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Sample records for 24-hour diet recall

  1. Validation of a group 24-hour recall method for dietary assessment 

    E-print Network

    Scott, Amanda Renee

    2002-01-01

    A group 24-hour recall method developed by the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program of Texas was validated in a population of low-income female food service workers using unobtrusive meal observation as a validation standard. All subjects...

  2. Learn More about Food Composition Databases for 24-hour Dietary Recalls and Food Records | Dietary Assessment Primer

    Cancer.gov

    In order to calculate nutrient and food group intakes from foods and beverages reported on 24-hour dietary recalls (24HRs) and food records, nutrient and food group composition databases are essential (see 24-hour Dietary Recall Profile and Food Record Profile). Typically, these databases include a description of the food and a code for each. Each code has associated nutrient and food group composition per 100 grams.

  3. Usability of a smartphone food picture app for assisting 24-hour dietary recall: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Benjamin T.; Bilgiç, Pelin; Orr, Barron J.; Suzuki, Asuka; Kim, Angela Sarah; Merchant, Nirav C.; Roe, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The Recaller app was developed to help individuals record their food intakes. This pilot study evaluated the usability of this new food picture application (app), which operates on a smartphone with an embedded camera and Internet capability. SUBJECTS/METHODS Adults aged 19 to 28 years (23 males and 22 females) were assigned to use the Recaller app on six designated, nonconsecutive days in order to capture an image of each meal and snack before and after eating. The images were automatically time-stamped and uploaded by the app to the Recaller website. A trained nutritionist administered a 24-hour dietary recall interview 1 day after food images were taken. Participants' opinions of the Recaller app and its usability were determined by a follow-up survey. As an evaluation indicator of usability, the number of images taken was analyzed and multivariate Poisson regression used to model the factors determining the number of images sent. RESULTS A total of 3,315 food images were uploaded throughout the study period. The median number of images taken per day was nine for males and 13 for females. The survey showed that the Recaller app was easy to use, and 50% of the participants would consider using the app daily. Predictors of a higher number of images were as follows: greater interval (hours) between the first and last food images sent, weekend, and female. CONCLUSIONS The results of this pilot study provide valuable information for understanding the usability of the Recaller smartphone food picture app as well as other similarly designed apps. This study provides a model for assisting nutrition educators in their collection of food intake information by using tools available on smartphones. This innovative approach has the potential to improve recall of foods eaten and monitoring of dietary intake in nutritional studies. PMID:25861429

  4. The Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children, 2012 version, for youth aged 9 to 11 Years: A validation study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to validate the 2012 version of the Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children (ASA24-Kids-2012), a self-administered web-based 24-hour dietary recall (24hDR) instrument, among children aged 9 to 11 years, in two sites using a quasiexperimental design. In one s...

  5. Food Intake Recording Software System, version 4 (FIRSSt4): A Self-Completed 24 Hour Dietary Recall for Children

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Tom; Islam, Noemi; Douglass, Deirdre; Dadabhoy, Hafza; Beltran, Alicia; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Debbe; Cullen, Karen W.; Subar, Amy F.

    2012-01-01

    The Food Intake Recording Software System, version 4(FIRSSt4), is a web-based 24 hour dietary recall (24hdr) self-administered by children based on the Automated Self-Administered 24-hour recall (ASA24) (a self-administered 24hdr for adults). The food choices in FIRSST4 are abbreviated to include only those reported by children in U.S. national surveys; and detailed food probe questions are simplified to exclude those that children could not be expected to answer (for example questions regarding food preparation and added fats). ASA24 and FIRSSt4 incorporate 10,000+ food images with up to eight images per food to assist in portion size estimation. This paper reviews the formative research conducted during the development of FIRSSt4. When completed, FIRSSt4 will be hosted and maintained for investigator use on the National Cancer Institute’s ASA24 website. PMID:22616645

  6. Comparison of Interviewer-Administered and Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recalls in 3 Diverse Integrated Health Systems.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Frances E; Dixit-Joshi, Sujata; Potischman, Nancy; Dodd, Kevin W; Kirkpatrick, Sharon I; Kushi, Lawrence H; Alexander, Gwen L; Coleman, Laura A; Zimmerman, Thea P; Sundaram, Maria E; Clancy, Heather A; Groesbeck, Michelle; Douglass, Deirdre; George, Stephanie M; Schap, TusaRebecca E; Subar, Amy F

    2015-06-15

    Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls provide high-quality intake data but have been prohibitively expensive for large epidemiologic studies. This study's goal was to assess whether the web-based Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Recall (ASA24) performs similarly enough to the standard interviewer-administered, Automated Multiple-Pass Method (AMPM) 24-hour dietary recall to be considered a viable alternative. In 2010-2011, 1,081 adults from 3 integrated health systems in Detroit, Michigan; Marshfield, Wisconsin; and Kaiser-Permanente Northern California participated in a field trial. A quota design ensured a diverse sample by sex, age, and race/ethnicity. Each participant was asked to complete 2 recalls and was randomly assigned to 1 of 4 protocols differing by type of recall and administration order. For energy, the mean intakes were 2,425 versus 2,374 kcal for men and 1,876 versus 1,906 kcal for women by AMPM and ASA24, respectively. Of 20 nutrients/food groups analyzed and controlling for false discovery rate, 87% were judged equivalent at the 20% bound. ASA24 was preferred over AMPM by 70% of the respondents. Attrition was lower in the ASA24/AMPM study group than in the AMPM/ASA24 group, and it was lower in the ASA24/ASA24 group than in the AMPM/AMPM group. ASA24 offers the potential to collect high-quality dietary intake information at low cost with less attrition. PMID:25964261

  7. Development and validity of a 3-day smartphone-assisted 24-hour recall to assess beverage consumption in a Chinese population: a randomized cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsey P.; Hua, Jenna; Seto, Edmund; Du, Shufa; Zang, Jiajie; Zou, Shurong; Popkin, Barry M.; Mendez, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for diet assessment methods that capture the rapidly changing beverage consumption patterns in China. The objective of this study was to develop a 3-day smartphone-assisted 24-hour recall to improve the quantification of beverage intake amongst young Chinese adults (n=110) and validate, in a small subset (n=34), the extent to which the written record and smartphone-assisted recalls adequately estimated total fluid intake, using 24-hour urine samples. The smartphone-assisted method showed improved validity compared to the written-assisted method, when comparing reported total fluid intake to total urine volume. However, participants reported consuming fewer beverages on the smartphone-assisted method compared to the written-assisted method, primarily due to decreased consumption of traditional zero-energy beverages (i.e. water, tea) in the smartphone-assisted method. It is unclear why participants reported fewer beverages in the smartphone-assisted method than the written-assisted method. One possibility is that participants found the smartphone method too cumbersome, and responded by decreasing beverage intake. These results suggest that smartphone-assisted 24-hour recalls perform comparably but do not appear to substantially improve beverage quantification compared to the current written record based approach. In addition, we piloted a beverage screener to identify consumers of episodically consumed SSBs. As expected, a substantially higher proportion of consumers reported consuming SSBs on the beverage screener compared to either recall type, suggesting that a beverage screener may be useful in characterizing consumption of episodically consumed beverages in China’s dynamic food and beverage landscape. PMID:25516327

  8. Development and validity of a 3-day smartphone assisted 24-hour recall to assess beverage consumption in a Chinese population: a randomized cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lindsey P; Hua, Jenna; Seto, Edmund; Du, Shufa; Zang, Jiajie; Zou, Shurong; Popkin, Barry M; Mendez, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for diet assessment methods that capture the rapidly changing beverage consumption patterns in China. The objective of this study was to develop a 3-day smartphone-assisted 24-hour recall to improve the quantification of beverage intake amongst young Chinese adults (n=110) and validate, in a small subset (n=34), the extent to which the written record and smartphone-assisted recalls adequately estimated total fluid intake, using 24-hour urine samples. The smartphone-assisted method showed improved validity compared with the written record-assisted method, when comparing reported total fluid intake to total urine volume. However, participants reported consuming fewer beverages on the smartphone-assisted method compared with the written record-assisted method, primarily due to decreased consumption of traditional zero-energy beverages (i.e. water, tea) in the smartphone-assisted method. It is unclear why participants reported fewer beverages in the smartphone-assisted method than the written record -assisted method. One possibility is that participants found the smartphone method too cumbersome, and responded by decreasing beverage intake. These results suggest that smartphone-assisted 24-hour recalls perform comparably but do not appear to substantially improve beverage quantification compared with the current written record-based approach. In addition, we piloted a beverage screener to identify consumers of episodically consumed SSBs. As expected, a substantially higher proportion of consumers reported consuming SSBs on the beverage screener compared with either recall type, suggesting that a beverage screener may be useful in characterizing consumption of episodically consumed beverages in China's dynamic food and beverage landscape. PMID:25516327

  9. Performance of the Automated Self-Administered 24-hour Recall relative to a measure of true intakes and to an interviewer-administered 24-h recall123

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Sharon I; Subar, Amy F; Douglass, Deirdre; Zimmerman, Thea P; Thompson, Frances E; Kahle, Lisa L; George, Stephanie M; Dodd, Kevin W; Potischman, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Automated Self-Administered 24-hour Recall (ASA24), a freely available Web-based tool, was developed to enhance the feasibility of collecting high-quality dietary intake data from large samples. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the criterion validity of ASA24 through a feeding study in which the true intake for 3 meals was known. Design: True intake and plate waste from 3 meals were ascertained for 81 adults by inconspicuously weighing foods and beverages offered at a buffet before and after each participant served him- or herself. Participants were randomly assigned to complete an ASA24 or an interviewer-administered Automated Multiple-Pass Method (AMPM) recall the following day. With the use of linear and Poisson regression analysis, we examined the associations between recall mode and 1) the proportions of items consumed for which a match was reported and that were excluded, 2) the number of intrusions (items reported but not consumed), and 3) differences between energy, nutrient, food group, and portion size estimates based on true and reported intakes. Results: Respondents completing ASA24 reported 80% of items truly consumed compared with 83% in AMPM (P = 0.07). For both ASA24 and AMPM, additions to or ingredients in multicomponent foods and drinks were more frequently omitted than were main foods or drinks. The number of intrusions was higher in ASA24 (P < 0.01). Little evidence of differences by recall mode was found in the gap between true and reported energy, nutrient, and food group intakes or portion sizes. Conclusions: Although the interviewer-administered AMPM performed somewhat better relative to true intakes for matches, exclusions, and intrusions, ASA24 performed well. Given the substantial cost savings that ASA24 offers, it has the potential to make important contributions to research aimed at describing the diets of populations, assessing the effect of interventions on diet, and elucidating diet and health relations. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00978406. PMID:24787491

  10. Impact of diet on 24-hour intragastric pH profile in healthy horses.

    PubMed

    Damkel, Cornelia; Snyder, Alice; Uhlig, Albrecht; Coenen, Manfred; Schusser, Gerald Fritz

    2015-01-01

    An electrode incorporated into a polyethylene hose was introduced under endoscopic control into the stomach of six fasting adult horses for long-lasting pH measurements. The intragastric pH was recorded every four seconds for a period of 24 hours. The Warmblood horses were assigned randomly to receive hay ad libitum (H group); 1.5 kg hay/100 kg BW/day and 1 kg concentrate/100 kg BW/ day (C group) or protocol C plus 75 g pectin-lecithin supplement/100 kg BW/day (P group). The horses were adapted to each diet for 14 days. The 24-hour median pH value for protocol H (2.69) was significantly lower compared to protocol C (3.35) and P (3.44) (p < 0.05). The horses in protocol P had a significant higher percentage (40.1 %) of 24-hour intragastric pH values ? 4 than in protocol C (36.2 %) or in protocol H (25.3 %) (p < 0.05). PMID:26591378

  11. Validation of the Portuguese self-administered computerised 24-hour dietary recall among second-, third- and fourth-grade children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current methods for assessing children's dietary intake, such as interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recall (24-h DR), are time consuming and resource intensive. Self-administered instruments offer a low-cost diet assessment method for use with children. The present study assessed the validity of ...

  12. Identifying nutrients that are under-reported by an automated 24-hour dietary recall method in overweight and obese women after weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Underreporting of energy intake by 15-50% is a common problem in dietary assessment. Evidence suggests overweight/obese respondents are more likely to under-report than normal weight. This study compared Automated Self-Administered 24-hour recall (ASA24)-reported dietary intake to true intake in ove...

  13. Validation of the automated self-administered 24-hour dietary recall for children (ASA24-Kids) among 9- to 11-year-old youth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to validate ASA24-Kids-2012, a self-administered web-based 24-hour dietary recall (24hDR) among 9- to 11-year-old children. Sixty-nine children in two sites participated in the study. In one site, trained staff observed and recorded types and portions of foods and drinks consumed by ...

  14. Videotape dietary assessment: validity, reliability, and comparison of results with 24-hour dietary recalls from elderly women in a retirement home.

    PubMed

    Brown, J E; Tharp, T M; Dahlberg-Luby, E M; Snowdon, D A; Ostwald, S K; Buzzard, I M; Rysavy, S M; Wieser, S M

    1990-12-01

    The validity and reliability of a videotape method for quantifying food intake were tested, and results of the method were compared with results obtained from 24-hour dietary recalls. Participants were 37 elderly Catholic nuns (aged 81.8 +/- 4.1 years) who were ambulatory and living in a retirement home. The videotape method of dietary assessment consisted of videotaping food trays of each participant for three meals during 1 day and the subsequent identification of food types and amounts from the videotapes. Estimates of food amounts obtained were used in the calculation of energy and nutrient intake. Correlation coefficients between values for energy and 14 nutrients obtained by direct measurement of food and estimates from the videotape method were high (r = 0.86 to 1.0). Compared with measured food amounts, the videotape method underestimated food quantities by an average of 6%. The reliability test indicated that mean nutrient values obtained from the videotape method by two research assistants differed by an average of 3.7% and were highly correlated (r = 0.84 to 0.98). Comparison of the videotape method with 24-hour dietary recalls revealed differences between mean values that were greater than 10% for energy and 6 of the 14 nutrients and correlations that ranged from 0.09 to 0.82. These results suggest that use of 24-hour dietary recalls among the elderly may result in a high percentage of error. PMID:2131337

  15. A Comparison of Fruit and Vegetable Intake Estimates from Three Survey Question Sets to Estimates from 24-Hour Dietary Recall Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Danice K.; Olsen, Emily O’Malley; Brener, Nancy D.; Scanlon, Kelley S.; Kim, Sonia A.; Demissie, Zewditu; Yaroch, Amy Lazarus

    2015-01-01

    Background Fruit and vegetable (F/V) intake surveillance can provide information critical to the design and evaluation of interventions and the assessment of progress toward national intake objectives. The CDC’s Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) assesses F/V intake among high school students using six questions about the frequency of intake in times per day. It is not known whether F/V intake frequency in times per day can be used as a proxy for intake in servings per day. Objective To compare F/V intake estimates based on responses to three sets of survey questions, including the standard set of six YRBSS questions, with criterion F/V intake in servings per day based on data from 24-hour dietary recall interviews. Participants/setting Study participants were 610 high school students who completed an in-class questionnaire and three telephone-administered 24-hour dietary recall interviews. The questionnaire asked students how many times they consumed 100% fruit juice and ate fruit, carrots, potatoes, green salad, and other vegetables during the “past 7 days” (set 1), the number of times they did so “yesterday” (set 2), and the number of cup-equivalents of fruits and vegetables they consumed per day (set 3). Main outcome measure Mean estimated F/V intake either as “times/day” or “servings/day” and the percentage of students whose estimated F/V intake was ?1, ?2, and ?3 times/day or servings/day. Statistical analyses performed t tests and corrected Pearson correlations were used to compare F/V intake estimates based on survey question responses with estimates based on responses to the 24-hour dietary recall interviews. Results Mean F/V intake estimates (in times/day or servings/day) based on responses to all sets of survey questions were significantly more than servings/day estimates based on responses to the 24-hour dietary recall interviews, and the percentages of students meeting each intake cutpoint were also more. Of the three sets of survey questions, the standard YRBSS questions produced estimates and percentages that were most consistently closest to 24-hour dietary recall interview estimates. Conclusions For brief self-administered questionnaires of high school students, the current YRBSS questions are recommended for monitoring F/V intake even though mean intake estimates in times/day will likely be higher than, and are not a proxy for, mean intake estimates in servings/day. PMID:23871104

  16. 24-hour energy expenditure and sympathetic activity in postobese women consuming a high-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Astrup, A; Buemann, B; Christensen, N J; Madsen, J

    1992-03-01

    It has been suggested that the energy expenditure (EE) of formerly obese subjects (postobese) is highly susceptible to the dietary carbohydrate content and that a high dietary carbohydrate-to-fat ratio may increase their 24-h EE. We studied eight obese women before and after weight normalization (postobese state) and compared them with eight matched controls. Twenty-four hour EE, substrate oxidations, and 24-h heart rate were measured in respiratory chambers on a fixed physical program, while the postobese and controls were in macronutrient balance on a high-carbohydrate diet. Mean 24-h EE decreased from the obese to the postobese state (P less than 0.01), but it remained higher in the postobese women than in the controls (8,292 +/- 153 vs. 7,646 +/- 190 kJ/day, P = 0.01). The higher EE in the postobese group was entirely covered by a 22% higher carbohydrate oxidation (P = 0.006). The mean 24-h heart rate, as measured by telemetry, was also higher in the postobese group than in the control group (74 vs. 66 beats/min, P less than 0.03). Plasma norepinephrine (NE) concentrations were greater by 50% in the postobese as compared with the controls (P = 0.004), and differences in plasma NE concentrations entirely accounted for the group difference in 24-h EE and heart rate between postobese and controls, as analyzed by stepwise regression analysis. We conclude that postobese women on a high-carbohydrate-low-fat diet have an enhanced sympathetic nervous system activity, which is responsible for the higher 24-h EE and heart rate. These findings may have implications for understanding the pathophysiology and for the treatment of obesity. PMID:1550221

  17. DASH for Health: Validation of Web-based 24-Hour Recall Questionnaire Designed for a Lifestyle Modification Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The DASH eating plan is nationally recognized and recommended by the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, among others, as a healthful way to reduce hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, and as being an overall healthy diet for all Americans. We created a web-based nutrition and physical activity...

  18. Dietary Patterns are similar using a population specific diet screening tool and multiple 24-hour recalls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary patterns (DP) are associated with nutritional and health status of older adults but requires comprehensive dietary assessment methods. We designed a dietary screening tool (DST) to assess DP using a population-specific data-based approach from a Geisinger Rural Aging Study (GRAS) cohort. Thi...

  19. Development and Pilot Testing of 24-Hour Multiple-Pass Recall to Assess Dietary Intake of Toddlers of Somali- and Iraqi-Born Mothers Living in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Navnit Kaur; Mosdøl, Annhild; Aunan, Marte Bergsund; Monsen, Carina; Torheim, Liv Elin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, test, and evaluate a 24-h recall procedure to assess the dietary intake of toddlers of Somali- and Iraqi-born mothers living in Norway. A protocol for a 24-h multiple-pass recall procedure, registration forms, and visual tools (a picture library for food identification and portion size estimation) was developed and tested in 12 mothers from Somalia and Iraq with children aged 10–21 months. Five female field workers were recruited and trained to conduct the interviews. Evaluation data for the 24-h recall procedure were collected from both the mothers and the field workers. Nutrient intake was calculated using a Norwegian dietary calculation system. Each child’s estimated energy intake was compared with its estimated energy requirement. Both the mothers and the field workers found the method feasible and the visual tools useful. The estimated energy intake corresponded well with the estimated energy requirement for most of the children (within mean ± 2 SD, except for three). The pilot study identified the need for additional foods in the picture library and some crucial aspects in training and supervising the field workers to reduce sources of error in the data collection. PMID:24949548

  20. Estimated dietary intakes of flavonols, flavanones and flavones in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) 24 hour dietary recall cohort.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Knaze, Viktoria; Luján-Barroso, Leila; Slimani, Nadia; Romieu, Isabelle; Fedirko, Veronika; de Magistris, Maria Santucci; Ericson, Ulrica; Amiano, Pilar; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Dilis, Vardis; Naska, Androniki; Engeset, Dagrun; Skeie, Guri; Cassidy, Aedin; Overvad, Kim; Peeters, Petra H M; Huerta, José María; Sánchez, María-José; Quirós, J Ramón; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Grioni, Sara; Tumino, Rosario; Johansson, Gerd; Johansson, Ingegerd; Drake, Isabel; Crowe, Francesca L; Barricarte, Aurelio; Kaaks, Rudolf; Teucher, Birgit; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; van Rossum, Caroline T M; Norat, Teresa; Romaguera, Dora; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjær, Jytte; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Touillaud, Marina; Salvini, Simonetta; Khaw, Kay-Thee; Wareham, Nicholas; Boeing, Heiner; Förster, Jana; Riboli, Elio; González, Carlos A

    2011-12-01

    Flavonols, flavanones and flavones (FLAV) are sub-classes of flavonoids that exert cardioprotective and anti-carcinogenic properties in vitro and in vivo. We aimed to estimate the FLAV dietary intake, their food sources and associated lifestyle factors in ten European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. FLAV intake and their food sources for 36 037 subjects, aged between 35 and 74 years, in twenty-seven study centres were obtained using standardised 24 h dietary recall software (EPIC-SOFT). An ad hoc food composition database on FLAV was compiled using data from US Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer databases and was expanded using recipes, estimations and flavonoid retention factors in order to increase its correspondence with the 24 h dietary recall. Our results showed that the highest FLAV-consuming centre was the UK health-conscious group, with 130·9 and 97·0 mg/d for men and women, respectively. The lowest FLAV intakes were 36·8 mg/d in men from Umeå and 37·2 mg/d in women from Malmö (Sweden). The flavanone sub-class was the main contributor to the total FLAV intake ranging from 46·6 to 52·9 % depending on the region. Flavonols ranged from 38·5 to 47·3 % and flavones from 5·8 to 8·6 %. FLAV intake was higher in women, non-smokers, increased with level of education and physical activity. The major food sources were citrus fruits and citrus-based juices (especially for flavanones), tea, wine, other fruits and some vegetables. We concluded that the present study shows heterogeneity in intake of these three sub-classes of flavonoids across European regions and highlights differences by sex and other sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. PMID:21679483

  1. 24-hour urine copper test

    MedlinePLUS

    The 24-hour urine copper test measures the amount of copper in a urine sample. ... A 24-hour urine sample is needed. On day 1, urinate into the toilet when you get up in the morning. Afterwards, collect ...

  2. A comparison of food frequency and diet recall methods in studies of nutrient intake of low-income pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Suitor, C J; Gardner, J; Willett, W C

    1989-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a self-administered food frequency questionnaire for use with low-income pregnant women and to evaluate its performance in classifying women according to nutrient intake. Index nutrients used were energy, protein, calcium, iron, zinc, and vitamins A, B-6, and C. Two hundred ninety-five Massachusetts women, aged 14 to 43 years, participated in the field test of the questionnaire. A subset of 95 women provided three 24-hour diet recalls for use in comparative studies. Correlation coefficients between questionnaire and diet recall scores were adjusted for measurement error resulting from the limited number of 24-hour recalls per subject, and their confidence intervals were computed. When subjects with implausibly high energy scores (greater than 4,500/day) were removed from the sample, reducing sample size by about 15%, correlation coefficients increased substantially (25% to 64%) for all nutrients except vitamin A. Adjusted correlation coefficients exceeded 0.5, excluding vitamin A (r approximately 0.15), and quintile comparisons indicated that the questionnaire would correctly identify a high proportion of the women having low intake of selected nutrients. We conclude that a self-administered questionnaire can provide useful data about individual recent intake of selected nutrients in a majority of English-speaking, low-income pregnant women, but that overestimation of food use may occur among up to 20% of this population. PMID:2592710

  3. Recalls

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 3 4 5 ... Next Search Recalls and News Alerts from to Find Recalls By: Company Country Where ... Stay Connected Follow us on Twitter Get Email Alerts Get the Recall Widget Find More Government Recalls ...

  4. 24-Hour Academic Libraries: Adjusting to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the adaptive measures that academic libraries perform when implementing and operating a 24-hour schedule. Five in-depth interviews were conducted with current managerial-level librarians at 24-hour academic libraries. The exploratory interviews revealed similar measures for security, budgeting, employee…

  5. Toward the 24-Hour Knowledge Factory

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Amar

    2004-03-12

    The term 24-Hour Knowledge Factory connotes a globally distributed work environment in which members of the global team work on a project around the clock; each member of the team works the normal workday hours that pertain ...

  6. Toward the 24-Hour Knowledge Factory

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Amar

    2004-12-10

    The term 24-Hour Knowledge Factory connotes a globally distributed work environment in which members of the global team work on a project around the clock; each member of the team works the normal workday ...

  7. 24-hour security contact (0115) 951 3013

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    24-hour security contact (0115) 951 3013 Landcroft Lane CollegeRoad Melton Lane CollegeRoad Tennis and Science Food Sciences Plant SciencesNorth Laboratory Library Gateway Building Farm Office Gate SC Sutton bus stop Hopper bus stop Secure cycle parking VP PD 32 The University of Nottingham Sutton Bonington

  8. Multiethnic/Minority Cohort Study of Diet and Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    At entry to the cohort study, each participant completed a 26-page mail questionnaire that included an extensive quantitative diet history, as well as other demographic, medical, and lifestyle information. Multiple 24-hour diet recalls were collected on more than 2,000 of the participants in a calibration study designed to permit correction of nutrient intake estimates for measurement error.

  9. HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND 24-HOUR MINIMUM HEART RATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heart rate variability (HRV) indices based on 24-hour electrocardiograph recordings have been used in clinical research studies to assess the aggregate activity of the autonomic nervous system. While 24-hour HRV is generally considered non-invasive, use in research protocols typically involves cons...

  10. Human prolactin - 24-hour pattern with increased release during sleep.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassin, J. F.; Weitzman, E. D.; Kapen, S.; Frantz, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Human prolactin was measured in plasma by radioimmunoassay at 20-minute intervals for a 24-hour period in each of six normal adults, whose sleep-wake cycles were monitored polygraphically. A marked diurnal variation in plasma concentrations was demonstrated, with highest values during sleep. Periods of episodic release occurred throughout the 24 hours.

  11. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes...

  12. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes...

  13. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes...

  14. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes...

  15. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes...

  16. Analysis of Continuous 24-Hour Intraocular Pressure Patterns in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Kaweh; Liu, John H. K.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Tafreshi, Ali; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To present a method to analyze circadian intraocular pressure (IOP) patterns in glaucoma patients and suspects undergoing repeated continuous 24-hour IOP monitoring. Methods. Forty patients with established (n = 19) or suspected glaucoma (n = 21) underwent ambulatory 24-hour IOP monitoring on two sessions 1 week apart using a contact lens sensor (CLS). The CLS provides its output in arbitrary units (a.u.). A modified cosinor rhythmometry method was adapted to the CLS output to analyze 24-hour IOP patterns and their reproducibility. Nonparametric tests were used to study differences between sessions 1 and 2 (S1 and S2). Patients pursued their routine daily activities and their sleep was uncontrolled. CLS data were used to assess sleep times. Results. Complete 24-hour data from both sessions were available for 35 patients. Mean (SD) age of the patients was 55.8 ± 15.5 years. The correlation of the cosinor fitting and measured CLS values was r = 0.38 (Spearman r; P < 0.001) for S1, r = 0.50 (P < 0.001) for S2, whereas the correlation between S1 and S2 cosinor fittings was r = 0.76 (P < 0.001). Repeated nocturnal acrophase was seen in 62.9% of patients; 17.1% of patients had no repeatable acrophase. The average amplitude of the 24-hour curve was 143.6 ± 108.1 a.u. (S1) and 130.8 ± 68.2 a.u. (S2) (P = 0.936). Conclusions. Adapting the cosinor method to CLS data is a useful way for modeling the rhythmic nature of 24-hour IOP patterns and evaluating their reproducibility. Repeatable nocturnal acrophase was seen in 62.9% of patients. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01319617.) PMID:23139273

  17. Mushroom intake is associated with better nutrient intake and diet quality: 2001-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The association between mushroom consumption and nutrient intake or diet quality has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between these variables in a nationally representative sample of adults. Dietary intake was determined using a 24-hour recall on adult 1...

  18. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other personal activities when not busy. A...for specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes no difference...

  19. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other personal activities when not busy. A...for specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes no difference...

  20. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other personal activities when not busy. A...for specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes no difference...

  1. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other personal activities when not busy. A...for specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes no difference...

  2. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other personal activities when not busy. A...for specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes no difference...

  3. The impact of dairy and sweetened beverage consumption on diet quality, nutrient intake, and weight of a multi-ethnic population of Head Start mothers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To assess the impact of milk and sweetened beverage (SwB) intake on diet and weight in Head Start mothers, three 24-hour dietary recalls were collected on 609 Black (43%), Hispanic (33%), or White (24%) women in AL and TX. Women were divided into four beverage consumption groups: low milk/high SwB, ...

  4. [Isolation of Mycobacterium avium complex from the "24-hour bath"].

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Murakami, K; Ishii, N; Kwon, H H

    2000-01-01

    The "24-HOUR BATH" is an apparatus which circulates the bath water, keeps it clean and warm, and makes it possible to take a bath at any time during the day or night. It consists of apparatus for cleaning (sponge or mesh filter and filter material), heating (ceramic heater), and sterilizing (UV lamp). Recently, three cases of skin disease due to M. avium infection in private homes, in which "24-HOUR BATH" water was suspected to be the source of infection, have been reported. We attempted to isolate M. avium complex from the water (32 specimens), sponge filter (29 specimens), and filter material (32 specimens) of the "24-HOUR BATH". One hundred-ml samples of bath water, and 50-ml samples of rinse from a sponge filter or filter material were centrifuged at 3000 rpm for 20 min. Sediment was suspended in distilled water and a smear was prepared, and then digested and decontaminated with 2% sodium hydroxide. The processed specimens were cultured on 2% Ogawa medium containing ofloxacin (1 microgram/ml) and ethambutol (2.5 micrograms/ml) for 8 weeks at 37 degrees C. Positive smears were 3 (9.4%), 25 (86.2%) and 25 (78.1%) specimens from the water, sponge and filter material, respectively. A few bacterial clumps were observed, especially in the sponge specimens. The number of positive culture was 5 (15.6%), 24 (82.8%) and 25 (78.1%) from the water, sponge and filter material, respectively. Among them the number of Runyon's Group III-positive cultures was 5 (100%), 22 (91.7%) and 20 (80%) in the water, sponge, and filter material specimens, respectively. In most cases, cultures were positive for both the sponge and filter material specimens. All of the Group III mycobacteria were smooth, grew at 28, 37, 42, and 45 degrees C, negative for niacin, nitrate reductase, semiquantitative catalase, urease and Tween80 hydrolysis, and positive for 68 degrees C catalase. All of the strains reacted with M. avium complex AccuProbe and M. avium AccuProbe, but none of the strains reacted with M. intracellulare AccuProbe. Therefore, all the Group III isolates were identified as M. avium by the culture, biochemical and genetical characteristics. PMID:10689814

  5. Dietary patterns are similar in multiple 24-hour recalls and a dietary screening tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary patterns (DP) have been associated with nutritional and health status of older adults but are usually derived by comprehensive dietary assessment methods. We designed a dietary screening tool (DST) to assess DP using a population-specific data-based approach from a cohort of the Geisinger R...

  6. Managing sleep and wakefulness in a 24-hour world

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to literature on the sociology of sleep by exploring the sleeping practices and subjective sleep experiences of two social groups: shift workers and students. It draws on data, collected in the UK from 25 semi-structured interviews, to discuss the complex ways in which working patterns and social activities impact upon experiences and expectations of sleep in our wired awake world. The data show that, typically, sleep is valued and considered to be important for health, general wellbeing, appearance and physical and cognitive functioning. However, sleep time is often cut back on in favour of work demands and social activities. While shift workers described their efforts to fit in an adequate amount of sleep per 24-hour period, for students, the adoption of a flexible sleep routine was thought to be favourable for maintaining a work–social life balance. Collectively, respondents reported using a wide range of strategies, techniques, technologies and practices to encourage, overcome or delay sleep(iness) and boost, promote or enhance wakefulness/alertness at socially desirable times. The analysis demonstrates how social context impacts not only on how we come to think about sleep and understand it, but also how we manage or self-regulate our sleeping patterns. PMID:23957268

  7. Diet Screener in CHIS 2005: Uses of Screener Estimates in CHIS

    Cancer.gov

    Dietary intake estimates from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) Diet Screener are rough estimates of usual intake of fruits and vegetables and added sugar. They are not as accurate as more detailed methods (e.g. 24-hour recalls). However, validation research suggests that the estimates may be useful to characterize a population's median intakes, to discriminate among individuals or populations with regard to higher vs.

  8. Flexibility of working hours in the 24-hour society.

    PubMed

    Costa, G

    2006-01-01

    The 24-hour Society undergoes an ineluctable process towards a social organisation where time constraints are no more restricting human life. The borders between working and social times are no more fixed and rigidly determined, and the value of working time changes according to the different economic and social effects you may consider. Shift and night work, irregular and flexible working hours, together with new technologies, are the milestone of this epochal passage. What are the advantages and disadvantages for the individual, the companies, and the society? What is the cost/benefit ratio in terms of health and social well-being? Coping properly with this process means avoiding a passive acceptance of it with consequent maladjustments at both individual and social level, but adopting effective preventive and compensative strategies aimed at building up a more sustainable society. Flexible working times now appear to be one of the best ways to cope with the demands of the modern life, but there are different points of view about labour and temporal 'flexibility" between employers and employees. For the former it means a prompt adaptation to market demands and technological innovations; for the latter it is a way to improve working and social life, by decreasing work constraints and increasing control and autonomy. Although it can be easily speculated that individual-based 'flexibility" should improve health and well-being, and especially satisfaction, whereas company-based flexibility" might interfere negatively, the effective consequences on health and well-being have still to be analysed properly. PMID:17017360

  9. The National Cancer Institute diet history questionnaire: validation of pyramid food servings.

    PubMed

    Millen, Amy E; Midthune, Douglas; Thompson, Frances E; Kipnis, Victor; Subar, Amy F

    2006-02-01

    The performance of the National Cancer Institute's food frequency questionnaire, the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ), in estimating servings of 30 US Department of Agriculture Food Guide Pyramid food groups was evaluated in the Eating at America's Table Study (1997-1998), a nationally representative sample of men and women aged 20-79 years. Participants who completed four nonconsecutive, telephone-administered 24-hour dietary recalls (n = 1,301) were mailed a DHQ; 965 respondents completed both the 24-hour dietary recalls and the DHQ. The US Department of Agriculture's Pyramid Servings Database was used to estimate intakes of pyramid servings for both diet assessment tools. The correlation (rho) between DHQ-reported intake and true intake and the attenuation factor (lambda) were estimated using a measurement error model with repeat 24-hour dietary recalls as the reference instrument. Correlations for energy-adjusted pyramid servings of foods ranged from 0.43 (other starchy vegetables) to 0.84 (milk) among women and from 0.42 (eggs) to 0.80 (total dairy food) among men. The mean rho and lambda after energy adjustment were 0.62 and 0.60 for women and 0.63 and 0.66 for men, respectively. This food frequency questionnaire validation study of foods measured in pyramid servings allowed for a measure of food intake consistent with national dietary guidance. PMID:16339051

  10. Recruiting strategy and 24-hour biomonitoring of paraquat in agricultural workers.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Kee; Duarte Tagles, Hector; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D; Lee, Kiyoung; Schenker, Marc B

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to recruit agricultural workers in Costa Rica to participate in a 24-hour urine collection for paraquat exposure assessment and to compare the 24-hour sampling to end-of-shift sampling. The authors recruited 187 handlers and 54 nonhandlers from coffee, banana, and palm oil plantations. The completeness of 24-hour urine samples collected (a total of 393 samples) was confirmed by questionnaire and urinary creatinine level. For a subset of 12 samples, the absorbed paraquat level was determined in 24-hours and end-of-shift spot urine samples. The participation rate for handlers was approximately 90%. The completeness of 24-hour urine collections was verified as the overall average of creatinine levels from 393 urines (1.11+/-0.50 g/L). A total of 92.4% to 96.7% of urine samples were considered within the acceptable range of urinary creatinine, whereas 94.7% of the samples were described as "complete" from the questionnaire. Measured creatinine correlated well to predicted values (r=.327, p=.0024, 95% CI .12-.51). Detected paraquat levels in spot urine samples had a sensitivity of 96.9% at the high specificity of 100% compared to 24-hour urine samples as the gold standard. There was a significant (p<.0001) correlation between spot and 24-hour urine paraquat levels (r=.7825, 95% CI .61-.88). The recruiting strategy was successful in getting 24-hour urine samples from a farm worker population. Comparison between the paraquat levels in spot and 24-hour urine samples demonstrated that for this compound, end-of-shift spot urine samples would be an appropriate substitute for 24-hour collections. PMID:19064412

  11. Technical aspects and clinical indications of 24-hour intragastric bile monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bechi, P; Cianchi, F

    1999-01-01

    Bilitec 2000 is a new device which spectrophotometrically detects the presence of bilirubin in the refluxate. It is, up to date, the only method able to monitor for 24 hours the exposure time of esophageal and/or gastric mucosa to bilirubin-containing reflux. From the technical point of view, a particularly relevant aspect is the necessity of associating pH and Bilitec monitorings. The reason why is that, even in the stomach where Bilitec itself is adequate for assessing the exposure time to duodenogastric reflux, the damaging capability of the different components of reflux strictly depends upon pH. The most correct position inside the stomach for gastric monitoring is the 5 cm-below-the-LES-distal-border-position. The diet needs to be standardized in order to avoid false positive results due to the ingestion of foods with absorption close to bilirubin absorption. Ranges of normality will soon be available from a collaborative European Study. At variance with the indications for esophageal monitoring which are wide (the same as for pH-monitoring), indications for gastric Bilitec monitoring are represented only by severe dyspeptic symptoms possibly related to duodenogastric reflux. An antrum-confined C gastritis in the absence of history of consumption of gastro-lesive drugs strongly suggests the possibility of duodenogastric reflux. In this case, Bilitec monitoring can provide further evidence by measuring the time of exposure of the gastric mucosa to reflux. PMID:10228765

  12. Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder in Sighted and Blind Patients.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Makoto; Lockley, Steven W

    2015-12-01

    Non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder (N24SWD) is a cyclic debilitating circadian rhythm sleep disorder characterized by an inability to sleep on a 24-hour schedule. Individuals isolated from a 24-hour light-dark cycle exhibit sleep-wake cycles different from 24 hours. Relatively rare in sighted patients, it may be associated with delayed sleep-wake rhythm disorder or psychiatric disorders. It is more common in totally blind individuals owing to the lack of light information reaching the circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamus. We review the clinical characteristics of patients with N24SWD, discuss the biological mechanisms that may underlie its development, and describe treatment strategies. PMID:26568125

  13. 77 FR 65310 - Additional Air Quality Designations for the 2006 24-Hour Fine Particle National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ...Designations for the 2006 24-Hour Fine Particle National Ambient Air Quality Standards...establish the initial 2006 24-hour fine particle (PM 2.5 ) national ambient air...counties to evaluate further high fine particle concentrations during...

  14. [24-Hour arterial pressure variability and 24-hour variability of pulse carries unidirectional character and is not associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (results of population study)].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A A; Krupa, T M; Pello, E V; Maliutina, S K; Nikitin, Iu P

    2012-01-01

    Alternative prognostic interpretation of variability of arterial pressure (AP) and pulse seems contradictory if one considers classical conceptions of close physiological connection between AP and pulse. It is logical to expect that elevated variability of AP should be associated with elevated variability of pulse and vice versa. Within framework of the project EPOCH we examined a populational sample of inhabitants of Novosibirsk (129 men and 170 women) formed according to the family principle. Ambulatory 24-hour registration of AP and pulse was carried out with 15-30 minutes interval. Variability of AP turned out to be unidirectionally interconnected with variability of pulse and was not an independent marker of hypertrophy of the left ventricle but was associated with it at the account of concealed dependence on mean 24-hour AP. Cornell voltage index in persons with normal AP, "white coat" arterial hypertension (AH), "masked" AH was comparable and significantly lower than in subjects with sustained AH. PMID:22839711

  15. 24-hour central blood pressure and intermediate cardiovascular phenotypes in untreated subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bednarek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Piotr; Olszanecka, Agnieszka; Windak, Adam; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Czarnecka, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recently, 24-hour monitoring of central systolic blood pressure (SBP) has become available. However, the relation between end-organ damage and the 24-hour central SBP profile and variability has not so far been analyzed. Therefore, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the relation between 24-hour central SBP, 24-hour central SBP profile as well as central SBP short-term variability and parameters of cardiac and vascular intermediate phenotypes. Methods: The study group consisted of 50 patients with newly diagnosed, untreated hypertension (age 40.4 ± 11.5 years, 35 men) and 50 normotensive subjects (age 38.3 ± 12.0 years, 35 men). Applanation tonometry of the radial artery and the “n-point forward moving average” method were used to determine 24-hour central SBP. Each study participant underwent echocardiography and carotid ultrasonography. Results: 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime central SBP was related to left ventricle end-diastole diameter (p < 0.05), left ventricular mass index (p < 0.001), relative wall thickness (p < 0.05), E/E’ ratio (p < 0.01), and left atrium volume (p < 0.01). The nocturnal central SBP fall was not related to any of the mentioned parameters, whereas parameters of short-term variability were related to IMT in hypertensives only (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study showed that 24-hour central SBP is related to intermediate cardiac phenotypes as assessed by echocardiography whereas short-term central SBP variability is mainly related to vascular phenotype as determined by IMT. PMID:25628959

  16. 24-hour energy expenditure and substrate oxidation rates are unaffected by body fat distribution in obese women.

    PubMed

    Buemann, B; Astrup, A; Quaade, F; Madsen, J

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure (EE) and nonprotein respiratory quotient (RQnp) were measured by indirect calorimetry in 19 upper-body-obese (UBO) and 15 lower-body-obese (LBO) women with similar body mass index (BMI) and body fat percent. The measurements were performed in a respiration chamber on a predetermined physical activity program and a controlled diet. No differences between the UBO and LBO groups were found in 24-hour, daytime, and sleeping EE after adjustment for differences in fat-free mass (FFM). Furthermore, no group effect was observed in RQnp, but a positive correlation was found between RQnp and age. Despite the fact that an increased free fatty acid (FFA) turnover has been found in UBO subjects, the present study does not support the contention that upper-body obesity is accompanied by an increased lipid oxidation. PMID:8289666

  17. The Road Ahead to Continuous 24-Hour Intraocular Pressure Monitoring in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Kaweh

    2014-01-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the only treatable risk factor for glaucoma. Yet, current glaucoma management usually relies on single IOP measurements during clinic hours despite the fact that IOP is a dynamic parameter with individual rhythms. Single IOP measurements underpin all major clinical guidelines on treatment of glaucoma. Other potentially informative parameters, such as IOP fluctuations and peak IOP, have been neglected, and effects of IOP-lowering interventions on such measures are largely unknown. The search for continuous 24-hour IOP monitoring started over 50 years ago, but only recent technological advances have provided clinician-researchers with devices for continuous IOP monitoring. Herein, we discuss innovative approaches with permanent and temporary devices for 24-hour IOP monitoring, such as a contact lens sensor. Despite being in their infancy, these devices may soon enable clinicians to use 24-hour IOP data to improve glaucoma management and reduce the glaucoma-related burden of disease. PMID:25279129

  18. Agreement between 24-hour salt ingestion and sodium excretion in a controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Lerchl, Kathrin; Rakova, Natalia; Dahlmann, Anke; Rauh, Manfred; Goller, Ulrike; Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F; Beck, Luis; Agureev, Alexander; Larina, Irina; Baranov, Victor; Morukov, Boris; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Vassilieva, Galina; Wabel, Peter; Vienken, Jörg; Kirsch, Karl; Johannes, Bernd; Krannich, Alexander; Luft, Friedrich C; Titze, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Accurately collected 24-hour urine collections are presumed to be valid for estimating salt intake in individuals. We performed 2 independent ultralong-term salt balance studies lasting 105 (4 men) and 205 (6 men) days in 10 men simulating a flight to Mars. We controlled dietary intake of all constituents for months at salt intakes of 12, 9, and 6 g/d and collected all urine. The subjects' daily menus consisted of 27 279 individual servings, of which 83.0% were completely consumed, 16.5% completely rejected, and 0.5% incompletely consumed. Urinary recovery of dietary salt was 92% of recorded intake, indicating long-term steady-state sodium balance in both studies. Even at fixed salt intake, 24-hour urine collection for sodium excretion (UNaV) showed infradian rhythmicity. We defined a ±25 mmol deviation from the average difference between recorded sodium intake and UNaV as the prediction interval to accurately classify a 3-g difference in salt intake. Because of the biological variability in UNaV, only every other daily urine sample correctly classified a 3-g difference in salt intake (49%). By increasing the observations to 3 consecutive 24-hour collections and sodium intakes, classification accuracy improved to 75%. Collecting seven 24-hour urines and sodium intake samples improved classification accuracy to 92%. We conclude that single 24-hour urine collections at intakes ranging from 6 to 12 g salt per day were not suitable to detect a 3-g difference in individual salt intake. Repeated measurements of 24-hour UNaV improve precision. This knowledge could be relevant to patient care and the conduct of intervention trials. PMID:26259596

  19. Mood-Dependent Cognitive Change in a Man with Bipolar Disorder Who Cycles Every 24 Hours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Dominic; Mansell, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A case study of a bipolar patient whose mood changes every 24 hours is described to illustrate the changes in cognitive processing and content during different phases of bipolar disorder. The participant completed a battery of questionnaires and tasks on 4 separate occasions: twice when depressed and twice when manic. Depression tended to be…

  20. 24-Hour Access: Responding to Students' Need for Late Library Hours at the University of Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Bethany B.

    2013-01-01

    The University of Denver's Penrose Library saw a substantial increase in use as a result of several new and enhanced services over a six-year period. In turn, longer operating hours and increased staffing for a 24-hours-a-day, five-days-a-week (24 x 5) operating schedule was funded. This case study analyzes student need for longer library hours…

  1. The Effects of 24-hour Sleep Deprivation on the Exploration-Exploitation Trade-off

    E-print Network

    Maddox, W. Todd

    The Effects of 24-hour Sleep Deprivation on the Exploration- Exploitation Trade-off Brian D. Glassa Biological Rhythm Research Sleep deprivation has a complex set of neurological effects that go beyond a mere slowing of mental processes. While cognitive and perceptual impairments in sleep deprived individuals

  2. Breast-feeding frequency during the first 24 hours after birth in full-term neonates.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Y; Yamanouchi, I

    1990-08-01

    The relation between the frequency of breast-feeding and intake, weight loss, meconium passage, and bilirubin levels was studied in 140 healthy, full-term, breast-fed, Japanese neonates born vaginally without complications. Factors affecting the frequency of breast-feeding were also evaluated. Mothers nursed their neonates, on average, 4.3 +/- 2.5 (SD) times (range 0 to 11) during the first 24 hours after birth, and this frequency increased significantly to 7.4 +/- 3.9 times during the next 24 hours (P less than .001). There was a significant correlation between the frequency of breast-feeding during the first and second 24 hours after birth (r = .69, P less than .001). The frequency of breast-feeding during the first 24 hours correlated significantly with frequency of meconium passage (r = .37, P less than .01), maximum weight loss (r = -.22, P less than .05), breast milk intake on day 3 (r = .50, P less than .01) and day 5 (r = .34, P less than .05), transcutaneous bilirubin readings on day 6 (r = -.18, P less than .05), and weight loss from birth to time of discharge (day 7) (r = -.32, P less than .01). There was a strong dose-response relationship between feeding frequency and a decreased incidence of significant hyperbilirubinemia (transcutaneous bilirubin readings greater than or equal to 23.5) on day 6. The time of birth also affected the frequency of breast-feeding during the first 24 hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2371092

  3. Intermittent short ECG recording is more effective than 24-hour Holter ECG in detection of arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients report symptoms of palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. These patients are often referred for 24-hour Holter ECG, although the sensitivity for detecting relevant arrhythmias is comparatively low. Intermittent short ECG recording over a longer time period might be a convenient and more sensitive alternative. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of 24-hour Holter ECG with intermittent short ECG recording over four weeks to detect relevant arrhythmias in patients with palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. Methods Design: prospective, observational, cross-sectional study. Setting: Clinical Physiology, University Hospital. Patients: 108 consecutive patients referred for ambiguous palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. Interventions: All individuals underwent a 24-hour Holter ECG and additionally registered 30-second handheld ECG (Zenicor EKG® thumb) recordings at home, twice daily and when having cardiac symptoms, during 28 days. Main outcome measures: Significant arrhythmias: atrial fibrillation (AF), paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), atrioventricular (AV) block II–III, sinus arrest (SA), wide complex tachycardia (WCT). Results 95 patients, 42 men and 53 women with a mean age of 54.1 years, completed registrations. Analysis of Holter registrations showed atrial fibrillation (AF) in two patients and atrioventricular (AV) block II in one patient (= 3.2% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 1.1–8.9]). Intermittent handheld ECG detected nine patients with AF, three with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and one with AV-block-II (= 13.7% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 8.2–22.0]). There was a significant difference between the two methods in favour of intermittent ECG with regard to the ability to detect relevant arrhythmias (P?=?0.0094). With Holter ECG, no symptoms were registered during any of the detected arrhythmias. With intermittent ECG, symptoms were registered during half of the arrhythmia episodes. Conclusions Intermittent short ECG recording during four weeks is more effective in detecting AF and PSVT in patients with ambiguous symptoms arousing suspicions of arrhythmia than 24-hour Holter ECG. PMID:24690488

  4. Diets

    MedlinePLUS

    Your diet is made up of what you eat. A healthy diet May include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat- ... added sugars There are many different types of diets. Some, like a vegetarian diet, don't include ...

  5. Continuous 24-hour ocular dimensional profile recording in medically treated normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacky WY; Fu, Lin; Shum, Jennifer WH; Chan, Jonathan CH; Lai, Jimmy SM

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the 24-hour ocular dimensional profile in normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) patients on medical treatment. Methods Consecutive, medically treated NTG subjects were recruited from a university eye center. Subjects were on a mean of 1.7±0.7 types of antiglaucoma medications and 56.6% were on a prostaglandin analog. A contact lens-based sensor device was worn in one eye of NTG patients to record the intraocular pressure (IOP)-related profile for 24 hours, recording the following: variability from mean over 24 hours, nocturnally and diurnally, as well as the number of peaks and troughs diurnally and nocturnally. Results In 18 NTG subjects, the nocturnal variability around the mean contact lens-based sensor device signal was 48.9% less than the diurnal variability around the mean. The number of peaks was 54.7% less during the nocturnal period than during the diurnal period. The rate of increase in the ocular dimensional profile when going to sleep was significantly greater than the rate of decrease upon waking (P<0.001). Conclusion In medically treated NTG subjects, there was more variability in the IOP-related pattern during the daytime and there were fewer peaks during sleep. PMID:25678768

  6. 40 CFR 52.1990 - Interstate Transport for the 2006 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 2006 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1990 Section 52.1990 Protection of...52.1990 Interstate Transport for the 2006 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS. (a) EPA approves the portion of...

  7. 40 CFR 52.1990 - Interstate Transport for the 2006 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 2006 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1990 Section 52.1990 Protection of...52.1990 Interstate Transport for the 2006 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS. (a) EPA approves the portion of...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1990 - Interstate Transport for the 2006 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 2006 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1990 Section 52.1990 Protection of...52.1990 Interstate Transport for the 2006 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS. (a) EPA approves the portion of...

  9. Spot Protein/Creatinine Ratio in Preeclampsia as an Alternative for 24-Hour Urine Protein

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Oya; Kumru, P?nar; Ar?nkan, Arzu; Ard?ç, Cem; Ar?soy, Resul; Tozk?r, Elif; Tando?an, Bülent; Ayvac?, Habibe; Tu?rul, Ahmet S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proteinuria is a major component of preeclampsia. Urine protein measurement after 24-hour urine collection is the traditional standard method for the detection of proteinuria. It is time-consuming. As an alternative, random spot sampling for a urine protein to creatinine (P/C) ratio has been investigated. Aims: The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the protein to creatinine ratio (P/C) compared with 24-hour urine collection for the detection of remarkable proteinuria and to evaluate the P/C ratio for different proteinuria ranges in patients with preeclampsia. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: Two hundred and eleven pregnant women who met the criteria of preeclampsia comprised the study group and fifty three pregnant women were taken as the control group. Spot urine specimens for measuring P/C ratio were obtained taken immediately before 24-hour urine collection. The correlation between the P/C ratio in the spot urine samples and urinary protein excretion in the 24-hour collections was examined using the Spearman correlation test. Results: It was found a good positive correlation between the P/C ratio and 24-hour protein excretion, with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.758. The best cut-off which gave the maximum area under the curve was 0.45 for 300 mg, 0.9 for 1000 mg, 1.16 for 2000 mg, 1.49 for 3000 mg, 2.28 for 4000 mg and 2.63 for 5000 mg per 24h. A P/C ratio above 0.9 strongly predicts significant proteinuria for more than 1 gram (AUC 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94–0.99 and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of 91%, 95.4%, 95.2%, and 91.2%, respectively). Conclusion: The P/C ratio can be used as a screening test as a good predictor for remarkable proteinuria. The P/C ratio seems to be highly predictive for diagnosis to detect proteinuria over one gram and it could be used as a rapid alternative test in preeclamptic patients not to delay implementation treatment. PMID:25759772

  10. Investigation of cattle methane production and emission over a 24-hour period using measurements of ?13C and ?D of emitted CH4 and rumen water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, R. S.; Tyler, S. C.; Kurihara, M.; Yagi, K.

    2001-07-01

    We have conducted a series of experiments to determine the effects different diets, including the addition of unsaturated fatty acids, had on isotopic signatures of CH4 emissions from dairy cattle. Measurements of emitted ?13CH4, ?13CO2, and ?D-CH4 were made on gases collected over a 24-hour period from animal chambers containing individual Holstein cows. Some measurements of ?D-H2O from samples collected directly from the rumen were also made. We observed variation in ?13CH4 values with time after feeding and a correlation in ?13C between emitted gases and diet. The average ?13CH4 value, which includes all samples of emitted gases, was -70.6±4.9‰ (n = 57). Measurements of ?D-CH4 over the 24-hour sampling period had an average value of -357.8±15.0‰ (n = 56). These ?D measurements are among the lightest reported for CH4 produced by cattle. Our cattle data indicate that hydrogen incorporated into the CH4 produced by CO2 reduction in high H2 concentration environments is fractionated to a greater degree than that incorporated in systems with relatively low H2 conditions, such as wetlands. Our results support bacterial studies that have demonstrated large hydrogen fractionation in high H2 concentration systems during methanogenesis.

  11. Mean 24-hours sympathetic nervous system activity decreases during head-down tilted bed rest but not during microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nj; Heer, M.; Ivanova, K.; Norsk, P.

    Sympathetic nervous system activity is closely related to gravitational stress in ground based experiments. Thus a high activity is present in the standing-up position and a very low activity is observed during acute head-out water immersion. Adjustments in sympathetic activity are necessary to maintain a constant blood pressure during variations in venous return. Head-down tilted bed rest is applied as a model to simulate changes observed during microgravity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that mean 24-hours sympathetic activity was low and similar during space flight and in ground based observation obtained during long-term head-down tilted bed rest. Forearm venous plasma noradrenaline was measured by a radioenzymatic technique as an index of muscle sympathetic activity and thrombocyte noradrenaline and adrenaline were measured as indices of mean 24-hours sympathoadrenal activity. Previous results have indicated that thrombocyte noradrenaline level has a half-time of 2 days. Thus to reflect sympathetic activity during a specific experiment the study period must last for at least 6 days and a sample must be obtained within 12 hours after the experiment has ended. Ten normal healthy subjects were studied before and during a 14 days head-down tilted bed rest as well as during an ambulatory study period of a similar length. The whole experiment was repeated while the subjects were on a low calorie diet. Thrombocyte noradrenaline levels were studied in 4 cosmonauts before and within 12 hours after landing after more than 7 days in flight. Thrombocyte noradrenaline decreased markedly during the head-down tilted bed rest (p<0.001), whereas there were no significant changes in the ambulatory study. Plasma noradrenaline decreased in the adaptation period but not during the intervention. During microgravity thrombocyte noradrenaline increased in four cosmonauts and the percentage changes were significantly different in cosmonauts and in subjects participating in the head down tilted bed rest study (170± 29% (Mean± SEM) vs. 57± 7%, respectively; p<0.001). The elevated sympathetic nervous system activity is most likely a regulatory response to combined effects of a reduced plasma volume and an increased vascular capacity in flight.

  12. The nutrient density of present-day and traditional diets and their health aspects: the Sami- and lumberjack families living in rural areas of Northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Håglin, L

    1999-01-01

    In a rural area of Northern Sweden, the food consumption of 22 Swedish Sami families and 32 lumberjack families was recorded. Repeated 24-hour recalls were obtained from September 1990 to April 1991. The traditional Sami diet was calculated from interviews with old Sami people living today and from information from the literature. The nutrient density was well above recommended levels for most nutrients except for folate and fiber, in the Sami and lumberjack diets. Sami diet was just below NNR for calcium density and the lumberjacks' diet for selenium density. The present-day diets of Sami families contain less protein than in the past. In lumberjack families today, the intake of energy and fat is less than in the past while protein content has been kept constant over time. Different aspects of these dietary changes and possible health effects are discussed and compared with food consumption in Iceland and Finland in the past. PMID:10208068

  13. Heterogeneity of Prognostic Studies of 24-Hour Blood Pressure Variability: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryn S.; Heneghan, Carl J.; Stevens, Richard J.; Adams, Emily C.; Nunan, David; Ward, Alison

    2015-01-01

    In addition to mean blood pressure, blood pressure variability is hypothesized to have important prognostic value in evaluating cardiovascular risk. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of blood pressure variability within 24 hours. Using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library to April 2013, we conducted a systematic review of prospective studies of adults, with at least one year follow-up and any day, night or 24-hour blood pressure variability measure as a predictor of one or more of the following outcomes: all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, all cardiovascular events, stroke and coronary heart disease. We examined how blood pressure variability is defined and how its prognostic use is reported. We analysed relative risks adjusted for covariates including the appropriate mean blood pressure and considered the potential for meta-analysis. Our analysis of methods included 24 studies and analysis of predictions included 16 studies. There were 36 different measures of blood pressure variability and 13 definitions of night- and day-time periods. Median follow-up was 5.5 years (interquartile range 4.2–7.0). Comparing measures of dispersion, coefficient of variation was less well researched than standard deviation. Night dipping based on percentage change was the most researched measure and the only measure for which data could be meaningfully pooled. Night dipping or lower night-time blood pressure was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events. The interpretation and use in clinical practice of 24-hour blood pressure variability, as an important prognostic indicator of cardiovascular events, is hampered by insufficient evidence and divergent methodologies. We recommend greater standardisation of methods. PMID:25984791

  14. Tasimelteon for the treatment of non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, D N

    2015-01-01

    Tasimelteon (Hetlioz®), a melatonin receptor agonist, is the first, and, at the time of the publication, the only drug to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder (non-24). This circadian rhythm disorder occurs most commonly in blind individuals without light perception, and it results from their inability to entrain to the 24-hour photoperiod, although the indication does not specify a particular patient population. Non-24 is characterized by a persistent cycle of nighttime insomnia and daytime sleepiness, alternating with asymptomatic periods depending on an individual's degree of circadian rhythm synchronization with the photoperiod at any particular time. Phase II clinical trials in healthy individuals confirmed the circadian phase-shifting potential of tasimelteon. Phase III trials in totally blind subjects diagnosed with non-24 demonstrated the efficacy of tasimelteon in reducing both nighttime wakefulness and daytime napping. Physiologic monitoring revealed that tasimelteon resulted in a higher proportion of individuals becoming entrained to the 24-hour cycle compared with placebo. Safety assessments indicated that tasimelteon is well tolerated, with the most common adverse events being headache, alanine aminotransferase elevation, nightmares or unusual dreams, and upper respiratory or urinary tract infections. Tasimelteon is available as a capsule in a single 20-mg dose and it must be obtained through Vanda Pharmaceutical's HetliozSolutions program with dispensing through a specialty pharmacy. Safety studies in blind individuals diagnosed with non-24 are ongoing and a future clinical trial with Smith-Magenis syndrome patients is planned. PMID:25685859

  15. Development of an artificial placenta IV: 24 hour venovenous extracorporeal life support in premature lambs.

    PubMed

    Gray, Brian W; El-Sabbagh, Ahmed; Rojas-Pena, Alvaro; Kim, Anne C; Gadepali, Samir; Koch, Kely L; Capizzani, Tony R; Bartlet, Robert H; Mychaliska, George B

    2012-01-01

    An extracorporeal artificial placenta would change the paradigm of treating extremely premature infants. We hypothesized that a venovenous extracorporeal life support (VV-ECLS) artificial placenta would maintain fetal circulation, hemodynamic stability, and adequate gas exchange for 24 hours. A near-term neonatal lamb model (130 days; term = 145 days) was used (n = 9). The right jugular vein was cannulated for VV-ECLS outflow, and an umbilical vein was used for inflow. The circuit included a peristaltic roller pump and a 0.5 m(2) hollow fiber oxygenator. Lambs were maintained on VV-ECLS in an "amniotic bath" for up to 24 hours. Five of nine fetuses survived for 24 hours. In the survivors, average mean arterial pressure was 69 ± 10 mm Hg for the first 4 hours and 36 ± 8 mm Hg for the remaining 20 hours. The mean fetal heart rate was 202 ± 30. Mean VV-ECLS flow was 94 ± 20 ml/kg/min. Using a gas mixture of 50% O(2)/3% CO(2) and sweep flow of 1-2 L/min, the mean pH was 7.27 ± 0.09, with Po(2) of 35 ± 12 mm Hg and Pco(2) of 48 ± 12 mm Hg. Necropsy revealed a patent ductus arteriosus in all cases, and there was no gross or microscopic intracranial hemorrhage. Complications in failed attempts included technically difficult cannulation and multisystem organ failure. Future studies will enhance stability and address the factors necessary for long-term support. PMID:22370685

  16. [Electrocardiographic recording of long duration (Holter) of 24 hours during idiopathic cardiomyopathy of the peripartum].

    PubMed

    Diao, M; Diop, I B; Kane, A; Camara, S; Kane, Ad; Sarr, M; Ba, S A; Diouf, S M

    2004-01-01

    The idiopathic myocardiopathy of the peripartum (IMPP) is a frequent disease in the Soudano-Sahelian zone of Africa whose evolution is loaded with many complications hemodynamic, thrombo-embolic and rhythmic. The prevalence and the meaning of the rhythm disorders are unknown. The aims of this prospective study are to measure and to describe the prevalence of the anomalies observed in Holter ECG of 24 hours. It's about a description cross-sectional study realized at the Cardiology Department (CHU Dakar) and 19 patients with IMPP were included, from October 2000 to July 2002. A recording ECG of 24 hours (Holter) was realized on all the patients. The average age was 29.4+/-6.9 years with a low socio-economic level (100%). The diagnosis of IMPP done before childbirth in 4 cases (21%) and the post partum on 15 patients (78.9%). The dyspnea was constant, the chest pain in 12 cases (63.1%) and palpitations in 8 cases (42%). The average rate of hemoglobin was of 10.85+/-2.05 g/dL. The standard electrocardiogram recorded a sinusal tachycardia (68.4%), a cavitary hypertrophy (78.8%), and disorders of the repolarization (47.3%). The cardiac echo-Doppler noted a cavitary dilatation (84.2%), a constant alteration of the left ventricular systolic function with a fraction of average ejection of 29.7+/-10.3%. The anatomy of the valves was normal. The recording Holter ECG of 24 hours recorded a sinusal tachycardia in 17 cases (89.4%), ventricular extrasystoles on 7 patients (36.8%), 4 cases of ventricular tachycardia non-sustained and double ventricular extrasystole on 1 patient, auricular extrasystoles in 4 cases (21%) and 1 case of auriculo-ventricular block of the first degree. The study of heart rate variability founded a mean value of 106 ms. PMID:15002707

  17. 24-Hour Rhythms of DNA Methylation and Their Relation with Rhythms of RNA Expression in the Human Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Andrew S. P.; Srivastava, Gyan P.; Yu, Lei; Chibnik, Lori B.; Xu, Jishu; Buchman, Aron S.; Schneider, Julie A.; Myers, Amanda J.; Bennett, David A.; De Jager, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms modulate the biology of many human tissues, including brain tissues, and are driven by a near 24-hour transcriptional feedback loop. These rhythms are paralleled by 24-hour rhythms of large portions of the transcriptome. The role of dynamic DNA methylation in influencing these rhythms is uncertain. While recent work in Neurospora suggests that dynamic site-specific circadian rhythms of DNA methylation may play a role in modulating the fungal molecular clock, such rhythms and their relationship to RNA expression have not, to our knowledge, been elucidated in mammalian tissues, including human brain tissues. We hypothesized that 24-hour rhythms of DNA methylation exist in the human brain, and play a role in driving 24-hour rhythms of RNA expression. We analyzed DNA methylation levels in post-mortem human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from 738 subjects. We assessed for 24-hour rhythmicity of 420,132 DNA methylation sites throughout the genome by considering methylation levels as a function of clock time of death and parameterizing these data using cosine functions. We determined global statistical significance by permutation. We then related rhythms of DNA methylation with rhythms of RNA expression determined by RNA sequencing. We found evidence of significant 24-hour rhythmicity of DNA methylation. Regions near transcription start sites were enriched for high-amplitude rhythmic DNA methylation sites, which were in turn time locked to 24-hour rhythms of RNA expression of nearby genes, with the nadir of methylation preceding peak transcript expression by 1–3 hours. Weak ante-mortem rest-activity rhythms were associated with lower amplitude DNA methylation rhythms as were older age and the presence of Alzheimer's disease. These findings support the hypothesis that 24-hour rhythms of DNA methylation, particularly near transcription start sites, may play a role in driving 24-hour rhythms of gene expression in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and may be affected by age and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25375876

  18. The Presence of Hypothermia within 24 Hours of Sepsis Diagnosis Predicts Persistent Lymphopenia

    PubMed Central

    Drewry, Anne M.; Fuller, Brian M.; Skrupky, Lee P.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether hypothermia within 24 hours of sepsis diagnosis is associated with development of persistent lymphopenia, a feature of sepsis-induced immunosuppression Design Retrospective cohort study Setting 1200-bed university-affiliated tertiary care hospital Patients Adult patients diagnosed with bacteremia and sepsis within 5 days of hospital admission between January 1, 2010 and July 31, 2012 Interventions None Measurements and main results Leukocyte counts were recorded during the first four days following sepsis diagnosis. Persistent lymphopenia was defined as an absolute lymphocyte count less than 1.2 cells/?l x 103 present on the fourth day after diagnosis. Of the 445 septic patients included, 64 (14.4%) developed hypothermia (defined as a body temperature less than 36.0°C) within 24 hours of sepsis diagnosis. Hypothermia was a significant independent predictor of persistent lymphopenia (adjusted OR 2.70 [95% CI 1.10, 6.60], p =.03) after accounting for age, disease severity, comorbidities, source of bacteremia, and type of organism. Compared to the non-hypothermic patients, hypothermic patients had higher 28-day (50.0% vs. 24.9%, p < .001) and 1-year mortality (60.9% vs. 47.0%, p = .001). Conclusions Hypothermia is associated with higher mortality and an increased risk of persistent lymphopenia in septic patients, and it may be an early clinical predictor of sepsis-induced immunosuppression. PMID:25793436

  19. Regional Neurodegeneration and Gliosis Are Amplified by Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Repeated at 24-Hour Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Amanda Nicholle; Saatman, Kathryn Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Most traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) that occur every year are classified as ‘mild’. Individuals involved in high-risk activities may sustain multiple mild TBIs. We evaluated the acute physiological and histopathological consequences of mild TBI in a mouse model, comparing sham injury, single impact, or 5 impacts at a 24- or 48-hour inter-injury interval. A single closed skull impact resulted in bilateral gliosis in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex that was proportional to impact depth. Midline impact, at a depth just above the threshold to induce transient unconsciousness, produced occasional axonal injury and degenerating neurons accompanied by astrogliosis in the entorhinal cortex and cerebellum. Mild TBI repeated every 24 hours resulted in bilateral hemorrhagic lesions in the entorhinal cortex along with significantly increased neurodegeneration and microglial activation despite diminished durations of apnea and unconsciousness with subsequent impacts. Astrogliosis and diffusely distributed axonal injury were also observed bilaterally in the cerebellum and the brainstem. When the interval between mild TBIs was increased to 48 hours, the pathological consequences were comparable to a single TBI. Together, these data suggest that in mice the brain remains at increased risk for damage for 24 hours after mild TBI despite reduced acute physiological responses to subsequent mild impacts. PMID:25232942

  20. Successful orthotopic heart transplantation in dogs after 24 hours of continuous perfusion with Bretschneider HTK cardioplegic solution.

    PubMed

    Dyszkiewicz, W; Flameng, W; Minten, J

    1989-01-01

    In 12 dogs the hearts after excision were perfused for 24 hours with Bretschneider HTK cardioplegic solution. Six of these hearts were used only to assess myocardial HEP and ultrastructure during 24 hours of conservation. In the next six dogs orthotopic heart transplantation was performed to evaluate functional outcome after prolonged preservation. After 24 hours of continuous perfusion of the donor heart the ATP level was completely comparable with control, preischemic value. Also ultrastructure of the myocytes was perfectly preserved. All transplanted hearts recovered completely upon reperfusion without a need of inotropic support. Good functional outcome after transplantation was correlated with about 70% of myocardial HEP content and intact ultrastructure of the myocytes. We concluded that continuous perfusion with Bretschneider HTK cardioplegic solution makes successful heart transplantation possible after 24 hours of preservation. PMID:2517448

  1. 76 FR 14812 - Additional Air Quality Designations for the 2006 24-Hour Fine Particle National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...Additional Air Quality Designations for the 2006 24-Hour Fine Particle National Ambient Air Quality Standards, 110(k)(6) Correction...Quality Designations and Classifications for the Annual Fine Particles National Ambient Air Quality Standards Correction In...

  2. Computerized identification of pathologic duodenogastric reflux using 24-hour gastric pH monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, K H; DeMeester, T R; Hinder, R A; Stein, H J; Barlow, A P; Gupta, N C

    1991-01-01

    Duodenogastric reflux is a naturally occurring sporadic event, the incidence, occurrence, and detrimental effects of which have been difficult to assess. The reliability of 24-hour gastric pH monitoring to detect duodenogastric reflux was studied. Central to the use of pH monitoring for this purpose is confidence in its ability to measure and display pH data in a way that reflects changes in the gastric pH environment with sufficient sensitivity. To test this the gastric pH of 10 dogs was measured in the fasting state, after feeding, and after pentagastrin stimulation. The antrum was more alkaline in the fasting state (p less than 0.01) and the display of data by frequency distribution graph was sensitive enough to reflect induced pH changes. To test the consistency of gastric pH at a given position, simultaneous 24-hour gastric monitoring was performed in 12 normal subjects with two probes placed at either 5 or 10 cm below the lower esophageal sphincter. Only at the 5-cm position did the two probes read within 1 pH unit of each other more than 90% of the time. Based on these principles, gastric pH monitoring was performed 5 cm below the lower esophageal sphincter in 30 normal subjects and 11 patients, fulfilling Ritchie's clinical criteria for pathologic duodenogastric reflux. The data obtained was arranged into 71 variables and subjected to discriminant analysis. Sixteen variables were identified, each with a corresponding coefficient to be used as a multiplier to derive a score. A score of more than +2.2 indicated a high probability of pathologic duodenogastric reflux. The test was applied to a validation population consisting of 10 additional normal subjects and 10 patients meeting Ritchie's criteria. All normal subjects had a normal score and all but one (90%) of the patients had an abnormal score. When compared to O-diisopropyl iminodiacetic acid (DISIDA) scintigraphy in another group of 22 normal subjects and 60 patients, 24-hour gastric pH monitoring was superior in the detection of pathologic duodenogastric reflux. The study shows how the application of computer technology can be used to diagnose pathologic duodenogastric reflux in patients with complex foregut complaints. PMID:1985534

  3. 24 Hour pumping test of production well 905-120P

    SciTech Connect

    Bledsoe, H.W.

    1990-12-01

    As part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Aquifer Characterization Program, the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is attempting to determine the water transmitting characteristics of the different aquifer units underlying the SRS by conducting single well pumping tests on wells installed as part of the SRS Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation. In April 1990, while performing the single well pumping test, an opportunity became available to collect data on aquifer properties utilizing a production well and observation wells. At this time the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) was completing a new production well (well 905-120P) in P-Area. This well, located in close proximity to well cluster P-24, was to undergo a 24-hour performance test by the COE. ESS arranged with the subcontractor working on the Single Well pumping Test project. Dames & Moore, to instrument the appropriate observation wells and to coordinate data collection with the COE.

  4. The Effects of 24-hour Sleep Deprivation on the Exploration-Exploitation Trade-off.

    PubMed

    Glass, Brian D; Maddox, W Todd; Bowen, Christopher; Savarie, Zachary R; Matthews, Michael D; Markman, Arthur B; Schnyer, David M

    2011-04-01

    Sleep deprivation has a complex set of neurological effects that go beyond a mere slowing of mental processes. While cognitive and perceptual impairments in sleep deprived individuals are widespread, some abilities remain intact. In an effort to characterize these effects, some have suggested an impairment of complex decision making ability despite intact ability to follow simple rules. To examine this trade-off, 24-hour total sleep deprived individuals performed two versions of a resource acquisition foraging task, one in which exploration is optimal (to succeed, abandon low value, high saliency options) and another in which exploitation is optimal (to succeed, refrain from switching between options). Sleep deprived subjects exhibited decreased performance on the exploitation task compared to non-sleep deprived controls, yet both groups exhibited increased performance on the exploratory task. These results speak to previous neuropsychological work on cognitive control. PMID:21686036

  5. After 24-hour scrub, another tower rollback for the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    As tower rollback begins, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying the Stardust spacecraft waits on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for the second launch attempt at 4:04 p.m. EST. The original launch was scrubbed on Feb. 6 for 24 hours. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  6. Setting Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for 1 hour or 24 hour contingency exposures to airborne chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Hector D.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Since the early years of the manned space program, NASA has developed and used exposure limits called Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) to help protect astronauts from airborne toxicants. Most of these SMACS are based on an exposure duration of 7 days, since this is the duration of a 'typical' mission. A set of 'contingency SMACs' is also being developed for scenarios involving brief (1-hour or 24- hour) exposures to relatively high levels of airborne toxicants from event-related 'contingency' releases of contaminants. The emergency nature of contingency exposures dictates the use of different criteria for setting exposure limits. The NASA JSC Toxicology Group recently began a program to document the rationales used to set new SMACs and plans to review the older, 7-day SMACs. In cooperation with the National Research Council's Committee on Toxicology, a standard procedure has been developed for researching, setting, and documenting SMAC values.

  7. 24 Hour pumping test of production well 905-120P

    SciTech Connect

    Bledsoe, H.W.

    1990-12-01

    As part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Aquifer Characterization Program, the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is attempting to determine the water transmitting characteristics of the different aquifer units underlying the SRS by conducting single well pumping tests on wells installed as part of the SRS Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation. In April 1990, while performing the single well pumping test, an opportunity became available to collect data on aquifer properties utilizing a production well and observation wells. At this time the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) was completing a new production well (well 905-120P) in P-Area. This well, located in close proximity to well cluster P-24, was to undergo a 24-hour performance test by the COE. ESS arranged with the subcontractor working on the Single Well pumping Test project. Dames Moore, to instrument the appropriate observation wells and to coordinate data collection with the COE.

  8. A 24-Hour Study of the Hypothalamo-Pituitary Axes in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nambron, Rajasree; Costelloe, Seán J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hill, Nathan R.; Frost, Chris; Watt, Hilary C.; Hindmarsh, Peter; Björkqvist, Maria; Warner, Thomas T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Huntington’s disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterised by motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Patients exhibit other symptoms including sleep and mood disturbances, muscle atrophy and weight loss which may be linked to hypothalamic pathology and dysfunction of hypothalamo-pituitary axes. Methods We studied neuroendocrine profiles of corticotropic, somatotropic and gonadotropic hypothalamo-pituitary axes hormones over a 24-hour period in controlled environment in 15 healthy controls, 14 premanifest and 13 stage II/III Huntington’s disease subjects. We also quantified fasting levels of vasopressin, oestradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free total thyroxine, prolactin, adrenaline and noradrenaline. Somatotropic axis hormones, growth hormone releasing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like factor binding protein-3 were quantified at 06:00 (fasting), 15:00 and 23:00. A battery of clinical tests, including neurological rating and function scales were performed. Results 24-hour concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone did not differ significantly between the Huntington’s disease group and controls. Daytime growth hormone secretion was similar in control and Huntington’s disease subjects. Stage II/III Huntington’s disease subjects had lower concentration of post-sleep growth hormone pulse and higher insulin-like growth factor-1:growth hormone ratio which did not reach significance. In Huntington’s disease subjects, baseline levels of hypothalamo-pituitary axis hormones measured did not significantly differ from those of healthy controls. Conclusions The relatively small subject group means that the study may not detect subtle perturbations in hormone concentrations. A targeted study of the somatotropic axis in larger cohorts may be warranted. However, the lack of significant results despite many variables being tested does imply that the majority of them do not differ substantially between HD and controls. PMID:26431314

  9. Heart rate variability and arrhythmic patterns of 24-hour Holter electrocardiography among Nigerians with cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Adebayo, Rasaaq Ayodele; Ikwu, Amanze Nkemjika; Balogun, Michael Olabode; Akintomide, Anthony Olubunmi; Ajayi, Olufemi Eyitayo; Adeyeye, Victor Oladeji; Mene-Afejuku, Tuoyo Omasan; Bamikole, Olaniyi James; Ogunyemi, Suraj Adefabi; Ajibare, Adeola Olubunmi; Oketona, Omolola Abiodun

    2015-01-01

    Background Facilities for Holter electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring in many Nigerian hospitals are limited. There are few published works in Nigeria on the use of 24-hour Holter ECG in cardiac arrhythmic evaluation of patients with cardiovascular diseases. Objective To study the clinical indications, arrhythmic pattern, and heart rate variability (HRV) among subjects referred for 24-hour Holter ECG at our Cardiac Care Unit. Methods Three-hundred and ten patients (134 males and 176 females) were studied consecutively over a 48-month period using Schiller type (MT-101) Holter ECG machine. Results Out of the 310 patients reviewed, 134 were males (43.2%) and 176 were females (56.8%). The commonest indication for Holter ECG was palpitation followed by syncope in 71 (23%) and 49 (15.8%) of subjects, respectively. Premature ventricular complex and premature atrial complex were the commonest types of arrhythmia in 51.5% and 15% subjects, respectively. Ventricular arrhythmia was more prevalent in dilated cardiomyopathy patients (85.7%). The HRV of subjects with palpitation, stroke, and diabetes mellitus with autonomic neuropathy, using standard deviation of normal to normal intervals average (milliseconds), were 107.32±49.61, 79.15±49.15, and 66.50±15.54, respectively. The HRV, using standard deviation of averages of normal to normal intervals average (milliseconds), of patients with palpitation, stroke, and diabetes mellitus with autonomic neuropathy were 77.39±62.34, 57.82±37.05, and 55.50±12.71, respectively. Conclusion Palpitation and syncope were the commonest indications for Holter ECG among our subjects. The commonest arrhythmic patterns were premature ventricular complex and premature atrial complex, with ventricular arrhythmia being more prevalent in dilated cardiomyopathy. There was a reduction in HRV in patients with stroke and diabetic autonomic neuropathy. PMID:26170685

  10. The 24-hour blood pressure pattern: does it have implications for morbidity and mortality?

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael A

    2002-01-24

    The onset of adverse cardiovascular events demonstrates a circadian pattern that reaches a peak in the morning shortly after awakening and arising. A parallel, 24-hour cyclical pattern has also been observed in the activities of various physiologic measurements, including blood pressure, heart rate, sympathetic nervous system activity, and platelet adhesiveness. Although a direct link has not yet been established, it can be postulated that the early morning surge in blood pressure may be a factor in precipitating acute cardiovascular episodes. Similar to the early morning blood pressure surge, blood pressure variability throughout the day appears to be a further independent risk factor for hypertensive target organ damage. Thus, it is reasonable to select an antihypertensive agent that offers smooth and well-sustained blood pressure control for the full 24-hour dosing interval, including the vulnerable early morning period. The results of clinical trials using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring have shown that telmisartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, possesses such properties. Whether or not these attributes of telmisartan might translate into improvements in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality will be explored in the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET). This study will compare the effects of telmisartan 80-mg monotherapy, ramipril 10-mg monotherapy, or a combination of telmisartan 80 mg plus ramipril 10 mg, on cardiovascular endpoints in patients at high risk of cardiovascular events, several of whom are likely to be hypertensive at baseline. Inclusion of the telmisartan plus ramipril treatment arm will allow investigation of the potential advantages presented by combining an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with an angiotensin II receptor antagonist. PMID:11835909

  11. Executive Functions are not Affected by 24 Hours of Sleep Deprivation: A Color-Word Stroop Task Study

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Abhinav; Mittal, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep is an important factor affecting cognitive performance. Sleep deprivation results in fatigue, lack of concentration, confusion and sleepiness along with anxiety, depression and irritability. Sleep deprivation can have serious consequences in professions like armed forces and medicine where quick decisions and actions need to be taken. Color-Word Stroop task is one of the reliable tests to assess attention and it analyzes the processing of information in two dimensions i.e., reading of words and naming of colour. The evidence regarding the effect of sleep deprivation on Stroop interference is conflicting. The present study evaluated the effect of 24 hours of sleep deprivation on reaction time and interference in Stroop task. Materials and Methods: The present study was done on 30 healthy male medical student volunteers in the age group of 18-25 years after taking their consent and clearance from Institute Ethics Committee. Recordings of Stroop task were at three times: baseline (between 7-9 am), after 12 hours (7-9 pm) and after 24 hours (7-9 am, next day). The subjects were allowed to perform normal daily activities. Results: The study revealed a significant increase in reaction time after 24 hours of sleep deprivation in comparison to baseline and after 12 hours of sleep deprivation. There was no significant change in interference and facilitation after sleep deprivation in comparison to baseline. The number of errors also did not show any significant change after sleep deprivation. Conclusion: The study indicated that there was slowing of responses without change in executive functions after 24 hours of sleep deprivation. It is probable that 24 hours of sleep deprivation does not bring about change in areas of brain affecting executive functions in healthy individuals who have normal sleep cycle. The present study indicated that in professions like armed forces and medicine working 24 hours at a stretch can lead to decrease in motor responses without affecting information processing and judgment ability. PMID:25969601

  12. Reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin during 24 hours in patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kristian H; Grove, Erik L; Würtz, Morten; Kristensen, Steen D; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2015-01-01

    Reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin has been reported in patients with type 2 diabetes, and recent studies suggest that once-daily aspirin provides insufficient platelet inhibition. We investigated if the effect of aspirin declined during the 24-hour dosing interval in patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes, and whether this correlated with increased platelet turnover. Furthermore, the intra-individual variation in platelet aggregation was determined during a 28-day period. We included 47 patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes treated with aspirin 75?mg daily. Blood samples were obtained 1 and 24 hours after aspirin intake, and this was repeated three times with a 2-week interval between each visit. Platelet aggregation was evaluated by impedance aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer) using arachidonic acid (1.0?mM) and collagen (3.2?µg/ml) as agonists. Markers of platelet turnover were measured by flow cytometry. Compliance was confirmed by serum thromboxane B2. Platelet aggregation levels measured 1 and 24 hours after aspirin intake were compared using the mean of 1- and 24-hour measurements at the three study visits. The difference in platelet aggregation was 70?±?97?AU?×?min (p?24 hours after aspirin intake (p values 0.06 and 0.07). Median intra-individual variation of platelet aggregation was 9-16%. Patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes had increased platelet aggregation at the end of the 24-hour aspirin dosing interval. Platelet turnover did not correlate significantly with residual platelet aggregation, although a trend was observed. The intra-individual variation of platelet aggregation after aspirin intake was low. PMID:24750015

  13. Importance of all movement behaviors in a 24 hour period for overall health.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Carson, Valerie; Gray, Casey E; Tremblay, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    Physical inactivity and childhood obesity are well-recognized public health concerns that are associated with a range of adverse health outcomes. Historically, the benefits of physical activity (e.g., moderate-to-vigorous physical activity-MVPA) to overall health have dominated discussions and emerging evidence indicates that a broader, more integrated approach is needed to better understand and address current public health crises. Existing guidelines for children and youth around the world only focus on MVPA, and recently sedentary behavior, despite an accumulating body of evidence showing that light-intensity physical activity (LPA) such as walking can provide important health benefits. Furthermore, there is accumulating support for the importance of adequate sleep and that these behaviors moderate the health impact of each other. Ignoring the other components of the movement continuum (i.e., sleep, sedentary time, LPA) while focusing efforts exclusively on MVPA (accounting for <5% of the time in a 24 h period) limits the potential to optimize the health benefits of movement behaviors. In order to address this limitation, experts in Canada are currently developing the world's first Integrated 24 Hour Movement Behaviour Guidelines for Children and Youth to help advance an integrated healthy active living agenda that has the potential to significantly improve the overall health and well-being of children and youth. PMID:25485978

  14. Importance of All Movement Behaviors in a 24 Hour Period for Overall Health

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Carson, Valerie; Gray, Casey E.; Tremblay, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Physical inactivity and childhood obesity are well-recognized public health concerns that are associated with a range of adverse health outcomes. Historically, the benefits of physical activity (e.g., moderate-to-vigorous physical activity—MVPA) to overall health have dominated discussions and emerging evidence indicates that a broader, more integrated approach is needed to better understand and address current public health crises. Existing guidelines for children and youth around the world only focus on MVPA, and recently sedentary behavior, despite an accumulating body of evidence showing that light-intensity physical activity (LPA) such as walking can provide important health benefits. Furthermore, there is accumulating support for the importance of adequate sleep and that these behaviors moderate the health impact of each other. Ignoring the other components of the movement continuum (i.e., sleep, sedentary time, LPA) while focusing efforts exclusively on MVPA (accounting for <5% of the time in a 24 h period) limits the potential to optimize the health benefits of movement behaviors. In order to address this limitation, experts in Canada are currently developing the world’s first Integrated 24 Hour Movement Behaviour Guidelines for Children and Youth to help advance an integrated healthy active living agenda that has the potential to significantly improve the overall health and well-being of children and youth. PMID:25485978

  15. Tasimelteon (Hetlioz™): A New Melatonin Receptor Agonist for the Treatment of Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder.

    PubMed

    Bonacci, Janene M; Venci, Jineane V; Gandhi, Mona A

    2015-10-01

    In January 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration approved tasimelteon (Hetlioz™), a melatonin-receptor agonist for the treatment of non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder. This article provides an overview of the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetic properties, as well as the clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of tasimelteon. Relevant information was identified through a comprehensive literature search of several databases using the key words tasimelteon, Non-24-hour Sleep-Wake disorder, Non-24, and melatonin. Further information was obtained from the tasimelteon package insert, fda.gov, clinicaltrials.gov, briefing materials provided by Vanda Pharmaceuticals, and posters from scientific meetings. PMID:25092604

  16. Randomization to plant-based dietary approaches leads to larger short-term improvements in Dietary Inflammatory Index scores and macronutrient intake compared with diets that contain meat.

    PubMed

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Wirth, Michael D; Shivappa, Nitin; Wingard, Ellen E; Fayad, Raja; Wilcox, Sara; Frongillo, Edward A; Hébert, James R

    2015-02-01

    Studies have examined nutrient differences among people following different plant-based diets. However, all of these studies have been observational. The aim of the present study was to examine differences in nutrient intake and Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) scores among overweight and obese (body mass index 25.0-49.9 kg/m(2)) adults randomized to receive dietary instruction on a vegan (n = 12), vegetarian (n = 13), pescovegetarian (n = 13), semivegetarian (n = 13), or omnivorous (n = 12) diet during a 6-month randomized controlled trial. Nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and DII score were assessed via two 24-hour dietary recalls (Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall) at baseline and at 2 and 6 months. Differences in nutrient intake and the DII were examined using general linear models with follow-up tests at each time point. We hypothesized that individuals randomized to the vegan diet would have lower DII scores and greater improvements in fiber, carbohydrate, fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol at both 2 and 6 months as compared with the other 4 diets. Participants randomized to the vegan diet had significantly greater changes in most macronutrients at both time points, including fat and saturated fat, as well as cholesterol and, at 2 months, fiber, as compared with most of the other diet groups (Ps < .05). Vegan, vegetarian, and pescovegetarian participants all saw significant improvements in the DII score as compared with semivegetarian participants at 2 months (Ps < .05) with no differences at 6 months. Given the greater impact on macronutrients and the DII during the short term, finding ways to provide support for adoption and maintenance of plant-based dietary approaches, such as vegan and vegetarian diets, should be given consideration. PMID:25532675

  17. Weight/age-dependent glucose turnover (GTO) in fed and 24 hour fasted rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, F.J.; Connett, R.J. )

    1990-02-26

    In small animals such as the rat, cardiac output and oxygen consumption are constant with age when normalized to the body surface area but not to body weight (BW). The authors explored this relationship for GTO in pentobarbital-anesthetized fed and 24 hours fasted Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 200 and 55 g. A bolus of 10 {mu}Ci/kg BW of (6-{sup 3}H)-glucose was injected into the carotid artery followed by a constant infusion equal to 1.5 {mu}Ci/minute *kg BW and samples taken from the right atrium every 15 minutes for glucose specific activity (SA) measurements over a 2 period. Steady state measurements of GTO ({mu}mol/minute) plotted as a function of BW (g) revealed GTO to be inversely related in fed rats but independent of BW in fasted rats. Although plasma (glucose) was significantly lower in fasted rats, there were no weight related differences within each group. Fasting decreased GTO across the whole range of body weights; however, the magnitude of the fasting effect was much larger in the smaller animals (50% lower) compared to the larger animals (25% lower). Although the lean body mass is increasing in this range of BW, the decrease in GTO indicates an age/weight-related decrease in glucose utilization which diminishes the effect of fasting as the animal grows. This data explains the inconsistency in the literature regarding the fasting effect on GTO in the rat and emphasizes the importance of weight/age matching of experimental groups to minimize the variability in the data when GTO is of interest.

  18. 24-hour time-dependent aspirin efficacy in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Henry, Patrick; Vermillet, Adeline; Boval, Bernadette; Guyetand, Carine; Petroni, Thibaut; Dillinger, Jean-Guillaume; Sideris, Georgios; Sollier, Claire Bal dit; Drouet, Ludovic

    2011-02-01

    Aspirin-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 acetylation is irreversible and it is assumed that the platelet thromboxane-A2 aggregation pathway is inhibited for at least 24 hours (h) after aspirin ingestion. However, time course of biological efficacy of daily low-dose aspirin has rarely been assessed in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We aimed to assess the 24-h biological efficacy of daily low-dose aspirin in CAD patients. The peak and trough (2 h-24 h) effect of a chronic treatment with once daily dose aspirin were studied in 150 consecutive stable CAD patients. The main outcome measure was light transmission aggregometry (LTA) triggered with 0.5 mg/ml arachidonic acid (AA). In the last 47 consecutive patients, additional tests were conducted at 6, 12, 16, 20 h after last aspirin administration. 4.7% of the patients had significant aggregation (>20% maximal intensity LTA-AA) 2 h after aspirin ingestion and 24.7% at 24 h (p<0.0001). The more precise assessments in the last 47 patients showed that significant platelet aggregation progressively reappeared with time after aspirin intake (2 h--4% of patients, 6 h-- 4%, 12 h--11%, 16 h--16%, 20 h--19% and 24 h--28%). Concordant results were observed using production of thromboxane-B2 and other techniques evaluating AA-induced platelet aggregation/activation. No significant differences were found between lower (75-100 mg/day) and higher (>100 mg/day) dose aspirin. Such aspirin «resistance» at 24 h after ingestion was related to biological inflammatory markers, current smoking and diabetes. In conclusion, once daily aspirin does not provide stable 24-h antiplatelet protection in a significant proportion of CAD patients. Any biological assessment of aspirin efficacy should take time since last aspirin intake into consideration. PMID:21136023

  19. No Enhancement of 24-Hour Visuomotor Skill Retention by Post-Practice Caffeine Administration

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Sara J.; Cole, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is widely consumed throughout the world and appears to indirectly facilitate learning and memory through effects on attention and motivation. Animal work indicates that post-training caffeine administration augments inhibitory avoidance memory, spatial memory, and object memory. In humans, post-training caffeine administration enhances the ability to discern between familiar images and new, similar images. However, the effect of post-training caffeine administration on motor memory has not been examined. Therefore, we tested two groups of low caffeine consumers (average weekly consumption ?500 mg) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving acquisition of a continuous isometric visuomotor tracking skill. On Day 1, subjects completed 5 blocks (150 repetitions) of training on the continuous isometric visuomotor skill and subsequently ingested either 200 mg of caffeine or placebo. On day 2, subjects completed an additional 5 blocks of training. Day 1 mean performance and performance variability were both similar between groups, suggesting that both groups acquired the motor skill similarly. For mean performance on Day 2, patterns of re-learning, mean performance learning magnitudes, mean performance learning rates, and mean performance retention magnitudes were all similar between groups. For performance variability on Day 2, there was a small trend towards increased variability in the caffeine group during re-learning, but performance variability learning magnitudes and performance variability retention magnitudes did not differ between groups. Because motor skill acquisition can also be conceptualized as a reduction in performance variability, these results suggest that there may be a small negative effect of post-practice caffeine administration on memory of a newly-learned visuomotor skill. Overall, we found no evidence to suggest that post-training caffeine administration enhances 24-hour retention of a newly-learned continuous visuomotor skill, and these results support the notion that memory-enhancing effects of post-training caffeine ingestion may be task-specific. PMID:26053288

  20. Protein synthesis and energy metabolism in hippocampal slices during extended (24 hours) recovery following different periods of ischemia.

    PubMed

    Djuricic, B; Berger, R; Paschen, W

    1994-12-01

    Hippocampal slices were successfully maintained for 24 hours in vitro in a flow-through chamber by using a modified artificial CSF (amino acids included). Measurement of energy metabolism parameters (adenine nucleotides) and the slice response to KCl-induced depolarization (release of GABA and aspartate) indicated that hippocampal slices were metabolically stable for at least 24 hours. The preparation was used to study recovery of protein synthesis after different periods of in vitro ischemia (5, 10, or 15 min). Protein synthesis inhibition was only partly reversed after 15 min of ischemia, but fully reversible after 5- or 10-min ischemia at 24 hours of recovery. Furthermore, the model was used to study a possible role of glutamate in postischemic inhibition of protein synthesis. Glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate or quinolinic acid) or antagonist (kynurenic acid) were applied during ischemia. Neither treatment affected the late (24 hours) outcome of ischemia, arguing against the critical role of glutamate in ischemic cell damage. The present approach allows use of the hippocampal slice preparation in the study of delayed effects of ischemia of different duration. PMID:7898404

  1. 77 FR 65310 - Additional Air Quality Designations for the 2006 24-Hour Fine Particle National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... Federal Regulations DC District of Columbia EO Executive Order EPA Environmental Protection Agency FR... EPA finalized designations for the 2006 24-hour PM 2.5 NAAQS (74 FR 58688, November 13, 2009), the EPA... near the deferred counties. On February 3, 2011 (76 FR 6056),\\1\\ the EPA took action to...

  2. Population Pharmacokinetic Model Characterizing 24-Hour Variation in the Pharmacokinetics of Oral and Intravenous Midazolam in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    van Rongen, A; Kervezee, L; Brill, MJE; van Meir, H; den Hartigh, J; Guchelaar, H-J; Meijer, JH; Burggraaf, J; van Oosterhout, F

    2015-01-01

    Daily rhythms in physiology may affect the pharmacokinetics of a drug. The aim of this study was to evaluate 24-hour variation in the pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A substrate midazolam. Oral (2 mg) and intravenous (1 mg) midazolam was administered at six timepoints throughout the 24-hour period in 12 healthy volunteers. Oral bioavailability (population mean value [RSE%] of 0.28 (7.1%)) showed 24-hour variation that was best parameterized as a cosine function with an amplitude of 0.04 (17.3%) and a peak at 12:14 in the afternoon. The absorption rate constant was 1.41 (4.7%) times increased after drug administration at 14:00. Clearance (0.38 L/min (4.8%)) showed a minor 24-hour variation with an amplitude of 0.03 (14.8%) L/min and a peak at 18:50. Simulations show that dosing time minimally affects the concentration time profiles after intravenous administration, while concentrations are higher during the day compared to the night after oral dosing, reflecting considerable variation in intestinal processes. PMID:26380154

  3. Dietary adherence and acceptability of five different diets, including vegan and vegetarian diets, for weight loss: The New DIETs study.

    PubMed

    Moore, Wendy J; McGrievy, Michael E; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine dietary adherence and acceptability among participants from the New DIETs study who were randomized to one of four plant-based diets (vegan, vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian) or an omnivore diet. Primary outcomes at two- and six months included dietary adherence (24-hour dietary recalls), weight loss and changes in animal product intake (mg cholesterol) by adherence status, Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), Power of Food Scale (PFS), dietary acceptability (Food Acceptability Questionnaire), and impact of diet preference on adherence. No differences were found in dietary adherence or changes in FAQ, TFEQ, or PFS among the groups. At six months, non-adherent vegan and vegetarian participants (n=16) had a significantly greater decrease in cholesterol intake (-190.2±199.2mg) than non-adherent pesco-vegetarian/semi-vegetarian (n=15, -2.3±200.3mg, P=0.02) or omnivore participants (n=7, 17.0±36.0, P=0.04). Non-adherent vegan/vegetarian participants lost significantly more weight at six months (-6.0±6.7%) than non-adherent omnivore participants (-0.4±0.6%, P=0.04). Dietary preference had no impact on adherence at six months. Due to equal rates of adherence and acceptability among the diet groups, instructing participants to follow vegan or vegetarian diets may have a greater impact on weight loss and animal product intake than providing instruction in more moderate approaches even among non-adherent participants. PMID:26164391

  4. Diet-Beverage Consumption and Caloric Intake Among US Adults, Overall and by Body Weight

    PubMed Central

    Bleich, Sara N.; Wolfson, Julia A.; Vine, Seanna; Wang, Y. Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined national patterns in adult diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake by body-weight status. Methods. We analyzed 24-hour dietary recall with National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2010 data (adults aged ??20 years; n?=?23?965). Results. Overall, 11% of healthy-weight, 19% of overweight, and 22% of obese adults drink diet beverages. Total caloric intake was higher among adults consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) compared with diet beverages (2351 kcal/day vs 2203 kcal/day; P?=?.005). However, the difference was only significant for healthy-weight adults (2302 kcal/day vs 2095 kcal/day; P?diet beverages compared with SSBs (overweight: 1965 kcal/day vs 1874 kcal/day; P?=?.03; obese: 2058 kcal/day vs 1897 kcal/day; P?diet-beverage consumption was 88 kilocalories for overweight and 194 kilocalories for obese adults. Conclusions. Overweight and obese adults drink more diet beverages than healthy-weight adults and consume significantly more solid-food calories and a comparable total calories than overweight and obese adults who drink SSBs. Heavier US adults who drink diet beverages will need to reduce solid-food calorie consumption to lose weight. PMID:24432876

  5. Analysis of 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Children With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kun-Tai; Chiu, Shuenn-Nan; Weng, Wen-Chin; Lee, Pei-Lin; Hsu, Wei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, we aimed to verify associations between ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a hospital-based population. This was a cross-sectional observational study on children aged 4 to 16 years with OSA-related symptoms from a tertiary referral medical center. All children received overnight polysomnography and 24-hour recording of ABP. Severity of the disease was classified as primary snoring (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI <1), mild OSA (AHI 1–5), and moderate-to-severe OSA (AHI >5). For 195 children enrolled in this study (mean age, 7.8?±?3.4 years; 69% boy), ABP increased as severity of OSA increased. During daytime, children with moderate-to-severe OSA had significantly higher systolic blood pressure (BP) (117.0?±?12.7 vs 110.5?±?9.3?mmHg), mean arterial pressure (MAP) (85.6?±?8.1 vs 81.6?±?6.8?mmHg), and diastolic BP load (12.0?±?9.6 vs 8.4?±?10.9?mmHg) compared with children with primary snoring. During nighttime, children with moderate-to-severe OSA had significantly higher systolic BP (108.6?±?15.0 vs 100.0?±?9.4?mmHg), MAP (75.9?±?9.6 vs 71.1?±?7.0?mmHg), systolic BP load (44.0?±?32.6 vs 26.8?±?24.5?mmHg), systolic BP index (0.5?±?13.1 vs ?6.8?±?8.5?mmHg), and higher prevalence of systolic hypertension (47.6% vs 14.7 %) compared with children with primary snoring. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed an independent association between AHI and nighttime systolic BP and MAP after adjusting for adiposity variables. This large hospital-based study showed that children with moderate-to-severe OSA had a higher ABP compared with children who were primary snorers. As elevated BP in childhood predicts future cardiovascular risks, children with severe OSA should be treated properly to prevent further adverse cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:26448004

  6. Characterisation of sleep in intensive care using 24-hour polysomnography: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many intensive care patients experience sleep disruption potentially related to noise, light and treatment interventions. The purpose of this study was to characterise, in terms of quantity and quality, the sleep of intensive care patients, taking into account the impact of environmental factors. Methods This observational study was conducted in the adult ICU of a tertiary referral hospital in Australia, enrolling 57 patients. Polysomnography (PSG) was performed over a 24-hour period to assess the quantity (total sleep time: hh:mm) and quality (percentage per stage, duration of sleep episode) of patients' sleep while in ICU. Rechtschaffen and Kales criteria were used to categorise sleep. Interrater checks were performed. Sound pressure and illuminance levels and care events were simultaneously recorded. Patients reported on their sleep quality in ICU using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire and the Sleep in Intensive Care Questionnaire. Data were summarised using frequencies and proportions or measures of central tendency and dispersion as appropriate and Cohen's Kappa statistic was used for interrater reliability of the sleep data analysis. Results Patients' median total sleep time was 05:00 (IQR: 02:52 to 07:14). The majority of sleep was stage 1 and 2 (medians: 19 and 73%) with scant slow wave and REM sleep. The median duration of sleep without waking was 00:03. Sound levels were high (mean Leq 53.95 dB(A) during the day and 50.20 dB(A) at night) and illuminance levels were appropriate at night (median <2 lux) but low during the day (median: 74.20 lux). There was a median 1.7 care events/h. Patients' mean self-reported sleep quality was poor. Interrater reliability of sleep staging was highest for slow wave sleep and lowest for stage 1 sleep. Conclusions The quantity and quality of sleep in intensive care patients are poor and may be related to noise, critical illness itself and treatment events that disturb sleep. The study highlights the challenge of quantifying sleep in the critical care setting and the need for alternative methods of measuring sleep. The results suggest that a sound reduction program is required and other interventions to improve clinical practices to promote sleep in intensive care patients. Trial registration Australian New Zealand clinical trial registry (http://www.anzctr.org.au/): ACTRN12610000688088. PMID:23506782

  7. Obstetric characteristics in parturient women with newborns dying during the first 24 hours of life in Maputo.

    PubMed

    Bergström, S; Schmauch, A

    1993-06-01

    A case-control study of parturient women with newborns dying during the first 24 hours of life was undertaken at the Maputo Central Hospital. A total of 36 such parturients were recruited on a consecutive basis. For each case woman two referent women randomly selected among parturients with newborns surviving the first 24 hours of life were recruited. Parturients suffering neonatal loss had, in relation to their referents, a similar number of previous pregnancies but significantly fewer surviving children, lower average gestational length, lower average fundal height at birth, longer duration of membrane rupture, fewer normal, cephalic vaginal deliveries, and much lower birthweight. Parturient women suffering from early neonatal loss in this setting represent a more vulnerable segment of the population than their referents. Their newborns suffer from a shorter gestational length and from a more prolonged duration of membrane rupture than newborns from referents. PMID:8326535

  8. A Case Report on Dyskinesia Following Rivastigmine Patch 13.3?mg/24?hours for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Maria Cristina B.; Rosales, Raymond L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current reports on movement disorder adverse effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors only include extrapyramidal symptoms and myoclonus. Here is a case of an 81-year-old female Filipino with dementia who presented with first-onset generalized choreiform movements. The etiology of the clinical finding of dyskinesia was investigated through laboratories, neuroimaging, and electroencephalogram, all of which yielded negative results. Review of her medications included the rivastigmine (Exelon) patch, which had just been increased to 13.3?mg/24-hour-dose 3 months prior. With all other possible causes excluded, a trial discontinuation of rivastigmine, showed decreased frequency of the dyskinesia 48?hours after, with complete resolution after 6 days, and no recurrence since then. This case thus presents a probable association or causality between the choreiform movement and rivastigmine at 13.3?mg/24-hour-dose patch because of clear temporal proximity, lack of alternative explanations, and a reversal of the dyskinesia upon medicament discontinuation. PMID:26313774

  9. Changes in platelet morphology and function during 24 hours of storage.

    PubMed

    Braune, S; Walter, M; Schulze, F; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2014-01-01

    For in vitro studies assessing the interaction of platelets with implant materials, common and standardized protocols for the preparation of platelet rich plasma (PRP) are lacking, which may lead to non-matching results due to the diversity of applied protocols. Particularly, the aging of platelets during prolonged preparation and storage times is discussed to lead to an underestimation of the material thrombogenicity. Here, we study the influence of whole blood- and PRP-storage times on changes in platelet morphology and function. Blood from apparently healthy subjects was collected according to a standardized protocol and examined immediately after blood collection, four hours and twenty four hours later. The capability of platelets to adhere and form stable aggregates (PFA100, closure time) was examined in sodium citrate anticoagulated whole blood (WB) using the agonists equine type I collagen and epinephrine bitartrate (collagen/epinephrine) as well as equine type I collagen and adenosine-5'-diphosphate (collagen/ADP). Circulating platelets were quantified at each time point. Morphology of platelets and platelet aggregates were visualized microscopically and measured using an electric field multi-channel counting system (CASY). The percentage of activated platelets was assessed by means of P-selectin (CD62P) expression of circulating platelets. Furthermore, platelet factor 4 (PF4) release was measured in platelet poor plasma (PPP) at each time point. Whole blood PFA100 closure times increased after stimulation with collagen/ADP and collagen/epinephrine. Twenty four hours after blood collection, both parameters were prolonged pathologically above the upper limit of the reference range. Numbers of circulating platelets, measured in PRP, decreased after four hours, but no longer after twenty four hours. Mean platelet volumes (MPV) and platelet large cell ratios (P-LCR, 12 fL - 40 fL) decreased over time. Immediately after blood collection, no debris or platelet aggregates could be visualized microscopically. After four hours, first debris and very small aggregates occurred. After 24 hours, platelet aggregates and also debris progressively increased. In accordance to this, the CASY system revealed an increase of platelet aggregates (up to 90 ?m diameter) with increasing storage time. The percentage of CD62P positive platelets and PF4 increased significantly with storage time in resting PRP. When soluble ADP was added to stored PRP samples, the number of activatable platelets decreased significantly over storage time. The present study reveals the importance of a consequent standardization in the preparation of WB and PRP. Platelet morphology and function, particularly platelet reactivity to adherent or soluble agonists in their surrounding milieu, changed rapidly outside the vascular system. This knowledge is of crucial interest, particularly in the field of biomaterial development for cardiovascular applications, and may help to define common standards in the in vitro hemocompatibility testing of biomaterials. PMID:25227196

  10. Assessment of 24-hours Aldosterone Administration on Protein Abundances in Fluorescence-Sorted Mouse Distal Renal Tubules by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas B; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D; Jensen, Uffe B; Fenton, Robert A; Praetorius, Helle A; Knepper, Mark A; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Aldosterone exerts multiple long-term effects in the distal renal tubules. The aim of this study was to establish a method for identifying proteins in these tubules that change in abundance by only 24-hours aldosterone administration. Methods Mice endogenously expressing green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in the connecting tubule and cortical collecting ducts were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 2.0 mg/kg aldosterone or vehicle (n=5), and sacrificed 24 hours later. Suspensions of single cells were obtained enzymatically, and eGFP positive cells were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Samples of 100 ?g proteins were digested with trypsin and labeled with 8-plex iTRAQ reagents and processed for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results FACS yielded 1.4 million cells per mouse. The LC-MS/MS spectra were matched to peptides by the SEQUEST search algorithm, which identified 3002 peptides corresponding to 506 unique proteins of which 20 significantly changed abundance 24-hours after aldosterone injection. Conclusion We find the method suitable and useful for studying hormonal effects on protein abundance in distal tubular segments. PMID:23428628

  11. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CLEANING: 24 HOUR FOOD DIARY (HAND ENTRY) (UA-D-40.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the SOP is to define the particular steps involved in cleaning the electronic data generated from data entry of the 24 Hour Food Diary. The procedure was developed to use during the Arizona NHEXAS project and the "Border" study. Keywords: data; cleaning; 24 hour ...

  12. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CODING: 24-HOUR FOOD DIARY (HAND ENTRY) (UA-D-39.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to define the coding strategy for the 24-Hour Food Diary. This diary was developed for use during the Arizona NHEXAS project and the "Border" study. Keywords: data; coding; 24-hour food diary.

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) i...

  13. Beverages in the diets of American teenagers.

    PubMed

    Guenther, P M

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of beverages, particularly soft drinks, in the diets of American teenagers by analyzing data collected in the Nationwide Food Consumption Survey, 1977-78. Interviewers obtained 24-hour recalls of dietary intake, and respondents completed diet records for the following 2 days. Variation in beverage intake was examined by eating occasion, season, day of the week, region, urbanization, race, age, sex, and household income. Soft drink and milk intakes were negatively correlated (r = -.22). Soft drinks were just as likely to be drunk at lunch or supper as for snacks. Those results suggest that teenagers may have substituted soft drinks for milk at meals. The nutritional impact of soft drink consumption was assessed by determining the part correlations of soft drink intake with intakes of energy and 14 nutrients, while controlling for 19 variables related to time, location, and personal and household characteristics. The negative part correlations of soft drink intake with intakes of calcium (-0.11), magnesium (-0.06), riboflavin (-0.09), vitamin A (-0.08), and ascorbic acid (-0.06) indicate that soft drinks may contribute to low intakes of those nutrients by some teenagers. PMID:3958400

  14. Iron and zinc content of selected foods in the diet of schoolchildren in Kumi district, east of Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron and zinc are essential micronutrients for humans and deficiency of the two elements is widespread in the world with the highest prevalence in less developed countries. There are few data on dietary intake of iron and zinc in Uganda, and no food composition table is available. There is hardly any widely published literature that clearly documents the quality of Ugandan children's diet. Thus information of both food intake and the concentration of these trace elements in local food ingredients are needed in order to assess daily intake. Methods The present study focused on the iron and zinc content in selected foods and intake of the micronutrients iron and zinc among schoolchildren in Kumi District, Uganda. Over a period of 4 weeks single 24-hour dietary recall interviews were carried out on a convenience sample of 178 schoolchildren (9-15 years old). Data from the dietary recalls was used when selecting foods for chemical analysis. Results Results from this study showed that the iron concentrations varied, and were high in some cereals and vegetables. The zinc concentrations in foods generally corresponded with results from other African countries (Mali and Kenya). Data from the 24-hour dietary recall showed that the daily Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) was met for iron but not for zinc. Conclusions The schoolchildren of Kumi district had a predominantly vegetable based diet. Foods of animal origin were consumed occasionally. The iron content in the selected foods was high and variable, and higher than in similar ingredients from Kenya and Mali, while the zinc concentrations were generally in accordance with reported values. The total daily zinc (mg) intake does not meet the daily RNI. The iron intake is adequate according to RNI, but due to iron contamination and reduced bioavailability, RNI may not be met in a vegetable based diet. More studies are needed to investigate possible sources of contamination. PMID:21827701

  15. Are energy dense diets also nutrient dense?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some beverages are nutrient dense, but they are often excluded from nutrient density calculations. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the energy-nutrient association changed when beverages were included in these calculations. Applying a cross-sectional design, a 24-hour dietary recall ...

  16. Assessment of the accuracy of portion size reports using computer-based food photographs aids in the development of an automated self-administered 24-hour recall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study is to assess the accuracy of portion-size estimates and participant preferences using various presentations of digital images. Two observational feeding studies were conducted. In both, each participant selected and consumed foods for breakfast and lunch, buffet style, se...

  17. Developing a Method to Test the Validity of 24 Hour Time Use Diaries Using Wearable Cameras: A Feasibility Pilot

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Paul; Thomas, Emma; Doherty, Aiden; Harms, Teresa; Burke, Órlaith; Gershuny, Jonathan; Foster, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Self-report time use diaries collect a continuous sequenced record of daily activities but the validity of the data they produce is uncertain. This study tests the feasibility of using wearable cameras to generate, through image prompted interview, reconstructed 'near-objective' data to assess their validity. 16 volunteers completed the Harmonised European Time Use Survey (HETUS) diary and used an Autographer wearable camera (recording images at approximately 15 second intervals) for the waking hours of the same 24-hour period. Participants then completed an interview in which visual images were used as prompts to reconstruct a record of activities for comparison with the diary record. 14 participants complied with the full collection protocol. We compared time use and number of discrete activities from the diary and camera records (using 10 classifications of activity). In terms of aggregate totals of daily time use we found no significant difference between the diary and camera data. In terms of number of discrete activities, participants reported a mean of 19.2 activities per day in the diaries, while image prompted interviews revealed 41.1 activities per day. The visualisations of the individual activity sequences reveal some potentially important differences between the two record types, which will be explored at the next project stage. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using wearable cameras to reconstruct time use through image prompted interview in order to test the concurrent validity of 24-hour activity time-use budgets. In future we need a suitably powered study to assess the validity and reliability of 24-hour time use diaries. PMID:26633807

  18. Axial Diffusivity of the Corona Radiata at 24 Hours Post-Stroke: A New Biomarker for Motor and Global Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Eric; Amor-Sahli, Mélika; Perlbarg, Vincent; Pires, Christine; Crozier, Sophie; Galanaud, Damien; Valabregue, Romain; Yger, Marion; Baronnet-Chauvet, Flore; Samson, Yves; Dormont, Didier; Rosso, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Fractional anisotropy (FA) is an effective marker of motor outcome at the chronic stage of stroke yet proves to be less efficient at early time points. This study aims to determine which diffusion metric in which location is the best marker of long-term stroke outcome after thrombolysis with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 24 hours post-stroke. Twenty-eight thrombolyzed patients underwent DTI at 24 hours post-stroke onset. Ipsilesional and contralesional FA, mean (MD), axial (AD), and radial (RD) diffusivities values were calculated in different Regions-of-Interest (ROIs): (1) the white matter underlying the precentral gyrus (M1), (2) the corona radiata (CoRad), (3) the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) and (4) the cerebral peduncles (CP). NIHSS scores were acquired at admission, day 1, and day 7; modified Rankin Scores (mRS) at 3 months. Significant decreases were found in FA, MD, and AD of the ipsilesional CoRad and M1. MD and AD were also significantly lower in the PLIC. The ratio of ipsi and contralesional AD of the CoRad (CoRad-rAD) was the strongest diffusion parameter correlated with motor NIHSS scores on day 7 and with the mRS at 3 months. A Receiver-Operator Curve analysis yielded a model for the CoRad-rAD to predict good outcome based on upper limb NIHSS motor scores and mRS with high specificity and sensitivity. FA values were not correlated with clinical outcome. In conclusion, axial diffusivity of the CoRad from clinical DTI at 24 hours post-stroke is the most appropriate diffusion metric for quantifying stroke damage to predict outcome, suggesting the importance of early axonal damage. PMID:26562509

  19. Caffeine does not entrain the circadian clock but improves daytime alertness in blind patients with non-24-hour rhythms

    PubMed Central

    St. Hilaire, Melissa A.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective/Background Totally blind individuals are highly likely to suffer from Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder due to a failure of light to reset the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. In this outpatient case series, we investigated whether daily caffeine administration could entrain the circadian pacemaker in non-entrained blind patients to alleviate symptoms of non-24-hour sleep–wake disorder. Patients/Methods Three totally blind males (63.0?±?7.5 years old) were studied at home over ~4 months. Urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) rhythms were measured for 48?h every 1–2 weeks. Participants completed daily sleep–wake logs, and rated their alertness and mood using nine-point scales every ~2–4?h while awake on urine sampling days. Caffeine capsules (150?mg per os) were self-administered daily at 10 a.m. for approximately one circadian beat cycle based on each participant's endogenous circadian period ? and compared to placebo (n?=?2) or no treatment (n?=?1) in a single-masked manner. Results Non-24-h aMT6s rhythms were confirmed in all three participants (? range?=?24.32–24.57?h). Daily administration of 150?mg caffeine did not entrain the circadian clock. Caffeine treatment significantly improved daytime alertness at adverse circadian phases (p?24-Hour Sleep–Wake Disorder in the blind appropriately. PMID:25891543

  20. The Effect of Lateral Decubitus Position on Nocturnal Intraocular Pressure over a Habitual 24-Hour Period in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jie; Zhen, Yi; Wang, Hao; Yang, Diya; Wang, Ningli

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of lateral decubitus position (LDP) on nocturnal intraocular pressure (IOP) and the effect of LDP on 24-hour habitual IOP pattern in healthy subjects. Methods Intraocular pressure was measured every 2-hours using an Accupen Applanation Tonometer (Accutome, USA). During the diurnal period (7:30 am, 9:30 am, 11:30 am, 1:30 pm, 3:30 pm, 5:30 pm, 7:30 pm, and 9:30 pm), IOP was measured in the sitting position under bright light (500–1000 lux) after the subjects had been seated for 5 min. The nocturnal IOP was measured in the supine position, right LDP, and left LDP, with randomized sequences, under dim light (<10 lux) at 11:30 pm, 1:30 am, 3:30 am, and 5:30 am. The subjects were awakened and maintained each position for 5 min before the measurement. The 24-hour habitual IOP patterns were obtained according to the nocturnal position (supine, right LDP and left LDP) for either eye. P<0.05 was considered to be significant. Results Nineteen healthy subjects were included with a mean age of 51.3±5.8 years. During the nocturnal period, a significant IOP difference was found between the dependent eye (the eye on the lower side) of LDP and the supine position, but not for all the nocturnal time points. Over a 24-hour period, the effect of LDP on habitual IOP pattern was not statistically significant, although the mean nocturnal IOP and the diurnal-nocturnal IOP change for the right and the left eye in the LDP pattern was slightly higher than that in the sitting-supine pattern. Conclusion Significant nocturnal IOP differences existed between the dependent eye and the supine, but did not occur consistently for all time points. Over a 24-hour period, the effect of LDP on habitual IOP pattern was not statistically significant in healthy subjects. PMID:25423190

  1. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Augments Perceptual Sensitivity and 24-Hour Retention in a Complex Threat Detection Task

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Brian; Coffman, Brian A.; Clark, Vincent P.; Parasuraman, Raja

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improved performance of a complex visual perceptual learning task (Clark et al. 2012). However, it is not known whether tDCS can enhance perceptual sensitivity independently of non-specific, arousal-linked changes in response bias, nor whether any such sensitivity benefit can be retained over time. We examined the influence of stimulation of the right inferior frontal cortex using tDCS on perceptual learning and retention in 37 healthy participants, using signal detection theory to distinguish effects on perceptual sensitivity (d?) from response bias (ß). Anodal stimulation with 2 mA increased d?, compared to a 0.1 mA sham stimulation control, with no effect on ß. On completion of training, participants in the active stimulation group had more than double the perceptual sensitivity of the control group. Furthermore, the performance enhancement was maintained for 24 hours. The results show that tDCS augments both skill acquisition and retention in a complex detection task and that the benefits are rooted in an improvement in sensitivity (d?), rather than changes in response bias (ß). Stimulation-driven acceleration of learning and its retention over 24 hours may result from increased activation of prefrontal cortical regions that provide top-down attentional control signals to object recognition areas. PMID:22511978

  2. Enhanced carotid-cardiac baroreflex response and elimination of orthostatic hypotension 24 hours after acute exercise in paraplegics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Shea, J. D.; Doerr, D. F.; Convertino, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that an acute bout of maximal exercise can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension consequent to prolonged wheelchair confinement, we evaluated heart rate (HR), systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure responses during 15 minutes of 70 degrees head-up tilt (HUT) in 10 paraplegic subjects 24 hours after arm crank exercise designed to elicit maximal effort, and during a control (no exercise) conditions. Additionally, the carotid baroreceptor stimulus-cardiac response relationship was determined by measurement of R-R interval during external application of graded pressures to the carotid sinuses. One week separated the treatment conditions. The maximum slope of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response was increased (p = 0.049) by exercise (6.2 +/- 1.7 msec/mmHg) compared to control (3.3 +/- 0.6). During control HUT, HR increased from 61 +/- 1 to 90 +/- 7 bpm (p = 0.001) while SBP decreased from 118 +/- 5 to 106 +/- 9 mmHg (p = 0.025). During HUT 24 hours after exercise, HR increased from 60 +/- 2 to 90 +/- 4 bpm (p = 0.001), but the reduction in SBP was essentially eliminated (116 +/- 5 to 113 +/- 5 mmHg).

  3. Device recalls and the recalling company's website.

    PubMed

    Hyman, William A

    2011-01-01

    An ongoing issue with respect to medical device recalls is getting the information to the right people in a timely manner so that appropriate action can be taken. For Class I recalls, this is often addressed by one or more means of professional and public communications, including after-the-fact posting of such recalls by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). One resource that could be included in a recall strategy is the recalling company's own website where the information could be readily available in close association with other information on the product, and where it would be readily found by someone making a product specific inquiry. However an investigation of 13 Class I recalls from the 4th quarter of 2010 shows that only four of these included a web presence, and even among these, the recall information was not necessarily easily found, nor closely linked, to other product information. PMID:21950445

  4. A 24-hour Approach to the Study of Health Behaviors: Temporal Relationships between Waking Health Behaviors and Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Irish, Leah A.; Kline, Christopher E.; Rothenberger, Scott D.; Krafty, Robert T.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Zheng, Huiyong; Hall, Martica H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although sleep is often associated with waking health behaviors (WHB) such as alcohol consumption, caffeine use, smoking, and exercise, the causal direction of these relationships is unclear. Purpose The present study used time-series data to examine the temporal dynamics of WHB and sleep characteristics in participants of the SWAN Sleep Study. Methods 303 women completed daily assessments of WHB and wore wrist actigraphs to measure sleep characteristics for the duration of the study (Mean=29.42 days, SD=6.71). Results Vector autoregressive modeling revealed that weekly patterns of sleep and WHB best predicted subsequent sleep and WHB, suggesting that the associations between WHB and sleep persist beyond their immediate influence. Some WHB predicted some subsequent sleep characteristics, but sleep did not predict subsequent WHB. Conclusions These novel findings provide insight into the temporal dynamics of 24-hour behaviors and encourage consideration of both sleep and WHB in health promotion and behavior change efforts. PMID:24043549

  5. Cross-Sectional Study of 24-Hour Urinary Electrolyte Excretion and Associated Health Outcomes in a Convenience Sample of Australian Primary Schoolchildren: The Salt and Other Nutrients in Children (SONIC) Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Janet R; Campbell, Karen J; Riddell, Lynn J; Rigo, Manuela; Liem, Djin Gie; Keast, Russell S; He, Feng J; Nowson, Caryl A

    2015-01-01

    Background Dietary sodium and potassium are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Data exploring the cardiovascular outcomes associated with these electrolytes within Australian children is sparse. Furthermore, an objective measure of sodium and potassium intake within this group is lacking. Objective The primary aim of the Salt and Other Nutrient Intakes in Children (“SONIC”) study was to measure sodium and potassium intakes in a sample of primary schoolchildren located in Victoria, Australia, using 24-hour urine collections. Secondary aims were to identify the dietary sources of sodium and potassium, examine the association between these electrolytes and cardiovascular risk factors, and assess children’s taste preferences and saltiness perception of manufactured foods. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a convenience sample of schoolchildren attending primary schools in Victoria, Australia. Participants completed one 24-hour urine collection, which was analyzed for sodium, potassium, and creatinine. Completeness of collections was assessed using collection time, total volume, and urinary creatinine. One 24-hour dietary recall was completed to assess dietary intake. Other data collected included blood pressure, body weight, height, waist and hip circumference. Children were also presented with high and low sodium variants of food products and asked to discriminate salt level and choose their preferred variant. Parents provided demographic information and information on use of discretionary salt. Descriptive statistics will be used to describe sodium and potassium intakes. Linear and logistic regression models with clustered robust standard errors will be used to assess the association between electrolyte intake and health outcomes (blood pressure and body mass index/BMI z-score and waist circumference) and to assess differences in taste preference and discrimination between high and low sodium foods, and correlations between preference, sodium intake, and covariates. Results A total of 780 children across 43 schools participated. The results from this study are expected at the end of 2015. Conclusions This study will provide the first objective measure of sodium and potassium intake in Australian schoolchildren and improve our understanding of the relationship of these electrolytes to cardiovascular risk factors. Furthermore, this study will provide insight into child taste preferences and explore related factors. Given the cardiovascular implications of consuming too much sodium and too little potassium, monitoring of these nutrients during childhood is an important public health initiative. PMID:25592666

  6. The prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in 24-hour ultra-mountain bikers, 24-hour ultra-runners and multi-stage ultra-mountain bikers in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) in two 24-hour mountain bike (MTB) (R1,R2), one 24-hour running (R3) and one multi-stage MTB (R4) races held in the Czech Republic in a cluster of four cross-sectional studies. Methods In 27 ultra-mountain bikers (ultra-MTBers), 12 ultra-runners, and 14 multi-stage MTBers, fluid intake, changes (?) in body mass, hematocrit, plasma volume, plasma [Na+], plasma [K+], plasma osmolality, urine [Na+], urine [K+], urine specific gravity, urine osmolality, K+/Na+ ratio in urine, transtubular potassium gradient and glomerular filtration rate were measured and calculated. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and symptoms of EAH were recorded using post-race questionnaires. Results Of the 53 finishers, three (5.7%) developed post-race EAH, thereof one (3.7%) ultra-MTBer, one (8.3%) ultra-runner and one (7.1%) multi-stage MTBer. Plasma [Na+] decreased significantly (p < 0.001) only in R4. Urine osmolality (R1, R3, R4 p < 0.001; R2 p < 0.05) and glomerular filtration rate (p < 0.001) increased, and body mass decreased in all races (p < 0.05). ? body mass was inversely related to the number of kilometers achieved (p < 0.001) in R2 where better ultra-MTBers tended to lose more weight. ? body mass (p < 0.001) and %? body mass (p = 0.05) were positively related to lower post-race plasma [Na+] in R3 that was associated with increased loss in body mass. Fluid intake was positively related to race performance in R1 and R2 (R1: p = 0.04; R2: p = 0.01) where ultra-MTBers in R1 and R2 who drank more finished ahead of those who drank less. Post-race plasma [Na+] was negatively associated with race performance in ultra-MTBers in R2 (p < 0.05), similarly ultra-runners in R3 (p < 0.05) where finishers with more kilometres had lower post-race plasma [Na+]. Conclusions The prevalence of EAH in the Czech Republic was no higher compared to existing reports on ultra-endurance athletes in other countries. Lower plasma [Na+] and development of EAH may be attributed to overdrinking, a pituitary secretion of vasopressin, an impaired mobilization of osmotically inactive sodium stores, and/or an inappropriate inactivation of osmotically active sodium. PMID:24512517

  7. 24-hour urine protein

    MedlinePLUS

    ... area around the urethra. Open a urine collection bag (a plastic bag with an adhesive paper on one end), and ... For males, place the entire penis in the bag and attach the adhesive to the skin. For ...

  8. A comparison of regression and Bayesian change point analysis for extreme 24hours rainfall in South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruzzaman, M.; Beecham, S.; Metcalfe, A.

    2013-12-01

    We consider monthly extremes rainfall, aggregated over 24 hours, at 24 rainfall station in South Australia (SA). A self-organizing map (SOM) technique is used to draw contours of extreme for this area for each month. The possibility of change in extreme rainfall is investigated in two ways. The first is a multiple regression with time, month, station and their interaction as predictor variables. A confidence interval and for the linear and quadratic effects of time series are given. We have developed a strategy to possible improve prediction of extreme rainfall as a linear combination of original prediction. The dramatic improvement is a consequence of introducing squares and cross product of predictor variables is given in calibration, validation and re-calibration model. The similarity between fitted to the calibration and validation periods suggests that the hydrological process have been relatively stable over the period. The modeling strategy is empirical and will valid for different time period; although, in general, estimated coefficients could change substantially. The second analysis is a Bayesian change's point (BCP) analysis based on deseasonalised extreme data. A univariate BCP is applied in the data averaged over stations and compared with a multivariate BCP applied to the individual station records. The BCP is applied to investigate the possibility of sudden change rather than a smooth trend.

  9. Relative prognostic value of rest thallium-201 imaging, radionuclide ventriculography and 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring after acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Hakki, A.H.; Nestico, P.F.; Heo, J.; Unwala, A.A.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-07-01

    Rest thallium-201 scintigraphy, radionuclide ventriculography and 24 hour Holter monitoring are acceptable methods to assess myocardial necrosis, performance and electrical instability. This study examined the relative value of the three tests, when obtained a mean of 7 days after acute myocardial infarction, in predicting 1 year mortality in 93 patients. Planar thallium-201 images were obtained in three projections and were scored on a scale of 0 to 4 in 15 segments (normal score = 60). Patients were classified as having high risk test results as follows: thallium score less than or equal to 45 (33 patients), left ventricular ejection fraction less than or equal to 40% (51 patients) and complex ventricular arrhythmias on Holter monitoring (36 patients). During the follow-up of 6.4 +/- 3.4 months (mean +/- SD), 15 patients died of cardiac causes. All three tests were important predictors of survival by univariate Cox survival analysis; the thallium score, however, was the only important predictor by multivariate analysis. The predictive power of the thallium score was comparable with that of combined ejection fraction and Holter monitoring (chi-square = 21 versus chi-square = 22). Thus, rest thallium-201 imaging performed before hospital discharge provides important prognostic information in survivors of acute myocardial infarction which is comparable with that provided by left ventricular ejection fraction and Holter monitoring. Patients with a lower thallium score (large perfusion defects) are at high risk of cardiac death during the first year after infarction.

  10. Adrenal catecholamine synthesis rate changes induced by combined thermal and immobilization stress in fed and 24 hour fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Bargiel, Z; Nowicka, H

    1989-01-01

    The combined stress of acute immobilization (IM) at high and low ambient temperature has been used to determine its influence on adrenal catecholamine (CA) content assassed histofluorimetrically in fed and 24 hour fasted rats. The general course of changes obtained after the arrangement of adrenal strips deriving from the adrenals of rats exposed to cold and IM stress (CIMS) at +10 degrees C to -25 degrees C during the different time fragments presented the adrenal CA depletion events followed sometimes by the adrenal CA content increase after the longer stress exposure or/and stronger CIMS and WIMS conditions. It was found that this depletion-stimulated increase of adrenal Ca synthesis rate had been accelerated in 24 h fasted rats compared to satiated ones exposed to the same stress conditions, especially after the CIMS exposure. Moreover the survival time duration at first lethal temperature (-5 degrees C and +45 degrees C) was significantly higher in fasted rats. The possible hypothalamic regulation of adrenal CA synthesis rate accordingly to the actual metabolism needs and beta-adrenoceptor sensitivity changes depending on satiety state have been discussed and the necessity of further investigations concerning the specificity of stress-induced metabolism changes in 24 h starved rats has been suggested. PMID:2767283

  11. Mediterranean-style diet reduces metabolic syndrome components in obese children and adolescents with obesity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet have been amply proven in adults with cardiovascular risk factors. The effects of this diet have not been extensively assessed in pediatric populations with obesity, insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of the Mediterranean style diet (MSD) to decrease cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents with obesity. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to a MSD rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, fiber, flavonoids and antioxidants (60% of energy from carbohydrate, 25% from fat, and 15% from protein, (n?=?24); or a standard diet (55% of carbohydrate, 30% from fat and 15% from protein, (n?=?25), the caloric ingest was individualized. At baseline and 16-week of intervention, the glucose, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), HDL-C, LDL-C were measured as well as the body composition and anthropometric data. The diet compliance was determined by the 24-hour recalls. Paired Student’s t and Macnemar’s test were used to compare effects in biochemical, body composition, anthropometric, and dietary variables. Results The MSD group had a significantly decrease in BMI, lean mass, fat mass, glucose, TC, TG, HDL-C and LDL-C. (p?diet compliance increased consumption of omega 9 fatty acids, zinc, vitamin E, selenium, and decreased consumption of saturated fatty acids (p?diet group decrease in glucose levels and frequency of glucose >100 mg/dL (p?

  12. What a Difference a Day Makes: Change in Memory for Newly Learned Word Forms Over 24 Hours

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Karla K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study explored the role of time and retrieval experience in the consolidation of word forms. Method Participants were 106 adults trained on 16 novel word-referent pairs, then tested immediately and 24 hr later for recognition and recall of word forms. In the interim, tests were repeated 2 hr or 12 hr after training, or not at all, thus varying the amount and timing of retrieval experience. Results Recognition accuracy was stable and speed improved over the 24-hr period. But these manifestations of consolidation did not depend on interim retrieval experience; in fact, the 2-hr interim test interfered with improvements in speed. In contrast, the number of word forms recalled increased only with interim retrieval experiences, and the 12-hr interim test was more advantageous to recall than the 2-hr test. Conclusions After a word form is encoded, it can become stronger with time. Retrieval experience can also strengthen the trace, but, if retrieval occurs when the memory is still labile, it can be disruptive. This complex interplay between retrieval experience and time holds implications for measuring learning outcomes and for scheduling practice in classrooms and clinics. PMID:24845578

  13. COMPARISON OF FIVE EXTRACTION METHODS ON INCURRED AND FORTIFIED PESTICIDES IN COMPOSITE DIETS: BLENDER, SOXHLET, ASE, MICROWAVE AND SFE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA National Exposure Research Laboratory studies dietary exposure to a diverse group of semi-volatile pesticides by analyzing 24 hour duplicate composite diets. The pesticides of interest include organochlorines, organophosphates, anilines, and triazines. Currently, there ...

  14. Relative Importance of Informational Units and Their Role in Long-Term Recall by Closed-Head-Injured Patients and Control Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vakil, Eli; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Administered Logical Memory subtest of Wechsler Memory Scale to 40 closed-head-injured (CHI) and 40 control subjects. Tested recall immediately after administration, 40 minutes later, and 24 hours later. Results suggest that CHI patients have difficulty selectively retrieving most important information after long delay. (Author/NB)

  15. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A: Evidence against sublingual absorption following ingestion in soup.

    PubMed

    Teeguarden, Justin G; Twaddle, Nathan C; Churchwell, Mona I; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Seryak, Liesel M; Doerge, Daniel R

    2015-10-15

    Extensive first-pass metabolism of ingested bisphenol A (BPA) in the gastro-intestinal tract and liver restricts blood concentrations of bioactive BPA to <1% of total BPA in humans and non-human primates. Absorption of ingested BPA through non-metabolizing tissues of the oral cavity, recently demonstrated in dogs, could lead to the higher serum BPA concentrations reported in some human biomonitoring studies. We hypothesized that the extensive interaction with the oral mucosa by a liquid matrix, like soup, relative to solid food or capsules, might enhance absorption through non-metabolizing oral cavity tissues in humans, producing higher bioavailability and higher serum BPA concentrations. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24hour period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30?g d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. Absorption of d6-BPA was rapid (t1/2=0.45h) and elimination of the administered dose was complete 24h post-ingestion, evidence against any tissue depot for BPA. The maximum serum d6-BPA concentration was 0.43nM at 1.6h after administration and represented <0.3% of total d6-BPA. Pharmacokinetic parameters, pharmacokinetic model simulations, and the significantly faster appearance half-life of d6-BPA-glucuronide compared to d6-BPA (0.29h vs 0.45h) were evidence against meaningful absorption of BPA in humans through any non-metabolizing tissue (<1%). This study confirms that typical exposure to BPA in food produces picomolar to subpicomolar serum BPA concentrations in humans, not nM concentrations reported in some biomonitoring studies. PMID:25620055

  16. Early coronary revascularization improves 24 hour survival and neurological function after ischemic cardiac arrest. A randomized animal study

    PubMed Central

    Sideris, Georgios; Magkoutis, Nikolaos; Sharma, Alok; Rees, Jennifer; McKnite, Scott; Caldwell, Emily; Sarraf, Mohammad; Henry, Patrick; Lurie, Keith; Garcia, Santiago; Yannopoulos, Demetris

    2014-01-01

    Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains poor. Acute coronary obstruction is a major cause of OHCA. We hypothesize that early coronary reperfusion will improve 24h-survival and neurological outcomes. Methods Total occlusion of the mid LAD was induced by balloon inflation in 27 pigs. After 5 minutes, VF was induced and left untreated for 8 minutes. If return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved within 15 minutes (21/27 animals) of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), animals were randomized to a total of either 45 minutes (group A) or 4 hours (group B) of LAD occlusion. Animals without ROSC after 15 minutes of CPR were classified as refractory VF (group C). In those pigs, CPR was continued up to 45 minutes of total LAD occlusion at which point reperfusion was achieved. CPR was continued until ROSC or another 10 minutes of CPR had been performed. Primary endpoints for groups A and B were 24-hour survival and cerebral performance category (CPC). Primary endpoint for group C was ROSC before or after reperfusion. Results Early compared to late reperfusion improved survival (10/11 versus 4/10, p= 0.02), mean CPC (1.4±0.7 versus 2.5±0.6, p= 0.017), LVEF (43±13 versus 32±9%, p=0.01), troponin I (37±28 versus 99±12, p=0,005) and CK-MB (11 ±4 versus 20.1±5, p=0.031) at 24-hr after ROSC. ROSC was achieved in 4/6 animals only after reperfusion in group C. Conclusions Early reperfusion after ischemic cardiac arrest improved 24h survival rate and neurological function. In animals with refractory VF, reperfusion was necessary to achieve ROSC. PMID:24200891

  17. / www.sciencemag.org/content/early/recent / XX Month 2014 / Page 1 / 10.1126/science.xxxxxx Endogenous circadian (~24 hour) rhythms are found in

    E-print Network

    Napp, Nils

    .xxxxxx Endogenous circadian (~24 hour) rhythms are found in diverse organisms, arising as an adaptation to the Earth S. elongatus (denoted by se ), the standard model for investigating in vivo circadian rhythms (16's persistent cycles of night and day (1). To uncover the molec- ular mechanism of a circadian clock, we chose

  18. Balancing Work and Family All of us must allocate 24 hours a day to the activities of life. How well we balance responsibilities with

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Balancing Work and Family All of us must allocate 24 hours a day to the activities of life. How. It also helps manage stress. Are you satisfied with your balance of time between work and family? If you answered "no," you are not alone. Achieving balance with work and family is an ongoing process of juggling

  19. Characterization of pulmonary protein profiles in response to zinc oxide nanoparticles in mice: a 24-hour and 28-day follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chih-Hong; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Lai, Ching-Huang; Jones, Tim P; BéruBé, Kelly A; Hong, Gui-Bing; Ho, Kin-Fai; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Although zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are recognized to cause systemic disorders, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the time-dependent differences that occur after exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanistic differences at 24 hours and 28 days after the exposure of BALB/c mice to ZnONPs via intratracheal instillation. An isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the differential protein expression, biological processes, molecular functions, and pathways. A total of 18 and 14 proteins displayed significant changes in the lung tissues at 24 hours and 28 days after exposure, respectively, with the most striking changes being observed for S100-A9 protein. Metabolic processes and catalytic activity were the main biological processes and molecular functions, respectively, in the responses at the 24-hour and 28-day follow-up times. The glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway was continuously downregulated from 24 hours to 28 days, whereas detoxification pathways were activated at the 28-day time-point after exposure. A comprehensive understanding of the potential time-dependent effects of exposure to ZnONPs was provided, which highlights the metabolic mechanisms that may be important in the responses to ZnONP. PMID:26251593

  20. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN AIR ONTO CARBONPAK X SOLID ADSORBENT WITH THEMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - FEASIBILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of 1,3-butadiene for 24 hours onto the graphitic adsorbent Carbopack X contained in a stainless steel tube badge (6.3 mm OD, 5 mm ID, and 90 mm in length) with analysis by thermal desorption/GC/MS has been evaluated in controlled tests. A test matrix of 42 tr...

  1. UCD Employer's Report of Occupational Injury or Illness UNIVERSITY POLICY REQUIRES THAT INDUSTRIAL INJURY/ILLNESS BE REPORTED TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION WITHIN 24 HOURS OF

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Yuko

    UCD Employer's Report of Occupational Injury or Illness UNIVERSITY POLICY REQUIRES THAT INDUSTRIAL INJURY/ILLNESS BE REPORTED TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION WITHIN 24 HOURS OF OCCURRENCE AND STATE REGULATIONS ( ) total weekly hours EMPLOYEESTATEMENT Specific Injury/Illness/Exposure: Body Part(s) affected: Date

  2. Investigations into the source of two fungicides measured in the air for 24 hours following application to a cereal crop.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M C Butler; Lane, A G; O'Sullivan, C M; Miller, P C H

    2009-01-01

    Airborne pesticides can be detected near to recently-treated arable fields for a period of days following the application. Identifying the source of such pesticides is important in developing predictive models for use in exposure and risk assessments. Previous work showed levels of pesticide in the air that were higher than expected for a low-vapour-pressure active ingredient, epoxiconazole, and comparable with an active ingredient of a significantly higher vapour pressure, fenpropidin. It was possible that the measured concentrations could be attributed to 'dust' particles emitted from the crop, either biological material contaminated with pesticide or solid dried deposits of active ingredient and other formulation components. A second experiment was therefore undertaken to measure airborne concentrations of the same active ingredients and to determine whether some or all of the measured airborne pesticide could be attributed to particles, using a Marple personal cascade impactor, which collects particles in the range 0.3 - 50 microm. Such samplers are not optimised to give good sampling efficiencies under the proposed field conditions, so some initial tests were undertaken in the Silsoe wind tunnel to assess its ability to sample particles in an air flow. In the subsequent field trial, a 192 m square plot in a commercially established winter cereal crop was sprayed with a tank mix of commercial formulations of epoxiconazole and fenpropidin. Measurements of airborne pesticides were made for 24 hours following the application with suction samplers attached to tenax tubes to evaluate vapour concentrations and with the cascade impactor to determine whether contaminated airborne particles were present. The concentrations of pesticide measured with the tenax tubes were significantly higher than the particulate component detected on the cascade impactor plates and it is therefore it was very unlikely that there was a significant contribution from pesticide-laden particles to the airborne concentration. Although it is clear that under these particular experimental conditions, airborne contaminated particles were not detected in significant quantities after the application, it is possible that this could occur under different circumstances, such as during pollen release or harvest. PMID:20218509

  3. Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch | ASA24 Enables Web-based Collection of 24-hour Dietary Data

    Cancer.gov

    Following the findings from the OPEN study, RFMMB (led by Dr. Amy Subar) recognized the need for a better instrument to replace FFQs in nutritional epidemiology research. If a more effective instrument could be made affordable and feasible, it had the potential to enable better assessment of the associations between diet and health.

  4. UCSD Academic Recall Appointment Employee Information

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    UCSD Academic Recall Appointment Employee Information Employee ID: Name: Retirement Date: Annual Salary: Scale Date: Proposed Recall Appointment School/Division: Recall Teaching (TC 1700) Recall HCOMP (TC 1701) Recall Faculty (TC 1702) Recall Non

  5. Failure to Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laming, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical analysis shows that if the pattern of rehearsal in free-recall experiments (of necessity, the pattern observed when participants rehearse aloud) be continued without any further interruption by stimuli (as happens during recall), it terminates with the retrieval of the same 1 word over and over again. Such a terminal state is commonly…

  6. Creativity and Dream Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schredl, Michael

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between creative interests and dream recall frequency (DRF) by having 44 adults complete dream recall journals as well as a verbal creativity test. Results indicate that persons with both visual and verbal creative skills remember their dreams more. Visual memory may be a mediating variable between…

  7. Recall Of Landslide

    E-print Network

    The United Mission To Nepal

    2003-01-01

    stream_source_info Recall_Of_Landslide.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 10 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Recall_Of_Landslide.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  8. Oatmeal consumption is associated with better diet quality and lower body mass index in adults: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Fulgoni, Victor L; Chu, YiFang; O'Shea, Marianne; Slavin, Joanne L; DiRienzo, Maureen A

    2015-12-01

    Data from the 2001-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed to assess the relationship between oatmeal consumption and nutrient intake, diet quality, and physiological measures in adults 19 years and older (n = 22,823). We hypothesized that oatmeal consumption is associated with a more favorable nutrient intake profile, better diet quality, and healthier physiological end points. Oatmeal consumers (n = 1429) were defined as those who had consumed any amount of cooked oatmeal cereal during a 24-hour recall period. Multiple regression analysis, after transforming variables to normality and using appropriate sample weights to ensure national representation, was used to assess differences between oatmeal consumers and nonconsumers in terms of demographics, and covariate-adjusted analysis of variance was used to assess differences between consumers and nonconsumers in nutrient intakes, diet quality (calculated using the Healthy Eating Index-2010), and physiological measures. Our results show that oatmeal consumers were older than nonconsumers and more likely to be female; they also were less likely to smoke and consumed less alcohol. Consumers had higher intakes of protein, dietary fiber, vitamin A, thiamin, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper, selenium, and potassium and lower intakes of total, monounsaturated, and saturated fats; cholesterol; and vitamin B12. Oatmeal consumers had higher Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores and lower body weights, waist circumferences, and body mass indices. To conclude, our results suggest that consuming oatmeal is consistent with better nutrient intakes and a higher diet quality. PMID:26494025

  9. Egg Contribution Towards the Diet of Pregnant Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Millán, Ángela; Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Damio, Grace; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Proper nutrition during gestation is important to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes. Eggs contain many important nutrients necessary for fetal development and human survival. Three focus groups were conducted with Latina women living in Connecticut to identify cultural beliefs toward egg consumption during pregnancy, traditional egg dishes, and methods of preparation. A cross-sectional study was then carried out with a sample of predominately Puerto Rican pregnant Latinas (N = 241) to identify the frequency of consumption of eggs and egg-containing dishes as well as methods of preparation using a tailored food frequency questionnaire modified for this population. Paired sample t-tests were used to examine if there were differences in weekly mean egg intake patterns between the year prior to the pregnancy and during pregnancy based on a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Women were categorized into eggs consumers and non-consumers if they consumed or did not consume eggs during the previous day based on 24-hour recall data. Independent-sample t-test and chi-square cross-tabulation analyses were conducted to examine the association between egg consumption and nutrient intake categories. Results showed that eggs and egg-containing traditional dishes are consumed by Latinas before and during pregnancy. Egg consumers had higher intakes of protein, fat, vitamin K, vitamin E, selenium, beta carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin, cholesterol, total polyunsaturated fatty acids, and docosahexaenoic acid. Eggs contribute significantly to the diet of pregnant Latinas. PMID:21883065

  10. [Structural changes of the myocardium and 24-hour blood pressure profile in subjects with hypertension studied during expedition work in the Far North].

    PubMed

    Gapon, L I; Shurkevich, N P; Vetoshkin, A S

    2005-01-01

    Echocardiography and 24-hour BP monitoring were carried out in 177 men with stage 1 and 2 essential hypertension aged 25-59 years when they worked the Far North shift (group l) and in 75 patients with essential hypertension living in moderate climatic zone (group 2). Normal left ventricular geometry was found in 10 and 39% of subjects in groups l and 2, respectively. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) was 2 times more frequent in group 1 where it was predominantly concentric. Contrary to group 2 significant correlations between parameters of 24-hour BP monitoring and echocardiography were found in group 1. All variants of left ventricular geometry in group 1 were characterized by lower systolic BP, high variability of systolic and diastolic BP, impaired 24-hour BP rhythm because of decreased night-day difference. Group 1 subjects with concentric left ventricular hypertrophy had significantly increased left ventricular mass index. Diastolic nocturnal hypertension was the factor most closely related to the structural state of the myocardium in group 1. PMID:15699939

  11. Recalling academic tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Franklin Gno

    This study was focused on what students remembered about five middle school science tasks when they were juniors and seniors in high school. Descriptions of the five tasks were reconstructed from available artifacts and teachers' records, notes and recollections. Three of the five tasks were "authentic" in the sense that students were asked to duplicate the decisions practitioners make in the adult world. The other two tasks were more typical school tasks involving note taking and preparation for a quiz. All five tasks, however, involved use of computers. Students were interviewed to examine what and how well they recalled the tasks and what forms or patterns of recall existed. Analysis of their responses indicated that different kinds of tasks produced different levels of recall. Authentically situated tasks were remembered much better than routine school tasks. Further, authentic tasks centered on design elements were recalled better than those for which design was not as pivotal. Patterns of recall indicated that participants most often recalled the decisions they made, the scenarios of the authentically situated tasks, the consequences of their tasks and the social contexts of the classroom. Task events, in other words, appeared to form a framework upon which students constructed stories of the tasks. The more salient the events, the richer the story, the deeper and more detailed the recall of the task. Thus, authentic tasks appeared to lend themselves to creating stories better than regular school tasks and therefore such tasks were recalled better. Implications of these patterns of recall are discussed with respect to issues of school learning and assessment.

  12. Decreased luteinizing hormone pulse frequency is associated with elevated 24-hour ghrelin after calorie restriction and exercise in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Jennifer L; De Souza, Mary Jane; Hill, Brenna R; Leidy, Heather J; Williams, Nancy I

    2013-01-01

    Elevated ghrelin has been shown to be associated with reduced luteinizing hormone (LH) pulsatility in Rhesus monkeys, rats, men, and recently women. We previously reported that 24-h ghrelin concentrations are elevated in women following a 3-mo exercise and diet program leading to weight loss. We investigated whether the elevations in ghrelin following an ~3-mo exercise and diet program leading to weight loss are associated with a decrease in LH pulsatility. The nonexercising control group (Control, n = 5) consumed a controlled diet that matched energy needs, whereas energy intake in the exercise group (Energy Deficit, n = 16) was reduced from baseline energy requirements and supervised exercise training occurred five times per a week. Significant decreases in body weight (-3.0 ± 0.6 kg), body fat (-2.9 ± 0.4 kg) and 24-h LH pulse frequency (-0.18 ± 0.08 pulses/h), and a significant increase in 24-h mean ghrelin were observed in only the Energy Deficit group. The pre-post change in LH pulse frequency was negatively correlated with the change in mean 24-h ghrelin (R = -0.485, P = 0.030) and the change in peak ghrelin at lunch (R = -0.518, P = 0.019). Interestingly, pre-post change in night LH pulse frequency was negatively correlated with the change in mean day ghrelin (R = -0.704, P = 0.001). Elevated total ghrelin concentrations are associated with the suppression of LH pulsatility in premenopausal women and may play a role in the suppression of reproductive function following weight loss. PMID:23115078

  13. Examining the Association between an Independent Variable & Diet as a Dependent Variable | Dietary Assessment Primer

    Cancer.gov

    For prospective or cross-sectional studies, we recommend that you use 24HRs (see the 24-hour Dietary Recall Profile). A single administration may be acceptable, but collecting and averaging repeat administrations will help improve your statistical power to detect effects (Row 7).

  14. The Abilities and Differential Difficulties of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Children with Specific Language Impairment to Use Semantic and Social Contexts to Infer and Recall Novel Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Melody R.

    2010-01-01

    Two studies assessed the ability of 12 pre-school children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD; N = 7) or Specific Language Impairment (SLI; N = 5) to use semantic context and eye gaze to infer the meanings of novel nouns, and to recall those meanings after a 24-hour delay. In Experiment 1, the children heard statements containing a familiar,…

  15. 21 CFR 7.49 - Recall communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Responsibilities § 7.49 Recall communications. (a) General. ...and extent of a recall communication should be commensurate with...product being recalled and the strategy developed for that recall...the purpose of a recall communication is to convey: (1)...

  16. 21 CFR 7.49 - Recall communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Responsibilities § 7.49 Recall communications. (a) General. ...and extent of a recall communication should be commensurate with...product being recalled and the strategy developed for that recall...the purpose of a recall communication is to convey: (1)...

  17. 21 CFR 7.49 - Recall communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Responsibilities § 7.49 Recall communications. (a) General. ...and extent of a recall communication should be commensurate with...product being recalled and the strategy developed for that recall...the purpose of a recall communication is to convey: (1)...

  18. 21 CFR 7.49 - Recall communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Responsibilities § 7.49 Recall communications. (a) General. ...and extent of a recall communication should be commensurate with...product being recalled and the strategy developed for that recall...the purpose of a recall communication is to convey: (1)...

  19. 21 CFR 7.49 - Recall communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Responsibilities § 7.49 Recall communications. (a) General. ...and extent of a recall communication should be commensurate with...product being recalled and the strategy developed for that recall...the purpose of a recall communication is to convey: (1)...

  20. A phase I trial of radiotherapy and simultaneous 24-hour paclitaxel in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, L; Hassan, M; Olmsted, L; Sharan, V; Stepnick, D; Hoppel, C; Mugharbil, A; Subramanyan, S; McGloin, B; Mackay, W; Strauss, M

    1997-12-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that tumor cells exposed to paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) for protracted periods (ie, 24 hours) and then irradiated undergo enhanced radiation-induced cell kill. Importantly, paclitaxel-induced tumor cell mitotic arrest at the time of radiation was associated with the enhanced cell kill. At the Case Western Reserve Cancer Center, we have conducted a phase I trial in 24 patients with either locally advanced or recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to evaluate the clinical and pharmacologic effects of a 24-hour paclitaxel infusion combined with radiotherapy. The maximum tolerated dose was < or =75 mg/m2. Dose-limiting toxicity was febrile granulocytopenia. Mucositis was significant and necessitated the use of enteral feeding tubes in the majority of patients. All patients with locally advanced disease demonstrated either a complete response or major partial response. At a median follow-up of 13.4 months, disease has relapsed in only two of 22 patients with locally advanced disease. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that a dose of > or =75 mg/m2 achieved near steady-state mean paclitaxel plasma concentrations greatly exceeding the threshold concentrations shown to alter microtubule function and induce tumor cell mitotic arrest in vitro. Pharmacodynamic studies performed at 21 to 26 hours after initiation of infusion demonstrated that a dose of > or =75 mg/m2 uniformly induced tumor cell mitotic arrest and oral epithelial mitotic arrest. The pharmacologic data and outcome results provide a strong rationale for the continued use of a 24-hour paclitaxel infusion and concurrent radiation for the treatment of newly diagnosed, locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in an experimental setting. PMID:9427267

  1. Ambulatory 24-hour cardiac oxygen consumption and blood pressure-heart rate variability: effects of nebivolol and valsartan alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L; Khan, Safi U; Saleem, Osman; Osmond, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    We compared an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan; VAL), a beta-blocker (nebivolol; NEB) and the combination of NEB/VAL with respect to 24-hour myocardial oxygen consumption (determined by 24-hour ambulatory heart rate-central systolic pressure product [ACRPP]) and its components. Subjects with hypertension (systolic blood pressure >140 or diastolic blood pressure >90; n = 26) were studied in a double-blinded, double-dummy, forced-titration, crossover design with 3 random-order experimental periods: VAL 320 mg, NEB 40 mg, and NEB/VAL 320/40 mg daily. After 4 weeks of each drug, ambulatory pulse wave analysis (MobilOGraph) was performed every 20 minutes for 24 hours. All three treatments resulted in nearly identical brachial and central systolic blood pressures. NEB alone or in combination with VAL resulted in lower ACRPP (by 11%-14%; P < .001 each) and heart rate (by 18%-20%; P < .001 each) compared with VAL, but stroke work (ACRPP per beat) was lower with VAL. Relative and adjusted variability (standard deviation and coefficient of variation) of heart rate were also lower with NEB and NEB/VAL than VAL. Results in African Americans, the majority subpopulation, were similar to those of the entire treatment group. We conclude that the rate-slowing effects of NEB cause ambulatory cardiac myocardial oxygen consumption to be lower with NEB monotherapy or NEB/VAL combination therapy than with VAL monotherapy. NEB/VAL is not superior to NEB alone in controlling heart rate, blood pressure, or ACRPP. Heart rate variability but not ACRPP variability is reduced by NEB or the combination NEB/VAL. There is no attenuation of beta-blocker-induced rate-slowing effects of in African Americans. PMID:26116459

  2. Assessing Dietary Quality of Older Chinese People Using the Chinese Diet Balance Index (DBI)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyue; Hall, John; Byles, Julie; Shi, Zumin

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Few studies have applied the Chinese Diet Balance Index (DBI) in evaluating dietary quality for Chinese people. The present cross-sectional study assessed dietary quality based on DBI for older people, and the associated factors, in four socioeconomically distinct regions in China. Methods The China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) involves 2745 older Chinese people, aged 60 or over, from four regions (Northeast, East Coast, Central and West) in 2009. Dietary data were obtained by interviews using 24 hour-recall over three consecutive days. Four indicators: Total Score (TS), Lower Bound Score (LBS), Higher Bound Score (HBS) and Diet Quality Distance (DQD) from DBI were calculated for assessing dietary quality in different aspects. Results 68.9% of older people had different levels of excessive cereals intake. More than 50% of older people had moderate or severe surplus of oil (64.9%) and salt (58.6%). Intake of vegetables and fruit, milk and soybeans, water, and dietary variety were insufficient, especially for milk and soybeans. 80.8% of people had moderate or severe unbalanced diet consumption. The largest differences of DQD scores have been found for people with different education levels and urbanicity levels. People with higher education levels have lower DQD scores (p<0.001), and people living in medium and low urbanicity areas had 2.8 and 8.9 higher DQD scores than their high urbanicity counterparts (p<0.001). Also, significant differences of DQD scores have been found according to gender, marital status, work status and regions (p<0.001). Conclusion DBI can reveal problems of dietary quality for older Chinese people. Rectifying unbalanced diet intake may lead to prevention of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Dieticians and health care professionals need to increase dissemination and uptake of nutrition education, with interventions targeted at regions of lower socioeconomic status. PMID:25811834

  3. A Case Report on Dyskinesia Following Rivastigmine Patch 13.3 mg/24 hours for Alzheimer's Disease: Perspective in the Movement Disorders Spectrum Following Use of Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maria Cristina B; Rosales, Raymond L

    2015-08-01

    Current reports on movement disorder adverse effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors only include extrapyramidal symptoms and myoclonus.Here is a case of an 81-year-old female Filipino with dementia who presented with first-onset generalized choreiform movements.The etiology of the clinical finding of dyskinesia was investigated through laboratories, neuroimaging, and electroencephalogram, all of which yielded negative results. Review of her medications included the rivastigmine (Exelon) patch, which had just been increased to 13.3?mg/24-hour-dose 3 months prior. With all other possible causes excluded, a trial discontinuation of rivastigmine, showed decreased frequency of the dyskinesia 48?hours after, with complete resolution after 6 days, and no recurrence since then.This case thus presents a probable association or causality between the choreiform movement and rivastigmine at 13.3?mg/24-hour-dose patch because of clear temporal proximity, lack of alternative explanations, and a reversal of the dyskinesia upon medicament discontinuation. PMID:26313774

  4. A Systematic Review of the Relationship between Acculturation and Diet among Latinos in the United States: Implications for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    AYALA, GUADALUPE X.; BAQUERO, BARBARA; KLINGER, SYLVIA

    2013-01-01

    Dietary intake is an important determinant of obesity and numerous chronic health conditions. A healthful diet is an essential component of chronic disease self-management. Researchers have indicated that the healthfulness of the Latino diet deteriorates during the acculturation process. However, given the many operationalizations of acculturation, conclusive evidence regarding this relationship is still lacking. This comprehensive and systematic literature review examines the relationship between acculturation and diet by examining national, quantitative, and qualitative studies involving Latinos living in the United States. Studies of diet included those that examined dietary intake using one of several validated measures (eg, food frequency questionnaire, 24-hour dietary recall, or dietary screener) and/or dietary behaviors (eg, away-from-home-eating and fat avoidance). Articles were identified through two independent searches yielding a final sample of 34 articles. Articles were abstracted by two independent reviewers and inter-rater reliability was assessed. Analyses examined the extent to which various measures of acculturation (ie, acculturation score, years in the United States, birthplace, generational status, and language use) were associated with macronutrient intake, micronutrient intake, and dietary behaviors. Several relationships were consistent irrespective of how acculturation was measured: no relationship with intake of dietary fat and percent energy from fat; the less vs more acculturated consumed more fruit, rice, beans, and less sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages. Additional observed relationships depended on the measure of acculturation used in the study. These findings suggest a differential influence of acculturation on diet, requiring greater specificity in our dietary interventions by acculturation status. PMID:18656573

  5. Home-Schooled Children are thinner, leaner, and report better diets relative to traditionally-schooled children

    PubMed Central

    Cardel, Michelle; Willig, Amanda L.; Dulin-Keita, Akilah; Casazza, Krista; Cherrington, Andrea; Gunnarsdottir, Thrudur; Johnson, Susan L.; Peters, John C.; Hill, James O.; Allison, David B.; Fernández, José R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine and compare the relationships among diet, physical activity, and adiposity between home-schooled children (HSC) and traditionally-schooled children (TSC). Design and Methods Subjects were HSC (n=47) and TSC (n=48) aged 7 to 12 years old. Dietary intakes were determined via two 24-hour recalls and physical activity was assessed with 7 days of accelerometry. Fat mass (FM), trunk fat, and percent body fat (%BF) were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results Relative to HSC, TSC demonstrated significantly higher BMI percentiles, FM, trunk fat, and %BF; consumed 120 total kilocalories more per day; and reported increased intakes of trans fats, total sugar, added sugars, calcium, and lower intakes of fiber, fruits, and vegetables (p<0.05). At lunch, TSC consumed significantly more calories, sugar, sodium, potassium, and calcium compared to HSC (p<0.05). Physical activity did not differ between groups. Traditional schooling was associated with increased consumption of trans fat, sugar, calcium (p<.05); lower intakes of fiber, and fruits and vegetables (p<.05); and higher FM, %BF, and trunk fat (p<0.01), after adjustment for covariates. Conclusions These data suggest HSC may consume diets that differ in energy and nutrient density relative to TSC, potentially contributing to differences in weight and adiposity. PMID:24039204

  6. Tree nut consumption improves nutrient intake and diet quality in US adults: an analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Carol E; Keast, Debra R; Fulgoni, Victor L; Nicklas, Theresa A

    2010-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies assessing tree nut (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts) consumption and the association with nutrient intake and diet quality are lacking. This study determined the association of tree nut consumption and nutrient intake and diet quality using a nationally representative sample of adults. Adults 19+ years (y) (n=13,292) participating in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. Intake was determined from 24-hour diet recalls; tree nut consumers were defined as those consuming > or =(1/4) ounce/day (7.09 g). Means, standard errors, and ANOVA (adjusted for covariates) were determined using appropriate sample weights. Diet quality was measured using the Healthy Eating Index-2005. Among consumers, mean intake of tree nuts/tree nut butters was 1.19 +/- 0.04 oz/d versus 0.01 +/- 0.00 oz/d for non-consumers. In this study, 5.5 +/- 0.3 % of individuals 19-50 y (n=7,049) and 8.4 +/- 0.6 % of individuals 51+ y (n=6,243) consumed tree nuts/tree nut butters. Mean differences (p<0.01) between tree nut consumers and non-consumers of adult shortfall nutrients were: fiber (+5.0 g/d), vitamin E (+3.7 mg AT/d), calcium (+73 mg/d), magnesium (+95 mg/d), and potassium (+260 mg/d). Tree nut consumers had lower sodium intake (-157 mg/d, p<0.01). Diet quality was significantly higher in tree nut consumers (58.0+/-0.4 vs. 48.5+/-0.3, p<0.01). Tree nut consumption was associated with a higher overall diet quality score and improved nutrient intakes. Specific dietary recommendations for nut consumption should be provided for consumers. PMID:20200000

  7. Evaluation and comparison of food records, recalls, and frequencies for energy and protein assessment by using recovery biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Ross L; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Huang, Ying; Van Horn, Linda; Beresford, Shirley A A; Caan, Bette; Tinker, Lesley; Schoeller, Dale; Bingham, Sheila; Eaton, Charles B; Thomson, Cynthia; Johnson, Karen C; Ockene, Judy; Sarto, Gloria; Heiss, Gerardo; Neuhouser, Marian L

    2011-09-01

    The food frequency questionnaire approach to dietary assessment is ubiquitous in nutritional epidemiology research. Food records and recalls provide approaches that may also be adaptable for use in large epidemiologic cohorts, if warranted by better measurement properties. The authors collected (2007-2009) a 4-day food record, three 24-hour dietary recalls, and a food frequency questionnaire from 450 postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative prospective cohort study (enrollment, 1994-1998), along with biomarkers of energy and protein consumption. Through comparison with biomarkers, the food record is shown to provide a stronger estimate of energy and protein than does the food frequency questionnaire, with 24-hour recalls mostly intermediate. Differences were smaller and nonsignificant for protein density. Food frequencies, records, and recalls were, respectively, able to "explain" 3.8%, 7.8%, and 2.8% of biomarker variation for energy; 8.4%, 22.6%, and 16.2% of biomarker variation for protein; and 6.5%, 11.0%, and 7.0% of biomarker variation for protein density. However, calibration equations that include body mass index, age, and ethnicity substantially improve these numbers to 41.7%, 44.7%, and 42.1% for energy; 20.3%, 32.7%, and 28.4% for protein; and 8.7%, 14.4%, and 10.4% for protein density. Calibration equations using any of the assessment procedures may yield suitable consumption estimates for epidemiologic study purposes. PMID:21765003

  8. Evaluation and Comparison of Food Records, Recalls, and Frequencies for Energy and Protein Assessment by Using Recovery Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Ross L.; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Huang, Ying; Van Horn, Linda; Beresford, Shirley A. A.; Caan, Bette; Tinker, Lesley; Schoeller, Dale; Bingham, Sheila; Eaton, Charles B.; Thomson, Cynthia; Johnson, Karen C.; Ockene, Judy; Sarto, Gloria; Heiss, Gerardo; Neuhouser, Marian L.

    2011-01-01

    The food frequency questionnaire approach to dietary assessment is ubiquitous in nutritional epidemiology research. Food records and recalls provide approaches that may also be adaptable for use in large epidemiologic cohorts, if warranted by better measurement properties. The authors collected (2007–2009) a 4-day food record, three 24-hour dietary recalls, and a food frequency questionnaire from 450 postmenopausal women in the Women’s Health Initiative prospective cohort study (enrollment, 1994–1998), along with biomarkers of energy and protein consumption. Through comparison with biomarkers, the food record is shown to provide a stronger estimate of energy and protein than does the food frequency questionnaire, with 24-hour recalls mostly intermediate. Differences were smaller and nonsignificant for protein density. Food frequencies, records, and recalls were, respectively, able to “explain” 3.8%, 7.8%, and 2.8% of biomarker variation for energy; 8.4%, 22.6%, and 16.2% of biomarker variation for protein; and 6.5%, 11.0%, and 7.0% of biomarker variation for protein density. However, calibration equations that include body mass index, age, and ethnicity substantially improve these numbers to 41.7%, 44.7%, and 42.1% for energy; 20.3%, 32.7%, and 28.4% for protein; and 8.7%, 14.4%, and 10.4% for protein density. Calibration equations using any of the assessment procedures may yield suitable consumption estimates for epidemiologic study purposes. PMID:21765003

  9. Personality Correlates of Dream Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    The study investigated the capacity of the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) to discriminate between those who frequently recall dreams and those who do not. The results are interpreted as indicating that the frequent recaller experiences less and the infrequent recaller experiences more intrapsychic conflict. (Author)

  10. Compound Cuing in Free Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohnas, Lynn J.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    According to the retrieved context theory of episodic memory, the cue for recall of an item is a weighted sum of recently activated cognitive states, including previously recalled and studied items as well as their associations. We show that this theory predicts there should be compound cuing in free recall. Specifically, the temporal contiguity…

  11. 21 CFR 7.40 - Recall policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recall policy. 7.40 Section 7.40 Food...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Industry Responsibilities § 7.40 Recall policy. (a) Recall is an...

  12. 21 CFR 7.40 - Recall policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recall policy. 7.40 Section 7.40 Food...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Industry Responsibilities § 7.40 Recall policy. (a) Recall is an...

  13. 21 CFR 7.40 - Recall policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recall policy. 7.40 Section 7.40 Food...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Industry Responsibilities § 7.40 Recall policy. (a) Recall is an...

  14. 21 CFR 7.40 - Recall policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recall policy. 7.40 Section 7.40 Food...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Industry Responsibilities § 7.40 Recall policy. (a) Recall is an...

  15. 21 CFR 7.40 - Recall policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recall policy. 7.40 Section 7.40 Food...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Industry Responsibilities § 7.40 Recall policy. (a) Recall is an...

  16. Writing superiority in cued recall

    PubMed Central

    Fueller, Carina; Loescher, Jens; Indefrey, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In list learning paradigms with free recall, written recall has been found to be less susceptible to intrusions of related concepts than spoken recall when the list items had been visually presented. This effect has been ascribed to the use of stored orthographic representations from the study phase during written recall (Kellogg, 2001). In other memory retrieval paradigms, by contrast, either better recall for modality-congruent items or an input-independent writing superiority effect have been found (Grabowski, 2005). In a series of four experiments using a paired associate learning paradigm we tested (a) whether output modality effects on verbal recall can be replicated in a paradigm that does not involve the rejection of semantically related intrusion words, (b) whether a possible superior performance for written recall was due to a slower response onset for writing as compared to speaking in immediate recall, and (c) whether the performance in paired associate word recall was correlated with performance in an additional episodic memory recall task. We observed better written recall in the first half of the recall phase, irrespective of the modality in which the material was presented upon encoding. An explanation for this effect based on longer response latencies for writing and hence more time for memory retrieval could be ruled out by showing that the effect persisted in delayed response versions of the task. Although there was some evidence that stored additional episodic information may contribute to the successful retrieval of associate words, this evidence was only found in the immediate response experiments and hence is most likely independent from the observed output modality effect. In sum, our results from a paired associate learning paradigm suggest that superior performance for written vs. spoken recall cannot be (solely) explained in terms of additional access to stored orthographic representations from the encoding phase. Our findings rather suggest a general writing-superiority effect at the time of memory retrieval. PMID:24151483

  17. Writing superiority in cued recall.

    PubMed

    Fueller, Carina; Loescher, Jens; Indefrey, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In list learning paradigms with free recall, written recall has been found to be less susceptible to intrusions of related concepts than spoken recall when the list items had been visually presented. This effect has been ascribed to the use of stored orthographic representations from the study phase during written recall (Kellogg, 2001). In other memory retrieval paradigms, by contrast, either better recall for modality-congruent items or an input-independent writing superiority effect have been found (Grabowski, 2005). In a series of four experiments using a paired associate learning paradigm we tested (a) whether output modality effects on verbal recall can be replicated in a paradigm that does not involve the rejection of semantically related intrusion words, (b) whether a possible superior performance for written recall was due to a slower response onset for writing as compared to speaking in immediate recall, and (c) whether the performance in paired associate word recall was correlated with performance in an additional episodic memory recall task. We observed better written recall in the first half of the recall phase, irrespective of the modality in which the material was presented upon encoding. An explanation for this effect based on longer response latencies for writing and hence more time for memory retrieval could be ruled out by showing that the effect persisted in delayed response versions of the task. Although there was some evidence that stored additional episodic information may contribute to the successful retrieval of associate words, this evidence was only found in the immediate response experiments and hence is most likely independent from the observed output modality effect. In sum, our results from a paired associate learning paradigm suggest that superior performance for written vs. spoken recall cannot be (solely) explained in terms of additional access to stored orthographic representations from the encoding phase. Our findings rather suggest a general writing-superiority effect at the time of memory retrieval. PMID:24151483

  18. Is There a Possible Association between Dietary Habits and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Elderly? The Importance of Diet and Counseling.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Adriane Rocha; Neves-Souza, Rejane Dias; Costa, Viviane de Souza Pinho; Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz; Franco, Pricila Perini Rigotti; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2015-10-01

    Introduction?Poor diet habits and inadequate intake of nutrients are a concern in the elderly. Nutritional education with guidance may improve the results of the treatment of vertigo. Objective?Evaluate the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) associated with feeding habits. Methods?Cross-sectional study with elderly people living independently. We evaluated nutritional habits through the method of dietary 24-hour recall and manipulation of Dix-Hallpike. Results?Based on a sample of 487 individuals, 117 had BPPV. Among the 117 elderly patients with BPPV, 37 (31.62%) had inadequate feeding. From those 370 individuals without BPPV, 97 (26.21%) had inappropriate feeding. No significant association between nutritional habits and BPPV in the total population was observed (p?=?0.3064). However, there was significant relation between BPPV and inadequate carbohydrate intake (p?=?0.0419) and insufficient fiber intake (p?=?0.03), and the diet of these subjects was rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (p?=?0.0084). Conclusion?These data correlate with the dyslipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia status, making it extremely important to reduce the intake of fats and carbohydrates and increase the fiber intake to stabilize triglycerides and thus minimize harmful effects on the inner ear. Food readjustment is suggested in patients with BPPV, along with the work of a multidisciplinary team to improve the quality of the elderly. PMID:26491473

  19. Is There a Possible Association between Dietary Habits and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Elderly? The Importance of Diet and Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Adriane Rocha; Neves-Souza, Rejane Dias; Costa, Viviane de Souza Pinho; Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz; Franco, Pricila Perini Rigotti; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction?Poor diet habits and inadequate intake of nutrients are a concern in the elderly. Nutritional education with guidance may improve the results of the treatment of vertigo. Objective?Evaluate the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) associated with feeding habits. Methods?Cross-sectional study with elderly people living independently. We evaluated nutritional habits through the method of dietary 24-hour recall and manipulation of Dix-Hallpike. Results?Based on a sample of 487 individuals, 117 had BPPV. Among the 117 elderly patients with BPPV, 37 (31.62%) had inadequate feeding. From those 370 individuals without BPPV, 97 (26.21%) had inappropriate feeding. No significant association between nutritional habits and BPPV in the total population was observed (p?=?0.3064). However, there was significant relation between BPPV and inadequate carbohydrate intake (p?=?0.0419) and insufficient fiber intake (p?=?0.03), and the diet of these subjects was rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (p?=?0.0084). Conclusion?These data correlate with the dyslipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia status, making it extremely important to reduce the intake of fats and carbohydrates and increase the fiber intake to stabilize triglycerides and thus minimize harmful effects on the inner ear. Food readjustment is suggested in patients with BPPV, along with the work of a multidisciplinary team to improve the quality of the elderly. PMID:26491473

  20. Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

    2014-03-11

    This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for enhanced H2 production profiles using selected culture conditions and inhibitors of specific pathways in WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 3. Create Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutant strains with modified hydrogenases exhibiting increased O2 tolerance and greater H2 production; and 4. Integrate enhanced hydrogenase mutants and culture and metabolic factor studies to maximize 24-hour H2 production.

  1. Control of bleeding by silk ligation and diathermy coagulation during tonsillectomy: A comparison of efficacy of the two techniques in the first 24 hours after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Khurshid; Ahmad, Rafiq; Khan, Muneeb

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the relative efficacy of silk ligation and diathermy coagulation techniques in controlling bleeding during tonsillectomy in the first 24 hours. Methods: This prospective study was conducted at the Department of ENT, Khalifa Gul Nawaz Teaching Hospital, Bannu and this department related consultants’ private clinics from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014. The study included 180 cases. All patients included were having history of recurrent, acute tonsillitis, with more than 6–7 episodes in one year, five episodes per year for two years, or three episodes per year for three years. All the surgeries were performed by dissection method. Haemostasis during the procedure was secured by either ligation with silk 1 or using diathermy. The results were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 for windows. Results: A total of180 cases were included in the study. The ages of the patients ranged from 5 to 40 years with the mean age of 15.56 years and a std.deviation of +/- 8.24. The male to female ratio was 1.25:1. The number of hemorrhages occurring was greater in the ‘diathermy coagulation’ group as compared to the ‘silk ligation’ group. However, the observed difference was statistically insignificant (p >.05). Conclusion: Primary haemorrhage occurring during tonsillectomy is a serious threat and control of bleeding during the procedure should therefore be meticulous. Both suture ligation and coagulation diathermy for control of bleeders during the procedure by dissection method are equally effective. PMID:26430438

  2. Computer simulation of the effect of dDAVP with saline loading on fluid balance after 24-hour head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. S.; Simanonok, K. E.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid loading (FL) before Shuttle reentry is a countermeasure currently in use by NASA to improve the orthostatic tolerance of astronauts during reentry and postflight. The fluid load consists of water and salt tablets equivalent to 32 oz (946 ml) of isotonic saline. However, the effectiveness of this countermeasure has been observed to decrease with the duration of spaceflight. The countermeasure's effectiveness may be improved by enhancing fluid retention using analogs of vasopressin such as lypressin (LVP) and desmopressin (dDAVP). In a computer simulation study reported previously, we attempted to assess the improvement in fluid retention obtained by the use of LVP administered before FL. The present study is concerned with the use of dDAVP. In a recent 24-hour, 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) study involving seven men, dDAVP was found to improve orthostatic tolerance as assessed by both lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and stand tests. The treatment restored Luft's cumulative stress index (cumulative product of magnitude and duration of LBNP) to nearly pre-bedrest level. The heart rate was lower and stroke volume was marginally higher at the same LBNP levels with administration of dDAVP compared to placebo. Lower heart rates were also observed with dDAVP during stand test, despite the lower level of cardiovascular stress. These improvements were seen with only a small but significant increase in plasma volume of approximately 3 percent. This paper presents a computer simulation analysis of some of the results of this HDT study.

  3. Short versus long-acting local anaesthetic in open carpal tunnel release: which provides better preemptive analgesia in the first 24 hours?

    PubMed

    Chan, Z H; Balakrishnan, V; McDonald, A

    2013-01-01

    Open carpal tunnel release is commonly performed under local anaesthesia. No study has compared intra-operative short- versus long-acting local anaesthetics as preemptive analgesics in carpal tunnel surgery. In this single-blinded prospective study, 100 consecutive carpal tunnel releases were performed by a single surgeon at one institution with either lignocaine (n = 50) or ropivacaine (n = 50). Allocation was performed via the method of alternation. Subjects were given a questionnaire to answer the following: (1) time to first incidence of pain, (2) quality of first night's sleep, and (3) mean numerical pain scores in the first 24 hours. The time to the first postoperative pain was significantly shorter in the lignocaine group (5.58 vs. 9.17 hours, p < 0.035). There were no significant difference in the incidence of poor first night's sleep (16% vs. 26%, p = 0.28) or mean pain scores in the first day (3.6 vs. 2.9, p = 0.16). Existing evidence advocates for long-acting intraoperative local anaesthetic because it results in a longer duration of postoperative analgesia, however, our study suggests that it may also result in a poorer first night's sleep. PMID:23413849

  4. "2001: A Space Odyssey" Revisited: The Feasibility of 24 Hour Commuter Flights to the Moon Using NTR Propulsion with LUNOX Afterburners. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for "24 hour" commuter flights to the Moon. similar to that portrayed in 2001: A Space Odyssey but on a more Spartan scale. are examined using two near term. "high leverage" technologies-liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion and "lunar-derived" oxygen (LUNOX) production. Iron-rich volcanic glass. or "orange soil," discovered during the Apollo 17 mission to Taurus-Littrow. has produced a 4% oxygen yield in recent NASA experiments using hydrogen reduction. LUNOX development and utilization would eliminate the need to transport oxygen supplies from Earth and is expected to dramatically reduce the size, cost and complexity of space transportation systems. The LOX-augmented NTR concept (LANTR) exploits the high performance capability of the conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and the mission leverage provided by LUNOX in a unique way. LANTR utilizes the large divergent section of its nozzle as an "afterburner" into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging from the engine's choked sonic throat-essentially "scramjet propulsion in reverse." By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio, the LANTR engine can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. The thrust augmentation feature of LANTR means that "big engine" performance can be obtained using smaller. more affordable. easier to test NTR engines. The use of high-density LOX in place of low-density LH2 also reduces hydrogen mass and tank volume resulting in smaller space vehicles. An implementation strategy and evolutionary lunar mission architecture is outlined which requires only Shuttle C or "in-line" Shuttle-derived launch vehicles, and utilizes conventional NTR-powered lunar transfer vehicles (LTVs), operating in an "expendable mode" initially, to maximize delivered surface payload on each mission. The increased payload is dedicated to installing "modular" LUNOX production units with the intent of supplying LUNOX to lunar landing vehicles (LLVs) and then LTVs at the earliest possible opportunity. Once LUNOX becomes available in low lunar orbit (LLO), monopropellant NTRs would be outfitted with an oxygen propellant module, feed system and afterburner nozzle for "bipropellant" operation. Transition to a "reusable" mission architecture now occurs with smaller, LANTR-powered LTVs delivering approximately 400% more payload on each piloted round trip mission than earlier expendable "all LH2" NTR systems. As initial lunar outposts grow to eventual lunar settlements and LUNOX production capacity increases, the LANTR concept can enable a rapid "commuter" shuttle capable of 24 hour "one way" trips to and from the Moon. A vast deposit of "iron-rich" volcanic glass beads identified at just one candidate site - located at the southeastern edge of Mare Serenitatis - could supply sufficient LUNOX to support daily commuter flights to the Moon for the next 9000 years'.

  5. "2001: A Space Odyssey" Revisited--The Feasibility of 24 Hour Commuter Flights to the Moon Using NTR Propulsion with LUNOX Afterburners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    1998-01-01

    The prospects for "24 hour" commuter flights to the Moon, similar to that portrayed in 2001: A Space Odyssey but on a more Spartan scale, are examined using two near term, "high leverage" technologies--liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion and "lunar-derived" oxygen (LUNOX) production. Ironrich volcanic glass, or "orange soil," discovered during the Apollo 17 mission to Taurus-Littrow, has produced a 4% oxygen yield in recent NASA experiments using hydrogen reduction. LUNOX development and utilization would eliminate the need to transport oxygen supplies from Earth and is expected to dramatically reduce the size, cost and complexity of space transportation systems. The LOX-augmented NTR concept (LANTR) exploits the high performance capability of the conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and the mission leverage provided by LUNOX in a unique way, LANTR utilizes the large divergent section of its nozzle as an "afterburner" into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging front the engine's choked sonic throat--essentially "scramjet propulsion in reverse." By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio, the LANTR engine can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. The thrust augmentation feature of LANTR means that "big engine" performance can be obtained using smaller, more affordable, easier to test NTR engines. The use of high-density LOX in place of low-density LH2 also reduces hydrogen mass and tank volume resulting in smaller space vehicles. An implementation strategy and evolutionary lunar mission architecture is outlined which requires only Shuttle C or "in-line" Shuttle-derived launch vehicles, and utilizes conventional NTR-powered lunar transfer vehicles (LTVs), operating in an "expendable mode" initially, to maximize delivered surface payload on each mission. The increased payload is dedicated to installing "modular" LUNOX production units with the intent of supplying LUNOX to lunar landing vehicles (LLVS) and then LTVs at the earliest possible opportunity. Once LUNOX becomes available in low lunar orbit (LLO), monopropellant NTRs would be outfitted with an oxygen propellant module, feed system and afterburner nozzle for "bipropellant" operation. Transition to a "reusable" mission architecture now occurs with smaller, LANTR-powered LTVs delivering approximately 400% more payload on each piloted round trip mission than earlier expendable "all LH2" NTR systems. As initial lunar outposts grow to eventual lunar settlements and LUNOX production capacity increases, the LANTR concept can enable a rapid "commuter" shuttle capable of 24 hour "one way" trips to and from the Moon, A vast deposit of"iron-rich" volcanic glass beads identified at just one candidate site--located at the southeastern edge of Mare Serenitatis--could supply, sufficient LUNOX to support daily commuter flights to the Moon for the next 9000 years!

  6. 2001: A Space Odyssey Revisited: The Feasibility of 24 Hour Commuter Flights to the Moon Using NTR Propulsion with LUNOX Afterburners. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2003-01-01

    The prospects for 24 hour commuter flights to the Moon, similar to that portrayed in 2001: A Space Odyssey but on a more Spartan scale, are examined using two near term, high leverage technologies: liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion and lunar-derived oxygen (LUNOX) production. Iron-rich volcanic glass, or orange soil, discovered during the Apollo 17 mission to Taurus-Littrow, has produced a 4 percent oxygen yield in recent NASA experiments using hydrogen reduction. LUNOX development and utilization would eliminate the need to transport oxygen supplies from Earth and is expected to dramatically reduce the size, cost and complexity of space transportation systems. The LOX-augmented NTR concept (LANTR) exploits the high performance capability of the conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and the mission leverage provided by LUNOX in a unique way. LANTR utilizes the large divergent section of its nozzle as an afterburner into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging from the engine's choked sonic throat, essentially scramjet propulsion in reverse. By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio, the LANTR engine can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. The thrust augmentation feature of LANTR means that big engine performance can be obtained using smaller, more affordable, easier to test NTR engines. The use of high-density LOX in place of low density LH2 also reduces hydrogen mass and tank volume resulting in smaller space vehicles. An implementation strategy and evolutionary lunar mission architecture is outlined which requires only Shuttle C or in-line Shuttle-derived launch vehicles, and utilizes conventional NTR-powered lunar transfer vehicles (LTVs), operating in an expendable mode initially, to maximize delivered surface payload on each mission. The increased payload is dedicated to installing modular LUNOX production units with the intent of supplying LUNOX to lunar landing vehicles (LLVs) and then LTVs at the earliest possible opportunity. Once LUNOX becomes available in low lunar orbit (LLO), monopropellant NTRs would be outfitted with an oxygen propellant module, feed system and afterburner nozzle for bipropellant operation. Transition to a reusable mission architecture now occurs with smaller, LANTR-powered LTVs delivering 400% more payload on each piloted round trip mission than earlier expendable all LH2 NTR systems. As initial lunar outposts grow to eventual lunar settlements and LUNOX production capacity increases, the LANTR concept can enable a rapid commuter shuttle capable of 24 hour one way trips to and from the Moon. A vast deposit of iron-rich volcanic glass beads identified at just one candidate site located at the southeastern edge of Mare Serenitatis could supply sufficient LUNOX to support daily commuter flights to the Moon for the next 9000 years!

  7. The Healthy Communities Study Nutrition Assessments: Child Diet and the School Nutrition Environment.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Lorrene D; Wakimoto, Patricia; Woodward-Lopez, Gail; Thompson, Frances E; Loria, Catherine M; Wilson, Dawn K; Kao, Janice; Crawford, Patricia B; Webb, Karen L

    2015-10-01

    Multifaceted community interventions directed at improving food environments are emerging, but their impact on dietary change and obesity prevalence has not been adequately documented. The Healthy Communities Study (HCS) is seeking to identify characteristics and combinations of programs and policies that are associated with children's diets and obesity-related outcomes in various types of communities across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methods used in 2013-2015 in the HCS to assess dietary intake, school nutrition environments, and other nutrition-related behaviors. The conceptual framework of the HCS is based on the socioecological model and behaviors shown in previous studies to be related to obesity in children guided selection of domains. Nine domains were identified as essential measures of nutrition in the HCS: (1) intake of selected foods and beverages; (2) food patterns and behaviors; (3) social support; (4) home environment; (5) school environment; (6) community environment; (7) breastfeeding history; (8) household food insecurity; and (9) dieting behaviors and body image. Children's dietary intake was assessed using a dietary screener and up to two automated 24-hour recalls. Dietary-related behaviors were assessed by a survey administered to the parent, child, or both, depending on child age. School nutrition measures were obtained from a combination of school staff surveys and researcher observations. Information from these measures is expected to contribute to a better understanding of "what is working" to improve the dietary behaviors that are likely to prevent obesity and improve health in children. PMID:26384936

  8. Evaluation of the indications and arrhythmic patterns of 24 hour Holter electrocardiography among hypertensive and diabetic patients seen at OAUTHC, Ile-Ife Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adebayo, Rasaaq A; Ikwu, Amanze N; Balogun, Michael O; Akintomide, Anthony O; Mene-Afejuku, Tuoyo O; Adeyeye, Victor O; Bamikole, Olaniyi J; Bisiriyu, Luqman A; Ajayi, Olufemi E; Ogunyemi, Suraj A; Oketona, Omolola A

    2014-01-01

    Background There are very limited published studies in Nigeria on the use of 24 hour Holter electrocardiogram (Holter ECG) in the arrhythmic evaluation of hypertensive and diabetic patients. Objective To evaluate indications, arrhythmic pattern of Holter ECG, and heart rate variability (HRV) among patients with hypertensive heart disease (HHD) with or without heart failure and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) seen in our cardiac care unit. Methods Seventy-nine patients (32 males and 47 females) were studied consecutively over a year using Schiller type (MT-101) Holter ECG machine. Results Out of the 79 patients, 17 (21.5%) had HHD without heart failure, 33 (41.8%) had HHD with hypertensive heart failure (HHF), while 29 (36.7%) were T2DM patients. The mean (standard deviation) ages of HHD without heart failure, HHF and T2DM patients were 59.65 (±14.38), 65.15 (±14.30), and 54.66 (±8.88) respectively. The commonest indication for Holter ECG was palpitation (38%), followed by syncope (20.3%). Premature ventricular contraction was the commonest arrhythmic pattern among the 79 patients, especially among HHF patients. The HRV using standard deviation of all normal-normal intervals was significantly reduced in T2DM patients (81.03±26.33, confidence interval [CI] =71.02–91.05) compared to the HHD without heart failure (119.65±29.86, CI =104.30–135.00) and HHF (107.03±62.50, CI =84.00–129.19). There was a negative correlation between the duration of T2DM and HRV (r=?0.613). Conclusion Palpitation was the commonest Holter ECG indication and premature ventricular contractions were the commonest arrhythmic pattern among our patients. HRV was reduced in T2DM patients compared with hypertensive patients. PMID:25473303

  9. External Beam Radiotherapy Plus 24-Hour Continuous Infusion of Gemcitabine in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mattiucci, Gian C.; Morganti, Alessio G.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Edy; Alfieri, Sergio; Antinori, Armando; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Agostino, Giuseppe R.; Di Lullo, Liberato; Luzi, Stefano; Mantini, Giovanna; Smaniotto, Daniela; Doglietto, Gian B.; Cellini, Numa

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of gemcitabine-based chemoradiation (CT-RT) in treating patients (pts) affected by locally advanced pancreatic cancers (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Weekly gemcitabine (100 mg/m{sup 2}) was given as a 24-hour infusion during the course of three-dimensional radiotherapy (50.4 Gy to the tumor, 39.6 Gy to the nodes). After CT-RT, pts received five cycles of sequential chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}; 1, 8, q21). Response rate was assessed according to World Health Organization criteria 6 weeks after the end of CT-RT. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), metastases-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the Kaplan Meier method. Results: Forty pts (male/female 22/18; median age 62 years, range, 36-76) were treated from 2000 to 2005. The majority had T4 tumour (n = 34, 85%), six pts (15%) had T3 tumour. Sixteen pts (40%) were node positive at diagnosis. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity was observed in 21 pts (52.5%). Thirty pts (75%) completed the treatment schedule. A clinical response was achieved in 12 pts (30%). With a median follow-up of 76 months (range, 32-98), 2-year LC was 39.6% (median, 12 months), 2-year TTP was 18.4% (median, 10 months), and 2-year MFS was 29.7% (median, 10 months). Two-year OS (25%; median, 15.5 months) compared with our previous study on 5-fluorouracil-based CT-RT (2.8%) was significantly improved (p <0.001). Conclusions: Gemcitabine CT-RT seems correlated with improved outcomes. Healthier patients who are likely to complete the treatment schedule may benefit most from this therapy.

  10. Histopathological changes in Yucatan minipig skin following challenge with sulphur mustard. A sequential study of the first 24 hours following challenge

    PubMed Central

    BROWN, R.F.R.; RICE, P.

    1997-01-01

    Sulphur mustard (HD) or ‘mustard gas’ is a potent vesicant chemical warfare agent whose biological effects in man have been well documented. The histopathological features of the developing cutaneous HD lesion in female Yucatan minipigs up to 24 hours post exposure are reported. Following challenge with HD vapour at a concentration of 12.0??mol/cm2 a sequence of ultrastructural changes to keratinocytes occurred which were initially seen in the stratum basale. Condensation of nuclear heterochromatin and loss of euchromatin was accompanied by cytoplasmic swelling and culminated in focal epidermal necrosis which was evident at 24?h after the challenge. The melanocyte appeared to be the cell type most sensitive to HD challenge with a loss of cytoplasmic electron density in areas of the cytoplasm immediately surrounding the melanosomes, chromatin condensation, nuclear membrane blebbing with mitochondrial and generalized cytoplasmic swelling. Isolated complete cell necrosis and disruption were noted as early as 2?h following the challenge with generalized necrosis being seen from 12?h onwards. From 12?h onwards, areas of basement membrane degeneration were also observed. These appeared similar in ultrastructure to that observed in other animal model systems but did not progress to the large blisters so typical of the human lesion. Damage to the upper dermis took the form of an inflammatory response typified by vascular endothelial swelling and vacuolation, dermal oedema and inflammatory cell (mainly neutrophil) infiltration. There was some evidence of transitory epidermal damage outside the prescribed wound area. This finding may be of clinical importance when surgical treatments are being considered. PMID:9166101

  11. Epidemiology of Urban Traffic Accident Victims Hospitalized More Than 24 Hours in a Level III Trauma Center, Kashan County, Iran, During 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Mahdian, Mehrdad; Sehat, Mojtaba; Fazel, Mohammad Reza; Moraveji, Alireza; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urban traffic accidents are an extensively significant problem in small and busy towns in Iran. This study tried to explore the epidemiological pattern of urban traffic accidents in Kashan and Aran-Bidgol cities, Iran. Objectives: This study aimed to assess various epidemiological factors affecting victims of trauma admitted to a main trauma center in Iran. Patients and Methods: During a retrospective study, data including age, sex, injury type and pattern, outcome, hospital stay and treatment expenditures regarding urban Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs) for one year (March 2012-March 2013) were obtained from the registry of trauma research center, emergency medical services and deputy of health of Kashan University of Medical Sciences. One-way ANOVA and chi-square tests were used to analyze data using SPSS version 16.0. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 1723 victims (82.6% male, sex ratio of almost 5:1) were considered in this study. Mortality rate in trauma cases hospitalized more than 24 hours during our study was 0.8%. Young motorcyclist men with the rate of more than 103 per 10000 were the most vulnerable group. The most common injury was head injury (73.6%) followed by lower limb injury (33.2%). A significant association was found between mechanism of injury and head, lower limb, multiple injuries and high risk age group. Conclusions: Urban RTAs are one of the most important problems in Kashan and Aran-Bidgol cities, which impose a great economic burden on health system. Motorcyclists are the most vulnerable victims and multiple trauma and head injury are seen among them extensively. PMID:26101765

  12. A Guide to using your Library The Library building is situated at the heart of campus and is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The entrance to the

    E-print Network

    Scheichl, Robert

    24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The entrance to the Library is on Level 2 where you will find asking you to collect it from the Issue Desk within 7 days. Books are available for 7 day loan, 28 day loan, short loan (day/overnight) or reference. To borrow a book, use one of the self-issue machines

  13. Whenever you need emergency service or answers, call the Benefit Administrator, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. For calls outside the United States, call collect at 0-410-581-9994.

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    HOURS A DAY, 365 DAYS A YEAR, CALL THE TOLL-FREE NUMBER ON THE BACK OF YOUR VISA® CARD, OR 1-800-VISAWhenever you need emergency service or answers, call the Benefit Administrator, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. For calls outside the United States, call collect at 0-410-581-9994. 1-800-VISA-911 (1

  14. 16 CFR 1102.14 - Recall notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recall notices. 1102.14 Section 1102... Content Requirements § 1102.14 Recall notices. All information presented in a voluntary or mandatory recall notice that has been made available...

  15. 16 CFR 1102.14 - Recall notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recall notices. 1102.14 Section 1102... Content Requirements § 1102.14 Recall notices. All information presented in a voluntary or mandatory recall notice that has been made available...

  16. Krivine's Classical Realizability (recall) The Specification Problem

    E-print Network

    Hyvernat, Pierre

    Krivine's Classical Realizability (recall) The Specification Problem The substitutive case The non Realizability #12;Krivine's Classical Realizability (recall) The Specification Problem The substitutive case Realizability #12;Krivine's Classical Realizability (recall) The Specification Problem The substitutive case

  17. 16 CFR 1102.14 - Recall notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recall notices. 1102.14 Section 1102... Content Requirements § 1102.14 Recall notices. All information presented in a voluntary or mandatory recall notice that has been made available...

  18. Recalls, Market Withdrawals and Safety Alerts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Safety Recalls, Market Withdrawals, & Safety Alerts Recalls, Market Withdrawals, & Safety Alerts Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Safety Alerts Archive. Sign up to receive Recalls, Market Withdrawals and Safety Alerts . Filter by Keyword(s): Filter ...

  19. Diets, equipment, and techniques for maintaining crawfish in the laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarshis, I.B.

    1978-01-01

    One commercial and 4 laboratory prepared extruded, water-stable diets were fed 3 times a week in 1-g portions to juvenile male and female White River crawfish, Procambarus acutus acutus (Girard), for 10 weeks. The. binding material in the laboratory preparation was alginate (Kelgin), whereas that in the commercial preparation was starch. No statistically significant weight differences developed between the groups of crawfish at the end of the 10-week period; all 5 diets were found satisfactory for feeding and maintaining P. acutus acutus in the laboratory, and all test crawfish survived throughout the experimental period. Weight gains were highest in a diet containing 50.5% protein; intermediate in those fed a diet with 46.0% protein; and lowest in those fed diets with 31.7 or 36.3% protein. Crawfish fed the commercial preparation of one of the 46.0% protein diets showed a slightly but not significantly higher weight gain than those fed the laboratory preparation of the diet. In an evaluation of the water stability of 5 commercially prepared animal chow diets and the commercial extruded diet, 2 of the commercial diets disintegrated after one hour exposure in water and the other 3 became bloated after one hour and remained on the surface throughout the 24-hour test. The commercial extruded diet maintained its water stability for the full 24 hours. The commercial preparation of the 46.0% protein diet was successfully used under laboratory conditions for feeding and maintaining the following crawfishes: Cambarellus shufeldtii (Faxon), Cambarus acuminatus Faxon, Orconectes limosus (Rafinesque), O. virilis (Hagen), Procambarus clarkii (Girard), and P. spiculifer (Le conte). In longevity experiments Cambarus diogenes diogenes Girard and Procambarus hinei (Ortmann) now have survived for 8 months on this diet in the laboratory.

  20. Diet Screener in the 2005 CHIS: Definition of Acceptable Dietary Data Values

    Cancer.gov

    Data collected on the 2005 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) Screener are coded by frequency and time unit -- times per day, week, or month. We used USDA's 1994-96 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes of Individuals (CSFII) data on reported intakes over two days of 24-hour recall to make judgments about reasonable frequencies of consumption that were reported on a per day basis. This helped us assess values from the CHIS Screener, some of which are highly unlikely.

  1. Sex and age-related differences in performance in a 24-hour ultra-cycling draft-legal event – a cross-sectional data analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the sex and age-related differences in performance in a draft-legal ultra-cycling event. Methods Age-related changes in performance across years were investigated in the 24-hour draft-legal cycling event held in Schötz, Switzerland, between 2000 and 2011 using multi-level regression analyses including age, repeated participation and environmental temperatures as co-variables. Results For all finishers, the age of peak cycling performance decreased significantly (? = ?0.273, p = 0.036) from 38 ± 10 to 35 ± 6 years in females but remained unchanged (? = ?0.035, p = 0.906) at 41.0 ± 10.3 years in males. For the annual fastest females and males, the age of peak cycling performance remained unchanged at 37.3 ± 8.5 and 38.3 ± 5.4 years, respectively. For all female and male finishers, males improved significantly (? = 7.010, p = 0.006) the cycling distance from 497.8 ± 219.6 km to 546.7 ± 205.0 km whereas females (? = ?0.085, p = 0.987) showed an unchanged performance of 593.7 ± 132.3 km. The mean cycling distance achieved by the male winners of 960.5 ± 51.9 km was significantly (p < 0.001) greater than the distance covered by the female winners with 769.7 ± 65.7 km but was not different between the sexes (p > 0.05). The sex difference in performance for the annual winners of 19.7 ± 7.8% remained unchanged across years (p > 0.05). The achieved cycling distance decreased in a curvilinear manner with advancing age. There was a significant age effect (F = 28.4, p < 0.0001) for cycling performance where the fastest cyclists were in age group 35–39 years. Conclusion In this 24-h cycling draft-legal event, performance in females remained unchanged while their age of peak cycling performance decreased and performance in males improved while their age of peak cycling performance remained unchanged. The annual fastest females and males were 37.3 ± 8.5 and 38.3 ± 5.4 years old, respectively. The sex difference for the fastest finishers was ~20%. It seems that women were not able to profit from drafting to improve their ultra-cycling performance. PMID:24883191

  2. Effect of a Low Iodine Diet vs. Restricted Iodine Diet on Postsurgical Preparation for Radioiodine Ablation Therapy in Thyroid Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chi Young; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Yoon, Mi-Jin; Chang, Hang Seok; Park, Cheong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The radioiodine ablation therapy is required for patients who underwent a total thyroidectomy. Through a comparative review of a low iodine diet (LID) and a restricted iodine diet (RID), the study aims to suggest guidelines that are suitable for the conditions of Korea. Materials and Methods The study was conducted with 101 patients. With 24-hour urine samples from the patients after a 2-week restricted diet and after a 4-week restricted diet, the amount of iodine in the urine was estimated. The consumed radioiodine amounts for 2 hours and 24 hours were calculated. Results This study was conducted with 47 LID patients and 54 RID patients. The amounts of iodine in urine, the 2-week case and 4-week case for each group showed no significant differences. The amounts of iodine in urine between the two groups were both included in the range of the criteria for radioiodine ablation therapy. Also, 2 hours and 24 hours radioiodine consumption measured after 4-week restrictive diet did not show statistical differences between two groups. Conclusion A 2-week RID can be considered as a type of radioiodine ablation therapy after patients undergo a total thyroidectomy. PMID:26069126

  3. Serial Position Curves in Free Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laming, Donald

    2010-01-01

    The scenario for free recall set out in Laming (2009) is developed to provide models for the serial position curves from 5 selected sets of data, for final free recall, and for multitrial free recall. The 5 sets of data reflect the effects of rate of presentation, length of list, delay of recall, and suppression of rehearsal. Each model…

  4. Post-retirement: Emeritus and Recall

    E-print Network

    Soloveichik, David

    Post-retirement: Emeritus and Recall Cynthia Lynch Leathers Assistant Vice Provost, Academic Recall appointments · Types of recall appointments #12;EMERITUS TITLE Academic Senate Faculty the purpose for which it is to be used. #12;Emeritus "Benefits" PARKING · Emeritus faculty ­ no paid recall

  5. Nutritional contribution of lean beef in diets of adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2004

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The learning outcome was to understand the important contribution of lean beef to total nutrient intake in diets of American adults and to determine dietary intake differences between lean beef consumers and non-consumers. The National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey, 1999-2004, 24-hour di...

  6. Diet in 45- to 74-year-old individuals with diagnosed diabetes: comparison to counterparts without diabetes in a nationally representative survey (Etude Nationale Nutrition Santé 2006-2007).

    PubMed

    Castetbon, Katia; Bonaldi, Christophe; Deschamps, Valérie; Vernay, Michel; Malon, Aurélie; Salanave, Benoit; Druet, Céline

    2014-06-01

    A healthy diet has been shown to prevent diabetes complications. However, the eating habits of individuals with diabetes who are aware of their glycemic condition have been poorly studied. This study's objective was to assess the dietary behavior overall and according to dietary recommendations in adults diagnosed with diabetes compared with those of a general population of the same age (45 to 74 years) in a nationally representative survey carried out in France in 2006-2007 (Etude Nationale Nutrition Santé) (n=1,476 including 101 patients with diabetes). Trained dietitians assessed diet using three 24-hour recalls and diabetes was self-declared. After weighting and using multiple adjustments, mean food and nutrient intakes were compared according to diabetes status. Interactions with age and sex were sought. Adults with diabetes had lower intakes of sweetened foods (40 g/day vs 125 g/day), alcohol (1.45 g/day vs 1.64 g/day), energy (1,790 kcal/day vs 1,986 kcal/day), and simple sugar (63.1 g/day vs 89.8 g/day) and higher intakes of meat (126 g/day vs 109 g/day), complex carbohydrates (26.3% energy intake vs 23.6% energy intake), and vitamins B and E (628 ?g/day vs 541 ?g/day). In addition, 45- to 59-year-old individuals with diabetes ate more fruits and vegetables, fiber, beta carotene, folate, vitamin C, and potassium than adults of the same age who did not have diabetes. Overall, 45- to 74-year-old adults with diabetes had a higher-quality diet than individuals without diabetes. However, compared with recommendations, a healthy diet continues to represent a public health challenge in terms of preventing diabetes complications. PMID:24183995

  7. Impact of dairy and sweetened beverage consumption on diet and weight of a multiethnic population of head start mothers.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Carol E; Nicklas, Theresa A; Liu, Yan; Franklin, Frank A

    2009-05-01

    Mothers with children in Head Start play a critical role in providing healthful diets and modeling good dietary behaviors to their children, but there is little information available on their diet, especially on beverage consumption. The objective of this study was to assess the association of milk and sweetened beverage consumption with nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, and weight of a multiethnic population of Head Start mothers. Using a cross-sectional, secondary analysis, African-American (43%), Hispanic (33%), and white (24%) women (n=609) were divided into four beverage consumption groups: high milk/low sweetened beverage, high milk/high sweetened beverage, low milk/low sweetened beverage, and low milk/high sweetened beverage. Nutrient intake was determined by averaging 24-hour dietary recalls from 3 nonconsecutive days. Dietary adequacy was determined with the Mean Adequacy Ratio. Mean body mass index for the four beverage consumption groups was compared; there were no differences among the groups (overall mean+/-standard error=30.8+/-0.3). Women in the high milk/low sweetened beverage group had higher mean intakes of vitamins A, D, and B-6; riboflavin; thiamin; folate; phosphorus; calcium; iron; magnesium; and potassium (P<0.0125 for all) when compared with the other beverage consumption groups. Mean Adequacy Ratio was highest in the high milk/low sweetened beverage (71.8+/-0.8) and lowest in the low milk/high sweetened beverage (58.4+/-0.8) consumption groups (P<0.0125). Women in the high milk/low sweetened beverage group consumed more nutrient-dense foods. Overall consumption of milk was low. Consumption of high milk/low sweetened beverage was associated with improved nutrient intake, including the shortfall nutrients, ie, calcium, potassium, magnesium, and vitamin A. PMID:19394474

  8. Action research through stimulated recall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, John

    1993-12-01

    The emphasis in classroom learning research has moved from process-product models to the mediating process paradigm. The stimulated-recall interview and thik aloud techniques are the two main processes that have been used in attempts to find out what goes on inside students' heads while they are learning. For example, this researcher has used the stimulated-recall interview technique to identify the workplace thinking of a marine science researcher, and the in-class thinking of a year eleven biology student. Such studies as these have produced findings with important implications for the classroom teacher in the role of action researcher. This paper describes how to conduct stimulated-recall interviews and discusses some classroom implications from the two studies.

  9. Study modality and false recall.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebekah E; Engle, Randall W

    2011-01-01

    False memories occur when individuals mistakenly report an event as having taken place when that event did not in fact occur. The DRM (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) paradigm provides an effective technique for creating and investigating false memories. In this paradigm participants study a list of words (e.g., SOUR, CANDY,…) that are highly associated to a non-presented critical item (e.g., SWEET). The study phase is followed by a test of memory for the study list words. Researchers typically find very high levels of false recall of the critical non-presented item. However, the likelihood of falsely remembering the non-presented critical items can be reduced by presenting studied associates visually rather than auditorally (e.g., Smith & Hunt, 1998). This is referred to as the modality effect in false memory. The current study investigated the role of resource availability in the expression of this modality effect in false recall. In Experiment 1 false recall was reduced in the visual study presentation condition relative to the auditory condition for participants with higher working memory capacity, but not for participants with lower working memory capacity. In Experiment 2 the effect of study modality on false recall was eliminated by the addition of a divided attention task at encoding. Both studies support the proposal that resource availability plays a role in the expression of the modality effect in the DRM paradigm (Smith, Lozito, & Bayen, 2005). PMID:20494859

  10. Recall Strategies and Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beebe, Mona J.; And Others

    Research on text organization has demonstrated that reading is responsive to the number and complexity of idea units or propositions in a text, and that the capacity of children to recall information is responsive to the relative importance of the idea units. A study was undertaken to examine an extension of these propositions: namely, that…

  11. Diet-Related Risk Factors for Leprosy: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Inge; van Muiden, Lisanne; Alam, Khorshed; Bowers, Robert; Hossain, Md. Anwar; Kispotta, Kolpona; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Background Food shortage was associated with leprosy in two recent studies investigating the relation between socioeconomic factors and leprosy. Inadequate intake of nutrients due to food shortage may affect the immune system and influence the progression of infection to clinical leprosy. We aimed to identify possible differences in dietary intake between recently diagnosed leprosy patients and control subjects. Methods In a leprosy endemic area of Bangladesh, newly diagnosed leprosy patients and control subjects were interviewed about their socioeconomic situation, health and diet. Dietary intakes were recorded with a 24-hour recall, from which a Dietary Diversity Score (DDS) was calculated. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated and Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) was filled out for every participant. Using logistic regression, a univariate, block wise multivariate, and an integrated analysis were carried out. Results 52 leprosy cases and 100 control subjects were included. Food shortage was more common, dietary diversity was lower and household food insecurity was higher in the patient group. Patients consumed significantly less items from the DDS food groups ‘Meat and fish’ and ‘Other fruits and vegetables.’ Lower food expenditure per capita, lower BMI, lower DDS and absence of household food stocks are the main factors associated with an increased risk of having leprosy. Conclusion Low income families have only little money to spend on food and consequently have a low intake of highly nutritious non-rice foods such as meat, fish, milk, eggs, fruits and vegetables. Development of clinical leprosy could be explained by deficiencies of the nutrients that these foods normally provide. PMID:25965879

  12. Peer and parental influences on adolescent body composition, nutrient intake, and food preference 

    E-print Network

    Lazarou, Emily Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    in the analyses of this thesis. Participants completed anthropometric measurements, a 24-hour dietary recall, food frequency questionnaire, 2-day diet record, and a cognitive questionnaire. Pearson's product moment and linear regression analyses were used...

  13. MERIT Award Recipient: Raymond J. Carroll, Ph.D.

    Cancer.gov

    In our work in nutritional epidemiology, we propose to develop statistical methods applicable to cohort studies of diet and cancer. Dietary studies typically use such instruments as food frequency questionnaires (FFQ), 24-hour recalls and diaries.

  14. 9 CFR 381.311 - Recall procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recall procedure. 381.311 Section 381...Canning and Canned Products § 381.311 Recall procedure. Establishments shall prepare and maintain a current procedure for the recall of all canned product covered by...

  15. 9 CFR 318.311 - Recall procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recall procedure. 318.311 Section 318...Canning and Canned Products § 318.311 Recall procedure. Establishments shall prepare and maintain a current procedure for the recall of all canned product covered by...

  16. 9 CFR 318.311 - Recall procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recall procedure. 318.311 Section 318...Canning and Canned Products § 318.311 Recall procedure. Establishments shall prepare and maintain a current procedure for the recall of all canned product covered by...

  17. 9 CFR 381.311 - Recall procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recall procedure. 381.311 Section 381...Canning and Canned Products § 381.311 Recall procedure. Establishments shall prepare and maintain a current procedure for the recall of all canned product covered by...

  18. 9 CFR 318.311 - Recall procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recall procedure. 318.311 Section 318...Canning and Canned Products § 318.311 Recall procedure. Establishments shall prepare and maintain a current procedure for the recall of all canned product covered by...

  19. Research Article Recalling a Witnessed Event

    E-print Network

    Patel, Aniruddh D.

    Research Article Recalling a Witnessed Event Increases Eyewitness Suggestibility The Reversed to misinformation about that event. The typical misinformation paradigm, however, does not include a recall test testing effect), recalling a witnessed event prior to re- ceiving misinformation about it should reduce

  20. 9 CFR 318.311 - Recall procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recall procedure. 318.311 Section 318...Canning and Canned Products § 318.311 Recall procedure. Establishments shall prepare and maintain a current procedure for the recall of all canned product covered by...

  1. 9 CFR 381.311 - Recall procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recall procedure. 381.311 Section 381...Canning and Canned Products § 381.311 Recall procedure. Establishments shall prepare and maintain a current procedure for the recall of all canned product covered by...

  2. BRIEF REPORT Free recall enhances subsequent learning

    E-print Network

    McDermott, Kathleen

    BRIEF REPORT Free recall enhances subsequent learning Kathleen M. Arnold & Kathleen B. Mc- duce a paradigm that can measure the indirect, potentiating effect of free recall tests on subsequent, the benefit of a restudy trial was enhanced when prior free recall tests had been taken. The results from

  3. 9 CFR 381.311 - Recall procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recall procedure. 381.311 Section 381...Canning and Canned Products § 381.311 Recall procedure. Establishments shall prepare and maintain a current procedure for the recall of all canned product covered by...

  4. 9 CFR 381.311 - Recall procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recall procedure. 381.311 Section 381...Canning and Canned Products § 381.311 Recall procedure. Establishments shall prepare and maintain a current procedure for the recall of all canned product covered by...

  5. An Improved Algorithm for Predicting Free Recalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laming, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Laming [Laming, D. (2006). "Predicting free recalls." "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition," 32, 1146-1163] has shown that, in a free-recall experiment in which the participants rehearsed out loud, entire sequences of recalls could be predicted, to a useful degree of precision, from the prior sequences of stimuli…

  6. 9 CFR 318.311 - Recall procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recall procedure. 318.311 Section 318...Canning and Canned Products § 318.311 Recall procedure. Establishments shall prepare and maintain a current procedure for the recall of all canned product covered by...

  7. Improved diet quality, nutrient intake, and health associated with out-of-hand tree nut consumption in U.S. adults: NHANES 1999–2004

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HANES (1999–2004), data were used to examine the association of out-of-hand tree nut consumption (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, filberts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts) with diet quality, nutrient intakes, and health risks in adults 19+ yrs (n equals 13,292). Using 24 hour ...

  8. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR REIMBURSEMENT FOR FIELD COLLECTION OF DIET SAMPLES (UA-F-23.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to provide a uniform procedure for the financial reimbursement of primary respondents for the collection of diet samples. Respondents were reimbursed for replicate food and beverage samples by type and amount collected over a 24-hour sampling period. ...

  9. Cross sectional longitudinal study of spot morning urine protein:creatinine ratio, 24 hour urine protein excretion rate, glomerular filtration rate, and end stage renal failure in chronic renal disease in patients without diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruggenenti, P.; Gaspari, F.; Perna, A.; Remuzzi, G.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the protein:creatinine ratio in spot morning urine samples is a reliable indicator of 24 hour urinary protein excretion and predicts the rate of decline of glomerular filtration rate and progression to end stage renal failure in non-diabetic patients with chronic nephropathy. DESIGN: Cross sectional correlation between the ratio and urinary protein excretion rate. Univariate and multivariate analysis of baseline predictors, including the ratio and 24 hour urinary protein, of decline in glomerular filtration rate and end stage renal failure in the long term. SETTING: Research centre in Italy. SUBJECTS: 177 non-diabetic outpatients with chronic renal disease screened for participation in the ramipril efficacy in nephropathy study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of decline in filtration rate evaluated by repeated measurements of unlabelled iohexol plasma clearance and rate of progression to renal failure. RESULTS: Protein:creatinine ratio was significantly correlated with absolute and log transformed 24 hour urinary protein values (P = 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively.) Ratios also had high predictive value for rate of decline of the glomerular filtration rate (univariate P = 0.0003, multivariate P = 0.004) and end stage renal failure (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04). Baseline protein:creatinine ratios and rate of decline of the glomerular filtration rate were also significantly correlated (P < 0.0005). In the lowest third of the protein:creatinine ratio (< 1.7) there was 3% renal failure compared with 21.2% in the highest third (> 2.7) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Protein:creatinine ratio in spot morning urine samples is a precise indicator of proteinuria and a reliable predictor of progression of disease in non-diabetic patients with chronic nephropathies and represents a simple and inexpensive procedure in establishing severity of renal disease and prognosis. PMID:9501711

  10. Recall termination in free recall Jonathan F. Miller & Christoph T. Weidemann &

    E-print Network

    Weidemann, Christoph

    Recall termination in free recall Jonathan F. Miller & Christoph T. Weidemann & Michael J. Kahana the dynamics of memory search in the free recall task, relatively little is known about the factors related to recall termination. Rean- alyzing individual trial data from 14 prior studies (1,079 participants in 28

  11. [Dream recall and sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Schredl, M; Bozzer, A; Morlock, M

    1997-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between dream recall and sleep disorders. The sample comprised 762 patients who were diagnosed in the sleep laboratory. In the course of the examination they completed the sleep questionnaire SF-B (Görtelmeyer 1986). The results showed a heightened dream recall frequency (DRF) in insomniacs and patients with myoclonia. This result as well as the findings in the control group supports the arousal-retrieval model of dream recall (Koulack u. Goodenough 1976) which emphasizes the importance of nocturnal awakenings. However, this model seems only to be valid for males. In females, DRF is mainly influenced by emotional stress which is best explained by the salience hypothesis of Cohen and MacNeilage (1974). They pointed out that intensive dream emotions lead to high recallability of dream experience. The data gives evidence to the hypothesis of Ermann et al. (1993, 1994) which states that reduced DRF in terms of unsuccessful dream work is accompanied by frequent nocturnal awakenings. DRF of patients with sleep apnea syndrome did not differ from DRF in healthy controls. In addition, sleep apnea parameters did not correlate substantially with DRF. The finding that insomniacs reported more negatively toned dreams in comparison to persons who were examined for sleep apnea but did not showed a pathological apnea index. This may be an hint to increased emotional stress in this patient group. To summarize, the results are promising in clarifying the relationship between sleep disorders and dream life. The next step is to investigate dream reports of these patients by means of content analysis. PMID:9206791

  12. 40 CFR 90.808 - Ordered recall provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ordered recall provisions. 90.808 Section 90.808 Protection...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.808 Ordered recall provisions....

  13. 40 CFR 90.804 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Voluntary emissions recall. 90.804 Section 90.804 Protection of...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.804 Voluntary emissions recall....

  14. 40 CFR 90.804 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 90.804 Section 90.804 Protection of...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.804 Voluntary emissions recall....

  15. 40 CFR 90.808 - Ordered recall provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ordered recall provisions. 90.808 Section 90.808 Protection...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.808 Ordered recall provisions....

  16. 40 CFR 90.808 - Ordered recall provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Ordered recall provisions. 90.808 Section 90.808 Protection...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.808 Ordered recall provisions....

  17. 40 CFR 90.808 - Ordered recall provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ordered recall provisions. 90.808 Section 90.808 Protection...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.808 Ordered recall provisions....

  18. 40 CFR 90.804 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 90.804 Section 90.804 Protection of...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.804 Voluntary emissions recall....

  19. 40 CFR 90.804 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 90.804 Section 90.804 Protection of...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.804 Voluntary emissions recall....

  20. 40 CFR 90.808 - Ordered recall provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ordered recall provisions. 90.808 Section 90.808 Protection...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.808 Ordered recall provisions....

  1. 40 CFR 90.804 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 90.804 Section 90.804 Protection of...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.804 Voluntary emissions recall....

  2. A Cross-Sectional Study on the Diet and Nutritional Status of Adolescent Girls in Zambézia Province, Mozambique (the ZANE Study): Design, Methods, and Population Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Freese, Riitta; Fidalgo, Lourdes; Selvester, Kerry; Ismael, Carina; Mutanen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Background There is very little published work on dietary intake and nutritional status of Mozambicans. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study on the diet and nutritional status of adolescent girls in different types of communities in Zambézia Province, Central Mozambique, in two distinct seasons. Objective The purpose of this paper is to present the design, methods, and study population characteristics of the Estudo do Estado Nutricional e da Dieta em Raparigas Adolescentes na Zambézia (the ZANE Study). Methods Data was collected in January-February 2010 ("hunger season") and in May-June 2010 ("harvest season"). A total of 551 girls in the age group 14-19 years old were recruited from one urban area and two districts (district towns and rural villages). The study protocol included a background interview, a 24-hour dietary recall interview, a food frequency questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, bioimpedance, hemoglobin measurement, and venous blood, urine, buccal cell, and fecal sampling. Results Adolescent motherhood was common in all study regions. Stunting prevalence for the total study population as a weighted percentage was 17.8% (95/549; 95% CI 14.3-22.0) with no regional differences. Overweight was found mainly in the urban area where the prevalence was 12.6% (20/159; 95% CI 7.5-17.6), thinness was rare. There were regional differences in the prevalence of malaria parasitemia and intestinal helminth infestation, but not human immunodeficiency virus. Conclusions The fully analyzed data from the ZANE Study will yield results useful for setting priorities in nutrition policy and further research on the diet and nutritional status in Mozambique and other countries with similar nutritional problems. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01944891; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01944891 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6L9OUrsq8). PMID:24598035

  3. POSITIVE EMOTIONS ENHANCE RECALL OF PERIPHERAL DETAILS

    PubMed Central

    Talarico, Jennifer M.; Berntsen, Dorthe; Rubin, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Emotional arousal and negative affect enhance recall of central aspects of an event. However, the role of discrete emotions in selective memory processing is understudied. Undergraduates were asked to recall and rate autobiographical memories of eight emotional events. Details of each memory were rated as central or peripheral to the event. Significance of the event, vividness, reliving and other aspects of remembering were also rated for each event. Positive affect enhanced recall of peripheral details. Furthermore, the impairment of peripheral recall was greatest in memories of anger, not of fear. Reliving the experience at retrieval was negatively correlated with recall of peripheral details for some emotions (e.g., anger) but not others (e.g., fear), irrespective of similarities in affect and intensity. Within individuals, recall of peripheral details was correlated with less belief in the memory’s accuracy and more likelihood to recall the memory from one’s own eyes (i.e., a field perspective). PMID:21359127

  4. Recall Latencies, Confidence, and Output Positions of True and False Memories: Implications for Recall and Metamemory Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jou, Jerwen

    2008-01-01

    Recall latency, recall accuracy rate, and recall confidence were examined in free recall as a function of recall output serial position using a modified Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to test a strength-based theory against the dual-retrieval process theory of recall output sequence. The strength theory predicts the item output sequence to be…

  5. Mediterranean Diet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Healthy Children Fats and Oils Meat, Poultry and Fish Milk Products Overweight in Children Vegetarian Diets Nutrition Center • Home • Healthy Eating AHA Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Making Healthy Choices ...

  6. Vegetarian Diet

    MedlinePLUS

    A vegetarian diet focuses on plants for food. These include fruits, vegetables, dried beans and peas, grains, seeds and nuts. There is no single type of vegetarian diet. Instead, vegetarian eating patterns usually fall into the ...

  7. Diet and serum lipids: changes over socio-economic transition period in Lithuanian rural population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since regaining of independence in 1990, Lithuania has been undergoing substantial political, economic, and social changes that affected the nutrition habits of population. Dietary changes might have impact on the trends of dietary related risk factors of chronic diseases. The aim of the study was to compare trends in diet and lipid profile of Lithuanian rural population aged 25-64 during two decades of transition period (1987-2007). Methods Four cross-sectional surveys were conducted within the framework of the Countrywide Integrated Noncommunicable Diseases Intervention Programme in five regions of Lithuania in 1987, 1993, 1999, and 2007. For each survey, a stratified independent random sample was drawn from the lists of the inhabitants aged 25-64 years registered at the primary health care centres. Altogether 3127 men and 3857 women participated in the surveys. 24-hour recall was used for evaluation of dietary habits. Serum lipids were determined using enzymatic methods. Predicted changes of serum cholesterol were calculated by Keys equation. Results The percentage of energy from saturated fatty acids has decreased from 18.0 to 15.1 among men and from 17.6 to 14.8 among women over the period of 20 years. The average share of polyunsaturated fatty acids in total energy intake increased from 5.3% to 7.1% among men and from 4.9% to 7.3% among women. The mean intake of cholesterol declined among women. Favourable trends in fatty acids composition were caused by increased use of vegetable oil for cooking and replacement of butter spread with margarine. Since 1987, the mean value of total cholesterol has decreased by 0.6 mmol/l. Total dietary effect accounts for a 0.26 mmol/l (43.3%) decline in serum cholesterol among men and 0.31 mmol/l (50.8%) decline among women. Conclusions Improvement in the quality of fat intake was observed in Lithuanian rural population over two decades of transition period. Positive changes in diet, mainly reduction in saturated fatty acids intake, contributed to decline in serum cholesterol level. Strengthening of favourable trends in nutrition habits in Lithuanian population should be one of the most important strategies of cardiovascular diseases prevention. PMID:21651754

  8. Quantum Bounce and Cosmic Recall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Singh, Parampreet

    2008-04-01

    Loop quantum cosmology predicts that, in simple models, the big bang is replaced by a quantum bounce. A natural question is whether the universe retains, after the bounce, its memory about the previous epoch. More precisely, does the Universe retain various properties of the state after evolving unitarily through the bounce, or does it suffer from recently suggested cosmic amnesia? We show that this issue can be answered unambiguously at least within an exactly solvable model. A semiclassical state at late times on one side of the bounce, peaked on a pair of canonically conjugate variables, strongly bounds the fluctuations on the other side, implying semiclassicality. For a model universe growing to 1 megaparsec, the change in relative fluctuation across the bounce is less than 10-56 (becoming smaller for larger universes). The universe maintains (an almost) total recall.

  9. Quantum bounce and cosmic recall.

    PubMed

    Corichi, Alejandro; Singh, Parampreet

    2008-04-25

    Loop quantum cosmology predicts that, in simple models, the big bang is replaced by a quantum bounce. A natural question is whether the universe retains, after the bounce, its memory about the previous epoch. More precisely, does the Universe retain various properties of the state after evolving unitarily through the bounce, or does it suffer from recently suggested cosmic amnesia? We show that this issue can be answered unambiguously at least within an exactly solvable model. A semiclassical state at late times on one side of the bounce, peaked on a pair of canonically conjugate variables, strongly bounds the fluctuations on the other side, implying semiclassicality. For a model universe growing to 1 megaparsec, the change in relative fluctuation across the bounce is less than 10(-56) (becoming smaller for larger universes). The universe maintains (an almost) total recall. PMID:18518182

  10. 21 CFR 107.230 - Elements of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...extent of a recall communication shall be commensurate...recalled and the strategy developed for the recall. The recall communication shall instruct...evaluation, the recall strategy, and all recall communications (including,...

  11. 21 CFR 107.230 - Elements of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...extent of a recall communication shall be commensurate...recalled and the strategy developed for the recall. The recall communication shall instruct...evaluation, the recall strategy, and all recall communications (including,...

  12. 21 CFR 107.230 - Elements of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...extent of a recall communication shall be commensurate...recalled and the strategy developed for the recall. The recall communication shall instruct...evaluation, the recall strategy, and all recall communications (including,...

  13. 21 CFR 107.230 - Elements of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...extent of a recall communication shall be commensurate...recalled and the strategy developed for the recall. The recall communication shall instruct...evaluation, the recall strategy, and all recall communications (including,...

  14. 21 CFR 107.230 - Elements of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...extent of a recall communication shall be commensurate...recalled and the strategy developed for the recall. The recall communication shall instruct...evaluation, the recall strategy, and all recall communications (including,...

  15. 22 CFR 19.10-6 - Benefits for recall service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Benefits for recall service. 19.10-6 Section 19...SYSTEM § 19.10-6 Benefits for recall service. (a) Annuity of recalled...recalled annuitant during the period of the recall service. Upon reversion of the...

  16. 22 CFR 19.10-6 - Benefits for recall service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Benefits for recall service. 19.10-6 Section 19...SYSTEM § 19.10-6 Benefits for recall service. (a) Annuity of recalled...recalled annuitant during the period of the recall service. Upon reversion of the...

  17. 22 CFR 19.10-6 - Benefits for recall service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Benefits for recall service. 19.10-6 Section 19...SYSTEM § 19.10-6 Benefits for recall service. (a) Annuity of recalled...recalled annuitant during the period of the recall service. Upon reversion of the...

  18. 22 CFR 19.10-6 - Benefits for recall service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Benefits for recall service. 19.10-6 Section 19...SYSTEM § 19.10-6 Benefits for recall service. (a) Annuity of recalled...recalled annuitant during the period of the recall service. Upon reversion of the...

  19. 22 CFR 19.10-6 - Benefits for recall service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Benefits for recall service. 19.10-6 Section 19...SYSTEM § 19.10-6 Benefits for recall service. (a) Annuity of recalled...recalled annuitant during the period of the recall service. Upon reversion of the...

  20. Smooth Calibration, Leaky Forecasts, and Finite Recall

    E-print Network

    Hart, Sergiu

    Smooth Calibration, Leaky Forecasts, and Finite Recall Sergiu Hart October 2015 SERGIU HART c 2015 ­ p. #12;Smooth Calibration, Leaky Forecasts, and Finite Recall Sergiu Hart Center for the Study://www.ma.huji.ac.il/hart SERGIU HART c 2015 ­ p. #12;Paper SERGIU HART c 2015 ­ p. #12;Paper Dean P. Foster and Sergiu Hart Smooth

  1. Directed Forgetting of Recently Recalled Autobiographical Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnier, Amanda J.; Conway, Martin A.; Mayoh, Lyndel; Speyer, Joanne; Avizmil, Orit; Harris, Celia B.

    2007-01-01

    In 6 experiments, the authors investigated list-method directed forgetting of recently recalled autobiographical memories. Reliable directed forgetting effects were observed across all experiments. In 4 experiments, the authors examined the impact of memory valence on directed forgetting. The forget instruction impaired recall of negative,…

  2. 21 CFR 7.42 - Recall strategy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recall strategy. 7.42 Section 7.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY... will be developed by the agency for a Food and Drug Administration-requested recall and by...

  3. 21 CFR 7.42 - Recall strategy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recall strategy. 7.42 Section 7.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY... will be developed by the agency for a Food and Drug Administration-requested recall and by...

  4. 21 CFR 7.42 - Recall strategy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recall strategy. 7.42 Section 7.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY... will be developed by the agency for a Food and Drug Administration-requested recall and by...

  5. 21 CFR 7.42 - Recall strategy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recall strategy. 7.42 Section 7.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY... will be developed by the agency for a Food and Drug Administration-requested recall and by...

  6. 21 CFR 7.42 - Recall strategy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recall strategy. 7.42 Section 7.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY... will be developed by the agency for a Food and Drug Administration-requested recall and by...

  7. Spatial recall improved by retrieval enactment.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gregory V; Martin, Maryanne

    2009-06-01

    Evidence from studies of intentional learning suggests that the accuracy of recall is not assisted by appropriate enactment at retrieval, as opposed to encoding. In the present study, long-term recall of spatial arrays following incidental learning (text messaging or calculator use) was tested under three different motor conditions at retrieval. For both letter and number arrays, the accuracy of recall was found to be improved by relevant enactment at the time of retrieval, relative to retrieval with no movement. In contrast, irrelevant movement was found to produce an impairment in accuracy. The overall accuracy of recalling a letter array was found to be a power-law function of the frequency of exposure to the array. The findings are discussed in terms of the hypothesis that appropriate movement during memory retrieval recruits egocentric representations that supplement allocentric representations subserving longer term spatial recall. PMID:19451379

  8. Drug recall: An incubus for pharmaceutical companies and most serious drug recall of history

    PubMed Central

    Nagaich, Upendra; Sadhna, Divya

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing trend in the number of prescribed and over-the-counter drug recall over the last few years. The recall is usually due to company's discovery, customer's complaint or Food and Drug Administration (FDA) observation. The process of recall involves a planned specific course of action, which addresses the depth of recall, need for public warning, and the extent of effectiveness checks for the recall. The FDA review and/or recommend changes to the firm's recall strategy, as appropriate. The critical recall information list includes the identity of the product; summary of the failure; amount of product produced in the distribution chain and direct account. Product recalls clashes thousands of companies every year affecting: sales, testing customer relationships and disrupting supply chains. Drug recall is incubus for pharmaceutical companies. It effects the reputation of the company. The reason for the recall can be divided into two categories: manufacturing affined and safety/efficacy affined. It is essential to follow all the guidelines related to drug development and manufacturing procedure so as to minimize drug recall. PMID:25599028

  9. 24-hour security contact (0115) 951 3013

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Pavilion Wolfson Building Architecture and Built Environment Chemical and Environmental Engineering and Social Club Lenton Eaves Lenton Fields Lenton Grove Lenton Hurst 4 3 5 52 The Downs Millennium Garden

  10. 300 billion watts, 24 hours a day

    SciTech Connect

    Shiner, L.

    1990-07-01

    A cosmic solution to the world's upcoming energy crunch and one man's persistent drive to realize a workable and acceptable concept is described. Photovoltaic cells ,the same equipment that for 30 years has converted sunlight to electricity for communication satellites are at the core of the proposal. Once a series of 'sunsats' reach geosynchronous orbit, the cells, arranged in huge grids, are bathed in almost perpetual sunlight. Each grid is equipped with devices for converting the electricity produced by the solar cells into microwaves and transmitting them to receiving stations on earth. The rectifying antennas, or rectennas, convert the microwaves into direct-current electricity, which is fed into the local utility's power supply. The status of proposal, development and opposition to solar power satellites is discussed. Relevant technologies associated with laser development, the SDI, moon-based solar stations, and those evolving from research in other countries continue to lend credence to eventually developing a practical solar power satellite program.

  11. 40 CFR 94.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting. 94.404 Section 94.404...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 94.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any...

  12. 21 CFR 810.13 - Mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mandatory recall order. 810.13 Section 810.13 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.13 Mandatory...

  13. 40 CFR 91.904 - Voluntary emission recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Voluntary emission recall. 91.904 Section 91.904 Protection...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.904 Voluntary emission recall. (a) A manufacturer, prior to...

  14. 40 CFR 91.904 - Voluntary emission recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Voluntary emission recall. 91.904 Section 91.904 Protection...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.904 Voluntary emission recall. (a) A manufacturer, prior to...

  15. 40 CFR 91.904 - Voluntary emission recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Voluntary emission recall. 91.904 Section 91.904 Protection...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.904 Voluntary emission recall. (a) A manufacturer, prior to...

  16. 40 CFR 94.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Voluntary emissions recall reporting. 94.404 Section 94.404...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 94.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any...

  17. 40 CFR 91.806 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Voluntary emissions recall. 91.806 Section 91.806 Protection...SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES In-Use Testing and Recall Regulations § 91.806 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) Prior to an EPA ordered...

  18. 40 CFR 91.904 - Voluntary emission recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Voluntary emission recall. 91.904 Section 91.904 Protection...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.904 Voluntary emission recall. (a) A manufacturer, prior to...

  19. 40 CFR 91.806 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 91.806 Section 91.806 Protection...SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES In-Use Testing and Recall Regulations § 91.806 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) Prior to an EPA ordered...

  20. 40 CFR 92.703 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Voluntary emissions recall. 92.703 Section 92.703 Protection...FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.703 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) Prior to an EPA ordered...

  1. 21 CFR 7.50 - Public notification of recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Public notification of recall. 7.50 Section 7.50 Food and...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Responsibilities § 7.50 Public notification of recall. The Food and Drug...

  2. 40 CFR 91.806 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 91.806 Section 91.806 Protection...SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES In-Use Testing and Recall Regulations § 91.806 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) Prior to an EPA ordered...

  3. 40 CFR 92.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting. 92.404 Section 92.404...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 92.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any...

  4. 16 CFR 1115.27 - Recall notice content requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recall notice content requirements. 1115.27 Section...REPORTS Guidelines and Requirements for Mandatory Recall Notices § 1115.27 Recall notice content requirements. Except as...

  5. 40 CFR 91.806 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 91.806 Section 91.806 Protection...SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES In-Use Testing and Recall Regulations § 91.806 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) Prior to an EPA ordered...

  6. 21 CFR 810.13 - Mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mandatory recall order. 810.13 Section 810.13 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.13 Mandatory...

  7. 21 CFR 7.53 - Recall status reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recall status reports. 7.53 Section 7...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Industry Responsibilities § 7.53 Recall status reports. (a) The...

  8. 40 CFR 92.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Voluntary emissions recall reporting. 92.404 Section 92.404...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 92.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any...

  9. 16 CFR 1115.27 - Recall notice content requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recall notice content requirements. 1115.27 Section...REPORTS Guidelines and Requirements for Mandatory Recall Notices § 1115.27 Recall notice content requirements. Except as...

  10. 21 CFR 810.13 - Mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mandatory recall order. 810.13 Section 810.13 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.13 Mandatory...

  11. 21 CFR 810.13 - Mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mandatory recall order. 810.13 Section 810.13 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.13 Mandatory...

  12. 40 CFR 91.904 - Voluntary emission recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Voluntary emission recall. 91.904 Section 91.904 Protection...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.904 Voluntary emission recall. (a) A manufacturer, prior to...

  13. 21 CFR 810.13 - Mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mandatory recall order. 810.13 Section 810.13 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.13 Mandatory...

  14. 21 CFR 7.53 - Recall status reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recall status reports. 7.53 Section 7...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Industry Responsibilities § 7.53 Recall status reports. (a) The...

  15. 21 CFR 7.53 - Recall status reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recall status reports. 7.53 Section 7...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Industry Responsibilities § 7.53 Recall status reports. (a) The...

  16. 21 CFR 7.50 - Public notification of recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Public notification of recall. 7.50 Section 7.50 Food and...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Responsibilities § 7.50 Public notification of recall. The Food and Drug...

  17. 40 CFR 92.703 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 92.703 Section 92.703 Protection...FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.703 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) Prior to an EPA ordered...

  18. 21 CFR 7.53 - Recall status reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recall status reports. 7.53 Section 7...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Industry Responsibilities § 7.53 Recall status reports. (a) The...

  19. 40 CFR 94.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting. 94.404 Section 94.404...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 94.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any...

  20. 40 CFR 91.806 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 91.806 Section 91.806 Protection...SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES In-Use Testing and Recall Regulations § 91.806 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) Prior to an EPA ordered...

  1. 40 CFR 94.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting. 94.404 Section 94.404...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 94.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any...

  2. 40 CFR 92.703 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 92.703 Section 92.703 Protection...FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.703 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) Prior to an EPA ordered...

  3. 40 CFR 92.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting. 92.404 Section 92.404...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 92.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any...

  4. 21 CFR 7.50 - Public notification of recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Public notification of recall. 7.50 Section 7.50 Food and...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Responsibilities § 7.50 Public notification of recall. The Food and Drug...

  5. 16 CFR 1115.27 - Recall notice content requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recall notice content requirements. 1115.27 Section...REPORTS Guidelines and Requirements for Mandatory Recall Notices § 1115.27 Recall notice content requirements. Except as...

  6. 40 CFR 92.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting. 92.404 Section 92.404...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 92.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any...

  7. 40 CFR 92.703 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 92.703 Section 92.703 Protection...FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.703 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) Prior to an EPA ordered...

  8. 21 CFR 7.50 - Public notification of recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Public notification of recall. 7.50 Section 7.50 Food and...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Responsibilities § 7.50 Public notification of recall. The Food and Drug...

  9. 21 CFR 7.50 - Public notification of recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Public notification of recall. 7.50 Section 7.50 Food and...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Responsibilities § 7.50 Public notification of recall. The Food and Drug...

  10. 40 CFR 92.703 - Voluntary emissions recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall. 92.703 Section 92.703 Protection...FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.703 Voluntary emissions recall. (a) Prior to an EPA ordered...

  11. 16 CFR 1115.27 - Recall notice content requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recall notice content requirements. 1115.27 Section...REPORTS Guidelines and Requirements for Mandatory Recall Notices § 1115.27 Recall notice content requirements. Except as...

  12. 40 CFR 94.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting. 94.404 Section 94.404...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 94.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any...

  13. 40 CFR 92.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall reporting. 92.404 Section 92.404...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 92.404 Voluntary emissions recall reporting. (a) When any...

  14. 21 CFR 7.53 - Recall status reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recall status reports. 7.53 Section 7...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Industry Responsibilities § 7.53 Recall status reports. (a) The...

  15. 21 CFR 7.46 - Firm-initiated recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...copy of the firm's recall communication if any has issued, or a proposed communication if none has issued. (8) Proposed strategy for conducting the recall...appropriate changes in the firm's strategy for the recall, and...

  16. 21 CFR 7.46 - Firm-initiated recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...copy of the firm's recall communication if any has issued, or a proposed communication if none has issued. (8) Proposed strategy for conducting the recall...appropriate changes in the firm's strategy for the recall, and...

  17. 21 CFR 7.46 - Firm-initiated recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...copy of the firm's recall communication if any has issued, or a proposed communication if none has issued. (8) Proposed strategy for conducting the recall...appropriate changes in the firm's strategy for the recall, and...

  18. 21 CFR 7.46 - Firm-initiated recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...copy of the firm's recall communication if any has issued, or a proposed communication if none has issued. (8) Proposed strategy for conducting the recall...appropriate changes in the firm's strategy for the recall, and...

  19. 21 CFR 7.46 - Firm-initiated recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...copy of the firm's recall communication if any has issued, or a proposed communication if none has issued. (8) Proposed strategy for conducting the recall...appropriate changes in the firm's strategy for the recall, and...

  20. 75 FR 3355 - Guidelines and Requirements for Mandatory Recall Notices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ...recall notices and Web site recall notices. Proposed...order to take advantage of social networking abilities. However...popularity of certain Web sites that sell, re-sell...stating that a Web site recall notice should...

  1. Ileostomy and your diet

    MedlinePLUS

    Standard ileostomy - diet; Brooke ileostomy - diet; Continent ileostomy - diet; Abdominal pouch - diet; End ileostomy - diet; Ostomy - diet ... digestive system and needed an operation called an ileostomy. The operation changed the way your body gets ...

  2. Reliability and Validity of the Multimedia Activity Recall in Children and Adults (MARCA) in People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Toby; Williams, Marie T.; Olds, Tim S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the reliability and validity of the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults (MARCA) in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Design People with COPD and their carers completed the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults (MARCA) for four, 24-hour periods (including test-retest of 2 days) while wearing a triaxial accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X+®), a multi-sensor armband (Sensewear Pro3®) and a pedometer (New Lifestyles 1000®). Setting Self reported activity recalls (MARCA) and objective activity monitoring (Accelerometry) were recorded under free-living conditions. Participants 24 couples were included in the analysis (COPD; age 74.4±7.9 yrs, FEV1 54±13% Carer; age 69.6±10.9 yrs, FEV1 99±24%). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) Test-retest reliability was compared for MARCA activity domains and different energy expenditure zones. Validity was assessed between MARCA-derived physical activity level (in metabolic equivalent of task (MET) per minute), duration of moderate to vigorous physical activity (min) and related data from the objective measurement devices. Analysis included intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC), Bland-Altman analyses, paired t-tests (p) and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (rs). Results Reliability between occasions of recall for all activity domains was uniformly high, with test-retest correlations consistently >0.9. Validity correlations were moderate to strong (rs?=?0.43–0.80) across all comparisons. The MARCA yields comparable PAL estimates and slightly higher moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) estimates. Conclusion In older adults with chronic illness, the MARCA is a valid and reliable tool for capturing not only the time and energy expenditure associated with physical and sedentary activities but also information on the types of activities. PMID:24312284

  3. Oak Ridge callibration recall program

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.G.; Wright, W.E.; Pritchard, E.W.

    1996-12-31

    A development effort was initiated within the Oak Ridge metrology community to address the need for a more versatile and user friendly tracking database that could be used across the Oak Ridge complex. This database, which became known as the Oak Ridge Calibration Recall Program (ORCRP), needed to be diverse enough for use by all three Oak Ridge facilities, as well as the seven calibration organizations that support them. Various practical functions drove the initial design of the program: (1) accessible by any user at any site through a multi-user interface, (2) real-time database that was able to automatically generate e-mail notices of due and overdue measuring and test equipment, (3) large memory storage capacity, and (4) extremely fast data access times. In addition, the program needed to generate reports on items such as instrument turnaround time, workload projections, and laboratory efficiency. Finally, the program should allow the calibration intervals to be modified, based on historical data. The developed program meets all of the stated requirements and is accessible over a network of computers running Microsoft Windows software.

  4. Quantum bounce and cosmic recall

    E-print Network

    Alejandro Corichi; Parampreet Singh

    2008-03-27

    Loop quantum cosmology predicts that, in simple models, the big bang singularity of classical general relativity is replaced by a quantum bounce. Because of the extreme physical conditions near the bounce, a natural question is whether the universe can retain, after the bounce, its memory about the previous epoch. More precisely, does the universe retain various properties of the state after evolving unitarily through the bounce or does it suffer from some cosmic amnesia as has been recently suggested? Here we show that this issue can be answered unambiguously at least within an exactly solvable model, derived from a small simplification of loop quantum cosmology, for which there is full analytical control on the quantum theory. We show that if there exists a semiclassical state at late times on one side, peaked around a pair of canonically conjugate variables, then there are very strong bounds on the fluctuations on the other side of the bounce, implying semi-classicality. For such a model universe which grows to a size of 1 megaparsec, at late times, the change in relative fluctuations of the only non-trivial observable of the model across the bounce is less than $10^{-56}$ (becoming smaller for universes which grow larger). The universe maintains (an almost) total recall.

  5. 76 FR 38669 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Food Reporting Comparison Study (FORCS) and Food and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ...collection was previously, ``24-Hour Dietary Recall Method Comparison and the National Cancer...computerized Automated Self- Administered 24-Hour Recall (ASA24) approach to collecting 24-hour recall (24HR) data with the current...

  6. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    SciTech Connect

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S

    2014-01-01

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  7. The Complexity of the California Recall Election

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, R. Michael

    2003-11-06

    The October 7, 2003 California Recall Election strained California’s direct democracy. In recent California politics there has not been a statewide election conducted on such short notice; county election officials were ...

  8. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    E-print Network

    Hadayat Seddiqi; Travis S. Humble

    2014-12-12

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall information stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are fixed points for the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We formulate the recall of memories stored in a Hopfield network using energy minimization by adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the quantum dynamics allow us to quantify the AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and the noise in the input key. We also investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model using different learning rules. Our results indicate that AQO performance varies strongly with learning rule due to the changes in the energy landscape. Consequently, learning rules offer indirect methods for investigating change to the computational complexity of the recall task and the computational efficiency of AQO.

  9. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis

    2014-12-01

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  10. Diabetes and diet in Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Kehkeshan; Zehra, Tabassum

    2015-05-01

    Ramadan, the month of fasting, is observed by Muslims all over the world. Fasting is obligatory for all healthy adult Muslims which amounts to refraining from eating and drinking from predawn to sunset. The dietary patterns therefore totally change. For people with diabetes, instead of taking 5-6 meals, it is reduced to 2 or 3 meals in 24 hours. Good glycaemic control can be accomplished by people with diabetes, maintaining appropriate diets. It is suggested that during Ramadan similar general dietary guidelines should be followed as those throughout the year. The pre dawn meal should be taken as late as possible, before the start of the fast and should have a high proportion of carbohydrates with fibre. The traditional sugar drinks and foods rich in fat taken at iftar should be avoided. The evening meal or dinner should be consumed as early as possible at iftar and contain whole wheat flour chapattis, vegetables and a meat dish. Salads increase the fiber intake. A glass of milk or fruit at bedtime will maintain normoglycaemia till suhur. PMID:26013795

  11. Diet & Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and the National School Lunch Program. Meals on Wheels America – Online search tool to locate home-delivered meal programs throughout the U.S. Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print Diet & Nutrition Take Control of Your Weight Portion Control Low Carb Omega-3 Publication Diet ...

  12. Word Recall: Cognitive Performance Within Internet Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Benjamin M; Jim, Heather S

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of online surveys for data collection has increased exponentially, yet it is often unclear whether interview-based cognitive assessments (such as face-to-face or telephonic word recall tasks) can be adapted for use in application-based research settings. Objective The objective of the current study was to compare and characterize the results of online word recall tasks to those of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and determine the feasibility and reliability of incorporating word recall tasks into application-based cognitive assessments. Methods The results of the online immediate and delayed word recall assessment, included within the Women’s Health and Valuation (WHV) study, were compared to the results of the immediate and delayed recall tasks of Waves 5-11 (2000-2012) of the HRS. Results Performance on the WHV immediate and delayed tasks demonstrated strong concordance with performance on the HRS tasks (?c=.79, 95% CI 0.67-0.91), despite significant differences between study populations (P<.001) and study design. Sociodemographic characteristics and self-reported memory demonstrated similar relationships with performance on both the HRS and WHV tasks. Conclusions The key finding of this study is that the HRS word recall tasks performed similarly when used as an online cognitive assessment in the WHV. Online administration of cognitive tests, which has the potential to significantly reduce participant and administrative burden, should be considered in future research studies and health assessments. PMID:26543924

  13. Comparison of yogurt, soybean, casein, and amino acid-based diets in children with persistent diarrhea.

    PubMed

    de Mattos, Angela P; Ribeiro, Tereza C M; Mendes, Patrícia S A; Valois, Sandra S; Mendes, Carlos M C; Ribeiro, Hugo C

    2009-07-01

    Although previous studies have shown successful treatment of persistent diarrhea (PD) with the use of yogurt-based diets, some recent ones speculate the need of special formulas for the nutritional management of PD complicated cases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the consumption of 3 lactose-free diets, with different degrees of complexity, is associated with lower stool output and shorter duration of diarrhea when compared with the use of a yogurt-based one on the nutritional management of PD. A total of 154 male infants, aged between 1 and 30 months, with PD and with or without dehydration, were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups. Throughout the study, the patients were placed in a metabolic unit; their body weights and intakes of oral rehydration solution, water, and formula diets, in addition to outputs of stool, urine, and vomit, were measured and recorded at 24-hour intervals. Four different diets were used in this study: diet 1, yogurt-based formula; diet 2, soy-based formula; diet 3, hydrolyzed protein-based formula; and diet 4, amino acid-based formula. Throughout the study, only these formula diets were fed to the children. The data showed that children fed the yogurt-based diet (diet 1) or the amino acid-based diet (diet 4) had a significant reduction in stool output and in the duration of diarrhea. The use of an inexpensive and worldwide-available yogurt-based diet is recommended as the first choice for the nutritional management of mild to moderate PD. For the few complicated PD cases, when available, a more complex amino acid-based diet should be reserved for the nutritional management of these unresponsive and severe presentations. Soy-based or casein-based diets do not offer any specific advantage or benefits and do not seem to have a place in the management of PD. PMID:19700033

  14. 21 CFR 7.55 - Termination of a recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Termination of a recall. 7.55 Section 7.55 Food and...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Responsibilities § 7.55 Termination of a recall. (a) A recall will be...

  15. 21 CFR 7.55 - Termination of a recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Termination of a recall. 7.55 Section 7.55 Food and...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Responsibilities § 7.55 Termination of a recall. (a) A recall will be...

  16. 21 CFR 7.55 - Termination of a recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Termination of a recall. 7.55 Section 7.55 Food and...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Responsibilities § 7.55 Termination of a recall. (a) A recall will be...

  17. Historical Recall and Precision: Summarizing Generated Hypotheses Richard Zanibbi

    E-print Network

    Zanibbi, Richard

    Historical Recall and Precision: Summarizing Generated Hypotheses Richard Zanibbi Centre and computing the recall and preci- sion of this set: we call these the `historical recall' and `historical precision.' Using table cell detection exam- ples, we demonstrate how historical recall and precision along

  18. 21 CFR 7.55 - Termination of a recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Termination of a recall. 7.55 Section 7.55 Food and...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Responsibilities § 7.55 Termination of a recall. (a) A recall will be...

  19. SPECIAL ISSUE ACQUISITION, RECALL, AND FORGETTING OF VERBAL

    E-print Network

    SPECIAL ISSUE ACQUISITION, RECALL, AND FORGETTING OF VERBAL INFORMATION IN LONG-TERM MEMORY recall task with 20-minute and 1-day delay free recall and recognition trials. The rate of acquisition related to the number of words recalled during acquisition for all age groups. The two oldest age groups

  20. 21 CFR 7.55 - Termination of a recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Termination of a recall. 7.55 Section 7.55 Food and...SERVICES GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections...Responsibilities § 7.55 Termination of a recall. (a) A recall will be...

  1. 21 CFR 810.13 - Mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mandatory recall order. 810.13 Section 810.13 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.13 Mandatory recall order. (a) If the person named in...

  2. Diet and Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Diet & Spondylitis Learn About Spondyloarthritis / Diet & Spondylitis Overview For The Newly Diagnosed Educational Materials - Books, Brochures & More ... AS / Low Starch Diet Blood Work and Spondylitis Diet & Spondylitis Overview Diet's Effect On Spondylitis Symptoms In ...

  3. Major food sources of calories, added sugars, and saturated fat and their contribution to essential nutrient intakes in the U.S. diet: data from the national health and nutrition examination survey (2003–2006)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of chronic disease cannot be predicted simply by the content of a single nutrient in a food or food group in the diet. The contribution of food sources of calories, added sugars and saturated fat (SFA) to intakes of dietary fiber and micronutrients of public health importance is also relevant to understanding the overall dietary impact of these foods. Objective Identify the top food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA in the U.S. diet and quantify their contribution to fiber and micronutrient intakes. Methods Single 24-hour dietary recalls (Day 1) collected from participants ?2 years (n?=?16,822) of the What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (WWEIA/NHANES 2003–2006) were analyzed. All analyses included sample weights to account for the survey design. Calorie and nutrient intakes from foods included contributions from disaggregated food mixtures and tabulated by rank order. Results No one food category contributes more than 7.2% of calories to the overall U.S. diet, but half of the top 10 contribute 10% or more of total dietary fiber and micronutrients. Three of the top 10 sources of calories and SFA (beef, milk and cheese) contribute 46.3% of the calcium, 49.5% of the vitamin D, 42.3% of the vitamin B12 as well as other essential nutrients to the American diet. On the other hand, foods categorized as desserts, snacks, or beverages, contribute 13.6% of total calories, 83% of added sugar intake, and provide little or no nutritional value. Including food components of disaggregated recipes more accurately estimated the contribution of foods like beef, milk or cheese to overall nutrient intake compared to “as consumed” food categorizations. Conclusions Some food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA make major contributions to American dietary fiber and micronutrient intakes. Dietary modifications targeting reductions in calories, added sugar, or SFA need to take these key micronutrient sources into account so as not to have the unintended consequence of lowering overall dietary quality. PMID:23927718

  4. Effects of Verapamil SR and Atenolol on 24-Hour Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in Hypertension Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: An International Verapamil SR-Trandolapril Ambulatory Monitoring Substudy

    PubMed Central

    Denardo, Scott J.; Gong, Yan; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Farsang, Csaba; Keltai, Matyas; Szirmai, László; Messerli, Franz H.; Bavry, Anthony A.; Handberg, Eileen M.; Mancia, Giuseppe; Pepine, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated nighttime blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), increased BP and HR variability, and altered diurnal variations of BP and HR (nighttime dipping and morning surge) in patients with systemic hypertension are each associated with increased adverse cardiovascular events. However, there are no reports on the effect of hypertension treatment on these important hemodynamic parameters in the growing population of hypertensive patients with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD). This was a pre-specified subgroup analysis of the INternational VErapamil SR-Trandolapril STudy (INVEST), which involved 22,576 clinically stable patients aged ?50 years with hypertension and CAD randomized to either verapamil SR- or atenolol-based hypertension treatment strategies. The subgroup consisted of 117 patients undergoing 24-hour ambulatory monitoring at baseline and after 1 year of treatment. Hourly systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) decreased after 1 year for both verapamil SR- and atenolol-based treatment strategies compared with baseline (P<0.0001). Atenolol also decreased hourly HR (P<0.0001). Both treatment strategies decreased SBP variability (weighted standard deviation: P = 0.012 and 0.021, respectively). Compared with verapamil SR, atenolol also increased the prevalence of BP and HR nighttime dipping among prior non-dippers (BP: OR = 3.37; 95% CI: 1.26 – 8.97; P = 0.015; HR: OR = 4.06; 95% CI: 1.35-12.17; P = 0.012) and blunted HR morning surge (+2.8 vs. +4.5 beats/min/hr; P = 0.019). Both verapamil SR- and especially atenolol-based strategies resulted in favorable changes in ambulatory monitoring parameters that have been previously associated with increased adverse cardiovascular events. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00133692 PMID:25835002

  5. Intrusions in Children’s Dietary Recalls: The Roles of Body Mass Index, Sex, Race, Interview Protocol, and Social Desirability

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Hardin, James W.; Royer, Julie A.; Smith, Albert F.

    2008-01-01

    Dietary-reporting validation study data and school foodservice production records were used to examine intrusions (reports of uneaten items) in school meals in 24-hour recalls. Fourth-grade children (20 low-body mass index [BMI; ?5th and <50th percentiles]; 20 high-BMI [?85th percentile];50% boys; 75% Black) were each observed eating two school meals (breakfast, lunch) and interviewed about the prior 24 hours that evening (24E) or the previous day the next morning (PDM). Social desirability was assessed. Intrusions were classified as stretches (on meal tray), internal confabulations (in school foodservice environment but not on meal tray), and external confabulations (not in school foodservice environment). For breakfast, reported items were less likely to be intrusions for Black than White children, and for low-BMI boys than the other BMI-x-sex groups, and to be external confabulations for high-BMI girls than high-BMI boys. For lunch, reported items and intrusions were more likely to be stretches for 24E than PDM interviews. As social desirability increased, fewer items were reported for breakfast, and reported items and intrusions were more likely to be internal confabulations for lunch. For breakfast, compared to low-BMI girls, as social desirability increased, intruded amounts were larger for high-BMI boys and smaller for high-BMI girls. For lunch, intruded amounts were smaller for high-BMI girls than the other BMI-x-sex groups. Amounts reported were smaller for stretches than internal confabulations and external confabulations for breakfast, and external confabulations for lunch. To better understand intrusions, dietary-reporting validation studies are needed with larger samples by BMI-group, sex, and race. PMID:18535542

  6. How Does Distinctive Processing Reduce False Recall?

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Dunlap, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    False memories arising from associatively related lists are a robust phenomenon that resists many efforts to prevent it. However, a few variables have been shown to reduce this form of false memory. Explanations for how the reduction is accomplished have focused on either output monitoring processes or constraints on access, but neither idea alone is sufficient to explain extant data. Our research was driven by a framework that distinguishes item-based and event-based distinctive processing to account for the effects of different variables on both correct recall of study list items and false recall. We report the results of three experiments examining the effect of a deep orienting task and the effect of visual presentation of study items, both of which have been shown to reduce false recall. The experiments replicate those previous findings and add important new information about the effect of the variables on a recall test that eliminates the need for monitoring. The results clearly indicate that both post-access monitoring and constraints on access contribute to reductions in false memories. The results also showed that the manipulations of study modality and orienting task had different effects on correct and false recall, a pattern that was predicted by the item-based/event-based distinctive processing framework. PMID:22003267

  7. Erroneous and Veridical Recall Are Not Two Sides of the Same Coin: Evidence From Semantic Distraction in Free Recall

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments examined the extent to which erroneous recall blocks veridical recall using, as a vehicle for study, the disruptive impact of distractors that are semantically similar to a list of words presented for free recall. Instructing participants to avoid erroneous recall of to-be-ignored spoken distractors attenuated their recall but this did not influence the disruptive effect of those distractors on veridical recall (Experiment 1). Using an externalized output-editing procedure—whereby participants recalled all items that came to mind and identified those that were erroneous—the usual between-sequences semantic similarity effect on erroneous and veridical recall was replicated but the relationship between the rate of erroneous and veridical recall was weak (Experiment 2). The results suggest that forgetting is not due to veridical recall being blocked by similar events. PMID:25938326

  8. IBS Diet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cost. Diet, Eating and IBS Symptoms Video with Peter Whorwell, MD There are a variety of factors ... deductible donation. Adapted from IFFGD Publication #220 by Peter J. Whorwell, MD, Professor of Medicine and Gastroenterology, ...

  9. The number of 24 h dietary recalls using the U.S. Department of Agriculture's automated multiple-pass method required to estimate nutrient intake in overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA’s Automated Multiple Pass Method (AMPM) is a five-step, multiple-pass, interviewer-administered, computerized, 24-h dietary recall. The objective of the study was to quantify sources of variation such as day of the week, season, sequence of the diet interviews (training effect), diet interv...

  10. The 24-h recall instrument for home nursing to measure the activity profile of home nurses: development and psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Gosset, Christiane; Heyden, Isabelle; Van Geert, Michel; Moons, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Home health care today is challenged by a shift from an acute to a chronic health-care model, moving the focus of care from the hospital to home-care setting. This increased focus on care at home emphasizes the need for an efficient, effective, and transparent management of home health care. However, it is not precisely known what home-care nurses do; what kind of care is received by patients; what the performance of home nurses is; and what the impact of the increasing need for home nursing is on the current and future role of home nurses. In this respect, it is necessary to gain a clear insight into the activity profile of home nurses, but there is no gold standard to measure their activities. This study reports on the development and psychometric testing of the '24-hour recall instrument for home nursing' to measure the activity profile of home nurses. Five home nurses in Belgium, simultaneously with the researcher, registered the performed activities in a total of 69 patients, using the 24-h recall instrument for home nursing. The validity and the interrater reliability of this instrument were high: the proportions that observed agreement were very high; the strength of kappa agreement was substantial to almost perfect; the prevalence index showed great variety; and the bias index was low. The findings in this study support the validity evidence based on test content and the interrater reliability of the 24-h recall instrument. This instrument can help to shape practice and policy by making the home nursing profession more transparent: a clear insight into the kind of care that is provided by home nurses and is received by the patients in primary care contributes to the development of a clear definition of the role of home nurses in health care. PMID:24479985

  11. Babcock and Wilcox recall system experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lexa, A.F.; Oelschlager, R.O.; Rapp, E.A.

    1982-05-01

    Late in 1979, Babcock and Wilcox began development of a dedicated data acquisition and display system called RECALL. This system was in response to industry's needs as put forth in the TMI-II Lesson Learned Reports. The starting point of this design was the B and W Reactimeter, which performed a vital role of transient data capture at TMI-II. A full discussion of the role that the Reactimeter played during the accident at TMI-II is contained. Since the development of the RECALL System, one such system has been installed at the Prairie Island Nuclear Power Plant, which is owned by Northern States Power Company. Other systems are in the process of being installed and assembled. The purpose of this paper is to report on the progress, to date, of the RECALL System and how it is being expanded to meet more stringent industry requirements.

  12. Emphasizing Expert Practice with Spaced Recall

    E-print Network

    Torigoe, Eugene T

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores an intervention that emphasizes expert practice using spaced recall. Interviews were performed with two students who were shown physics solutions, and were asked to repeatedly recall the solutions over a period of weeks. The students reflected that they became aware of the importance of using the diagrams to create equations, as well as the utility of reasoning over pure memorization. We believe that the structure of this activity may be an effective way of encouraging expert practice to introductory physics students.

  13. An Automated Dental Recall and Information System

    PubMed Central

    Caron, J.V.; Wilkie, N.D.; Loizeaux, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    A preventive dentistry program for fleet and shore based naval units assigned to Hawaii is monitored by a computerized dental recall system. The data base contains information concerning the identity, location, dental classification, required treatment and/or examination, and location of each individual's record. There are approximately 25,000 individual records in the data base. Utilizing this data, several functions concerning the management of dental treatment are accomplished. These include the dental recall of each individual, the dental status of each unit, the efficiency of each clinic, and most important, the identity of personnel who do not respond to treatment calls.

  14. Recalling and forgetting dreams: theta and alpha oscillations during sleep predict subsequent dream recall.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Cristina; Ferrara, Michele; Mauro, Federica; Moroni, Fabio; Gorgoni, Maurizio; Tempesta, Daniela; Cipolli, Carlo; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2011-05-01

    Under the assumption that dream recall is a peculiar form of declarative memory, we have hypothesized that (1) the encoding of dream contents during sleep should share some electrophysiological mechanisms with the encoding of episodic memories of the awake brain and (2) recalling a dream(s) after awakening from non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep should be associated with different brain oscillations. Here, we report that cortical brain oscillations of human sleep are predictive of successful dream recall. In particular, after morning awakening from REM sleep, a higher frontal 5-7 Hz (theta) activity was associated with successful dream recall. This finding mirrors the increase in frontal theta activity during successful encoding of episodic memories in wakefulness. Moreover, in keeping with the different EEG background, a different predictive relationship was found after awakening from stage 2 NREM sleep. Specifically, a lower 8-12 Hz (alpha) oscillatory activity of the right temporal area was associated with a successful dream recall. These findings provide the first evidence of univocal cortical electroencephalographic correlates of dream recall, suggesting that the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the encoding and recall of episodic memories may remain the same across different states of consciousness. PMID:21543596

  15. Subjective organisation in the recall of abstract body movements.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, J S

    1998-06-01

    Subjective organisation is a well known characteristic of verbal free recall in that items are recalled in groupings known as "chunks" or "clusters." This organisation is indicative of a memory strategy and has been used to derive the cognitive structure of particular areas of knowledge. Clustering might also occur in the free recall of body movements. Subjects attempted to learn unfamiliar abstract body movements over five learning and recall trials. Analysis showed that subjective organisation occurred and increased with additional recall trials. This extends the clustering effect to the free recall of body movements. It is suggested that this effect can be used to probe the cognitive structure of motor memory. PMID:9656289

  16. 21 CFR 7.42 - Recall strategy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...developed by the agency for a Food and Drug Administration-requested...essential products. (2) The Food and Drug Administration...the level in the distribution chain to which the recall is to extend...product appear inadequate. The Food and Drug Administration...

  17. 21 CFR 7.42 - Recall strategy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...developed by the agency for a Food and Drug Administration-requested...essential products. (2) The Food and Drug Administration...the level in the distribution chain to which the recall is to extend...product appear inadequate. The Food and Drug Administration...

  18. 21 CFR 7.42 - Recall strategy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...developed by the agency for a Food and Drug Administration-requested...essential products. (2) The Food and Drug Administration...the level in the distribution chain to which the recall is to extend...product appear inadequate. The Food and Drug Administration...

  19. 21 CFR 7.42 - Recall strategy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...developed by the agency for a Food and Drug Administration-requested...essential products. (2) The Food and Drug Administration...the level in the distribution chain to which the recall is to extend...product appear inadequate. The Food and Drug Administration...

  20. Improving Text Recall with Multiple Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background. QuikScan (QS) is an innovative design that aims to improve accessibility, comprehensibility, and subsequent recall of expository text by means of frequent within-document summaries that are formatted as numbered list items. The numbers in the QS summaries correspond to numbers placed in the body of the document where the summarized…

  1. Fading Memories: Retrospective Recall Inaccuracies in ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carlin J.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Halperin, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This longitudinal study examines the recall accuracy of childhood ADHD symptoms in late adolescence and early adulthood by youth and their parents, compared with reports obtained during childhood. Method: Participants (N = 94) are initially evaluated when they are aged between 7 and 11 and reassessed when they are aged between 16 and 22…

  2. Task Context and Organization in Free Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polyn, Sean M.; Norman, Kenneth A.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Prior work on organization in free recall has focused on the ways in which semantic and temporal information determine the order in which material is retrieved from memory. Tulving's theory of ecphory suggests that these organizational effects arise from the interaction of a retrieval cue with the contents of memory. Using the…

  3. Genetic Counselling: Information Given, Recall and Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michie, Susan; McDonald, Valerie; Marteau, Theresa M.

    1997-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to counselors (N=32) to categorize the key points given in genetic counseling; to assess the amount and type of information recalled; and to examine the relationships between counselees' knowledge, satisfaction with information received, the meeting of expectations, concern, and anxiety. Results emphasize the importance of…

  4. Information Impact and Factors Affecting Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Ralph A.

    A study was conducted to examine the effect of factors related to the format, presentation style, and order in which ideas are presented on students' recall of chemistry material. Data were obtained from students who viewed three different multi-image presentations in a large lecture hall setting. Following the presentations, students were…

  5. Exploring the relationship between retrieval disruption from collaboration and recall

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Sarah J.; Rajaram, Suparna

    2011-01-01

    When people recall together in a collaborative group, they recall less than their potential. This phenomenon of collaborative inhibition is explained in terms of retrieval disruption. However, collaborative recall also re-exposes individuals to items recalled by others that they themselves might otherwise have forgotten. This re-exposure produces post-collaborative benefits in individual recall. The current study examined whether reduced retrieval disruption during group recall is related not only to less collaborative inhibition, but also to greater post-collaborative recall benefits. To test this, we devised a paradigm to calculate the extent to which each individual experienced retrieval disruption during group recall. We also included two types of collaborative groups, one of which was expected to experience greater retrieval disruption than the other. Results suggest that the relationship between retrieval disruption and recall performance depends upon the level at which retrieval disruption is measured. When retrieval disruption was assessed at the individual level, then minimizing retrieval disruption was associated with higher recall (i.e., less collaborative inhibition and greater post-collaborative individual recall). However, when retrieval disruption was assessed at the group level there was no relationship with recall. Furthermore, the findings from this design suggest a role of cross-cueing in modulating group recall levels. PMID:21736433

  6. Vertical Proximity Effects in the California Recall Election

    E-print Network

    Sled, Sarah M.

    2003-10-27

    The 2003 California recall election provides a unique opportunity to assess the impact of variations in ballot design and voting methods on the voting accuracy of citizens. Analysis of the results of the California Recall ...

  7. Recognition versus recall as measures of television commercial forgetting.

    E-print Network

    Singh, Surendra N.; Rothschild, Michael L.; Churchill, Gilbert A.

    1988-02-01

    Investigated the impact of time since exposure, commercial length, and commercial repetition on recognition and unaided recall scores, using 204 undergraduates. Ss were randomly assigned to 12 experimental cells and asked to recall the product...

  8. Development of a unique Physical Metrology Laboratory Recall System

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, C.Y.

    1983-08-01

    The Rocky Flats Standards Laboratory is required to maintain a calibration recall program. The Standards Laboratory has three distinct and separate recall systems. Each of these recall systems currently has new needs and requirements that cannot be provided by the present system in a reasonable length of time or at a reasonable cost. The Physical Metrology Laboratory (PML) of the Rocky Flats Standards Laboratory was the first of the three recall programs to be changed. This new PML recall incorporates a data base management concept which is a departure from the old PML recall on the Rocky Flats mainframe computer system. This new in-house system organizes the data in a manner that provides the current recall information as-well-as statistical and trend information and is designed with enough flexibility to encompass future needs and requirements. This report discusses the new PML recall which utilizes the HP System 45 Data Base Management program.

  9. Kernel Spectral Document Clustering Using Unsupervised Precision-Recall Metrics

    E-print Network

    Kernel Spectral Document Clustering Using Unsupervised Precision-Recall Metrics Raghvendra Mall KU techniques based on an unsupervised version of Precision, Recall and F-measure proposed in [1] to come up

  10. A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of incorporating peanuts into an American Diabetes Association meal plan on the nutrient profile of the total diet and cardiometabolic parameters of adults with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the nutritional goals for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are to achieve an optimal nutrient intake to achieve normoglycemia and a cardioprotective lipid profile. Peanuts are nutrient dense foods that contain high levels of monounsaturated fat (MUFA) and are a natural source of arginine, fiber, phytosterols, resveritrol, niacin, folate, vitamin E and magnesium, which have the potential for improving blood lipids and glycemic control. This study sought to evaluate the effect of a peanut enriched ADA meal plan on the nutrient profile of the total diet and cardiometabolic parameters in adults with T2D. Methods This was a randomized, prospective 24-week parallel-group clinical trial with 60 adults with T2D [age range 34–84 years; body mass index (BMI) range 17.2-48.7 kg/m2]. Subjects consumed an ADA meal plan containing ~20% of energy from peanuts (peanut group) or a peanut-free ADA meal plan (control group). Weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC) and nutrient intake from 24-hour recalls were measured every 4 weeks and fasting blood glucose (FBG), HbA1c and blood lipids were measured every 12 weeks. A mixed-model repeated-measures analysis of covariance was performed to assess the significance of changes in the cardiometabolic parameters. Results A higher polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) to saturated fat diet ratio and higher intake of MUFA, PUFA, ?-tocopherol, niacin and magnesium was observed in the peanut group as compared to the control group (P?diet and is compatible with weight management and improvement in specific blood lipids. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00937222 PMID:24450471

  11. 40 CFR 51.370 - Compliance with recall notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Compliance with recall notices. 51.370 Section 51.370...Requirements § 51.370 Compliance with recall notices. States shall establish methods...included in either a “Voluntary Emissions Recall” as defined at 40 CFR...

  12. 40 CFR 205.59 - Recall of noncomplying vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recall of noncomplying vehicles. 205.59...Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.59 Recall of noncomplying vehicles. (a...may issue an order to the manufacturer to recall and repair or modify any vehicle...

  13. A Practical Use of Imperfect Recall Kevin Waugh, Martin Zinkevich

    E-print Network

    Bowling, Michael

    A Practical Use of Imperfect Recall Kevin Waugh, Martin Zinkevich , Michael Johanson, Morgan Kan of Alberta Santa Clara, CA, USA 95054 Edmonton, AB Canada T6G 2E8 Abstract Perfect recall is the common, this improvement enables new types of information to be used in the abstraction. By making use of imperfect recall

  14. 40 CFR 51.370 - Compliance with recall notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Compliance with recall notices. 51.370 Section 51.370...Requirements § 51.370 Compliance with recall notices. States shall establish methods...included in either a “Voluntary Emissions Recall” as defined at 40 CFR...

  15. 6 A computational model of nonword repetition, immediate serial recall,

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Prahlad

    6 A computational model of nonword repetition, immediate serial recall, and nonword learning across word forms (as in list recall) and within word forms (as in nonword repetition). The model was set list recall and nonword repetition, and has the potential to play a useful role in investigation

  16. 40 CFR 51.370 - Compliance with recall notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Compliance with recall notices. 51.370 Section 51.370...Requirements § 51.370 Compliance with recall notices. States shall establish methods...included in either a “Voluntary Emissions Recall” as defined at 40 CFR...

  17. 40 CFR 51.370 - Compliance with recall notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Compliance with recall notices. 51.370 Section 51.370...Requirements § 51.370 Compliance with recall notices. States shall establish methods...included in either a “Voluntary Emissions Recall” as defined at 40 CFR...

  18. 40 CFR 51.370 - Compliance with recall notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Compliance with recall notices. 51.370 Section 51.370...Requirements § 51.370 Compliance with recall notices. States shall establish methods...included in either a “Voluntary Emissions Recall” as defined at 40 CFR...

  19. Total Recall: Are Privacy Changes Inevitable? William C. Cheng

    E-print Network

    Kay, David G.

    Total Recall: Are Privacy Changes Inevitable? William C. Cheng Computer Science Dept. & IMSC of Information and Computer Sciences University of California, Irvine ABSTRACT Total Recall in a pair of glasses or a camera in a necklace. There are many applications of Total Recall ­ patients

  20. 40 CFR 205.59 - Recall of noncomplying vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Recall of noncomplying vehicles. 205.59...Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.59 Recall of noncomplying vehicles. (a...may issue an order to the manufacturer to recall and repair or modify any vehicle...

  1. 40 CFR 205.59 - Recall of noncomplying vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recall of noncomplying vehicles. 205.59...Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.59 Recall of noncomplying vehicles. (a...may issue an order to the manufacturer to recall and repair or modify any vehicle...

  2. Generative Modeling for Maximizing Precision and Recall in Information Visualization

    E-print Network

    Kaski, Samuel

    579 Generative Modeling for Maximizing Precision and Recall in Information Visualization Jaakko) precision and recall. We turn the visualiza- tion into a generative modeling task where a simple user model maximizes pure recall, adding a mixture component that "explains away" misses allows our generative model

  3. Against Recall: Is it Persistence, Cardinality, Density, Coverage, or Totality?

    E-print Network

    Zobel, Justin

    ESSAY Against Recall: Is it Persistence, Cardinality, Density, Coverage, or Totality? Justin Zobel of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia jz,alistair,lapark@csse.unimelb.edu.au Abstract The concept of recall questions and explore several further issues that affect the usefulness of recall. In particular, we ask

  4. 40 CFR 205.59 - Recall of noncomplying vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recall of noncomplying vehicles. 205.59...Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.59 Recall of noncomplying vehicles. (a...may issue an order to the manufacturer to recall and repair or modify any vehicle...

  5. The Significance of Recall in Automatic Metrics for MT Evaluation

    E-print Network

    Lavie, Alon

    The Significance of Recall in Automatic Metrics for MT Evaluation Alon Lavie and Kenji Sagae and recall outperforms the widely used BLEU and NIST metrics for Machine Translation evaluation in terms be achieved by placing more weight on recall than on precision. While this may seem unexpected, since BLEU

  6. 40 CFR 205.59 - Recall of noncomplying vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recall of noncomplying vehicles. 205.59...Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.59 Recall of noncomplying vehicles. (a...may issue an order to the manufacturer to recall and repair or modify any vehicle...

  7. Source Memory in the Absence of Successful Cued Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Gabriel I.; Marsh, Richard L.; Hicks, Jason L.

    2006-01-01

    Five experiments were conducted to address the question of whether source information could be accessed in the absence of being able to recall an item. The authors used a paired-associate learning paradigm in which cue-target word pairs were studied, and target recall was requested in the presence of the cue. When target recall failed,…

  8. Radiation recall dermatitis induced by trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dochang; Koo, Ja Seung; Suh, Chang-Ok; Yoon, Chang Yun; Bae, Jaehyun; Lee, Soohyeon

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of radiation recall dermatitis caused by trastuzumab. A 55-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer received palliative first-line trastuzumab/paclitaxel and a salvage partial mastectomy with lymph node dissection was subsequently performed. In spite of the palliative setting, the pathology report indicated that no residual carcinoma was present, and then she underwent locoregional radiotherapy to ensure a definitive response. After radiotherapy, she has maintained trastuzumab monotherapy. Nine days after the fifth cycle of trastuzumab monotherapy, dermatitis in previously irradiated skin developed, with fever. Radiation recall dermatitis triggered by trastuzumab is extremely rare. A high fever developed abruptly with a skin rash. This may be the first case of this sort to be reported. PMID:23543400

  9. Examining the Relationship between Free Recall and Immediate Serial Recall: The Role of List Length, Strategy Use, and Test Expectancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenfell-Essam, Rachel; Ward, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that the immediate free recall (IFR) of short lists is similar to immediate serial recall (ISR). These findings were obtained using a methodology in which participants did not know the list length in advance of each list, and this uncertainty may have encouraged participants to adopt atypical recall strategies. Therefore,…

  10. Paclitaxel-carboplatin induced radiation recall colitis.

    PubMed

    Kundak, Isil; Oztop, Ilhan; Soyturk, Mujde; Ozcan, Mehmet Ali; Yilmaz, Ugur; Meydan, Nezih; Gorken, Ilknur Bilkay; Kupelioglu, Ali; Alakavuklar, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    Some chemotherapeutic agents can "recall" the irradiated volumes by skin or pulmonary reactions in cancer patients who previously received radiation therapy. We report a recall colitis following the administration of paclitaxel-containing regimen in a patient who had been irradiated for a carcinoma of the uterine cervix. A 63-year-old woman underwent a Wertheim operation because of uterine cervix carcinoma. After 8 years of follow-up, a local recurrence was observed and she received curative external radiotherapy (45 Gy) to the pelvis. No significant adverse events were observed during the radiotherapy. Approximately one year later, she was hospitalized because of metastatic disease with multiple pulmonary nodules, and a chemotherapy regimen consisting of paclitaxel and carboplatin was administered. The day after the administration of chemotherapy the patient had diarrhea and rectal bleeding. Histological examination of the biopsy taken from rectal hyperemic lesions showed a radiation colitis. The symptoms reappeared after the administration of each course of chemotherapy and continued until the death of the patient despite the interruption of the chemotherapy. In conclusion, the probability of recall phenomena should be kept in mind in patients who received previously with pelvic radiotherapy and treated later with cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:15237594

  11. 21 CFR 107.250 - Termination of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Termination of an infant formula recall. 107.250 Section 107.250 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.250 Termination of an infant formula recall. The recalling firm may submit a...

  12. 40 CFR 90.805 - Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. 90.805 Section...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.805 Reports, voluntary recall plan...

  13. 21 CFR 107.250 - Termination of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...false Termination of an infant formula recall. 107.250 Section 107.250 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.250 Termination of an infant formula recall. The recalling firm may submit a...

  14. 21 CFR 107.250 - Termination of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Termination of an infant formula recall. 107.250 Section 107.250 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.250 Termination of an infant formula recall. The recalling firm may submit a...

  15. 40 CFR 90.805 - Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. 90.805 Section...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.805 Reports, voluntary recall plan...

  16. 40 CFR 90.805 - Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. 90.805 Section...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.805 Reports, voluntary recall plan...

  17. 40 CFR 90.805 - Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. 90.805 Section...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.805 Reports, voluntary recall plan...

  18. 40 CFR 90.805 - Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. 90.805 Section...Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program, Ordered Recalls § 90.805 Reports, voluntary recall plan...

  19. 77 FR 45636 - Food Safety Modernization Act Domestic and Foreign Facility Reinspection, Recall, and Importer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ...Domestic and Foreign Facility Reinspection, Recall, and Importer Reinspection Fee Rates...reinspections, failures to comply with a recall order, and importer reinspections that...an importer who does not comply with a recall order, to cover food recall...

  20. 21 CFR 107.250 - Termination of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...false Termination of an infant formula recall. 107.250 Section 107.250 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.250 Termination of an infant formula recall. The recalling firm may submit a...

  1. The role of phantom recollection in false recall.

    PubMed

    Marche, Tammy A; Brainerd, C J

    2012-08-01

    Although high levels of phantom recollection (illusory vivid experience of the prior "presentation" of unpresented items) have been found for false recognition, little is known about phantom recollection in recall. We examined this issue with Deese/Roediger-McDermott lists using two paradigms: repeated recall and conjoint recall. High levels of phantom recollection were observed with both standard behavioral measures and the parameters of fuzzy-trace theory's dual-recall model. In addition, phantom recollection and the true recollection that accompanies presented items appear to involve different retrieval processes, because they were dissociated by manipulations such as number of recall tests and list strength. PMID:22371165

  2. Televised Self-Confrontation and Recalled Affect: A New Look at Videotape Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David; Resnikoff, Arthur

    1977-01-01

    The extent to which individuals can recall feelings they experienced during a dyadic interaction, when shown a televised replay of that interaction, was investigated. Pairs of subjects (N=10) were trained rate their degree of comfort or discomfort during the actual ("live") interaction and, subsequently, as they watched a video-taped replay of…

  3. Diets that Work

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diets that Work Share: Fact Sheet Diets that Work February 2014 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Susan ... there? It can be hard to know what works and what’s healthy. Everyone wants a diet that ...

  4. Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rings Frequently Asked Questions Definitions Transplantation Diet and Nutrition Food . . . . Adherence to a low copper diet is most important ... Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Generic Zinc Options Inheritence Diet & Nutrition Kayser-Fleischer Rings Wilson Disease FAQs Definitions Transplantation ...

  5. Fluoride in diet

    MedlinePLUS

    Diet - fluoride ... bones and teeth. Too much fluoride in the diet is very rare. Rarely, infants who get too ... of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the ...

  6. A comparative analysis of double-crested cormorant diets from stomachs and pellets from two Lake Ontario colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Ross, Robert M.; McCullough, Russell D.; Mathers, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    Double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) diets were compared with evidence from the stomachs of shot birds and from regurgitated pellets at High Bluff Island and Little Galloo Island, Lake Ontario. The highest similarity in diets determined by stomach and pellet analyses occurred when both samples were collected on the same day. Diet overlap dropped substantially between the two methods when collection periods were seven to ten days apart, which suggested differences in prey availability between the two periods. Since the average number of fish recovered in pellets was significantly higher than that in stomachs, use of pellets to determine fish consumption of double-crested cormorants may be more valid than stomach analysis because pellet content represent an integrated sampling of food consumed over approximately 24 hours.

  7. Recall compliance and incidence of dental caries among underserved children.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ulysses; Hui, Brian K; Pourat, Nadereh

    2015-02-01

    Regular dental recall intervals are widely recommended by dentists in the U.S. to prevent caries and improve periodontal health. However, there is some debate on whether or not compliance with six-month or more frequent recall intervals results in reduced incidence of dental caries. This study examines whether compliance with regular recall and receipt of cleanings, exams and patient education reduces rates of new decay in underserved children and finds a positive impact. PMID:25868221

  8. Recall Latencies, Confidence, and Output Positions of True and False Memories: Implications for Recall and Metamemory Theories

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Jerwen

    2012-01-01

    Recall latency, recall accuracy rate, and recall confidence were examined in free recall as a function of recall output serial position using a modified Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to test a strength-based theory against the dual-retrieval process theory of recall output sequence. The strength theory predicts the item output sequence to be in the descending order of memory strength. The dual-retrieval process theory postulates two phases in a free recall, a first direct access phase in which items are output verbatim in the weakest-to-strongest order (cognitive triage) and a second reconstructive phase in which reconstructed items are output in the strongest-to-weakest order. In three experiments, all three indicators of memory strength (latency, accuracy, and confidence) consistently showed a descending-strength order of recall both for true and false memories. Additionally, false memory was found to be output in two phases and subjects’ confidence judgment of their own memory to be unaccountable by retrieval fluency (recall latency). PMID:22582008

  9. Beyond Memorability: Visualization Recognition and Recall.

    PubMed

    Borkin, Michelle A; Bylinskii, Zoya; Kim, Nam Wook; Bainbridge, Constance May; Yeh, Chelsea S; Borkin, Daniel; Pfister, Hanspeter; Oliva, Aude

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we move beyond memorability and investigate how visualizations are recognized and recalled. For this study we labeled a dataset of 393 visualizations and analyzed the eye movements of 33 participants as well as thousands of participant-generated text descriptions of the visualizations. This allowed us to determine what components of a visualization attract people's attention, and what information is encoded into memory. Our findings quantitatively support many conventional qualitative design guidelines, including that (1) titles and supporting text should convey the message of a visualization, (2) if used appropriately, pictograms do not interfere with understanding and can improve recognition, and (3) redundancy helps effectively communicate the message. Importantly, we show that visualizations memorable "at-a-glance" are also capable of effectively conveying the message of the visualization. Thus, a memorable visualization is often also an effective one. PMID:26390488

  10. Diet and nutritional status among children 24–59 months by seasons in a mountainous area of Northern Vietnam in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Huong, Le Thi; Xuan, Le Thi Thanh; Phuong, Le Hong; Huyen, Doan Thi Thu; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2014-01-01

    Background Seasonal variation affects food availability. However, it is not clear if it affects dietary intake and nutritional status of children in Vietnam. Objectives This paper aims at examining the seasonal variation in nutrition status and dietary intake of children aged 24–59 months. Design A repeated cross-sectional study design was used to collect data of changes in nutritional status and diets of children from 24 to 59 months through four seasons in Chiem Hoa district, Tuyen Quang province, a predominately rural mountainous province of northern Vietnam. The quantitative component includes anthropometric measurements, 24 hours dietary recall and socio-economic characteristics. The qualitative component was conducted through focus group discussions (FGDs) with mothers of the children surveyed in the quantitative component. The purpose of FGDs was to explore the food habits of children during the different seasons and the behaviours of their mothers in relation to the food that they provide during these seasons. Results The prevalence of underweight among children aged 24–59 months is estimated at around 20–25%; it peaked in summer (24.9%) and reached a low in winter (21.3%). The prevalence of stunting was highest in summer (29.8%) and lowest in winter (22.2%). The prevalence of wasting in children was higher in spring and autumn (14.3%) and lower in summer (9.3%). Energy intake of children was highest in the autumn (1259.3 kcal) and lowest in the summer (996.9 kcal). Most of the energy and the nutrient intakes during the four seasons did not meet the Vietnamese National Institute of Nutrition recommendation. Conclusions Our study describes some seasonal variation in nutrition status and energy intake among children in a mountainous area northern Vietnam. Our study indicated that the prevalence of stunting and underweight was higher in summer and autumn, while the prevalence of wasting was higher in spring and autumn. Energy intake did not always meet national recommendations, especially in summer. PMID:25511885

  11. Academic Recall Appointment Academic Personnel Office 3/15/13, sb

    E-print Network

    Academic Recall Appointment Academic Personnel Office 3/15/13, sb UC Riverside Academic Recall: Proposed Recall Appointment College/School: Title: Department: Annual Salary: Scale: Begin Date: End Date: Proposed Recall Duties Purpose of Recall: Teaching Research Administrative Other Description of Duties

  12. 21 CFR 107.230 - Elements of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Elements of an infant formula recall. 107.230... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.230 Elements of an infant formula recall. A recalling firm shall conduct an infant formula recall with the following elements:...

  13. 21 CFR 107.230 - Elements of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Elements of an infant formula recall. 107.230... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.230 Elements of an infant formula recall. A recalling firm shall conduct an infant formula recall with the following elements:...

  14. 21 CFR 107.230 - Elements of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Elements of an infant formula recall. 107.230... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.230 Elements of an infant formula recall. A recalling firm shall conduct an infant formula recall with the following elements:...

  15. 21 CFR 107.230 - Elements of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Elements of an infant formula recall. 107.230... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.230 Elements of an infant formula recall. A recalling firm shall conduct an infant formula recall with the following elements:...

  16. Free, Forced, and Restricted Recall in Verbal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Walter; Buschke, Herman

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to clarify the nature of retrieving information from Long Term Storage by using forced recall as well as free recall to determine whether further search may lead to retrieval of additional repeated items. (Author/RK)

  17. Brief Communication Delayed Recall of Fear Extinction in Rats With

    E-print Network

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    Brief Communication Delayed Recall of Fear Extinction in Rats With Lesions of Ventral Medial School of Medicine, Ponce, Puerto Rico 00732, USA Extinction of auditory fear conditioning is thought within a session, but showed no recall of extinction 24 h later. One interpretation is that the vm

  18. Lawfulness of preventive recall from a community treatment order.

    PubMed

    Dawson, John

    2015-04-01

    Preventive recall to hospital of a patient on a community treatment order can be lawful when it is based on a convincing prediction that relapse in illness would otherwise occur. The legislation for England and Wales provides several indications that authorising preventive recall in those circumstances is a purpose of the community treatment order regime. PMID:25833866

  19. The fSAM Model of False Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Daniel R.; Smith, Troy A.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a new theory of false memory building upon existing associative memory models and implemented in fSAM, the first fully specified quantitative model of false recall. Participants frequently intrude unstudied critical words while recalling lists comprising their strongest semantic associates but infrequently produce other…

  20. Veridical and False Recall in Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Courtney T.; Sheng, Li; Ratner, Nan Bernstein; Gkalitsiou, Zoi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study used a false memory paradigm to explore the veridical and false recall of adults who stutter. Method: Twelve adults who stutter and 12 age-matched typically fluent peers listened to and then verbally recalled lists of words that consisted of either semantic or phonological associates or an equal number of semantic and…

  1. Rethinking Familiarity: Remember/Know Judgments in Free Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickes, Laura; Seale-Carlisle, Travis M.; Wixted, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Although frequently used with recognition, a few studies have used the Remember/Know procedure with free recall. In each case, participants gave Know judgments to a significant number of recalled items (items that were presumably not remembered on the basis of familiarity). What do these Know judgments mean? We investigated this issue using a…

  2. 21 CFR 7.50 - Public notification of recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public notification of recall. 7.50 Section 7.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Responsibilities § 7.50 Public notification of recall. The Food and Drug Administration will promptly...

  3. 21 CFR 7.50 - Public notification of recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public notification of recall. 7.50 Section 7.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Responsibilities § 7.50 Public notification of recall. The Food and Drug Administration will promptly...

  4. 21 CFR 7.50 - Public notification of recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Public notification of recall. 7.50 Section 7.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Responsibilities § 7.50 Public notification of recall. The Food and Drug Administration will promptly...

  5. 21 CFR 7.50 - Public notification of recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public notification of recall. 7.50 Section 7.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Responsibilities § 7.50 Public notification of recall. The Food and Drug Administration will promptly...

  6. 21 CFR 7.50 - Public notification of recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public notification of recall. 7.50 Section 7.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Responsibilities § 7.50 Public notification of recall. The Food and Drug Administration will promptly...

  7. 75 FR 3355 - Guidelines and Requirements for Mandatory Recall Notices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ...The Consumer Product Safety Commission (``Commission,'' ``CPSC,'' ``we'') is issuing a final rule establishing guidelines and requirements for mandatory recall notices as required by section 214 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (``CPSIA''). The rule contains the Commission's interpretation of information which must appear on mandatory recall notices ordered by the......

  8. 40 CFR 205.59 - Recall of noncomplying vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... manufacturer to recall and repair or modify any vehicle distributed in commerce not in compliance with this... Administrator that vehicles of a specified category or configuration have been distributed in commerce which do... opportunity for a hearing. (e) All costs, including labor and parts, associated with the recall and repair...

  9. Using Recall to Reduce False Recognition: Diagnostic and Disqualifying Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Whether recall of studied words (e.g., parsley, rosemary, thyme) could reduce false recognition of related lures (e.g., basil) was investigated. Subjects studied words from several categories for a final recognition memory test. Half of the subjects were given standard test instructions, and half were instructed to use recall to reduce false…

  10. Prior-List Intrusions in Serial Recall Are Positional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osth, Adam F.; Dennis, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Henson (1996) provided a number of demonstrations of error patterns in serial recall that contradict chaining models. One such error pattern concerned when participants make intrusions from prior lists: Rather than originating from random positions in the prior list, intrusions tend to be recalled in the same position as their position in the…

  11. Food Recall Attitudes and Behaviors of School Nutrition Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grisamore, Amber; Roberts, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore school nutrition directors' attitudes and behaviors about food recalls. Specific objectives included: 1) Determine current food recall attitudes and the relationship between demographics and these attitudes; 2) Determine current practices of school nutrition directors related to…

  12. Temporal texture of associative encoding modulates recall processes.

    PubMed

    Tibon, Roni; Levy, Daniel A

    2014-02-01

    Binding aspects of an experience that are distributed over time is an important element of episodic memory. In the current study, we examined how the temporal complexity of an experience may govern the processes required for its retrieval. We recorded event-related potentials during episodic cued recall following pair associate learning of concurrently and sequentially presented object-picture pairs. Cued recall success effects over anterior and posterior areas were apparent in several time windows. In anterior locations, these recall success effects were similar for concurrently and sequentially encoded pairs. However, in posterior sites clustered over parietal scalp the effect was larger for the retrieval of sequentially encoded pairs. We suggest that anterior aspects of the mid-latency recall success effects may reflect working-with-memory operations or direct access recall processes, while more posterior aspects reflect recollective processes which are required for retrieval of episodes of greater temporal complexity. PMID:24215986

  13. Observed vs. Recalled Exercise Behavior: A Validation of a Seven Day Exercise Recall for Boys 11 to 13 Years Old.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Janet P.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Eleven boys at a summer camp were asked to recall the mode, duration, and intensity of their physical activity during the preceding seven days. When compared with their counselor's records, the boys were accurate enough to make seven-day recall applicable as a summary tool of children's total energy expenditure. (Author/MT)

  14. Diet Quality of Multiethnic Mothers with Limited Incomes in the Southern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared nutrient intakes of a multiethnic sample of mothers with children in Head Start in 2 southern states in the U.S.: 24% white (W), 43% African American (AA) and 33% Hispanic (HSP). Interviewers elicited 3 nonconsecutive days of dietary recalls. Diet quality was evaluated using th...

  15. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107.200 Section 107.200 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug...

  16. 40 CFR 205.163 - Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling of mislabeled motorcycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling...CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.163 Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling...may issue an order to the manufacturer to recall, repair, modify, or relabel any...

  17. 21 CFR 810.17 - Termination of a cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order. 810.17 Section 810.17 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.17 Termination of...

  18. 21 CFR 107.220 - Scope and effect of infant formula recalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Scope and effect of infant formula recalls. 107.220 Section 107.220 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.220 Scope and effect of infant formula recalls. (a) The requirements of this...

  19. 21 CFR 107.220 - Scope and effect of infant formula recalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...false Scope and effect of infant formula recalls. 107.220 Section 107.220 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.220 Scope and effect of infant formula recalls. (a) The requirements of this...

  20. 21 CFR 810.16 - Cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order status reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order status reports. 810.16 Section...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.16 Cease...

  1. 40 CFR 91.905 - Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. 91.905...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.905 Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. (a)...

  2. 21 CFR 810.15 - Communications concerning a cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order. 810.15 Section 810.15 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.15 Communications...

  3. 40 CFR 91.905 - Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. 91.905...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.905 Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 91.905 - Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. 91.905...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.905 Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 810.15 - Communications concerning a cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order. 810.15 Section 810.15 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.15 Communications...

  6. 40 CFR 85.1904 - Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports. 85.1904...Requirements § 85.1904 Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports. (a...manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall campaign involving twenty-five...

  7. 40 CFR 205.163 - Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling of mislabeled motorcycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling...CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.163 Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling...may issue an order to the manufacturer to recall, repair, modify, or relabel any...

  8. 40 CFR 205.163 - Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling of mislabeled motorcycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling...CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.163 Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling...may issue an order to the manufacturer to recall, repair, modify, or relabel any...

  9. 21 CFR 810.17 - Termination of a cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order. 810.17 Section 810.17 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.17 Termination of...

  10. 21 CFR 107.250 - Termination of an infant formula recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...false Termination of an infant formula recall. 107.250 Section 107.250 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.250 Termination of an infant formula recall. Link to an amendment published at...

  11. 76 FR 66723 - Food Safety Modernization Act Domestic and Foreign Facility Reinspections, Recall, and Importer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ...Domestic and Foreign Facility Reinspections, Recall, and Importer Reinspection User Fee Rates...Domestic and Foreign Facility Reinspections, Recall, and Importer Reinspection User Fee Rates...reinspections, non- compliance with recall order, and importer reinspection FY...

  12. 21 CFR 107.220 - Scope and effect of infant formula recalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Scope and effect of infant formula recalls. 107.220 Section 107.220 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.220 Scope and effect of infant formula recalls. (a) The requirements of this...

  13. 77 FR 26769 - Educational Forum on Medical Device Reporting, Complaint Files, and Recalls, Corrections, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ...Device Reporting, Complaint Files, and Recalls, Corrections, and Removals; Public...Device Reporting, Complaint Files, and Recalls, Corrections, and Removals.'' The...device reporting, (3) medical device recalls, corrections, and removals, and...

  14. 10 CFR 30.62 - Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material. 30.62 ...Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material. The Commission may cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material from...

  15. 10 CFR 30.62 - Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material. 30.62 ...Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material. The Commission may cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material from...

  16. 9 CFR 418.3 - Preparation and maintenance of written recall procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Preparation and maintenance of written recall procedures. 418.3 Section 418...AND THE POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT RECALLS § 418.3 Preparation and maintenance of written recall procedures. Each official...

  17. 9 CFR 418.3 - Preparation and maintenance of written recall procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Preparation and maintenance of written recall procedures. 418.3 Section 418...AND THE POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT RECALLS § 418.3 Preparation and maintenance of written recall procedures. Each official...

  18. 21 CFR 810.17 - Termination of a cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order. 810.17 Section 810.17 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.17 Termination of...

  19. 40 CFR 91.905 - Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. 91.905...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.905 Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. (a)...

  20. 21 CFR 810.17 - Termination of a cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order. 810.17 Section 810.17 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.17 Termination of...

  1. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107.200 Section 107.200 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug...

  2. 21 CFR 810.17 - Termination of a cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order. 810.17 Section 810.17 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.17 Termination of...

  3. 40 CFR 205.163 - Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling of mislabeled motorcycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling...CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.163 Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling...may issue an order to the manufacturer to recall, repair, modify, or relabel any...

  4. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107.200 Section 107.200 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug...

  5. 21 CFR 810.16 - Cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order status reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order status reports. 810.16 Section...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.16 Cease...

  6. 21 CFR 107.220 - Scope and effect of infant formula recalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...false Scope and effect of infant formula recalls. 107.220 Section 107.220 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.220 Scope and effect of infant formula recalls. (a) The requirements of this...

  7. 10 CFR 30.62 - Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material. 30.62 ...Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material. The Commission may cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material from...

  8. 21 CFR 810.15 - Communications concerning a cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order. 810.15 Section 810.15 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.15 Communications...

  9. 78 FR 78321 - Early Warning Reporting, Foreign Defect Reporting, and Motor Vehicle and Equipment Recall...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...Reporting, and Motor Vehicle and Equipment Recall Regulations; Meeting AGENCY: National...secure electronic transfer of manufacturer recall data to NHTSA when a consumer submits...agency's Web site for purposes of learning recall information about the vehicle....

  10. 40 CFR 85.1904 - Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports. 85.1904...Requirements § 85.1904 Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports. (a...manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall campaign involving twenty-five...

  11. 40 CFR 85.1904 - Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports. 85.1904...Requirements § 85.1904 Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports. (a...manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall campaign involving twenty-five...

  12. 40 CFR 85.1904 - Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports. 85.1904...Requirements § 85.1904 Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports. (a...manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall campaign involving twenty-five...

  13. 40 CFR 85.1904 - Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports. 85.1904...Requirements § 85.1904 Voluntary emissions recall report; quarterly reports. (a...manufacturer initiates a voluntary emissions recall campaign involving twenty-five...

  14. 10 CFR 30.62 - Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material. 30.62 ...Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material. The Commission may cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material from...

  15. 21 CFR 810.16 - Cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order status reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order status reports. 810.16 Section...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.16 Cease...

  16. 49 CFR 573.15 - Public availability of motor vehicle recall information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Public availability of motor vehicle recall information. 573.15 Section 573... Public availability of motor vehicle recall information. (a) General ...calendar year shall make motor vehicle safety recall information applicable to the...

  17. 21 CFR 810.15 - Communications concerning a cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order. 810.15 Section 810.15 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.15 Communications...

  18. 21 CFR 810.16 - Cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order status reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order status reports. 810.16 Section...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.16 Cease...

  19. 21 CFR 810.15 - Communications concerning a cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order. 810.15 Section 810.15 Food...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.15 Communications...

  20. 49 CFR 573.15 - Public Availability of Motor Vehicle Recall Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Public Availability of Motor Vehicle Recall Information. 573.15 Section 573... Public Availability of Motor Vehicle Recall Information. (a) General ...calendar year shall make motor vehicle safety recall information applicable to the...

  1. 10 CFR 30.62 - Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material. 30.62 ...Right to cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material. The Commission may cause the withholding or recall of byproduct material from...

  2. 21 CFR 107.220 - Scope and effect of infant formula recalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...false Scope and effect of infant formula recalls. 107.220 Section 107.220 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.220 Scope and effect of infant formula recalls. (a) The requirements of this...

  3. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107.200 Section 107.200 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug...

  4. 40 CFR 91.905 - Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. 91.905...Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.905 Reports, voluntary recall plan filing, record retention. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107.200 Section 107.200 Food...CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug...

  6. 21 CFR 810.16 - Cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order status reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Cease distribution and notification or mandatory recall order status reports. 810.16 Section...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY Mandatory Medical Device Recall Procedures § 810.16 Cease...

  7. 40 CFR 205.163 - Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling of mislabeled motorcycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling...CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.163 Recall of noncomplying motorcycles; relabeling...may issue an order to the manufacturer to recall, repair, modify, or relabel any...

  8. Los Angeles Times: Court Restores Oct. 7 Recall Vote http://www.latimes.com/la-me-recall24sep24000427,1,691732.story

    E-print Network

    Redmiles, David F.

    Los Angeles Times: Court Restores Oct. 7 Recall Vote http://www.latimes.com/la-me-recall24sep24000427,1,691732.story THE RECALL CAMPAIGN a d v e r t i s e m e n t Court Restores Oct. 7 Recall Vote September 24, 2003 A federal appeals court Tuesday put the California recall race back on track for an Oct

  9. Recall and recognition hypermnesia for Socratic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kazén, Miguel; Solís-Macías, Víctor M

    2016-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigate hypermnesia, net memory improvements with repeated testing of the same material after a single study trial. In the first experiment, we found hypermnesia across three trials for the recall of word solutions to Socratic stimuli (dictionary-like definitions of concepts) replicating Erdelyi, Buschke, and Finkelstein and, for the first time using these materials, for their recognition. In the second experiment, we had two "yes/no" recognition groups, a Socratic stimuli group presented with concrete and abstract verbal materials and a word-only control group. Using signal detection measures, we found hypermnesia for concrete Socratic stimuli-and stable performance for abstract stimuli across three recognition tests. The control group showed memory decrements across tests. We interpret these findings with the alternative retrieval pathways (ARP) hypothesis, contrasting it with alternative theories of hypermnesia, such as depth of processing, generation and retrieve-recognise. We conclude that recognition hypermnesia for concrete Socratic stimuli is a reliable phenomenon, which we found in two experiments involving both forced-choice and yes/no recognition procedures. PMID:25523628

  10. The impact of fertilization on the chicken egg yolk plasma and granule proteome 24 hours post-lay at room temperature: capitalizing on high-pH/low-pH reverse phase chromatography in conjunction with tandem mass tag (TMT) technology.

    PubMed

    Padliya, Neerav D; Qian, Meiqian; Mimi Roy, Sushmita; Chu, Patrick; Zheng, Haiyan; Tess, Alex; Dariani, Maghsoud; Hariri, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Chicken egg yolk is a rich source of nutrients providing high quality proteins, vitamins, minerals, carotenoids and antioxidants. Chicken egg yolk, recovered from whole egg within 24 hours post-lay has been utilized as a starting material in the preparation of a dietary supplement that has been demonstrated to lead to gains in muscle mass in a human clinical study. Further, an oil derived from chicken egg yolk has been utilized as a topical agent to treat third degree burn injury. The molecular changes that take place in fertilized, chicken egg yolk during the first 24 hours post-lay are not well understood. By studying how the protein composition of egg yolk varies with fertility status, one can utilize this knowledge to develop egg yolk-based products that have been optimized for specific applications. In this study, a direct quantitative comparison was made between the proteome of fertilized chicken egg yolk and the proteome of unfertilized chicken egg yolk, both maintained at 20 °C and analyzed within 24 hours post-lay. Egg yolk proteins from each fertility state were digested with trypsin, labeled with distinct chemical labels (tandem mass tag reagents) and then combined in a 1?:?1 ratio. A TMT-labeled tryptic digest derived from chicken egg yolk proteins (fertilized and unfertilized) was separated using high-pH/low-pH reverse-phase chromatography and analyzed using mass spectrometry. 225 protein identifications were made from this TMT-labeled tryptic digest based on a minimum of 2 unique peptides observed per protein. 9 proteins increased in abundance in fertilized egg yolk relative to unfertilized egg yolk and 9 proteins decreased in abundance in fertilized egg yolk relative to unfertilized egg yolk. Some proteins that increased in abundance in fertilized egg yolk play an important role in angiogenesis (pleiotrophin, histidine rich glycoprotein) and defense against pathogens (mannose-binding lectin, ?-defensin 11, serum amyloid P-component, ovostatin). Based on this study, fertilized chicken egg yolk may be more useful as a starting material relative to unfertilized chicken egg yolk for the purpose of enriching or isolating proteins with pro-angiogenic and anti-microbial properties. PMID:26073176

  11. The SHINE Trial Infant Feeding Intervention: Pilot Study of Effects on Maternal Learning and Infant Diet Quality in Rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Amy; Smith, Laura E.; Mbuya, Mduduzi N. N.; Chigumira, Ancikaria; Fundira, Dadirai; Tavengwa, Naume V.; Malaba, Thokozile R.; Majo, Florence D.; Humphrey, Jean H.; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial is designed to measure the independent and combined effects of improved water, sanitation, and hygiene and improved infant feeding on child stunting and anemia in Zimbabwe. We developed and pilot-tested the infant feeding intervention delivered by 9 village health workers to 19 mothers of infants aged 7–12 months. Between September 2010 and January 2011, maternal knowledge was assessed using mixed methods, and infant nutrient intakes were assessed by 24-hour recall. We observed positive shifts in mothers' knowledge. At baseline, 63% of infants met their energy requirement and most did not receive enough folate, zinc, or calcium; none met their iron requirement. Postintervention, all infants received sufficient fat and vitamin A, and most consumed enough daily energy (79%), protein (95%), calcium (89%), zinc (89%), folate (68%), and iron (68%). The SHINE trial infant feeding intervention led to significant short-term improvements in maternal learning and infant nutrient intakes. PMID:26602298

  12. The SHINE Trial Infant Feeding Intervention: Pilot Study of Effects on Maternal Learning and Infant Diet Quality in Rural Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Desai, Amy; Smith, Laura E; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Chigumira, Ancikaria; Fundira, Dadirai; Tavengwa, Naume V; Malaba, Thokozile R; Majo, Florence D; Humphrey, Jean H; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2015-12-15

    The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial is designed to measure the independent and combined effects of improved water, sanitation, and hygiene and improved infant feeding on child stunting and anemia in Zimbabwe. We developed and pilot-tested the infant feeding intervention delivered by 9 village health workers to 19 mothers of infants aged 7-12 months. Between September 2010 and January 2011, maternal knowledge was assessed using mixed methods, and infant nutrient intakes were assessed by 24-hour recall. We observed positive shifts in mothers' knowledge. At baseline, 63% of infants met their energy requirement and most did not receive enough folate, zinc, or calcium; none met their iron requirement. Postintervention, all infants received sufficient fat and vitamin A, and most consumed enough daily energy (79%), protein (95%), calcium (89%), zinc (89%), folate (68%), and iron (68%). The SHINE trial infant feeding intervention led to significant short-term improvements in maternal learning and infant nutrient intakes. PMID:26602298

  13. Established dietary estimates of net acid production do not predict measured net acid excretion in patients with Type 2 diabetes on Paleolithic-Hunter-Gatherer-type diets

    PubMed Central

    Frassetto, Lynda A; Shi, Lijie; Schloetter, Monique; Sebastian, Anthony; Remer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Formulas developed to estimate diet-dependent net acid excretion (NAE) generally agree with measured values for typical Western diets. Whether they can also appropriately predict NAE for "Paleolithic-type" (Paleo) diets – which contain very high amounts of fruits and vegetables (F&V) and concurrent high amounts of protein is unknown. Here we compare measured NAEs with established NAE-estimates in subjects with Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Thirteen subjects with well controlled T2D were randomized to either a Paleo or American Diabetes Association (ADA) diet for 14 days. 24-hour urine collections were performed at baseline and end of the diet period, and analyzed for titratable acid, bicarbonate, and ammonium to calculate measured NAE. Three formulas for estimating NAE from dietary intake were used; two (NAE_diet R or L) that include dietary mineral intake and sulfate- and organic acid (OA) production, and one that is empirically-derived (NAE_diet F) only considering potassium and protein intake. Results Measured NAE on the Paleo diet was significantly lower than on the ADA diet (+31±22 vs. 112±52 mEq/day, p=0.002). Although all formula estimates showed similar and reasonable correlations (r=0.52–0.76) with measured NAE, each one underestimated measured values. The formula with the best correlation did not contain an estimate of dietary organic acid production. Conclusions Paleo diets are lower in NAE than typical Western diets. However, commonly used formulas clearly underestimate NAE, especially for diets with very high F&V (as the Paleo diet), and in subjects with T2D. This may be due to an inappropriate estimation of proton loads stemming from OAs, underlining the necessity for improved measures of OA-related proton sources. PMID:23859996

  14. Diet myths and facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... myths and facts; Overweight - diet myths and facts; Obesity- diet myths and facts ... evidence: using the proposed effect of breakfast on obesity to show 2 practices that distort scientific evidence. ...

  15. Diet and Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the course of the day to provide essential amino acids. Vegan/vegetarian diets should include a calcium rich ... is a hypoallergenic formula-based diet providing essential amino acids, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals. There are multiple ...

  16. High blood pressure and diet

    MedlinePLUS

    Hypertension - diet ... diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure . These changes can also help you lose weight ... DIET The low-salt Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is proven to help lower blood ...

  17. Essays on Product Recalls, New Product Preannouncements, and Shareholder Value 

    E-print Network

    Yun, Wonjoo

    2014-08-08

    Product recalls are widely recognized as a manufacturer’s worst nightmare. They put the value generated by product innovation at risk. In my dissertation, I investigate the factors that determine the effects of product ...

  18. Jim Lovell Recalls Apollo 8 Launch Day - Duration: 71 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronaut Jim Lovell, veteran of two Gemini flights as well as the legendary missions of Apollo 8 and Apollo 13, recalls his thoughts on launch day of Apollo 8 in 1968, when humans first left the E...

  19. 40 CFR 94.404 - Voluntary emissions recall reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission-related Defect... or group of engine subject to the voluntary emissions recall campaign, the quarterly report...

  20. [Variations of encoding and false memories in recall].

    PubMed

    Corson, Yves; Mahé, Aurélia; Verrier, Nadège; Colombel et Luc Jagot, Fabienne

    2011-12-01

    This article presents two experiments using the DRM paradigm and examining the effects of variations in the depth of processing on the occurrence of false memories at recall. Contrary to what is generally observed, the results of the first experiment indicate that deep processing, maximizing the possibility of implication of distinctive characteristics, leads to an increase of the recall of hits without increasing the recall of lures. The second experiment uses instructions of inclusion requiring participants to recall not only the presented items but also all the words that were activated in memory both during the encoding and retrieval phases. These instructions, which deactivate the strategy of control of the source, support the notion that deep processing favours the activation of distinctive characteristics that facilitate the process of discrimination during the identification of the source. PMID:21728403