase, whereas 2.5-14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such "energy-dependent" responses of electrons preferably occur during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and these events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examined one of the cases where observed EMIC waves can resonate effectively with >2.5 MeV electrons and scatter them into the atmosphere. The correlation study further illustrates that electron flux dropouts during storm main phases do not correlate well with the flux buildup during storm recovery phases. We suggest that a combination of efficient EMIC-induced scattering and weaker chorus-driven acceleration provides a viable candidate for the energy-dependent responses of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons to geomagnetic storms. These results are of great interest to both understanding of the radiation belt dynamics and applications in space weather.

  5. Energy Dependent Responses of Relativistic Electron Fluxes in the Outer Radiation Belt to Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase 4 or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3-2.5 MeV electrons fluxes show increase, whereas 2.5-14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such 'energy dependent' behavior of electrons preferably occurs during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and these 'energy dependent' events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examined one of the cases where observed EMIC waves can resonate effectively with >2.5 MeV electrons and scatter them into the atmosphere. The correlation study further illustrates that electron flux drop-outs during storm main phases do not correlate well with the flux build-up during storm recovery phases. We suggest that a combination of efficient EMIC-induced scattering and weaker chorus-driven acceleration provide a viable candidate for the energy dependent responses of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons to geomagnetic storms. These results are of great interest to both understanding of the radiation belt dynamics and applications in space weather.

  6. Relativistic electron precipitation during geomagnetic storm time in the years 2006-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesnes Ødegaard, Linn-Kristine; Nesse Tyssøy, Hilde; Sandanger, Marit irene; Stadsnes, Johan; Søraas, Finn

    2015-04-01

    The processes leading to acceleration or loss of relativistic electrons in the magnetosphere during geomagnetic storm time have yet to be fully understood, and whether a geomagnetic storm will lead to enhanced or depleted fluxes of relativistic electrons can not be known in advance. Relativistic Electron Precipitation (REP) can penetrate deep into the atmosphere and influence composition and dynamics. To study the effect of REP upon the atmosphere, the energy and intensity of the electrons need to be accurately represented. We use satellite measurements of electrons with energies E>300 keV and E>1000 keV to study the behaviour of these electron populations during geomagnetic storms. We use the MEPED detectors on board the POES satellites NOAA-17, NOAA-18, MetOp-02 and NOAA-19, where the vertical telescope measures precipitated flux, and the horizontal telescope trapped flux at satellite altitude (ca 850 km). Using a newly developed technique, we can derive the flux of electrons depositing their energy in the atmosphere from the pair of detectors on each satellite. 75 isolated storms were identified in the period 2006-2010. The storms include both typical CME driven storms, and weak long duration storms driven by CIRs. Each storm was divided into pre-storm phase, main phase and recovery phase, and the flux of relativistic electrons was monitored through the storms. By combining the measurements from several satellites, we obtain a close to global view of the relativistic electron fluxes, enabling us to study the relationship between the REP and different geomagnetic indices and solar wind drivers.

  7. A Superposed Epoch Analysis of Geomagnetic Storms over a Solar Cycle: Geomagnetic and Solar Wind Data, Radar Backscatter & Auroral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, J. A.; Wright, D. M.; Milan, S. E.; Grocott, A.

    2010-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms - episodes of intense solar wind-magnetosphere coupling usually associated with extreme conditions in the solar wind such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) or co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) - cause large global disturbances in the Earth’s magnetosphere. During such storms, large amounts of energy are deposited in the magnetotail and inner magnetosphere, producing an enhanced ring current and energising plasma to relativistic levels by as yet unknown excitation mechanisms. By exploiting data from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in conjunction with space- and ground-based measurements of geospace over the last solar cycle, a database of geomagnetic storms has been compiled and analysed. Here we present some statistical findings from a superposed epoch analysis of 143 events identified from the global SYM-H index. We find that the duration of the main phase of storms decreases for increasing storm size, as defined by the maximum negative excursion of SYM-H, contrary to the results of previous studies. We also discuss a comparison of CME and CIR driven storms in terms of storm size, phase duration and evolution, and the associated solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. Initial work has successfully identified characteristic radar backscatter observed by the Super Dual Auoral Radar Network (SuperDARN) and, in particular, the new lower-latitude StormDARN radar network during these storm-time conditions. Here we present early findings of a superposed epoch analysis of auroral imagery from the IMAGE spacecraft and ionospheric convection maps from the SuperDARN radar network. This work further illustrates the storm-time coupling between the solar wind and magnetosphere, and develops the relationship between auroral oval radius and the evolution of the storm-time SYM-H index first reported by Milan et al., (2009). Once completed, this will be the most complete superposed epoch analyses of storms to date, combining multiple datasets

  8. Longitude dependent response of the GPS derived ionospheric ROTI to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanna, H. J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2014-08-01

    The local time dependent effects of geomagnetic storm on the ionospheric TEC and Rate of change of TEC Index (ROTI) are studied here using the GPS data for four different low latitude stations: Ogaswara, Japan (24.29 °N, 153.91 °E; Geomagnetic: 17.21 °N, 136.16 °W); Surat, India (21.16 °N, 72.78 °E; Geomagnetic: 12.88 °N, 146.91 °E); Bogota, Colombia (4.64 °N, -74.09 °E; Geomagnetic: 14.42 °N, 1.67 °W); and Kokee park Waimea, Hawaii, US (22.12 °N, -159.67 °E; Geomagnetic: 22.13 °N, 91.19 °W). The solar wind velocity and geomagnetic indices: Dst, Kp and IMF Bz are utilized to validate the geomagnetic storms registered during the years 2011 and 2012. Using the GPS based TEC data and computed values of ROTI, the storm induced ionospheric irregularities generation and inhibition has been studied for all stations. The present study suggests that, the F-region irregularities of a scale length of few kilometers over the magnetic equator are locally affected by geomagnetic storms. This study also shows a good agreement (70-84 %) with the Aaron's criteria (Aarons, Radio Sci., 26:1131-1149, 1991; Biktash, Ann. Geophys., 19:731-739, 2004) as significant absence and enhancement of ROTI was found to be influenced by the local time of the negative peak of Dst index association.

  9. Energy dependence of relativistic electron flux variations in the outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Li, Jinxing; Fu, Suiyan; Pu, Zuyin; Chen, Lunjin; Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt, depending on the delicate competition between electron energization and loss processes. Despite the well-known "energy independent" prototype in which electron fluxes enhance after geomagnetic storms at all energies, we present observations of "energy dependent" events, i.e., post-storm electron fluxes at lower energies (0.3-2.5 MeV, measured by MEPED/POES) recover or even exceed the pre-storm level, while electron fluxes at higher energies (2.5-14 MeV, measured by PET/SAMPEX) do not restore. The statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies: ~ 82% (3%) storm events produce increased (decreased) flux for 0.3-2.5 MeV electrons, while ~ 37% (45%) storms lead to enhancements (reductions) of 2.5-14 MeV electron flux. Superposed epoch analysis suggests that "energy dependent" events preferentially occur during periods of high solar wind density along with high dynamic pressure. Previous statistical studies have shown that this kind of solar wind conditions account for significant enhancements of EMIC waves, which cause efficient precipitation of > 2 MeV electrons into atmosphere via pitch angle scattering. Two cases of "energy dependent" events are investigated in detail with evident observations of EMIC waves that can resonate effectively with >2 MeV electrons. Besides, we do not capture much differences in the chorus wave activity between those "energy dependent" and "energy independent" events. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that EMIC waves play a crucial role in the occurrences of those "energy dependent" events in the outer zone during geomagnetic storms.

  10. A theoretical study of thermospheric composition perturbations during an impulsive geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, A.G.; Killeen, T.L. ); Roble, R.G. )

    1991-08-01

    The compositional response of the neutral thermosphere to an impulsive geomagnetic storm has been investigated using a numerical simulation made with the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermospheric general circulation model (NCAR-TGCM). Calculated time-dependent changes in neutral thermospheric composition have been studied, together with detailed neutral parcel trajectories and other diagnostic information from the model, to gain a greater understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for composition variability during geomagnetic storms and, in particular, to investigate the causes of the positive and negative ionospheric storm effects. The following principal results were obtained from this study. (1) Calculated perturbations in thermospheric composition following the onset of an impulsive geomagnetic storm were found to be in good qualitative agreement with the previous experimental statistical study of storm time thermospheric morphology by Proelss. (2) During the initial (onset) phase of the simulated storm, upward vertical winds occurred in the auroral zone and downward winds occurred in the central magnetic polar cap. (3) The largest perturbations in mass mixing ratio of nitrogen at F region altitudes were found to be associated with parcels of neutral gas that travelled through the cusp region and with parcels that were trapped within the auroral zone for a long time. (4) Storm time enhancements in {Psi}{sub N{sub 2}} were found to occur in the midnight and early morning sectors both within and equatorward of the auroral zone, and these were determined to be associated with the advective effects of the large antisunward polar cap neutral winds.

  11. Analysis of the Solar Diameter Variations at July, 1986 and the Geomagnetic Storm of March, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberto Andrei, Alexandre; Garcia, Marcos A.; Papa, Andres R. R.; Calderari Boscardin, Sergio; Lousada Penna, Jucira; Sigismondi, Costantino

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we have a well-known event in scientific literature used to illustrate our investigation on the viability of the solar diameter variation be a precursor for the occurrence of sets of coronal mass ejections, and thus, for geomagnetic storms, as noted in previous works of our group, but now, in a time scale of a few days. The selected event was that of March 13, 1989, a strong geomagnetic storm that made the Hydro-Quebec power grid fall down by 9 hours, damaging the local economy in millions of dollars. At the same time we have investigated a time interval belonging to a solar minimum period, on July 1986, prior to the rising phase and solar maximum of Solar Cycle 22, to compare with the geomagnetic pattern, as well as with the solar diameter behavior along these periods of low solar and geomagnetic activity. We used the time series of the CERGA’s astrolabe (because its dataset is long enough as to comprise both time periods of the analysis), the geomagnetic index AP and the H geomagnetic component from the Tatuoca Magnetic Observatory (because it is near to the geomagnetic equator and with the extra aim of checking the sensitivity of its magnetometers to global events).

  12. The geomagnetic storm time response of GPS total electron content in the North American sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E. G.; Baker, J. B. H.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Coster, A. J.; Zhang, S.-R.

    2016-02-01

    Over the last two decades, maps of GPS total electron content (TEC) have improved our understanding of the large perturbations in ionospheric electron density which occur during geomagnetic storms. However, previous regional and global studies of ionospheric storms have performed only a limited separation of storm time, local time, longitudinal, and seasonal effects. Using 13 years of GPS TEC data, we present a complete statistical characterization of the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms for midlatitudes in the North American sector where dense ground receiver coverage is available. The rapid onset of a positive phase is observed across much of the dayside and evening ionosphere followed by a longer-lasting negative phase across all latitudes and local times. Our results show clear seasonal variations in the storm time TEC, such that summer events tend to be dominated by the negative storm response while winter events exhibit a stronger initial positive phase with minimal negative storm effects. We find no discernable difference between spring and fall equinox events with both being equivalent to the average storm time response across all seasons. We also identify a prominent magnetic declination effect such that stronger dayside positive storm effects are observed in regions of negative declination (i.e., eastern North America). On the nightside, asymmetries in the TEC response are observed near the auroral oval and midlatitude trough which may be attributed to thermospheric zonal winds pushing plasma upward/downward along field lines of opposite declination.

  13. Solar wind low-energy energetic ion enhancements: A tool to forecast large geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Z. K.; Murtagh, W. J.

    2009-10-01

    Predicting the occurrence of large geomagnetic storms more than an hour in advance is an important, yet difficult task. Energetic ion data show enhancements in flux that herald the approach of interplanetary shocks, usually for many hours before the shock arrival. We present a technique for predicting large geomagnetic storms (Kp ⩾ 7) following the arrival of interplanetary shocks at 1 AU, using low-energy energetic ions (47-65 keV) and solar wind data measured at the L1 libration point. It is based on a study of the relationship between energetic ion enhancements (EIEs) and large geomagnetic storms by Smith et al. [Smith, Z., Murtagh, W., Smithtro, C. Relationship between solar wind low-energy energetic ion enhancements and large geomagnetic storms. J. Geophys. Res. 109, A01110, 2004. doi:10.1029/ 2003JA010044] using data in the rise and maximum of solar cycle 23 (February 1998-December 2000). An excellent correlation was found between storms with Kp ⩾ 7 and the peak flux of large energetic ion enhancements that almost always (93% of time in our time period) accompany the arrival of interplanetary shocks at L1. However, as there are many more large EIEs than large geomagnetic storms, other characteristics were investigated to help determine which EIEs are likely to be followed by large storms. An additional parameter, the magnitude of the post-shock total magnetic field at the L1 Lagrangian point, is introduced here. This improves the identification of the EIEs that are likely to be followed by large storms. A forecasting technique is developed and tested on the time period of the original study (the training data set). The lead times, defined as the times from the arrival of the shock to the start of the 3-h interval of maximum Kp, are also presented. They range from minutes to more than a day; the average for large storms is 7 h. These times do not include the extra warning time given when the EI flux cross the high thresholds ahead of the shock. Because the

  14. Climatological response of Indian low-latitude ionosphere to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Sunanda; Dashora, N.

    2016-05-01

    A climatological response of low-latitude ionosphere to geomagnetic storms is presented using long-term global ionospheric maps data from June 1998 to June 2015 covering two solar cycles 23 and 24. The results are presented for daytime forenoon and afternoon sectors under minor, moderate, and major ionospheric storm categories based on minimum Dst index criterion. For the first time the effectiveness of storms is identified using monthly standard deviation as an indicator of the day to day variability in equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere. Thus, results on climatology are definitive and form a database that would be comparable to statistical results from any other longitude and time. Seasonal statistics for total storms, effective positive and negative storms, and amplitude of mean seasonal perturbation in total electron content are obtained. Total and effective storms are found to be higher in solar cycle 23 than in 24 and only a couple of effective storms occurred during low solar activity 2007-2009 that too in minor category. Afternoon sector is found to be favorable for occurrence of maximum number of effective positive storms. A latitudinal preference is found for a given storm to be effective in either time sectors. Equinoctial asymmetry in ionospheric response both in terms of occurrence and perturbation amplitude is found. September equinoxes are found to bear maximum total, effective positive and negative storms. Winters are found more prone to negative storms, whereas summers have recorded minimum number of either of storms and minimum perturbation amplitudes.

  15. Infrared response of the thermosphere-ionosphere system to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, J. P.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Hunt, L. A.; Russell, J. M., III

    2015-12-01

    For 14 years the SABER instrument on the NASA TIMED satellite has been observing the radiative cooling of the thermosphere-ionosphere system associated with infrared emission by nitric oxide (NO) and carbon dioxide (CO2). From these observations a very clear picture of fundamental processes that control the thermal structure above 100 km has emerged. The radiative cooling is modulated by variations in solar UV irradiance and geomagnetic effects. A pronounced solar cycle variation in both NO and CO2 cooling is observed, and CO2 cooling dominates during solar minimum. Radiative cooling in the current maximum peaked in December 2014, nine months after the sunspot peak. On average, solar ultraviolet irradiance provides about 70% of the energy that results in cooling by NO and the remaining 30% arises from geomagnetic processes. The relative roles of irradiance and geomagnetism vary strongly over a solar cycle. Of particular interest are the large, short-term increases in radiative cooling associated with intense geomagnetic storms. The large energy deposition heats the atmosphere and the infrared cooling increases non-linearly, helping the atmosphere to shed the storm energy and rapidly return to pre-storm conditions. This "natural thermostat" effect of infrared radiation will be shown in detail in this talk, as a function of latitude and altitude for a number of different geomagnetic storms. The relative roles of radiative cooling by NO and CO2 will also be investigated, to see if there is any storm-dependent preference. Finally, the sensitivity of the NO cooling to geomagnetic processes suggests that near real time observations of NO emission may serve as a forecasting tool for space weather. Increases in NO infrared emissions are associated with energy deposition and heating of the atmosphere. Observations of NO emission may then identify regions in which atmospheric drag is increasing, and thus may be a tool for now casting of drag for space operations.

  16. A study of OI 844.6 nm dayglow emission under geomagnetic storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharwan, Maneesha; Singh, Vir

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive model is developed to study 844.6 nm dayglow emission. The Solar2000 EUV (extreme ultraviolet) flux model, neutral atmosphere model (NRLMSISE-00) and latest available cross-sections are incorporated in this model. The present model is used to study the effects of geomagnetic storm on the 844.6 nm dayglow emission at a low latitude station Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E). Three geomagnetic storms which occurred during 23rd-27th August 2005, 13th-17th April 2006 and 1st-5th February 2008 are chosen in the present study. It is found that the volume emission rate (VER) shows a negative correlation with the Dst index for all the three geomagnetic storms. The present study also shows that the altitude of the peak emission rate does not vary with the activity of geomagnetic storm. The model predicts a positive correlation between the zenith intensity of 844.6 nm dayglow emission and atomic oxygen number density. The consistency of atomic oxygen number density obtained from the NRLMSISE-00 model during a geomagnetic storm is checked using the satellite measurements of Earle et al. (2013). It is found that the atomic oxygen number density given by NRLMSISE-00 model is significantly lower than the measured values. Consequently, the effect of atomic oxygen number density abundance on 844.6 nm dayglow emission is further studied by treating the atomic oxygen number density as a variable parameter in the present model. An increase of more than 50% in the zenith intensity above the normal level (before the onset of the storm) is found when the atomic oxygen number density which is obtained from NRLMSISE-00 model is doubled (under the limits of measurements).

  17. Storm time ionosphere and plasmasphere structuring: SAMI3-RCM simulation of the 31 March 2001 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Sazykin, S.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first self-consistent modeling study of the ionosphere-plasmasphere system response to a geomagnetic storm. We use the coupled SAMI3-Rice Convention Model (RCM) of the global ionosphere and inner magnetosphere, with self-consistent electrodynamics, to simulate the 31 March 2001 magnetic storm. We find that the penetration electric fields associated with the magnetic storm lead to a storm time-enhanced density (SED) in the low- to middle-latitude ionosphere and that the separation in latitude of the Appleton anomaly peaks increases. The SED exhibits magnetic conjugacy, occurring in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Moreover, mapping the boundary of the SED into the equatorial plane coincides with the development of a "plume-like" structure in the plasmasphere. These preliminary results are consistent with observations.

  18. A case study of the thermospheric neutral wind response to geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoying; Zhang, Shunrong; Wang, Wenbin; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Qian; Xu, Jiyao

    A minor geomagnetic storm (Kp=5) occurred on March 27-28, 2012. The response of the thermospheric neutral wind at ~ 250 km to this storm was investigated by the 630.0 nm nightglow measurements of Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) over Xinglong (geographic location: 40.2N, 117.4E; geomagnetic location: 29.8N, 193.2E) and Millstone Hill (geographic location: 42.6N, 71.5W; geomagnetic location: 53.1N, 65.1W). Our results show that the minor storm on March 27-28, 2012 obviously effected on the thermospheric neutral winds over Xinglong and Millstone Hill, especially Millstone Hill had larger response because of its higher geomagnetic latitude. Another interesting result is that a small variation in geomagnetic activity (Kp=2.7) could enough introduce a clear disturbance in the nighttime thermospheric neutral wind over Millstone hill. NCAR-TIME-GCM (National Center for Atmospheric Research-Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics-General Circulation Model) was employed to study the evolution and mechanism of the thermospheric neutral wind response.

  19. Electromagnetic emissions and fine structures observed near main ionospheric trough during geomagnetic storms and their interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przepiórka, Dorota; Marek, Michał; Matyjasiak, Barbara; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic conditions triggered by the solar activity affect the ionosphere, its fine and global structures. Very intense magnetic storms substantially change the plasma density, concentration and circulation. Especially sensitive region is located near auroral oval, where most energy is deposited during geomagnetic storms. In this region and just below it, where the main ionospheric trough is located, we observe enhanced electromagnetic emissions in different frequency ranges. In particular the AKR-like (Auroral Kilometric Radiation) emissions are seen at frequencies of the order of hundreds of kHz in the ionosphere, just below the auroral oval. Analyzing spectrograms from DEMETER mission and comparing them with electron density measurements from DEMETER, we found that AKR-like emissions are seen near poleward wall of the main ionospheric trough, during geomagnetic storms. Main ionospheric trough is known as a turbulent region which properties change as the geomagnetic storm evolves. This work is an attempt to determine how the presence of the different emissions affect main ionospheric trough parameters such as location, width and depth. Data used in this study come from DEMETER and RELEC missions. This work was partly supported by NCN grant Rezonans 2012/07/B/ST9/04414.

  20. Observations in the South Atlantic Geomagnetic Anomaly with Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 during a geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoshev, M.M.; Gogosheva, TS.N.; Kostadinov, I.N.; Markova, T.I.; Kisovski, S.

    1985-01-01

    The region of South Atlantic Geomagnetic Anomaly was investigated by the Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 satellite, launched on August 7, 1981. On the basis of data obtained from 15 orbits during increased geomagnetic activity in August 1981, a map of the Anomaly was elaborated. Two centers of activity were identified. By means of the EMO-5 electrophotometer on board the Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 satellite, the atmosphere glow in lines 5577 A, 6300 A and 4278 A was studied. 11 references.

  1. Effects on the geomagnetic tail at 60 earth radii of the geomagnetic storm of April 9, 1971.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Rich, F. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Colburn, D. S.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1973-01-01

    A geomagnetic storm beginning with an sc occurred on Apr. 9, 1971. During the storm the charged particle lunar environment experiment at the Apollo 14 site, the solar wind spectrometer experiment at the Apollo 12 site, and the Ames magnetometers on Explorer 35 took data in the magnetosheath, at the magnetopause, in the plasma sheet, and in the high-latitude geomagnetic tail. The MIT Faraday cup and Ames magnetometers on board Explorer 33 monitored the solar wind. The data show that the storm was caused by a corotating tangential discontinuity in the solar wind, the magnetopause position is strongly dependent on the attack angle of the solar wind, and the tail field strength was indirectly measured to increase from 10 to 14 gamma after the sc. During the main phase the field strength in the tail was observed to increase to between 28 and 34 gamma. This increase is consistent with a thermal and magnetic compression of the tail radius from about 26 to about 16 earth radii.

  2. Investigation of Ionospheric response to Geomagnetic Storms over a Low Latitude Station, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimoh, Oluwaseyi E.; Yesufu, Thomas K.; Ariyibi, Emmanuel A.

    2016-05-01

    Due to several complexities associated with the equatorial ionosphere, and the significant role which the total electron content (TEC) variability plays in GPS signal transmission, there is the need to monitor irregularities in TEC during storm events. The GPS SCINDA receiver data at Ile-Ife, Nigeria, was analysed with a view to characterizing the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms on 9 March and 1 October 2012. Presently, positive storm effects, peaks in TEC which were associated with prompt penetration of electric fields and changes in neutral gas composition were observed for the storms. The maximum percentage deviation in TEC of about 120 and 45% were observed for 9 March and 1 October 2012, respectively. An obvious negative percentage TEC deviation subsequent to sudden storm commencement (SSC) was observed and besides a geomagnetic storm does not necessarily suggest a high scintillation intensity (S4) index. The present results show that magnetic storm events at low latitude regions may have an adverse effect on navigation and communication systems.

  3. An empirical probability density distribution of planetary ionosphere storms with geomagnetic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, Tamara; Stanislawska, Iwona; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan

    moderate geomagnetic storms occurred during 2013. Results are discussed in the paper. This study is supported by the joint grant of TUBITAK 112E568 and RFBR 13-02-91370-CT_a.

  4. Energetic Electron Populations in the Magnetosphere During Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific work performed by the Aerospace Corporation under NASA Grant NAG5-10278, 'Energetic Electron Populations in the Magnetosphere during Geomagnetic Storms and Subsisting.' The period of performance for the Grant was March 1, 2001 to February 28, 2002. The following is a summary of the Statement of Work for this Grant. Use data from the PIXIE instrument on the Polar spacecraft from September 1998 onward to derive the statistical relationship between particle precipitation patterns and various geomagnetic activity indices. We are particularly interested in the occurrence of substorms during storm main phase and the efficacy of storms and substorms in injecting ring-current particles. We will compare stormtime simulations of the diffuse aurora using the models of Chen and Schulz with stormtime PIXIE measurements.

  5. Great Lakes Region Morphology and Impacts of March 17, 2015 SED Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, T.; Moldwin, M.; Zou, S.

    2015-12-01

    Under quiet geomagnetic conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is relatively uniform with little spatial variation in electron density. However, during intense geomagnetic storms, density gradients associated with Storm Enhanced Density (SED) plumes and Sub-auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) can move across the dayside mid-latitude ionosphere producing small spatial scale density structure that may be connected to ionospheric scintillation. The evolution of the SED plume during the March 17, 2015 "St. Patrick's Day Storm" is investigated using aggregated data from high resolution GPS receivers at the University of Michigan and throughout the Great Lakes region. Structural density features in the SED gradient can be observed and compared to GPS scintillation measurements—providing insight into the physical mechanisms behind ionospheric scintillation.

  6. Global inospheric effects of the October 1989 geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, K.C.; Lin, K.H.; Ma, S.Y.

    1994-04-01

    Based on a large data base from 40 ionosonde stations distributed worldwide and 12 total electron content stations, a case study is made on the global behavior of ionospheric responses to the great magnetic storm of October 1989. The magnetic storm was triggered by a solar flare with the largest class of X13/4B and started with a sudden storm commencement (ssc) at 0917 UT on October 20. After the initial phase the storm underwent two periods of maximum activities in the following 2 days. Low-latitude auroras were sighted and reported in widely separated areas in both northern and southern hemispheres. In response to these magnetic and auroral activities the ionosphere showed remarkable effects. Depending on the local time of ssc occurrence, the ionospheric response differed appreciably. Impressive changes were long-lasting, large-scale effects, such as the severe depressions of foF2 at higher latitudes, the temporary suppression of the equatorial anomaly and large horizontal gradients at certain latitudes. Also observed were positive storm effects of short duration during the post-sunset period in response to the onset of both ssc and main phase of the magnetic storm. These two positive storm effects showed different patterns suggesting different casual mechanisms. In addition, global propagation of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) was seen during 2 nights, identified by dramatic rises of h{prime}F with periodic fluctuations. The equatorward propagation velocities of the TIDs varied between 330 m/s and 680 m/s for the east Asia region. 33 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Observations of the plasma density enhancement in the high-altitude polar region during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Naritoshi; Shinbori, Atsuki; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Ono, Takayuki; Iizima, Masahide; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Yamada, Manabu; Watanabe, Shigeto; Abe, Takumi; Yau, Andrew W.

    Recent satellite observations have clarified that plasma outflows play an important role in abrupt changes in the ion composition in the plasmasheet and ring current during geomagnetic storms. In the present study, we perform case studies of enhancement of the plasma density and ion upflow in the high-altitude polar region during geomagnetic storms using the data observed by the Akebono satellite. We use the electron density data observed by the plasma wave and sounder experiments (PWS), and the ion composition and field-aligned velocity measured by the suprathermal ion mass spectrometer (SMS) onboard the Akebono satellite. We perform case studies for the geomagnetic storm events which occurred on June 6, June 9, 1989 and March 30, 1990. Enhancements of the electron density are identified in the entire polar cap associated with the period of the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The electron density in June 7 and 9 enhanced up to 100 times larger than the quiet-time level. During the main phase of the March 30 storm, Akebono crossed the dayside polar region directed from dawn to dusk, and the electron density enhanced up to 30 times larger than the quiet-time level in the auroral zone and dayside polar cap in an altitude range of 7000-10000 km. The SMS instrument measured ion upflows in the entire polar cap along the satellite path. Eighty percent of the upflowing ions were composed of oxygen ions and the field-aligned upward velocity of oxygen ions reached 5-10 km/s. Existence of ion upflows dominated by oxygen ions indicates that the plasma is originated from the ionosphere. The upflow flux of the oxygen ion mapped to 1000 km altitude corresponded to 1-4*109 /cm2 /s. The flux is about the same as the maximum flux observed by DE-1 [Pollock et al., 1990] and Polar during a geomagnetic storm [Moore et al., 1999], and the flux was observed continuously (8-16 h in magnetic local time) in the polar cap. These results indicate that a large amount of the ionospheric

  8. Multiscale and cross entropy analysis of auroral and polar cap indices during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Sumesh; Prince, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve general monoscale information entropy methods like permutation and sample entropy in characterizing the irregularity of complex magnetospheric system, it is necessary to extend these entropy metrics to a multiscale paradigm. We propose novel multiscale and cross entropy method for the analysis of magnetospheric proxies such as auroral and polar cap indices during geomagnetic disturbance times. Such modified entropy metrics are certainly advantageous in classifying subsystems such as individual contributions of auroral electrojets and field aligned currents to high latitude magnetic perturbations during magnetic storm and polar substorm periods. We show that the multiscale entropy/cross entropy of geomagnetic indices vary with scale factor. These variations can be attributed to changes in multiscale dynamical complexity of non-equilibrium states present in the magnetospheric system. These types of features arise due to imbalance in injection and dissipation rates of energy with variations in magnetospheric response to solar wind. We also show that the multiscale entropy values of time series decrease during geomagnetic storm times which reveals an increase in temporal correlations as the system gradually shifts to a more orderly state. Such variations in entropy values can be interpreted as the signature of dynamical phase transitions which arise at the periods of geomagnetic storms and substorms that confirms several previously found results regarding emergence of cooperative dynamics, self-organization and non-Markovian nature of magnetosphere during disturbed periods.

  9. Impacts of Geomagnetic Storms on the Terrestrial H-Exosphere Using Twins-Lyman Stereo Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nass, U.; Zoennchen, J.; Fahr, H. J.; Goldstein, J.

    2015-12-01

    Based on continuously monitored Lyman-alpha data registered by the TWINS1/2-LAD instruments we have studied the impact of a weaker and a stronger geomagnetic storm on the exospheric H-density distribution between heights of 3--8 Earth-radii. As is well known, solar Lyman-alpha radiation is resonantly backscattered from geocoronal neutral hydrogen (H). The resulting resonance glow intensity in the optically thin regime is proportional to H column density along the line of sight (LOS). Here we present the terrestrial exospheric response to geomagnetic storms. We quantify the reaction to geomagnetic activity in form of amplitude and temporal response of the H-density, sampled at different geocentric distances. We find that even in case of a weak storm, the exospheric H-density in regions above the exobase reacts with a suprisingly large increase in a remarkably short time period of less than half a day. Careful analysis of this geomagnetic density effect indicates that it is an expansion in the radial scale height of the exospheric H-density, developing from exobasic heights.

  10. Phase fluctuations of GPS signals and irregularities in the high latitude ionosphere during geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagimuratov, I.; Chernouss, S.; Cherniak, Iu.; Efishov, I.; Filatov, M.; Tepenitsyna, N.

    2016-05-01

    In this report we analysed latitudinal occurrence of TEC fluctuations over Europe during October 2, 2013 geomagnetic storm. The data of GPS stations spaced in latitudinal range 68°-54° N over longitude of 20°E were involved in this investigation. The magnetograms of the IMAGE network and geomagnetic pulsations at Lovozero (68°02'N 35°00'W) and Sodankyla (67°22'N 26°38'W) observatories were used as indicator of auroral activity. During October 2, 2013 the strong geomagnetic field variations took place near 05 UT at auroral IMAGE network. We found good similarities between time development of substorm and fluctuations of GPS signals. The bay-like geomagnetic variations were followed by intensive phase fluctuations at auroral and subauroral stations. The strong short-term phase fluctuations were also found at mid-latitude Kaliningrad station near 05 UT that correspond to the maximal intense geomagnetic bay variations. This date confirms the equatorward expansion of the auroral oval. It brings in evidence also the storm time behavior of the irregularities oval obtained from multi-site GPS observations.

  11. Modelling total electron content during geomagnetic storm conditions using empirical orthogonal functions and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwamahoro, Jean Claude; Habarulema, John Bosco

    2015-12-01

    It has been shown in ionospheric research that modelling total electron content (TEC) during storm conditions is a big challenge. In this study, TEC modelling was performed over Sutherland (32.38°S, 20.81°E, 41.09°S geomagnetic), South Africa, during storm conditions, using a combination of empirical orthogonal function (EOF) and regression analyses techniques. The neural network (NN) technique was also applied to the same TEC data set, and its output was compared with TEC modeled using the EOF model. TEC was derived from GPS observations, and a geomagnetic storm was defined for Dst≤-50 nT. The hour of the day and the day number of the year, F10.7p and A indices, were chosen as inputs for the modeling techniques to take into account diurnal and seasonal variation of TEC, solar, and geomagnetic activities, respectively. Both EOF and NN models were developed using GPS TEC data for storm days counted from 1999 to 2013 and tested on different storms. For interpolation, the EOF and NN models were validated on storms that occurred during high and low solar activity periods (storms of 2000 and 2006), while for extrapolation the validation was done for the storms of 2014 and 2015, identified based on the provisional Dst index data. A comparison of the modeled TEC with the observed TEC showed that both EOF and NN models perform well for storms with nonsignificant ionospheric TEC response and storms that occurred during period of low solar activity. For storms with significant TEC response, TEC magnitude is well captured during the nighttime and early morning, but short-term features, TEC enhancement, and depression are not sufficiently captured by the models. Statistically, the NN model performs 12.79% better than the EOF model on average, over all storm periods considered. Furthermore, it has been shown that the EOF and NN models developed for a specific station can be used to estimate TEC over other locations within a latitudinal and longitudinal coverage of 8.7

  12. On the source of flare-ejecta responsible for geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic bottles as the sources of moving metric type 4 bursts are not responsible for the development of geomagnetic storms, despite the fact that shock waves producing type 2 bursts are the sources of the interplanetary shock waves, which produce SSC's on the geomagnetic field. These magnetic bottles, in general, tend to move in the solar envelope with the speed of several hundred Km/sec at most, which is much slower than that of the motion of type 2 radio sources.

  13. Detailed Analysis of Solar Data Related to Historical Extreme Geomagnetic Storms: 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Laure; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Dumbović, Mateja; Vršnak, Bojan; Sudar, Davor; Arlt, Rainer; Clette, Frédéric; Crosby, Norma

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of historical Sun-Earth connection events in the context of the most extreme space weather events of the last ˜150 years is presented. To identify the key factors leading to these extreme events, a sample of the most important geomagnetic storms was selected based mainly on the well-known aa index and on geomagnetic parameters described in the accompanying paper (Vennerstrøm et al., Solar Phys. in this issue, 2016, hereafter Paper I). This part of the analysis focuses on associating and characterizing the active regions (sunspot groups) that are most likely linked to these major geomagnetic storms. For this purpose, we used detailed sunspot catalogs as well as solar images and drawings from 1868 to 2010. We have systematically collected the most pertinent sunspot parameters back to 1868, gathering and digitizing solar drawings from different sources such as the Greenwich archives, and extracting the missing sunspot parameters. We present a detailed statistical analysis of the active region parameters (sunspots, flares) relative to the geomagnetic parameters developed in Paper I. In accordance with previous studies, but focusing on a much larger statistical sample, we find that the level of the geomagnetic storm is highly correlated to the size of the active regions at the time of the flare and correlated with the size of the flare itself. We also show that the origin at the Sun is most often a complex active region that is also most of the time close to the central meridian when the event is identified at the Sun. Because we are dealing with extremely severe storms, and not the usual severe storm sample, there is also a strong correlation between the size of the linked active region, the estimated transit speed, and the level of the geomagnetic event. In addition, we confirm that the geomagnetic events studied here and the associated events at the Sun present a low probability of occurring at low sunspot number value

  14. The Dynamics of Thermospheric Composition and Ionospheric Total Electron Content During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigwarth, John B.; Foster, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The geomagnetic storms of April 17-21,2002 and May 29-30,2003 caused large decreases in the O/N2 column density ratio in the thermosphere. For these storms, O/N2 column density decreases of greater than 50% were observed to extend to mid-to-low latitudes with the FUV sensitive Earth Camera of the Visible Imaging System (VIS) on the Polar spacecraft. Simultaneously in these same regions, the ground-based GPS network observed approximately 80% reductions in the Total Electron Content (TEC) of the ionosphere. The reduction in the O/N2 column density ratio is due mainly to increases in the molecular species that have welled-up into the thermosphere from the lower levels of the atmosphere due to auroral heating. The geomagnetic-storm driven increase in molecular densities at typical ionospheric heights rapidly charge exchange with the ambient ionized atoms and subsequently dissociatively recombine with the ionospheric electrons leading to a reduction in the total charge density. The transition boundaries between high and low regions of O/N2 as well as TEC can be tracked in the images and the thermospheric winds may be inferred from the motion of the boundaries. The motion of these boundaries during the development of the geomagnetic storm will be discussed.

  15. Occurrence of equatorial spread F during intense geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S.; Roy, B.; Das, A.

    2015-07-01

    Equatorial spread F (ESF) has been observed in response to the prompt penetration of magnetospheric electric field to equatorial latitudes during intense (minimum Dst ≤ -100 nT; Bz ≤ -10 nT for at least 3 h) magnetic storms using global ion density plots of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) over nearly one solar cycle (1996-2005). Geostationary amplitude scintillation observations from Calcutta at VHF and L band for 1996-2005 and GPS amplitude scintillation measurements during 2004-2005 from the Indian Satellite Based Augmentation System Geostationary and GPS Navigation Outlay (GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation) network of stations all over India have been used to corroborate the DMSP observations. Subsequent to the time of southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz crossing -10 nT for an intense storm, it has been observed that within 4 h, ESF is generated at a longitude where the local time is dusk.

  16. Geomagnetic storms during the last decade: Cluster and Double Star observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C.; Taylor, M. G.; Masson, A.; Laakso, H. E.; Liu, Z.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    The launch of the Cluster spacecraft almost coincided with one of the largest geomagnetic storm of the last decade, well known as the "Bastille Day" storm, on 14-15 July 2000. Planned on 15 July, the launch was aborted a few minutes before due to a thunderstorm that had hit the Baikonour cosmodrome and made a disruption in the communication lines with the rocket. The launch took place the day after, on 16 July 2000. Our US colleagues had warned us about the storm and recommended not to launch on 15 July. Given the facts that (1) Cluster was built to study the effects of space weather and geomagnetic storms and (2) that the Russian launch authorities were not concerned for the Soyuz rocket, it was decided to go ahead with the launch. The launch was fine and, after a second launch less than a month later, the four Cluster spacecraft were put successfully in their 4x19 RE polar orbit. Since then, Cluster has observed many geomagnetic storms and could observe, for the first time with a constellation of four spacecraft, the dynamics induced in the magnetosphere by coronal mass ejections or interplanetary shocks coming from the Sun. In this talk we will use storms observed by Cluster and Double Star in the last decade to illustrate how the magnetosphere was affected. We have observed large compressions of the magnetosphere, distortions of the polar cusp, acceleration of particles associated with chorus and ULF waves, intensification of the ring current imaged by energetic neutral atom imagers, oxygen outflow from polar regions, and tail current sheet motions.

  17. Two-step forecast of geomagnetic storm using coronal mass ejection and solar wind condition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, R-S; Moon, Y-J; Gopalswamy, N; Park, Y-D; Kim, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    To forecast geomagnetic storms, we had examined initially observed parameters of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and introduced an empirical storm forecast model in a previous study. Now we suggest a two-step forecast considering not only CME parameters observed in the solar vicinity but also solar wind conditions near Earth to improve the forecast capability. We consider the empirical solar wind criteria derived in this study (Bz ≤ −5 nT or Ey ≥ 3 mV/m for t≥ 2 h for moderate storms with minimum Dst less than −50 nT) and a Dst model developed by Temerin and Li (2002, 2006) (TL model). Using 55 CME-Dst pairs during 1997 to 2003, our solar wind criteria produce slightly better forecasts for 31 storm events (90%) than the forecasts based on the TL model (87%). However, the latter produces better forecasts for 24 nonstorm events (88%), while the former correctly forecasts only 71% of them. We then performed the two-step forecast. The results are as follows: (i) for 15 events that are incorrectly forecasted using CME parameters, 12 cases (80%) can be properly predicted based on solar wind conditions; (ii) if we forecast a storm when both CME and solar wind conditions are satisfied (∩), the critical success index becomes higher than that from the forecast using CME parameters alone, however, only 25 storm events (81%) are correctly forecasted; and (iii) if we forecast a storm when either set of these conditions is satisfied (∪), all geomagnetic storms are correctly forecasted. PMID:26213515

  18. Comparison of Ionospheric TEC Derived from GPS and IRI 2012 Model during Geomagnetic Storms at Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlia, Dessi; Wu, Falin

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the variations of vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) at Manado, Indonesia (geographic coordinates : lat 1.34 ° S and long 124.82 ° E) for period 2013. The GPS measured TEC is compared with the TEC derived from the IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) 2012 model. Vertical TEC measurements obtained from dual frequency GPS receiver that is GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillations and TEC monitor). Variation of TEC validate to IRI 2012 model at Manado station has been compared with the model for three different topside of electron density namely NeQuick, IRI-01-Corr and IRI2001.There is a need to investigation on diurnal, seasonal variations, solar activity dependence of TEC and including effects of space weather related events to TEC and modeling of TEC. In this paper, diurnal and seasonal variations of VTEC and the effect of VTEC due to space weather events like Geomagnetic storms are analyzed. The result show that the TEC prediction using IRI-2001 model overestimated the GPS TEC measurements, while IRI-NeQuick and IRI-01-corr show a tendency to underestimates the observed TEC during the day time particularly in low latitude region in the maximum solar activity period (2013). The variations of VTEC during 17th March, 2013, 29th June, 2013 storms are analyzed. During 17th March,2013 storm enhancement in VTEC with Kp value 6 and Disturbance storm index (DST) -132 nT. During 29th June, 2013 storm VTEC depletion with value 7 and DST -98 nT. Significant deviations in VTEC during the main phase of the storms are observed. It is found that the response of ionospheric TEC consist of effects of both enhancement and depletions in ionospheric structures (positive and negative storm). Keywords: TEC ionosphere, GPS, GISTM, IRI 2012 model, solar activity, geomagnetic storm

  19. Modeling of severe geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 23 by means of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revallo, Milos; Valach, Fridrich; Hejda, Pavel; Bochnicek, Josef

    2015-04-01

    We set up a model for strong geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 23 using the method of artificial neural networks combined with an empirical model of the solar wind magnetosphere interaction. The set of solar wind data obtained from the ACE satellite is considered and the corresponding geomagnetic response is modeled and compared with real data. The discontinuity in magnetic field at the magnetopause is shown to play a key role in this study. The geomagnetic response is evaluated in terms of the Dst index. To assess the model performance, we compute the skill scores, namely the correlation coefficient and the prediction efficiency. We compare the model with previously known similar models based on artificial neural networks.

  20. The Response of Thermospheric Winds to Geomagnetic Storms and Its Solar Cycle Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Burns, A. G.; Qian, L.

    2014-12-01

    Thermospheric neutral wind circulation is set up as a result of a number of competing forcing processes. These include the pressure gradient, ion drag, Coriolis, momentum advection and viscosity forces. All of these forces change with varying solar radiation and geomagnetic activity. In this study we employ the thermosphere ionosphere electrodynamics global circulation model (TIEGCM) to elucidate the changes of thermospheric neutral winds with geomagnetic storms when a large amount of energy and momentum is deposited into the thermosphere at high latitudes. We will focus on the low and middle latitudes, where enhanced equatorward and westward winds are seen during the storms. The storm-time westward winds occur at all local times and are sustained well into the storm recovery phase. Diagnostic analysis on TIEGCM simulations suggests that momentum advection, ion drag and pressure gradient are the main drivers of these storm-time wind changes. The TIEGCM has also been run for different solar cycle conditions. Wind changes are smaller during solar maximum at low and middle latitudes. This is the result of higher neutral temperature and pressure gradient at low and middle latitudes in solar maximum, which limits the penetration of wind changes at high latitudes into low and middle latitudes.

  1. Plasma and Magnetic Field Characteristics of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections in Relation to Geomagnetic Storm Intensity and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying D.; Hu, Huidong; Wang, Rui; Yang, Zhongwei; Zhu, Bei; Liu, Yi A.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Richardson, John D.

    2015-08-01

    The largest geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 24 so far occurred on 2015 March 17 and June 22 with {D}{st} minima of -223 and -195 nT, respectively. Both of the geomagnetic storms show a multi-step development. We examine the plasma and magnetic field characteristics of the driving coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in connection with the development of the geomagnetic storms. A particular effort is to reconstruct the in situ structure using a Grad-Shafranov technique and compare the reconstruction results with solar observations, which gives a larger spatial perspective of the source conditions than one-dimensional in situ measurements. Key results are obtained concerning how the plasma and magnetic field characteristics of CMEs control the geomagnetic storm intensity and variability: (1) a sheath-ejecta-ejecta mechanism and a sheath-sheath-ejecta scenario are proposed for the multi-step development of the 2015 March 17 and June 22 geomagnetic storms, respectively; (2) two contrasting cases of how the CME flux-rope characteristics generate intense geomagnetic storms are found, which indicates that a southward flux-rope orientation is not a necessity for a strong geomagnetic storm; and (3) the unexpected 2015 March 17 intense geomagnetic storm resulted from the interaction between two successive CMEs plus the compression by a high-speed stream from behind, which is essentially the “perfect storm” scenario proposed by Liu et al. (i.e., a combination of circumstances results in an event of unusual magnitude), so the “perfect storm” scenario may not be as rare as the phrase implies.

  2. A new parameter of geomagnetic storms for the severity of space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Batista, I. S.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Rajesh, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Using the continuous Dst data available since 1957 and H component data for the Carrington space weather event of 1859, the paper shows that the mean value of Dst during the main phase of geomagnetic storms, called mean DstMP, is a unique parameter that can indicate the severity of space weather. All storms having high mean DstMP (≤-250 nT), which corresponds to high amount of energy input in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system in short duration, are found associated with severe space weather events that caused all known electric power outages and telegraph system failures.

  3. HF Doppler oscillations during the geomagnetic storm of February 6-9, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.; Kainuma, S.; Katoh, C.

    Some results of HF Doppler (HFD) measurements during the large geomagnetic storm of February 6-9, 1986 are reported. In association with the storm sudden commencement at 1312 UT on February 6, HFD frequency deviations belonging to an SCF(+ -) type, which is believed to be caused by westward and subsequent eastward electric fields, were observed. Wave parameters of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (period = 80-100 minutes, phase velocity = 440 m/s, and horizontal wavelength = 2100-2600 km), detected on the night of February 7, are almost completely consistent with those observed by the MU radar at Shigaraki. Very clear, sinusoidal HFD oscillations with a period of 2.5 minutes triggered by the sudden impulse at 1748 UT on February 9 were simultaneously accompanied by the geomagnetic pulsation. These HFD oscillations can be explained by the compressions and rarefactions of the ionospheric plasma due to the pulsation magnetic field.

  4. Model of the evolution of the plasmasphere during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Xu, R. L.

    The morphology of the plasmasphere during a geomagnetic storm is simulated by considering the two dimensional E × B drift motion of plasmaspheric charged particles in the equatorial plane. Assuming a time-independent dipolar magnetic field and a corotation electric field plus, a spatially uniform dawn-dusk convection electric field varying with Kp index, the spatial distributions of charged particles at different time during a geomagnetic storm are obtained. Our results show that if Kp increases with time, some particles inside the original plasmapause will convect into the magnetopause, forming a long tail that stretches from the plasmasphere to the magnetopause in the afternoon region. The particle convection weakens as Kp decreases, and as Kp returns to its normal value, the plasmasphere develops a thin tail that wraps around the Earth.

  5. A case study of ionospheric storm effects in the Chinese sector during the October 2013 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tian; Sun, Lingfeng; Hu, Lianhuan; Wang, Yungang; Wang, Zhijun

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the ionospheric storm effects in the Chinese sector during 2 October 2013 geomagnetic storm. The TEC map over China sector (1° × 1°) and eight ionosondes data along the longitude of 110°E are used to show significant positive ionospheric phases (enhancements in TEC and ionospheric peak electron density NmF2) in the high-middle latitude region and the negative effects at the low latitude and equatorial region during the storm. A wave structure with periods about 1-2 h and horizontal speed about 680 m/s, propagating from the high latitudes to the low latitudes is observed in electron densities within the height region from 200 to 400 km, which is caused by the combined effects of neutral wind and the large-scale traveling disturbances (LSTIDs). In the low latitude regions, compared with those in the quiet day, the ionospheric peak heights of the F2 layer (hmF2) in the storm day obviously increase accompanying a notably decrease in TEC and NmF2, which might be as a result of the eastward prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) evidenced by the two magnetometers and the subsequent westward disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEF). The storm-time TEC enhancement mainly occurs in the topside ionosphere, as revealed from the topside TEC, bottomside TEC and GPS TEC.

  6. Geomagnetic storms, the Dst ring-current myth and lognormal distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    The definition of geomagnetic storms dates back to the turn of the century when researchers recognized the unique shape of the H-component field change upon averaging storms recorded at low latitude observatories. A generally accepted modeling of the storm field sources as a magnetospheric ring current was settled about 30 years ago at the start of space exploration and the discovery of the Van Allen belt of particles encircling the Earth. The Dst global 'ring-current' index of geomagnetic disturbances, formulated in that period, is still taken to be the definitive representation for geomagnetic storms. Dst indices, or data from many world observatories processed in a fashion paralleling the index, are used widely by researchers relying on the assumption of such a magnetospheric current-ring depiction. Recent in situ measurements by satellites passing through the ring-current region and computations with disturbed magnetosphere models show that the Dst storm is not solely a main-phase to decay-phase, growth to disintegration, of a massive current encircling the Earth. Although a ring current certainly exists during a storm, there are many other field contributions at the middle-and low-latitude observatories that are summed to show the 'storm' characteristic behavior in Dst at these observatories. One characteristic of the storm field form at middle and low latitudes is that Dst exhibits a lognormal distribution shape when plotted as the hourly value amplitude in each time range. Such distributions, common in nature, arise when there are many contributors to a measurement or when the measurement is a result of a connected series of statistical processes. The amplitude-time displays of Dst are thought to occur because the many time-series processes that are added to form Dst all have their own characteristic distribution in time. By transforming the Dst time display into the equivalent normal distribution, it is shown that a storm recovery can be predicted with

  7. Comparison of storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at ground and MAGSAT altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1982-01-01

    The MAGSAT data for the period Nov. 2-20, 1979 were studied. From the observed H, the HMD predicted by model was subtracted. The residue delta H = H-HMD shows storm-time variations similar to geomagnetic Dst, at least qualitatively. Delta H sub 0, i.e., equatorial values of delta H were studied separately for dusk and dawn and show some differences.

  8. TEC variations during geomagnetic storm/substorm with Pc5/PI2 pulsation signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, A. M.; Mahrous, A. M.; Fathy, I.; Ghamry, E.; Groves, K.; Yumoto, K.

    2015-06-01

    The electron density integral along the paths between a GPS satellite and receiver is known as Total Electron Content (TEC), and this parameter is used in studying the ionosphere behaviors. TEC can be obtained by means of many methods. A space-based radio navigation system, such as Global Positioning System (GPS), offers good opportunities for studying the ionosphere. The TEC is calculated from the group path delay and phase advance in GPS satellite signals along the slant paths connecting GPS receivers and satellites at 22,000 km. Locally, a dual frequency GPS receiver was installed in Helwan, Egypt (29.86°N, 31.32°E) in November 2009. Here, GPS data were analyzed to establish a daily observation of Vertical TEC in a region located near to the northern crest of the ionospheric equatorial anomaly. During a moderate geomagnetic storm, observed on 02-05 May 2010, a number of ionospheric/magnetic phenomena were observed. Also, observations for Pc5/Pi2 pulsations were recorded during the geomagnetic storm phases. These geomagnetic observations are taken from MAGDAS-magnetometer station, located at Aswan (23.59°N, 32.51°E). More than 10 TECU increase in the ionospheric TEC values were recorded during the daytime of 02 May, followed by a large reduction during 03 May, reference to the pre-storm conditions. This confirms the enhancement in the geomagnetic H-component peak during the storm's initial phase and its reduction during the main phase.

  9. Comparisons of Several Coupling Functions during Moderate Geomagnetic Storms of SC23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris Muntean, Georgeta; Mierla, Marilena; Besliu-Ionescu, Diana; Talpeanu, Dana Camelia

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the evolution of the interplanetary parameters before a geomagnetic storm and how they relate to its magnitude should improve our perspective towards a better prediction of geo-effectiveness of the solar eruptive events. One important way to understand the evolution of a geomagnetic storm is by computing the quantity of energy that is transferred from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. There are several formulas (coupling functions) to estimate this transfer of energy. We selected moderate geomagnetic storms (-50 nT ≥ Dst ≥ -150 nT) that were produced by interplanetary coronal mass ejections throughout the solar cycle 23. We selected only the events which were clearly associated with a solar event (i.e. a coronal mass ejection) (see Richardson and Cane online catalogue). We will present here a comparative analysis between different coupling functions such as epsilon parameter (Akasofu, 1981) and Ein parameter (Wang et al., 2014). We will discuss how these coupling functions are related to the geoeffective interplanetary electric field Em (see e.g. - Kan and Lee, 1979) that we have computed for the selected events. We will focus on a detailed case study.

  10. Numerical Simulations of the Ring Current During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Lemon, C.; Guild, T. B.; Schulz, M.; Roeder, J. L.; Lui, A.; Keesee, A. M.; Goldstein, J.; Le, G.; Rodriguez, J. V.

    2012-12-01

    Recent progress in ring current modeling has shown the importance of a self-consistent treatment of particle transport along with magnetic and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. The ring current intensity and spatial distribution are significantly affected by variations in the plasma sheet (the major source to the ring current), the cross polar cap potential, and compressions and expansions of the magnetosphere. We simulate the ion and electron ring current and plasma sheet by using the magnetically and electrically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a time-varying magnetopause driven by upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic (IMF) conditions and with time-varying plasma sheet distributions as boundary conditions. Examples of detailed comparisons of simulated storm events with in-situ magnetic intensities (e. g., GOES, Polar/MPA, or THEMIS) and proton flux spectra (e. g., LANL/MPA and SOPA, Polar/CAMMICE, or THEMIS) and energetic neutral atom (ENA) fluxes (e. g., TWINS) will be shown. We will also present comparisons of observed electron flux spectra with simulations based on a few simple electron loss models. These data-model comparisons test the ability of our model to characterize the ring current environment and the storm-time inner magnetospheric magnetic field.

  11. Weakening of the mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huixin; Yamamoto, Mamoru

    2011-04-01

    This brief report presents geomagnetic storm effects on the formation and characteristics of the midlatitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA). This anomaly is a phenomenon where the diurnal variation of the plasma density maximizes at night instead of day. Under disturbed geomagnetic conditions, the MSNA is found to have smaller spatial coverage, lower magnitude of the reversed diurnal cycle, and shorter duration of the nighttime enhancement. All these features demonstrate a weakening of the MSNA. In addition, the nighttime maximum tends to occur at earlier local time. These effects can be reasonably understood in the frame of storm-induced equatorward wind and the molecular-rich air it carries along with. For instance, the shrink of the spatial coverage is essentially a dominant effect of the molecular-rich air, which tends to deplete the plasma significantly on the poleward edge of the MSNA region. On the other hand, the smaller magnitude and the shorter duration seem to be mainly caused by the storm-induced equatorward wind. Storm effects presented here add further evidence to the pivot role of effective neutral wind in the formation of MSNA.

  12. Development of a CME-associated geomagnetic storm intensity prediction tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. C.; DeHart, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    From 1995 to 2012, the Wind spacecraft recorded 168 magnetic cloud (MC) events. Among those events, 79 were found to have upstream shock waves and their source locations on the Sun were identified. Using a recipe of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz initial turning direction after shock (Wu et al., 1996, GRL), it is found that the north-south polarity of 66 (83.5%) out of the 79 events were accurately predicted. These events were tested and further analyzed, reaffirming that the Bz intial turning direction was accurate. The results also indicate that 37 of the 79 MCs originate from the north (of the Sun) averaged a Dst_min of -119 nT, whereas 42 of the MCs originating from the south (of the Sun) averaged -89 nT. In an effort to provide this research to others, a website was built that incorporated various tools and pictures to predict the intensity of the geomagnetic storms. The tool is capable of predicting geomagnetic storms with different ranges of Dst_min (from no-storm to gigantic storms). This work was supported by Naval Research Lab HBCU/MI Internship program and Chief of Naval Research.

  13. Severe ionosphere disturbances caused by the sudden response of evening subequatorial ionospheres to geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.

    1981-12-01

    By monitoring C band beacon signals from geostationary satellites in Japan, we have observed anomalously strong ionospheric scintillations several times during three years from 1978 to 1980. These severe scinitillations occur associated with geomagnetic storms and accompany sudden and intense ionospheric perturbations in the low-latiude region. Through the analysis of these phenomena we have identified a new type of ionospheric disturbances characterized by intensifications of equatorial anomalies and successive severe ionospheric scintillations that extend to the C band range. The events occur only during a limited local time interval after the sunset, when storm time decreases of midlatitude geomagnetic fields in the same meridan take place during the same time interval. From the viewpoint of ionospheric storms, these disturbances precede the occurrence of midlatitude negative phases and storm time depressions of equatorial anomalies to indicate that the cause of the events is different from distrubed thermospheric circulations. The timing and magnitude of substorms at high-latitudes not always correlate with the events. We have concluded that the phenomena are closely related with penetrations toward low-latitudes of electric fields owing to the partial closure of asymmetrical ring currents.

  14. DE 2 observations of disturbances in the upper atmosphere during a geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.J.; Brace, L.H.; Spencer, N.W. ); Carignan, G.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Data taken in the dusk sector of the mid-latitude thermosphere at 275-450 km by instruments on board Dynamics Explorer 2 in polar orbit are used to examine the response of the ionosphere- thermosphere system during a geomagnetic storm. The results represent the first comparison of nearly simultaneous measurements of storm disturbances in dc electric fields, zonal ion convection, zonal winds, gas composition and temperature, and electron density and temperature, at different seasons in a common local time sector. The storm commenced on November 24, 1982, during the interaction of a solar wind disturbance with the geomagnetic field while the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field, B{sub z}, was northward. The storm main phase began while B{sub z} was turning southward. Storm-induced variations in meridional de electric fields, neutral composition, and N{sub e} were stronger and spread farther equatorward in the winter hemisphere. Westward ion convection was intense enough to produce westward winds of 600 m s{sup {minus} 1} via ion drag in the winter hemisphere. Frictional heating was sufficient to elevate ion temperatures above electron temperatures in both seasons and to produce large chemical losses of O{sup +} by increasing the rate of O{sup +} loss via ion-atom interchange. Part of the chemical loss of O{sup +} was compensated by upward flow of O{sup +} as the ion scale height adjusted to the increasing ion temperatures. In this storm, frictional heating was an important subauroral heat source equatorward to at least 53{degree} invariant latitude.

  15. Two-Step Forecast of Geomagnetic Storm Using Coronal Mass Ejection and Solar Wind Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, R.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Park, Y.-D.; Kim, Y.-H.

    2014-01-01

    To forecast geomagnetic storms, we had examined initially observed parameters of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and introduced an empirical storm forecast model in a previous study. Now we suggest a two-step forecast considering not only CME parameters observed in the solar vicinity but also solar wind conditions near Earth to improve the forecast capability. We consider the empirical solar wind criteria derived in this study (Bz = -5 nT or Ey = 3 mV/m for t = 2 h for moderate storms with minimum Dst less than -50 nT) (i.e. Magnetic Field Magnitude, B (sub z) less than or equal to -5 nanoTeslas or duskward Electrical Field, E (sub y) greater than or equal to 3 millivolts per meter for time greater than or equal to 2 hours for moderate storms with Minimum Disturbance Storm Time, Dst less than -50 nanoTeslas) and a Dst model developed by Temerin and Li (2002, 2006) (TL [i.e. Temerin Li] model). Using 55 CME-Dst pairs during 1997 to 2003, our solar wind criteria produce slightly better forecasts for 31 storm events (90 percent) than the forecasts based on the TL model (87 percent). However, the latter produces better forecasts for 24 nonstorm events (88 percent), while the former correctly forecasts only 71 percent of them. We then performed the two-step forecast. The results are as follows: (i) for 15 events that are incorrectly forecasted using CME parameters, 12 cases (80 percent) can be properly predicted based on solar wind conditions; (ii) if we forecast a storm when both CME and solar wind conditions are satisfied (n, i.e. cap operator - the intersection set that is comprised of all the elements that are common to both), the critical success index becomes higher than that from the forecast using CME parameters alone, however, only 25 storm events (81 percent) are correctly forecasted; and (iii) if we forecast a storm when either set of these conditions is satisfied (?, i.e. cup operator - the union set that is comprised of all the elements of either or both

  16. General circulation modeling of the thermosphere-ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, Erdal; Immel, Thomas; Ridley, Aaron; Frey, Harald U.; Moldwin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Using a three-dimensional general circulation model (GCM) of the upper atmosphere, we investigate the response of the thermosphere-ionosphere system to the August 2011 major geomagnetic storm. The GCM is driven by measured storm-time input data of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF), solar activity, and auroral activity. Simulations for quiet steady conditions over the same period are performed as well in order to assess the response of the neutral and plasma parameters to the storm. During the storm, the high-latitude mean ion flows are enhanced by up to ~150%. Overall, the global mean neutral temperature increases by up to 15%, while the maximum thermal response is higher in the winter Southern Hemisphere at high-latitudes than the summer Northern Hemisphere: 40% vs. 20% increase in high-latitude mean temperature, respectively. The global mean Joule heating of the neutral atmosphere increases by more than a factor of three. There are distinct hemispheric differences in the magnitude and morphology of the horizontal ion flows and thermospheric circulation during the different phases of the storm. The thermospheric circulation demonstrates the largest amount of hemispheric differences during the later stages of the storm. Dynamical diagnostics show that advective forcing contributes to hemispheric differences.

  17. Investigation of a strong positive ionospheric storm during geomagnetic disturbances occurred in the Brazilian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, A. J.; Sahai, Y.; Fagundes, P. R.; de Jesus, R.; Bittencourt, J. A.; Pillat, V. G.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the responses of the ionospheric F region at equatorial and low latitude regions in the Brazilian sector during the super geomagnetic storm on 15-16 May 2005. The geomagnetic storm reached a minimum Dst of -263 nT at 0900 UT on 15 May. In this paper, we present vertical total electron content (vTEC) and phase fluctuations (in TECU/min) from Global Positioning System (GPS) observations obtained at Belém (BELE), Brasília (BRAZ), Presidente Prudente (UEPP), and Porto Alegre (POAL), Brazil, during the period 14-17 May 2005. Also, we present ionospheric parameters h'F, hpF2, and foF2, using the Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI) obtained at Palmas (PAL) and São José dos Campos (SJC), Brazil, for the same period. The super geomagnetic storm has fast decrease in the Dst index soon after SSC at 0239 UT on 15 May. It is a good possibility of prompt penetration of electric field of magnetospheric origin resulting in uplifting of the F region. The vTEC observations show a trough at BELE and a crest above UEPP, soon after SSC, indicating strengthening of nighttime equatorial anomaly. During the daytime on 15 and 16 May, in the recovery phase, the variations in foF2 at SJC and the vTEC observations, particularly at BRAZ, UEPP, and POAL, show large positive ionospheric storm. There is ESF on the all nights at PAL, in the post-midnight (UT) sector, and phase fluctuations only on the night of 14-15 May at BRAZ, after the SSC. No phase fluctuations are observed at the equatorial station BELE and low latitude stations (BRAZ, UEPP, and POAL) at all other times. This indicates that the plasma bubbles are generated and confined on this magnetically disturbed night only up to the low magnetic latitude and drifted possibly to west.

  18. Geomagnetic storms link to the mortality rate in the Smolyan region for the period 1988--2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonova, Siyka G. 1; Georgieva, Radostina C. 2; Dimitrova, Boryana H. 2; Slavcheva, Radka G. 2; Kerimova, Bojena P. 2; Georgiev, Tsvetan B. 34

    We present correlations and trends of 10 parameters of annual mortality rate (1 to common mortality rate, 5 to cardiovascular reasons and 4 to "accidental" reasons (car accidents, suicides, infections)) with respect to 6 parameters of annual solar and geomagnetic activity (Wolf index, number of geomagnetic storms, duration of the storms, amplitude of the storms). During the period of observation, characterized by a 3-4-fold decrease of the mean geomagnetic activity (in terms of the number and the duration of the storms) and with a strong variations of the amplitude of the storms (about an almost constant mean values for the period), there is a 1.3-fold decrease in the urban population, a 1.5-fold increase of the common mortality rate, a 1.8-fold increase of the cardiovascular mortality rate and a 1.1-fold decrease of the "accidental" mortality rates. During the years 2003-2005 we observe about 2-fold temporary increase in the storm amplitudes. During the years 2007-2008, characterized by extremely low geomagnetic activity, we observe a surprising temporary increase of the common and the cardiovascular mortality rates 1.1 and 1.3-fold, respectively (Figures 1-4). We point out 3 main results. (1) The available data shows notable increase in the mortality rates while there is generally a decrease of the solar or geomagnetic activity during the studied period (Figures 5-9). We explain this anti-correlation with the domination of the increasing mortality rates as an effect of the advance in the mean age of the population (due to immigration of young people and decrease of new-borns), hiding an eventual display of the solar and geomagnetic influence on the mortality rates. Using this data we can not reveal influence of the long-time (10-20 years) change of the average solar and geomagnetic activity on the mortality rate. (2) Excluding the unusual years 2007 and 2008, we establish that with respect to the years with low geomagnetic activity (1993, 1995, 1996, 1999), in

  19. Real-Time WINDMI Predictions of Geomagnetic Storm and Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Horton, W.; Spencer, E.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2008-12-01

    Real-Time WINMDI is plasma physics-based, nonlinear dynamical model of the coupled solar WIND Magentosphere-Ionosphere system. Using upstream solar wind particle and field data, a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations is solved numerically to describe the energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. The physics model WINMDI divides the incoming power into energy stored in multiple regions of M-I system and has been verified on GEM storm data in Spencer et al. (2007). The system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which describes energy transfer into, and between dominant components of the nightside magnetosphere and ionosphere, is solved numerically to determine the state of each component. The low-dimensional model characterizes the energy stored in the ring current and the region 1 field-aligned current which are use to compute model Dst and AL values. Real-time solar wind plasma parameters, available from ACE, are downloaded every 10 minutes to compute the input solar wind driving voltage for the model. Real-Time WINDMI computes model Dst and AL values about 1-2 hours before index data is available at the Kyoto WDC Quicklook website. Results are shown on the Real-Time WINDMI website. We present statistics for Real-Time WINDMI performance from 2006 to present and also compare the results for different input driving voltages. We plan to compare the database of Real-Time WINDMI Dst predictions with other ring current models which contain different loss and energization processes. The work is supported by NSF grant ATM-0638480.

  20. TEC response at two equatorial stations in the African sector to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olawepo, A. O.; Oladipo, Olusola Abel; Adeniyi, Jacob Olusegun; Doherty, Patricia H.

    2015-07-01

    GPS data obtained from two equatorial stations of Ilorin (geographic Lat. 8.53°N, Long. 4.57°E and geomagnetic Lat. 10.57°N, Long. 78.56°E) and Toro (geographic Lat. 10.12°N, Long. 9.12°W and geomagnetic Lat. 11.36°N, Long. 83.35°E) have been used to study the response of vertical TEC to four geomagnetic storms which occurred during 22-23 Jan, 23-26 Jan, 6-8 March and 8-11 March in the year 2012. Three of these events were in the category of moderate storms (-50 > Dst > -100 nT) while the 8-11 March event was in the category of intense storm (-100 > Dst > -200 nT). Results obtained show that TEC response can either be enhancement or depletion irrespective of the category of the storm. While the main and recovery phases of the 23-26 Jan. and 6-8 March, 2012 moderate events produced TEC enhancement at Toro, TEC depletions were observed at Ilorin during the main phases of these two events. The result of the analysis of the 22-23 Jan, 2012 moderate storms with sudden commencement shows that response of TEC to the main phase was depletion at both stations. Percentage deviations in TEC with respect to quiet time averages ranged between -19% and +21% at Toro and -42% to +34% at Ilorin. The moderate storms with gradual commencement (i.e. 23-26 Jan and 6-8 March events) have different effects on TEC at the two stations. While the initial and recovery phases of the 23-24 Jan event produced significant TEC enhancement at both stations (+119% at Toro and +82% at Ilorin), the recovery phase of the 6-8 March event produced enhancement at Toro and depletion at Ilorin. The intense storm of 8-11 March, 2012 produced almost opposite effects on TEC at the two stations. While the effect at Toro was TEC enhancement of 0% to +116% during all the three phases, TEC fluctuations at Ilorin ranged between -36% and +28% during the initial and main phases.

  1. Latitudinal variation of 732.0 nm dayglow emission under geomagnetic storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vir; Dharwan, Maneesha

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive model is developed to study 732.0 nm dayglow emission. The Solar2000 EUV (extreme ultraviolet) flux model, neutral atmosphere model (NRLMSISE-00), latest transition probabilities and updated reaction rate coefficients are incorporated in the present model. The modeled volume emission rates (VER) are compared with the measurements as provided by Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite, Dynamics Explorer-2 spacecraft and WINDII measurements. The model is found in very good agreement with the measurements. This model is used to study the effects of geomagnetic storm on the 732.0 nm dayglow emission at various latitudes in northern hemisphere. It is found that the VER decreases as the latitude increases. The decrease in VER from low to mid latitudes is due to the decrease in atomic oxygen number density with latitude. The zenith intensity at the maximum geomagnetic activity is about 15% higher than the zenith intensity before the start of the geomagnetic storm in equatorial region. However, no appreciable change in the zenith intensity is found at higher latitudes (above 50° N). Further a negative correlation is found between the volume emission rate and DST index at all latitudes.

  2. An Investigation of Geomagnetic Storms and Associated Cosmic Ray Intensity During Recent Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Sonia

    2016-07-01

    Shocks driven by energetic coronal mass ejections (CME's) and other interplanetary (IP) transients are mainly responsible for initiating large and intense geomagnetic storms. Observational results indicate that galactic cosmic rays (CR) coming from deep surface interact with these abnormal solar and IP conditions and suffer modulation effects. The current solar cycle has provided a long list of these highly energetic events influencing the Earth's geomagnetic field up to a great extent. We have selected such intense geo-effective CME's occurred during recent solar cycle and studied their possible influence on cosmic ray intensity as well as on Earth' s geomagnetic field using the hourly values of IMF data obtained from the NSSD Center. Solar wind data obtained from various satellites are used in the studies which are available during the selected events period. The super neutron monitor data obtained from Kiel, Oulu and Huancayo stations, well distributed over different latitudes has been used in the present study. It is found that AP and AE indices show rise before the forward turnings of IMF and both the Dst index and cosmic ray intensity show a classic decrease. The analysis further indicates the significant role of the magnitudes of Bz component of IMF substantiating the earlier results. It is further inferred that the magnitude of these responses depends on BZ component of IMF being well correlated with solar maximum and minimum periods. Transient decrease in cosmic ray intensity with slow recovery is observed during the storm phase duration.

  3. Equatorial electrojet in the Indian region during the geomagnetic storm of 13-14 November 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, H.; Rastogi, R. G.; Choudhary, R. K.; Sharma, Som

    2016-04-01

    The geomagnetic storm of November 1998 is a unique event where IMF-Bz remained southward with values exceeding -15 nT for more than a day. The SYM/H index decreased from about 07 hr on 13 November 1998 reaching a minimum of about -120 nT around midnight of 13-14 November 1998. Features of the equatorial electrojet in the Indian region are studied during the geomagnetic storm event of 13-14 November 1998, based on the geomagnetic data from the chain of observatories in India. Sudden northward turning of IMF-Bz for a very short duration around 08 hr on 13 November 1998 resulted in a small and very short duration counter electrojet. A strong (-50 nT) and a long duration counter electrojet, right from 08 to 13 hr on 14 November 1998 was observed resulting in the absence of equatorial Es at Thumba. Absence of the equatorial ionization anomaly was also observed as seen from the ionograms over Thumba and ionspheric data from Ahmedabad. The delayed effect on 14 November 1998 is due to the disturbance dynamo effect.

  4. The Study of a Solar Storm and Its Interplanetary and Geomagnetic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, B. H.; Li, C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed study of a solar storm occurred on 2014 January 7. By using the remote-sensing solar observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), the eruptions of the solar flare and the coronal mass ejection (CME) are investigated. Based on the particle measurement from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and the in-situ plasma measurement from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), the solar energetic particle (SEP) event, the interplanetary CME (ICME), and its driven shock are analyzed. The influence of the solar storm on the geomagnetic fields is also analyzed. The results show that: (1) The impulsive eruption of the solar flare and the lift of the CME are temporally in accordance with each other. (2) The solar protons are mainly accelerated by the CME-driven shock when the CME travels to 7.7 solar radius, rather than by the magnetic reconnection in the flare. (3) The widths of the interplanetary shock sheath and the ICME itself are derived to be 0.22 AU and 0.26 AU, respectively. (4) The interplanetary shock and the ICME give rise to substorms and aurora, whereas no obvious geomagnetic storm is detected. The reason is that the ICME does not include a structure of the magnetic cloud (MC) or southward magnetic fields.

  5. The UAH Spinning Terrella Experiment: A Laboratory Model of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, R. B.; Reynolds, E. W.

    2001-05-01

    The UAH Spinning Terrella Experiment demonstrated that hot plasma in the vicinity of strong magnetic gradients, can generate not unreasonable space charge potentials1. For example, a 5kG Nd-B magnet of 1 cm radius was shown to have a ~10 nF capacitance when embedded in a 100 mTorr and supplied with ions by a DC glow discharge. When the voltage on the capacitor exceeds the breakdown electric field of the background gas, field-aligned arcs are generated that dump the charge in about 30μ s. Images (and movies if possible) of this phenomena will be shown. This system can be scaled to the Earth's dipole, where it predicts a similar discharge during geomagnetic storms due to the injection of plasmasheet ions into the ring current2. While not the cause of the storm, this mechanism explains many of the related phenomena of geomagnetic storms, including localized X-rays, O+\\ gyrofrequency Pc1 waves, explosive growth of Dst, two timescales for recovery, RC oxygen content, and field-aligned particle beams. In addition, the model predicts that dipole tilt and seasonal variations in the ionospheric conductivity may control the magnitude of Dst. We argue this point statistically and relate it to the debated ``Russell-McPherron'' effect. 1Sheldon, R. and S. Spurrier, Phys. Plasmas, 2001.\\2Sheldon, R. Adv. Sp. Res, 25, pp2347-2356, 2000.

  6. Modeling Ionospheric Convection During a Major Geomagnetic Storm on October 22-23, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Aggson, T. L.; Heelis, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Following the passage of an interplanetary shock at approximately 0500 UT, a major geomagnetic storm developed on October 22-23, 1981. Numerous auroral substorms occurred during this storm leading to an AE index greater than 1000 nT. We have used the expanding/contracting polar cap (ECPC) model (Moses et al., 1989) and data from the Dynamics Explorer 2 spacecraft to study the ionospheric electric fields for 12 consecutive traversals of the polar regions. The ECPC model can determine the voltage drops across the dayside merging and nightside reconnection gaps. We determined the relationship of the AL index (i.e., the intensity of the westward electrojet) to the nightside reconnection potential drop. An excellent linear correlation was found between the nightside reconnection gap voltage drop and the AL index. These results show that the solar wind strongly drives the magnetosphere-ionosphere system throughout the geomagnetic storm. A substantial level of dayside merging seems to occur throughout the event. Nightside reconnection varies from satellite pass to satellite pass and within the substorm recovery phase. We find that tail reconnection is an important feature of the recovery phase of substorms.

  7. Artificial reproduction of magnetic fields produced by a natural geomagnetic storm increases systolic blood pressure in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Bretón, J. L.; Mendoza, B.; Miranda-Anaya, M.; Durán, P.; Flores-Chávez, P. L.

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of geomagnetic storms may be associated with changes in circulatory physiology. The way in which the natural variations of the geomagnetic field due to solar activity affects the blood pressure are poorly understood and require further study in controlled experimental designs in animal models. In the present study, we tested whether the systolic arterial pressure (AP) in adult rats is affected by simulated magnetic fields resembling the natural changes of a geomagnetic storm. We exposed adult rats to a linear magnetic profile that simulates the average changes associated to some well-known geomagnetic storm phases: the sudden commencement and principal phase. Magnetic stimulus was provided by a coil inductor and regulated by a microcontroller. The experiments were conducted in the electromagnetically isolated environment of a semi-anechoic chamber. After exposure, AP was determined with a non-invasive method through the pulse on the rat's tail. Animals were used as their own control. Our results indicate that there was no statistically significant effect in AP when the artificial profile was applied, neither in the sudden commencement nor in the principal phases. However, during the experimental period, a natural geomagnetic storm occurred, and we did observe statistically significant AP increase during the sudden commencement phase. Furthermore, when this storm phase was artificially replicated with a non-linear profile, we noticed a 7 to 9 % increase of the rats' AP in relation to a reference value. We suggested that the changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm in its first day could produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response in AP.

  8. The F region and topside ionosphere response to a strong geomagnetic storm at Arecibo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yun; Zhou, Qihou; Zhang, Shao Dong; Aponte, NéStor; Sulzer, Michael; GonzáLez, Sixto A.

    2013-08-01

    analyze the data derived from the Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements to investigate the response of the F region and topside ionosphere to a strong geomagnetic storm that occurred during the period of 5-6 August 2011. The meridional wind was extremely enhanced at the early stage of the storm. The peak velocity reached approximately 300 m/s at an altitude of 340 km, which is seldom seen at the Arecibo latitude. During the storm, the vertical ion drift caused by the meridional wind was positively correlated with that caused by the electric field, which is opposite to the quiet time relationship. The disturbed vertical ion drifts resulted in large ionospheric perturbations in the F and topside regions. Several collapses were observed in hmF2 during the storm night. NmF2 rapidly increased after the storm and then decreased around midnight. At an altitude of 610 km, the concentration of H+ and O+, and the ratio of H+ over electron density all exhibited large variations. The ratio of H+ over electron density changed from less than 10% to more than 80% in a matter of 2 hours in the morning of 6 August. One explanation for such a behavior is that vertical transport dominates over charge exchange late at night due to the lower concentration of O+.

  9. Investigation of Hemispherical Differences in Total Electron Content During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, K. R.; Coster, A. J.; Zhang, S.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of geomagnetic storms on the total electron content (TEC) varies as a function of longitude, season, and hemisphere. None of these differences in TEC are fully understood. Using the TEC data from the ground-based GPS receiver network in the Madrigal database, we analyze the data from 2009 until 2014 in the polar regions from 60 to 90 degrees and -60 to -90 degrees, in the mid-latitudes from 30 to 60 degrees and -30 to -60 degrees, and the equatorial regions from 0 to 30 degrees and 0 to -30 degrees. Our processing started in 2009 due to the better coverage in the GPS ground network in the southern hemisphere in this solar cycle. Case studies are selected from different seasons and longitudes to compare and contrast quiet-time TEC and storm-associated TEC in both hemispheres. We first identify a seasonal dependence of the hourly TEC by analyzing hourly averages in a three-day period around the solstices and equinoxes from 2009 to 2013. Then, we examine storm-time effects on the TEC by examining the hourly averaged TEC in a three day window around a particular storm. We investigate a hypothesis that 1900 UT and 700 UT are favorable times for storm enhanced density (SED) in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively.

  10. The Plasma Physics Processes that Drive Ring Current Enhancements during Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, Michele Diane

    Geomagnetic storms result when energetic particles of solar and ionospheric origin fill Earth's inner magnetosphere and create a strong westward current, known as the ring current. This dissertation presents results from investigating the plasma dynamics that contribute to the development of Earth's ring current from ionospheric outflow of H+ and O+ ions, and the role of ring current enhancements in the generation of geomagnetic storms and substorms. Modeling was carried via a combined multifluid and particle approach, which enables us to resolve the small-scale dynamics that are key to particle energization within the context of the global magnetosphere. The results presented in this dissertation substantially contribute to our understanding of the development and composition of the ring current during geomagnetic storms and substorms, and offer insight into the ionospheric sources regions for ring current ions, as well as the processes through which these particles are energized, injected, and trapped within the inner magnetosphere. This thesis presents results that show how small-scale particle dynamics within the current sheet, boundary layers, and reconnection regions drive the acceleration of ring current particles within the larger global context of the magnetosphere. Small-scale structures within the magnetotail are shown to be more important in determining when particles are accelerated than the time after particles are initialized in the ionosphere. It is also found that after a period of southward IMF, in which particle energization is observed, a northerly turning of the IMF is necessary in order to trap energetic particles in orbit around the Earth and form a symmetric ring current. Asymmetries in the acceleration mechanisms between ionospheric H+ and O + ions were observed with oxygen ions convecting duskward according to the cross-tail current and gaining more energy than protons, which moved earthward on reconnecting field lines and were accelerated

  11. Unexpected non seismic signals recorded by broadband seismic stations during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, M.; Grad, M.; Jóźwiak, W.

    2015-12-01

    Broadband seismometer is a very complicated and sensitive device designed to record ground motion with resolutions as low as nm/s. While short period geophone is only mass in a coil the broadband sensor is sophisticated combination of feedback circuits. Experience shows that broadband sensors are very sensitive to ground motion and its orientation, especially tilt. On March 17, 2015 an amazing, strong event was simultaneously recorded by all stations at Z component, with very long period - not typical for seismic events. Records at the same time suggested geomagnetic storm. In this study broadband seismometer response to electromagnetic wave caused by geomagnetic storms is shown and analyzed. Main observation was done using network of 13 broadband stations in northern Poland. Same signal was recorded on all stations on area of 120 km in diameter. Time and shape of recording was exactly the same as recording of magnetic anomaly in permanent magnetic station HEL located about 50 km from the nearest seismic station. The first small event was recorded at about 5 am, and following it strong event started at about 4 pm UTC. An increase of signal amplitude is observed with geomagnetic latitude in the range 52.26 - 53.27o (corresponding geographic 53.69 - 54.54oN). Seismic and magnetic records are compared for other permanent stations in the area, as well as for other recent storms. In this study circumstances needed for recording magnetic anomalies with seismic stations are discussed based on years of seismic recording by Polish permanent stations and temporary passive experiments "13BB star" and PASSEQ. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  12. Ionospheric response to the sustained high geomagnetic activity during the March 1989 great storm

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, J.J.; Schunk, R.W.; Denig, W.F.

    1994-11-01

    A simulation was conducted to model the high-latitude ionospheric response to the sustained level of high geomagnetic activity for the great magnetic storm period of March, 13-14, 1989. The geomagnetic and solar activity indices and the DMSP F8 and F9 satellite data for particle precipitation and high-latitude convection were used as inputs to a time-dependent ionospheric model (TDIM). The results of the TDIM were compared to both DMSP plasma density data and ground-based total electron content (TEC) measurements for the great storm period as well as with earlier storm observations. The comparisons showed that the overall structure of the high-latitude ionosphere was dominated by an increased convection speed within the polar cap that led to increased ion temperatures. In turn, this enhanced the NO(+) density, raised the atomic-to-molecular ion transition height to over 300 km, decreased N{sub m}F{sub 2}, increased h{sub m}F{sub 2}, and in places either increased n{sub e} at 800 km or slightly decreased it. The morphology of the ionosphere under, these extreme conditions was considerably different than that modeled for less disturbed intervals. These differences included the character of the dayside tongue of ionization that no longer extended deep into the polar cap. Instead, as a result of the ion heating and consequent reduction in N{sub m}F{sub 2}, a large polar hole occupied much of the polar region. This polar hole extended beyond the auroral oval and merged with the night sector midlatitude trough. The limitations associated with the applicability of the TDIM to the geomagnetic conditions present on March 13 and 14 are discussed.

  13. Radial deformation of the solar current sheet as a cause of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that the solar current sheet, extending from a coronal streamer, develops a large-scale radial deformation, at times with a very steep gradient at the earth's distance. The associated magnetic field lines (namely, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines) are expected to have also a large gradient in the vicinity of the current sheet. It is also suggested that some of the major geomagnetic storms occur when the earth is located in the region where IMF field lines have a large dip angle with respect to the ecliptic plane for an extended period (6-48 h), as a result of a steep radial deformation of the current sheet.

  14. Relationships Among Geomagnetic Storms, Interplanetary Shocks, Magnetic Clouds, and Sunspot Number During 1995 - 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Lepping, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    During 1995 - 2012, the Wind spacecraft has recorded 168 magnetic clouds (MCs), 197 magnetic cloud-like structures (MCLs), and 358 interplanetary (IP) shocks. Ninety-four MCs and 56 MCLs had upstream shock waves. The following features are found: i) The averages of the solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), duration (< Δ t >), the minimum of B_{min}, and intensity of the associated geomagnetic storm/activity (Dst_{min}) for MCs with upstream shock waves (MC_{shock}) are higher (or stronger) than those averages for the MCs without upstream shock waves (MC_{no-shock}). ii) The average < Δ t > of MC_{shock} events ({≈} 19.8 h) is 9 % longer than that for MC_{no-shock} events ({≈} 17.6 h). iii) For the MC_{shock} events, the average duration of the sheath (<Δ t_{sheath}>) is 12.1 h. These findings could be very useful for space weather predictions, i.e. IP shocks driven by MCs are expected to arrive at Wind (or at 1 AU) about 12 h ahead of the front of the MCs on average. iv) The occurrence frequency of IP shocks is well associated with sunspot number (SSN). The average intensity of geomagnetic storms measured by < Dst_{min}> for MC_{shock} and MC_{no-shock} events is -102 and -31 nT, respectively. The average values < {Dst}_{min} > are -78, -70, and -35 nT for the 358 IP shocks, 168 MCs, and 197 MCLs, respectively. These results imply that IP shocks, when they occur with MCs/MCLs, must play an important role in the strength of geomagnetic storms. We speculate about the reason for this. Yearly occurrence frequencies of MC_{shock} and IP shocks are well correlated with solar activity ( e.g., SSN). Choosing the correct Dst_{min} estimating formula for predicting the intensity of MC-associated geomagnetic storms is crucial for space weather predictions.

  15. Effects of geomagnetic storm on low latitude ionospheric total electron content: A case study from Indian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Monti; Kumar, Sanjay; De, Barin Kumar; Guha, Anirban

    2015-07-01

    The effect of geomagnetic storms on low latitude ionosphere has been investigated with the help of Global Positioning System Total Electron Content (GPS-TEC) data. The investigation has been done with the aid of TEC data from the Indian equatorial region, Port Blair (PBR) and equatorial ionization anomaly region, Agartala (AGR). During the geomagnetic storms on 24th April and 15th July 2012, significant enhancement up to 150% and depression up to 72% in VTEC is observed in comparison to the normal day variation. The variations in VTEC observed from equatorial to EIA latitudes during the storm period have been explained with the help of electro-dynamic effects (prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) and disturbance dynamo electric field (DDEF)) as well as mechanical effects (storm-induced equatorward neutral wind effect and thermospheric composition changes). The current study points to the fact that the electro-dynamic effect of geomagnetic storms around EIA region is more effective than at the lower latitude region. Drastic difference has been observed over equatorial region (positive storm impact) and EIA region (negative storm impact) around same longitude sector, during storm period on 24th April. This drastic change as observed in GPS-TEC on 24th April has been further confirmed by using the O/N2 ratio data from GUVI (Global Ultraviolet Imager) as well as VTEC map constructed from IGS data. The results presented in the paper are important for the application of satellite-based communication and navigational system.

  16. Causes of HF Backscatter Loss During Large Geomagnetic Storms: Comparisons between Northern and Southern Hemisphere SuperDARN Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, J. L.; Waters, C. L.; Menk, F. W.; Sciffer, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    HF communication and surveillance systems are known to experience difficulty during geomagnetic storm conditions. The Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) comprises over 35, HF (8-12 MHz) over-the-horizon radars used to study ionosphere dynamics and HF propagation. It is well known that SuperDARN radars experience a loss of backscatter during geomagnetic storm events, yet details of the reasons why this occurs are not clear. Loss of HF backscatter during geomagnetic storms is often attributed to D region absorption. However, the data shows that during intense geomagnetic storms, SuperDARN radars return high signal/noise ratio, backscatter from ranges out to ~800 km, inconsistent with loss due to absorption in the D region. Examples of SuperDARN backscatter during large storms will be presented and discussed together with HF ray-tracing, ionosonde and riometer data. Data from Kodiak in the north and Bruny Island in the south hemisphere are compared. These reveal properties of the ionosphere as the storm progresses and show hemisphere similarities and differences. Possible backscatter loss mechanisms will be discussed, given the evidence derived from the experimental data.

  17. GPS derived ionospheric TEC response to geomagnetic storm on 24 August 2005 at Indian low latitude stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    Results pertaining to the response of the low latitude ionosphere to a major geomagnetic storm that occurred on 24 August 2005 are presented. The dual frequency GPS data have been analyzed to retrieve vertical total electron content at two Indian low latitude stations (IGS stations) Hyderabad (Geographic latitude 17°20‧N, Geographic longitude 78°30‧E, Geomagnetic latitude 8.65°N) and Bangalore (Geographic latitude 12°58‧N, Geographic longitude 77°33‧E, Geomagnetic latitude 4.58°N). These results show variation of GPS derived total electron content (TEC) due to geomagnetic storm effect, local low latitude electrodynamics response to penetration of high latitude convection electric field and effect of modified fountain effect on GPS-TEC in low latitude zone.

  18. A time-compressed simulated geomagnetic storm influences the nest-exiting flight angles of the stingless bee Tetragonisca angustula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, D. M. S.; Corrêa, A. A. C.; Vaillant, O. S.; de Melo, V. Bandeira; Gouvêa, G. S.; Ferreira, C. G.; Ferreira, T. A.; Wajnberg, E.

    2014-03-01

    Insects have been used as models for understanding animal orientation. It is well accepted that social insects such as honeybees and ants use different natural cues in their orientation mechanism. A magnetic sensitivity was suggested for the stingless bee Schwarziana quadripunctata, based on the observation of a surprising effect of a geomagnetic storm on the nest-exiting flight angles. Stimulated by this result, in this paper, the effects of a time-compressed simulated geomagnetic storm (TC-SGS) on the nest-exiting flight angles of another stingless bee, Tetragonisca angustula, are presented. Under an applied SGS, either on the horizontal or vertical component of the geomagnetic field, both nest-exiting flight angles, dip and azimuth, are statistically different from those under geomagnetic conditions. The angular dependence of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of whole stingless bees shows the presence of organized magnetic nanoparticles in their bodies, which indicates this material as a possible magnetic detector.

  19. Probing geomagnetic storm-driven magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics in D-region ionosphere using VLF signal propagation characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ogunmodimu, Olugbenga

    2016-07-01

    When propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, the amplitude and phase of VLF/LF radio signals are sensitive to changes in the electrical conductivity of the lower ionosphere. This characteristic makes it useful in studying sudden ionospheric disturbances, especially those related to prompt X-ray flux output from solar flares and gamma ray bursts (GRBs). However, strong geomagnetic disturbances and/or storm conditions are known to produce large and global ionospheric disturbances, which can significantly affect VLF radio propagation in the D region ionosphere. Diurnal VLF signature may also convey other important information, especially those related to geomagnetic disturbance/storm induced ionospheric changes. In this paper, using the data of three propagation paths (at latitudes 40-54º), we analyze in detail the trend of anomalies of VLF diurnal signal under varying solar and geomagnetic space environmental conditions to identify possible geomagnetic footprints on the D region ionosphere.

  20. A case study of ionospheric storm effects during long-lasting southward IMF Bz-driven geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Libo; Nakamura, Takuji; Zhao, Biqiang; Ning, Baiqi; Yoshikawa, A.

    2014-09-01

    Multiple instrumental observations including GPS total electron content (TEC), foF2 and hmF2 from ionosondes, vertical ion drift measurements from Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System, magnetometer data, and far ultraviolet airglow measured by Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Global Ultraviolet Imager (TIMED/GUVI) are used to investigate the profound ionospheric disturbances at midlatitude and low latitude during the 14-17 July 2012 geomagnetic storm event, which was featured by prolonged southward interplanetary geomagnetic field component for about 30 h below -10 nT. In the East Asian/Australian sector, latitudinal profile of TEC variations in the main phase were characterized by three bands of increments and separated by weak depressions in the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA) crest regions, which were caused by the combined effects of disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEF) and equatorward neutral winds. In the recovery phase, strong inhibition of EIA occurred and the summer crest of EIA disappeared on 16 July due to the combined effects of intrusion of neutral composition disturbance zone as shown by the TIMED/GUVI O/N2 measurements and long-lasting daytime westward DDEF inferred from the equatorial electrojet observations. The transit time of DDEF over the dip equator from westward to eastward is around 2200 LT. In the American longitude, the salient ionospheric disturbances in the summer hemisphere were characterized by daytime periodical intrusion of negative phase for three consecutive days in the recovery phase, preceded by storm-enhanced density plume in the initial phase. In addition, multiple short-lived prompt penetration electric fields appeared during stable southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz in the recovery phase and were responsible for enhanced the EIA and equatorial ionospheric uplift around sunset.

  1. A case study of Ionospheric storm effects during long-lasting southward IMF Bz driven geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    Multiple instrumental observations including GPS TEC, foF2 and hmF2 from ionosondes, vertical ion drift measurements from C/NOFS, magnetometer data and far-ultraviolet airglow measured by TIMED/GUVI are used to investigate the profound ionospheric disturbances at mid- and low-latitudes during the 14-17 July 2012 geomagnetic storm event, which was featured by prolonged southward interplanetary geomagnetic field component for about 30 hours below -10 nT. In the East Asian/Australian sector, latitudinal profile of TEC variations in the main phase were characterized by three bands of increments and separated by weak depressions in the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly (EIA) crest regions, which were caused by the combined effects of disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEF) and equatorward neutral winds. In the recovery phase, strong inhibition of EIA occurred and the summer crest of EIA disappeared on 16 July due to the combined effects of intrusion of neutral composition disturbance zone as shown by the TIME/GUVI O/N2 measurements and long-lasting daytime westward DDEF inferred from the equatorial electric electrojet (EEJ) observations. The transit time of DDEF over the dip equator from westward to eastward is around 2200 LT. In the American longitude, the salient ionospheric disturbances in the summer hemisphere were characterized by daytime periodical intrusion of negative phase for three consecutive days in the recovery phase, preceded by storm enhanced density (SED) plume in the initial phase. In addition, multiple short-lived prompt penetration electric fields (PPEF) appeared during stable southward IMF Bz in the recovery phase and were responsible for enhanced the EIA and equatorial ionospheric uplift around sunset.

  2. Ionospheric response to the sustained high geomagnetic activity during the March '89 great storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Denig, W. F.

    1994-01-01

    A simulation was conducted to model the high-latitude ionospheric to the sustaied level of high geomagnetic activity for the great magnetic storm period of March 13-14, 1989. The geomagnetic and solar activity indices and the Defense Meterological Satellite Program (DMSP) F8 and F9 satellite data for particle precipitation and high-latitude convection were used as inputs to a time-dependent ionospheric model (TDIM). The results of the TDIM were compared to both DMSP plasma density data and ground-based total electron content (TEC) measurements for the great storm period as well as with earlier storm observations. The comparisons show that the overall structure of the high-latitude ionosphere was dominated by an increased convection speed within the polar cap that led to increased ion temperatures. In turn, this enhanced the NO(+) density, raised the atomic-to-molecular ion transition height to over 300 km, decreased N(sub m)F(sub 2), increased h(sub m)F(sub 2), and in places either increased n(sub e) at 800 km or slightly decreased it. The morphology of the ionosphere under these extreme conditions was considerably different than that modeled for less distributed intervals. These differences included the character of the dayside tongue of ionization that no longer extended deep into the polar cap. Instead, as a result of the ion heating and consequent reduction in N(sub m)F(sub 2), a large polar hole occupied much of the polar region. This polar hole extended beyond the auroral oval and merged with the night sector midatitude trough. The limitaions associated with the applicability of the TDIM to the geomagnetic conditions present on March 13 and 14 are discussed. The primary limitations of the TDIM derive from the limited temporal resolution of the model input parameters and the lack of suitably dynamic thermospheric specification for the great storm conditions. These limitations leads to midlatitude ionospheric storm phases that do no follow those observed.

  3. Ionospheric response to the sustained high geomagnetic activity during the March `89 great storm

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, J.J.; Schunk, R.W.; Denig, W.F. |

    1994-11-01

    A simulation was conducted to model the high-latitude ionospheric to the sustaied level of high geomagnetic activity for the great magnetic storm period of March 13-14, 1989. The geomagnetic and solar activity indices and the Defense Meterological Satellite Program (DMSP) F8 and F9 satellite data for particle precipitation and high-latitude convection were used as inputs to a time-dependent ionospheric model (TDIM). The results of the TDIM were compared to both DMSP plasma density data and ground-based total electron content (TEC) measurements for the great storm period as well as with earlier storm observations. The comparisons show that the overall structure of the high-latitude ionosphere was dominated by an increased convection speed within the polar cap that led to increased ion temperatures. In turn, this enhanced the NO(+) density, raised the atomic-to-molecular ion transition height to over 300 km, decreased N(sub m)F(sub 2), increased h(sub m)F(sub 2), and in places either increased n(sub e) at 800 km or slightly decreased it. The morphology of the ionosphere under these extreme conditions was considerably different than that modeled for less distributed intervals. These differences included the character of the dayside tongue of ionization that no longer extended deep into the polar cap. Instead, as a result of the ion heating and consequent reduction in N(sub m)F(sub 2), a large polar hole occupied much of the polar region. This polar hole extended beyond the auroral oval and merged with the night sector midatitude trough. The limitaions associated with the applicability of the TDIM to the geomagnetic conditions present on March 13 and 14 are discussed. The primary limitations of the TDIM derive from the limited temporal resolution of the model input parameters and the lack of suitably dynamic thermospheric specification for the great storm conditions. These limitations leads to midlatitude ionospheric storm phases that do no follow those observed.

  4. The Study on a Solar Storm and Its Interplanetary and Geomagnetic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai-han, Qiu; Chuan, LI

    2015-10-01

    We present a detailed study on a solar storm occurred on 2014 January 7. By using the remote-sensing observations of solar activities at multiple wavelengths from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), the eruptions of the solar flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) are investigated. Based on the measurement of energetic protons from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and the in-situ plasma measurement from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) at the solar-terrestrial L1 point, the solar energetic particle (SEP) event and interplanetary CME (ICME) accompanied by the solar storm, and the shock driven by the ICME are analyzed. The influence of the solar storm on the geomagnetic fields is also analyzed with the ground-based magnetic data. The results in this study show that: (1) The initial time of impulsive phase of the solar flare and the ejection time of the CME are temporally in accordance with each other. (2) The solar protons are mainly accelerated by the CME-driven shock, rather than by the magnetic reconnection in the flare, and the protons are released when the CME travels to 7.7 solar radius. (3) The widths of the interplanetary shock sheath and the ICME itself are derived to be 0.22 AU and 0.26 AU, respectively. (4) The interplanetary shock and the ICME give rise to substorms and aurora, whereas no obvious geomagnetic storm is detected. The reason is that the ICME does not contain a regular structure of magnetic cloud (MC) or evident southward component of magnetic field.

  5. Aurora Activities Observed by SNPP VIIRS Day-Night Band during St. Patrick's Day, 2015 G4 Level Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. C.; Shao, X.; Cao, C.; Zhang, B.; Fung, S. F.; Sharma, S.

    2015-12-01

    A G4 level (severe) geomagnetic storm occurred on March 17 (St. Patrick's Day), 2015 and it is among the strongest geomagnetic storms of the current solar cycle (Solar Cycle 24). The storm is identified as due to the Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) which erupted on March 15 from Region 2297 of solar surface. During this event, the geomagnetic storm index Dst reached -223 nT and the geomagnetic aurora electrojet (AE) index increased and reached as high as >2200 nT with large amplitude fluctuations. Aurora occurred in both hemispheres. Ground auroral sightings were reported from Michigan to Alaska and as far south as southern Colorado. The Day Night Band (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPP represents a major advancement in night time imaging capabilities. The DNB senses radiance that can span 7 orders of magnitude in one panchromatic (0.5-0.9 μm) reflective solar band and provides imagery of clouds and other Earth features over illumination levels ranging from full sunlight to quarter moon. In this paper, DNB observations of aurora activities during the St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm are analyzed. Aurora are observed to evolve with salient features by DNB for orbital pass on the night side (~local time 1:30am) in both hemispheres. The radiance data from DNB observation are collected at the night sides of southern and northern hemispheres and geo-located onto geomagnetic local time (MLT) coordinates. Regions of aurora during each orbital pass are identified through image processing by contouring radiance values and excluding regions with stray light near day-night terminator. The evolution of aurora are characterized with time series of the poleward and low latitude boundary of aurora, their latitude-span and area, peak radiance and total light emission of the aurora region in DNB observation. These characteristic parameters are correlated with solar wind and geomagnetic index parameters.

  6. Energetic Electron Transport in the Inner Magnetosphere During Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, D. L.; Anderson, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    We propose to examine the relationship of geomagnetic storms and substorms and the transport of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere using measurements of the auroral X-ray emissions by PIXIE. PIXIE provides a global view of the auroral oval for the extended periods of time required to study stormtime phenomena. Its unique energy response and global view allow separation of stormtime particle transport driven by strong magnetospheric electric fields from substorm particle transport driven by magnetic-field dipolarization and subsequent particle injection. The relative importance of substorms in releasing stored magnetospheric energy during storms and injecting particles into the inner magnetosphere and the ring current is currently hotly debated. The distribution of particles in the inner magnetosphere is often inferred from measurements of the precipitating auroral particles. Thus, the global distributions of the characteristics of energetic precipitating particles during storms and substorms are extremely important inputs to any description or model of the geospace environment and the Sun-Earth connection. We propose to use PIXIE observations and modeling of the transport of energetic electrons to examine the relationship between storms and substorms.

  7. Equatorial Ionospheric Irregularities Observed in the South American Sector During the December 2006 Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Y.; de Jesus, R.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Fagundes, P. R.; de Abreu, A. J.; Becker-Guedes, F.; Abalde, J. R.; Brunini, C.; Gende, M.; Cintra, T.; de Souza, V.; Pillat, V.; Lima, W.

    2009-05-01

    This investigation presents studies related to the observations of equatorial ionospheric irregularities in the ionospheric F-region in the South American sector during the intense geomagnetic storm in December 2006, during the period of low solar activity. The geomagnetic storm reached a minimum Dst of -147 nT at 0700 UT on 15 December. In this work ionospheric sounding data obtained between 13 and 16 December 2006 at Palmas (PAL; 10.2o S, 48.2o W; dip latitude 6.6o S) and São José dos Campos (SJC, 23.2o S, 45.9o W; dip latitude 17.6o S), Brazil, and Jicamarca (JIC, 12.0o S, 76.8o W; dip latitude 0.05o S), Peru, have been used. Also, vertical total electron content (VTEC) and phase fluctuations (TECU/min) from GPS observations obtained at Brasilia (BRAZ, 15.9o S, 47.9o W; dip latitude 11.7o S), Presidente Prudente (PPTE, 22.12° S, 51.4° W; dip latitude 14,9° S), Curitiba (PARA, 25.43o S, 49.21o W; dip latitude 18.4o S), Santa Maria (SMAR, 29.71o S, 53.07o W; dip latitude 19.6o S), Brazil, Bahia Blanca (VBCA, 38.7o S, 62.3o W; dip latitude 22.4o S) and Puerto Deseado (PDES, 47.7o S, 65.9o W, dip latitude 27.1o S), Argentina, during the period 13 to 16 December are presented. An unusual uplifting of the F-region during pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) on 14 December was possibly associated with a prompt penetration of electric field of magnetospheric origin after the storm sudden commencement (1414 UT on 14 December). On this geomagnetically disturbed night of 14-15 December, intense equatorial ionospheric irregularities were observed up to southern most GPS station PDES in Argentina. It should be mentioned that on the other nights viz., 12-13 and 13-14 December (both nights before the storm), and 15-16 December (recovery phase), the ionospheric irregularities are limited to only the Brazilian GPS stations. On the geomagnetically disturbed night of 14-15 December, strong oscillations were observed in the F-region base height possibly associated with Joule heating

  8. Relevance vector machines as a tool for forecasting geomagnetic storms during years 1996-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyas, T.; Andriyas, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of relevance vector machine (RVM) as a learning tool in order to generate 1-h (one hour) ahead forecasts for geomagnetic storms driven by the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere during the years 1996-2007. This epoch included solar cycle 23 with storms that were both ICME (interplanetary coronal mass ejection) and CIR (corotating interaction region) driven. Merged plasma and magnetic field measurements of the solar wind from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and WIND satellites located upstream of the Earth's magnetosphere at 1-h cadence were used as inputs to the model. The magnetospheric response to the solar wind driving measured by the disturbance storm time or the Dst index (measured in nT) was used as the output to be forecasted. The model was first tested on previously reported storms in Wu and Lundstedt (1997) and it gave a linear correlation coefficient, ρ, of above 90% and prediction efficiency (PE) above 80%. During 1996-2007, several storms (within each year) were chosen as test cases to analyze the forecasting robustness of the model. The top three forecasts per year were analyzed to assess the generalization ability of the model. These included storms with varying intensities ranging from weak (-53.01 nT) to strong (-422.02 nT) and durations (119-445 h). The top RVM forecast in a given year had ρ above 85% (87.00-96.85%), PE > 73 % (73.59-93.59%), and a root mean square error (RMSE) ranging from 9.31 to 33.45 nT. A qualitative comparison is made with model forecasts previously reported by Ji et al. (2012). We found that the robustness of the model with regards to fast learning and generating forecasts within acceptable error bounds makes it a very good proposition as a prediction tool (given the solar wind parameters) for space weather monitoring.

  9. Ring current electron dynamics during geomagnetic storms based on the Van Allen Probes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Baker, D. N.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Larsen, B. A.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2016-04-01

    Based on comprehensive measurements from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron Mass Spectrometer Ion Spectrometer, Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope, and Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment instruments on the Van Allen Probes, comparative studies of ring current electrons and ions are performed and the role of energetic electrons in the ring current dynamics is investigated. The deep injections of tens to hundreds of keV electrons and tens of keV protons into the inner magnetosphere occur frequently; after the injections the electrons decay slowly in the inner belt but protons in the low L region decay very fast. Intriguing similarities between lower energy protons and higher-energy electrons are also found. The evolution of ring current electron and ion energy densities and energy content are examined in detail during two geomagnetic storms, one moderate and one intense. The results show that the contribution of ring current electrons to the ring current energy content is much smaller than that of ring current ions (up to ~12% for the moderate storm and ~7% for the intense storm), and <35 keV electrons dominate the ring current electron energy content at the storm main phases. Though the electron energy content is usually much smaller than that of ions, the enhancement of ring current electron energy content during the moderate storm can get to ~30% of that of ring current ions, indicating a more dynamic feature of ring current electrons and important role of electrons in the ring current buildup. The ring current electron energy density is also shown to be higher at midnight and dawn while lower at noon and dusk.

  10. Statistical analysis of the ionospheric response during geomagnetic storm conditions over South Africa using ionosonde and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matamba, Tshimangadzo Merline; Habarulema, John Bosco; McKinnell, Lee-Anne

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a statistical analysis of ionospheric response over ionosonde stations Grahamstown (33.3°S, 26.5°E, geographic) and Madimbo (22.4°S, 30.9°E, geographic), South Africa, during geomagnetic storm conditions which occurred during the period 1996-2011. Such a climatological study is important in establishing local ionospheric behavior trend which later forms a basis for accurate modeling and forecasting electron density and critical frequency of the F2 layer (foF2) useful for high-frequency communication. The analysis was done using foF2 and total electron content (TEC), and to identify the geomagnetically disturbed conditions, the Dst index with a storm criterion of Dst ≤ nT was used. Results show a strong solar cycle dependence with negative ionospheric storm effects following the solar cycle and positive ionospheric storm effects occurring most frequently during solar minimum. Seasonally, negative and positive ionospheric storm effects occurred most in summer (63.24%) and in winter (53.62%), respectively. An important finding is that only negative ionospheric storms were observed during great geomagnetic storm activity (Dst ≤ nT). For periods when both foF2 and TEC data (from colocated ionosonde and GPS receiver stations) were available, a similar response in terms of variational trend was observed. Hence, GPS data can be used to effectively identify the ionospheric response in the absence of ionosonde data.

  11. Mid-Latitude Ionospheric Disturbances Due to Geomagnetic Storms at ISS Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft charging of the International Space Station (ISS) is dominated by the interaction of the high voltage US solar arrays with the F2-region ionospheric plasma environment. We are working to fully understand the charging behavior of the ISS solar arrays and determine how well future charging behavior can be predicted from in-situ measurements of plasma density and temperature. One aspect of this work is a need to characterize the magnitude of electron density and temperature variations that may be encountered at ISS orbital altitudes (approximately 400 km), the latitudes over which they occur, and the time periods for which the disturbances persist. We will present preliminary results from a study of ionospheric disturbances in the "mid-latitude" region defined as the approximately 30 - 60 degree extra-equatorial magnetic latitudes sampled by ISS. The study is focused on geomagnetic storm periods because they are well known drivers for disturbances in the high-latitude and mid-latitude ionospheric plasma. Changes in the F2 peak electron density obtained from ground based ionosonde records are compared to in-situ electron density and temperature measurements from the CHAMP and ISS spacecraft at altitudes near, or above, the F2 peak. Results from a number of geomagnetic storms will be presented and their potential impact on ISS charging will be discussed.

  12. Multipoint Measurements and Global Simulations of the June 23, 2015 Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzulukova, Natalia; Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Glocer, Alex; Dorelli, John; Sibeck, David; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Valek, Phil; McComas, David

    2016-04-01

    On 22-23 June 2015 a severe geomagnetic storm occurred with Dst minimum of approximately -200nT. During this extreme event, multipoint observations of magnetospheric dynamics were obtained by a fleet of Geospace spacecraft including MMS, TWINS, Van-Allen Probes and THEMIS. Extensive data coverage allows us to examine the responses of the ring current, radiation belts, ion composition and wave activity during this unusual event, both for the main phase of the storm as well as for the recovery phase. We present results of analysis of satellite data and simulation from a global coupled MHD-ring current model-radiation belt model (BATSRUS-CIMI) to connect multipoint observations from different parts of the magnetosphere. The output of virtual s/c in the global model is calculated and compared with the observations. The analysis helps to identify different magnetospheric domains from multipoint measurements and various magnetospheric boundary motions. We find the model is able to capture the global structure of the magnetosphere. We also explore how the initial disturbance from the solar wind propagates through the magnetosphere causing energization of plasma in the inner magnetosphere and producing severe geomagnetic activity.

  13. Characteristics of precipitating energetic electron fluxes relative to the plasmapause during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian C.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.

    2014-11-01

    In this study we investigate the link between precipitating electrons from the Van Allen radiation belts and the dynamical plasmapause. We consider electron precipitation observations from the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) constellation during geomagnetic storms. Superposed epoch analysis is performed on precipitating electron observations for the 13 year period of 1999 to 2012 in two magnetic local time (MLT) sectors, morning and afternoon. We assume that the precipitation is due to wave-particle interactions and our two MLT sectors focus on chorus (outside the plasmapause) and plasmaspheric hiss (inside the plasmapause) waves. We generate simple expressions based on the geomagnetic index, Dst, which reproduce the chorus-driven observations for the >30 keV precipitating electron flux magnitudes. Additionally, we find expressions for the fitted spectral index to describe the flux variation with energy, allowing a full energy reproduction as a function of distance from the plasmapause. The hiss-driven precipitating flux occurs inside the plasmapause but is independent of distance from the plasmapause. In the POES observations the hiss-induced electron precipitation is only detectable above the instrument noise in the >300 keV and P6 (>800 keV) channels of the flux detection instrument. We have derived expressions for the storm time variation in flux inside the plasmapause using Dst as a proxy. The observations show that there is little evidence for >800 keV electron precipitation occurring outside of the plasmapause, in the MLT sectors studied.

  14. Equatorial All Sky Imager Images from the Seychelles during the March 17th, 2015 geomagnetic storm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, B.

    2015-12-01

    An all sky imager was installed in the Seychelles earlier this year. The Seychelles islands are located northeast of Madagascar and east of Somalia in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The all sky imager is located on the island of Mahe (4.6667°S, 55.4667°E geographic), (10.55°S, 127.07°E geomagnetic), with filters of 557.7, 620.0, 630.0, 765.0 and 777.4 nm. Images with a 90 second exposure from Seychelles in 777.4nm and 630.0nm from the night before and night of the March 17th geomagnetic storm are discussed in comparison to solar wind measurements at ACE and the disturbance storm time (Dst) index. These images show line-of-sight intensities of photons received dependent on each filters wavelength. A time series of these images sometimes will show the movement of relatively dark areas, or depletions, in each emission. The depletion regions are known to cause scintillation in GPS signals. The direction and speed of movement of these depletions are related to changes observed in the solar wind.

  15. Variation of the cold plasma density structure above the polar ionosphere associated with geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, N.; Shinbori, A.; Nishimura, Y.; Ono, T.; Iizima, M.; Kumamoto, A.; Yamada, M.; Watanabe, S.; Abe, T.

    2007-12-01

    Plasma outflow from the polar ionosphere into the magnetosphere is one of the most important processes in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the polar region. Recent satellite observations have clarified that plasma outflow takes an important role for plasma transport into the magnetosphere, abrupt changes of the ring current ion composition, and the disappearance of the auroral acceleration region during geomagnetic storms. In the present study, we analyzed the electron density data observed by the Akebono satellite in an altitude range from 300 to 10500 km, in order to clarify the formation process of the plasma density enhancement above the polar ionosphere. The electron density along the satellite path was derived using the upper-hybrid resonance (UHR) frequency and maximum frequency of whistler-mode waves observed by the PWS instrument onboard the Akebono satellite with the time resolution of 2 seconds. In the present data analysis, we used the electron density data from March, 1989 to July, 1990 for statistical analyses. First, we investigate the statistically averaged density distributions during the quiet time in summer, equinox, and winter seasons. The data are sorted by day and night in magnetic local time, 5 degrees in invariant latitude and 100 km in altitude. The logarithmically averaged data in each bin are fitted by using the non-linear least square fitting method in altitude direction, using the equation of sum of the exponential and power law functions. Then, the fitted profiles are interpolated in ILAT direction by exponential functions. Finally, we obtain electron density distribution on the meridian plane. From comparing these distributions, it is identified that electron density in summer is 5 to 50 times larger than that in winter below 5000 km altitude in the polar cap and auroral zone. Next, we perform case studies for the geomagnetic storm events which occurred on June 6, June 9, 1989 and March 30, 1990. In these events, enhancements

  16. A storm time assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics analysis for the severe geomagnetic storm of November 8-9, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.L.; Clauer, C.R.; Emery, B.A.

    1995-10-01

    Global parameters are obtained for the November 8-9, 1991, severe geomagnetic storm with the application of a slightly modified version of the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) data inversion model. Inputs to the model include ground magnetometer data, satellite electron precipitation data, satellite ion drift data, and ion drift velocities obtained from radar measurements. The authors compare two of the AMIE computed parameters, the total Joule heating and the polar cap potential, to both the AE (12) index and the AE{sub AMIE} index, an AMIE modeled AE index created specifically for severe storm times. The equation obtained from a linear fit to the total Joule heating versus the AE{sub AMIE} index, closely resembles other equations found during much less disturbed times using the AE(12) index. These results using the AE(12) index appear to saturate at a level around 1300 nT. However, this saturation is associated with the calculation of the AE(12) index and not a physical result. An apparent saturation can also be seen in the comparison of the polar cap potential with the AE(12) index, but this is not the case when using the AE{sub AMIE} index. The comparison between the polar cap potential and the AE{sub AMIE} index yields an approximate linear relationship with a correlation coefficient of 0.80. From these results, the authors find that the magnitude of the auroral electrojets and the polar cap potential drop do not show signs of saturation at the activity levels that were present during the November 8-9, 1991 severe storm. 37 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Are stress responses to geomagnetic storms mediated by the cryptochrome compass system?

    PubMed Central

    Close, James

    2012-01-01

    A controversial body of literature demonstrates associations of geomagnetic storms (GMS) with numerous cardiovascular, psychiatric and behavioural outcomes. Various melatonin hypotheses of GMS have suggested that temporal variation in the geomagnetic field (GMF) may be acting as an additional zeitgeber (a temporal synchronizer) for circadian rhythms, with GMS somehow interfering with the hypothesized system. The cryptochrome genes are known primarily as key components of the circadian pacemaker, ultimately involved in controlling the expression of the hormone melatonin. Cryptochrome is identified as a clear candidate for mediating the effect of GMS on humans, demonstrating the prior existence of several crucial pieces of evidence. A distinct scientific literature demonstrates the widespread use of geomagnetic information for navigation across a range of taxa. One mechanism of magnetoreception is thought to involve a light-dependent retinal molecular system mediated by cryptochrome, acting in a distinct functionality to its established role as a circadian oscillator. There is evidence suggesting that such a magnetosense—or at least the vestiges of it—may exist in humans. This paper argues that cryptochrome is not acting as secondary geomagnetic zeitgeber to influence melatonin synthesis. Instead, it is hypothesized that the cryptochrome compass system is mediating stress responses more broadly across the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis (including alterations to circadian behaviour) in response to changes in the GMF. Two conceptual models are outlined for the existence of such responses—the first as a generalized migrational/dispersal strategy, the second as a stress response to unexpected signals to the magnetosense. It is therefore proposed that GMS lead to disorientation of hormonal systems in animals and humans, thus explaining the effects of GMS on human health and behaviour. PMID:22418257

  18. Modelling of ionospheric irregularities during geomagnetic storms over African low latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungufeni, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    In this study, empirical models of occurrence of ionospheric irregularities over low latitude African region during geomagnetic storms have been developed. The geomagnetic storms considered consisted of Dst ≤ -50 nT. GNSS-derived ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) data over Libreville, Gabon (NKLG) (0.35° N, 9.68° E, geographic, 8.05° S, magnetic) and Malindi, Kenya (MAL2) (2.99° S, 40.19° E, geographic, 12.42° S, magnetic) during 2000 - 2014 were used. Ionospheric irregularities at scale- lengths of a few kilometers and ˜400 m were represented with the rate of change of TEC index (ROTI). The inputs for the models are the local time, solar flux index, Auroral Electrojet index, day of the year, and the Dst index, while the output is the median ROTI during these given conditions. To develop the models, the ROTI index values were binned based on the input parameters and cubic B splines were then fitted to the binned data. Developed models using data over NKLG and MAL2 were validated with independent data over stations within 510 km and 680 km radius, respectively. The models captured the enhancements and inhibitions of the occurrence of the ionospheric irregularities during the storm period. The models even emulated these patterns in the various seasons, during medium and high solar activity conditions. The correlation coefficients for the validations were statistically significant and ranged from 0.58 - 0.73, while the percentage of the variance in the observed data explained by the modelled data ranged from 34 - 53.

  19. GPS derived spatial ionospheric total electron content variation over South-Indian latitudes during intense geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Sampad K.; Gedam, Shirishkumar S.

    2012-10-01

    The geomagnetic storms are turbulence in geomagnetic field when interplanetary magnetic field driven by solar wind move southward and continue for extended period of time. Although these occur less frequently, but may energize ionospheric electrons and particles adversely affecting ground- and space-based electronic systems. Ionosphere at higher latitude is more prone to geomagnetic storms. Over lower latitude region like Indian sub-continent, the effect is less prominent but still can exhibit many distinctive effects like scintillations, equatorial ionization anomaly, fountain effect and equatorial electrojets. The increased numbers of free electrons in ionosphere introduce delays in global positioning system (GPS) satellite signals resulting in errors during GPS positioning. In a dual frequency GPS receiver, the line integral of free electron density along the pathway of signal through the ionosphere (i.e., Total Electron Content, TEC) can be measured. In this present paper, GPS observation data of three low latitude GPS stations in India located at Bangalore, Hyderabad and Mumbai during four severe geomagnetic storms from 2003-2005, are processed to measure ionospheric TEC during the events. The measured TEC at each of the station is compared with quietest days of the months to investigate its abnormal changes in responses to severe geomagnetic storms. The consequences of TEC variation is analyzed and correlated with interplanetary magnetic field (IMF-Bz), geomagnetic Kp and Dst-indices to study its behavioral changes during the storms. Eventually the aim of the study is to estimate the influence of ionospheric condition on GPS positioning to devise suitable method for accurate position measurements in the low latitude Indian region.

  20. Ionospheric response to geomagnetic storm on July 14-17, 2012 in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Elena; Zherebtsov, Gelii; Wang, Guojun; Zolotukhina, Nina; Polekh, Nelya; Wang, Xiao; Shi, Jiankui

    We study manifestation of intense geomagnetic storm on July 14-17, 2012 in the ionosphere high, middle and low latitudes. The peculiarity of the storm is that for nearly 30 hours the IMF Bz had southward direction (-20 ÷ -10 nT). We use data from the chains of stations located near the meridians 90E, 110E and 150E. The critical frequency (foF2) variation analysis showed that during the storm main phase the ionosphere response depends strongly on the local time of the sudden storm commencement so the negative perturbations were observed near the meridian 90E and positive perturbations were observed near the meridian 150E. At the end of the storm main phase the traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) were observed at all stations. The critical frequencies were extremely low during the storm recovery phase on July 16, 2012 at all stations and this phase lasted nearly three days. At the low-latitude station Hainan (19.5N, 109E) on July 16, 2012 the day foF2 values were the same as the night values. This intense and prolonged negative perturbation is a very rare event at low latitudes. Since prolonged negative disturbance is usually associated with a decrease in the ratio of concentration of atomic oxygen to that of molecular nitrogen [O]/[N2] which is transported by the disturbed thermospheric wind from auroral latitudes to middle and low, then we analyzed measuring [O]/[N2] (Global Ultraviolet Imager, http://guvi.jhuapl.edu/site/gallery/guvi-galleryl3on2.shtml). It found out that feature of the studied storm is very low values of [O]/[N2] which were observed on July 16 in the longitudinal sector 60 - 150E from high latitude almost to the equator. Modeling results of the ionospheric response to this storm are also presented. At low-latitudes the extreme low values of [O]/[N2] also can be one of the reasons of the prolonged negative disturbance. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 13-05-91159) and RF President Grant of Public

  1. Positive and negative ionospheric storms occurring during the 15 May 2005 geomagnetic superstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2015-09-01

    This study focuses on the 15 May 2005 geomagnetic superstorm and aims to investigate the global variation of positive and negative storm phases and their development. Observations are provided by a series of global total electron content maps and multi-instrument line plots. Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe) simulations are also employed. Results reveal some sunward streaming plumes of storm-enhanced density (SED) over Asia and a well-developed midlatitude trough over North America forming isolated positive and negative storms, respectively. The simultaneous development of positive and negative storms over North America is also shown. Then, some enhanced auroral ionizations maintained by strong equatorward neutral winds appeared in the depleted nighttime ionosphere. Meanwhile, the northern nighttime polar region became significantly depleted as the SED plume plasma could not progress further than the dayside cusp. Oppositely, a polar tongue of ionization (TOI) developed in the daytime southern polar region. According to CTIP simulations, solar heating locally maximized (minimized) over the southern (northern) magnetic pole. Furthermore, strong upward surges of molecular-rich air created O/N2 decreases both in the auroral zone and in the trough region, while some SED-related downward surges produced O/N2 increases. From these results we conclude for the time period studied that (1) composition changes contributed to the formation of positive and negative storms, (2) strengthening polar convection and increasing solar heating of the polar cap supported polar TOI development, and (3) a weaker polar convection and minimized solar heating of the polar cap aided the depletion of polar plasma.

  2. A two-ejecta event associated with a two-step geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Jordanova, V. K.; Thomsen, M. F.; Lu, G.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.

    2006-11-01

    A new view on how large disturbances in the magnetosphere may be prolonged and intensified further emerges from a recently discovered interplanetary process: the collision/merger of interplanetary (IP) coronal mass ejections (ICMEs; ejecta) within 1 AU. As shown in a recent pilot study, the merging process changes IP parameters dramatically with respect to values in isolated ejecta. The resulting geoeffects of the coalesced ("complex") ejecta reflect a superposition of IP triggers which may result in, for example, two-step, major geomagnetic storms. In a case study, we isolate the effects on ring current enhancement when two coalescing ejecta reached Earth on 31 March 2001. The magnetosphere "senses" the presence of the two ejecta and responds with a reactivation of the ring current soon after it started to recover from the passage of the first ejection, giving rise to a double-dip (DD) great storm (each min Dst < -250 nT). A drift-loss global kinetic model of ring current buildup shows that in this case the major factor determining the intensity of the storm activity is the very high (up to ˜10 cm-3) plasma sheet density. The plasma sheet density, in turn, is found to correlate well with the very high solar wind density, suggesting the compression of the leading ejecta as the source of the hot, superdense plasma sheet in this case. This correlation is similar to that obtained in a previous investigation extending over several years, but the present case study extends the range of plasma sheet densities from ˜2 to ˜10 cm-3. Since the features of the ejecta interaction in this example are fairly general, we propose that interacting ejecta are a new, important IP source of DD major storms. Peculiarities in the behavior of the magnetopause current during these extreme events are briefly discussed in the light of recent work. In a brief discussion of a second example (21-23 October 2001), we suggest that by strengthening the leading shock, the ejecta merger may have

  3. High-frequency ``Pc1'' during the geomagnetic storm of November 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, Elena; Demekhov, Andrei; Yahnin, Alexander; Kotik, Dmitry; Yahnina, Tatyana

    At 00-04 UT on 10 November 2004 during a strong geomagnetic storm the IMAGE spacecraft observed proton auroras at extremely low latitudes (L=2.4). Conjugated with the auroras the low orbiting NOAA satellites detected localized precipitation of energetic (>30 keV) protons (LPEP). The LPEP are typically associated with EMIC waves or geomagnetic pulsations in the Pc1 range. This means that both EMIC waves and LPEP are the result of ion-cyclotron interaction operating in the equatorial plane in the magnetosphere. Close to the meridian of the low-latitude proton aurora there exist several geomagnetic observatories located at L>3.4, but none of them detected any pulsations in the Pc1 range. Here we present results of observations performed at a mid-latitude site Novaya Zhizn located at L=2.6, that is, close to the observed proton aurora. This site is equipped with a magnetometer which produces pulsation spectra up to 30 Hz. Not surprisingly, we found some emissions correlated with the proton aurora and LPEP at frequencies exceeding first Sсhumann resonance. Oscillations of the horizontal component of the magnetic field were detected at frequencies of about 9.5-11.5 Hz. It worth noting that both modeling and IMAGE EUV and RPI observations show that the plasmasphere was very contracted during the storm and the plasmapause was located at about L=2.5. The precipitation zone was projected onto the plasmapause. The emission frequency corresponds to the band above the equatorial gyrofrequency of He+ ions at the geomagnetic flux tube of the precipitation region and, thus, the signal may be associated with the ion-cyclotron instability of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves at the unusually low latitude plasmapause. Further study has revealed three more periods of the detection of such "high frequency" emissions: from 22:30 UT on November 10, 2004 to 03:00 UT on November 11, 2004,from 06-08 UT on November 11, 2004, and 09-12 UT on November 11, 2004. During the period 06

  4. Comparison between the effect of two geomagnetic storms with the same seasonal and daily characteristics and different intensity on the European ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Bouza, Marta; Herraiz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Caderot, Gracía; Paparini, Claudia; Otero, Xurxo; Radicella, Sandro M.

    2016-04-01

    This work presents an analysis of the ionospheric disturbance caused by two geomagnetic storms occurred on the same day, 17th March, but one in 2013 and other in 2015. The greatest intensity of both storms occurs after sunset when geomagnetic indexes (Dst index, Kp and Ap) reached the peak values. Both geomagnetic storms can be classified as intense according to the Dst index criteria. The storm of March 17, 2015, ("St Patricḱs storm"), can be considered even "severe" because the Dst index dropped off -200nT. The solar origins of both geomagnetic storms were magnetic filament eruptions followed by Coronal Mass Ejections, CME. The ionospheric behavior has been studied through the total electron content, TEC. This parameter is obtained from RINEX files processed using the calibration technique developed by Prof. Luigi Ciraolo. RINEX files from selected GNSS stations on Europe belonging to International GPS Service, IGS, and EUREF Permanent Network, have been used. The calibration technique assumes the ionospheric thin shell model to obtain vertical total electron content (vTEC) from slant total electron content (sTEC) at the Ionospheric Pierce Point. The data were obtained in periods of the geomagnetic storms and during quite days surrounding the storms days, at 1 minute sampling. The behavior of the ionosphere during the two geomagnetic storms was similar. In both cases, a positive ionospheric storm, defined as an increase on the TEC, occurred during the main phase of the geomagnetic storms on 17th of March. These increases were followed by a negative ionospheric storm, a decreasing of TEC, in the recuperation phase. However, in the event of 2015, the positive ionospheric storm of the main phase had more intensity but the same duration than that of 2013 and for the negative ionospheric storm both, intensity and duration, were largest in 2015 than in 2013.

  5. Observations of high-latitude geomagnetic field fluctuations during St. Patrick's Day storm: Swarm and SuperDARN measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michelis, Paola; Consolini, Giuseppe; Tozzi, Roberta; Marcucci, Maria Federica

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study the properties of the magnetic field's fluctuations produced by ionospheric and magnetospheric electric currents during the St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm (17 March 2015). We analyse the scaling features of the external contribution to the horizontal geomagnetic field recorded simultaneously by the three satellites of the Swarm constellation during a period of 13 days (13-25 March 2015). We examine the different latitudinal structure of the geomagnetic field fluctuations and analyse the dynamical changes in the magnetic field scaling features during the development of the geomagnetic storm. Analysis reveals consistent patterns in the scaling properties of magnetic fluctuations and striking changes between the situation before the storm, during the main phase and recovery phase. We discuss these dynamical changes in relation to those of the overall ionospheric polar convection and potential structures as reconstructed using SuperDARN data. Our findings suggest that distinct turbulent regimes characterised the mesoscale magnetic field's fluctuations and that some factors, which are known to influence large-scale fluctuations, have also an influence on mesoscale fluctuations. The obtained results are an example of the capability of geomagnetic field fluctuations data to provide new insights about ionospheric dynamics and ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling. At the same time, these results could open doors for development of new applications where the dynamical changes in the scaling features of the magnetic fluctuations are used as local indicators of magnetospheric conditions.

  6. Monitoring the ionospheric total electron content variations over the Korean Peninsula using a GPS network during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Jeong; Park, Jong-Uk

    2011-06-01

    We have established a regional ionospheric model (RIM) for investigating changes in the total electron content (TEC) over South Korea using 38 Korean GPS reference stations. The inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation method was applied to create a two-dimensional ionospheric map of vertical TEC units (TECU) based on a grid. To examine the diurnal patterns of ionospheric TEC over South Korea, we first processed the GPS data from a geomagnetically quiet period of 10 days. In a second step, we compared the estimated GPS-TEC variations with the changes in geomagnetic activity indices (the K p and D st indices) and the auroral electrojet index (AE) as a function of universal time (UT) on 4 and 20 November, 2003. The GPS-TEC responses for those storm events were proportional to the geomagnetic activity at this mid-latitude location. The sudden increases in ionospheric TEC (SITEC) caused by the geomagnetic storms were detected. The variations in GPS-TEC may help reveal the processes of ionospheric disturbances caused by geomagnetic storms.

  7. Prediction of Geomagnetic Storm Strength from Inner Heliospheric In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubicka, M.; Moestl, C.; Rollett, T.; Feng, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Boakes, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    In order to predict the effects of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) on Earth, it is important to know the properties of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Of special interest is the southward component (Bz) of the IMF, acting as a main driver for geomagnetic storms. We are working on a proof-of-concept for predicting the strength of geomagnetic storms caused by ICMEs by using in situ data from spacecraft in the inner heliosphere. Our prediction includes the arrival time and speed of the ICME at Earth, the IMF's Bz component and the resulting disturbance storm time index (Dst), which is a prime indicator of geomagnetic activity. For Dst forecasting, the two well established models Burton et al. (1975) and O'Brien & McPherron (2000) are used. Necessary parameters for those models are the ICME speed and the Bz component of the IMF at 1 AU. We obtain the ICME speed using a drag-based model, and the IMF's Bz component is predicted based on a power law from the in situ data. Additionally, the ENLIL/WSA model provides the solar wind background speed for the drag-based model.An advantage of our method is the use of the in situ spacecraft as a reference point for the drag based-model, leading to a more precise arrival speed of the ICME at Earth, and an improved arrival time. Investigation of an ICME in June 2012 shows already very promising results for the Dst index, as well as for the ICME arrival speed. The main advantage of this method is the prediction lead time of ~21 hours compared to only ~40-60 minutes, using an L1 located spacecraft. Furthermore, the feasibility of this method can be studied with any in situ spacecraft temporarily located between the Sun and Earth, like Helios, Solar Orbiter or Solar Probe Plus, and also works for radial spacecraft alignments. The techniques we develop could be routinely applied to a mission that forms an artificial Lagrange point along the Sun-Earth line, e.g. for a Sunjammer or Heliostorm mission.

  8. October 29-31, 2003 geomagnetic storm: geomagnetically induced currents and their relation to problems in the Swedish high-voltage power transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, A. A.; Lindahl, S.; Viljanen, A.; Pirjola, R.

    2004-12-01

    In October 30, 2003, an ongoing geomagnetic superstorm knocked down a part of the high-voltage power transmission system in southern Sweden operated by the Sydkraft company. The blackout lasted for an hour and left about 50000 people without electricity. The incident was probably the most severe GIC failure observed since the well-known March 1989 Québec blackout and thus the problems in a Swedish system deserve a closer look. The geophysical background and the impacts on the Swedish high-voltage power transmission system of the October 29-31, 2003 geomagnetic storm are described in the study at hand. It was seen that athough no serious problems in North-America have been reported, the "three-phase" storm produced exceptionally large geomagnetic activity at the Fennoscandian auroral region. It was also seen that GIC modeled for southern Sweden region using very simplistic methods were able to explain the times of the failures in the Swedish system thus confirming the sources of experienced problems and adding also GIC to the long list of causes of technological impacts of the storm. Though the great diversity of the GIC drivers are addresses in the study, the problems in operating the Swedish system during the exceptionally intense storm of October 29-31, 2003 are attributed geophysically to substorms, SSCs and enhanced ionospheric convection all of which were creating large and complex geoelectric fields capable of driving large GIC. Based on the basic two-fold nature of the failure-related geoelectric field characteristics, a semi-deterministic approach for forecasting GIC-related geomagnetic activity in which average overall activity is supplemented with statistical estimations of the amplitudes of GIC fluctuations is suggested.

  9. The first super geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24: "The St. Patrick's day event (17 March 2015)"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Lepping, Ronald P.; Hutting, Lynn; Plunkett, Simon; Howard, Russ A.; Socker, Dennis

    2016-09-01

    The first super geomagnetic storm (Dst < -200 nT) of solar cycle 24 occurred on "St. Patrick's day" (17 March 2015). Notably, it was a two-step storm. The source of the storm can be traced back to the solar event on 15 March 2015. At ~2:10 UT on that day, SOHO/LASCO C3 recorded a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME), which was associated with a C9.1/1F flare (S22W25) and a series of type II/IV radio bursts. The initial propagation speed of this CME is estimated to be ~668 km/s. An interplanetary (IP) shock, likely driven by a magnetic cloud (MC), arrived at the Wind spacecraft at 03:59 UT on 17 March and caused a sudden storm commencement. The storm intensified during the Earth's crossing of the ICME/shock sheath and then recovered slightly after the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) turned northward. The IMF started turning southward again due to a large MC field itself, which caused the second storm intensification, reaching a minimum value (Dst = -223 nT). It is found that the first step is caused by a southward IMF component in the sheath (between the upstream shock and the front of the MC), whereas the second step is associated with the passage of the MC. The CME that erupted on 15 March is the sole solar source of the MC. We also discuss the CME/storm event with detailed data from observations ( Wind and SOHO) and our algorithm for predicting the intensity of a geomagnetic storm (Dstmin) from known IP parameter values. We found that choosing the correct Dstmin estimating formula for predicting the intensity of MC-associated geomagnetic storms is crucial for space weather predictions.

  10. Global Ionospheric and Thermospheric Response to the April 2010 Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, G.; Haeusler, K.; Hagan, M. E.; Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Ober, D. M.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Ribeiro, A.; Ruohoniemi, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present a detailed case study of the 5 April 2010 geomagnetic storm. The event was prompted by a fast-moving coronal mass ejection from the Sun. Despite being a rather moderate storm with a minimum Dst value only around -70 nT, the event showcases some important yet complex ionospheric and thermospheric characteristics that are typically seen during major storms, including plasma density perturbations by penetration electric fields, strong equatorward neutral wind surges, and the development of westward disturbance dynamo winds. These storm-related features are examined in light of the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM) simulations. To replicate magnetospheric forcing during the event, time-dependent global patterns of ionospheric plasma convection and auroral energy dissipation obtained from the AMIE procedure were used to drive the TIMEGCM. AMIE synthesizes various data sets from both space- and ground-based instruments, including DMSP, AMPERE, and SuperDARN. This study was also motivated by the unprecedented thermospheric observations available from the GOCE, CHAMP, and GRACE satellites, which were operating at average altitudes of 270, 300, and 470 km, and covering local time sectors at 6:20-18:20 LT, 12:00-24:00 LT, and 8:30-20:30 LT, respectively. The emphasis of the paper is placed on the inter-comparison of the simulation results with satellite and other ground-based measurements in order to unveil the physical processes responsible for the observed latitudinal and longitudinal/local-time variations from high latitudes to the equatorial regions.

  11. Radiation belt electron reanalysis over two solar cycles: Comparitive modeling and analysis of several geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Adam; Turner, Drew; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Shprits, Yuri; Podladchikova, Tatiana; Drozdov, Alexander

    Earth’s electron radiation belts are a dynamic system, coupled to the solar wind and to the ionosphere. Understanding the observed dynamics requires consideration of the coupling between the three systems. Remote sensing and in situ observations provide information on the current state of the radiation belt system, and together with careful modeling may be used to resolve the physical processes at work. The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) model solves the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation in three dimensional invariant coordinates, which allows one to more effectively separate adiabatic and non-adiabatic changes in the radiation belt electron population. The model includes geomagnetic storm intensity dependent parameterizations of the following dominant magnetospheric waves: day- and night-side chorus, plasmaspheric hiss (in the inner magnetosphere and inside the plume region), lightning and anthropogenic generated waves, and electro-magnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, also inside of plasmaspheric plumes. The model is used to forecast the future state of the radiation belt electron population, while real-time data may be used to update the current state of the belts through assimilation with the model. The Kalman filter provides a computationally inexpensive method to assimilate data with a model, while taking into account the errors associated with each. A split-operator Kalman filter approach is applied in this study, which provides a fast and effective way to assimilate data over very long time periods. Data error estimates are derived through the intercalibration, while model error estimates are adjusted dynamically based on the model forecast performance. In the current study, a set of geomagnetic storms are investigated comparatively using solar wind data, and reanalysis of electron phase space density from several different spacecraft missions. The storms occurred during periods that span over two solar cycles, and include CME and CIR driven

  12. Isis 1 observations of the high-latitude ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitteker, J. H.; Hartz, T. R.; Brace, L. H.; Burrows, J. R.; Heikkila, W. J.; Sagalyn, R. C.; Thomas, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    The Isis 1 satellite has made measurements of several ionospheric and related parameters, and the results of the various measurements have been compared in detail for two north transpolar passes during the geomagnetic storm of February 3, 1969. Simultaneous measurements were made of local electron and ion densities and temperatures, electron density between the satellite and the peak of the F layer, radio noise, and particle fluxes over a wide energy range extending down to 10 eV. Several features of the ionosphere (in particular, enhancements of radio noise, scale height, and plasma temperatures) appear to be due to soft-particle (100 eV to 1 keV) precipitation, which is related to magnetospheric structure as delineated by the observation of more energetic particles. The magnetosheath particles precipitating on the dayside of the polar cap are particularly effective.

  13. MAINSTREAMING SPACE WEATHER: Training Teachers to Understand the Causes and Effects of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, W. J.; Bowen, W. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Goncharenko, L. P.

    2001-05-01

    How much does the average person understand about "Aurora"? Most might describe it as a seemingly random natural phenomenon that occurs only in polar regions. Probing the person by asking such questions as; "What causes aurora? Where are they located (altitude)? Can they be predicted?", would, most likely, provide little further information. There is no doubt that the average person has a vague understanding of aurora. As part of a summer internship funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Educators Program we created lesson plans, demonstrations, and laboratory experiences designed to explain how aurora, an indicator of geomagnetic activity, is created. The ultimate intent of the research was to find a way to help educators understand what "Space Weather" is. We chose to begin with "The Earth-Sun System" and a superb video done by The Discover Channel, "The Savage Sun". These lessons include information on the process of fusion, sunspots, coronal holes, and solar wind. Geomagnetism included the topics of "The Dynamic Earth", and the Earth's magnetosphere. A complete comprehension of "The Electromagnetic Spectrum" is essential for understanding. This topic is a part of the Massachusetts Frameworks for the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment exams on every grade level, to varying degrees. No lessons are completed without some physics and chemistry to provide the background necessary. Finally, we are able to discuss the Earth's atmosphere and the differences between the neutral layer and the ionosphere, as well as terms like "Electron Density", and "Incoherent Scatter", "D,E,F Layers". The ability of a non-atmospheric scientist to understand the cause and effect of geomagnetic storms relies heavily on their educational level and relative experiences. Our goal was to provide an in-service training program to give an educator enough background information so they will be able to discuss space weather in their classroom in an informed and

  14. Modeling of Coronal Mass Ejections that Caused Particularly Large Geomagnetic Storms Using ENLIL Heliosphere Cone Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taktakishvili, A.; Pulkkinen, A.; MacNeice, P.; Kuznetsova, M.; Hesse, M.; Odstrcil, D.

    2011-01-01

    In our previous paper we reported the results of modeling of 14 selected well -observed strong halo coronal mass ejection (CME) events using the WSA -ENLIL cone model combination. Cone model input parameters were obtained from white light coronagraph images of the CME events using the analytical method developed by Xie et al. This work verified that coronagraph input gives reasonably good results for the CME arrival time prediction. In contrast to Taktakishvili et al., where we started the analysis by looking for clear CME signatures in the data and then proceeded to model the interplanetary consequences at 1 AU, in the present paper we start by generating a list of observed geomagnetic storm events and then work our way back to remote solar observations and carry out the corresponding CME modeling. The approach used in this study is addressing space weather forecasting and operational needs. We analyzed 36 particularly strong geomagnetic storms, then tried to associate them with particular CMEs using SOHO/LASCO catalogue, and finally modeled these CMEs using WSA-ENLIL cone model. Recently, Pulkkinen et al. developed a novel method for automatic determination of cone model parameters. We employed both analytical and automatic methods to determine cone model input parameters. We examined the CME arrival times and magnitude of impact at 1 AU for both techniques. The results of the simulations are compared with the ACE satellite observations. This comparison demonstrated that WSA -ENLIL model combination with coronagraph input gives reasonably good results for the CME arrival times for this set of 'geoeffective" CME events as well.

  15. Modeling of coronal mass ejections that caused particularly large geomagnetic storms using ENLIL heliosphere cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taktakishvili, A.; Pulkkinen, A.; MacNeice, P.; Kuznetsova, M.; Hesse, M.; Odstrcil, D.

    2011-06-01

    In our previous paper we reported the results of modeling of 14 selected well-observed strong halo coronal mass ejection (CME) events using the WSA-ENLIL cone model combination. Cone model input parameters were obtained from white light coronagraph images of the CME events using the analytical method developed by Xie et al. (2004). This work verified that coronagraph input gives reasonably good results for the CME arrival time prediction. In contrast to Taktakishvili et al. (2009), where we started the analysis by looking for clear CME signatures in the data and then proceeded to model the interplanetary consequences at 1 AU, in the present paper we start by generating a list of observed geomagnetic storm events and then work our way back to remote solar observations and carry out the corresponding CME modeling. The approach used in this study is addressing space weather forecasting and operational needs. We analyzed 36 particularly strong geomagnetic storms, then tried to associate them with particular CMEs using SOHO/LASCO catalogue, and finally modeled these CMEs using WSA-ENLIL cone model. Recently, Pulkkinen et al. (2010) developed a novel method for automatic determination of cone model parameters. We employed both analytical and automatic methods to determine cone model input parameters. We examined the CME arrival times and magnitude of impact at 1 AU for both techniques. The results of the simulations are compared with the ACE satellite observations. This comparison demonstrated that WSA-ENLIL model combination with coronagraph input gives reasonably good results for the CME arrival times for this set of "geoeffective" CME events as well.

  16. Geomagnetic inverse of the ring current during magnetic storm and its applications in the Dst index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, C.

    2012-12-01

    Intensity and lasting time of the main phase were two significantly important parts for the space weather prediction. Furthermore, any improvements of forecasting technique and result depend on the studies of the ring current energization during magnetic storm. It's also helpful to advance our knowledge of the energy transport and transformation when energization was fully understood. In a word, the research progress by the methods of theoretic analysis combined with geomagnetic inverse should be useful to investigate the physical energization with both academic meanings and operational application. This program start with the lognormal fitting of Dst indices and further analyse the energization of the charged particle in traveling magnetosphere by using single particle dynamics and adiabatic theory. The probability distribution function will be proposed in order to extend the single particle problem to many particles which consistent with real physics. After that, a quantitative parameter which called energizing index as describe the efficiency of the ring current energization will be designed. Finally, the two fitting parameters of lognormal will be physically interpreted after compared with the geomagnetic observations and then the theoretic basis for Dst physical predicting can be constructed.

  17. Network of observations on the atmospheric electrical parameters during geomagnetic storm on 5 April 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, N. Jeni; Manu, S.; Frank-Kamenetsky, A. V.; Panneerselvam, C.; Anil Kumar, C. P.; Elango, P.

    2016-03-01

    The effects of a geomagnetic storm on the variation of the atmospheric electric field over Maitri (70°45'S, 11°44'E), Dome C (75°06'S, 123°20'E), and Vostok (78°27'S, 106°52'E) Antarctic research stations are presented in this paper. For the first time, the paper reports the simultaneous observations of the atmospheric electric field/potential gradient (PG) over the three high-latitude stations at the Southern Hemisphere, and its associated changes due to a substorm phenomenon. PG data obtained from these three stations under fair-weather conditions on 5 April 2010 are analyzed. The duration of geomagnetic disturbance is classified into three intervals, which contains three consecutive substorms based on the magnetic records of the Maitri station. The substorm is directly related to an enhancement of the magnetospheric convective electric field at high latitude, generally controlled by the solar wind parameters. It is found that the variation in the amplitude of PG depends on the magnetic latitude during substorm onset. During the substorm expansion phase, when the convection cell is at overhead, PG is significantly enhanced due to the downward mapping of the ionospheric horizontal electric field. The present observation demonstrated the changes on PG due to the spatial extension of the convection cell from high latitudes up to middle latitudes.

  18. On the Responses of Geomagnetic Field at African and Asian Longitudes during the Storm of April 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falayi, E.; Rabiu, A.; Yumoto, K.; Uozumi, T.; Magdas, M.

    2010-12-01

    The geomagnetic horizontal (H) field from the chain of 16 MAGDAS magnetic observatories along African and Asian longitudes are used to study the storm-time and disturbance daily variations. Geomagnetic field components vary when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented in southward direction. Also effect of sudden magnetospheric compression is clearly seen at all latitudes. There is persistent decrease of H of disturbance daily variation during the storm at equatorial latitudes which could be the effect of a westward electric field due to the Disturbance Ionospheric dynamo coupled with abnormally large electrical conductivities in the E region over the equator. Therefore by analysing the data observed in the stations along African and Asian longitudes during the magnetic storm, the variations in electromagnetic environment in the near-earth space could be obtained.

  19. The effects of neutral inertia on ionospheric currents in the high-latitude thermosphere following a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, W.; Killeen, T. L.; Burns, A. G.; Roble, R. G.; Slavin, J. A.; Wharton, L. E.

    1993-01-01

    Neutral flywheel effects are investigated in NCAR-TIGCM simulation of geomagnetic storms that occurred in November 23, 1982 and December 7-8, 1982. Theoretical calculations from the latter storm are compared with measurements of currents form instruments on the Dynamics Explorer 2 satellite. It is concluded that neutral flywheel effects can make a contribution to high latitude electrodynamics for a few hours after the main phase of a geomagnetic storm. The Hall currents that are driven by neutral winds during B(Z) northward conditions are generally in the opposite direction to those that occur during B(Z) southward conditions, when they are driven primarily by ion winds. The morphology of the field-aligned current system calculated by the NCAR-TIGCM during southward B(Z) conditions is in general agreement with observations.

  20. Ionospheric E-Region Response to Solar-Geomagnetic Storms Observed by TIMED/SABER and Application to IRI Storm-Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Mast, Jeffrey C.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Russell, James M., III; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Evans, David S.

    2007-01-01

    The large thermospheric infrared radiance enhancements observed from the TIMED/SABER experiment during recent solar storms provide an exciting opportunity to study the influence of solar-geomagnetic disturbances on the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. In particular, nighttime enhancements of 4.3 um emission, due to vibrational excitation and radiative emission by NO+, provide an excellent proxy to study and analyze the response of the ionospheric E-region to auroral electron dosing and storm-time enhancements to the E-region electron density. In this paper we give a status report of on-going work on model and data analysis methodologies of deriving NO+ 4.3 um volume emission rates, a proxy for the storm-time E-region response, and the approach for deriving an empirical storm-time correction to International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) E-region NO+ and electron densities.

  1. Support Vector Machine combined with Distance Correlation learning for Dst forecasting during intense geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. Y.; Peng, Y. X.; Wang, M.; Gu, S. J.; Zhao, M. X.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we apply the Support Vector Machine (SVM) combined together with Distance Correlation (DC) to the forecasting of Dst index by using 80 intense geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤ - 100 nT) from 1995 to 2014. We also train the Neural Network (NN) and the Linear Machine (LM) to verify the effectiveness of SVM. The purpose for us to introduce DC is to make feature screening in input datasets that can effectively improve the forecasting performance of the SVM. For comparison, we estimate the correlation coefficients (CC), the RMS errors, the absolute value of difference in minimum Dst (ΔDstmin) and the absolute value of difference in minimum time (ΔtDst) between observed Dst and predicted one. K-fold Cross Validation is used to improve the reliability of the results. It is shown that DC-SVM model exhibits the best forecasting performance for all parameters when all 80 events are considered. The CC, the RMS error, the ΔDstmin, and the ΔtDst of DC-SVM are 0.95, 16.8 nT, 9.7 nT and 1.7 h, respectively. For further comparison, we divide the 80 storm events into two groups depending on minimum value of Dst. It is also found that the DC-SVM is better than other models in the two groups.

  2. OI 630.0 nm Night Airglow Observations during the Geomagnetic Storm on November 20, 2003 at Kolhapur (P43)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. K.; et al.

    2006-11-01

    sharma_ashokkumar@yahoo.com The ground based photometric observations of OI 630 nm emission line have been carried out from Kolhapur station (Geog. Lat.16.8˚N, Geo. Long 74.2˚E), India during the period of the largest geomagnetic storm of the solar cycle 23 which occurred on 20 November 2003, with minimum Dst index 472 nT occurring around mid-night hours. We observed that on 19 November 2003 which was geomagnetically quiet day, the airglow activity of OI 630 nm emission was subdued and it was decreasing monotonically. However, on the night of November 20, 2003 the enhancement is observed during geomagnetic storm due to the increased electron density at the altitude of the F region which is related to the downward transport of electron from the plasmasphere to the F-region. Airglow intensity at OI 630.0 nm showed increase around midnight on November 21, 2003 but comparatively on a smaller scale. On this night the DST index was about 100 nT. This implies that the effect of the geomagnetic storm persisted on that night also. These observations have been explained by the penetration magnetospheric electric field to the low latitude region and the subsequent modulation of meridional wind during the magnetic disturbance at night.

  3. Major Geomagnetic Storms (Dst less than or equal to -100 nT) Generated by Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Webb, D. F.; Zhang, J.; Berdichevsky, B. D.; Biesecker, D. A.; Kasper, J. C.; Kataoka, R.; Steinberg, J. T.; Thompson, B. J.; Wu, C.-C.; Zhukov, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    Seventy-nine major geomagnetic storms (minimum Dst less than or equal to -100 nT) observed in 1996 to 2004 were the focus of a Living with a Star Coordinated Data-Analysis Workshop (CDAW) in March, 2005. In 9 cases, the storm driver appears to have been purely a corotating interaction region (CIR) without any contribution from coronal mass ejection-related material (interplanetary coronal mass ejections, ICMEs). These storms were generated by structures within CIRs located both before and/or after the stream interface that included persistently southward magnetic fields for intervals of several hours. We compare their geomagnetic effects with those of 159 CIRs observed during 1996 - 2005. The major storms form the extreme tail of a continuous distribution of CIR geoeffectiveness which peaks at Dst approx. -40 nT but is subject to a prominent seasonal variation of - 40 nT which is ordered by the spring and fall equinoxes and the solar wind magnetic field direction towards or away from the Sun. The O'Brien and McPherron [2000] equations, which estimate Dst by integrating the incident solar wind electric field and incorporating a ring current loss term, largely account for the variation in storm size. They tend to underestimate the size of the larger CIR-associated storms by Dst approx. 20 nT. This suggests that injection into the ring current may be more efficient than expected in such storms. Four of the nine major storms in 1996 - 2004 occurred during a period of less than three solar rotations in September - November, 2002, also the time of maximum mean IMF and solar magnetic field intensity during the current solar cycle. The maximum CIR-storm strength found in our sample of events, plus additional 23 probable CIR-associated Dst less than or equal to -100 nT storms in 1972 - 1995, is (Dst = -161 nT). This is consistent with the maximum storm strength (Dst approx. -180 nT) expected from the O'Brien and McPherron equations for the typical range of solar wind

  4. First results on climatological response of Indian low latitude ionosphere to geomagnetic storms during solar cycle 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Sunanda; Dashora, Nirvikar

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, a climatological response of low latitude ionosphere to geomagnetic storms is presented using long term global ionospheric maps (GIM) data from June 1998 to June 2015 covering two solar cycles 23 and 24. The results are not only the first from Indian region but also the first around the globe to bring latitudinal character of daytime ionospheric storms with use of newly defined criteria. The results are presented for daytime forenoon and afternoon sectors under minor, moderate and major ionospheric storm categories based on minimum Dst index criterion. For the first time the effectiveness of storms is identified using monthly standard deviation as an indicator of the day-to-day variability in equatorial and low latitude ionosphere. Thus results on climatology are definitive and form a data base that would be comparable to statistical results from any other longitude and time. Seasonal statistics for total storms, effective positive and negative storms, and amplitude of mean seasonal perturbation in total electron content are obtained. Total and effective storms are found to be higher in solar cycle 23 than in 24 and only couple of effective storms occurred during low solar activity 2007-2009 that also in minor category. Afternoon sector is found to be favourable for occurrence of maximum number of effective positive storms. A latitudinal preference is found for a given storm to be effective in either time sectors. Equinoctial asymmetry in ionospheric response both in terms of occurrence and perturbation amplitude is found. September equinoxes are found to bear maximum total, effective positive and negative storms. Winters are found more prone to negative storms whereas summers have recorded minimum number of either of storms and minimum perturbation amplitudes.

  5. Multi-satellite observations of energy transport during an intense geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Ma, Yuduan; Duan, Aiying; Dunlop, M. W.

    2016-05-01

    Energy transport during a geomagnetic substorm is a very important process for solar wind-magnetosphere energy coupling and the energy cycle in the magnetotail. In this paper, we use magnetotail data from the five THEMIS probes and two Cluster satellites on the dayside to investigate the energy transport of one intense storm during the period from 08 March to 11 March 2008 at large spatial-temporal scales. Simultaneous observations of the five THEMIS probes indicate that there is a stronger and earlier duskward energy flux density in the near-Earth magnetotail than that in the mid-tail in the initial phase. Low energy particles inject earthward from the dusk flank. Stronger and more variable earthward energy flux density is observed in the mid-tail compared to that near Earth in the main phase; mainly caused by high-speed flow. Tailward energy flux was observed in the near-Earth and mid-tail regions during the recovery phase. Dayside data observed by two Cluster satellites show that the duskward energy flux may be related to stable solar wind input. Tailward energy flux on the dayside should experience some energy conversion process in the magnetotail before it can provide the earthward energy flux in the magnetotail for this intense storm. The strongest energy transport observed by the nightside probes occurs in the main phase. However, the strongest energy measured by the dayside satellites is in the recovery phase without intense activities, two hours later. Different features of the energy transport in the three phases of the storm may be closely related to the different physical processes such as the energy entry, westward drift, particle injection or other potential mechanisms.

  6. The Response of Thermospheric Nitric Oxide to the Geomagnetic Storm of April 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.; Crowley, G.; Solomon, S. C.; Baker, D. N.

    2002-12-01

    The presence of nitric oxide in the lower thermosphere is important for several reasons. NO plays a strong role in the thermospheric energy balance as it emits efficiently in the infrared, it is the terminal ion in the lower ionosphere and, if transported to lower altitudes, will catalytically destroy ozone. NO is primarily produced through the reaction of excited atomic nitrogen with molecular oxygen. One of the primary loss mechanisms of NO is photodissociation by solar ultraviolet irradiance. In order to produce the excited atomic nitrogen atom, the strong N2 molecular bond must be broken. It has been shown that at high latitudes, auroral electrons and the energetic secondary electrons provide the source of energy that leads to the large amounts of NO that are observed. The Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite has been observing NO in the thermosphere daily since February of 1998. Global observations of the abundance of NO were made throughout the period of the large geomagnetic storm that occurred April 16-20 of 2002. Large increases in NO abundance were observed during the storm. Auroral production of the NO is demonstrated by the distribution with magnetic latitude. Equatorward enhancement of NO was observed and suggests transport by meridional winds. Because the NO molecule has a lifetime of about one day, a high latitude observation of NO provides an indication of the integrated auroral energy deposition over the previous day. In this talk we will present the NO observations during the time period of the storm. We will also compare the observations to results from the ASPEN version of the TIME-GCM model now in use at SWRI.

  7. Large decreases in ionospheric total electron content as a result of thermospheric composition changes during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigwarth, J. B.; Foster, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    The geomagnetic storms of April 17-21,2002 and May 29-30,2003 caused large decreases in the O/N2 column density ratio in the thermosphere. For these storms, ON2 column density decreases of greater than 50% were observed to extend to mid-to-low latitudes with the FUV sensitive Earth Camera of the Visible Imaging System (VIS) on the Polar spacecraft. Simultaneously in these same regions, the ground-based GPS network observed approximately 80% reductions in the Total Electron Content (TEC) of the ionosphere. The reduction in the Om2 column density ratio is due mainly to increases in the molecular species that have welled-up into the thermosphere from the lower levels of the atmosphere due to auroral heating. The geomagnetic-storm driven increase in molecular densities at typical ionospheric heights rapidly charge exchange with the ambient ionized atoms and subsequently dissociatively recombine with the ionospheric electrons leading to a reduction in the total charge density. The transition boundaries between high and low regions of O/N2 as well as TEC can be tracked in the images and the thermospheric winds can be determined from the motion of the boundaries. The motion of these boundaries during the development of the geomagnetic storm will be discussed.

  8. Do ambient electromagnetic fields affect behaviour? A demonstration of the relationship between geomagnetic storm activity and suicide.

    PubMed

    Berk, Michael; Dodd, Seetal; Henry, Margaret

    2006-02-01

    The relationship between ambient electromagnetic fields and human mood and behaviour is of great public health interest. The relationship between Ap indices of geomagnetic storm activity and national suicide statistics for Australia from 1968 to 2002 was studied. Ap index data was normalised so as to be globally uniform and gave a measure of storm activity for each day. A geomagnetic storm event was defined as a day in which the Ap index was equal to or exceeded 100 nT. Suicide data was a national tally of daily male and female death figures where suicide had been documented as the cause of death. A total of 51 845 males and 16 327 females were included. The average number of suicides was greatest in spring for males and females, and lowest in autumn for males and summer for females. Suicide amongst females increased significantly in autumn during concurrent periods of geomagnetic storm activity (P = .01). This pattern was not observed in males (P = .16). This suggests that perturbations in ambient electromagnetic field activity impact behaviour in a clinically meaningful manner. The study furthermore raises issues regarding other sources of stray electromagnetic fields and their effect on mental health. PMID:16304696

  9. Analysis of the Energy Transferred from the Solar Wind into the Magnetosphere during the April 11, 2001 Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besliu-Ionescu, D.; Mierla, M.; Maris-Muntean, G.

    2016-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can have major consequences on Earth's magnetosphere. We investigate here the full halo CME registered by LASCO at 05:30 UT on April 10, 2001. A geomagnetic storm that had a minimum Dst value of 271 nT, on April 11 at 23:00 UT was triggered upon its arrival to Earth. We focus our study on the energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere during this geomagnetic storm. We estimate the quantity of energy that is deposited into the magnetosphere during this event using two different formulas by Akasofu (1981) and Wang et al. (2014). We note that the transfer of energy thus calculated does not resume to the main phase of the storm, but lasts much longer. We also discuss the implications of other formulas used in the literature to analyse this kind of transfer. The chain of events coronal mass ejections - interplanetary coronal mass ejections - geomagnetic storm was tested from a statistical point of view using a model based on logistic regression. We obtained a 100% probability that the April 10, 2001 CME should be geoeffective.

  10. Study on geomagnetic storms driving motion of 0.1-2 MeV radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenxia; Li, Xinqiao

    2016-08-01

    Using more than five years' worth of data observed by the Instrument for the Detection of Particles (IDP) spectrometer onboard the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite, we studied the motion characteristics of energetic electrons in different regions, i.e., the inner radiation belt, the outer radiation belt, and the slot region in geomagnetic storms. We investigated the flux change of 0.1-2.4 MeV electrons and the energy change of 0.1-1.0 MeV electrons in these different regions. By cross correlation analysis, we came to the following conclusions. First, when Dst < -50, the correlation coefficient (c.c.) of the electron flux and Dst index ranges from -0.63 to -0.86, and the enhancement of the electron flux generally occurs during the storm's main and recovery phases. Second, the storms greatly influence the lower energy region of the electron energy spectrum in the inner radiation belt, while the enhancement in the higher energy region is more significant in the outer radiation belt and the slot region. Third, the effects of geomagnetic storms on electrons are not distinguished significantly between in the day and night, and independent of the timing of the events. For storms with -50 < Dst < -30, there is a negative correlation of -0.51 to -0.57 between the Dst index and the electron flux in the outer radiation belt. Our analysis suggests that strong storms cause energetic electron ejections across a wide range, and the ejection level is affected by the storm intensity. Furthermore, the electron energy region influenced by the strong geomagnetic storms is opposite in the inner and outer radiation belts. The proportion of electrons accelerated to relativistic energies is greater in the outer radiation and slot regions, while the ejection energetic electrons are more concentrated in the low energy region of the inner radiation belt. This phenomenon reflects the different electron injection mechanisms and

  11. Development of a numerical scheme to predict geomagnetic storms after intense solar events and geomagnetic activity 27 days in advance. Final report, 6 Aug 86-16 Nov 90

    SciTech Connect

    Akasofu, S.I.; Lee, L.H.

    1991-02-01

    The modern geomagnetic storm prediction scheme should be based on a numerical simulation method, rather than on a statistical result. Furthermore, the scheme should be able to predict the geomagnetic storm indices, such as the Dst and AE indices, as a function of time. By recognizing that geomagnetic storms are powered by the solar wind-magnetosphere generator and that its power is given in terms of the solar wind speed, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude and polar angle, the authors have made a major advance in predicting both flare-induced storms and recurrent storms. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the prediction scheme can be calibrated using the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observation, when the solar disturbance advances about half-way to the earth. It is shown, however, that we are still far from a reliable prediction scheme. The prediction of the IMF polar angle requires future advance in understanding characteristics of magnetic clouds.

  12. The impact of Sep 30 - Oct 1, 2012 geomagnetic storm on the Ionosphere studied using GPS receivers in Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungufeni, Patrick

    We have used VTEC and S4 indices obtained from the GPS receivers, namely: GPS-SCINDA at Mbarara and Kampala, UNAVCO station at Entebbe to show TEC variability, occurrence of ionospheric irregularities and scintillations during the intense geomagnetic storm of Sep 30 - Oct 1, 2012. TEC response to the storm showed a positive storm effect a few hours after the SSC followed by a negative storm effect and then a long period of positive storm effect during the recovery phase of the storm. The peak of the positive storm effect reached 120.7 % at 21:00 LT (30 hours after the SSC). Primarily, these variations are connected with transport by electric fields and neutral winds, changes in the neutral composition and structure. The storm significantly reduced TEC depletion and suppressed irregularities due to reduction of day time eastward electric field by the ring current. Post mid-night scintillation activity at about 09:00 LT reached almost saturation level. Trans-ionospheric communication, navigation, and surveillance signals could be affected by such modified ionosphere.

  13. Equatorial counterelectrojets during geomagnetic storms and their possible dynamos in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Hashimoto, K. K.; Ebihara, Y.; Tsuji, Y.; Veenadhari, B.; Nishimura, T.; Tanaka, T.; Fujita, S.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2012-12-01

    During the substorm growth phase and storm main phase, the high pressure plasma accumulated in the cusp and mantle regions activates a dynamo for the dawn-to-dusk convection electric field and the Region-1 field-aligned currents (R1 FACs) [Tanaka, 1995]. The electric field and FACs are conveyed by the shear Alfven waves to the polar ionosphere and the electric field extends promptly to low latitude through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide [Kikuchi and Araki, 1979]. The electric field drives the DP2 currents at mid latitudes [Wilson et al., 2001; Tsuji et al., 2012] and intensifies the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) [Kikuchi et al., 1996, 2008]. The convection electric field extends to the inner magnetosphere promptly [Nishimura et al., 2009] and energizes the plasma in the partial ring current region with the help of the gradient and curvature drift [Ebihara and Ejiri, 2000], which in turn works as a dynamo for the dusk-to-dawn electric field and the R2 FACs. The dusk-to-dawn electric field causes the counterelectrojet (CEJ) at the equator when the IMF turns northward [Rastogi, 1975]. The CEJ often appears during substorms [Kobea et al., 2000; Kikuchi et al., 2000]. Both the R1 and R2 FACs are intensified by the substorm expansion, with the R2 FACs strong enough to cause the CEJ [Hashimoto et al., 2011]. The CEJ often occurs during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms [Kikuchi et al., 2008; Tsuji et al., 2012], while the CEJ also appears during the storm main phase under the relatively stable southward IMF [Fejer et al., 2007; Veenadhari et al., 2010]. In this paper, we analyzed several storm events to identify the dynamo for the stormtime CEJ. The disturbance dynamo is a commonly accepted dynamo for the long lasting stormtime CEJ [Blanc and Richmond, 1980; Fejer and Scherliess 1997]. However, the observed rapid and periodic development of the CEJ should be attributed to the R2 FACs generated in the inner magnetosphere. Based on the magnetometer and radar

  14. The response of local power grid at low-latitude to geomagnetic storm: An application of the Hilbert Huang transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Wang, Chuan-Bing; Liu, Lu; Sun, Wei-Huai

    2016-04-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is an adaptive data analysis method that can accommodate the variety of data generated by nonlinear and nonstationary processes in nature. In this paper, we focus on the small geomagnetically induced current (GIC) at the local substations in low-latitude power grid of China, responding to a moderate storm on 14-18 July 2012. The HHT is applied to analyze the neutral point currents (NPCs) of transformers measured at different substations, and the GIC indices converted from local geomagnetic field measurements. The original data are decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) using the ensemble empirical mode decomposition. After removal of the quasi-diurnal components related with the solar quiet variation, the IMFs representing storm disturbances are transformed into Hilbert energy spectra. The results show that some transformers have more or less responses to the moderate storm in the form of Hilbert energy spectra with the frequency around 2-3 mHz. A comparison on the amplitude changes of the spectra total energy of NPCs' perturbation during storm time intervals at different sites suggests that a shell type of three-phase single transformer group seems to be more vulnerable in the storm. Although the low-latitude power grids usually show very small GIC, these can be used to investigate the potential risk of space weather to the system.

  15. Dynamics of the magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms on January 21-22, 2005 and December 14-15, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalegaev, V. V.; Vlasova, N. A.; Peng, Z.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of large-scale magnetospheric current systems during geomagnetic storms on January 21-22, 2005 and December 14-15, 2006 is investigated using the A2000 model of the magnetospheric magnetic field. Storm development is controlled by both the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind pressure that create conditions for injection of plasma into the inner magnetosphere. It is demonstrated that the main role in the development of the January 21-22, 2005 magnetic storm was played by a strong impulse of solar wind pressure, while the December 14-15, 2006 storm was initiated by a changed orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. As a consequence, the Dst variation of the geomagnetic field during the January 21-22, 2005 storm is determined basically by ring current development. On December 14-15, 2006 it is determined by comparable contributions of the ring current and of the magnetotail currents. The results of modeling are confirmed by data on dynamic properties of the fluxes of three populations of ions with energies 30-80 keV (at low latitudes L < 2, and at latitudes below and above the isotropic precipitation boundary) measured by the solar-synchronous satellites of NOAA ( POES 15, POES 16, and POES 17).

  16. Temporal and Spatial Characterization of ULF power and its relation to relativistic electrons in the radiation belts during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Moya, P. S.; Pinto, V. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Kanekal, S.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the inner magnetosphere to different geomagnetic storm and solar wind conditions is still not fully understood. For example, electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt can be enhanced or depleted depending on the energy of the particles, and the phase or driver of the storm. In addition, the time scale of the process can vary from minutes to several days. Wave-particle interactions (such as stochastic diffusion or resonant acceleration) are believed to play an important role regulating the dynamics of the particles. However, despite decades of intense theoretical and observational studies, a definitive framework for the wave-particle interactions and the resulting effects in the magnetospheric dynamics remains an open problem. To progress towards a better understanding of the inner magnetosphere dynamics, we need a complete characterization of the electromagnetic fluctuations during storms. Here, using Van Allen Probe magnetic field and relativistic electron observations, we present an statistical study of the relationship between ULF wave power and relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt during several geomagnetic storms between 2012 and 2015, depending on local time, geocentric distance and storm phase.

  17. Influence of geomagnetic storms of September 26-30, 2011, on the ionosphere and HF radiowave propagation. I. Ionospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Bessarab, F. S.; Ratovsky, K. G.; Zakharenkova, I. E.; Nosikov, I. A.; Stepanov, A. E.; Kotova, D. S.; Vorobjev, V. G.; Yagodkina, O. I.

    2015-11-01

    Geomagnetic storm ionospheric effects observed at different latitudes and longitudes on September 26 and 28-30, 2011, are interpreted with the GSM TIP model. It has been justified that the results of this model can subsequently be used to calculate the HF radiowave ray tracing under quiet conditions and for the selected dates in September 2011. The model calculations are compared with observations of the ionospheric parameters performed by different radiophysical methods. The presented results confirm the classical mechanisms by which positive and negative ionospheric storms are formed during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm. At high latitudes, the electron density is mainly disturbed due to changes in the neutral composition of the thermosphere, resulting in an increase in the chemical loss rates, and the electromagnetic drift, which results in a substantial reconstruction of the high-latitude ionosphere owing to the horizontal plasma transfer. During the storm recovery phase at midlatitudes, electron density positive disturbances are formed in the daytime due to an increase in the n(O)/ n(N2) ratio; at the same time, negative effects in the electron density are formed at night as a result of plasma tube devastation. Comparison with the observations indicates that the presented model calculation results can be used to describe a medium for solving problems of radiowave propagation in the ionosphere during the storm main phase on September 26 and during the recovery phase on September 28-30, 2011.

  18. Behavior of the ionosphere over Europe during two geomagnetic storms which caused tongues of ionization over North America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Bouza, Marta; Herraiz, Miguel; Rodriguez-Caderot, Gracia; Radicella, Sandro M.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the effect of two geomagnetic storms on the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) over Europe. Those geomagnetic storms occurred on July 14th, 2013 and February 19th, 2014 and originated a tongue of ionization over North America. Following the criteria of Gonzalez et al.(1994), the July storm can be classified as a moderate one because the Dst index reached a value of -72nT, whereas the February storm as an intense event considering that Dst index dropped to -112nT. For this study we have used RINEX files obtained from GNSS stations belonging to International GPS Service, IGS, EUREF Permanent Network, and University Navstar Consortium, UNAVCO, networks. The data has been divided into two groups in function of the region: Europe or North America. For each group we have used all the available stations. The RINEX files have been processed using a technique developed by Ciraolo (2012) which assumes the ionospheric thin shell model to obtain the vertical total electron content (vTEC) from the slant total electron content (sTEC) at the Ionospheric Pierce Point, IPP, the point where the line-of-sight between the satellite and the ground receiver intersects the ionosphere. The data were obtained at 1 minute sampling in periods of geomagnetic storms and quiet days close to them. In both storms a tongue of ionization, ToI, appeared over North America from afternoon to dusk (between 19:00 and 3:00 GMT). The behavior of the ionosphere over Europe was very different in eachcase. In July, the TEC decreased respect the quiet days during the ToI time. In the February storm the behavior of the ionosphere over Europe was similar to that of a quiet day but the following day appeared a phenomenom similar to the ToI. Ciraolo, L. (2012). Ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) from Global Positioning System. Personal Communication. González, W.D., Joselyn, J. A., Kamide, Y., Kroehl, H. W., Rostoker, G., Tsurutani, B. T., Vasyliunas, V. M. (1994). What is a

  19. Geomagnetic Storm Main Phase effect on the Equatorial Ionosphere as measured from GPS observations at Ile-Ife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabode, Ayomide; Ariyibi, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the main phase of two intense geomagnetic storm events which occurred on August 5-6 and September 26-27, 2011 on the equatorial ionosphere have been investigated using Global Positioning System (GPS) data obtained from an Ile-Ife station (geomagnetic lat. 9.84°N, long. 77.25°E). The WinTEC-P and GPS-TEC analysis software programs were used to process the GPS data to obtain Total Electron Content (TEC) and Scintillation Index (S4). TEC profiles during the main phase of the two geomagnetically disturbed days were compared with quiet time average profiles to examine the response of the equatorial ionosphere. International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 TEC model was also obtained from Virtual Ionosphere, Thermosphere, Mesosphere Observatory (VITMO) and the extents of deviation from measured GPS-derived TEC were examined for the main phase of the storm events. The results showed that the intensity of both storm events during the main phase which occurred at night-time correlated well with a strong southward direction of the z-component of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF-Bz) and Solar Wind Speed (Vsw), with the Disturbance storm time (Dst) profile showing multiple step development. TEC depletion was observed during the main phase of the August 5-6, 2011 storm event with TEC recording a maximum value of 9.31 TECU. A maximum TEC value of 55.8 TECU was recorded during the main phase of the September 26-27, 2011 storm event depicting TEC enhancement. Significant scintillation index value of 0.57 was observed when the main phase started on August 5-6, 2011 followed by a prolonged suppression while there was less significant scintillation impact on September 26-27, 2011 with a maximum value of 0.33. The study concluded that the intensification of the ring current during the main phase of geomagnetic storm events was responsible for the intensity of the storm events causing large variations in TEC and significant scintillation phenomenon.

  20. Global ionospheric effects of geomagnetic storm on May 2-3, 2010 and their influence on HF radio wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, Daria; Klimenko, Maxim; Klimenko, Vladimir; Zakharov, Veniamin

    2013-04-01

    In this work we have investigated the global ionospheric response to geomagnetic storm on May 2-3, 2010 using GSM TIP (Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere) simulation results. In the GSM TIP storm time model runs, several input parameters such as cross-polar cap potential difference and R2 FAC (Region 2 Field-Aligned Currents) varied as a function of the geomagnetic activity AE-index. Current simulation also uses the empirical model of high-energy particle precipitation by Zhang and Paxton. In this model, the energy and energy flux of precipitating electrons depend on a 3 hour Kp-index. We also have included the 30 min time delay of R2 FAC variations with respect to the variations of cross-polar cap potential difference. In addition, we use the ground-based ionosonde data for comparison our model results with observations. We present an analysis of the physical mechanisms responsible for the ionospheric effects of geomagnetic storms. The obtained simulation results are used by us as a medium for HF radio wave propagation at different latitudes in quiet conditions, and during main and recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm. To solve the problem of the radio wave propagation we used Zakharov's (I. Kant BFU) model based on geometric optics. In this model the solution of the eikonal equation for each of the two normal modes is reduced using the method of characteristics to the integration of the six ray equation system for the coordinates and momentum. All model equations of this system are solved in spherical geomagnetic coordinate system by the Runge-Kutta method. This model was tested for a plane wave in a parabolic layer. In this study, the complex refractive indices of the ordinary and extraordinary waves at ionospheric heights was calculated for the first time using the global first-principal model of the thermosphere-ionosphere system that describes the parameters of an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium during a

  1. Ionospheric Irregularities at High Latitudes During Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms: Simultaneous Observations of Magnetic Field Perturbations and GPS Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Deshpande, K.; Clauer, C. R.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Humphreys, T. E.; Kim, L.; Lessard, M.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Zachariah, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    Plasma instability in the ionosphere is often observed as disturbance and distortion of the amplitude and phase of radio signals, which are known as ionospheric scintillations. High-latitude ionospheric plasma, closely connected to solar wind and magnetospheric dynamics, produce very dynamic and short-lived GPS scintillations, making it challenging to characterize them. This study reports simultaneous observations of geomagnetic pulsations and GPS signal scintillations during geomagnetic storms and substorms using a newly designed Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platform (AAL-PIP) installed at the South Pole. A statistical investigation of the AAL-PIP data recorded from January through May 2012 is presented to study local time distribution of scintillation events and a correlation between GPS scintillation and magnetic field perturbations. This report discusses a possible connection between magnetic field perturbations associated with the ionospheric currents and the creation of plasma instability by examining relative contribution of storm/substorm activity to ionospheric irregularities.

  2. Latitude dependence of cosmic-ray cutoff-rigidity variations during the initial phase of a geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Flueckiger, E.O.; Smart, D.F.; Shea, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the cosmic-ray cutoff-rigidity variations over Europe during the initial phase of the 17/18 December 1971 geomagnetic storm. Cutoff-rigidity changes deduced from neutron-monitor measurements are compared to results obtained by tracing cosmic-ray trajectories in a model of the perturbed geomagnetic field. It is demonstrated that about 1 hour after the storm sudden commencement at 1418 UT on 17 December 1971 the cosmic ray cutoff rigidities over Europe were increased. Due to the dominating effect caused by the magnetopause currents the increases had a significant amplitude of about 0.3 GV at high latitudes whereas at middle and low latitudes they were only of the order of 0.1GV or less.

  3. Modeling of Coronal Mass Ejections That Caused Particularly Large Geomagnetic Storms Using ENLIL Heliosphere Cone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taktakishvili, A.; Pulkkinen, A.; MacNeice, P. J.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Odstrcil, D.

    2010-12-01

    The largest geomagnetic storms are caused by the solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In our previous paper (Taktakishvili et al., [2009]) we reported the results of modeling 14 selected well observed strong halo CME events using the WSA/ENLIL cone model combination. In that study the cone model input parameters were obtained from white-light coronagraph images of the CME events using the analytical method developed by Xie et al [ 2004 ]. This work verified that coronagraph input gives reasonably good results for the CME arrival time prediction. Recently Pulkkinen et al., [2009] developed a novel method for automatic determination of cone model parameters. This approach combines standard image processing techniques and a novel inversion routine to derive the cone parameters. The present work extends our previous studies by addressing more CME events. The approach in this paper is different from our previous study: we started from addressing 36 particularly strong geomagnetic storms, then tried to associate them with particular CMEs using SOHO/LASCO catalogue, and finally modeled these CMEs using WSA/ENLIL cone model. This approach is addressing space weather forecasting and operational needs. We employed both analytical and automatic methods to determine cone model input parameters. We examined the CME arrival times and magnitude of impact at 1 AU for both techniques. The results of the simulations were compared with the ACE satellite observations. This comparison demonstrated that WSA/ENLIL model combination with coronograph input gives reasonably good results for the CME arrival times for this set of "geo-effective" CME events as well. References: Taktakishvili, A., M. Kuznetsova, P. Macneice, M. Hesse, L. Rastaetter, A. Pulkkinen, A. Chulaki and D. Odstrci (2009), Validation of the coronal mass ejection predictions at the Earth orbit estimated by ENLIL heliosphere cone model, Space Weather,7, S03004,doi10.1029/2008SW000448. Xie, H., L. Ofman, and G. Lawrence

  4. Relationships between SC- and SI-associated ULF waves and ionospheric HF Doppler oscillations during the great geomagnetic storm of February 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, K.; Takahashi, K.; Ogawa, T.; Tsunomura, S.; Nagai, T.

    The SC- and SI-associated ionospheric Doppler velocity oscillations and geomagnetic pulsations during the great geomagnetic storm of February 1986 are interpreted. This is done by considering the 'dynamo-motor' mechanism of ionospheric E-field and the global compressional oscillations of the magnetosphere and the ionosphere, respectively.

  5. Relationships between SC- and SI-associated ULF waves and ionospheric HF Doppler oscillations during the great geomagnetic storm of February 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yumoto, K.; Takahashi, K.; Ogawa, T.; Tsunomura, S.; Nagai, T.

    1989-01-01

    The SC- and SI-associated ionospheric Doppler velocity oscillations and geomagnetic pulsations during the great geomagnetic storm of February 1986 are interpreted. This is done by considering the 'dynamo-motor' mechanism of ionospheric E-field and the global compressional oscillations of the magnetosphere and the ionosphere, respectively.

  6. Mid-Latitude Ionospheric Disturbances Due to Geomagnetic Storms at ISS Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Neergaard Parker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft charging of the International Space Station (ISS) is dominated by interaction of the US high voltage solar arrays with the F2-region ionosphere plasma environment. ISS solar array charging is enhanced in a high electron density environment due to the increased thermal electron currents to the edges of the solar cells. High electron temperature environments suppress charging due to formation of barrier potentials on the charged solar cell cover glass that restrict the charging currents to the cell edge [Mandell et al., 2003]. Environments responsible for strong solar array charging are therefore characterized by high electron densities and low electron temperatures. In support of the ISS space environmental effects engineering community, we are working to understand a number of features of solar array charging and to determine how well future charging behavior can be predicted from in-situ plasma density and temperature measurements. One aspect of this work is a need to characterize the magnitude of electron density and temperature variations that occur at ISS orbital altitudes (approximately 400 km) over time scales of days, the latitudes over which significant variations occur, and the time periods over which the disturbances persist once they start. This presentation provides examples of mid-latitude electron density and temperature disturbances at altitudes relevant to ISS using data sets and tools developed for our ISS plasma environment study. "Mid-latitude" is defined as the extra-tropical region between approx. 30 degrees to approx. 60 degrees magnetic latitude sampled by ISS over its 51.6 degree inclination orbit. We focus on geomagnetic storm periods because storms are well known drivers for disturbances in the ionospheric plasma environment.

  7. Theoretically modeling the low-latitude, ionospheric response to large geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D.; Anghel, A.; Araujo, E.; Eccles, V.; Valladares, C.; Lin, C.

    2006-10-01

    In the low-latitude, ionospheric F region, the primary transport mechanism that determines the electron and ion density distributions is the magnitude of the daytime, upward E × B drift velocity. During large geomagnetic storms, penetration of high-latitude electric fields to low latitudes can often produce daytime, vertical E × B drift velocities in excess of 50 m/s. Employing a recently developed technique, we can infer these daytime, upward E × B drift velocities from ground-based magnetometer observations at Jicamarca and Piura, Peru, as a function of local time (0700-1700 LT). We study the ionospheric response in the Peruvian longitude sector to these large upward drifts by theoretically calculating electron and ion densities as a function of altitude, latitude, and local time using the time-dependent Low-Latitude Ionospheric Sector (LLIONS) model. This is a single-sector ionosphere model capable of incorporating data-determined drivers, such as E × B drift velocities. For this study, we choose three large storms in 2003 (29 and 30 October and 20 November) when daytime E × B drift velocities approached or exceeded 50 m/s. Initial results indicate that the large, upward E × B drift velocities on 29 October produced equatorial anomaly crests in ionization at ±20° dip latitude rather than the usual ±16° dip latitude. We compare the theoretically calculated results with a variety of ground-based and satellite observations for these three periods and discuss the implications of these comparisons as they relate to the capabilities of current theoretical models and our ability to infer ionospheric drivers such as E × B drifts (Anderson et al., 2002).

  8. Ionosphere-magnetosphere structure during a geomagnetic storm based on measurements in the morning auroral zone

    SciTech Connect

    Denig, W.F.; Rich, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of field-aligned currents (FAC's), convection electric fields, and precipitating electrons were made by the S3 2 satellite in the midmorning time sectors of both the northern and southern high-latitude ionospheres before and during a geomagnetic storm. The patterns of electric fields and FAC's did not match the standard configuration of two-cell convection and the region 1/region 2 FAC's. In particular, near the beginning of the main phase of the storm an intense (242 m V/m) convection electric field and an extra FAC were observed just poleward of the region 1 current in the southern hemisphere. The observations, made over a period of at least 3 hours, were consistent with a quasi-steady three-cell convection pattern with stresses from a strong B/sub y/ component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). An analysis of the particle and field data from within the region of the intense convection electric field is in sharp disagreement with the single particle motion model of Lyons (1980) and implies that a significant portion of the measured FAC was from ionospheric ions. Finally, large-amplitude AC electric waves from broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) were present in the high-altitude southern (or winter) passes but not in the northern passes at lower altitudes. In general, BEN was observed occasionally by S3 2 within the high-altitude (1000-1500 km) winter auroral regions but not detected during other seasons or at lower altitudes. The implication of these measurements is that the low-altitude limit for the region of field aligned potentials is determined by the local plasma density.

  9. Ionospheric data assimilation with thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model and GPS-TEC during geomagnetic storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Lin, C. H.; Matsuo, T.; Chen, W. H.; Lee, I. T.; Liu, J. Y.; Lin, J. T.; Hsu, C. T.

    2016-06-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of rapid assimilation-forecast cycling on the performance of ionospheric data assimilation during geomagnetic storm conditions. An ensemble Kalman filter software developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), called Data Assimilation Research Testbed, is applied to assimilate ground-based GPS total electron content (TEC) observations into a theoretical numerical model of the thermosphere and ionosphere (NCAR thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model) during the 26 September 2011 geomagnetic storm period. Effects of various assimilation-forecast cycle lengths: 60, 30, and 10 min on the ionospheric forecast are examined by using the global root-mean-squared observation-minus-forecast (OmF) TEC residuals. Substantial reduction in the global OmF for the 10 min assimilation-forecast cycling suggests that a rapid cycling ionospheric data assimilation system can greatly improve the quality of the model forecast during geomagnetic storm conditions. Furthermore, updating the thermospheric state variables in the coupled thermosphere-ionosphere forecast model in the assimilation step is an important factor in improving the trajectory of model forecasting. The shorter assimilation-forecast cycling (10 min in this paper) helps to restrain unrealistic model error growth during the forecast step due to the imbalance among model state variables resulting from an inadequate state update, which in turn leads to a greater forecast accuracy.

  10. Hemispheric differences in the response of the upper atmosphere to the August 2011 geomagnetic storm: A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiğit, Erdal; Frey, Harald U.; Moldwin, Mark B.; Immel, Thomas J.; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2016-04-01

    Using a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic general circulation model, we investigate the response of the thermosphere-ionosphere system to the 5-6 August 2011 major geomagnetic storm. The model is driven by measured storm-time input data of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF), solar activity, and auroral activity. Simulations for quiet steady conditions over the same period are performed as well in order to assess the response of the neutral and plasma parameters to the storm. During the storm, the high-latitude mean ion flows are enhanced by up to 150-180%. Largest ion flows are found in the main phase of the storm. Overall, the global mean neutral temperature increases by up to 15%, while the maximum thermal response is higher in the winter Southern Hemisphere at high-latitudes than the summer Northern Hemisphere: 40% vs. 20% increase in high-latitude mean temperature, respectively. The global mean Joule heating increases by more than a factor of three. There are distinct hemispheric differences in the magnitude and morphology of the horizontal ion flows and thermospheric flows during the different phases of the storm. The largest hemispheric difference in the thermospheric circulation is found during the main and recovery phases of the storm, demonstrating appreciable geographical variations. The advective forcing is found to contribute to the modeled hemispheric differences.