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Sample records for 240pu core experiments

  1. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.

    SciTech Connect

    Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-23

    ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium

  2. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240} PU core : a cylindrical assemby with mixed (PU, U)-oxide fuel and a central high {sup 240} PU zone.

    SciTech Connect

    Lell, R. M.; Schaefer, R. W.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

    2007-10-01

    Over a period of 30 years more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. The term 'benchmark' in a ZPR program connotes a particularly simple loading aimed at gaining basic reactor physics insight, as opposed to studying a reactor design. In fact, the ZPR-6/7 Benchmark Assembly (Reference 1) had a very simple core unit cell assembled from plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U3O8, and plutonium. The ZPR-6/7 core cell-average composition is typical of the interior region of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) of the era. It was one part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program,a which provided integral experiments characterizing the important features of demonstration

  3. Microscopic Calculations of 240Pu Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2007-09-11

    Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations have been performed with the Gogny finite-range effective interaction for {sup 240}Pu out to scission, using a new code developed at LLNL. A first set of calculations was performed with constrained quadrupole moment along the path of most probable fission, assuming axial symmetry but allowing for the spontaneous breaking of reflection symmetry of the nucleus. At a quadrupole moment of 345 b, the nucleus was found to spontaneously scission into two fragments. A second set of calculations, with all nuclear moments up to hexadecapole constrained, was performed to approach the scission configuration in a controlled manner. Calculated energies, moments, and representative plots of the total nuclear density are shown. The present calculations serve as a proof-of-principle, a blueprint, and starting-point solutions for a planned series of more comprehensive calculations to map out a large set of scission configurations, and the associated fission-fragment properties.

  4. Numerical simulation of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations by an ocean general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi

    2003-01-01

    We simulated the spatial distributions and the temporal variations of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations in the ocean by using the ocean general circulation model which was developed by National Center of Atmospheric Research. These nuclides are introduced into seawaters from global fallout due to atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The distribution of radioactive deposition on the world ocean is estimated from global precipitation data and observed values of annual deposition of radionuclides at the Meteorological Research Institute in Japan and several observed points in New Zealand. Radionuclides from global fallout have been transported by advection, diffusion and scavenging, and this concentration reduces by radioactive decay in the ocean. We verified the results of the model calculations by comparing simulated values of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu in seawater with the observed values included in the Historical Artificial Radionuclides in the HAM database, which has been constructed by the Meteorological Research Institute. The vertical distributions of the calculated 137Cs concentrations were in good agreement and are in good agreement with the observed profiles in the 1960s up to 250 m, in the 1970s up to 500 m, in the 1980s up to 750 m and in the 1990s up to 750 m. However, the calculated 137Cs concentrations were underestimated compared with the observed 137Cs at the deeper layer. This may suggest other transport processes of 137Cs to deep waters. The horizontal distributions of 137Cs concentrations in surface water could be simulated. A numerical tracer release experiment was performed to explain the horizontal distribution pattern. A maximum (239,240)Pu concentration layer occurs at an intermediate depth for both observed and calculated values, which is formed by particle scavenging. The horizontal distributions of the calculated (239,240)Pu concentrations in surface water could be simulated by considering the scavenging effect. PMID:12860090

  5. Cluster approach to the structure of 240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneidman, T. M.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2015-09-01

    The cluster approach, which allows us to take into account both shape deformation parameters and cluster degrees of freedom, is developed to describe alternating-parity rotational bands. The important ingredient of the model is the dinuclear system concept in which the wave function of the nucleus is treated as a superposition of a mononucleus and two-cluster configurations. The model is applied to describe the multiple positive and negative parity rotational bands in 240Pu . The observed excitation spectrum and the angular momentum dependences of the parity splitting and of the electric E 1 and E 2 transition moments are explained. Special emphasis is made on the investigation of the recently measured positive parity 02+ rotational band of reflection-asymmetric nature. The results suggest that this band might be understood as being built on the lowest excited state in the mass asymmetry degree of freedom. The B (E 1 )/B (E 2 ) branching ratios between the reduced transition probabilities of decay from the states of the 02+ band to the first negative parity band and to the groundstate band, respectively, are calculated and compared with experimental data.

  6. Determination of /sup 239,240/Pu in bottom sediments of the Baltic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Legin, V.K.; Pospelov, Yu.N.; Simonyak, Z.N.

    1988-11-01

    We present a technique for determining the /sup 239,240/Pu content, using /sup 236/Pu as the monitor of chemical yield, in samples of soils and bottom sediments - objects of the external environment. Plutonium is extracted from the matrix material by leaching with a mixture of concentrated acids HCl-HNO/sub 3/, after which it is separated by ion-exchange methods. After electrodeposition onto stainless steel discs the activity of the nuclides of plutonium is measured by the method of alpha-spectrometry. The average chemical yields during the analysis of the samples was 40-60%, the relative standard deviation was 10%, and the lower limit of detectability was 0.3 Bq. We present results of the determination of the /sup 239,240/Pu content in surface samples of bottom sediments from the Gulf of Finland and that past of the Baltic Sea which adjoins the territory of the USSR. It is found that the unit activity of /sup 239,240/Pu in the bottom sediments varies within the limits of 0.4-1.2 Bq/kg and lies at the global level. Global genesis of /sup 239,240/Pu in the bottom sediments of the Gulf of Finland and the open parts of the Baltic Sea is also confirmed by the values which are found for the ratios /sup 238/Pu//sup 239,240/Pu and /sup 239,240/Pu//sup 137/Cs.

  7. Study of neutron-deficient isotopes of Fl in the 239Pu, 240Pu + 48Ca reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinov, A. A.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Brewer, N. T.; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Abdullin, F. Sh; Dmitriev, S. N.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Itkis, M. G.; Miernik, K.; Polyakov, A. N.; Roberto, J. B.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shumeiko, M. V.; Tsyganov, Yu S.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Sabelnikov, A. V.; Vostokin, G. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Stoyer, M. A.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2016-07-01

    The results of the experiments aimed at the synthesis of Fl isotopes in the 239Pu + 48Ca and 240Pu + 48Ca reactions are presented. The experiment was performed using the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator at the U400 cyclotron. In the 239Pu+48Ca experiment one decay of spontaneously fissioning 284Fl was detected at 245-MeV beam energy. In the 240Pu+48Ca experiment three decay chains of 285Fl were detected at 245 MeV and four decays were assigned to 284Fl at the higher 48Ca beam energy of 250 MeV. The α-decay energy of 285Fl was measured for the first time and decay properties of its descendants 281Cn, 277Ds, 273Hs, 269Sg, and 265Rf were determined more precisely. The cross section of the 239Pu(48Ca,3n)284Fl reaction was observed to be about 20 times lower than those predicted by theoretical models and 50 times less than the value measured in the 244Pu+48Ca reaction. The cross sections of the 240Pu(48Ca,4-3n)284,285Fl at both 48Ca energies are similar and exceed that observed in the reaction with lighter isotope 239Pu by a factor of 10. The decay properties of the synthesized nuclei and their production cross sections indicate rapid decrease of stability of superheavy nuclei with departing from the neutron number N=184 predicted to be the next magic number.

  8. Experimental values for 241Am and 239+240Pu Kd's in French agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Roussel-Debet, Sylvie

    2005-01-01

    Experiments resulted in determination of K(d) values for (241)Am and (239+240)Pu in 6 soils whose characteristics are representative of agricultural soils found around French nuclear power plant sites. These experiments were conducted in stirred batch reactors and the sorption isotherms were plotted. For americium, the experimental K(d) values varied from 60 to 4000 Lkg(-1) (d.w.) and correlated well with soil pH, K(d) increased with increasing pH. As regards plutonium, the experimental K(d) values varied between 300 and 9600 Lkg(-1) and decreased with increasing total sand content. The estimation of the total residence time determined by using a particular and experimentally refined value for K(d)-with a model similar to those currently used for impact assessments-illustrates the importance of establishing values that are better suited to specific soils than generic values. Lastly, depending on the type of evaluation envisioned, it might be important to look for a specific value of K(d)-and even modelling-more suited to the specificity of the scenario studied, by performing more complex, or even in situ, experiments. PMID:15603906

  9. Modeling and production of 240Am by deuteron-induced activation of a 240Pu target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Erin C.; McNamara, Bruce; Greenwood, Larry; Wittman, Richard; Soderquist, Charles; Woods, Vincent; VanDevender, Brent; Metz, Lori; Friese, Judah

    2015-04-01

    A novel reaction pathway for production of 240Am is reported. Models of reaction cross-sections in EMPIRE II suggest that deuteron-induced activation of a 240Pu target produces maximum yields of 240Am from 11.5 MeV incident deuterons. This activation had not been previously reported in the literature. A 240Pu target was activated under the modeled optimum conditions to produce 240Am. The modeled cross-section for the 240Pu(d, 2n)240Am reaction is on the order of 20-30 mbarn, but the experimentally estimated value is 5.6 ± 0.2 mbarn. We discuss reasons for the discrepancy as well as production of other Am isotopes that contaminate the final product.

  10. Modeling and production of 240Am by deuteron-induced activation of a 240Pu target

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Erin C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Wittman, Richard S.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Woods, Vincent T.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Metz, Lori A.; Friese, Judah I.

    2015-02-01

    A novel reaction pathway for production of 240Am is reported. Models of reaction cross-sections in EMPIRE II suggests that deuteron-induced activation of a 240Pu target produces maximum yields of 240Am from 11.5 MeV incident deuterons. This activation had not been previously reported in the literature. A 240Pu target was activated under the modeled optimum conditions to produce 240Am. The modeled cross-section for the 240Pu(d, 2n)240Am reaction is on the order of 20-30 mbarn, but the experimentally estimated value is 5.3 ± 0.2 mbarn. We discuss reasons for the discrepancy as well as production of other Am isotopes that contaminate the final product.

  11. Examining (239+240)Pu, (210)Pb and historical events to determine carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus burial in mangrove sediments of Moreton Bay, Australia.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Christian J; Santos, Isaac R; Maher, Damien T; Breithaupt, Joshua L; Smoak, Joseph M; Ketterer, Michael; Call, Mitchell; Sanders, Luciana; Eyre, Bradley D

    2016-01-01

    Two sediment cores were collected in a mangrove forest to construct geochronologies for the previous century using natural and anthropogenic radionuclide tracers. Both sediment cores were dated using (239+240)Pu global fallout signatures as well as (210)Pb, applying both the Constant Initial Concentration (CIC) and the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) models. The (239+240)Pu and CIC model are interpreted as having comparable sediment accretion rates (SAR) below an apparent mixed region in the upper ∼5 to 10 cm. In contrast, the CRS dating method shows high sediment accretion rates in the uppermost intervals, which is substantially reduced over the lower intervals of the 100-year record. A local anthropogenic nutrient signal is reflected in the high total phosphorus (TP) concentration in younger sediments. The carbon/nitrogen molar ratios and δ(15)N values further support a local anthropogenic nutrient enrichment signal. The origin of these signals is likely the treated sewage discharge to Moreton Bay which began in the early 1970s. While the (239+240)Pu and CIC models can only produce rates averaged over the intervals of interest within the profile, the (210)Pb CRS model identifies elevated rates of sediment accretion, organic carbon (OC), nitrogen (N), and TP burial from 2000 to 2013. From 1920 to 2000, the three dating methods provide similar OC, N and TP burial rates, ∼150, 10 and 2 g m(-2) year(-1), respectively, which are comparable to global averages. PMID:26004816

  12. Comprehensive appraisal of {sup 239+240}Pu in soils around Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Litaor, M.I.; Allen, L.; Ellerbroek, D.

    1995-12-01

    Plutonium contamination of soils around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site, near Golden, Colorado, resulted from past outdoor storage practices and subsequent remobilization due to inadequate cleanup practices. Until now human-health risk assessment has not been performed because of a lack of sufficient information regarding the spatial extent of {sup 239+240}Pu in soils. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the extent of plutonium contamination in surface soils, and to assess the uncertainty associated with the spatial distribution of {sup 239+240}Pu around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site.

  13. 137Cs and (239+240)Pu levels in the Asia-Pacific regional seas.

    PubMed

    Duran, E B; Povinec, P P; Fowler, S W; Airey, P L; Hong, G H

    2004-01-01

    137Cs and (239+240)Pu data in seawater, sediment and biota from the regional seas of Asia-Pacific extending from 50 degrees N to 60 degrees S latitude and 60 degrees E to 180 degrees E longitude based on the Asia-Pacific Marine Radioactivity Database (ASPAMARD) are presented and discussed. 137Cs levels in surface seawater have been declining to its present median value of about 3 Bq/m3 due mainly to radioactive decay, transport processes, and the absence of new significant inputs. (239+240)Pu levels in surface seawater are much lower, with a median of about 6 mBq/m3. (239+240)Pu appears to be partly scavenged by particles and is therefore more readily transported down the water column. As with seawater, (239+240)Pu concentrations are lower than 137Cs in surface sediment. The median 137Cs concentration in surface sediment is 1.4 Bq/kg dry, while that of (239+240)Pu is only 0.2 Bq/kg dry. The vertical profiles of both 137Cs and (239+240)Pu in the sediment column of coastal areas are different from deep seas which can be attributed to the higher sedimentation rates and additional contribution of run-offs from terrestrial catchment areas in the coastal zone. Comparable data for biota are far less extensive than those for seawater and sediment. The median 137Cs concentration in fish (0.2 Bq/kg wet) is higher than in crustaceans (0.1 Bq/kg wet) or mollusks (0.1 Bq/kg wet). Benchmark values (as of 2001) for 137Cs and (239+240)Pu concentrations in seawater, sediment and biota are established to serve as reference values against which the impact of future anthropogenic inputs can be assessed. ASPAMARD represents one of the most comprehensive compilations of available data on 137Cs and (239+240)Pu in particular, and other anthropogenic as well as natural radionuclides in seawater, sediment and biota from the Asia-Pacific regional seas. PMID:15245845

  14. Bioturbation depths, rates and processes in Massachusetts Bay sediments inferred from modeling of 210Pb and 239 + 240Pu profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crusius, John; Bothner, Michael H.; Sommerfield, Christopher K.

    2004-01-01

    Profiles of 210Pb and 239 + Pu from sediment cores collected throughout Massachusetts Bay (water depths of 36-192 m) are interpreted with the aid of a numerical sediment-mixing model to infer bioturbation depths, rates and processes. The nuclide data suggest extensive bioturbation to depths of 25-35 cm. Roughly half the cores have 210Pb and 239 + 240Pu profiles that decrease monotonically from the surface and are consistent with biodiffusive mixing. Bioturbation rates are reasonably well constrained by these profiles and vary from ~0.7 to ~40 cm2 yr-1. As a result of this extensive reworking, however, sediment ages cannot be accurately determined from these radionuclides and only upper limits on sedimentation rates (of ~0.3 cm yr-1) can be inferred. The other half of the radionuclide profiles are characterized by subsurface maxima in each nuclide, which cannot be reproduced by biodiffusive mixing models. A numerical model is used to demonstrate that mixing caused by organisms that feed at the sediment surface and defecate below the surface can cause the subsurface maxima, as suggested by previous work. The deep penetration depths of excess 210Pb and 239 + 240Pu suggest either that the organisms release material over a range of >15 cm depth or that biodiffusive mixing mediated by other organisms is occurring at depth. Additional constraints from surficial sediment 234Th data suggest that in this half of the cores, the vast majority of the present-day flux of recent, nuclide-bearing material to these core sites is transported over a timescale of a month or more to a depth of a few centimeters below the sediment surface. As a consequence of the complex mixing processes, surface sediments include material spanning a range of ages and will not accurately record recent changes in contaminant deposition.

  15. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 240Pu from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Göök, A.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.; Pretel, C.

    2015-07-01

    240Pu has recently been pointed out by a sensitivity study of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) to be one of the isotopes whose fission cross section lacks accuracy to meet the upcoming needs for the future generation of nuclear power plants (GEN-IV). In the High Priority Request List (HPRL) of the OECD, it is suggested that the knowledge of the 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section should be improved to an accuracy within 1-3 %, compared to the present 5%. A measurement of the 240Pu cross section has been performed at the Van de Graaff accelerator of the Joint Research Center (JRC) Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) using quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (TFGIC) has been used in a back-to-back configuration as fission fragment detector. The 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section has been normalized to three different isotopes: 237Np(n ,f ) , 235U (n ,f ) , and 238U (n ,f ) . Additionally, the secondary standard reactions were benchmarked through measurements against the primary standard reaction 235U (n ,f ) in the same geometry. A comprehensive study of the corrections applied to the data and the associated uncertainties is given. The results obtained are in agreement with previous experimental data at the threshold region. For neutron energies higher than 1 MeV, the results of this experiment are slightly lower than the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, but in agreement with the experiments of Laptev et al. (2004) as well as Staples and Morley (1998).

  16. Presence of plutonium isotopes, 239Pu and 240Pu, in soils from Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, E.; García-León, M.; Peruchena, J. I.; Cereceda, F.; Vidal, V.; Pinilla, E.; Miró, C.

    2011-12-01

    Plutonium is present in every environmental compartment, due to a variety of nuclear activities. The Southern Hemisphere has received about 20% of the global 239Pu and 240Pu environmental inventory, with an important contribution of the so-called tropospheric fallout from both the atmospheric nuclear tests performed in the French Polynesia and in Australia by France and United Kingdom, respectively. In this work we provide new data on the impact of these tests to South America through the study of 239Pu and 240Pu in soils from different areas of Northern, Central and Southern Chile. The obtained results point out to the presence of debris from the French tests in the 20-40° Southern latitude range, with 240Pu/ 239Pu atomic ratios quite heterogeneous and ranging from 0.02 to 0.23. They are significantly different from the expected one for the global fallout in the Southern Hemisphere for the 30-53°S latitude range (0.185 ± 0.047), but they follow the same trend as the reported values by the Department of Energy of United States for other points with similar latitudes. The 239 + 240Pu activity inventories show as well a wider variability range in that latitude range, in agreement with the expected heterogeneity of the contamination.

  17. Room-temperature electron spectroscopy of 239Pu and 240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.

    2015-06-01

    Passivated, implanted, planar silicon (PIPS) detectors have been used for the measurement of electron spectra. The commercially available PIPS detectors, available in thicknesses of 100 μm, 300 μm, and 500 μm, have an energy resolution (FWHM) of ~ 2.2 keV, which is essentially the same as that of PIN diodes. Alpha and electron spectra of mass-separated 239Pu and 240Pu sources have been measured with a 300-μm thick PIPS detector and the electron to alpha ratios for the conversion lines of the 51.62- and 45.24-keV transitions have been determined. A procedure has been developed to determine the amount of 239Pu and 240Pu in a mixed source. The α-particle emission rate of the mixed source is measured, which is the sum of individual rates. From the electron spectrum of the mixed source, measured with the same setup as the alpha spectrum, the rates of 239Pu electron lines are determined. Using the electron rate of the 239Pu line and the electron to alpha ratio measured for the pure source, the α-particle emission rate of 239Pu is determined. The difference from the total α-particle emission rate gives the α-particle emission rate of 240Pu. In addition, electron intensities and conversion coefficients of the 239Pu and 240Pu transitions have been measured.

  18. A comparative study of (239,240)Pu in soil near the former Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Facility, Golden, CO.

    PubMed

    Margulies, Todd D; Schonbeck, Niels D; Morin-Voillequé, Normie C; James, Katherine A; LaVelle, James M

    2004-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant near Golden, CO released plutonium into the environment during almost 40 years of operation. Continuing concern over possible health impacts of these releases has been heightened by lack of public disclosure of the US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. A dose reconstruction study for the Rocky Flats facilities, begun in 1990, provided a unique opportunity for concerned citizens to design and implement field studies without participation of the DOE, its contractors, or other government agencies. The Citizens Environmental Sampling Committee was formed in late 1992 and conducted a field sampling program in 1994. Over 60 soil samples, including both surface and core samples, were collected from 28 locations where past human activities would have minimal influence on contaminant distributions in soil. Cesium-137 activity was used as a means to assess whether samples were collected in undisturbed locations. The distribution of plutonium (as (239,240)Pu) in soil was consistent with past sampling conducted by DOE, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and others. Elevated levels of (239,240)Pu were found immediately east of the Rocky Flats Plant, with concentrations falling rapidly with distance from the plant to levels consistent with background from fallout. Samples collected in areas south, west, and north of the plant were generally consistent with background from fallout. No biases in past sampling due to choice of sampling locations or sampling methodology were evident. The study shows that local citizens, when provided sufficient resources, can design and implement technical studies that directly address community concerns where trust in the regulated community and/or regulators is low. PMID:15172724

  19. Prompt fission γ -ray spectrum characteristics from 240Pu(sf ) and 242Pu(sf )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.; Gatera, A.; Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Moens, A.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present first results for prompt fission γ -ray spectra (PFGS) characteristics from the spontaneous fission (sf) of 240Pu and 242Pu. For 242Pu(sf ) we obtained, after proper unfolding of the detector response, an average energy per photon ɛ¯γ=(0.843 ±0.012 ) MeV, an average multiplicity M¯γ=(6.72 ±0.07 ) , and an average total γ -ray energy release per fission E¯γ ,tot = (5.66 ± 0.06) MeV. The 240Pu(sf ) emission spectrum was obtained by applying a so-called detector-response transformation function determined from the 242Pu spectrum measured in exactly the same geometry. The results are an average energy per photon ɛ¯γ=(0.80 ±0.07 ) MeV, the average multiplicity M¯γ = (8.2 ± 0.4), and an average total γ -ray energy release per fission E¯γ ,tot = (6.6 ± 0.5) MeV. The PFGS characteristics for 242Pu(sf ) are in very good agreement with those from thermal-neutron-induced fission on 241Pu and scales well with the corresponding prompt neutron multiplicity. Our results in the case of 240Pu(sf ), although drawn from a limited number of events, show a significantly enhanced average multiplicity and average total energy, but may be understood from a different fragment yield distribution in 240Pu(sf ) compared to that of 242Pu(sf ).

  20. 210Pb, 137Cs and 239,240Pu in East China Sea Sediments: Sources, Pathways and Budgets of Sediments and Radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Huh, C.

    2001-05-01

    Profiles of 210Pb, 137Cs and 239,240Pu measured in eighty-three sediment cores collected from various sedimentary regimes in the East China Sea were analyzed to elucidate the sources, routes and budgets of sediments as well as these radionuclides. Distributions of sedimentation rates and nuclide inventories reveal alongshore transport of sediments, 137Cs and 239,240Pu from the mouth of the Yangtze River toward the south, and it is largely confined to the inner-shelf area (water depth <70 m). Mass balance calculations of the budgets of nuclides suggest that the East China Sea is a sink for the particle-reactive 210Pb and 239,240Pu, with up to 20% of their sedimentary budgets supplied via boundary scavenging. In contrast, due to lower affinity of 137Cs for particles and rapid turnover of the shelf water, the East China Sea serves as a source for 137Cs. About two-thirds of the cumulative inputs of 137Cs have been transported out of the East China Sea, leaving the remaining one-third in sediments and the overlying water column. As for the sediment budget, mass balance can not be established due to a shortfall in sediment supply of more than 30% based on a comparison between input terms documented thus far and the sedimentation flux derived from this study. It could be that our sedimentation rates are overestimated, and/or that long-distance transport from the Yellow River's dispersal system to the ECS is underestimated previously. Alternatively, there is no reason to expect the attainment of equilibrium between sediment input and output in the East China Sea on decadal time scales.

  1. A multi-radionuclide approach to evaluate the suitability of (239+240)Pu as soil erosion tracer.

    PubMed

    Meusburger, Katrin; Mabit, Lionel; Ketterer, Michael; Park, Ji-Hyung; Sandor, Tarjan; Porto, Paolo; Alewell, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Fallout radionuclides have been used successfully worldwide as tracers for soil erosion, but relatively few studies exploit the full potential of plutonium (Pu) isotopes. Hence, this study aims to explore the suitability of the plutonium isotopes (239)Pu and (240)Pu as a method to assess soil erosion magnitude by comparison to more established fallout radionuclides such as (137)Cs and (210)Pbex. As test area an erosion affected headwater catchment of the Lake Soyang (South Korea) was selected. All three fallout radionuclides confirmed high erosion rates for agricultural sites (>25tha(-1)yr(-1)). Pu isotopes further allowed determining the origin of the fallout. Both (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratios and (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratios were close to the global fallout ratio. However, the depth profile of the (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratios in undisturbed sites showed lower ratios in the top soil increments, which might be due to higher migration rates of (239+240)Pu. The activity ratios further indicated preferential transport of (137)Cs from eroded sites (higher ratio compared to the global fallout) to the depositional sites (smaller ratio). As such the (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratio offered a new approach to parameterize a particle size correction factor that can be applied when both (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu have the same fallout source. Implementing this particle size correction factor in the conversion of (137)Cs inventories resulted in comparable estimates of soil loss for (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu. The comparison among the different fallout radionuclides highlights the suitability of (239+240)Pu through less preferential transport compared to (137)Cs and the possibility to gain information regarding the origin of the fallout. In conclusion, (239+240)Pu is a promising soil erosion tracer, however, since the behaviour i.e. vertical migration in the soil and lateral transport during water erosion was shown to differ from that of (137)Cs, there is a clear

  2. Comprehensive appraisal of 239 + 240Pu in soils around Rocky Flats, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Litaor, M I; Ellerbroek, D; Allen, L; Dovala, E

    1995-12-01

    Plutonium contamination of soils around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site, near Golden, Colorado, resulted from past outdoor storage practices and subsequent remobilization due to inadequate cleanup practices. Until now human-health risk assessment has not been performed because of a lack of sufficient information regarding the spatial extent of 239 + 240Pu in soils. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the extent of plutonium contamination in surface soils, and to assess the uncertainty associated with the spatial distribution of 239 + 240Pu around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site. Four data sets were collected or compiled for this investigation: (1) samples collected from 240 plots of 1.01- or 4.05-hectare by compositing 25 evenly-spaced samples from the upper 0.64 cm in each plot; (2) samples collected from the upper 5 cm of soil in 167 of the same 240 plots by compositing 10 samples from the center of each plot; (3) historical data compiled from samples collected between 1969 and 1973, considered to be the most indicative of the original release; and (4) the exhaustive data set that contains the samples from 1, 2, and 3 and other published data sets collected between 1974 and 1994. These latter samples varied in depth and method of sampling. Plutonium activity reported in the exhaustive data set ranged from 0.03 Bq kg-1 to 407,000 Bq kg-1 with a mean of 1,443 Bq kg-1, median of 6.6 Bq kg-1, standard deviation of 18,463 Bq kg-1, and a coefficient of variation of 12.6. The technique of nonparametric indicator kriging was used to model four conditional cumulative distribution functions of 239 + 240Pu in soils around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site. Each of the conditional cumulative distribution functions was used to generate an E-type (mean of the conditional cumulative distribution functions) surface. The resulted surfaces were consistent with the hypothesis that the westerly winds were the dominant mechanism of plutonium

  3. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multidimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. We obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both to the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic fission characteristics.

  4. Suitability of 239+240Pu and 137Cs as tracers for soil erosion assessment in Swiss mountain grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alewell, Christine; Meusburger, Katrin; Juretzko, Gregor; Mabit, Lionel; Ketterer, Michael E.

    2014-05-01

    We compare the suitability of the anthropogenic FRNs, 137Cs and 239+240Pu as soil erosion tracers in two alpine valleys of Switzerland (Ursern Valley, Canton Uri, Central Swiss Alps and Val Piora, Ticino, Southern Alps). We sampled reference and potentially erosive sites in transects along both valleys. 137Cs measurements of soil samples were done with a Li-drifted Germanium detector and 239+240Pu with ICP-MS. Our data indicates a heterogeneous deposition of the 137Cs, since most of the fallout origins from the Chernobyl April/May 1986 accident, when large parts of the European Alps were still snow-covered. In contrast, 239+240Pu fallout originated mainly from 1950's-1960's atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, resulting in a more homogenous distribution and thus seems to be a more suitable tracer in mountainous grasslands. Soil erosion assessment using 239+240Pu as a tracer pointed to a huge dynamic and high heterogeneity of erosive processes (between sedimentation of 0.9 to 6.4 t ha1yr1 and erosion of 2.3 to 14.1 t ha1yr1 in the Ursern Valley and sedimentation of 0.7 to 77 t ha1yr1 and erosion of 1 to 5.3 t ha1yr1at Val Piora). Our study represents a novel, successful application of 239+240Pu as a tracer of soil erosion in a mountain environment.

  5. Transuranic concentrations in reef and pelagic fish from the Marshall Islands. [/sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.

    1980-09-01

    Concentrations of /sup 239 + 240/Pu are reported in tissues of several species of reef and pelagic fish caught at 14 different atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. Several regularities that are species dependent are evident in the distribution of /sup 239 + 240/Pu among different body tissues. Concentrations in liver always exceeded those in bone and concentrations were lowest in the muscle of all fish analyzed. A progressive discrimination against /sup 239 + 240/Pu was observed at successive trophic levels at all atolls except Bikini and Enewetak, where it was difficult to conclude if any real difference exists between the average concentration factor for /sup 239 + 240/Pu among all fish, which include bottom feeding and grazing herbivores, bottom feeding carnivores, and pelagic carnivores from different atoll locations. The average concentration of /sup 239 + 240/Pu in the muscle of surgeonfish from Bikini and Enewetak was not significantly different from the average concentrations determined in these fish at the other, lesser contaminated atolls. Concentrations among all 3rd, 4th, and 5th trophic level species are highest at Bikini where higher environmental concentrations are found. The reasons for the anomalously low concentrations in herbivores from Bikini and Enewetak are not known.

  6. Activity ratios of 137Cs, 90Sr and 239+240Pu in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Bossew, P; Lettner, H; Hubmer, A; Erlinger, C; Gastberger, M

    2007-01-01

    Both global and Chernobyl fallout have resulted in environmental contamination with radionuclides such as 137Cs, 90Sr and 239+240Pu. In environmental samples, 137Cs and 239+240Pu can be divided into the contributions of either source, if also the isotopes 134Cs and 238Pu are measurable, based on the known isotopic ratios in global and Chernobyl fallout. No analogous method is available for 90Sr. The activity ratios of Sr to Cs and Pu, respectively, are known for the actual fallout mainly from air filter measurements; but due to the high mobility of Sr in the environment, compared to Cs and Pu, these ratios generally do not hold for the inventory many years after deposition. In this paper we suggest a method to identify the mean contributions of global and Chernobyl fallout to total Sr in soil, sediment and cryoconite samples from Alpine and pre-Alpine regions of Austria, based on a statistical evaluation of Sr/Cs/Pu radionuclide activity ratios. Results are given for Sr:Cs, Sr:Pu and Cs:Pu ratios. Comparison with fallout data shows a strong depletion of Sr against Cs and Pu. PMID:17407799

  7. Alpha-particle emission probabilities in the decay of 240Pu.

    PubMed

    Sibbens, G; Pommé, S; Altzitzoglou, T; García-Toraño, E; Janssen, H; Dersch, R; Ott, O; Sánchez, A Martín; Montero, M P Rubio; Loidl, M; Coron, N; de Marcillac, P; Semkow, T M

    2010-01-01

    Sources of enriched (240)Pu were prepared by vacuum evaporation on quartz substrates. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of (240)Pu was performed with high statistical accuracy using silicon detectors and with low statistical accuracy using a bolometer. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of six transitions were derived from the spectra and compared with literature values. Additionally, some alpha-particle emission probabilities were derived from gamma-ray intensity measurements with a high-purity germanium detector. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of the three main transitions at 5168.1, 5123.6 and 5021.2 keV were derived from seven aggregate spectra analysed with five different fit functions and the results were compatible with evaluated data. Two additional weak peaks at 4863.5 and 4492.0 keV were fitted separately, using the exponential of a polynomial function to represent the underlying tailing of the larger peaks. The peak at 4655 keV could not be detected by alpha-particle spectrometry, while gamma-ray spectrometry confirms that its intensity is much lower than expected from literature. PMID:20106670

  8. Precision of gamma-ray measurements of the effective specific power and effective {sup 240}Pu fraction of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, T.E.

    1992-05-01

    This paper uses gamma-ray spectrometry data from replicate measurements on 40 plutonium-bearing samples to examine the repeatability of the effective {sup 240}Pu fraction ({sup 240}Pu{sub eff}) and the effective specific power (P{sub eff}) calculated from the isotopic distribution analyzed with gamma-ray spectrometry codes. The measurements were used to identify the error component arising from repeatability in the determination of the isotopic composition of plutonium in the sample and the contribution of the error component to the uncertainty in total plutonium mass measurements from neutron coincidence counting ({sup 240}Pu{sub eff}) and calorimetry (P{sub eff}). The 40 samples had {sup 240}Pu{sub eff} percentages ranging from 2 to 39% and P{sub eff} values ranging from 2 to 16 mW/g Pu. Four different gamma-ray spectrometry codes (FRAM, MGA, Blue Box, and PUJRC) were used to analyze the data (not all samples were analyzed with each code). All analyses showed that the % relative standard deviation of P{sub eff} was smaller than that of {sup 240}Pu{sub eff}. This result coupled with a cursory examination of uncertainties in coincidence counting of well-characterized samples and water-bath calorimetry errors for the same types of samples lead to the conclusion that smaller uncertainties will be present in the total plutonium mass determined by the combination of calorimetry/gamma-ray spectrometry than in the mass determined by coincidence counting/gamma-ray spectrometry. An additional examination of the biases arising from the {sup 240}Pu correlation used in the gamma-ray spectrometry codes also supported this conclusion. 17 refs.

  9. Performance of Cladding on MOX Fuel with Low 240Pu/239Pu Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Kevin; Blanpain, Patrick; Morris, Robert Noel

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of its surplus plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. As part of fuel qualification, four lead assemblies were manufactured and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod average burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg heavy metal. This was the world s first commercial irradiation of MOX fuel with a 240Pu/239Pu ratio less than 0.10. Five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This paper discusses the results of those examinations with emphasis on cladding performance. Exams relevant to the cladding included visual and eddy current exams, profilometry, microscopy, hydrogen analysis, gallium analysis, and mechanical testing. There was no discernible effect of the type of MOX fuel on the performance of the cladding.

  10. Plutonium-239, /sup 240/Pu and /sup 210/Po contents of tobacco and cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H.; Jaakkola, T.

    1985-08-01

    The /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu found in the environment has mainly been produced by atmospheric nuclear tests. The accumulation of fallout Pu in man from inhalation and ingestion and its distribution in the body has previously been studied. Information about the accumulation is needed because of the expanding production of this highly radiotoxic substance. In the present work the Pu content of tobacco and cigarette smoke was determined to evaluate the contribution of smoking to total Pu intake by man. For comparison the /sup 210/Po content of tobacco and smoke were analyzed. The release of /sup 210/Po in tobacco smoke and the radiation dose for man have been widely studied because of the high incidence of lung cancer among smokers.

  11. Induced Fission of ^{240}Pu within a Real-Time Microscopic Framework.

    PubMed

    Bulgac, Aurel; Magierski, Piotr; Roche, Kenneth J; Stetcu, Ionel

    2016-03-25

    We describe the fissioning dynamics of ^{240}Pu from a configuration in the proximity of the outer fission barrier to full scission and the formation of the fragments within an implementation of density functional theory extended to superfluid systems and real-time dynamics. The fission fragments emerge with properties similar to those determined experimentally, while the fission dynamics appears to be quite complex, with many excited shape and pairing modes. The evolution is found to be much slower than previously expected, and the ultimate role of the collective inertia is found to be negligible in this fully nonadiabatic treatment of nuclear dynamics, where all collective degrees of freedom (CDOF) are included (unlike adiabatic treatments with a small number of CDOF). PMID:27058076

  12. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sandhukhan, Jhilam; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-20

    We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multidimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. As a result, we obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both tomore » the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic fission characteristics.« less

  13. Induced Fission of 240Pu within a Real-Time Microscopic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgac, Aurel; Magierski, Piotr; Roche, Kenneth J.; Stetcu, Ionel

    2016-03-01

    We describe the fissioning dynamics of 240Pu from a configuration in the proximity of the outer fission barrier to full scission and the formation of the fragments within an implementation of density functional theory extended to superfluid systems and real-time dynamics. The fission fragments emerge with properties similar to those determined experimentally, while the fission dynamics appears to be quite complex, with many excited shape and pairing modes. The evolution is found to be much slower than previously expected, and the ultimate role of the collective inertia is found to be negligible in this fully nonadiabatic treatment of nuclear dynamics, where all collective degrees of freedom (CDOF) are included (unlike adiabatic treatments with a small number of CDOF).

  14. Microscopic Calculation of 240Pu Scission with a Finite-Range Effective Force

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2009-05-04

    Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations of hot fission in {sup 240}Pu have been performed with a newly-implemented code that uses the D1S finite-range effective interaction. The hot-scission line is identified in the quadrupole-octupole-moment coordinate space. Fission-fragment shapes are extracted from the calculations. A benchmark calculation for {sup 226}Th is obtained and compared to results in the literature. In addition, technical aspects of the use of HFB calculations for fission studies are examined in detail. In particular, the identification of scission configurations, the sensitivity of near-scission calculations to the choice of collective coordinates in the HFB iterations, and the formalism for the adjustment of collective-variable constraints are discussed. The power of the constraint-adjustment algorithm is illustrated with calculations near the critical scission configurations with up to seven simultaneous constraints.

  15. Analysis of 137Cs and 239,240Pu concentrations in surface waters of the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Katsumi; Aoyama, Michio

    2003-09-01

    Geographical and temporal variations of anthropogenic radionuclides, 137Cs and 239,240Pu, in surface waters of the North Pacific Ocean were studied using the HAM database, which is a comprehensive data set on 137Cs, 239,240Pu, and other anthropogenic radionuclides. The geographical distributions suggest that 137Cs and 239,240Pu concentrations in surface waters of the Pacific Ocean in the 1960s were controlled by global fallout from the 1961-1962 US and former USSR atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The changes in surface 137Cs concentrations in the Pacific that occurred after 1970 were caused by physical processes. In the 1990s, surface 137Cs showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the Pacific. Biogeochemical and physical processes are important factors controlling surface 239,240Pu concentrations. The time-series data on anthropogenic radionuclides suggest that wind-driven circulation, subduction, and upwelling of Pacific surface and subsurface waters control the geographic distributions of anthropogenic radionuclides and their fates.

  16. Comparative distribution of 241 Am and 239,240 Pu in soils around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, S A; Schierman, M J; Whicker, F W

    1996-04-01

    The distribution and behavior of 241 Am and 239,240 Pu in soils from the buffer zone of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site have been investigated. Concentrations of both radionuclides decreased at similar rates with soil depth. More than 80% of the total inventory of both contaminants was found in the upper 9 cm of the soils with over 50% of the inventory residing in the top 3 cm. Comparison with earlier studies indicate that the plutonium depth profile has not changed significantly over the last 25 y. The inventories of 241 Am and 239,240 Pu decreased with distance from the 903 Pad (a former waste storage site) according to a power function, and the plume extended mainly toward the east. The lateral movement of the two contaminants away from the 903 Pad was not significantly different. The median activity ratio of 241 Am: 239,240 Pu ranged from 17 to 19% and was independent of sampling location and soil depth. This observation provided further evidence that the movement of both contaminants is indistinguishable in the study area. Because of the strong correlation between the two radionuclides, 241 Am concentrations can then be used to infer 239,240 Pu by counting the 241 Am via gamma spectroscopy. PMID:8617592

  17. Suitability of 239+240Pu and 137Cs as tracers for soil erosion assessment in mountain grasslands.

    PubMed

    Alewell, Christine; Meusburger, Katrin; Juretzko, Gregor; Mabit, Lionel; Ketterer, Michael E

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides have been distributed globally due to nuclear weapons testing, nuclear accidents, nuclear weapons fabrication, and nuclear fuel reprocessing. While the negative consequences of this radioactive contamination are self-evident, the ubiquitous fallout radionuclides (FRNs) distribution form the basis for the use as tracers in ecological studies, namely for soil erosion assessment. Soil erosion is a major threat to mountain ecosystems worldwide. We compare the suitability of the anthropogenic FRNs, 137Cs and 239+240Pu as soil erosion tracers in two alpine valleys of Switzerland (Urseren Valley, Canton Uri, Central Swiss Alps and Val Piora, Ticino, Southern Alps). We sampled reference and potentially erosive sites in transects along both valleys. 137Cs measurements of soil samples were performed with a Li-drifted Germanium detector and 239+240Pu with ICP-MS. Our data indicates a heterogeneous deposition of the 137Cs, since most of the fallout origins from the Chernobyl April/May 1986 accident, when large parts of the European Alps were still snow-covered. In contrast, 239+240Pu fallout originated mainly from 1950s to 1960s atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, resulting in a more homogenous distribution and thus seems to be a more suitable tracer in mountainous grasslands. Soil erosion assessment using 239+240Pu as a tracer pointed to a huge dynamic and high heterogeneity of erosive processes (between sedimentation of 1.9 and 7 t ha(-1) yr(-1) and erosion of 0.2-16.4 t ha(-1) yr(-1) in the Urseren Valley and sedimentation of 0.4-20.3 t ha(-1) yr(-1) and erosion of 0.1-16.4 t ha(-1) yr(-1) at Val Piora). Our study represents a novel and successful application of 239+240Pu as a tracer of soil erosion in a mountain environment. PMID:24374184

  18. Measurement of fallout radionuclides, (239)(,240)Pu and (137)Cs, in soil and creek sediment: Sydney Basin, Australia.

    PubMed

    Smith, B S; Child, D P; Fierro, D; Harrison, J J; Heijnis, H; Hotchkis, M A C; Johansen, M P; Marx, S; Payne, T E; Zawadzki, A

    2016-01-01

    Soil and sediment samples from the Sydney basin were measured to ascertain fallout radionuclide activity concentrations and atom ratios. Caesium-137 ((137)Cs) was measured using gamma spectroscopy, and plutonium isotopes ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) were quantified using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Fallout radionuclide activity concentrations were variable ranging from 0.6 to 26.1 Bq/kg for (137)Cs and 0.02-0.52 Bq/kg for (239+240)Pu. Radionuclides in creek sediment samples were an order of magnitude lower than in soils. (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu activity concentration in soils were well correlated (r(2) = 0.80) although some deviation was observed in samples collected at higher elevations. Soil ratios of (137)Cs/(239+240)Pu (decay corrected to 1/1/2014) ranged from 11.5 to 52.1 (average = 37.0 ± 12.4) and showed more variability than previous studies. (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.117 to 0.165 with an average of 0.146 (±0.013) and an error weighted mean of 0.138 (±0.001). These ratios are lower than a previously reported ratio for Sydney, and lower than the global average. However, these ratios are similar to those reported for other sites within Australia that are located away from former weapons testing sites and indicate that atom ratio measurements from other parts of the world are unlikely to be applicable to the Australian context. PMID:26344369

  19. 239,240Pu and inorganic substances in aerosols from the vicinity of a waste isolation pilot plant: the importance of resuspension.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, R; Kirchner, T; Webb, J; Conley, M; Stewart, B; Schoep, D; Walthall, M

    2002-10-01

    Aerosol samples were collected and analyzed to characterize the spatial and temporal variations in the concentrations of plutonium and selected inorganic substances in the atmosphere around the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). High-volume aerosol sampling was conducted at three sites: (1) On Site, (2) Near Field, and (3) Cactus Flats. 239,240Pu was determined by alpha spectrometry following chemical separations; mass loadings were determined gravimetrically. A separate set of low-volume aerosol samples was analyzed for major ions using ion chromatography and for trace elements by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry. The average 239,240Pu activity concentrations in total suspended particle (TSP) samples (12 to 16 nBq m(-3)) were consistent with those previously reported, but they varied strongly with season, with the highest values generally in spring. Further, the 239,240Pu activity concentrations were comparable among the three sites, and therefore there was no evidence for elevated 239,240Pu activities due to WIPP operations. The fraction of the 239,240Pu activity concentrations in the PM10, samples (particles less than 10 microm diameter) relative to TSP was lower than the corresponding PM10/TSP ratios of either high-volume mass or several inorganics (sulfate, aluminum or lead), indicating that 239,240Pu tends to be on large particles. Aerosol mass loadings (microg m(-3)) and 239,240Pu activity concentrations were correlated for all sets of samples, but at On Site, the TSP samples showed higher mass to 239,240Pu ratios than the other sites. Thus activities or processes occurring at or near the WIPP site evidently produced aerosols that contributed to the mass loadings but contained less 239,244Pu than ambient aerosols. About 63% of the variability in 239,240Pu activity concentrations was explained by wind travel, sampling location, length of the sampling interval, and aerosol mass. 239,240Pu activity concentrations also were

  20. Radioecologycal study of {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula: Determination of {sup 239/240}Pu in marine sediment and seawater as part of baseline data collecting for sitting of candidates of first Indonesia NPP

    SciTech Connect

    Suseno, Heny; Wisnubroto, Djarot S.

    2014-03-24

    Radioisotope Pu-239/240 are alpha emitting nuclides important indicators of radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Global fallout is the main source of plutonium in the marine environment. There are very limited study on {sup 239/240}Pu in Indonesia coastal environments. The data of this radioisotopes is needed for baseline data of nuclear power plant (NPP) site candidates both in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. Bottom sediments play an important role in radioecological studies of the marine environment because a large proportion of radioactive substances entering the sea is adsorbed over time onto suspended particulate matter and deposited in sediments. Plutonium is particle reactive and deposited in marine sediment. Radioisotope {sup 239/240}Pu was determinated by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical procedure that was performed in both water and marine sediment from Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. The sediment baseline of concentration {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula were range from 0.013 to 0.021 Bq.kg{sup −1} and 0.018 to 0.024 Bq.kg{sup −1} respectively. The water baseline concentration this isotope were range from 2.73 to 4.05 mBq.m{sup −3} and 2.98 to 4.50 mBq.m{sup −3}.

  1. The depth distribution of sup 90 Sr, sup 137 Cs, and sup 239,240 Pu in soil profile samples

    SciTech Connect

    Price, K.R.

    1989-04-01

    A special study was conducted at the Hanford Site and vicinity to investigate the depth distribution of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 239,240}Pu in soil at two locations. Duplicate sets of samples were collected at each location from the soil surface to a depth of 30 cm in increments of 2.5 cm. Results from an onsite location near a retired nuclear fuel reprocessing facility were compared to results from a background location upwind and distant from the Site. The study showed that, regardless of location, the top 5 cm of soil contained 51 to 74% of the {sup 90}Sr, 99% of the {sup 137}Cs, and 96% of the {sup 239,240}Pu. Soil at the background location received radionuclides only from deposition of worldwide fallout, and averaged 1.6 pCi/cm{sup 2} of {sup 90}Sr, 3.0 pCi/cm{sup 2} of {sup 137}Cs, and 0.071 pCi/cm{sup 2} of {sup 239,240}Pu. Soil at the onsite location received radionuclides from deposition of both worldwide fallout and past operations of the retired fuel reprocessing facility and contained 4 times as much {sup 90}Sr, 5 times as much {sup 137}Cs, and 44 times as much {sup 239,240}Pu as the background location. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory is operated for the US Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute under Contract AC06-76RLO1830.) 8 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Pu-239 and Pu-240 inventories and Pu-240/ Pu-239 atom ratios in the water column off Sanriku, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Aono, Tatsuo

    2013-04-01

    A magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami occurred in the Pacific Ocean off northern Honshu, Japan, on 11 March 2011 which caused severe damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. This accident has resulted in a substantial release of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and ocean, and has caused extensive contamination of the environment. However, no information is available on the amounts of radionuclides such as Pu isotopes released into the ocean at this time. Investigating the background baseline concentration and atom ratio of Pu isotopes in seawater is important for assessment of the possible contamination in the marine environment. Pu-239 (half-life: 24,100 years), Pu-240 (half-life: 6,560 years) and Pu-241 (half-life: 14.325 years) mainly have been released into the environment as the result of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. The atom ratio of Pu-240/Pu-239 is a powerful fingerprint to identify the sources of Pu in the ocean. The Pu-239 and Pu-240 inventories and Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios in seawater samples collected in the western North Pacific off Sanriku before the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant will provide useful background baseline data for understanding the process controlling Pu transport and for distinguishing additional Pu sources. Seawater samples were collected with acoustically triggered quadruple PVC sampling bottles during the KH-98-3 cruise of the R/V Hakuho-Maru. The Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios were measured with a double-focusing SF-ICP-MS, which was equipped with a guard electrode to eliminate secondary discharge in the plasma and to enhance overall sensitivity. The Pu-239 and Pu-240 concentrations were 2.07 and 1.67 mBq/m3 in the surface water, respectively, and increased with depth; a subsurface maximum was identified at 750 m depth, and the concentrations decreased with depth, then increased at the bottom layer. The total Pu-239+240 inventory in the entire water column (depth interval 0

  3. Characterization of ^{239,240}Pu Radionuclide Adsorption to Soil Particles and Mineral Dust Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatro, D. P.; Arimoto, R.; McMillan, N. J.; Barnes, M.

    2006-12-01

    The release of ^{239,240}Pu into the environment by nuclear weapons testing 50 years ago initiated the cyclic mobilization of Pu-contaminated soil particles via the resuspension of dust resulting in a widespread distribution of Pu and other radionuclides. It is unclear what enables the aeolian transport of Pu in the environment; plausible hypotheses of Pu binding to dust and soil particles include Pu adsorption to iron oxides/hydroxides, organic acids, or silicate minerals such as clays. To investigate the connections between surface soils, dust and radionuclides, samples of soil and/or dust were collected from the Project Gnome Site in Eddy County, NM, the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos, NM, and two 50-year old attics and wind-blown dust in Big Spring, TX. This study tests the hypothesis that Pu is adsorbed onto Fe oxides and hydroxides that coat dust/soil particles. The samples are generally low in organic carbon (0.2 - 4.8%, except for the unburned Los Alamos sample at 9.4%), as measured by LOI (Loss On Ignition) at 360 °C. The citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite method (CDB) of Fe oxide removal, first proposed by Mehra and Jackson in 1960, was used to selectively extract Fe oxides from the samples while leaving silicate Fe intact. Chemical digestion of each sample creates two fractions, the extracted supernatant and a solid pellet residue. If the Pu were associated with Fe oxides, then Fe and Pu should both be selectively removed from the bulk sample during the CBD process, leaving the pellet depleted in Fe and Pu and the supernatant enriched. For Fe, this was confirmed by scanning electron microscope and petrographic analyses. Preliminary radiochemical analyses of Pu activity also verify this hypothesis. Pu activity is significantly lower in pellets than bulk samples (Pu activitypellet/Pu activitybulk average = 0.07, range 0.02-0.12); Pu activity in supernatants is significantly higher than in bulk samples (Pu activitysupernatant/Pu activitybulk average = 4

  4. 137Cs, 239+240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the surface waters of the western North Pacific Ocean, eastern Indian Ocean and their adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2006-07-31

    Surface seawater samples were collected along the track of the R/V Hakuho-Maru cruise (KH-96-5) from Tokyo to the Southern Ocean. The (137)Cs activities were determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, the eastern Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, the Andaman Sea, and the South China Sea. The (137)Cs activities showed a wide variation with values ranging from 1.1 Bq m(-3) in the Antarctic Circumpolar Region of the Southern Ocean to 3 Bq m(-3) in the western North Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea. The latitudinal distributions of (137)Cs activity were not reflective of that of the integrated deposition density of atmospheric global fallout. The removal rates of (137)Cs from the surface waters were roughly estimated from the two data sets of Miyake et al. [Miyake Y, Saruhashi K, Sugimura Y, Kanazawa T, Hirose K. Contents of (137)Cs, plutonium and americium isotopes in the Southern Ocean waters. Pap Meteorol Geophys 1988;39:95-113] and this study to be 0.016 yr(-1) in the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, 0.033 yr(-1) in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, and 0.029 yr(-1) in the South China Sea. These values were much lower than that in the coastal surface water of the western Northwest Pacific Ocean. This was likely due to less horizontal and vertical mixing of water masses and less scavenging. (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were also determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and the South China Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.199+/-0.026 to 0.248+/-0.027 on average, and were significantly higher than the global stratospheric fallout ratio of 0.18. The contributions of the North Pacific Proving Grounds close-in fallout Pu were estimated to be 20% for the western North Pacific Ocean, 39% for the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and 42% for the South China Sea by using the two end-member mixing model. The higher (240)Pu/(239)Pu

  5. Comparison of 241Am, (239,240)Pu and 137Cs concentrations in soil around rocky flats.

    PubMed

    Hulse, S E; Ibrahim, S A; Whicker, F W; Chapman, P L

    1999-03-01

    Gamma spectroscopy measurements were used to estimate concentrations of 241Am and 137Cs in soil profiles to depths of 21 cm at on-site and off-site locations around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and at regional background locations east of the Front Range between Colorado's borders with New Mexico and Wyoming. Concentrations of these radionuclides were compared with concentrations of (239,240)Pu in the same samples. Concentrations of 241Am in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm decreased in an easterly direction from more than 5.3 kBq kg(-1) near the 903 pad to background levels of 1.3 Bq kg(-1) 5 to 7 km away at a rate that was nearly proportional to the inverse square of distance. Deposits of 137Cs were ubiquitous, averaging 0.12 kBq kg(-1) in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm, but were unevenly distributed around Rocky Flats and the regional background locations. Deviations from the uniform exponential rate at which soil concentrations of 137Cs typically decreased with depth, -0.25 cm(-1) at undisturbed sites, enabled us to determine that about 10% of our sampling sites had been disturbed by erosion, tillage, or other factors. The mean rate at which (239,240)Pu decreased with depth was about the same, -0.23 cm(-1), throughout the study area. Soil concentrations of 241Am decreased with depth at a similar mean rate of -0.22 cm(-1) at locations close to the 903 pad where measurements were robust. Ratios between 241Am or (239,240)Pu and 137Cs proved more useful for delineating the extent and pattern of contamination from Rocky Flats than did activity concentrations in soil. PMID:10025653

  6. Comparison of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 137}Cs concentrations in soil around Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Hulse, S.E.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Chapman, P.L.

    1999-03-01

    Gamma spectroscopy measurements were used to estimate concentrations of {sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs in soil profiles to depths of 21 cm at on-site and off-site locations around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and at regional background locations east of the Front Range between Colorado`s borders with New Mexico and Wyoming. Concentrations of these radionuclides were compared with concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu in the same samples. Concentrations of {sup 241}Am in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm decreased in an easterly direction from more than 5.3 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} 5 to 7 km away at a rate that was nearly proportional to the inverse square of distance. Deposits of {sup 137}Cs were ubiquitous, averaging 0.12 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm, but were unevenly distributed around Rocky Flats and the regional background locations. Deviations from the uniform exponential rate at which soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs typically decreased with depth, {minus}0.25 cm{sup {minus}1} at undisturbed sites, enabled the authors to determine that about 10% of their sampling sites had been disturbed by erosion, tillage, or other factors. The mean rate at which {sup 239,240}Pu decreased with depth was about the same, {minus}0.23 cm{sup {minus}1}, throughout the study area. Soil concentrations of {sup 241}Am decreased with depth at a similar mean rate of {minus}0.22 cm{sup {minus}1} at locations close to the 903 pad where measurements were robust. Ratios between {sup 241}Am or {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 137}Cs proved more useful for delineating the extent and pattern of contamination from Rocky Flats than did activity concentrations in soil.

  7. Transport of 137Cs and 239,240Pu with ice-rafted debris in the Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Reimnitz, E.; Beals, D.M.; Pochkowski, J.M.; Winn, W.G.; Rigor, I.

    1998-01-01

    Ice rafting is the dominant mechanism responsible for the transport of fine-grained sediments from coastal zones to the deep Arctic Basin. Therefore, the drift of ice-rafted debris (IRD) could be a significant transport mechanism from the shelf to the deep basin for radionuclides originating from nuclear fuel cycle activities and released to coastal Arctic regions of the former Soviet Union. In this study, 28 samples of IRD collected from the Arctic ice pack during expeditions in 1989-95 were analyzed for 137Cs by gamma spectrometry and for 239Pu and 240Pu by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. 137Cs concentrations in the IRD ranged from less than 0.2 to 78 Bq??kg-1 (dry weight basis). The two samples with the highest 137Cs concentrations were collected in the vicinity of Franz Josef Land, and their backward trajectories suggest origins in the Kara Sea. Among the lowest 137Cs values are seven measured on sediments entrained on the North American shelf in 1989 and 1995, and sampled on the shelf less than six months later. Concentrations of 239Pu + 240Pu ranged from about 0.02 to 1.8 Bq??kg-1. The two highest values came from samples collected in the central Canada Basin and near Spitsbergen; calculated backward trajectories suggest at least 14 years of circulation in the Canada Basin in the former case, and an origin near Severnaya Zemlya (at the Kara Sea/Laptev Sea boundary) in the latter case. While most of the IRD samples showed 240Pu/239Pu ratios near the mean global fallout value of 0.185, five of the samples had lower ratios, in the 0.119 to 0.166 range, indicative of mixtures of Pu from fallout and from the reprocessing of weapons-grade Pu. The backward trajectories of these five samples suggest origins in the Kara Sea or near Severnaya Zemlya.

  8. Determination of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios in Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) Collected from Amchitka Island, Alaska.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-05-02

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) activity concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) collected from the littoral zone of Amchitka Island (Alaska) and at a control site on the Alaskan peninsula. Plutonium isotope measurements were performed in replicate using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio observed in dried Fucus d. collected from Amchitka Island was 0.227 {+-} 0.007 (n=5) and compares with the expected {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in integrated worldwide fallout deposition in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.1805 {+-} 0.0057 (Cooper et al., 2000). In general, the characteristically high {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu content of Fucus d. analyzed in this study appear to indicate the presence of a discernible basin-wide secondary source of plutonium entering the marine environment. Of interest to the study of plutonium source terms within the Pacific basin are reports of elevated {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in fallout debris from high-yield atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands during the 1950s (Diamond et al., 1960), the wide range of {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio values (0.19 to 0.34) observed in sea water, sediments, coral and other environmental media from the North Pacific Ocean (Hirose et al., 1992; Buesseler, 1997) and updated estimates of the relative contributions of close-in and intermediate fallout deposition on oceanic inventories of radionuclidies, especially in the Northern Pacific Ocean (Hamilton, 2004).

  9. Migration of (137)Cs, (90)Sr, and (239+240)Pu in Mediterranean forests: influence of bioavailability and association with organic acids in soil.

    PubMed

    Guillén, J; Baeza, A; Corbacho, J A; Muñoz-Muñoz, J G

    2015-06-01

    The understanding of downward migration of anthropogenic radionuclides in soil is a key factor in the assessment of their environmental behavior. There are several factors that can affect this process, such as the radionuclide source, their chemical form, soil and environmental characteristics, etc. Two Mediterranean pinewood ecosystems in Spain, which were affected mainly by global fallout, were selected to assess the migration of (137)Cs, (90)Sr, and (239+240)Pu. Using auxiliary modeling (diffusion-convection equation and compartmental model), it followed from field observations that the migration velocities of (90)Sr and (239+240)Pu were similar and higher than that of (137)Cs. The downward migration of radionuclides can be considered a consequence of their association with soil particles. A sequential speciation procedure also confirmed that (90)Sr was the most bioavailable radionuclide followed by (239+240)Pu and (137)Cs. Although this can explain the different velocity of (90)Sr and (137)Cs, bioavailability could not explain by itself the similar velocities of (239+240)Pu and (90)Sr. The presence of organic acids in the soil can also influence the migration of radionuclides attached to them, which decreased in the order: (239+240)Pu > (90)Sr > (137)Cs. Thus, the joint consideration of bioavailable and humic + fulvic acid fractions can explain the observed differences in the downward velocities. PMID:25827576

  10. Distribution and source of (129)I, (239)(,240)Pu, (137)Cs in the environment of Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Ežerinskis, Ž; Hou, X L; Druteikienė, R; Puzas, A; Šapolaitė, J; Gvozdaitė, R; Gudelis, A; Buivydas, Š; Remeikis, V

    2016-01-01

    Fifty five soil samples collected in the Lithuania teritory in 2011 and 2012 were analyzed for (129)I, (137)Cs and Pu isotopes in order to investigate the level and distribution of artificial radioactivity in Lithuania. The activity and atomic ratio of (238)Pu/((239,24)0)Pu, (129)I/(127)I and (131)I/(137)Cs were used to identify the origin of these radionuclides. The (238)Pu/(239+240)Pu and (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratios in the soil samples analyzed varied in the range of 0.02-0.18 and 0.18-0.24, respectively, suggesting the global fallout as the major source of Pu in Lithuania. The values of 10(-9) to 10(-6) for (129)I/(127)I atomic ratio revealed that the source of (129)I in Lithuania is global fallout in most cases though several sampling sites shows a possible impact of reprocessing releases. Estimated (129)I/(131)I ratio in soil samples from the southern part of Lithuania shows negligible input of the Chernobyl fallout. No correlation of the (137)Cs and Pu isotopes with (129)I was observed, indicating their different sources terms. Results demonstrate uneven distribution of these radionuclides in the Lithuanian territory and several sources of contamination i.e. Chernobyl accident, reprocessing releases and global fallout. PMID:26476410

  11. Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) Measurements of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios In Soil Extracts Supplied by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-02-28

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-239+240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) activities concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for a series of chemically purified soil extracts received from the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC) in New Mexico. Samples were analyzed without further purification at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This report also includes a brief description of the AMS system and internal laboratory procedures used to ensure the quality and reliability of the measurement data.

  12. References to Studies of 137Cs, 90Sr and 239+240Pu in the Pacific Ocean a Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Noshkin, V.E.

    2001-02-01

    This report contains a listing of publications known to this author on reported concentrations, reviews and discussions of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239+240}Pu in seawater, sediment and the biota from parts of the North and South Pacific Ocean. Each reference has been assigned an accession number consisting of the first three letters of the first author's last name followed by the first letter of the first name, the year of the publication and an assigned number. Studies in both the coastal areas and the open ocean are included as well as those providing data within lagoons of coral atolls. Some references to the radionuclides in the Indian Ocean are also provided.

  13. Measurement of 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratios in soils from the Marshall Islands using ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Y; Hamilton, T; Uchida, S; Tagami, K; Yoshida, S; Robison, W

    2001-10-20

    Nuclear weapons tests conducted by the United States in the Marshall Islands produced significant quantities of regional or tropospheric fallout contamination. Here we report on some preliminary inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements of plutonium isolated from seven composite soil samples collected from Bikini, Enewetak and Rongelap Atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. These data show that 240Pu/239Pu isotopic signatures in surface soils from the Marshall Island vary significantly and could potentially be used to help quantify the range and extent of fallout deposition (and associated impacts) from specific weapons tests. 137Cs and 60Co were also determined on the same set of soil samples for comparative purposes. PMID:11669263

  14. Determination of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu) in environmental samples using radiochemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Pan, Shaoming; Roos, Per

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports an analytical method for the determination of plutonium isotopes ((238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu) in environmental samples using anion exchange chromatography in combination with extraction chromatography for chemical separation of Pu. Both radiometric methods (liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied for the measurement of plutonium isotopes. The decontamination factors for uranium were significantly improved up to 7.5 × 10(5) for 20 g soil compared to the level reported in the literature, this is critical for the measurement of plutonium isotopes using mass spectrometric technique. Although the chemical yield of Pu in the entire procedure is about 55%, the analytical results of IAEA soil 6 and IAEA-367 in this work are in a good agreement with the values reported in the literature or reference values, revealing that the developed method for plutonium determination in environmental samples is reliable. The measurement results of (239+240)Pu by alpha spectrometry agreed very well with the sum of (239)Pu and (240)Pu measured by ICP-MS. ICP-MS can not only measure (239)Pu and (240)Pu separately but also (241)Pu. However, it is impossible to measure (238)Pu using ICP-MS in environmental samples even a decontamination factor as high as 10(6) for uranium was obtained by chemical separation. PMID:24401459

  15. Transfer of aged 239+240Pu, 238Pu, 241Am, and 137Cs to cattle grazing a contaminated arid environment.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, R O; Engel, D W; Anspaugh, L R

    1989-09-01

    In this paper, estimates are obtained of the fraction of ingested 239+240Pu, 238Pu, 241Am and 137Cs transferred to blood, muscle, liver, kidney, femur, vertebra, and gonads of a reproducing herd of 17 beef cattle, individuals of which grazed within fenced enclosures for up to 1064 days under natural conditions with no supplemental feeding at an arid site contaminated 16 years previously with transuranic radionuclides. The estimated geometric mean (GM) GI-to-blood fractional transfer of 238Pu (0.0001) was about 20 times larger than the estimated transfer of 239+240Pu (0.000005), while the estimated transfer of 241Am (0.00001) was about 2 times larger than that of 239+240Pu. These GM GI-to-blood transfers were smaller than the GI-to-blood transfer value of 0.001 recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for humans exposed via food chains or occupationally from unknown mixtures or compounds of plutonium and americium. Statistical tests indicated significantly (p less than 0.05) larger GI-to-tissue transfers of (1) 238Pu as compared to 239+240Pu for all tissues examined, (2) of 238Pu as compared to 241Am for muscle, liver, femur, and vertebra, and (3) of 241Am as compared to 239+240Pu for blood serum, femur, and kidney. The estimated GM fractional transfers of 137Cs from GI to muscle and liver were 0.03 (n = 8) and 0.001 (n = 3), respectively, assuming a 50-day biological half-time of 137Cs in cattle tissue. PMID:2814465

  16. Use of anthropogenic radioisotopes to estimate rates of soil redistribution by wind II: The potential for future use of 239+240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Pelt, R. Scott; Ketterer, Michael E.

    2013-06-01

    In the previous paper, the use of soilborne 137Cs from atmospheric fallout to estimate rates of soil redistribution, particularly by wind, was reviewed. This method relies on the assumption that the source of 137Cs in the soil profile is from atmospheric fallout following the period of atmospheric weapons testing so that the temporal and, to a certain extent, the spatial patterns of 137Cs deposition are known. One of the major limitations occurs when local or regional sources of 137Cs contamination mask the pulse from global fallout, making temporal estimates of redistribution difficult or impossible. Like 137Cs, Pu exhibits strong affinity for binding to soil particle surfaces, and therefore, re-distribution of Pu inventory indicates inferred soil re-distribution. Compared to 137Cs, 239Pu and 240Pu offer several important advantages: (a) the two major Pu isotopes have much longer half-lives than 137Cs and (b) the ratio 240Pu/239Pu is used to examine whether the Pu is from stratospheric fallout. In this paper, we review the literature concerning Pu in soil and of current attempts to use this tracer to estimate rates of soil redistribution. We also present preliminary, unpublished data from a pilot study designed to test whether or not 239+240Pu can be used to estimate rates of soil redistribution by wind. Based on similarities of profile distribution and relative inventories between 137Cs measurements and 239+240Pu measurements of split samples from a series of fields with documented wind erosion histories, we conclude that 239+240Pu may well be the anthropogenic radioisotope of choice for future soil redistribution investigations.

  17. Distribution of 90Sr, 137Cs and 239,240Pu in Caspian Sea water and biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povinec, Pavel P.; Froehlich, Klaus; Gastaud, Janine; Oregioni, Beniamino; Pagava, Samson V.; Pham, Mai K.; Rusetski, Vladimir

    2003-09-01

    Two sampling expeditions were carried out in the Caspian Sea in 1995 and 1996. The aim was to investigate oceanographic conditions, water dynamics of the Sea and to measure radionuclide concentrations using 90Sr, 137Cs and 239,240Pu as tracers in the water column. Of the three basins comprising the Caspian Sea, the two deep basins (the central and southern basins) appear to be rapidly ventilated on a time scale of about 30 years, as shown by the penetration of radionuclides to bottom waters. The main source of radionuclides in the Sea has been global fallout and subsequent river run-off from catchment areas. At the stations visited, there were no signs of radioactive waste dumping, although the 90Sr levels found were higher than expected from global fallout, which may be due to remobilization of 90Sr from soil and its transport by rivers to the Sea. Radionuclide concentrations in fish and caviar are within the expected ranges and are not of radiological importance for consumption of fish and caviar from the Caspian Sea.

  18. (236)U and (239,)(240)Pu ratios from soils around an Australian nuclear weapons test site.

    PubMed

    Tims, S G; Froehlich, M B; Fifield, L K; Wallner, A; De Cesare, M

    2016-01-01

    The isotopes (236)U, (239)Pu and (240)Pu are present in surface soils as a result of global fallout from nuclear weapons tests carried out in the 1950's and 1960's. These isotopes potentially constitute artificial tracers of recent soil erosion and sediment movement. Only Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has the requisite sensitivity to measure all three isotopes at these environmental levels. Coupled with its relatively high throughput capabilities, this makes it feasible to conduct studies of erosion across the geographical extent of the Australian continent. In the Australian context, however, global fallout is not the only source of these isotopes. As part of its weapons development program the United Kingdom carried out a series of atmospheric and surface nuclear weapons tests at Maralinga, South Australia in 1956 and 1957. The tests have made a significant contribution to the Pu isotopic abundances present in the region around Maralinga and out to distances ∼1000 km, and impact on the assessment techniques used in the soil and sediment tracer studies. Quantification of the relative fallout contribution derived from detonations at Maralinga is complicated owing to significant contamination around the test site from numerous nuclear weapons safety trials that were also carried out around the site. We show that (236)U can provide new information on the component of the fallout that is derived from the local nuclear weapons tests, and highlight the potential of (236)U as a new fallout tracer. PMID:26141189

  19. [Accumulation of 238, 239 + 240Pu and 241Am in Boar Organs and Tissues on the Territory of the Belarusian Part of the ChNPP Exclusion Zone].

    PubMed

    Bondar, Yu I; Zabrotski, V N; Sadchikov, V I; Kalinin, V N

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to determination of α-emitting radionuclides of 238, 239 + 240Pu and 241Am in liver, lungs, muscular and bone tissues of the boars on the territory of the Belarusian part of the ChNPP exclusion zone. It is shown that the content of Pu and Am isotopes in boar organs and tissues decreases in the following order: liver > bone tissues > lungs ≥ muscular tissues. The results received allow evaluation of penetration of 238, 239 + 240Pu and 241Am through the biological chain "soil-ration-organs and tissues". It is calculated that 1.7% of a boar's ration falls on the soil getting into the stomach with food. Translocation and accumulation coefficients characterizing the transfer of radionuclides through the chain "soil-vegetation-organs and tissues" were calculated. The conclusion about accumulation of Pu in the boar's body is made. PMID:26964350

  20. Can 239 + 240Pu replace 137Cs as an erosion tracer in agricultural landscapes contaminated with Chernobyl fallout?

    PubMed

    Schimmack, W; Auerswald, K; Bunzl, K

    2001-01-01

    Erosion studies often use 137Cs from the global fallout (main period: 1953-1964) as a tracer in the soil. In many European countries, where 137Cs was deposited in considerable amounts also by the Chernobyl fallout in 1986, the global fallout fraction (GF-Cs) has to be separated from the Chernobyl fraction by means of the isotope 134Cs. In a few years, this will no longer be possible due to the short half-life of 134Cs (2 yr). Because GF-Cs in the soil can then no longer be determined, the potential of using 239 + 240Pu as a tracer is evaluated. This radionuclide originates in most European countries essentially only from the global fallout. The activities and spatial distributions of Pu and GF-Cs were compared in the soil of a steep field (inclination about 20%, area ca. 3 ha, main soil type Dystric Eutrochrept), sampled at 48 nodes of a 25 x 25 m2 grid. The reference values were determined at 12 points adjacent to the field. Their validity was assured by an inventory study of radiocaesium in a 70 ha area surrounding the field sampling 275 nodes of a 50 x 50 m2 grid. In the field studied, the activity concentrations of GF-Cs and Pu in the Ap horizon were not correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient R = 0.20, p > 0.05), and the activity balance of Pu differed from that of GF-Cs. Whereas no net loss of GF-Cs from the field was observed as compared to the reference site, Pu was more mobile with an average loss of ca. 11% per unit area. In addition, the spatial pattern of GF-Cs and Pu in the field differed significantly. The reason may be that due to their different associations with soil constituents, Pu and Cs represent different fractions of the soil, exhibiting different properties with respect to erosion/deposition processes. This indicates that both radionuclides or one of them may not be appropriate to quantity past erosion. When tracer losses are used to calibrate or verify erosion prediction models, systematic deviations may not only stem from model

  1. Determination of {sup 230}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 240}Pu in soils by ICP-MS using flow-injection preconcentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, M.; Grohs, J.; Mamich, S.; Kroft, M.

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy needs improved analytical methods for alpha-emitting radionuclides to support environmental restoration and waste management projects. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been used successfully to measure radionuclides with relatively long half-lives; however, ICP-MS used with conventional sample introduction techniques lacks the sensitivity or selectivity to measure shorter-lived radionuclides at levels important for environmental monitoring. New methods were developed for measuring {sup 230}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 240}Pu in soils. Samples are dried, ground, and dissolved by fusion. A flow injection (FI) analysis system is used to separate and concentrate the analytes by solid-phase extraction. The FI eluent is pumped directly into the nebulizer of the ICP-MS. The use of FI resulted in greater sensitivity and freedom from interferences when compared with direct aspiration. Detection limits are improved by approximately a factor of 20. The detection limits are approximately 3 Bq/kg (4 ng/kg) for {sup 230}Th, 0.6 Bq/kg (3 ng/kg) for {sup 234}U, 0.4 Bq/kg (0.2 ng/kg) for {sup 239}Pu, and 2 Bq/kg (0.3 ng/kg) for {sup 240}Pu. The FI-ICP-MS methods are faster, less labor intensive, and generate less laboratory waste than traditional radiochemical methods. The FI-ICP-MS gives individual results for {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu which cannot be resolved by the usual radiochemical method. The accuracy of the methods was verified by analyzing reference soils.

  2. Parity splitting and E1/E2 branching in the alternating parity band of {sup 240}Pu from two-center octupole wave functions using supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Jolos, R. V.; Brentano, P. von

    2011-08-15

    An interpretation is suggested of the recently published experimental data on the alternating parity bands in {sup 240}Pu. The interpretation is based on the assumption that the main role in the description of the properties of the alternating parity bands plays the octupole mode which preserves the axial symmetry. The mathematical technique of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics is used for the realization of the model with the two-center octupole wave functions. A good description of the parity splitting and of the ratio of the dipole and quadrupole transitional moments is obtained for the first two bands.

  3. Perturbation in the 240Pu/239Pu global fallout ratio in local sediments following the nuclear accidents at Thule (Greenland) and Palomares (Spain).

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P I; León Vintró, L; Dahlgaard, H; Gascó, C; Sánchez-Cabeza, J A

    1997-08-25

    It is well established that the main source of the plutonium found in marine sediments throughout the Northern Hemisphere is global stratospheric fallout, characterized by a typical 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio of approximately 0.18. Measurement of perturbations in this ratio at various sites which had been subjected to close-in fallout, mainly from surface-based testing (e.g. Bikini Atoll, Nevada test site, Mururoa Atoll), has confirmed the feasibility of using this ratio to distinguish plutonium from different fallout sources. In the present study, the 240Pu/239Pu ratio has been examined in samples of sediment (and soil) collected at Thule (Greenland) and Palomares (Spain), where accidents involving the release and dispersion of plutonium from fractured nuclear weapons occurred in 1968 and 1966, respectively. The 240Pu/239Pu ratio was measured by high-resolution alpha spectrometry and spectral deconvolution, and confirmed in the case of the most active samples by high-resolution X-ray spectrometry. Only samples which displayed plutonium heterogeneities, i.e. hot particles or concentrations well in excess (at least two orders of magnitude) of those expected from global fallout, were selected for analysis. The analytical results showed that at Thule the mean 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio was 0.033 +/- 0.004 (n = 4), while at Palomares the equivalent ratio appeared to be significantly higher at 0.056 +/- 0.003 (n = 4). Both ratios are indicative of low burn-up plutonium and are consistent with those reported for weapons-grade plutonium. It is noteworthy that the mean 238Pu/239Pu activity ratio in the Thule samples, at 0.0150 +/- 0.0017 (n = 4), was also lower than that measured in the Palomares samples, namely, 0.0275 +/- 0.0012 (n = 4). The 241Pu/239Pu ratios were similarly different. Finally, the data show, in contrast to Palomares, that not all of the samples from the Thule accident site were contaminated with plutonium of identical isotopic composition. PMID:9241884

  4. Determination of 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratios in human tissues collected from areas around the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site by sector-field high resolution ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Oikawa, S; Sakaguchi, A; Tomita, J; Hoshi, M; Apsalikov, K N

    2008-09-01

    Information on the 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios in human tissues for people living around the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) was deduced from 9 sets of soft tissues and bones, and 23 other bone samples obtained by autopsy. Plutonium was radiochemically separated and purified, and plutonium isotopes (239Pu and 240Pu) were determined by sector-field high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. For most of the tissue samples from the former nine subjects, low 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios were determined: bone, 0.125 +/- 0.018 (0.113-0.145, n = 4); lungs, 0.063 +/- 0.010 (0.051-0.078, n = 5); and liver, 0.148 +/- 0.026 (0.104-0.189, n = 9). Only 239Pu was detected in the kidney samples; the amount of 240Pu was too small to be measured, probably due to the small size of samples analyzed. The mean 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratio for bone samples from the latter 23 subjects was 0.152 +/- 0.034, ranging from 0.088 to 0.207. A significant difference (a two-tailed Student's t test; 95% significant level, alpha = 0.05) between mean 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios for the tissue samples and for the global fallout value (0.178 +/- 0.014) indicated that weapons-grade plutonium from the atomic bombs has been incorporated into the human tissues, especially lungs, in the residents living around the SNTS. The present 239,240Pu concentrations in bone, lung, and liver samples were, however, not much different from ranges found for human tissues from other countries that were due solely to global fallout during the 1970's-1980's. PMID:18695410

  5. Measurement of the 240Pu/239Pu mass ratio using a transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter for total decay energy spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Andrew S; Bond, Evelyn M; Croce, Mark P; Holesinger, Terry G; Kunde, Gerd J; Rabin, Michael W; Wolfsberg, Laura E; Bennett, Douglas A; Hays-Wehle, James P; Schmidt, Dan R; Swetz, Daniel; Ullom, Joel N

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a new category of sensor for measurement of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu mass ratio from aqueous solution samples with advantages over existing methods. Aqueous solution plutonium samples were evaporated and encapsulated inside of a gold foil absorber, and a superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter detector was used to measure the total reaction energy (Q-value) of nuclear decays via heat generated when the energy is thermalized. Since all of the decay energy is contained in the absorber, we measure a single spectral peak for each isotope, resulting in a simple spectral analysis problem with minimal peak overlap. We found that mechanical kneading of the absorber dramatically improves spectral quality by reducing the size of radioactive inclusions within the absorber to scales below 50 nm such that decay products primarily interact with atoms of the host material. Due to the low noise performance of the microcalorimeter detector, energy resolution values of 1 keV fwhm (full width at half-maximum) at 5.5 MeV have been achieved, an order of magnitude improvement over α-spectroscopy with conventional silicon detectors. We measured the (240)Pu/(239)Pu mass ratio of two samples and confirmed the results by comparison to mass spectrometry values. These results have implications for future measurements of trace samples of nuclear material. PMID:25723106

  6. Calculated gamma-ray spectra for keV neutron capture in /sup 240/Pu, /sup 242/Pu, and /sup 238/U

    SciTech Connect

    Reffo, G.; Fabbri, F.; Kappeler, F.; Wisshak, K.

    1983-03-01

    Capture gamma-ray spectra of /sup 240/Pu, /sup 242/Pu, and /sup 238/U were calculated in the framework of the spherical optical model and the statistical model. A consistent set of input parameters was determined from available experimental information or from model-guided systematics. The complete gamma-ray cascades were calculated considering all possible transitions up to multiplicity seven. All experimental information on level schemes and gamma-ray transition probabilities of the compound nuclei was explicitly included as input. The capture gamma-ray spectra were used to correct experimental data for the capture cross sections of /sup 240/Pu and /sup 242/Pu from a relative measurement using a Moxon-Rae detector with a graphite converter and with /sup 197/Au and /sup 238/U as standards. This correction is required to take into account that the detector efficiency is not exactly proportional to the gamma-ray energy. The resulting correction factors proved to be negligible for measurements relative to /sup 238/U; whereas, they are about 3% if gold is used as a standard.

  7. Measurement of the 240Pu/239Pu mass ratio using a transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter for total decay energy spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoover, Andrew S.; Bond, Evelyn M.; Croce, Mark P.; Holesinger, Terry G.; Kunde, Gerd J.; Rabin, Michael W.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Hays-Wehle, James P.; Schmidt, Dan R.; et al

    2015-02-27

    In this study, we have developed a new category of sensor for measurement of the 240Pu/239Pu mass ratio from aqueous solution samples with advantages over existing methods. Aqueous solution plutonium samples were evaporated and encapsulated inside of a gold foil absorber, and a superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter detector was used to measure the total reaction energy (Q-value) of nuclear decays via heat generated when the energy is thermalized. Since all of the decay energy is contained in the absorber, we measure a single spectral peak for each isotope, resulting in a simple spectral analysis problem with minimal peak overlap. We foundmore » that mechanical kneading of the absorber dramatically improves spectral quality by reducing the size of radioactive inclusions within the absorber to scales below 50 nm such that decay products primarily interact with atoms of the host material. Due to the low noise performance of the microcalorimeter detector, energy resolution values of 1 keV fwhm (full width at half-maximum) at 5.5 MeV have been achieved, an order of magnitude improvement over α-spectroscopy with conventional silicon detectors. We measured the 240Pu/239Pu mass ratio of two samples and confirmed the results by comparison to mass spectrometry values. These results have implications for future measurements of trace samples of nuclear material.« less

  8. Nevada test site fallout atom ratios: /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.G.; Barr, D.W.

    1984-02-01

    The exposure of the population in Utah to external gamma radiation from the fallout from nuclear weapons tests carried out between 1951 and 1958 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been reconstructed from recent measurements of /sup 137/Cs and plutonium in soil. The fraction of /sup 137/Cs in the fallout from NTS events was calculated from the total plutonium and the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratios measured in the soil, using the values of 0.180 +- 0.006 and 0.032 +- 0.003 for that ratio in global fallout and NTS fallout, respectively. The total population exposure from NTS events was then calculated on the basis of exposure rates resulting from short-lived radionuclides associated with the /sup 137/Cs at the time of deposition. While the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratio is constant in global fallout, this ratio varies greatly in the fallout from individual events. While the composition of fallout on Utah from NTS events is rather uniform, the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project is currently reconstructing radiation exposures for locations close to NTS where the fallout may be predominantly from one event. Therefore, the authors compiled the pertinent ratios in order to provide information concerning the exposure resulting from any individual event. The plutonium ratios measured at 30 days postshot were compiled from unpublished values in the archives of the Nuclear Chemistry Division of LLNL and INC-11 of LANL. These ratios are pertinent to fallout data. Dates for each event were taken from a publication by the Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy. 3 references.

  9. Role of natural organic matter on iodine and (239)(,240)Pu distribution and mobility in environmental samples from the northwestern Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Zhang, Saijin; Sugiyama, Yuko; Ohte, Nobuhito; Ho, Yi-Fang; Fujitake, Nobuhide; Kaplan, Daniel I; Yeager, Chris M; Schwehr, Kathleen; Santschi, Peter H

    2016-03-01

    In order to assess how environmental factors are affecting the distribution and migration of radioiodine and plutonium that were emitted from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, we quantified iodine and (239,240)Pu concentration changes in soil samples with different land uses (urban, paddy, deciduous forest and coniferous forest), as well as iodine speciation in surface water and rainwater. Sampling locations were 53-63 km northwest of the FDNPP within a 75-km radius, in close proximity of each other. A ranking of the land uses by their surface soil (<4 cm) stable (127)I concentrations was coniferous forest > deciduous forest > urban > paddy, and (239,240)Pu concentrations ranked as deciduous forest > coniferous forest > paddy ≥ urban. Both were quite distinct from that of (134)Cs and (137)Cs: urban > coniferous forest > deciduous forest > paddy, indicating differences in their sources, deposition phases, and biogeochemical behavior in these soil systems. Although stable (127)I might not have fully equilibrated with Fukushima-derived (129)I, it likely still works as a proxy for the long-term fate of (129)I. Surficial soil (127)I content was well correlated to soil organic matter (SOM) content, regardless of land use type, suggesting that SOM might be an important factor affecting iodine biogeochemistry. Other soil chemical properties, such as Eh and pH, had strong correlations to soil (127)I content, but only within a given land use (e.g., within urban soils). Organic carbon (OC) concentrations and Eh were positively, and pH was negatively correlated to (127)I concentrations in surface water and rain samples. It is also noticeable that (127)I in the wet deposition was concentrated in both the deciduous and coniferous forest throughfall and stemfall water, respectively, comparing to the bulk rainwater. Further, both forest throughfall and stemflow water consisted exclusively of organo-iodine, suggesting all inorganic iodine in the

  10. Determination of 239Pu and 240Pu isotope ratio for a nuclear bomb particle using X-ray spectrometry in conjunction with γ-ray spectrometry and non-destructive α-particle spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöllänen, R.; Ruotsalainen, K.; Toivonen, H.

    2009-11-01

    A nuclear bomb particle from Thule containing Pu and U was analyzed using X-ray spectrometry in combination with γ-ray spectrometry and non-destructive α-spectrometry. The main objective was to investigate the possibility to determine the 239Pu and 240Pu isotope ratios. Previously, X-ray spectrometry together with the above-mentioned methods has been successfully applied for radiochemically processed samples, but not for individual particles. In the present paper we demonstrate the power of non-destructive analysis. The 239Pu/( 239Pu+ 240Pu) atom ratio for the Thule particle was determined, using two different approaches, to be 0.93±0.07 and 0.91±0.05. These results are consistent with weapons-grade material and the results obtained by other investigators.

  11. Ultra-trace determination of (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu by triple quadruple collision/reaction cell-ICP-MS/MS: Establishing a baseline for global fallout in Qatar soil and sediments.

    PubMed

    Amr, Mohamed A; Helal, Abdul-Fattah I; Al-Kinani, Athab T; Balakrishnan, Perumal

    2016-03-01

    The development of practical, fast, and reliable methods for the ultra-trace determination of anthropogenic radionuclides (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu by triple quadruple collision/reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CRC-ICP-MS/MS) were investigated in term of its accuracy and precision for producing reliable results. The radionuclides were extracted from 1 kg of the environmental soil samples by concentrated nitric and hydrochloric acids. The leachate solutions were measured directly by triple quadrupole CRC-ICP-MS/MS. For quality assurance, a chemical separation of the concerned radionuclides was conducted and then measured by single quadrupole-ICP-MS. The developed methods were next applied to measure the anthropogenic radionuclides (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu in soil samples collected throughout the State of Qatar. The average concentrations of (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu were 0.606 fg/g (3.364 Bq/kg), 0.619 fg/g (2.038 Bq/kg), 0.034 fg/g (0.0195 Bq/kg), 65.59 fg/g (0.150 Bq/kg), and 12.06 fg/g (0.103 Bq/kg), respectively. PMID:26736181

  12. Simultaneous determination of radiocesium ((135)Cs, (137)Cs) and plutonium ((239)Pu, (240)Pu) isotopes in river suspended particles by ICP-MS/MS and SF-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liguo; Zheng, Jian; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Pan, Shaoming; Wang, Zhongtang; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2016-10-01

    Due to radioisotope releases in the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, long-term monitoring of radiocesium ((135)Cs and (137)Cs) and Pu isotopes ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) in river suspended particles is necessary to study the transport and fate of these long-lived radioisotopes in the land-ocean system. However, it is expensive and technically difficult to collect samples of suspended particles from river and ocean. Thus, simultaneous determination of multi-radionuclides remains as a challenging topic. In this study, for the first time, we report an analytical method for simultaneous determination of radiocesium and Pu isotopes in suspended particles with small sample size (1-2g). Radiocesium and Pu were sequentially pre-concentrated using ammonium molybdophosphate and ferric hydroxide co-precipitation, respectively. After the two-stage ion-exchange chromatography separation from the matrix elements, radiocesium and Pu isotopes were finally determined by ICP-MS/MS and SF-ICP-MS, respectively. The interfering elements of U ((238)U(1)H(+) and (238)U(2)H(+) for (239)Pu and (240)Pu, respectively) and Ba ((135)Ba(+) and (137)Ba(+) for (135)Cs and (137)Cs, respectively) were sufficiently removed with the decontamination factors of 1-8×10(6) and 1×10(4), respectively, with the developed method. Soil reference materials were utilized for method validation, and the obtained (135)Cs/(137)Cs and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios, and (239+240)Pu activities showed a good agreement with the certified/information values. In addition, the developed method was applied to analyze radiocesium and Pu in the suspended particles of land water samples collected from Fukushima Prefecture after the FDNPP accident. The (135)Cs/(137)Cs atom ratios (0.329-0.391) and (137)Cs activities (23.4-152Bq/g) suggested radiocesium contamination of the suspended particles mainly originated from the accident-released radioactive contaminates, while similar Pu contamination of suspended

  13. Sediment core record of global fallout and Bikini close-in fallout Pu in Sagami Bay, Western Northwest Pacific margin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2004-07-01

    The total 239-240Pu activity and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio in the sediments in Sagami Bay of the western Northwest Pacific margin were investigated using ICP-MS with a shield torch system. 239+240Pu inventories in the examined sediment cores were found to be much higher than those predicted from atmospheric global fallout (42 MBq/km2) at the same latitude. In addition, elevated 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios ranging from 0.22 to 0.28 were observed in the sediment samples. On the basis of the vertical profiles of 239+240Pu and characterized 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in a sediment core collected in the center of Sagami Bay, we identified two distinct sources of fallout Pu in the bay: the global stratospheric fallout with characteristic 240Pu/239Pu ratio of 0.18 and the transported close-in fallout derived from Bikini and Enewetak surface nuclear weapon test series in the 1950s. We propose that the Pu transportation was mainly due to oceanic processes (for example, through the North Equatorial Current and the Kuroshio Current). Using a two fallout end-member model, we find that the contribution of Bikini close-in fallout Pu ranged from 44 to 59% in Sagami Bay sediments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that Pu contamination, which originated from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapon test series in the 1950s, has extended westwards as far as the Japanese coast. PMID:15296298

  14. Experience with the BEACON core monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.L. ); Icide, C.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The BEACON operational core support system was developed for use in pressurized water reactors to provide an integrated system to perform reactor core monitoring, core measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core predictions. It is based on the very fast and accurate three-dimensional SPNOVA nodal program. The experience to date has shown the importance of an accurate integrated system. The benefits accrued are greater for the total system than the benefits that are possible separately.

  15. Characterisation of the plutonium isotopic composition of a sediment core from Palomares, Spain, by low-energy AMS and alpha-spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, E.; Jiménez-Ramos, M. C.; Enamorado, S. M.; García-León, M.; García-Tenorio, R.; Mas, J. L.; Masqué, P.; Merino, J.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    The measurement of plutonium isotopes, 239Pu and 240Pu, at 670 kV on the compact accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) in Seville, Spain, is now a reality. In this work, we present first Pu AMS results for environmental samples: a sediment core collected in a submarine canyon in the Mediterranean coast of the Spanish region of Palomares, affected by a nuclear accident in 1966. From the study of the 240Pu/ 239Pu atomic ratio profile, showing on average levels lower than 11%, we confirm that the weapon-grade plutonium released on land during the accident, with a characteristic 240Pu/ 239Pu atomic ratio of 5.8%, has found its way into the marine environment. A two-plutonium sources mixture model (Palomares and fallout) is used to elucidate the percentage of the plutonium coming from the accident. As a validation exercise of the Pu AMS measuring technique and in order to obtain the 238Pu/ (239+240)Pu activity ratios, samples were also studied by alpha-spectrometry (AS). The obtained AS 239+240Pu activity concentration results fit in with the AMS ones in a wide dynamic range, thus validating the AMS technique.

  16. Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (COREs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffies, Stephen M.; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus; Bryan, Frank; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Chassignet, Eric P.; England, Matthew H.; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Haak, Helmuth; Hallberg, Robert W.; Hazeleger, Wilco; Jungclaus, Johann; Large, William G.; Madec, Gurvan; Pirani, Anna; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Gupta, Alex Sen; Severijns, Camiel A.; Simmons, Harper L.; Treguier, Anne Marie; Winton, Mike; Yeager, Stephen; Yin, Jianjun

    Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (COREs) are presented as a tool to explore the behaviour of global ocean-ice models under forcing from a common atmospheric dataset. We highlight issues arising when designing coupled global ocean and sea ice experiments, such as difficulties formulating a consistent forcing methodology and experimental protocol. Particular focus is given to the hydrological forcing, the details of which are key to realizing simulations with stable meridional overturning circulations. The atmospheric forcing from [Large, W., Yeager, S., 2004. Diurnal to decadal global forcing for ocean and sea-ice models: the data sets and flux climatologies. NCAR Technical Note: NCAR/TN-460+STR. CGD Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research] was developed for coupled-ocean and sea ice models. We found it to be suitable for our purposes, even though its evaluation originally focussed more on the ocean than on the sea-ice. Simulations with this atmospheric forcing are presented from seven global ocean-ice models using the CORE-I design (repeating annual cycle of atmospheric forcing for 500 years). These simulations test the hypothesis that global ocean-ice models run under the same atmospheric state produce qualitatively similar simulations. The validity of this hypothesis is shown to depend on the chosen diagnostic. The CORE simulations provide feedback to the fidelity of the atmospheric forcing and model configuration, with identification of biases promoting avenues for forcing dataset and/or model development.

  17. The history and source of particulate 137Cs and 239,240Pu deposition in sediments of the Ob River Delta, Siberia.

    PubMed

    Sayles, F L; Livingston, H D; Panteleyev, G P

    1997-08-25

    This paper presents the first results of a project designed to examine the transfer of particle-associated artificial radionuclides down the Ob River in Siberia to its delta over the past 5 decades. The main sources include fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests and weapons complexes and test sites of the Former Soviet Union in or near the Ob watershed. The approach is to measure the accumulation of the radionuclides in undisturbed delta sediments-obtaining a record of their deposition over time. These records were found in sediments of shallow lakes apart from, and connected to, the main channel. Sediment cores were collected in the summer of 1994 using a shallow draft catamaran to reach these lakes from a support ship in the main channel. Measurements are presented on the depth distributions of 137Cs and Pu isotopes and their inventories in a series of dated sediment cores-including one from a location in the Taz Estuary (which does not receive Ob River sediments). Sediment dating was carried out using the excess 210Pb technique. The results obtained are compared with known information on the temporal history of releases from the various sources and characteristics of the isotopic composition of the sources. The results show that good records of radionuclide deposition indicate that the major fraction of 137Cs and Pu isotopes deposited in these delta sediments comes from atmospheric nuclear weapons test fallout-both delivered directly from the atmosphere and from downstream transport of watershed sediments. No more than 25% of the observed inventories could be derived from other sources. PMID:9241876

  18. Measurement of Absolute Fission Yields in the Fast Neutron-Induced Fission of Actinides: {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm by Track-Etch-cum-Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, R.H.; Naik, H.; Pandey, A.K.; Kalsi, P.C.; Singh, R.J.; Ramaswami, A.; Nair, A.G.C.

    2000-07-15

    The absolute fission yields of 46 fission products in {sup 238}U (99.9997 at.%), 46 fission products in {sup 237}Np, 27 fission products in {sup 238}Pu (99.21 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 240}Pu (99.48 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 243}Am (99.998 at.%), and 32 fission products in {sup 244}Cm (99.43 at.%) induced by fast neutrons were determined using a fission track-etch-cum-gamma spectrometric technique. In the case of highly alpha-active and sparingly available actinides - e.g., {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm - a novel recoil catcher technique to collect the fission products on a Lexan polycarbonate foil followed by gamma-ray spectrometry was developed during the course of this work. This completely removed interferences from (a) gamma rays of daughter products in secular equilibrium with the target nuclide (e.g., {sup 243}Am-{sup 239}Np), (b) activation products of the catcher foil [e.g., {sup 24}Na from Al(n,{alpha})], and (c) activation products of the target [e.g., {sup 238}Np from {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) and {sup 239}Np from {sup 238}U(n,{gamma})] reactions, making the gamma spectrometric analysis very simple and accurate. The high-yield asymmetric fission products were analyzed by direct gamma spectrometry, whereas the low-yield symmetric products (e.g., Ag, Cd, and Sb) as well as some of the asymmetric fission products (e.g., Br) and rare earths (in the case of {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np) were radiochemically separated and then analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry. The neutron spectra in the irradiation positions of the reactors were measured and delineated in the thermal to 10-MeV region using threshold activation detectors. The present data were compared with the ENDF/VI and UKFY2 evaluated data files. From the measured cumulative yields, the mass-chain yields have been deduced using charge distribution systematics. The mass yields, along with similar data for other fast neutron-induced fissioning systems, show several

  19. Evidence for Hydroxamate Siderophores and Other N-Containing Organic Compounds Controlling (239,240)Pu Immobilization and Remobilization in a Wetland Sediment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Zhang, Saijin; Kaplan, Daniel I; Ho, Yi-Fang; Schwehr, Kathleen A; Roberts, Kimberly A; Chen, Hongmei; DiDonato, Nicole; Athon, Matthew; Hatcher, Patrick G; Santschi, Peter H

    2015-10-01

    Pu concentrations in wetland surface sediments collected downstream of a former nuclear processing facility in F-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), USA, were ∼2.5 times greater than those measured in the associated upland aquifer sediments; similarly, the Pu concentration solid/water ratios were orders of magnitude greater in the wetland than in the low-organic matter content aquifer soils. Sediment Pu concentrations were correlated to total organic carbon and total nitrogen contents and even more strongly to hydroxamate siderophore (HS) concentrations. The HS were detected in the particulate or colloidal phases of the sediments but not in the low molecular weight fractions (<1000 Da). Macromolecules which scavenged the majority of the potentially mobile Pu were further separated from the bulk mobile organic matter fraction ("water extract") via an isoelectric focusing experiment (IEF). An electrospray ionization Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (ESI FTICR-MS) spectral comparison of the IEF extract and a siderophore standard (desferrioxamine; DFO) suggested the presence of HS functionalities in the IEF extract. This study suggests that while HS are a very minor component in the sediment particulate/colloidal fractions, their concentrations greatly exceed those of ambient Pu, and HS may play an especially important role in Pu immobilization/remobilization in wetland sediments. PMID:26313339

  20. Analysis of 236U and plutonium isotopes, 239,240Pu, on the 1 MV AMS system at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, as a potential tool in oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, Elena; López-Lora, Mercedes; Villa, María; Casacuberta, Núria; López-Gutiérrez, José María; Pham, Mai Khanh

    2015-10-01

    The performance of the 1 MV AMS system at the CNA (Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Seville, Spain) for 236U and 239,240Pu measurements has been extensively investigated. A very promising 236U/238U abundance sensitivity of about 3 × 10-11 has been recently achieved, and background figures for 239Pu of about 106 atoms were reported in the past. These promising results lead to the use of conventional low energy AMS systems for the analysis of 236U and 239Pu and its further application in environmental studies. First 236U results obtained on our AMS system for marine samples (sediments and water) are presented here. Results of two new IAEA reference materials (IAEA-410 and IAEA-412, marine sediments from Pacific Ocean) are reported. The obtained 236U/239Pu atom ratios, of 0.12 and 0.022, respectively, show a dependency with the contamination source (i.e. local fallout from the US tests performed at the Bikini Atoll and general fallout). The results obtained for a third IAEA reference material (IAEA-381, seawater from the Irish Sea), are also presented. In the following, the uranium and plutonium isotopic compositions obtained on a set of 5 intercomparison seawater samples from the Arctic Ocean provided by the ETH Zürich are discussed. By comparing them with the obtained results on the 600 kV AMS facility Tandy at the ETH Zürich, we demonstrate the solidity of the CNA technique for 236U/238U determinations at, at least, 7 × 10-10 level. Finally, these results are discussed in their environmental context.

  1. Association of Chernobyl-derived 239+240Pu, 241Am, 90Sr and 137Cs with different molecular size fractions of organic matter in the soil solution of two grassland soils.

    PubMed

    Bunzl, K; Kracke, W; Agapkina, G I; Tikhomirov, A; Shcheglov, A I

    1998-10-01

    Radiocesium is normally bound only rather weakly and unspecifically by humic substances, in contrast to the actinides Pu and Am. Recently, however, it was observed that fallout 137Cs in the soil solution from an Of-horizon of a podzol forest soil (slightly decomposed plant material) was associated essentially only with one single size fraction of the humic substances. In deeper soil layers with well humified material (AOh-horizon), radiocesium was associated with all size fractions of the dissolved organic matter (DOM). To examine whether this unexpected behaviour is also observable for DOM isolated from other soils, we determined the association of fallout 137Cs, 90Sr, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am with various size fractions of DOM from in situ soil solutions isolated from two layers (0-2 cm and 2-5 cm) of two grassland soils (a soddy podzolic soil and a peat soil) within the 10 km zone of the nuclear reactor at Chernobyl (Ukraine). The four size fractions of DOM as obtained by gel filtration of the soil solution were (mean nominal molecular weight in daltons): fraction I: > or = 2000, fraction II: 1300; fraction III: 560, fraction IV: inorganic compounds. The results for the well humified DOM (humus accumulation horizon of podzol, deeper layer of peat soil) showed that Pu and Am are essentially associated with the high molecular weight fractions, while Sr is present only in the 'inorganic' fraction. Radiocesium is found in all the size fractions separated. A quite similar pattern was also found for Pu, Am, and Sr in the soil solution from only slightly decomposed plant material (0-2 cm of peat soil), but not for radiocesium. This radionuclide was again essentially only observable in one single low molecular weight fraction of DOM. The above results thus support our recent observations in the different horizons of a forest podzol mentioned above, even though no reason for the different binding of radiocesium by well humified soil organic matter and by only slightly

  2. Analysis of core soil and water samples from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.

    1981-02-18

    Core soil samples and water samples were collected from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak for analysis of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am by both gamma spectroscopy and, through a contractor laboratory, by wet chemistry procedures. The samples processing methods, the analytical methods and the analytical quality control are all procedures developed for the continuing Marshall Island radioecology and dose assessment work.

  3. Experience with imaging algorithms on multiple core CPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Richard

    2011-01-01

    With the release of an eight core Xeon processor by Intel and a twelve core Opteron processor by AMD in the spring of 2010, the increase of multiple cores per chip package continues. Multiple core processors are common place in most workstations sold today and are an attractive option for increasing imaging performance. Visual attention models are very compute intensive, requiring many imaging algorithms to be run on images such as large difference of Gaussian filters, segmentation, and region finding. In this paper we present our experience in optimizing the performance of a visual attention model on standard multi-core Windows workstations.

  4. Many-core experience with HEP software at CERN openlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarp, Sverre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Leduc, Julien; Nowak, Andrzej

    2012-12-01

    The continued progression of Moore's law has led to many-core platforms becoming easily accessible commodity equipment. New opportunities that arose from this change have also brought new challenges: harnessing the raw potential of computation of such a platform is not always a straightforward task. This paper describes practical experience coming out of the work with many-core systems at CERN openlab and the observed differences with respect to their predecessors. We provide the latest results for a set of parallelized HEP benchmarks running on several classes of many-core platforms.

  5. Laboratory Experiments on Core Merging and Stratification After Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landeau, M.; Olson, P.; Deguen, R.; Hirsh, B.

    2015-12-01

    The fluid dynamics of core merging after giant impacts in the late stages of accretion provides constraints on metal-silicate equilibration, core stratification, and early magnetic field generation. The energy released during giant impacts, such as those thought to have formed Earth's Moon and the crustal dichotomy on Mars, likely resulted in melting of the impactor and much or all of the protoplanet's mantle. Under these conditions, the liquid core of the impactor migrates through a fully-liquid magma ocean, and merges with the protoplanet's core. Unlike the laminar flow in numerical simulations, liquid impact experiments can produce turbulence, as expected during core formation. We present experiments on liquid blobs of variable density released into another liquid consisting of two immiscible layers, representing the magma ocean and protocore, respectively. The released liquid is denser than the upper layer, immiscible in the upper layer, and miscible in the lower layer. With a shallow upper layer, the relevant regime for giant impacts, a turbulent cloud of released and upper liquids penetrates into the lower layer, collapses and spreads along the interface between the upper and lower layers. This behavior contrasts with the laminar core merging observed in impact simulations or the classical iron rain scenario, and suggests that metal-silicate chemical equilibration extends inside the protocore. Experimental scalings for low-density releases predict that compositional stratification of the core is likely in the aftermath of planet formation, and the stratified layer detected by seismology at the top of Earth's core is compatible with a moon-forming impact. By implication, the early core dynamo had to overcome compositional stratification to initiate.

  6. ESADA Plutonium Program Critical Experiments: Power Distribution Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, H.

    2001-06-12

    In 1967, a series of critical experiments were conducted at the Westinghouse Reactor Evaluation Center (WREC) using mixed-oxide (MOX) PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} and/or UO{sub 2} fuels in various lattices and configurations. These experiments were performed under the joint sponsorship of Empire State Atomic Development Associates (ESADA) plutonium program and Westinghouse. The purpose of these experiments was to develop experimental data useful in validating analytical methods used in the design of plutonium-bearing replacement fuel for water reactors. Three different fuel types were used during the experimental program: two MOX fuels and a low-enriched UO{sub 2} fuel. The MOX fuels were distinguished by their {sup 240}Pu content: 8 wt % {sup 240}Pu and 24 wt % {sup 240}Pu. Both MOX fuels contained 2.0 wt % PuO{sub 2} in natural UO{sub 2}. The UO{sub 2} fuel with 2.72 wt % enrichment was used for comparison with the plutonium data and for use in multiregion experiments.

  7. Chronology of Pu isotopes and 236U in an Arctic ice core.

    PubMed

    Wendel, C C; Oughton, D H; Lind, O C; Skipperud, L; Fifield, L K; Isaksson, E; Tims, S G; Salbu, B

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, state of the art isotopic fingerprinting techniques are applied to an Arctic ice core in order to quantify deposition of U and Pu, and to identify possible tropospheric transport of debris from former Soviet Union test sites Semipalatinsk (Central Asia) and Novaya Zemlya (Arctic Ocean). An ice core chronology of (236)U, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu concentrations, and atom ratios, measured by accelerator mass spectrometry in a 28.6m deep ice core from the Austfonna glacier at Nordaustlandet, Svalbard is presented. The ice core chronology corresponds to the period 1949 to 1999. The main sources of Pu and (236)U contamination in the Arctic were the atmospheric nuclear detonations in the period 1945 to 1980, as global fallout, and tropospheric fallout from the former Soviet Union test sites Novaya Zemlya and Semipalatinsk. Activity concentrations of (239+240)Pu ranged from 0.008 to 0.254 mBq cm(-2) and (236)U from 0.0039 to 0.053 μBq cm(-2). Concentrations varied in concordance with (137)Cs concentrations in the same ice core. In contrast to previous published results, the concentrations of Pu and (236)U were found to be higher at depths corresponding to the pre-moratorium period (1949 to 1959) than to the post-moratorium period (1961 and 1962). The (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratio ranged from 0.15 to 0.19, and (236)U/(239)Pu ranged from 0.18 to 1.4. The Pu atom ratios ranged within the limits of global fallout in the most intensive period of nuclear atmospheric testing (1952 to 1962). To the best knowledge of the authors the present work is the first publication on biogeochemical cycles with respect to (236)U concentrations and (236)U/(239)Pu atom ratios in the Arctic and in ice cores. PMID:23770554

  8. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  9. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores.

    PubMed

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core. PMID:27587138

  10. Neutronic Benchmarks for the Utilization of Mixed-Oxide Fuel: Joint U.S./Russian Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1997 - Volume 4, Part 2--Saxton Plutonium Program Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurrahman, NM

    2000-10-12

    Critical experiments with water-moderated, single-region PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} or UO{sub 2}, and multiple-region PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2}- and UO{sub 2}-fueled cores were performed at the CRX reactor critical facility at the Westinghouse Reactor Evaluation Center (WREC) at Waltz Mill, Pennsylvania in 1965 [1]. These critical experiments were part of the Saxton Plutonium Program. The mixed oxide (MOX) fuel used in these critical experiments and then loaded in the Saxton reactor contained 6.6 wt% PuO{sub 2} in a mixture of PuO{sub 2} and natural UO{sub 2}. The Pu metal had the following isotopic mass percentages: 90.50% {sup 239}Pu; 8.57% {sup 239}Pu; 0.89% {sup 240}Pu; and 0.04% {sup 241}Pu. The purpose of these critical experiments was to verify the nuclear design of Saxton partial plutonium cores while obtaining parameters of fundamental significance such as buckling, control rod worth, soluble poison worth, flux, power peaking, relative pin power, and power sharing factors of MOX and UO{sub 2} lattices. For comparison purposes, the core was also loaded with uranium dioxide fuel rods only. This series is covered by experiments beginning with the designation SX.

  11. Description and Analysis of Core Samples: The Lunar Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Allton, Judith H.

    1997-01-01

    Although no samples yet have been returned from a comet, extensive experience from sampling another solar system body, the Moon, does exist. While, in overall structure, composition, and physical properties the Moon bears little resemblance to what is expected for a comet, sampling the Moon has provided some basic lessons in how to do things which may be equally applicable to cometary samples. In particular, an extensive series of core samples has been taken on the Moon, and coring is the best way to sample a comet in three dimensions. Data from cores taken at 24 Apollo collection stations and 3 Luna sites have been used to provide insight into the evolution of the lunar regolith. It is now well understood that this regolith is very complex and reflects gardening (stirring of grains by micrometeorites), erosion (from impacts and solar wind sputtering), maturation (exposure on the bare lunar surface to solar winds ions and micrometeorite impacts) and comminution of coarse grains into finer grains, blanket deposition of coarse-grained layers, and other processes. All of these processes have been documented in cores. While a cometary regolith should not be expected to parallel in detail the lunar regolith, it is possible that the upper part of a cometary regolith may include textural, mineralogical, and chemical features which reflect the original accretion of the comet, including a form of gardening. Differences in relative velocities and gravitational attraction no doubt made this accretionary gardening qualitatively much different than the lunar version. Furthermore, at least some comets, depending on their orbits, have been subjected to impacts of the uppermost surface by small projectiles at some time in their history. Consequently, a more recent post-accretional gardening may have occurred. Finally, for comets which approach the sun, large scale erosion may have occurred driven by gas loss. The uppermost material of these comets may reflect some of the features

  12. Predicting Activation of Experiments Inside the Annular Core Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Joseph Isaac

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this thesis is to create a program to quickly estimate the radioactivity and decay of experiments conducted inside of the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and eliminate the need for users to write code. This is achieved by model the neutron fluxes in the reactor’s central cavity where experiments are conducted for 4 different neutron spectra using MCNP. The desired neutron spectrum, experiment material composition, and reactor power level are then input into CINDER2008 burnup code to obtain activation and decay information for every isotope generated. DREAD creates all of the files required for CINDER2008 through user selected inputs in a graphical user interface and executes the program for the user and displays the resulting estimation for dose rate at various distances. The DREAD program was validated by weighing and measuring various experiments in the different spectra and then collecting dose rate information after they were irradiated and comparing it to the dose rates that DREAD predicted. The program provides results with an average of 17% higher estimates than the actual values and takes seconds to execute.

  13. A method of measurement of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu in high U content marine sediments by sector field ICP-MS and its application to Fukushima sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Guo, Qiuju; Aono, Tatsuo; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    An accurate and precise analytical method is highly needed for the determination of Pu isotopes in marine sediments for the long-term marine environment monitoring that is being done since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The elimination of uranium from the sediment samples needs to be carefully checked. We established an analytical method based on anion-exchange chromatography and SF-ICP-MS in this work. A uranium decontamination factor of 2 × 10(6) was achieved, and the U concentrations in the final sample solutions were typically below 4 pg mL(-1), thus no extra correction of (238)U interferences from the Pu spectra was needed. The method was suitable for the analysis of (241)Pu in marine sediments using large sample amounts (>10 g). We validated the method by measuring marine sediment reference materials and our results agreed well with the certified and the literature values. Surface sediments and one sediment core sample collected after the nuclear accident were analyzed. The characterization of (241)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in the surface sediments and the vertical distribution of Pu isotopes showed that there was no detectable Pu contamination from the nuclear accident in the marine sediments collected 30 km off the plant site. PMID:24328266

  14. Analysis of actinides in an ombrotrophic peat core - evidence of post-depositional migration of fallout radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Francesca; Hrnecek, Erich; Krachler, Michael; Shotyk, William; Steier, Peter; Winkler, Stephan R.

    2013-04-01

    Plutonium (239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu) and uranium (236U, 238U) isotopes were analyzed in an ombrotrophic peat core from the Black Forest, Germany, representing the last 80 years of atmospheric deposition. The reliable determination of these isotopes at ultra-trace levels was possible using ultra-clean laboratory procedures and accelerator mass spectrometry. The 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratios are constant along the core with a mean value of 0.19 ±0.02 (N = 32). This result is consistent with the acknowledged average 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratio from global fallout in the Northern Hemisphere. The global fallout origin of Pu is confirmed by the corresponding 241Pu/239Pu (0.0012 ±0.0005) and 242Pu/239Pu (0.004 ± 0.001) isotopic ratios. The identification of the Pu isotopic composition characteristic for global fallout in peat layers pre-dating the period of atmospheric atom bomb testing (AD 1956 - AD 1980) is a clear evidence of the migration of Pu downwards the peat profile. The maximum of global fallout derived 236U is detected in correspondence to the age/depth layer of maximum stratospheric fallout (AD 1963). This finding demonstrates that the 236U bomb peak can be successfully used as an independent chronological marker complementing the 210Pb dating of peat cores. The profiles of the global fallout derived 236U and 239Pu are compared with those of 137Cs and 241Am. As typical of ombrothrophic peat, the temporal fallout pattern of 137Cs is poorly retained. Similarly like for Pu, post-depositional migration of 241Am in peat layers preceding the era of atmospheric nuclear tests is observed.

  15. Experiments on the synthesis of superheavy nuclei 284Fl and 285Fl in the Pu,240239+48Ca reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utyonkov, V. K.; Brewer, N. T.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Itkis, M. G.; Miernik, K.; Polyakov, A. N.; Roberto, J. B.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shumeiko, M. V.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Voinov, A. A.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Sabel'nikov, A. V.; Vostokin, G. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Stoyer, M. A.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2015-09-01

    Irradiations of 239Pu and 240Pu targets with 48Ca beams aimed at the synthesis of Z =114 flerovium isotopes were performed at the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator. A new spontaneously fissioning (SF) isotope 284Fl was produced for the first time in the 240Pu+48Ca (250 MeV) and 239Pu+48Ca (245 MeV) reactions. The cross section of the 239Pu(48Ca,3 n )284Fl reaction channel was about 20 times lower than predicted by theoretical models and about 50 times lower than the maximum fusion-evaporation cross section for the 3 n and 4 n channels measured in the 244Pu+48Ca reaction. In the 240Pu+48Ca experiment, performed at 245 MeV in order to maximize the 3 n -evaporation channel, three decay chains of 285Fl were detected. The α -decay energy of 285Fl was measured for the first time and decay properties of its descendants 281Cn, 277Ds, 273Hs, 269Sg, and 265Rf were determined with higher accuracy. The assignment of SF events observed during the irradiation of the 240Pu target with a 250 MeV 48Ca beam to 284Fl decay is presented and discussed. The cross sections at both 48Ca energies are similar and exceed that observed in the reaction with the lighter isotope 239Pu by a factor of 10. The decay properties of the synthesized nuclei and their production cross sections indicate a rapid decrease of stability of superheavy nuclei as the neutron number decreases from the predicted magic neutron number N =184 .

  16. Experience with Intel's Many Integrated Core architecture in ATLAS software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, S.; Kama, S.; Lavrijsen, W.; Neumann, M.; Vitillo, R.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Intel recently released the first commercial boards of its Many Integrated Core (MIC) Architecture. MIC is Intel's solution for the domain of throughput computing, currently dominated by general purpose programming on graphics processors (GPGPU). MIC allows the use of the more familiar x86 programming model and supports standard technologies such as OpenMP, MPI, and Intel's Threading Building Blocks (TBB). This should make it possible to develop for both throughput and latency devices using a single code base. In ATLAS Software, track reconstruction has been shown to be a good candidate for throughput computing on GPGPU devices. In addition, the newly proposed offline parallel event-processing framework, GaudiHive, uses TBB for task scheduling. The MIC is thus, in principle, a good fit for this domain. In this paper, we report our experiences of porting to and optimizing ATLAS tracking algorithms for the MIC, comparing the programmability and relative cost/performance of the MIC against those of current GPGPUs and latency-optimized CPUs.

  17. Experiments pertaining to the formation and equilibration of planetary cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Knittle, Elise; Williams, Quentin

    1987-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO was experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock wave and diamond-cell techniques. Researchers discovered a metallic phase of FeO at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the Earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood. The high pressures necessry for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the Earth's accretion. The core forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions.

  18. Assessment of Core French: The New Brunswick Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Viviane

    1985-01-01

    The development of an oral language proficiency rating scale for use in evaluating New Brunswick's junior and senior high school students' core French program achievement is described and discussed. (MSE)

  19. Text and Truth: Reading, Student Experience, and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Susan; Hammond, Zaretta

    2012-01-01

    One of the rumors making the rounds of K-12 educators goes something like this: The Common Core State Standards do not allow "prereading"--the pedagogical practice meant to help students better understand a text they are about to read--or for that matter any classroom activities that contextualize a text through outside sources. The interesting…

  20. Determination of optimal coring values from psychophysical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyung Jun; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Allebach, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    The use of color electrophotographic (EP) laser printing systems is growing because of their declining cost. Thus, the print quality of color EP laser printers is more important than ever before. Since text and lines are indispensable to print quality, many studies have proposed methods for measuring these print quality attributes. Toner scatter caused by toner overdevelopment in color EP laser printers can significantly impact print quality. A conventional approach to reduce toner overdevelopment is to restrict the color gamut of printers. However, this can result in undesired color shifts and the introduction of halftone texture in light regions. Coring, defined as a process whereby the colorant level is reduced in the interior of text or characters, is a remedy for these shortcomings. The desired amount of reduction for coring depends on line width and overall nominal colorant level. In previous work, these amounts were chosen on the basis of data on the perception of edge blur that was published over 25 years ago.

  1. Students' Understanding of Analogy after a Core (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation) Learning Cycle, General Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avargil, Shirly; Bruce, Mitchell R. M.; Amar, Franc¸ois G.; Bruce, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    Students' understanding about analogy was investigated after a CORE learning cycle general chemistry experiment. CORE (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation) is a new three-phase learning cycle that involves (phase 1) guiding students through chemical observations while they consider a series of open-ended questions, (phase 2)…

  2. Combustion and Energy Transfer Experiments: A Laboratory Model for Linking Core Concepts across the Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreto, Jose C.; Dubetz, Terry A.; Schmidt, Diane L.; Isern, Sharon; Beatty, Thomas; Brown, David W.; Gillman, Edward; Alberte, Randall S.; Egiebor, Nosa O.

    2007-01-01

    Core concepts can be integrated throughout lower-division science and engineering courses by using a series of related, cross-referenced laboratory experiments. Starting with butane combustion in chemistry, the authors expanded the underlying core concepts of energy transfer into laboratories designed for biology, physics, and engineering. This…

  3. Applicability of BWR SFD experiments and codes for advanced core component designs

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1997-12-01

    Prior to the DF-4 boiling water reactor (BWR) severe fuel damage (SFD) experiment conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1986, no experimental database existed for guidance in modeling core component behavior under postulated severe accident conditions in commercial BWRs. This paper presents the lessons learned from the DF-4 experiment (and subsequent German CORA BWR SFD tests) and the impact on core on of SFD code.

  4. Core analysis in a low permeability sandstone reservoir: Results from the Multiwell Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, A.R.

    1989-04-01

    Over 4100 ft (1100 ft oriented) of Mesaverde core was taken during the drilling of the three Multiwell Experiment (MWX) wells, for study in a comprehensive core analysis program. This core traversed five separate depositional environments (shoreline/marine, coastal, paludal, fluvial, and paralic), and almost every major sand in the Mesaverde at the site was sampled. This paper summarizes MWX core analysis and describes the petrophysical properties at the MWX site; reservoir parameters, including permeabilities of naturally fractured core; and mechanical rock properties including stress-related measurements. Some correlations are made between reservoir properties and mineralogy/petrology data. Comparisons are made between the properties of lenticular and blanket sandstone morphologies existing at the site. This paper provides an overview of a complete core analysis in a low-permeability sandstone reservoir. 66 refs., 17 figs. , 9 tabs.

  5. Development of a drilling and coring test-bed for lunar subsurface exploration and preliminary experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaomeng; Deng, Zongquan; Quan, Qiquan; Tang, Dewei; Hou, Xuyan; Jiang, Shengyuan

    2014-07-01

    Drill sampling has been widely employed as an effective way to acquire deep samples in extraterrestrial exploration. A novel sampling method, namely, flexible-tube coring, was adopted for the Chang'e mission to acquire drilling cores without damaging stratification information. Since the extraterrestrial environment is uncertain and different from the terrestrial environment, automated drill sampling missions are at risk of failure. The principles of drilling and coring for the lunar subsurface should be fully tested and verified on earth before launch. This paper proposes a test-bed for conducting the aforementioned experiments on earth. The test-bed comprises a rotary-percussive drilling mechanism, penetrating mechanism, drilling medium container, and signal acquisition and control system. For granular soil, coring experiments indicate that the sampling method has a high coring rate greater than 80%. For hard rock, drilling experiments indicate that the percussive frequency greatly affects the drilling efficiency. A multi-layered simulant composed of granular soil and hard rock is built to test the adaptability of drilling and coring. To tackle complex drilling media, an intelligent drilling strategy based on online recognition is proposed to improve the adaptability of the sampling drill. The primary features of this research are the proposal of a scheme for drilling and coring a test-bed for validation on earth and the execution of drilling experiments in complex media.

  6. Language core values in a multicultural setting: An Australian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolicz, Jerzy J.

    1991-03-01

    While it has been agreed by the members of the European Community (except the UK) that all secondary students should study two EC languages in addition to their own, in Australia the recent emphasis has been on teaching languages for external trade, particularly in the Asian region. This policy over-looks the 13 per cent of the Australian population who already speak a language other than English at home (and a greater number who are second generation immigrants), and ignores the view that it is necessary to foster domestic multiculturalism in order to have fruitful links with other cultures abroad. During the 1980s there have been moves to reinforce the cultural identity of Australians of non-English speaking background, but these have sometimes been half-hearted and do not fully recognise that cultural core values, including language, have to achieve a certain critical mass in order to be sustainable. Without this recognition, semi-assimilation will continue to waste the potential cultural and economic contributions of many citizens, and to lead to frustration and eventual violence. The recent National Agenda for a Multicultural Australia addresses this concern.

  7. Tritium systems for the tokamak fusion core experiment, TFCX

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Tritium systems, tritium needs and possible tritium release scenarios were assessed for a TFCX class of device, 250 MW, 2 x 10/sup 5/ s of burn, with burn times from 20 s to 300 s. On-site and off-site, continuous and batch processing modes were considered. A reference case, batch processing was developed which fulfills the requirements for plasma physics experiments.

  8. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  9. Analyzing the thermionic reactor critical experiments. [thermal spectrum of uranium 235 core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederauer, G. F.

    1973-01-01

    The Thermionic Reactor Critical Experiments (TRCE) consisted of fast spectrum highly enriched U-235 cores reflected by different thicknesses of beryllium or beryllium oxide with a transition zone of stainless steel between the core and reflector. The mixed fast-thermal spectrum at the core reflector interface region poses a difficult neutron transport calculation. Calculations of TRCE using ENDF/B fast spectrum data and GATHER library thermal spectrum data agreed within about 1 percent for the multiplication factor and within 6 to 8 percent for the power peaks. Use of GAM library fast spectrum data yielded larger deviations. The results were obtained from DOT R Theta calculations with leakage cross sections, by region and by group, extracted from DOT RZ calculations. Delineation of the power peaks required extraordinarily fine mesh size at the core reflector interface.

  10. Chemical Convection in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Fe-Ni-S System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Wang, Y.; Jing, Z.; Li, Z.; Li, J.

    2012-12-01

    The thermal and chemical states of the lunar interior are directly related to the origin and evolution of the Moon. Recent seismic study suggested the lunar core is partially molten, consisting of a liquid outer shell and a solid inner sphere (Weber et al., 2011). The volume fraction of the lunar inner core is 38%, which is much higher than that for the Earth (~ 4%). This volume fraction can be used to establish the relation between the bulk composition of the lunar core and its temperature profile if the liquidi of relevant compositions at lunar inner core boundary (ICB) pressure (~ 5.1 GPa) are known. Moreover, knowledge on the extent of core solidification can be used to evaluate the role of compositional convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo (Stegman et al., 2003). We have conducted melting experiments at 5.1 GPa and 900-1600 °C for the Fe-rich portion of Fe-Ni-S system, using the multi-anvil apparatus and synchrotron and laboratory-based analytical methods. Our data show that in the iron-rich portion of the Fe-S binary system, the liquidus curve reflects nearly ideal mixing between iron and FeS end-members. In contrast, the liquidus curve of the Fe-Ni-S ternary contains two inflection points with a turning point at a sulfur content of 10 wt.%, resulting from a departure from ideal solution behavior. Given that the compositional buoyancy force scales with the slope of the liquidus curve at the ICB pressure and temperature, the contribution of compositional convection to sustain the early lunar dynamo can be estimated from our data: for a simplified model of Fe-S binary core, the role of chemical convection was probably negligible in the early history of the Moon and would have remained nearly constant since the inception of the inner core. The lunar core, however, likely contains nickel, the turning points in liquidus curve of the Fe-Ni-S ternary system may lead to dynamo initiation if the sulfur content of the bulk lunar core is less than 10 wt

  11. Analysis of the AP600 core makeup tank experiments using the NOTRUMP code

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.C.; Haberstroh, R.C.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Jaroszewicz, J.

    1995-12-31

    The AP600 design utilizes passive methods to perform core and containment cooling functions for a postulated loss of coolant. The core makeup tank (CMT) is an important feature of the AP600 passive safety system. The NOTRUMP code has been compared to the 300-series core makeup tank experiments. It has been observed that the code will capture the correct thermal-hydraulic behavior observed in the experiments. The correlations used for wall film condensation and convective heat transfer to the heated CMT liquid appear to be appropriate for these applications. The code will predict the rapid condensation and mixing thermal-hydraulic behavior observed in the 300-series tests. The NOTRUMP predictions can be noding-dependent since the condensation is extremely dependent on the amount of cold CMT liquid that mixes with the incoming steam flow.

  12. Composition of the core from gallium metal-silicate partitioning experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, I.; Badro, J.; Siebert, J.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2015-10-01

    Gallium concentration (normalized to CI chondrites) in the mantle is at the same level as that of lithophile elements with similar volatility, implying that there must be little to no gallium in Earth's core. Metal-silicate partitioning experiments, however, have shown that gallium is a moderately siderophile element and should be therefore depleted in the mantle by core formation. Moreover, gallium concentrations in the mantle (4 ppm) are too high to be only brought by the late veneer; and neither pressure, nor temperature, nor silicate composition has a large enough effect on gallium partitioning to make it lithophile. We therefore systematically investigated the effect of core composition (light element content) on the partitioning of gallium by carrying out metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a piston-cylinder press at 2 GPa between 1673 K and 2073 K. Four light elements (Si, O, S, C) were considered, and their effect was found to be sufficiently strong to make gallium lithophile. The partitioning of gallium was then modeled and parameterized as a function of pressure, temperature, redox and core composition. A continuous core formation model was used to track the evolution of gallium partitioning during core formation, for various magma ocean depths, geotherms, core light element contents, and magma ocean composition (redox) during accretion. The only model for which the final gallium concentration in the silicate Earth matched the observed value is the one involving a light-element rich core equilibrating in a FeO-rich deep magma ocean (>1300 km) with a final pressure of at least 50 GPa. More specifically, the incorporation of S and C in the core provided successful models only for concentrations that lie far beyond their allowable cosmochemical or geophysical limits, whereas realistic O and Si amounts (less than 5 wt.%) in the core provided successful models for magma oceans deeper that 1300 km. These results offer a strong argument for an O- and Si

  13. Secondary Social Studies Teachers' Experiences Implementing Common Core State Literacy Standards: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Krista Faith Huskey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the experiences of secondary social studies teachers who implemented Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in history/social studies, science and technical subjects in social studies courses requiring End of Course Tests at secondary schools in one suburban…

  14. Exploration of Children's Literature Core-Curriculum Alignment with Preservice Teacher Practicum Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research, completed through the implementation of a case study, was conducted to explore the benefits of children's literature core-curriculum alignment with preservice teacher practicum experience. The significance of the study was based on four foundation issues: personal reading attitude, addressing the value of using…

  15. Earth's Core Formation and Composition : New Constraints from Diamond Anvil Cell Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, J.; Badro, J.; Antonangeli, D.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    The pattern of siderophile (iron-loving) element abundance in the silicate portion of the Earth is a consequence of metal separation during core formation. Thermodynamic expressions used to constrain the metal-silicate partitioning behavior of siderophile elements are mainly established from large volume press experiments that do not cover the full range of potential P-T conditions for core-mantle equilibrium. The diamond anvil cell is the only static technique capable of achieving required P-T conditions but until now its capabilities to perform quantitative metal-silicate partitioning experiments at extreme conditions has been untapped. We use protocols that effectively link high P-T diamond anvil cell with analytical techniques such as focused ion beam device (FIB); NanoSIMS; electron microprobe; transmission electron microscopes; and in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements allow us to obtain quantitative data on element partitioning at superliquidus conditions above 30 GPa and 3000 K. Here we present our advances in both experimental and analytical methods. We look at the partitioning of 6 siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Cr, V, Mn, and Nb) that have been extensively studied at lower P-T conditions and constrain the solubility of light elements (Si and O) at these extreme conditions. We then update expressions that describe the partitioning behavior of these elements to address the validity of proposed core formation models (i.e. single-stage core formation model and continuous core formation model).

  16. Many-core applications to online track reconstruction in HEP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerio, S.; Bastieri, D.; Corvo, M.; Gianelle, A.; Ketchum, W.; Liu, T.; Lonardo, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Poprocki, S.; Rivera, R.; Tosoratto, L.; Vicini, P.; Wittich, P.

    2014-06-01

    Interest in parallel architectures applied to real time selections is growing in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. In this paper we describe performance measurements of Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) and Intel Many Integrated Core architecture (MIC) when applied to a typical HEP online task: the selection of events based on the trajectories of charged particles. We use as benchmark a scaled-up version of the algorithm used at CDF experiment at Tevatron for online track reconstruction - the SVT algorithm - as a realistic test-case for low-latency trigger systems using new computing architectures for LHC experiment. We examine the complexity/performance trade-off in porting existing serial algorithms to many-core devices. Measurements of both data processing and data transfer latency are shown, considering different I/O strategies to/from the parallel devices.

  17. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency–based Program on Residents’ Learning and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Background The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency–based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency–based program on residents’ learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. Methods The data from the 2007–2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents’ learning was measured using preceptors’ evaluations of residents’ skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents’ rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate’s Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. Results For residents’ learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents’ scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents’ training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. Conclusion The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience. PMID:27403213

  18. Patient Experience and Satisfaction with Inpatient Service: Development of Short Form Survey Instrument Measuring the Core Aspect of Inpatient Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Eliza L. Y.; Coulter, Angela; Hewitson, Paul; Cheung, Annie W. L.; Yam, Carrie H. K.; Lui, Siu fai; Tam, Wilson W. S.; Yeoh, Eng-kiong

    2015-01-01

    Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients’ perspective; therefore, patients’ experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients’ experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients’ perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients’ experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ) was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ). The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient’s journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients’ experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time. PMID:25860775

  19. Alternating current dielectrophoresis of core-shell nanoparticles: Experiments and comparison with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chungja

    Nanoparticles are fascinating where physical and optical properties are related to size. Highly controllable synthesis methods and nanoparticle assembly are essential for highly innovative technological applications. Well-defined shaped and sized nanoparticles enable comparisons between experiments, theory and subsequent new models to explain experimentally observed phenomena. Among nanoparticles, nonhomogeneous core-shell nanoparticles (CSnp) have new properties that arise when varying the relative dimensions of the core and the shell. This CSnp structure enables various optical resonances, and engineered energy barriers, in addition to the high charge to surface ratio. Assembly of homogeneous nanoparticles into functional structures has become ubiquitous in biosensors (i.e. optical labeling), nanocoatings, and electrical circuits. Limited nonhomogenous nanoparticle assembly has only been explored. Many conventional nanoparticle assembly methods exist, but this work explores dielectrophoresis (DEP) as a new method. DEP is particle polarization via non-uniform electric fields while suspended in conductive fluids. Most prior DEP efforts involve microscale particles. Prior work on core-shell nanoparticle assemblies and separately, nanoparticle characterizations with dielectrophoresis and electrorotation, did not systematically explore particle size, dielectric properties (permittivity and electrical conductivity), shell thickness, particle concentration, medium conductivity, and frequency. This work is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to systematically examine these dielectrophoretic properties for core-shell nanoparticles. Further, we conduct a parametric fitting to traditional core-shell models. These biocompatible core-shell nanoparticles were studied to fill a knowledge gap in the DEP field. Experimental results (chapter 5) first examine medium conductivity, size and shell material dependencies of dielectrophoretic behaviors of spherical CSnp into 2D and

  20. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  1. Compression After Impact on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels With Thin Facesheets. Part 1; Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2012-01-01

    A two part research study has been completed on the topic of compression after impact (CAI) of thin facesheet honeycomb core sandwich panels. The research has focused on both experiments and analysis in an effort to establish and validate a new understanding of the damage tolerance of these materials. Part one, the subject of the current paper, is focused on the experimental testing. Of interest are sandwich panels, with aerospace applications, which consist of very thin, woven S2-fiberglass (with MTM45-1 epoxy) facesheets adhered to a Nomex honeycomb core. Two sets of specimens, which were identical with the exception of the density of the honeycomb core, were tested. Static indentation and low velocity impact using a drop tower are used to study damage formation in these materials. A series of highly instrumented CAI tests was then completed. New techniques used to observe CAI response and failure include high speed video photography, as well as digital image correlation (DIC) for full-field deformation measurement. Two CAI failure modes, indentation propagation, and crack propagation, were observed. From the results, it can be concluded that the CAI failure mode of these panels depends solely on the honeycomb core density.

  2. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a

  3. Investigations on the Melt Gate Ablation by Ex-Vessel Core Melts in the KAPOOL Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Eppinger, Beatrix; Schmidt-Stiefel, Sike; Tromm, Walter

    2002-07-01

    In future Light Water Reactors (LWR) containment failure should be prevented even for very unlikely core meltdown sequences with reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure. In the case of such a postulated core meltdown accident in a future LWR the ex-vessel melt shall be retained and cooled in a special compartment inside the containment to exclude significant radioactive release to the environment. In such a case, a gate has to be designed to allow the melt release from the reactor cavity into the compartment. A series of transient experiments has been performed to investigate the melt gate ablation using iron and alumina melts as a simulant for the corium melt. The results of the KAPOOL tests are analyzed with the HEATING5 code in order to evaluate realistic cases of internally heated corium melts and melt gates with the same theoretical tool. (authors)

  4. Development of Yangbajing air shower core detector for a new EAS hybrid experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-Sheng; Huang, Jing; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Ying; Zhai, Liu-Ming; Chen, Xu; Hu, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Feng, Cun-Feng; Jia, Huan-Yu; Zhou, Xun-Xiu; Danzengluobu; Chen, Tian-Lu; Li, Hai-Jin; Liu, Mao-Yuan; Yuan, Ai-Fang

    2015-08-01

    Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition in the “knee” energy region, we have been developing a new type of air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522° E, 30.102° N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m2) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water Cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thickness and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to 106 MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named “YAC- I”, consists of 16 YAC detectors each with a size of 40 cm×50 cm and distributed in a grid with an effective area of 10 m2. YAC- I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment, called “YAC- II”, consists of 124 YAC detectors with coverage of about 500 m2. The inner 100 detectors of 80 cm×50 cm each are deployed in a 10×10 matrix with a 1.9 m separation; the outer 24 detectors of 100 cm×50 cm each are distributed around these to reject non-core events whose shower cores are far from the YAC- II array. YAC- II is used to study the primary cosmic-ray composition, in particular, to obtain the energy spectra of protons, helium and iron nuclei between 5×1013 eV and 1016 eV, covering the “knee” and also connected with direct observations at energies around 100 TeV. We present the design and performance of YAC- II in this paper. Supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11078002, 11275212, 11165013), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (H9291450S3, Y4293211S5) and the Knowledge Innovation Fund of Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), China (H95451D0U2, H8515530U1)

  5. The GUINEVERE experiment: First PNS measurements in a lead moderated sub-critical fast core

    SciTech Connect

    Thyebault, H. E.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Lehaut, G.; Marie, N.; Ban, G.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) experimental program is dedicated to the study of Accelerator Driven System reactivity monitoring. It was partly carried out within the EUROTRANS integrated project (EURATOM FP6). GUINEVERE consists in coupling the fast core of the VENUS-F reactor (SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)), composed of enriched uranium and solid lead, with a T(d,n) neutron source provided by the GENEPI-3C deuteron accelerator. This neutron source can be operated in several modes: pulsed mode, continuous mode and also continuous mode with short beam interruptions (the so called 'beam trips'). In the past, the key questions of the reactivity control and monitoring in a subcritical system were studied in the MUSE experiments (1998-2004). These experiments highlighted the difficulty to determine precisely the reactivity with a single technique. This led to investigate a new strategy which is based on the combination of the relative reactivity monitoring via the core power to beam current relationship with absolute reactivity cross-checks during programmed beam interruptions. Consequently, to determine the reactivity, several dynamical techniques of reactivity determination have to be compared. In addition, their accuracy for absolute reactivity determination must be evaluated using a reference reactivity determination technique (from a critical state: rod drop and MSM measurements). The first sub-critical configuration which was studied was around k{sub eff} = 0.96 (SCI). Pulsed Neutron Source experiments (PNS) were carried out. The neutron population decrease was measured using fission chambers in different locations inside the core and the reflector. Neutron population time decrease was analyzed using fitting techniques and the Area Method Results obtained for the SCI reactivity will be shown, discussed and compared to the reference value given by the MSM method. (authors)

  6. Core-centering of compound drops in capillary oscillations: Observations on USML-1 experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G.; Anikumar, A. V.; Lee, C. P.; Lin, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    AA Using the existing inviscid theories, an attempt is made to explain the centering of the oscillating liquid shell. Experiments on liquid shells and liquid-core compound drops were conducted using acoustic levitation, in a low-gravity environment during a Space Shuttle flight. It was observed that their inner and outer interfaces became concentric when excited into capillary oscillations. Using the existing inviscid theories, and attempt is made to explain the centering of the oscillating liquid shell. It is concluded that viscosity needs to be considered in order to provide a realistic description of the centering process.

  7. Compression After Impact Experiments and Analysis on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels with Thin Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of the effect of impact damage on composite structures is necessary to give the engineer an ability to design safe, efficient structures. Current composite structures suffer severe strength reduction under compressive loading conditions, due to even light damage, such as from low velocity impact. A review is undertaken to access the current state-of-development in the areas of experimental testing, and analysis methods. A set of experiments on honeycomb core sandwich panels, with thin woven fiberglass cloth facesheets, is described, which includes detailed instrumentation and unique observation techniques.

  8. Long-term reactive transport modelling of Berea and chalk core flood experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, A. V.; Godoy, J.; Tonietto, G.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon sequestration in geological structures establishes a long-term chemical system between the dissolved gas, fluids and rocks from the injection site. Thus, the time scale used to assess the progress of chemical reactions is normally between tens and hundreds of years. Geochemical modeling is used in a variety of fields, including environmental protection and remediation, the petroleum industry, and economic geology and it is one of the best alternatives to evaluate the reactions with geochemical data possible injection sites. In this work we used data presented in a recent article (SPE165500) in different scenarios injection with three scales 50, 100, 250 and 1000 years. The experimental data used were from core flood experiment Berea and chalk in a condition similar to those found in the reservoirs of the North Sea. (340 bar and 130 C). The approach used to the lack of appropriate kinetic parameter in reservoir conditions, was the use of experimental data collected in two different conditions (340 bar and 130 C) and (2 Bar at room temperature) after the rocky core. The numerical simulations carried out using the same conditions with two different geochemical softwares PHREEQC and TOUGHREACTS. The results provide a detailed understanding of the system resulting rock-fluid-CO2 in the medium and long term. However, the accuracy of the models is strongly dependent on the mineral primary and secondary cores found in rocks.

  9. Sequential Development of Interfering Metamorphic Core Complexes: Numerical Experiments and Comparison to the Cyclades, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirel, C.; Gautier, P.; van Hinsbergen, D.; Wortel, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Cycladic extensional province (Greece) contains classical examples of metamorphic core complexes (MCCs), where exhumation was accommodated along multiple interfering and/or sequentially developed syn- and antithetic extensional detachment zones. Previous studies on the development of MCCs did not take into account the possible interference between multiple and closely spaced MCCs. In the present study, we have performed new lithosphere-scale experiments in which the deformation is not a priori localized so as to explore the conditions of the development of several MCCs in a direction parallel to extension. In a narrow range of conditions, MCCs are closely spaced, interfere with each other, and develop in sequence. From a comparison between numerical results and geological observations, we find that the Cyclades metamorphic core complexes are in good agreement with the model in terms of Moho geometry and depth, kinematic and structural history, timing and duration of core complex formation and metamorphic history. We infer that, for Cycladic MCC-type to develop, an initial crustal thickness prior to the onset of post-orogenic extension between 40 and 44 km, a boundary velocity close to 2 cm/yr and an initial thermal lithospheric thickness of about 60 km are required. The latter may be explained by a significant heating due to delamination of subducting continental crust or vigorous small-scale thermal convection.

  10. EXPERIENCE WITH FPGA-BASED PROCESSOR CORE AS FRONT-END COMPUTER.

    SciTech Connect

    HOFF, L.T.

    2005-10-10

    The RHIC control system architecture follows the familiar ''standard model''. LINUX workstations are used as operator consoles. Front-end computers are distributed around the accelerator, close to equipment being controlled or monitored. These computers are generally based on VMEbus CPU modules running the VxWorks operating system. I/O is typically performed via the VMEbus, or via PMC daughter cards (via an internal PCI bus), or via on-board I/O interfaces (Ethernet or serial). Advances in FPGA size and sophistication now permit running virtual processor ''cores'' within the FPGA logic, including ''cores'' with advanced features such as memory management. Such systems offer certain advantages over traditional VMEbus Front-end computers. Advantages include tighter coupling with FPGA logic, and therefore higher I/O bandwidth, and flexibility in packaging, possibly resulting in a lower noise environment and/or lower cost. This paper presents the experience acquired while porting the RHIC control system to a PowerPC 405 core within a Xilinx FPGA for use in low-level RF control.

  11. Earth's core-mantle boundary - Results of experiments at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments document that liquid iron reacts chemically with silicates at high pressures (above 2.4 x 10 to the 10th Pa) and temperatures. In particular, (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite, the most abundant mineral of earth's lower mantle, is expected to react with liquid iron to produce metallic alloys (FeO and FeSi) and nonmetallic silicates (SiO2 stishovite and MgSiO3 perovskite) at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary, 14 x 10 to the 10th Pa. The experimental observations, in conjunction with seismological data, suggest that the lowermost 200 to 300 km of earth's mantle, the D-double-prime layer, may be an extremely heterogeneous region as a result of chemical reactions between the silicate mantle and the liquid iron alloy of earth's core. The combined thermal-chemical-electrical boundary layer resulting from such reactions offers a plausible explanation for the complex behavior of seismic waves near the core-mantle boundary and could influence earth's magnetic field observed at the surface.

  12. Results of the in-pile degraded core coolability experiments: DCC-1 and DDC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Boldt, K.R.; Kuenstler, P.A. Jr.; Schmidt, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of DCC-1 and DCC-2, the first Degraded Core Coolability experiments in the USNRC's Severe Fuel Damage Program, are presented. The experiments evaluated the coolability of a fission-heated UO/sub 2/ debris bed in a water bath with pressure variable from 1 to 170 atmospheres. The 0.5-meter deep bed consisted of small-sized particulate with an average diameter of 0.4 mm for DCC-1 and large-sized particulate with an average diameter of 1.8 mm for DCC-2. DCC-1 evaluated deep bed behavior in the laminar coolability regime while DDC-2 examined coolability in the transition and turbulent flow regimes. The main results presented are the dryout heat flux dependence on pressure and the rate and method of quench of dry debris.

  13. ORR core re-configuration measurements to increase the fast neutron flux in the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, R. W.; Stinnett, R. M.; Sims, T. M.

    1985-06-01

    The relative increases obtainable in the fast neutron flux in the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) experiment positions were studied by reconfiguring the current ORR core. The percentage increase possible in the current displacement per atom (dpa) rate was examined. The principle methods to increase the fast flux, consisted of reducing the current core size (number of fuel elements), to increase the core average power density and arrangement of the fuel elements in the reduced-size core to tilt the core power distribution towards the MFE positions were investigated. It is concluded that fast fluxes in the E-3 core position can be increased by approximately 15 to 20% over current values and in E-5 by approximately 45 to 55%.

  14. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, P J; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ambulatory care program and the kinds of teaching skills required of tutors. RESULTS: All of the directors responded. Fifteen stated that the ambulatory care program is mandatory, and the other stated that it is an elective. Block rotations are more common than continuity-of-care assignments. In 12 of the programs 10% or less of the overall training time is spent in ambulatory care. In 11 the faculty tutors comprise a mixture of generalists and subspecialists. The tutors simultaneously care for patients and teach residents in the ambulatory care setting in 14 of the schools. Most are paid through fee-for-service billing. The respondents felt that the ideal program should contain a mix of general and subspecialty ambulatory care training. There was no consensus on whether it should be a block or continuity-of-care experience, but the directors felt that consultation and communication skills should be emphasized regardless of which type of experience prevails. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a widespread commitment to provide core internal medicine residents with experience in ambulatory care, there is little uniformity in how this is achieved in Canadian training programs. PMID:8324688

  15. Plutonium, cesium and uranium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, H. J.; Trier, R. M.; Olsen, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co are found in nearly al sediment samples containing appreciable /sup 137/Cs between 15 km upstream of Indian Point and the downstream extent of our sampling about 70 km south of the reactor. Fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu reaching the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the systems by particle deposition, while 70 to 90% of the /sup 137/Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported to the coastal waters in solution. Activity levels of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in New York harbor sediments indicate a significant source in addition to suspended particles carried down the Hudson. The most likely cause appears to be transport into the estuary of particles from offshore waters having higher specific activities of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu. Measurements of fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion may indeed be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility.

  16. Programming for 1.6 Millon cores: Early experiences with IBM's BG/Q SMP architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosli, James

    2013-03-01

    With the stall in clock cycle improvements a decade ago, the drive for computational performance has continues along a path of increasing core counts on a processor. The multi-core evolution has been expressed in both a symmetric multi processor (SMP) architecture and cpu/GPU architecture. Debates rage in the high performance computing (HPC) community which architecture best serves HPC. In this talk I will not attempt to resolve that debate but perhaps fuel it. I will discuss the experience of exploiting Sequoia, a 98304 node IBM Blue Gene/Q SMP at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The advantages and challenges of leveraging the computational power BG/Q will be detailed through the discussion of two applications. The first application is a Molecular Dynamics code called ddcMD. This is a code developed over the last decade at LLNL and ported to BG/Q. The second application is a cardiac modeling code called Cardioid. This is a code that was recently designed and developed at LLNL to exploit the fine scale parallelism of BG/Q's SMP architecture. Through the lenses of these efforts I'll illustrate the need to rethink how we express and implement our computational approaches. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Partitioning of potassium between silicates and sulphide melts: Experiements relevant to the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The partitioning of potassium between roedderite, K2Mg5Si12O30 and an Fe-FeS melt was investigaged at temperatures about 40 C above the Fe-FeS eutectic. Roedderite was considered a prime candidate for one of the potassium-bearing phases in the primitive earth because roedderite and merrihueite are the only two silicates containing essential potassium which have been identified in stony meteorites. A mean K2S/FeS weight ratio of (3.340 + or - 0.015) x 0.001 was determined in these experiments; a K2S/FeS weight ratio of about 0.01 would be sufficient to extract all potassium in a chondritic earth into the core. Application of these results to a primitive chondritic earth is discussed and it is concluded that extraction of most of the earth's potassium into the Fe-FeS core would occur under the conditions in the early earth.

  18. Earliest step of core-mantle separation: Shock melting experiment of chondrite-like materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiichi, T.; Tsumagari, Y.; Nishio, M.; Sekine, T.

    2009-12-01

    formed even in shortest runs (Fig.1b, 1600C 10 sec). Based on these experiments, we conclude that size of the metal grains formed in each shock melting process in planet building stage depends on the connectivity of Fe-metal phase in the source materials. Pallasite (stony-iron meteorite) may represent the product of local melt pockets formed after impacts, the earliest form of core-mantle separation in planet building stage.

  19. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment: design studies based on superconducting and hybrid toroidal field coils. Design overview

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1984-10-01

    This document is a design overview that describes the scoping studies and preconceptual design effort performed in FY 1983 on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) class of device. These studies focussed on devices with all-superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and on devices with superconducting TF coils supplemented with copper TF coil inserts located in the bore of the TF coils in the shield region. Each class of device is designed to satisfy the mission of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn. Typical design parameters are: major radius = 3.75 m, minor radius = 1.0 m, field on axis = 4.5 T, plasma current = 7.0 MA. These designs relay on lower hybrid (LHRH) current rampup and heating to ignition using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF). A pumped limiter has been assumed for impurity control. The present document is a design overview; a more detailed design description is contained in a companion document.

  20. Flowing gas, non-nuclear experiments on the gas core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Cooper, C. G.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Variations in cavity wall and injection configurations of the gas core reactor were aimed at establishing flow patterns that give a maximum of the nuclear criticality eigenvalue. Correlation with the nuclear effect was made using multigroup diffusion theory normalized by previous benchmark critical experiments. Air was used to simulate the hydrogen propellant in the flow tests, and smoked air, argon, or Freon to simulate the central nuclear fuel gas. Tests were run both in the down-firing and upfiring directions. Results showed that acceptable flow patterns with volume fraction for the simulated nuclear fuel gas and high flow rate ratios of propellant to fuel can be obtained. Using a point injector for the fuel, good flow patterns are obtained by directing the outer gas at high velocity long the cavity wall, using louvered injection schemes. Recirculation patterns were needed to stabilize the heavy central gas when different gases are used.

  1. Implications for Core Formation of the Earth from High Pressure-Temperature Au Partitioning Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Sharp, T. G.; Hervig, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    Siderophile elements in the Earth.s mantle are depleted relative to chondrites. This is most pronounced for the highly siderophile elements (HSEs), which are approximately 400x lower than chondrites. Also remarkable is the relative chondritic abundances of the HSEs. This signature has been interpreted as representing their sequestration into an iron-rich core during the separation of metal from silicate liquids early in the Earth's history, followed by a late addition of chondritic material. Alternative efforts to explain this trace element signature have centered on element partitioning experiments at varying pressures, temperatures, and compositions (P-T-X). However, first results from experiments conducted at 1 bar did not match the observed mantle abundances, which motivated the model described above, a "late veneer" of chondritic material deposited on the earth and mixed into the upper mantle. Alternatively, the mantle trace element signature could be the result of equilibrium partitioning between metal and silicate in the deep mantle, under P-T-X conditions which are not yet completely identified. An earlier model determined that equilibrium between metal and silicate liquids could occur at a depth of approximately 700 km, 27(plus or minus 6) GPa and approximately 2000 (plus or minus 200) C, based on an extrapolation of partitioning data for a variety of moderately siderophile elements obtained at lower pressures and temperatures. Based on Ni-Co partitioning, the magma ocean may have been as deep as 1450 km. At present, only a small range of possible P-T-X trace element partitioning conditions has been explored, necessitating large extrapolations from experimental to mantle conditions for tests of equilibrium models. Our primary objective was to reduce or remove the additional uncertainty introduced by extrapolation by testing the equilibrium core formation hypothesis at P-T-X conditions appropriate to the mantle.

  2. Experience of Delphi technique in the process of establishing consensus on core competencies

    PubMed Central

    Raghav, Pankaja Ravi; Kumar, Dewesh; Bhardwaj, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine (CMFM) has been started as a new model for imparting the components of family medicine and delivering health-care services at primary and secondary levels in all six newly established All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), but there is no competency-based curriculum for it. The paper aims to share the experience of Delphi method in the process of developing consensus on core competencies of the new model of CMFM in AIIMS for undergraduate medical students in India. Methods: The study adopted different approaches and methods, but Delphi was the most critical method used in this research. In Delphi, the experts were contacted by e-mail and their feedback on the same was analyzed. Results: Two rounds of Delphi were conducted in which 150 participants were contacted in Delphi-I but only 46 responded. In Delphi-II, 26 participants responded whose responses were finally considered for analysis. Three of the core competencies namely clinician, primary-care physician, and professionalism were agreed by all the participants, and the least agreement was observed in the competencies of epidemiologist and medical teacher. The experts having more experience were less consistent as responses were changed from agree to disagree in more than 15% of participants and 6% changed from disagree to agree. Conclusion: Within the given constraints, the final list of competencies and skills for the discipline of CMFM compiled after the Delphi process will provide a useful insight into the development of competency-based curriculum of the subject. PMID:27563586

  3. Chemical Convention in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Ironsulfur System

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2012-03-26

    By reanalyzing Apollo lunar seismograms using array-processing methods, a recent study suggests that the Moon has a solid inner core and a fluid outer core, much like the Earth. The volume fraction of the lunar inner core is 38%, compared with 4% for the Earth. The pressure at the Moon's core-mantle boundary is 4.8 GPa, and that at the ICB is 5.2 GPa. The partially molten state of the lunar core provides constraints on the thermal and chemical states of the Moon: The temperature at the inner core boundary (ICB) corresponds to the liquidus of the outer core composition, and the mass fraction of the solid core allows us to infer the bulk composition of the core from an estimated thermal profile. Moreover, knowledge on the extent of core solidification can be used to evaluate the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo. Sulfur is considered an antifreeze component in the lunar core. Here we investigate the melting behavior of the Fe-S system at the pressure conditions of the lunar core, using the multi-anvil apparatus and synchrotron and laboratory-based analytical methods. Our goal is to understand compositionally driven convection in the lunar core and assess its role in generating an internal magnetic field in the early history of the Moon.

  4. Experiences modeling ocean circulation problems on a 30 node commodity cluster with 3840 GPU processor cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.

    2008-12-01

    Low cost graphic cards today use many, relatively simple, compute cores to deliver support for memory bandwidth of more than 100GB/s and theoretical floating point performance of more than 500 GFlop/s. Right now this performance is, however, only accessible to highly parallel algorithm implementations that, (i) can use a hundred or more, 32-bit floating point, concurrently executing cores, (ii) can work with graphics memory that resides on the graphics card side of the graphics bus and (iii) can be partially expressed in a language that can be compiled by a graphics programming tool. In this talk we describe our experiences implementing a complete, but relatively simple, time dependent shallow-water equations simulation targeting a cluster of 30 computers each hosting one graphics card. The implementation takes into account the considerations (i), (ii) and (iii) listed previously. We code our algorithm as a series of numerical kernels. Each kernel is designed to be executed by multiple threads of a single process. Kernels are passed memory blocks to compute over which can be persistent blocks of memory on a graphics card. Each kernel is individually implemented using the NVidia CUDA language but driven from a higher level supervisory code that is almost identical to a standard model driver. The supervisory code controls the overall simulation timestepping, but is written to minimize data transfer between main memory and graphics memory (a massive performance bottle-neck on current systems). Using the recipe outlined we can boost the performance of our cluster by nearly an order of magnitude, relative to the same algorithm executing only on the cluster CPU's. Achieving this performance boost requires that many threads are available to each graphics processor for execution within each numerical kernel and that the simulations working set of data can fit into the graphics card memory. As we describe, this puts interesting upper and lower bounds on the problem sizes

  5. Burn Survivors' Experience of Core Outcomes during Return to Life: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Lotfi, Mojgan; Salehi, Feridoon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Burn is one of the main and common health problems that face the victims with significant challenges in their lives. The main purpose of caring and rehabilitating these people is returning them to their previous life situation. Thus, the present study was conducted with the purpose of determining the experience of burn survivors with regard to returning to life in order to be able to obtain new concepts of acceptable implications in the present cultural and religious context. Methods: The present study is a qualitative study that was conducted using qualitative content analysis and in-depth unstructured interviews with 15 burn survivors in 2012 and 2013 in Tabriz. Results: During the process of qualitative analysis, the content of the category "balance", as the core essence of the experience of participants, was extracted according to three sub-categories: a- the physical integration (physiological stability, saving the affected limb), b-connecting to the life stream (self-care, getting accustomed, normalization), and c- return to the existence (sense of inner satisfaction and excellence). Conclusion: The results of this study confirmed the physical, psychological and social scales introduced by other studies. Also proposed the concept "return to the existence", that can be measured by the emergence of a sense of inner satisfaction and excellence in the individual, as one of the key and determinant scales in returning the victims of burn to life. PMID:25717453

  6. Interpretation of experimental results from the CORA core melt progression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hohorst, J.K.; Allison, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from the CORA bundle heatup and melting experiments, performed at Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany, are being analyzed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The analysis is being performed as part of a systematic review of core melt progression experiments for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission to (a) develop an improved understanding of important phenomena occurring during a severe accident, (b) to validate existing severe accident models, and (c) where necessary, develop improved models. An assessment of the variations in damage progression behavior because of variations in test parameters (a) bundle design and size, (b) system pressure, (c) slow cooling of the damaged bundles in argon versus rapid quenching in water, and (d) bundle inlet temperatures and flow rates is provided in the paper. The influence of uncertainties in important test conditions is also discussed. Specific results presented include (a) bundle temperature, (b) the onset and movement of the oxidation front within the bundle, (c) fuel rod ballooning and rod failure, and (d) melt relocation and associated material interactions between bundle components and structures. 12 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The SCORPIO core surveillance system - operational experience and new methods development

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, T.; Berg, O.; Hval, S.

    1995-12-31

    The main motivation behind the development of SCORPIO is to make a practical tool for reactor operators that can increase the quality and quantity of information presented on core status and dynamic behavior. This can first of all improve plant safety because undesired core conditions are detected and prevented. Second, a more flexible and efficient operation of the plant is made possible. The improvement in surveillance is obtained partly by better surveillance of core instrumentation and by running detailed core simulators on-line. The complete system has two parallel modes of operation: the Core Follow Mode and the Predictive Mode.

  8. Subsurface Organics in Aseptic Cores From the MARTE Robotic Drilling Experiment: Ground truth and Contamination Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Stoker, C. R.

    2006-12-01

    The subsurface is the key environment for searching for life on planets lacking surface life. This includes the search for past/present life on Mars where possible subsurface life could exist [1]. The Mars-Analog-Rio-Tinto-Experiment (MARTE) performed a simulation of a Mars robotic drilling at the RT Borehole#7 Site ~6.07m, atop a massive-pyrite deposit from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. The RT site is considered an important analog of Sinus Meridiani on Mars, an ideal model analog for a subsurface Martian setting [2], and a relevant example of deep subsurface microbial community including aerobic and anaerobic chemoautotrophs [4-5]. Searching for microbes or bulk organics of biological origin in a subsurface sample from a planet is a key scientific objective of Robotic drilling missions. During the 2005 Field experiment 28 minicores were robotically handled and subsampled for life detection experiments under anti-contamination protocols. Ground truth included visual observation of cores and lab based Elemental and Isotope Ratios Mass Spectrometry analysis (EA-IRMS) of bulk organics in Hematite and Gohetite-rich gossanized tuffs, gossan and clay layers within 0-6m-depth. C-org and N-tot vary up to four orders of magnitude among the litter (~11Wt%, 0-1cm) and the mineralized (~3Wt%, 1-3cm) layers, and the first 6 m-depth (C-org=0.02-0.38Wt%). Overall, the distribution/ preservation of plant and soil-derived organics (d13C-org = 26 per mil to 24 per mil) is ten times higher (C-org=0.33Wt%) that in hematite-poor clays, or where rootlets are present, than in hematite- rich samples (C-org=<0.01Wt%). This is consistent with ATP assay (Lightning-MVP, Biocontrol) for total biomass in subsurface (Borehole#7 ~6.07m, ~avg. 153RLU) vs. surface soil samples (~1,500-81,449RLU) [5]. However, the in-situ ATP assay failed in detecting presence of roots during the in-situ life detection experiment. Furthermore, cm-sized roots were overlooked during remote observations. Finally, ATP

  9. Methodology of full-core Monte Carlo calculations with leakage parameter evaluations for benchmark critical experiment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sboev, A. G.; Ilyashenko, A. S.; Vetrova, O. A.

    1997-02-01

    The method of bucking evaluation, realized in the MOnte Carlo code MCS, is described. This method was applied for calculational analysis of well known light water experiments TRX-1 and TRX-2. The analysis of this comparison shows, that there is no coincidence between Monte Carlo calculations, obtained by different ways: the MCS calculations with given experimental bucklings; the MCS calculations with given bucklings evaluated on base of full core MCS direct simulations; the full core MCNP and MCS direct simulations; the MCNP and MCS calculations, where the results of cell calculations are corrected by the coefficients taking into the account the leakage from the core. Also the buckling values evaluated by full core MCS calculations have differed from experimental ones, especially in the case of TRX-1, when this difference has corresponded to 0.5 percent increase of Keff value.

  10. Calculations of ADS with deep subcritical uranium active cores - comparison with experiments and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivkov, P.; Furman, W.; Stoyanov, Ch

    2014-09-01

    The main characteristics of the neutron field formed within the massive (512 kg) natural uranium target assembly (TA) QUINTA irradiated by deuteron beam of JINR Nuclotron with energies 1,2,4, and 8 GeV as well as the spatial distributions and the integral numbers of (n,f), (n,γ) and (n,xn)- reactions were calculated and compared with experimental data [1] . The MCNPX 27e code with ISABEL/ABLA/FLUKA and INCL4/ABLA models of intra-nuclear cascade (INC) and experimental cross-sections of the corresponding reactions were used. Special attention was paid to the elucidation of the role of charged particles (protons and pions) in the fission of natural uranium of TA QUINTA. Extensive calculations have been done for quasi-infinite (with very small neutron leakage) depleted uranium TA BURAN having mass about 20 t which are intended to be used in experiments at Nuclotron in 2014-2016. As in the case of TA QUINTA which really models the central zone of TA BURAN the total numbers of fissions, produced 239Pu nuclei and total neutron multiplicities are predicted to be proportional to proton or deuteron energy up to 12 GeV. But obtained values of beam power gain are practically constant in studied incident energy range and are approximately four. These values are in contradiction with the experimental result [2] obtained for the depleted uranium core weighting three tons at incident proton energy 0.66 GeV.

  11. High-performance TF coil design for the Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strivastava, V. C.

    1984-09-01

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (RFCX) is a proposed concept for an ignited, long-pulse, current-driven Tokamak device. The TF coil winding cross section in the inboard region is impacted by peak field 10 T, winding current density approx. 3500 A/cm(2), and peak nuclear heating rates 50 mW/cc. The winding utilizes a Nb3Sn internally cooled cable superconductor (ICCS), which is a modified version of the conductor used in the Westinghouse LCP coil. These modifications include the increase of void fraction from 32% to 41% of the cable space for withstanding higher nuclear heating rates and a thicker conduit wall to carry larger magnetic loads. The critical current of an Nb3Sn conductor is strongly dependent on strain in the superconducting strands. The strain in strands is lower when the windings are: (1) wound and then reacted (W/R), as compared to (2) reacted and then wound (R/W). The impact of these approaches on winding performance is discussed. The windings are pancake wound and cooled with supercritical helium. The LHe inlet (approx. 4 K) and outlet (approx. 5.5 K) connections are located on the sides of the TF coils. The conductor design, the winding design, and performance analysis are described.

  12. Transitioning to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: A Mixed Methods Study of Elementary Teachers' Experiences and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swars, Susan Lee; Chestnutt, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored elementary teachers' (n = 73) experiences with and perspectives on the recently implemented Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-Mathematics) at a high-needs, urban school. Analysis of the survey, questionnaire, and interview data reveals the findings cluster around: familiarity with and preparation…

  13. The "Bain Linguistique": A Core French Experiment at Churchill Alternative School, 1993-94. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesche, Marjorie; MacFarlane, Alina; Peters, Martine

    This report describes an experimental intensive core French program for grades 5 and 6 at Churchill Alternative School in Ottawa (Canada). The aim was to improve the oral French skills of core French students by providing a period of intensive exposure to French and by increasing the total number of hours in French during one program year from 120…

  14. Chemical Convection in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Iron-Sulfur System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental results on the liquidus curve of the Fe-S system at the pressures of the lunar core provide constraints on the Moon’s thermal and chemical states and the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo.

  15. Experiments on Lunar Core Composition: Phase Equilibrium Analysis of A Multi-Element (Fe-Ni-S-C) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, B. M.; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.

    2015-01-01

    Previous geochemical and geophysical experiments have proposed the presence of a small, metallic lunar core, but its composition is still being investigated. Knowledge of core composition can have a significant effect on understanding the thermal history of the Moon, the conditions surrounding the liquid-solid or liquid-liquid field, and siderophile element partitioning between mantle and core. However, experiments on complex bulk core compositions are very limited. One limitation comes from numerous studies that have only considered two or three element systems such as Fe-S or Fe-C, which do not supply a comprehensive understanding for complex systems such as Fe-Ni-S-Si-C. Recent geophysical data suggests the presence of up to 6% lighter elements. Reassessments of Apollo seismological analyses and samples have also shown the need to acquire more data for a broader range of pressures, temperatures, and compositions. This study considers a complex multi-element system (Fe-Ni-S-C) for a relevant pressure and temperature range to the Moon's core conditions.

  16. Independent analysis of selected core-concrete interaction and fission product release experiments with CORCON-MOD2 and VANESA

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Sanborn, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The discrepancies between experimental findings and the Reactor Safety Study predictions, as well as the rapidly developing data base enabling phenomenological modeling of core-concrete interactions and ex-vessel fission product release, have prompted the development of several new computer models of core-concrete interactions and fission product release during severe accidents. Two such models are the CORCON-MOD2 model of core-concrete interactions and the VANESA model of ex-vessel aerosol and fission product release during core-concrete interactions. The final judge on the adequacy of the development of models of core debris-concrete interactions is, of course, comparison of the model predictions with the results of experiments. The research into ex-vessel core debris behavior differs from research into many aspects of reactor accidents in that there are many experimental results for comparison. Comparisons of code predictions with results of tests using realistic temperatures and conditions should provide an indication of the progress that has been made and, with appropriately chosen tests, an indication of work that needs to be done. 9 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Tailoring Sandwich Face/Core Interfaces for Improved Damage Tolerance—Part II: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2010-12-01

    A face/core debond in a sandwich structure may propagate in the interface or kink into either the face or core. It is found that certain modifications of the face/core interface region influence the kinking behavior, which is studied experimentally in the present paper. A sandwich double cantilever beam specimen loaded by uneven bending moments (DCB-UBM) allows for accurate measurements of the J integral as the crack propagates under large scale fibre bridging. By altering the mode-mixity of the loading, the crack path changes and deflects from the interface into the adjacent face or core. The transition points where the crack kinks are identified and the influence of four various interface design modifications on the propagation path and fracture resistance are investigated.

  18. /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu in sediments of the Hudson River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Linsalata, P.; Wrenn, M.E.; Cohen, N.; Singh, N.P.

    1980-12-01

    Plutonium-239,240 and plutonium-238 were determined in 59 Hudson River sediment dredge samples collected during 1973-77 in the vicinity of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Station. Acid leaching followed by solvent extraction, electrodeposition, and alpha-spectrometry were used to extract, purify, and quantitate plutonium isotopes present in these samples. Annual median plutonium-238/plutonium-239,240 isotopic activity ratios in surficial sediments were 0.032 (1973-74), 0.035 (1975), 0.042 (1976), and 0.040 (1977). The source of these nuclides in the estuary was identified by analysis of the sample isotopic activity ratios. On the basis of the sampling regimen and the methods used, it is concluded that no input, other than that of fallout, has contributed significantly to the plutonium burden in Hudson sediments. (1 map, 9 references, 9 tables)

  19. Plutonium, cesium, uranium, and thorium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1982-November 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Anderson, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured radionuclide activities in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu moving downstream in the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the system by particle deposition, while more than 50% of the /sup 137/Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported from the tidal Hudson to coastal waters. Measurements of fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/ Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion is likely to be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility in some environments and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility. 5 references.

  20. Evaluation of Slime-Producing Bacteria in Oil Field Core Flood Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Geesey, G. G.; Mittelman, M. W.; Lieu, V. T.

    1987-01-01

    Epifluorescence microscopy and carbohydrate determinations indicated that the decrease in permeability of oil reservoir sand to reclaimed sewage water was partially the result of biological plugging. Filtration and biocide addition studies demonstrated that the increase in bacterial densities and slime concentrations in flooded oil field cores appeared to be due to both deposition from the reclaimed water and in situ microbial growth and slime production. Although these biological components increased throughout the cores during flooding, the region where the water entered the core exhibited the highest cell densities and slime concentrations. The approach described in this report should be useful in predicting the potential of a water source to induce biological plugging of oil reservoir sand. PMID:16347276

  1. Self-consistent description of the core and boundary plasma in the high-field ignition experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, R.; Zagórski, R.

    2000-03-01

    A model has been developed which is capable to describe in a self-consistent way plasma dynamics in the center and edge region of fusion reactor. The core plasma is treated in the frame of 1D radial transport model whereas a 1D analytical model along magnetic field lines for plasma and impurity transport outside the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) is applied. The model has been used to investigate operation regimes of the high-field IGNITOR experiment.

  2. Vertical distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides in cores from contaminated floodplains of the Yenisey River.

    PubMed

    Standring, W J F; Brown, J E; Dowdall, M; Korobova, E M; Linnik, V G; Volosov, A G

    2009-12-01

    The Mining and Chemical Industrial Combine, Zheleznogorsk (MCIC, previously known as Krasnoyarsk-26) on the River Yenisey has contaminated the surrounding environment with anthropogenic radionuclides as a result of discharges of radioactive wastes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the vertical distribution of anthropogenic contamination ((137)Cs and plutonium) within floodplain areas at different distances from the discharge point. Sites were chosen that display different characteristics with respect to periodic inundation with river water. Cs-137 activity concentrations were in the range 23-3770 Bq/kg (dry weight, d.w.); Pu-239,240 activity concentrations were in the range <0.01-14.2 Bq/kg (d.w.). Numerous sample cores exhibited sub-surface maxima which may be related to the historical discharges from the MCIC. Possible evidence indicating the deposition of earlier discharges at MCIC in deeper core layers was observed in the (238)Pu:(239,240)Pu activity ratio data: a Pu signal discernible from global fallout could be observed in numerous samples. Cs-137 and Pu-239,240 activity concentrations were correlated with the silt fraction (% by mass <63 microm) though no significant correlation was observed between (grain-size) normalised (137)Cs activity concentrations and distance downstream from the MCIC. PMID:19446379

  3. AN INTEGRAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT TO INFER ACTINIDE CAPTURE CROSS-SECTIONS FROM THORIUM TO CALIFORNIUM WITH ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; M. Salvatores; M. Paul; R. Pardo; G. Palmiotti; F. Kondev; G. Imel

    2010-04-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 248Cm.

  4. Time-resolved characterization and energy balance analysis of implosion core in shock-ignition experiments at OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Florido, R. Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Tommasini, R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.

    2014-10-15

    Time-resolved temperature and density conditions in the core of shock-ignition implosions have been determined for the first time. The diagnostic method relies on the observation, with a streaked crystal spectrometer, of the signature of an Ar tracer added to the deuterium gas fill. The data analysis confirms the importance of the shell attenuation effect previously noted on time-integrated spectroscopic measurements of thick-wall targets [R. Florido et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 066408 (2011)]. This effect must be taken into account in order to obtain reliable results. The extracted temperature and density time-histories are representative of the state of the core during the implosion deceleration and burning phases. As a consequence of the ignitor shock launched by the sharp intensity spike at the end of the laser pulse, observed average core electron temperature and mass density reach T ∼ 1100 eV and ρ ∼ 2 g/cm{sup 3}; then temperature drops to T ∼ 920 eV while density rises to ρ ∼ 3.4 g/cm{sup 3} about the time of peak compression. Compared to 1D hydrodynamic simulations, the experiment shows similar maximum temperatures and smaller densities. Simulations do not reproduce all observations. Differences are noted in the heating dynamics driven by the ignitor shock and the optical depth time-history of the compressed shell. Time-histories of core conditions extracted from spectroscopy show that the implosion can be interpreted as a two-stage polytropic process. Furthermore, an energy balance analysis of implosion core suggests an increase in total energy greater than what 1D hydrodynamic simulations predict. This new methodology can be implemented in other ICF experiments to look into implosion dynamics and help to understand the underlying physics.

  5. Media Literacy Is Common Sense: Bridging Common Core Standards with the Media Experiences of Digital Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the concept of "texts" and how the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) affords teachers opportunities to implement media literacy education, in turn providing developmentally and culturally responsive middle level practice and promoting 21st century skills. This has implications for middle…

  6. High-resolution Valence and Core Excitation Spectra via First-Principles Calculations and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Eric; Fossard, F.; Gilmore, K.; Hug, G.; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F.

    We calculate the optical and C K-edge near edge spectra of crystalline and molecular C60 measured with high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The calculations are carried out using at least three different methods: Bethe-Salpeter calculations using the NIST Bethe-Salpeter Equation solver (NBSE) in the valence and OCEAN (Obtaining Core Excitation with Ab initio methods and NBSE) suite [Gilmore et al., Comp. Phys. Comm., (2015)]; excited-core-hole calculations using XCH [D. Prendergast and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 215502 (2006)]; and constrained occupancy using StoBe (Stockholm-Berlin core-excitation code) [StoBe-deMon version 3.0, K. Hermann et al. (2009)]. They include self-energy effects, lifetime-damping, and Debye-Waller effects. A comparison of spectral features to those observed illustrates the sensitivity of certain features to computation details (e.g., self-energy corrections and core-hole screening). This may point to limitations of various approximations, e.g. in conventional BSE paradigm and/or the incomplete treatment of vibrational effects. Supported in part by DOE BES Grant DE-FG03-97ER45623 (JJR, JJK, FV).

  7. Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, Junior High School. A Core Experience Study of the Natural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.; Willink, Wesley H.

    This Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, developed for use in the junior high school, is designed to familiarize teachers with how an environmental education program can help in their teaching and in achieving the goals of the school. The suggested core activities in this guide are designed to be a motivating way of introducting junior high…

  8. Core-concrete interactions using molten UO sub 2 with zirconium on a basaltic basemat: The SURC-2 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Copus, E.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Simpson, R.B.; Lucero, D.A. ); Blose, R.E. )

    1992-08-01

    An inductively heated experiment, SURC-2, using prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} materials was executed as part of the Integral Core-Concrete Interactions Experiments Program. The purpose of this experimental program was to measure and assess the variety of source terms produced during core debris/concrete interactions. These source terms include thermal energy released to both the reactor basemat and the containment environment, as well as flammable gas, condensable vapor and toxic or radioactive aerosols generated during the course of a severe reactor accident. The SURC-2 experiment eroded a total of 35 cm of basaltic concrete during 160 minutes of sustained interaction using 203.9 kg of prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} core debris material that included 18 kg of Zr metal and 3.4 kg of fission product simulants. The meltpool temperature ranged from 2400--1900{degrees}C during the first 50 minutes of the test followed by steady temperatures of 1750--1800{degrees}C during the middle portion of the test and increased temperatures of 1800--1900{degrees}C during the final 50 minutes of testing. The total erosion during the first 50 minutes was 15 cm with an additional 7 cm during the middle part of the test and 13 cm of ablation during the final 50 minutes. Comprehensive gas flowrates, gas compositions, and aerosol release rates were also measured during the SURC-2 test. When combined with the SURC-1 results, SURC-2 forms a complete data base for prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} core debris interactions with concrete.

  9. Combining N-body accretion simulations with partitioning experiments in a statistical model of terrestrial planet accretion and core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. A.; Ciesla, F.; Campbell, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial planets accreted in a series of increasingly large and violent collisions. Simultaneously, metallic cores segregated from their silicate mantles, acquiring their modern compositions through high pressure (P), high temperature (T) partitioning reactions. Here we present a model that couples these aspects of early planetary evolution, building on recent accretion simulations and experimental results. We have run 100 N-body simulations of terrestrial planet accretion, with Jupiter and Saturn on either circular (CJS) or eccentric (EJS) orbits, to gain insight into the statistics of this highly stochastic process (Fischer and Ciesla, 2014). An Earth (Mars) analogue forms in 84-92% (2-10%) of our simulations. We draw on our recent high P-T metal-silicate partitioning experiments of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O in a diamond anvil cell to 100 GPa and 5500 K. In our model, N-body simulations describe the delivery, masses, and original locations of planetary building blocks. As planets accrete, their core and mantle compositions are modified by high P-T reactions with each collision (Rubie et al., 2011). By utilizing a large number of N-body simulations, we obtain a statistical view and observe a wide range of outcomes. We use this model to predict the core compositions of Earth-like planets. For partial equilibration of the mantle at 50% of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, we find that their cores contain 6.9 ± 1.8 wt% Si and 4.8 ± 2.3 wt% O (Figure), with this uncertainty due entirely to variations in accretion history in our 100 simulations. This composition is consistent with the seismologically-inferred density of Earth's core, based on comparisons to high P-T equations of state (Fischer et al., 2011, 2014). Earth analogues experience 0.7 ± 0.1 or 0.9 ± 0.2 log units of oxidation during accretion in EJS or CJS simulations respectively, which is due to both the effects of high P-T partitioning and the temporal evolution of the Earth analogue

  10. Direct containment heating experiments in Zion Nuclear Power Plant Geometry using prototypic core materials, the U2 test

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-05-01

    A third Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments has been completed which utilizes prototypic core materials. The reactor material tests are a follow on to the Integral Effects Testing (IET) DCH program. The IET series of tests primarily addressed the effect of scale on DCH phenomena. This was accomplished by completing a series of counterpart tests in 1/40 and 1/10th linear scale DCH facilities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), respectively. The IET experiments modeled the Zion Nuclear Power Plant Geometry. The scale models included representations of the primary system volume, RPV lower head, cavity and instrument tunnel, and the lower containment structures. The experiments were steam driven at nominally 6.2 MPa. Iron-alumina thermite with chromium was used as a core melt simulant in the IET experiments. While the IET experiments at ANL and SNL provided useful data on the effect of scale on DCH phenomena, a significant question concerns the potential experiment distortions introduced by the use of non-prototypic iron/alumina thermite. Therefore, further testing with prototypic materials has been carried out at ANL. A prototypic core melt was produced for the experiment by first mixing powders of uranium, zirconium, iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and chromium trioxide (CrO{sub 3}). When ignited the powders react exothermically to produce a molten mixture. The amounts of each powder were selected to produce the anticipated composition for a core melt following a station blackout: 57.8 mass% UO{sub 2} 10.5 mass% ZrO{sub 2} 14.3 mass% Fe, 13.7 mass% Zr, and 3.7 mass% Cr. Development tests measured the initial melt temperature to be in the range of 2600 - 2700 K. The total thermal specific energy content of the melt at 2700 K is 1.2 MJ/kg compared to 2.25 MJ/kg for the iron-alumina simulant at its measured initial temperature of 2500 K.

  11. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K.; Novak, Jérôme; Oertel, Micaela; Margueron, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-03-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the centre of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as standing accretion shock instability and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. The potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory is analysed. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.

  12. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K.; Novak, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-03-17

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. Lastly, we analyse the potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.

  13. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K.; Novak, Jérôme; Oertel, Micaela; Margueron, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; et al

    2015-03-17

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernovamore » remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. Lastly, we analyse the potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.« less

  14. Partitioning of potassium between silicates and sulphide melts - Experiments relevant to the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The partitioning of potassium between roedderite, K2Mg5Si12O30 and an Fe-FeS melt was investigated at temperatures about 40 C above the Fe-FeS eutectic. Roedderite was considered a prime candidate for one of the potassium-bearing phases in the primitive earth because roedderite and merrihueite are the only two silicates containing essential potassium which have been identified in stony meteorites. Application of the results to a primitive chondritic earth is discussed, and it is concluded that extraction of most of the earth's potassium into the Fe-FeS core would occur under the conditions in the early earth.-

  15. Staying True to the Core: Designing the Future Academic Library Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, the practice of user experience design in academic libraries continues to evolve. It is typically applied in the context of interactions with digital interfaces. Some academic librarians are applying user experience approaches more broadly to design both environments and services with human-centered strategies. As the competition for the…

  16. Vocational Agriculture I Basic Core. Section C--Supervised Experience Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains five units teaching preservice vocational teachers to conduct supervised experience programs. Each unit contains an objective (e.g., "After completing this unit, the student should be able to choose and plan supervised occupational experience programs"); specific objectives (e.g., "State reasons for having a…

  17. MANTRA: An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer Actinide Capture Cross-sections from Thorium to Californium with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; C. McGrath; G. Imel; M. Paul; R. Pardo; F. Kondev; M. Salvatores; G. Palmiotti

    2011-08-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am, 244Cm and 248Cm.

  18. High temperature UF6 RF plasma experiments applicable to uranium plasma core reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure, high temperature uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon fluid mechanically confined, steady state, RF heated plasma while employing different exhaust systems and diagnostic techniques to simulate and investigate some potential characteristics of uranium plasma core nuclear reactors. The development of techniques and equipment for fluid mechanical confinement of RF heated uranium plasmas with a high density of uranium vapor within the plasma, while simultaneously minimizing deposition of uranium and uranium compounds on the test chamber peripheral wall, endwall surfaces, and primary exhaust ducts, is discussed. The material tests and handling techniques suitable for use with high temperature, high pressure, gaseous UF6 are described and the development of complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma, effluent exhaust gases, and residue deposited on the test chamber and exhaust system components is reported.

  19. Self-consistent description of the core and boundary plasma in the high-field ignition experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, R.; Zagórski, R.

    2001-03-01

    A model has been developed which is capable to describe in a self-consistent way plasma dynamics in the center and edge regions of fusion reactor. The core plasma is treated in the frame of 1-D radial transport model whereas a 1-D analytical model along magnetic field lines for plasma and impurity transport outside the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) is applied. The model is suitable to fast scans of the parameter space of the tokamak type reactor and has been used to investigate operation regimes of the high-field IGNITOR experiment.

  20. C 1s and N 1s core excitation of aniline: Experiment by electron impact and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Duflot, D.; Flament, J.-P.; Giuliani, A.; Heinesch, J.; Grogna, M.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.

    2007-05-15

    Core shell excitation spectra of aniline at the carbon and nitrogen 1s edges have been obtained by inner-shell electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded under scattering conditions where electric dipolar conditions dominate, with higher resolution than in the previous studies. They are interpreted with the aid of ab initio configuration interaction calculations. The spectrum at the C 1s edge is dominated by an intense {pi}{sup *} band. The calculated chemical shift due to the different chemical environment at the carbon 1s edge calculated is in agreement with the experimental observations within a few tenths of an eV. The transition energies of the most intense bands in the C 1s excitation spectrum are discussed at different levels of calculations. In the nitrogen 1s excitation spectrum the most intense bands are due to Rydberg-valence transitions involving the {sigma}{sup *}-type molecular orbitals, in agreement with the experiment. This assignment is different from that of extended Hueckel molecular orbital calculations. The geometries of the core excited states have been calculated and compared to their equivalent core molecules and benzene.

  1. Experiment Provides the Best Look Yet at 'Warm Dense Matter' at Cores of Giant Planets

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-23

    In an experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, scientists precisely measured the temperature and structure of aluminum as it transitions into a superhot, highly compressed concoction known as “warm dense matter.”

  2. Analysis of wall heat capacity effects on core makup tank drain-down behavior in ROSA/AP600 experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Masaya; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Asaka, Hideaki

    1997-12-01

    The thermal-hydraulic behavior of the core makeup tank (CMT) during scaled integral experiments on the Westinghouse AP600 reactor design was analyzed using the RELAP5/Mod3 (version 5M5) code. The natural circulation rate through the CMT was predicted well, although the prediction of the thermal stratification in the CMT had a problem due to inability to predict multidimensional mixing in the CMT upper regions. The over-scaled CMT metal mass in the experimental facility affected the CMT drain-down behavior in two experiments: (i) a multiple-failure experiment where the system depressurization became extremely slow due to the simulated failure of the ADS valves; and (ii) a relatively-large break experiment where the CMT started draining before thermal stratification developed in the CMT water inventory. In both experiments, the CMT wall became a heat sink and was a large steam condensation site. This had a effect to limit the CMT drain rate. 6 refs., 15 figs.

  3. Performance of Core Exit Thermocouple for PWR Accident Management Action in Vessel Top Break LOCA Simulation Experiment at OECD/NEA ROSA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Presented are experiment results of the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with a focus on core exit thermocouple (CET) performance to detect core overheat during a vessel top break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation experiment. The CET temperatures are used to start accident management (AM) action to quickly depressurize steam generator (SG) secondary side in case of core temperature excursion. Test 6-1 is the first test of the OECD/NEA ROSA Project started in 2005, simulating withdraw of a control rod drive mechanism penetration nozzle at the vessel top head. The break size is equivalent to 1.9% cold leg break. The AM action was initiated when CET temperature rose up to 623K. There was no reflux water fallback onto the CETs during the core heat-up period. The core overheat, however, was detected with a time delay of about 230s. In addition, a large temperature discrepancy was observed between the CETs and the hottest core region. This paper clarifies the reasons of time delay and temperature discrepancy between the CETs and heated core during boil-off including three-dimensional steam flows in the core and core exit. The paper discusses applicability of the LSTF CET performance to pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions and a possibility of alternative indicators for earlier AM action than in Test 6-1 is studied by using symptom-based plant parameters such as a reactor vessel water level detection.

  4. "Real-time" core formation experiments using X-ray tomography at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, H. C.; Anzures, B.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The process of differentiation is a defining moment in a planet's history. Direct observation of this process at work is impossible in our solar system because it was complete within the first few tens of millions of years. Geochemical and geophysical evidence points to magma ocean scenarios to explain differentiation of large planets such as Earth. Smaller planets and planetesimals likely never achieved the high temperatures necessary for wide scale melting. In these smaller bodies, silicates may have only partially melted, or not melted at all. Furthermore, isotopic signatures in meteorites suggest that some planetesimals differentiated within just a few million years. Achieving efficient core segregation on this rapid timescale is difficult, particularly in a solid or semi-solid silicate matrix. Direct measurements of metallic melt migration velocities have been difficult due to experimental limitations and most previous work has relied on geometric models based on 2-D observations in quenched samples. We have employed a relatively new technique of in-situ, high pressure, high temperature, X-ray micro-tomography coupled with 3-D numerical simulations to evaluate the efficiency of melt percolation in metal/silicate systems. From this, we can place constraints on the timing of core formation in early solar system bodies. Mixtures of olivine and KLB-1 peridotite and up to 12 vol% FeS were pre-synthesized to achieve an initial equilibrium microstructure of silicate and sulfide. The samples were then were then pressed again to ~2GPa, and heated to ~1300°C to collect X-ray tomography images as the partially molten samples were undergoing shear deformation. The reconstructed 3-D images of melt distribution were used as the input for lattice Boltzmann simulations of fluid flow through the melt network and calculations of permeability and melt migration velocity. Our in-situ x-ray tomography results are complemented by traditional 2-D image analysis and high

  5. The La Verne Experience: A Common Core for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Devorah

    2014-01-01

    The lasting sense of connection that a graduate feels for his or her alma mater is often rooted in those especially memorable aspects of the college experience--the times spent bonding with friends and faculty, practicing and playing on athletic teams, collaborating with professors on research, and serving as leaders in student government. Such…

  6. Student Teachers' Experiences of Initial Teacher Preparation in England: Core Themes and Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Andrew J.; Malderez, Angi; Tracey, Louise; Giannakaki, Marina; Pell, Godfrey; Tomlinson, Peter D.

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on data generated via large-scale survey and in-depth interview methods, this article reports findings which show that being a student teacher in early-twenty-first-century England is a demanding personal experience which requires considerable engagement and commitment in the face of built-in challenges and risks, and which engenders, for…

  7. Core Heat Flow and Suppression of Mantle Plumes by Plate-Scale Mantle Flow: Results From Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, H. M.; Jellinek, A. M.; Richards, M. A.; Manga, M.

    2002-12-01

    Heat flow from the Earth's core to the mantle remains an unresolved quantity. Its value has implications for the core's thermal evolution and growth of the inner core, the geodynamo, and the relative abundance of radioactive elements in the core and mantle. Core heat flow is affected by dynamics of the lowermost mantle in three ways: (1) advection of heat by plume instabilities; (2) conductive heating of subducted material; and (3) suppression of plume instabilities, as well as advection of heat by plate-scale mantle flow. We present results from a boundary-layer analysis and laboratory experiments aimed at understanding the effects of an imposed large-scale circulation on thermal convection at high-Rayleigh number (106<=Ra<=109) in a fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The ultimate goal of this work is to better understand the effect of plate-scale mantle flow on heat flux across the CMB and on the dynamics of plume formation at the CMB. Our theoretical analysis is complemented by lab experiments, in which a layer of corn syrup is heated from below and a large-scale flow is induced in the fluid above the hot boundary. We identify 4 convective regions associated with high-Rayleigh number convection in the presence of a large-scale flow: (1) a subcritical TBL region (Domain I), where plume instabilities are suppressed by the advective thinning of the TBL and heat flux is increased relative to convection without large-scale flow; (2) a supercritical TBL region (Domain II), where plume instabilities are no longer suppressed and heat flux is equal to convection without large-scale flow; (3) a flow-dominated region (Domain III), which is free of plumes; and (4) a plume-dominated domain (Domain IV), where the interaction of hot buoyant plumes and imposed large-scale flow results in lateral advection and distortion of rising plumes. In addition, we present a boundary-layer analysis that predicts heat flux, Q, from a hot surface as a function of imposed

  8. Thermodynamics and the hydrophobic effect in a core-softened model and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huš, Matej; Urbic, Tomaz

    2014-08-01

    A simple and computationally inexpensive core-softened model, originally proposed by Franzese [G. Franzese, J. Mol. Liq. 136, 267 (2007), 10.1016/j.molliq.2007.08.021], was adopted to show that it exhibits properties of waterlike fluid and hydrophobic effect. The potential used between particles is spherically symmetric with two characteristic lengths. Thermodynamics of nonpolar solvation were modeled as an insertion of a modified Lennard-Jones particle. It was investigated how the anomalous predictions of the model as well as the nonpolar solvation compare with the experimental data for water anomalies and the temperature dependence of noble gases hydration. It was shown that the model qualitatively follows the same trends as water. The model is able to reproduce waterlike anomalous properties (density maximum, heat capacity minimum, isothermal compressibility, etc.) and hydrophobic effect (minimum solubility for nonpolar solutes near ambient conditions, increased solubility of larger noble gases, etc.). It is argued that the model yields similar results as more complex and computationally expensive models.

  9. Simultaneous Determination of Capillary Pressure and Relative Permeability Curves from Core-Flooding Experiments with Various Fluid Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Ronny; Hingerl, Ferdinand; Benson, Sally

    2013-04-01

    Geological systems are complex and so are the processes that determine the distribution of two (or more) immiscible phases within their porous structure; nevertheless, an empirical relationship between the capillary pressure and saturation, the capillary pressure function, provides the foundation for the theory of multiphase flow in porous media. The simultaneous existence of at least two fluids in a porous rock further implies that the ability of each fluid to flow is reduced by the presence of the other and a so-called relative permeability function has been introduced and defined as the ratio between the effective permeability to the given phase and the absolute permeability of the rock. When coupled to the continuum-scale equations of motion, these two characteristic curves allow for a description of multiphase displacement processes in a variety of natural settings that are related to a wide range of applications, thus including the storage of carbon dioxide into deep saline aquifers. In this study, capillary pressure and relative permeability drainage curves are measured on a single Berea Sandstone core by using three different fluid pairs, namely gCO2/water, gN2/water and scCO2/brine. An important feature of this experimental investigation is that these two multiphase properties are obtained simultaneously during a core-flooding experiment. The applied technique possesses many of the characteristics of a conventional steady-state relative permeability experiment and consists of injecting the nonwetting fluid at increasingly higher flow rates in a core that is initially saturated with the wetting phase, while observing fluid saturations with a medical x-ray CT scanner [Pini et al. 2012]. Injection flow rates are varied so as to cover a sufficiently large range of capillary pressures, whereas fluid-pairs and experimental conditions are selected in order to move across a range interfacial tension values (40-65 mN/m), while maintaining a constant viscosity ratio

  10. FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) Reactor Characterization Program: Absolute Fission-rate Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.L.; Gilliam, D.M.; Grundl, J.A.; Rawlins, J.A.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  11. FFTF (FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY) REACTOR CHARACTERIZATION PROGRAM ABSOLUTE FISSION RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    FULLER JL; GILLIAM DM; GRUNDL JA; RAWLINS JA; DAUGHTRY JW

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  12. A Virtual Interface for Recreating a School of Rock Experience: An Inquiry-Driven Approach Towards Describing and Interpreting Deep Ocean Cores and Smear Slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoesen, J.; Collins, J.

    2011-12-01

    The School of Rock (SOR) is a professional development program for educators that takes place on the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's (IODP) JOIDES Resolution and at the core repository at Texas A&M. The program brings formal and informal educators together with scientists, technicians, and IODP staff to learn about and experience ocean drilling science. An essential element of this multi-day program is the utilization of cores and smear slides for making inferences about a variety Earth events. A similar inquiry-based experience can be offered to a broader audience using a virtual experience. Our virtual interface incorporates high-resolution gigapixel images of selected IODP core sections and smear slides. These images can be used with annotations, to provide background information and explain the scientific significance of each core, or without annotation for a guided-inquiry lesson. The primary objective of this project is to provide educators a useful and accessible tool for increasing student understanding of drill core characteristics and how they relate to ocean processes. The interactive nature of the interface also allows teachers and students to explore ocean cores and ancillary smear slides using similar processes and techniques as scientists aboard the JOIDES Resolution or in one of the core repositories.

  13. Large-scale boiling experiments of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Slezak, S.E.; Bentz, J.H.; Pasedag, W.F.

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents results of ex-vessel boiling experiments performed in the CYBL (CYlindrical BoiLing) facility. CYBL is a reactor-scale facility for confirmatory research of the flooded cavity concept for accident management. CYBL has a tank-within-a-tank design; the inner tank simulates the reactor vessel and the outer tank simulates the reactor cavity. Experiments with uniform and edge-peaked heat flux distributions up to 20 W/cm{sup 2} across the vessel bottom were performed. Boiling outside the reactor vessel was found to be subcooled nucleate boiling. The subcooling is mainly due to the gravity head which results from flooding the sides of the reactor vessel. The boiling process exhibits a cyclic pattern with four distinct phases: direct liquid/solid contact, bubble nucleation and growth, coalescence, and vapor mass dispersion (ejection). The results suggest that under prototypic heat load and heat flux distributions, the flooded cavity in a passive pressurized water reactor like the AP-600 should be capable of cooling the reactor pressure vessel in the central region of the lower head that is addressed by these tests.

  14. Phasemeter core for intersatellite laser heterodyne interferometry: modelling, simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerberding, Oliver; Sheard, Benjamin; Bykov, Iouri; Kullmann, Joachim; Esteban Delgado, Juan Jose; Danzmann, Karsten; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Intersatellite laser interferometry is a central component of future space-borne gravity instruments like Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), evolved LISA, NGO and future geodesy missions. The inherently small laser wavelength allows us to measure distance variations with extremely high precision by interfering a reference beam with a measurement beam. The readout of such interferometers is often based on tracking phasemeters, which are able to measure the phase of an incoming beatnote with high precision over a wide range of frequencies. The implementation of such phasemeters is based on all digital phase-locked loops (ADPLL), hosted in FPGAs. Here, we present a precise model of an ADPLL that allows us to design such a readout algorithm and we support our analysis by numerical performance measurements and experiments with analogue signals.

  15. Core-flood experiment for transport of reactive fluids in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, H.; de Kloe, K.; van Bakel, M.; Vos, F.; van Pelt, A.; Legerstee, P.; Bauer, A.; Eide, K.; van der Linden, A.; Berg, S.; Makurat, A.

    2012-08-01

    Investigation of the transport of reactive fluids in porous rocks is an intriguing but challenging task and relevant in several areas of science and engineering such as geology, hydrogeology, and petroleum engineering. We designed and constructed an experimental setup to investigate physical and chemical processes caused by the flow of reactive and volatile fluids such as supercritical CO2 and/or H2S in geological formations. Potential applications are geological sequestration of CO2 in the frame of carbon capture and storage and acid-gas injection for sulfur disposal and/or enhanced oil recovery. The present paper outlines the design criteria and the realization of reactive transport experiments on the laboratory scale. We focus on the spatial and time evolution of rock and fluid composition as a result of chemical rock fluid interaction and the coupling of chemistry and fluid flow in porous rocks.

  16. The Effect of Birthrate Granularity on the Release- to- Birth Ratio for the AGR-1 In-core Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn Scates; John Walter

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) tristructural-isotropic-particle fuel experiment underwent 13 irradiation intervals from December 2006 until November 2009 within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant program. During this multi-year experiment, release-to-birth rate ratios were computed at the end of each operating interval to provide information about fuel performance. Fission products released during irradiation were tracked daily by the Fission Product Monitoring System using 8-hour measurements. Birth rates calculated by MCNP with ORIGEN for as-run conditions were computed at the end of each irradiation interval. Each time step in MCNP provided neutron flux, reaction rates and AGR-1 compact composition, which were used to determine birth rates using ORIGEN. The initial birth-rate data, consisting of four values for each irradiation interval at the beginning, end, and two intermediate times, were interpolated to obtain values for each 8-hour activity. The problem with this method is that any daily changes in heat rates or perturbations, such as shim control movement or core/lobe power fluctuations, would not be reflected in the interpolated data and a true picture of the system would not be presented. At the conclusion of the AGR-1 experiment, great efforts were put forth to compute daily birthrates, which were reprocessed with the 8-hour release activity. The results of this study are presented in this paper.

  17. The effect of birthrate granularity on the release-to-birth ratio for the AGR-1 in-core experiment

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Scates; J. B. Walter; J. T. Maki; J. W. Sterbentz; J. R. Parry

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) tristructural-isotropic-particle fuel experiment underwent 13 irradiation intervals from December 2006 until November 2009 within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant program. During this multi-year experiment, release-to-birth rate ratios were computed at the end of each operating interval to provide information about fuel performance. Fission products released during irradiation were tracked daily by the Fission Product Monitoring System using 8-h measurements. Birth rate calculated by MCNP with ORIGEN for as-run conditions were computed at the end of each irradiation interval. Each time step in MCNP provided neutron flux, reaction rates and AGR-1 compact composition, which were used to determine birth rate using ORIGEN. The initial birth-rate data, consisting of four values for each irradiation interval at the beginning, end, and two intermediate times, were interpolated to obtain values for each 8-h activity. The problem with this method is that any daily changes in heat rates or perturbations, such as shim control movement or core/lobe power fluctuations, would not be reflected in the interpolated data and a true picture of the system would not be presented. At the conclusion of the AGR-1 experiment, great efforts were put forth to compute daily birthrates, which were reprocessed with the 8-h release activity. The results of this study are presented in this paper.

  18. Frictional and hydrologic behavior of the San Andreas Fault: Insights from laboratory experiments on SAFOD cuttings and core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, B. M.; Marone, C.; Saffer, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    The debate concerning the apparent low strength of tectonic faults, including the San Andreas Fault (SAF), continues to focus on: 1) low intrinsic friction resulting from mineralogy and/or fabric, and 2) decreased effective normal stress due to elevated pore pressure. Here we inform this debate with laboratory measurements of the frictional behavior and permeability of cuttings and core returned from the SAF at a vertical depth of 2.7 km. We conducted experiments on cuttings and core recovered during SAFOD Phase III drilling. All samples in this study are adjacent to and within the active fault zone penetrated at 10814.5 ft (3296m) measured depth in the SAFOD borehole. We sheared gouge samples composed of drilling cuttings in a double-direct shear configuration subject to true-triaxial loading under constant effective normal stress, confining pressure, and pore pressure. Intact wafers of material were sheared in a single-direct shear configuration under similar conditions of effective stress, confining pressure, and pore pressure. We also report on permeability measurements on intact wafers of wall rock and fault gouge prior to shearing. Initial results from experiments on cuttings show: 1) a weak fault (µ=~0.21) compared to the surrounding wall rock (µ=~0.35), 2) velocity strengthening behavior, (a-b > 0), consistent with aseismic slip, and 3) near zero healing rates in material from the active fault. XRD analysis on cuttings indicates the main mineralogical difference between fault rock and wall rock, is the presence of significant amounts of smectite within the fault rock. Taken together, the measured frictional behavior and clay mineral content suggest that the clay composition exhibits a basic control on fault behavior. Our results document the first direct evidence of weak material from an active fault at seismogenic depths. In addition, our results could explain why the SAF in central California fails aseismically and hosts only small earthquakes.

  19. A brittle (normal?) shear zone cored in Site C0002 of Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (IODP Expedition 348)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Sample, James; Brown, Kevin; Otsubo, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yuzuru

    2016-04-01

    Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 348, which belongs to the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment, conducted riser-drilling to make deeper an existing hole at Site C0002, up to 3058.5 meters below seafloor (mbsf). This site is located 80 km SE of the Kii Peninsula (Japan) in the Kumano forearc basin, in turn situated on top of the Nankai accretionary prism. Cuttings (875.5-3058.5 mbsf) and cores (2163.0-2217.5 mbsf) were collected in the upper Miocene to Pliocene turbiditic silty claystone with few intercalations of sandstone which characterize the accretionary prism lithological units. A remarkably preserved fault zone has been cored around 2205 mbsf (core section Hole C0002P-348-5R-4). It is characterized by 34 cm of fault breccia, in which an anastomosed cataclastic foliation is present. The rocks of the damaged zone are formed by silty claystone with an incipient scaly fabric and scarce levels of sandstones. Extra-large thin sections were made along the whole core section. In the brittle shear zone, they reveal a catalogue of deformation structures characteristic of a high structural level. In particular, almond-type structures and arrays of microfaults cutting the stratification are the most common structures and outline the cataclastic foliation. The occurrence of calcite veins in the recovered cores is limited to this fault zone, which is indicative of its role as fluid path, accompanied by carbonate cementation. Generally fault veins have lower δ18O values than carbonate cements in the sedimentary matrix, consistent with veins forming at higher temperatures and/or from a fluid more strongly depleted in 18O. A continuum of the relationships between calcite veins and cataclastic deformation is observed, from veins that precipitated early in the fault history, with calcite grains broken during subsequent deformation, to late veins which seal the almond-type structures within the claystones. The geometry of the calcite grains within the

  20. Simultaneous determination of capillary pressure and relative permeability curves from core-flooding experiments with various fluid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Ronny; Benson, Sally M.

    2013-06-01

    Capillary pressure and relative permeability drainage curves are simultaneously measured on a single Berea Sandstone core by using three different fluid pairs, namely gCO 2/water, gN2/water and scCO 2/brine. This novel technique possesses many of the characteristics of a conventional steady-state relative permeability experiment and consists of injecting the nonwetting fluid at increasingly higher flow rates in a core that is initially saturated with the wetting phase, while observing fluid saturations with a medical x-ray CT scanner. Injection flow rates (0.5-75 mL/min) are varied so as to generate a large range of capillary pressures (up to 18 kPa), whereas fluid-pairs and experimental conditions are selected in order to move across a range interfacial tension values (γ12=40-65 mN/m), while maintaining a constant viscosity ratio (μw/μnw ≈30). Moreover, these experiments, carried out at moderate pressures (P=2.4 MPa and T=50°C), can be compared directly with results for gas/liquid pairs reported in the literature and they set the benchmark for the experiment at a higher pressure (P=9 MPa and T=50°C), where CO 2 is in the supercritical state. Contrary to some prior investigations, from these experiments we find no evidence that the scCO 2/brine system behaves differently than any of these other fluid pairs. At the same time, capillary pressure data show a significant (but consistent) effect of the different values for the interfacial tension. The fact that the three different fluid pairs yield the same drainage relative permeability curve is consistent with observations in the petroleum literature. Additionally, the observed end-point values for the relative permeability to the nonwetting phase (kr,nw 0.9) and the corresponding irreducible water saturations (Sw,irr 0.35) suggest that water-wet conditions are maintained

  1. Core-log integration for rock mechanics using borehole breakouts and rock strength experiments: Recent results from plate subduction margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Lin, W.

    2014-12-01

    Core-log integration has been applied for rock mechanics studies in scientific ocean drilling since 2007 in plate subduction margins such as Nankai Trough, Costa Rica margin, and Japan Trench. State of stress in subduction wedge is essential for controlling dynamics of plate boundary fault. One of the common methods to estimate stress state is analysis of borehole breakouts (drilling induced borehole wall compressive failures) recorded in borehole image logs to determine the maximum horizontal principal stress orientation. Borehole breakouts can also yield possible range of stress magnitude based on a rock compressive strength criterion. In this study, we constrained the stress magnitudes based on two different rock failure criteria, the Mohr-Coulomb (MC) criteria and the modified Wiebols-Cook (mWC) criteria. As the MC criterion is the same as that under unconfined compression state, only one rock parameter, unconfined compressive strength (UCS) is needed to constrain stress magnitudes. The mWC criterion needs the UCS, Poisson's ratio and internal frictional coefficient determined by triaxial compression experiments to take the intermediate principal stress effects on rock strength into consideration. We conducted various strength experiments on samples taken during IODP Expeditions 334/344 (Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project) to evaluate reliable method to estimate stress magnitudes. Our results show that the effects of the intermediate principal stress on the rock compressive failure occurred on a borehole wall is not negligible.

  2. Reactive Transport Modeling of the CO2 Core Flooding Experiments for the Weyburn CO2 Storage Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y.; Sholokhova, Y.; Smith, M. M.; Carroll, S.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic CO2 sequestration and storage in hydrocarbon reservoirs such as Weyburn oil field has a large potential to reduce net CO2 released into atmosphere and, therefore, mitigate man-made global warming. One key research area for CO2 sequestration/EOR (enhanced oil recovery) operations, requiring both numerical and experimental investigations, is to develop a good understanding of the chemical rock-fluid interactions induced by CO2 injection that influence rock porosity and permeability evolution, and may potentially alter reservoir performance. In this study we apply a Darcy scale continuum model to simulate reactive transport and mineral-dissolution processes for the core flooding experiments in which the CO2-equilibrated brine is injected into carbonate rock samples of both the Midale Vuggy and Marly units from the Weyburn oil field. The three-dimensional reactive-transport model is developed and constrained based on physical characterization of the Vuggy and Marly flow units (e.g. mineral distribution and pore-space identification) and solution chemistry data, which are obtained from X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) analysis, and experimental measurements. It is observed experimentally that the mineral dissolution fronts become more unstable in highly heterogeneous Vuggy limestone, ultimately leading to the formation of highly porous flow channels, often referred to as "wormholes". In order to effectively account for strong coupling between flow, reactive transport and mineral dissolution processes, in particular within the wormholes, we employ empirical correlations to quantify the relationships between mineral dissolution and the resulting increases in porosity and permeability. The reactive transport simulations are performed by the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code, and their results are compared with experimental data. Our simulation results indicate that Darcy-scale based flow and reactive transport models are able to

  3. Acknowledging How Older Australian Women Experience Life After Stroke: How Does the WHO 18-Item Brief ICF Core Set for Stroke Compare?

    PubMed

    Tavener, Meredith; Thijsen, Amanda; Hubbard, Isobel J; Francis, J Lynn; Grennall, Claire; Levi, Christopher; Byles, Julie

    2015-01-01

    We examined older women's qualitative experiences of stroke with the World Health Organization's 18-item Brief International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke. Women were participants of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, born between 1921 and 1926, who had experienced a stroke in the previous 3 years. An inductive thematic analysis was conducted of women's qualitative experiences of stroke, which were then examined with the 18-item Brief Core Set for Stroke for congruency. Our analysis showed that for older Australian women, their concerns of poststroke living were not adequately classified, potentially impeding a full recovery. PMID:26042797

  4. A laboratory experiment on the behaviour of soil-derived core and intact polar GDGTs in aquatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterse, F.; Moy, C. M.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2015-02-01

    We have performed incubation experiments in order to examine the behaviour of soil-derived branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) membrane lipids upon entering an aquatic environment and to evaluate the processes that potentially take place during their fluvial transport from land to sea. We incubated a soil from the Rakaia River catchment on the South Island of New Zealand using Rakaia River water and ocean water collected near the river mouth as inocula for a period of up to 152 days. The concentrations, as well as the relative distribution of brGDGTs derived from intact polar ("living"; IPL) lipids and core ("fossil"; CL) lipids remained unaltered over the course of the experiment. Although the stability of the brGDGTs may be a consequence of the higher than natural soil : water ratio used in the laboratory experiment, the substantial increase (27-72%) in the total pool of isoprenoid GDGTs (isoGDGTs) in all incubation setups, including the control using distilled water, indicates that entering an aquatic environment does influence the behaviour of soil-derived GDGTs. However, the availability of water appears to be more important than its properties. As a consequence of increasing isoGDGT concentrations, a decrease in Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT) index values - a proxy for the relative input of fluvially discharged soil material into a marine system - became evident after an incubation period of 30 days, with a maximum final decrease of 0.88 to 0.74 in the experiment with river water. The relative distribution within the isoGDGT pool shows changes with time, suggesting that isoGDGT producers may either have different rates of membrane adaptation or production/degradation, or that preferential release from the soil matrix or a shift in source organism(s) may take place. While the apparent stability of soil brGDGTs during this incubation experiment reinforces their potential as tracers for land-sea transport of soil organic carbon and

  5. Wide-Angle Refraction Tomographic Inversion of Mid Cayman Spreading Center and its Oceanic Core Complex, CaySEIS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The CaySEIS experiment, conducted in April 2015, is a multi-national collaborative seismic study of the Mid Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC), an ultra-slow spreading center [15 mm/yr fr] in the Caribbean Sea. Ultra-slow spreading centers are thought to have very thin crust and a paucity of magmatism due to cooler mantle conditions. However, the suggestion that gabbro-cored oceanic core complexes (OCCs), volcanic deposits, and multiple layers of hydrothermal vents are widespread in the MCSC and other ultra-slow spreading centers has led to questions about the relationship between seafloor spreading rates and magmatism. To investigate this further, we conducted the CaySEIS experiment, with five wide-angle seismic refraction lines parallel and perpendicular to the neovolcanic zone. This analysis is based on two east-west oriented 100-km-long seismic refraction lines, which were each occupied by 18 ocean bottom seismometers. Line 2 lies across the central MCSC and an OCC called Mt. Dent. Line 3 crosses the northern end of the MCSC near the Oriente Transform Zone. With the wide-angle OBS data we can image the seismic velocity structure of Mt. Dent and distinguish between two models of OCCs - either Mt. Dent is composed of mostly gabbro with peridotite lenses identified by a low velocity gradient, or it is composed of mostly peridotite with gabbroic bodies identified by a constant velocity gradient. The crustal structure of both lines gives more insight into the asymmetry of the MCSC and the style of seafloor spreading to the east vs. the west. The 2-D velocity models reveal Mt. Dent has thick crust of 8 km with a low velocity gradient, supporting the magmatic gabbroic origin of OCCs. The surrounding crust to the west of the MCSC is highly variable, with areas of very thin crust. The crust to the east of the MCSC has an approximately constant thickness of 4 km. The development of OCCs may contribute to the crustal heterogeneity of ultra-slow spreading centers.

  6. Impact of surface roughness of Au core in Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles toward formic acid oxidation - Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2013-12-01

    The Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au cores by adding different concentrations of Na2SO3 solution. It was found that the higher concentration of Na2SO3 that was used, the rougher the Au nanospheres became. However, the rougher Au surface may cause more defects in the Pd layers and decrease the catalytic abilities. The Au/Pd NPs synthesized using 0 M Na2SO3 (denoted as 0 M-Au/Pd NPs) have the smoothest Pd surface and demonstrate higher formic acid oxidation (FAO) activity (0.714 mA cm-2, normalized to the surface area of Pd) than other Au/Pd NPs and commercial Pd black (0.47 mA cm-2). Additional electrochemical characterization of the 0 M-Au/Pd NPs also demonstrated lower CO-stripping onset and peak potentials, higher stability (8× improvement in stabilized oxidation current), and superior durability (by 1.6×) than the Pd black. In addition, a simple simulation of FAO was adopted to predict the anodic curve by including reaction intermediates of formate and hydroxyl. The 0 M-Au/Pd NPs were found to show higher formate and lower hydroxyl coverage than the Pd black.

  7. Stable chromium isotopic composition of meteorites and metal-silicate experiments: Implications for fractionation during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, P.; Williams, H. M.; Parkinson, I. J.; Wood, B. J.; Halliday, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    We present new mass independent and mass dependent Cr isotope compositions for meteorites measured by double spike thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. Small differences in both mass independent 53Cr and 54Cr relative to the Bulk Silicate Earth are reported and are very similar to previously published values. Carbonaceous chondrites are characterised by an excess in 54Cr compared to ordinary and enstatite chondrites which make mass independent Cr isotopes a useful tool for distinguishing between meteoritic groups. Mass dependent stable Cr isotope compositions for the same samples are also reported. Carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites are identical within uncertainty with average δ53 Cr values of - 0.118 ± 0.040 ‰ and - 0.143 ± 0.074 ‰ respectively. The heaviest isotope compositions are recorded by an enstatite chondrite and a CO carbonaceous chondrite, both of which have relatively reduced chemical compositions implying some stable Cr isotope fractionation related to redox processes in the circumstellar disk. The average δ53 Cr values for chondrites are within error of the estimate for the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) also determined by double spiking. The lack of isotopic difference between chondritic material and the BSE provides evidence that Cr isotopes were not fractionated during core formation on Earth. A series of high-pressure experiments was also carried out to investigate stable Cr isotope fractionation between metal and silicate and no demonstrable fractionation was observed, consistent with our meteorites data. Mass dependent Cr isotope data for achondrites suggest that Cr isotopes are fractionated during magmatic differentiation and therefore further work is required to constrain the Cr isotopic compositions of the mantles of Vesta and Mars.

  8. Core needle biopsies and surgical excision biopsies in the diagnosis of lymphoma-experience at the Lymph Node Registry Kiel.

    PubMed

    Johl, Alice; Lengfelder, Eva; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Klapper, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Current guidelines of the European Society of Medical Oncology recommend surgical excision biopsies of lymph nodes for the diagnosis of lymphoma whenever possible. However, core needle biopsies are increasingly used. We aimed to understand the common practice to choose the method of biopsy in Germany. Furthermore, we wanted to understand performance of surgical excision and core needle biopsies of lymph nodes in the diagnosis of lymphoma. The files of 1510 unselected, consecutive lymph node specimens from a consultation center for lymphoma diagnosis were analyzed. Core needle biopsies were obtained frequently from lymph nodes localized in mediastinal, abdominal, retroperitoneal, or thoracic regions. Patients undergoing core needle biopsies were significantly older and suffered significantly more often from lymphoma than patients undergoing surgical excision biopsies. Although more immunohistochemical tests were ordered by the pathologist for core needle biopsies specimens than for surgical excision biopsies specimens, core needle biopsies did not yield a definite diagnosis in 8.3 % of cases, compared to 2.8 % for SEB (p = 0.0003). Restricting the analysis to cases with a final diagnosis of follicular lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, core needle biopsies identified a simultaneous low- and high-grade lymphoma (transformation) in 3.3 % of cases, compared to 7.6 % for surgical excision biopsies (p = 0.2317). In Germany, core needle biopsies are preferentially used in elderly patients with a high likelihood of suffering from lymphoma. Core needle appeared inferior to surgical excision biopsies at providing a definite diagnosis and at identifying multiple lymphoma differentiations and transformation. PMID:27236576

  9. Absorption spectra of CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dots at high photon energies: Experiment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Amlan; Ghosh, Sandip

    2014-11-01

    Absorption spectra of CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dot (QD) ensembles, with average core diameters ranging from 2.6 nm to 7.2 nm have been obtained using both transmission and photoluminescence excitation measurements. In agreement with previous reports, the absorption coefficient at energies ≃1 eV above the effective bandgap increases monotonically as in bulk solids. A simple effective-mass spherical core-shell potential model cannot explain the relatively high absorption at higher energies. The calculated electron and hole radial envelope wavefunctions show asymmetry due to the core-shell structure. It leads to normally symmetry-disallowed transitions acquiring a weak oscillator strength, with their number and strength increasing with energy. A phenomenological model that invokes normally disallowed transitions in general is shown to reproduce the absorption spectrum at higher energies quite well. The oscillator strength scaling factor for such transitions increases with decrease in QD size, consistent with expectations.

  10. Plasma current start-up experiments without a central solenoid in the iron core STOR-M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitarai, O.; Tomney, G.; Rohollohi, A.; Lewis, E.; McColl, D.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2015-06-01

    Reproducible plasma current start-up without a central solenoid (CS) has been demonstrated using the outer ohmic heating (OH) coils in the iron core STOR-M tokamak (Mitarai et al 2014 Fusion Eng. Des. 89 2467-71). Although the outer OH coil current saturates the iron core eventually, it has been demonstrated that the plasma current can be maintained during the iron core saturation phase. In this work, further studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of the turn number of the outer OH coils (N = 4 or N = 6) in the CS-less discharges and to evaluate the plasma stability with respect to the n-decay index of the vertical magnetic field. For the loose coupling of the iron core with N = 4 turns, the plasma current can be sustained after the additional third capacitor bank is applied near the iron core saturation phase, showing the slow transition from the unsaturated to the partially saturated phase. For the case of stronger coupling of N = 6 turns, the plasma current is increased at the same fast bank voltage, but the main discharge is shortened from 35 to 20 ms. As the magnetizing current is smaller due to stronger coupling between the OH coils and the plasma current, the transition from the unsaturated to the saturated phase is slightly difficult at present. The present experimental results suggest a feasible operation scenario in a future spherical tokamak (ST) at least using loose iron core coupling for smoother transition from the unsaturated to the saturated iron core phase. Thus, a reliable plasma current start-up by the outer OH coils and the current ramp-up to a steady state by additional heating power and vertical field coils could be considered as an operation scenario for future ST reactors with an iron core transformer.

  11. Enhancing the Practicum Experience for Pre-service Chemistry Teachers Through Collaborative CoRe Design with Mentor Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an ongoing study exploring how the Content Representation (CoRe) design can be used as a tool to help chemistry student teachers begin acquiring the professional knowledge required to become expert chemistry teachers. Phase 2 of the study, reported in this paper, investigated how collaboration with school-based mentors (associate teachers) on teaching practice (practicum) might impact on this process and student teachers' development of their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The collaboration involved identifying and discussing pedagogical issues related to a practicum-teaching topic using a student teacher's draft CoRe as a starting point and ongoing focus for the professional dialogue. Practicum offered an opportunity for aspects of student teachers' PCK, as embodied in their draft CoRes, to be explored and expanded upon in classroom programmes with the support and input of associate teachers. The findings were influenced by different contextual factors; however, the student teachers found their CoRes to be very useful frameworks for engaging in focussed professional dialogue with their teaching mentors. They valued the expertise, currency of knowledge and mentoring of their associates and reported positively about the contribution this support made to their PCK development via the CoRe design process and the transformation of the CoRe into classroom teaching.

  12. Permeability Evolution During Reactive Flow Experiments on Cores Under CO2 Sequestration Conditions and Development of Fully Coupled Reactive Flow Simulations at the Reservoir Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, M. O.; Kong, X. Z.; Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Physical, chemical, thermal, and mechanical processes can modify permeability and affect CO2 injectivity and reactive fluid flow during geologic CO2 sequestration. Here we report permeability evolutions observed in core-flood experiments using CO2-charged fluids under various formation conditions. Temperature-series experiments on consolidated dolomite cores show a permeability increase due to dissolution, followed by a two-step permeability decrease due to CO2 exsolution and secondary dolomite precipitation, as temperature is increased from 21 to 50°C and then to 100°C, respectively. CO2 mass balance calculations suggest that, under dynamic steady-state conditions, CO2 saturation and its relative permeability can only reach up to ~0.5 and ~0.0065, respectively. Permeability reductions of ~1/3 and mass losses of ~2% are observed both in a 52-day recycling and in two 3-day single-pass experiments with K-feldspar-rich sandstone (150°C, 200 bar). Water chemistry, SEM, and XRCT data suggest feldspar dissolution and precipitation of either boehmite (recycling) or kaolinite (single-pass) during the experiments. These observations indicate that permeability can decrease with increasing porosity due to mineral precipitation in critical pore throats. Single-pass experiments on nine dolomite cores (150°C and 150 bar with NaCl) reveal permeability enhancements and dissolution patterns at different flow rates. Permeability-porosity data indicate an increase in permeability enhancement rate per increase in porosity with reaction progress as dissolution channels lengthen along the core. These experimental observations provide the requisite data for informing up-scaled, fully-coupled reactive transport simulations of CO2 sequestration in interbedded siliclastic-carbonate sedimentary reservoirs, which we present.

  13. Resolving global versus local/regional Pu sources in the environment using sector ICP-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketterer, M.E.; Hafer, K.M.; Link, C.L.; Kolwaite, D.; Wilson, Jim; Mietelski, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is a versatile method for the determination of plutonium activities and isotopic compositions in samples containing this element at fallout levels. Typical detection limits for 239+240Pu are 0.1, 0.02 and 0.002 Bq kg -1Pu for samples sizes of 0.5 g, 3 g, and 50 g of soil, respectively. The application of sector ICP-MS-based Pu determinations is demonstrated in studies in sediment chronology, soil Pu inventory and depth distribution, and the provenance of global fallout versus local or regional Pu sources. A sediment core collected from Sloans Lake (Denver, Colorado, USA) exhibits very similar 137Cs and 239+240Pu activity profiles; 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios indicate possible small influences from the Nevada Test Site and/or the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. An undisturbed soil profile from Lockett Meadow (Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) exhibits an exponential decrease in 239+240Pu activity versus depth; 240Pu/239Pu in the top 3 cm is slightly lower than the global fallout range of 0.180 ?? 0.014 due to possible regional influence of Nevada Test Site fallout. The 239??240Pu inventory at Lockett Meadow is 56 ?? 4 Bq m-2, consistent with Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude fallout. Archived NdF3 sources, prepared from Polish soils, demonstrate that substantial 239+240Pu from the 1986 Chernobyl disaster has been deposited in north eastern regions of Poland; compared to global fallout, Chernobyl Pu exhibits higher abundances of 240Pu and 241Pu. The ratios 240Pu/239pu and 241Pu/239Pu co-vary and range from 0.186-0.348 and 0.0029-0.0412, respectively, in forest soils (241Pu/239Pu = 0.2407??[240Pu/239Pu] - 0.0413; r2 = 0.9924). ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry 2004.

  14. Implementation of automated testing for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D: Return of experience from a core-laboratory.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nathalie; Gruson, Damien

    2016-02-01

    Measurement of 1,25(OH)2D, the most biologically active form of vitamin D, circulating levels is relevant in several physiopathological states such as chronic kidney disease, parathyroid dysfunction, sarcoidosis, and vitamin D dependent rickets. Our study determined the performances of a novel automated 1,25(OH)2D immunoassay in a core-laboratory environment. We observed satisfactory analytical performances for this assay and an excellent agreement with a well established LC-MS/MS method. Furthermore, this assay allows a reduced TAT, integration in automated core-laboratories and potential consolidation with other tests of the bone and mineral metabolism. PMID:26519091

  15. CALORIMETER-BASED ADJUSTMENT OF MULTIPLICITY DETERMINED 240PU EFF KNOWN-A ANALYSIS FOR THE ASSAY OF PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Dubose, F.

    2012-02-21

    In nuclear material processing facilities, it is often necessary to balance the competing demands of accuracy and throughput. While passive neutron multiplicity counting is the preferred method for relatively fast assays of plutonium, the presence of low-Z impurities (fluorine, beryllium, etc.) rapidly erodes the assay precision of passive neutron counting techniques, frequently resulting in unacceptably large total measurement uncertainties. Conversely, while calorimeters are immune to these impurity effects, the long count times required for high accuracy can be a hindrance to efficiency. The higher uncertainties in passive neutron measurements of impure material are driven by the resulting large (>>2) {alpha}-values, defined as the ({alpha},n):spontaneous fission neutron emission ratio. To counter impurity impacts for high-{alpha} materials, a known-{alpha} approach may be adopted. In this method, {alpha} is determined for a single item using a combination of gamma-ray and calorimetric measurements. Because calorimetry is based on heat output, rather than a statistical distribution of emitted neutrons, an {alpha}-value determined in this way is far more accurate than one determined from passive neutron counts. This fixed {alpha} value can be used in conventional multiplicity analysis for any plutonium-bearing item having the same chemical composition and isotopic distribution as the original. With the results of single calorimeter/passive neutron/gamma-ray measurement, these subsequent items can then be assayed with high precision and accuracy in a relatively short time, despite the presence of impurities. A calorimeter-based known-{alpha} multiplicity analysis technique is especially useful when requiring rapid, high accuracy, high precision measurements of multiple plutonium bearing items having a common source. The technique has therefore found numerous applications at the Savannah River Site. In each case, a plutonium (or mixed U/Pu) bearing item is divided into multiple containers. A single item from that batch is then selected for both neutron and calorimetric measurements; all remaining items undergo a neutron measurement only. Using the technique mentioned above, the 'true' {alpha} value determined from the first (calorimeter and passive neutron measured) item is used in multiplicity analysis for all other items in the batch. The justification for using this {alpha} value in subsequent calculations is the assumption that the chemical composition and isotopic distribution of all batch items are the same, giving a constant ({alpha},n):spontaneous fission ratio. This analysis method has been successfully applied to the KIS Facility, significantly improving measurement uncertainties and reducing processing times for numerous items. Comprehensive plans were later developed to extend the use of this method to other applications, including the K-Area Shuffler and the H-Area Pu-Blending Project. While only the feasibility study for the Shuffler has been completed, implementation of the method in the H-Area Pu-Blending Project is currently in progress and has been successfully applied to multiple items. This report serves to document the details of this method in order to serve as a reference for future applications. Also contained herein are specific examples of the application of known-{alpha} multiplicity analysis.

  16. Use of plutonium isotope activity ratios in dating recent sediments. [/sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu + /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    The majority of plutonium presently in the biosphere has come from the testing of nuclear devices. In the early 1950s, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratio of fallout debris was > 0.04; in the more extensive test series of 1961 to 1962, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratios were quite consistent at 0.02 to 0.03 and maximum fallout delivery occurred in mid-1963. A significant perturbation in Pu isotope activity ratios occurred in mid-1966 with the deposition of Pu-238 from the SNAP-9A reentry and burn-up. Recently deposited sediments have recorded these events and where accumulation rates are rapid (> 1 cm/y), changes in Pu isotope activity ratios can be used as a geochronological tool.

  17. Petrophysical characterization of first ever drilled core samples from an active CO2 storage site, the German Ketzin Pilot Site - Comparison with long term experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemke, Kornelia; Liebscher, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Stuttgart Formation it is difficult to estimate definite CO2 induced changes from petrophysical measurements. The observed changes are only minor. Several batch experiments on Ketzin samples drilled prior injection confirm the results from investigation of the in-situ rock cores. Core samples of the pre-injection wells were exposed to CO2 and brine in autoclaves over various time periods. Samples were characterized prior to and after the experiments by NMR and Mercury Injection Porosimetry (MIP). The results are consistent with the logging data and show only minor change. Unfortunately, also in these experiments observed mineralogical and petrophysical changes were within the natural heterogeneity of the Ketzin reservoir and precluded unequivocal conclusions. However, given the only minor differences between post-injection well and pre-injection well, it is reasonable to assume that the potential dissolution-precipitation processes appear to have no severe consequences on reservoir and cap rock integrity or on the injection behaviour. This is also in line with the continuously recorded injection operation parameter. These do not point to any changes in reservoir injectivity.|

  18. Plutonium, cesium, uranium and thorium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1983-November 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Anderson, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in sediment cores and suspended particle samples from the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs, and /sup 60/Co, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu indicate rapid accumulation in marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor adjacent to New York City, resulting in /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu accumulations of more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu moving downstream appears to be retained within the system by particle deposition, while more than 50% of the /sup 137/Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported. Significant movement of dissolved plutonium into the estuary from adjacent coastal waters may be occurring. Depth profiles of radionuclides are not significantly altered by physical mixing processes in areas accumulating particles at greater than 1 cm/yr. Transport of fallout radionuclides appears to have decreased faster than would be calculated from continuous removal from a well-mixed soil reservoir, indicating that sequestering of a substantial portion of the soil fallout burden has occurred in the watershed soils over the past two decades. Measurements of fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities two orders of magnitude greater than that found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ions are likely to be important in regulating plutonium solubility in some environments and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility. 45 references, 17 figures, 14 tables.

  19. Plutonium, cesium, uranium, and thorium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1981-November 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Anderson, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu moving downstream in the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the system by particle deposition, while 80 to 90% of the /sup 137/Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported to the coastal waters in solution. Measurements of fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion is likely to be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility in some environments and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility. Activities of several other nuclides of interest in radioactive waste management (/sup 238/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 232/Th, /sup 230/Th, /sup 228/Th, /sup 231/Pa) were also found to be orders of magnitude greater in high carbonate waters than in other natural waters.

  20. The Core of Mentorship: Medical Students' Experiences of One-to-One Mentoring in a Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalen, Susanne; Ponzer, Sari; Silen, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring has been used in different health care educational programmes, but the core of mentorship, i.e., facilitating the development of medical students' professional competence, has not been explored in depth in the literature. In order to create effective and meaningful mentoring programmes, there is a need for deeper knowledge of the meaning…

  1. Enhancing the Practicum Experience for Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers through Collaborative CoRe Design with Mentor Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an ongoing study exploring how the Content Representation (CoRe) design can be used as a tool to help chemistry student teachers begin acquiring the professional knowledge required to become expert chemistry teachers. Phase 2 of the study, reported in this paper, investigated how collaboration with school-based…

  2. Characterization of Pu concentration and its isotopic composition in soils of Gansu in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi; Wu, Fengchang; Liao, Haiqing

    2009-01-01

    The total 239+240Pu activities and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in surface soil samples (0-5cm) in the Kumtag Desert in western Gansu Province, and in a soil core sample in Lanzhou were investigated using a sector-field ICP-MS. In the surface soil samples, 239+240Pu activities in fine particles (<150microm) were 1.3-2.1 times of those in coarse particles (150microm-1mm) which ranged from 0.005 to 0.157mBq/g. Atom ratios of 240Pu/239Pu in the surface soils ranged from 0.168 to 0.192 with a mean of 0.182+/-0.008. The mean ratio was similar to the typical global fallout value although the Kumtag Desert was believed to have received close-in fallout derived from Chinese nuclear weapons tests mainly conducted in the 1970s. Furthermore, the mean 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio observed in the soil core sample in Lanzhou was similar to the typical global fallout value. In the soil core sample, 239+240Pu activities in the various layers ranged from 0.012 to 0.23mBq/g, and the inventory of 239+240Pu (32.4Bq/m2, 0-23cm) was slightly lower than that expected from global fallout (42Bq/m2) at the same latitude. Rapid downward migration of Pu isotopes was observed in Lanzhou soil core sample layers. The contribution of the 10-cm deep top layers of surface soils to total inventory was only 17%, while the contribution of deeper layers (10-23cm) was as high as 83%. The 239+240Pu activity levels and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in soils in Gansu Province, China are similar to those in atmospheric deposition samples collected in the spring in recent years in Japan. PMID:19058885

  3. Sound Speed of Liquid Iron Along the Outer Core Isentrope: New Pre-heated Ramp Compression Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, P. D.; Nguyen, J.; Akin, M. C.; Fatýanov, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed elasticity data on liquid Fe and candidate molten core alloys should offer new constraints on the under-constrained problem of Earth's core composition. Density, sound speed, and the gradient in sound speed with pressure are each potentially distinct experimental constraints and are each well-known for Earth. The gradient in sound speed, though, has not been used because sound speed depends on both T and P, such that data must be collected or reconstructed along the correct, nearly adiabatic, thermal profile. Reconstruction requires the Grüneisen γ, which is composition-dependent, and data over a large P-T space to allow extrapolation. Both static and dynamic compression methods could be used, but the conditions (140 - 330 GPa and 4000 - 6000 K) are very challenging for static methods and standard shock compression only samples the outer core P-T profile at a single P. Instead we are applying quasi-isentropic dynamic ramp compression, using pre-heating of the target and impedance of the leading edge of a graded-density impactor (GDI) to select a probable outer core isentrope. The target material is melted and raised to a point on the outer core isentrope by the initial shock, then quasi-isentropically ramped to a maximum P by increasing shock impedance of trailing GDI layers. Particle velocity is monitored by photonic doppler velocimetry (PDV) at two step thicknesses at the interface of Fe or Fe-alloy target and MgO windows. The difference in arrival time of each particle velocity at the two steps directly gives the Lagrangian sound speed vs. particle velocity, which is integrated to obtain Pand density. At the writing of this abstract, we have completed one shot of this type. We successfully heated a two-step Fe target in a Mo capsule with MgO windows to 1350 °C, maintaining sufficient alignment and reflectivity to collect PDV signal returns. We characterized the velocity correction factor for PDV observation through MgO windows, and have confirmed

  4. Crystallization Processes in Mercury's Core Inferred from In-situ High-Pressure Melting Experiments in the Fe-S-Si-C System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. M.; Van Orman, J. A.; Hauck, S. A., II; Sun, N.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Based upon the high pressure melting temperatures in the Fe-FeS system, an iron "snow" process has been suggested to occur in Mercury's core. However, recent results from the MESSENGER mission indicate very reducing conditions in Mercury, under which a substantial amount of silicon should also dissolve into the core. The presence of Si can significantly modify the chemical and physical properties of Mercury's core (e.g., phase relations, crystallization, density). Moreover, up to 4 wt% C could have been incorporated into the core during the planet formation. In order to test the iron snow hypothesis in a system that is likely to be closer to the actual core composition, we performed in situ high-pressure, high-temperature experiments in the Fe-FeS-Fe2Si-Fe3C system using a multi-anvil press on a synchrotron (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne). To observe low degree eutectic melting, we separated the samples in two parts: (1) an iron rod presaturated with Si and C and (2) a mixture of FeS, Fe2Si and Fe3C. Eutectic melting temperature and phase relations were determined at various pressures between 4.5 and 15.5 GPa using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and imaging. Temperature was quenched soon after melting in order to preserve the eutectic melt composition. The X-ray images, diffraction spectra and back-scattered electron images of the recovered samples show that eutectic melting occurs in the range of 800 - 900°C in all our experiments. These temperatures are close to the eutectic temperatures in the Fe-FeS-Fe3C system, indicating that Si does not change the eutectic temperatures significantly. Melting therefore occurs at much lower temperature than suggested for the Fe-S-Si system at similar pressures. This difference may be explained by the presence of C and by the higher silicon content in our starting composition. Our experimental setup may also be more suitable for detecting the low degrees of melting in metallic systems. Such low eutectic melting

  5. Modulation of mantle plumes and heat flow at the core mantle boundary by plate-scale flow: results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.; Jellinek, A. Mark; Richards, Mark A.; Manga, Michael

    2004-09-01

    We report results from analog laboratory experiments, in which a large-scale flow is imposed upon natural convection from a hot boundary layer at the base of a large tank of corn syrup. The experiments show that the subdivision of the convective flow into four regions provides a reasonable conceptual framework for interpreting the effects of large-scale flow on plumes. Region I includes the area of the hot thermal boundary layer (TBL) that is thinned by the large-scale flow, thereby suppressing plumes. Region II encompasses the critically unstable boundary layer where plumes form. Region III is the area above the boundary layer that is devoid of plumes. Region IV comprises the area of hot upwelling and plume conduits. Quantitative analysis of our experiments results in a scaling law for heat flux from the hot boundary and for the spatial extent of plume suppression. When applied to the Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB), our results suggest that large-scale mantle flow, due to sinking lithospheric plates, can locally thin the TBL and suppress plume formation over large fractions of the CMB. Approximately 30% of heat flow from the core may be due to increased heat flux from plate-scale flow. Furthermore, CMB heat flux is non-uniformly distributed along the CMB, with large areas where heat flux is increased on average by a factor of 2. As a consequence, the convective flow pattern in the outer core may be affected by CMB heat-flux heterogeneity and sensitive to changes in plate-scale mantle flow. Because of plume suppression and 'focusing' of hot mantle from the CMB into zones of upwelling flow, plume conduits (hotspots) are expected to be spatially associated with lower-mantle regions of low seismic velocities, inferred as hot upwelling mantle flow.

  6. Correlation Between Active-Learning Coursework and Student Retention of Core Content During Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Testman, Julie A.; Hoyland, Marcella N.; Kimble, Angel M.; Euler, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To implement an active-learning approach in a pharmacotherapy course sequence in the second year (P2) and third (P3) year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program and determine whether the pedagogical changes correlated with retention of core content in the fourth year (P4). Design. Class sessions were transitioned from slides-based lectures to discussion-based active-learning pedagogy. Assessment. A comprehensive examination was created and administered to assess student retention of therapeutic topics taught. Students demonstrated significantly improved overall scores on questions derived from the active-learning pedagogy used in Pharmacotherapy II and III compared to those derived from Pharmacotherapy I in which content was delivered by lecture. Conclusion. The use of active-learning strategies over lecture-based methods in pharmacotherapy courses resulted in higher retention of core content. Students’ performance in areas taught using the discussion-based methodology was superior to that which was taught using lecture-based slide presentations. PMID:24159212

  7. DoE Early Career Research Program: Final Report: Model-Independent Dark-Matter Searches at the ATLAS Experiment and Applications of Many-core Computing to High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Farbin, Amir

    2015-07-15

    This is the final report of for DoE Early Career Research Program Grant Titled "Model-Independent Dark-Matter Searches at the ATLAS Experiment and Applications of Many-core Computing to High Energy Physics".

  8. Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present (version 1) - PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Gregoire, Lauren J.; Kageyama, Masa; Roche, Didier M.; Valdes, Paul J.; Burke, Andrea; Drummond, Rosemarie; Peltier, W. Richard; Tarasov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    The last deglaciation, which marked the transition between the last glacial and present interglacial periods, was punctuated by a series of rapid (centennial and decadal) climate changes. Numerical climate models are useful for investigating mechanisms that underpin the climate change events, especially now that some of the complex models can be run for multiple millennia. We have set up a Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) working group to coordinate efforts to run transient simulations of the last deglaciation, and to facilitate the dissemination of expertise between modellers and those engaged with reconstructing the climate of the last 21 000 years. Here, we present the design of a coordinated Core experiment over the period 21-9 thousand years before present (ka) with time-varying orbital forcing, greenhouse gases, ice sheets and other geographical changes. A choice of two ice sheet reconstructions is given, and we make recommendations for prescribing ice meltwater (or not) in the Core experiment. Additional focussed simulations will also be coordinated on an ad hoc basis by the working group, for example to investigate more thoroughly the effect of ice meltwater on climate system evolution, and to examine the uncertainty in other forcings. Some of these focussed simulations will target shorter durations around specific events in order to understand them in more detail and allow for the more computationally expensive models to take part.

  9. Historical trends of organochlorine pesticides in a sediment core from the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Hernández, C M; Tolosa, I; Mesa-Albernas, M; Díaz-Asencio, M; Corcho-Alvarado, J A; Sánchez-Cabeza, J A

    2015-10-01

    Sediments can be natural archives to reconstruct the history of pollutant inputs into coastal areas. This is important to improve management strategies and evaluate the success of pollution control measurements. In this work, the vertical distribution of organochlorine pesticides (DDTs, Lindane, HCB, Heptachlor, Aldrin and Mirex) was determined in a sediment core collected from the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba, which was dated by using the (210)Pb dating method and validated with the (239,240)Pu fallout peak. Results showed significant changes in sediment accumulation during the last 40 years: recent mass accumulation rates (0.321 g cm(-2) yr(-1)) double those estimated before 1970 (0.15 g cm(-2) yr(-1)). This change matches closely land use change in the region (intense deforestation and regulation of the Colon River in the late 1970s). Among pesticides, only DDTs isomers, Lindane and HCB were detected, and ranged from 0.029 to 0.374 ng g(-1) dw for DDTs, from<0.006 to 0.05 ng g(-1) dw for Lindane and from<0.04 to 0.134 ng g(-1) dw for HCB. Heptachlor, Aldrin and Mirex were below the detection limits (∼0.003 ng g(-1)), indicating that these compounds had a limited application in the Coloma watershed. Pesticide contamination was evident since the 1970s. DDTs and HCB records showed that management strategies, namely the banning the use of organochlorine contaminants, led to a concentration decline. However, Lindane, which was restricted in 1990, can still be found in the watershed. According to NOAA guidelines, pesticides concentrations encountered in these sediments are low and probably not having an adverse effect on sediment dwelling organisms. PMID:26051863

  10. The Models and Hard Cores: Selective Acculturation and Racial Stratification in Chinese Students' School Experience in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kee, Geok Hwa

    2010-01-01

    Are the academic and social experiences of Chinese Malaysian students as much an outcome of the selective acculturation strategy of their parents as the linguistic assimilation policy of the government? Driven by economic necessity on one hand and pressured by cultural preservation on the other, Chinese parents first send their sons and daughters…

  11. Challenging Idealism: Pre-Service Teachers' Core Beliefs Before, During, and after an Extended Field-Based Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John W.; Chant, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher beliefs have for some time been directly linked to teacher actions. What teachers believe about curriculum, pedagogy, their students, and the greater goals of education itself influences their instructional behaviors and resultant decision-making. This study sought to analyze how experiences influence changes in beliefs, can provide…

  12. CO2 Exsolution from CO2 Saturated Water: Core-Scale Experiments and Focus on Impacts of Pressure Variations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruina; Li, Rong; Ma, Jin; Jiang, Peixue

    2015-12-15

    For CO2 sequestration and utilization in the shallow reservoirs, reservoir pressure changes are due to the injection rate changing, a leakage event, and brine withdrawal for reservoir pressure balance. The amounts of exsolved CO2 which are influenced by the pressure reduction and the subsequent secondary imbibition process have a significant effect on the stability and capacity of CO2 sequestration and utilization. In this study, exsolution behavior of the CO2 has been studied experimentally using a core flooding system in combination with NMR/MRI equipment. Three series of pressure variation profiles, including depletion followed by imbibitions without or with repressurization and repetitive depletion and repressurization/imbibition cycles, were designed to investigate the exsolution responses for these complex pressure variation profiles. We found that the exsolved CO2 phase preferentially occupies the larger pores and exhibits a uniform spatial distribution. The mobility of CO2 is low during the imbibition process, and the residual trapping ratio is extraordinarily high. During the cyclic pressure variation process, the first cycle has the largest contribution to the amount of exsolved CO2. The low CO2 mobility implies a certain degree of self-sealing during a possible reservoir depletion. PMID:26509211

  13. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  14. Long-term effects of cocaine experience on neuroplasticity in the nucleus accumbens core of addiction-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Waselus, M; Flagel, S B; Jedynak, J P; Akil, H; Robinson, T E; Watson, S J

    2013-09-17

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse is associated with structural plasticity in brain reward pathways. Rats selectively bred for locomotor response to novelty differ on a number of neurobehavioral dimensions relevant to addiction. This unique genetic animal model was used here to examine both pre-existing differences and long-term consequences of repeated cocaine treatment on structural plasticity. Selectively bred high-responder (bHR) and low-responder (bLR) rats received repeated saline or cocaine injections for 9 consecutive days. Escalating doses of cocaine (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/kg) were administered on the first (day 1) and last (day 9) days of treatment and a single injection of the intermediate dose (15 mg/kg) was given on days 2-8. Motor activity in response to escalating doses of cocaine was compared on the first and last days of treatment to assess the acute and sensitized response to the drug. Following prolonged cocaine abstinence (28 days), spine density was examined on terminal dendrites of medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens core. Relative to bLRs, bHRs exhibited increased psychomotor activation in response to both the acute and repeated effects of cocaine. There were no differences in spine density between bHR and bLR rats under basal conditions or following repeated saline treatment. However, spine density differed markedly between these two lines following prolonged cocaine abstinence. All spine types were decreased in cocaine-treated bHRs, while only mushroom spines were decreased in bLRs that received cocaine. Changes in spine density occurred specifically near the branch point of terminal dendrites. These findings indicate that structural plasticity associated with prolonged cocaine abstinence varies markedly in two selected strains of rats that vary on numerous traits relevant to addiction. Thus, genetic factors that contribute to individual variation in the behavioral response to cocaine also influence cocaine-induced structural

  15. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF COCAINE EXPERIENCE ON NEUROPLASTICITY IN THE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS CORE OF ADDICTION-PRONE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Waselus, Maria; Flagel, Shelly B.; Jedynak, Jakub P.; Akil, Huda; Robinson, Terry E.; Watson, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse is associated with structural plasticity in brain reward pathways. Rats selectively bred for locomotor response to novelty differ on a number of neurobehavioral dimensions relevant to addiction. This unique genetic animal model was used here to examine both pre-existing differences and long-term consequences of repeated cocaine treatment on structural plasticity. Selectively bred high-responder (bHR) and low-responder (bLR) rats received repeated saline or cocaine injections for 9 consecutive days. Escalating doses of cocaine (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/kg) were administered on the first (day 1) and last (day 9) days of treatment and a single injection of the intermediate dose (15 mg/kg) was given on days 2-8. Motor activity in response to escalating doses of cocaine was compared on the first and last days of treatment to assess the acute and sensitized response to the drug. Following prolonged cocaine abstinence (28 days), spine density was examined on terminal dendrites of medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens core. Relative to bLRs, bHRs exhibited increased psychomotor activation in response to both the acute and repeated effects of cocaine. There were no differences in spine density between bHR and bLR rats under basal conditions or following repeated saline treatment. However, spine density differed markedly between these two lines following prolonged cocaine abstinence. All spine types were decreased in cocaine-treated bHRs, while only mushroom spines were decreased in bLRs that received cocaine. Changes in spine density occurred specifically near the branch point of terminal dendrites. These findings indicate that structural plasticity associated with prolonged cocaine abstinence varies markedly in two selected strains of rats that vary on numerous traits relevant to addiction. Thus, genetic factors that contribute to individual variation in the behavioral response to cocaine also influence cocaine-induced structural

  16. Alteration of Caprock Fracture Geometries During Flow of CO2-acidified Brine: Informing Basin-scale Leakage Models From Pore-scale modeling and Core-scale Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, B. R.; Peters, C. A.; Fitts, J. P.; Nogues, J. P.; Celia, M. A.; Dobossy, M.; Janzen, A.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, geologic carbon sequestration leakage assessment models do not account for geochemical alteration of potential leakage pathways such as fractures in the caprock formation. Leakage of CO2-acidified brine may lead to geochemical alterations of the fracture geometry that may alter fracture permeability. Accurate prediction of CO2 leakage potential requires bridging the gap between small-scale models and laboratory experiments, which have limited scope in space and time, and basin-scale leakage models. Results from two CO2-acidified brine flow-through experiments performed on artificially-fractured carbonate caprock samples will be presented. Although the two experiments used core samples taken from the same formation only centimeters apart, they resulted in two very different outcomes with respect to fracture permeability evolution. One experiment exhibited extensive deterioration along the fracture due primarily to dissolution of calcite, while the other exhibited a net decrease in fracture permeability due to a combination of mineral precipitation and particle clogging. The stark difference observed in the two experiments, for rocks from the same formation, suggests caprock fracture evolution is highly sensitive to variations in mineral spatial heterogeneity, brine composition and flow conditions. In addition to the laboratory experiments, we have developed a reactive-transport pore-network model that is capable of simulating alterations in network permeability and porosity due to flow of a CO2-acidified brine phase through carbonate rocks. The pore-network model will help us identify the important flow and geochemical conditions in which precipitation and dissolution occur. These small-scale projects will be used to inform a basin-scale leakage model of the pertinent range of geochemical conditions that should be tested in order to determine 1-D permeability evolution of leakage pathways. Finally, simplified mathematical rules will be derived to describe

  17. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX): A Core Element for the Asian Monsoon Year (2008-2009)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, WIlliam K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is to unravel the physical mechanisms and multi-scale interactions associated with aerosol-monsoon water cycle in the Asian Indo-Paczj?c region towards improved prediction of rainfall in land regions of the Asian monsoon. JAMEX will be planned as a five-year (2007-201 1) multi-national aerosol-monsoon research project, aimed at promoting collaboration, partnership and alignment of ongoing and planned national and international programs. Two coordinated special observing periods (SOP), covering the pre-monsoon (April-May) and the monsoon (June-August) periods is tentatively targeted for 2008 and 2009. The major work on validation and reference site coordination will take place in 2007 through the spring of 2008. A major science workshop is planned after SOP-I1 in 2010. Modeling and satellite data utilization studies will continue throughout the entire period to help in design of the observation arrays and measurement platforms for SOPS. The tentative time schedule, including milestones and research activities is shown in Fig. 1. One of the unique aspects of JAMEX is that it stems from grass-root scientific and societal imperatives, and it bridges a gap in existing national and international research programs. Currently we have identified 10 major national and international projects/programs separately for aerosols and monsoon research planned in the next five years in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the US, that could be potential contributors or partners with JAMEX. These include the Asian-Indo- Pacific Ocean (AIPO) Project and Aerosol Research Project from China, Monsoon Asian Hydro- Atmospheric Science Research and predication Initiative (MAHASRI) from Japan, Continental Tropical Convergence Zone (CTCZ) and Severe Thunderstorm: Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) from India, Share-Asia from Italy, Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC), Pacific Aerosol-Cloud-Dust Experiment (PACDEX), East Asia Study of

  18. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX): A Core Element for the Asian Monsoon Year (2008-2009)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is to unravel the physical mechanisms and multi-scale interactions associated with aerosol-monsoon water cycle in the Asian Indo-Pacific region towards improved prediction of rainfall in land regions of the Asian monsoon. JAMEX will be planned as a five-year (2007-201 1) multi-national aerosol-monsoon research project, aimed at promoting collaboration, partnership and alignment of ongoing and planned national and international programs. Two coordinated special observing periods (SOP), covering the pre-monsoon (April-May) and the monsoon (June-August) periods is tentatively targeted for 2008 and 2009. The major work on validation and reference site coordination will take place in 2007 through the spring of 2008. A major science workshop is planned after SOP-I1 in 2010. Modeling and satellite data utilization studies will continue throughout the entire period to help in design of the observation arrays and measurement platforms for SOPS. The tentative time schedule, including milestones and research activities is shown in Fig. 1. One of the unique aspects of JAMEX is that it stems from grass-root scientific and societal imperatives, and it bridges a gap in existing national and international research programs. Currently we have identified 10 major national and international projects/programs separately for aerosols and monsoon research planned in the next five years in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the US, that could be potential contributors or partners with JAMEX. These include the Asian-Indo- Pacific Ocean (AIPO) Project and Aerosol Research Project from China, Monsoon Asian Hydro- Atmospheric Science Research and predication Initiative (MAHASRI) from Japan, Continental Tropical Convergence Zone (CTCZ) and Severe Thunderstorm: Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) from India, Share-Asia from Italy, Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC), Pacific Aerosol-Cloud-Dust Experiment (PACDEX), East Asia Study of

  19. Sampling in the Snow: High School Winter Field Experiences Provide Relevant, Real World Connections Between Scientific Practices and Disciplinary Core Ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, E. W.; Burakowski, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    For much of the northern United States, the months surrounding the winter solstice are times of increased darkness, low temperatures, and frozen landscapes. It's a time when many high school science educators, who otherwise would venture outside with their classes, hunker down and are wary of the outdoors. However, a plethora of learning opportunities lies just beyond the classroom. Working collaboratively, a high school science teacher and a snow scientist have developed multiple activities to engage students in the scientific process of collecting, analyzing and interpreting the winter world using snow data to (1) learn about the insulative properties of snow, and (2) to learn about the role of snow cover on winter climate through its reflective properties while participating in a volunteer network that collects snow depth, albedo (reflectivity), and density data. These outdoor field-based snow investigations incorporate Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and disciplinary core ideas, including ESS2.C: The roles of water in Earth's surface processes and ESS2.D: Weather and Climate. Additionally, the lesson plans presented address Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Mathematics, including the creation and analysis of bar graphs and time series plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.A.1) and xy scatter plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.B.6). High school students participating in the 2013/2014 snow sampling season described their outdoor learning experience as "authentic" and "hands-on" as compared to traditional class indoors. They emphasized that learning outdoors was essential to their understanding of underlying content and concepts because they "learn through actual experience."

  20. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  1. The ICDP Lake Bosumtwi impact crater scientific drilling project (Ghana): Core LB-08A litho-log, related ejecta, and shock recovery experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Alexander; Luetke, Sabine; Heinrich, Volker

    The 1.07 Myr old Lake Bosumtwi impact crater in Ghana was drilled within the framework of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Project (ICDP). Hole LB-08A, drilled into the outer flank of the central uplift and with a total depth of 451 m, yielded 215.71 m of impact-related rocks. This paper summarizes observations of the lithological logging on core LB-08A. Between a depth of 235.6 and ~260 m, the section consists of a melt-bearing allochthonous, polymict, and mostly clast-supported impact breccia. Down to ~418 m, the section comprises a rather uniform unit of metagraywacke alternating with phyllite to slate (lower greenschist facies); few (par-) autochthonous impact breccia bodies and rare impact dike breccias are present. The lowermost part of the section contains several centimeter- to decimeter-thick melt-bearing breccia dikes in country rocks identical to those occurring above. Omnipresent fracturing was mapped in a qualitative manner. Most prominent shock effects in the uplifted target rocks comprise planar fractures and deformation elements in quartz and polysynthetic twinning in carbonate minerals; the maximum shock pressure as evidenced by quartz is below 26 GPa. The allochthonous breccias occasionally contain a few vol% of melt particles. Suevites occur outside the crater rim, carrying diaplectic crystals, coesite, and ballen quartz as well as true melt glasses and a variety of lithic clasts, among those spectacular staurolite-rich mica-schists. The recorded shock level in the uplifted target rocks is lower than expected and modeled. Shock recovery experiments with analogue carbonaceous graywackes at 34 and 39.5 GPa yielded nearly complete transformation of quartz into diaplectic glass. We therefore exclude a specific shock behavior of the soft, fluid-rich target material (carbonaceous graywackes, shales, slates) in core LB-08A as the prime or only reason for the melt deficit and the generally low shock levels recorded inside the Lake

  2. Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present; PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, Ruza; Gregoire, Lauren; Kageyama, Masa; Roche, Didier; Valdes, Paul; Burke, Andrea; Drummond, Rosemarie; Peltier, W. Richard; Tarasov, Lev

    2016-04-01

    The last deglaciation, which marked the transition between the last glacial and present interglacial periods, was punctuated by a series of rapid (centennial and decadal) climate changes. Numerical climate models are useful for investigating mechanisms that underpin the events, especially now that some of the complex models can be run for multiple millennia. We have set up a Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) working group to coordinate efforts to run transient simulations of the last deglaciation, and to facilitate the dissemination of expertise between modellers and those engaged with reconstructing the climate of the last 21 thousand years. Here, we present the design of a coordinated Core simulation over the period 21-9 thousand years before present (ka) with time varying orbital forcing, greenhouse gases, ice sheets, and other geographical changes. A choice of two ice sheet reconstructions is given. Additional focussed simulations will also be coordinated on an ad-hoc basis by the working group, for example to investigate the effect of ice sheet and iceberg meltwater, and the uncertainty in other forcings. Some of these focussed simulations will concentrate on shorter durations around specific events to allow the more computationally expensive models to take part. Ivanovic, R. F., Gregoire, L. J., Kageyama, M., Roche, D. M., Valdes, P. J., Burke, A., Drummond, R., Peltier, W. R., and Tarasov, L.: Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present; PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., 8, 9045-9102, doi:10.5194/gmdd-8-9045-2015, 2015.

  3. Physical and Chemical Effects of Two-Phase Brine/Supercritical-CO2 Fluid Flow on Clastic Rocks: Real-Time Monitoring and NMR Imaging of Flow-Through Core Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, C. A.; Vogt, S.; Maneval, J. E.; Brox, T.; Skidmore, M. L.; Codd, S. L.; Seymour, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Sandstone core samples were challenged with a supercritical CO2-saturated brine mixture in a laboratory flow-through core reactor system over a range of temperatures and brine strengths. Cores of quartz arenite from the Berea formation were selected to represent ideal ‘clean’ sandstone These laboratory experiments potentially provide an analog for the acidification of pore fluids near the brine/CO2 interface during CO2 flooding of depleted clastic hydrocarbon reservoirs for carbon sequestration. Flow in the reactor was perpendicular to bedding. Initial experiments were run at 50°C and 100°C with brine concentrations of 1g/L and 10g/L (TDS) to test effects of different temperatures and brine compositions. Real-time monitoring of fluid pH and conductivity provided a measure of reaction rates. Introduction of supercritical CO2 into the brine-saturated cores initiated a reduction in pH accompanied by an increase in conductivity. NMR images of fresh cores were compared with images of challenged cores using a protocol for pixel-by-pixel comparison to determine the effects on bulk pore volume and geometry. Two types of imaging experiments were conducted: multi-slice spin echo and 3-D spin echo images. Multi-slice experiments had a slice thickness of 1.5 mm and an in-plane resolution of 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm, and 3-D experiments had a resolution of 0.47 mm x 0.55 mm x 0.55mm. Imaging results reflected the observed changes in the physical and chemical structure post-challenge. Two-dimensional relaxation correlation experiments were also conducted to probe the pore sizes, connectivity and fluid saturation of the rock cores before and after challenging. Chemical analyses and microscopic examination of the challenged cores will provide a better understanding of alteration in the cores and the changes in the volume, geometry and connectivity of pore space.

  4. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD3.1 for gravity-driven injection experiment in the core makeup tank of the CARR Passive Reactor (CP-1300)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.I.; No, H.C.; Bang, Y.S.; Kim, H.J.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to improve the analysis capability of RELAP5/MOD3.1 on the direct contact condensation in the core makeup tank (CMT) of passive high-pressure injection system (PHPIS) in the CARR Passive Reactor (CP-1300). The gravity-driven injection experiment is conducted by using a small scale test facility to identify the parameters having significant effects on the gravity-driven injection and the major condensation modes. It turns out that the larger the water subcooling is, the more initiation of injection is delayed, and the sparger and the natural circulation of the hot water from the steam generator accelerate the gravity-driven injection. The condensation modes are divided into three modes: sonic jet, subsonic jet, and steam cavity. RELAP5/MOD3.1 is chosen to evaluate the cod predictability on the direct contact condensation in the CMT. It is found that the predictions of MOD3.1 are in better agreement with the experimental data than those of MOD3.0. From the nodalization study of the test section, the 1-node model shows better agreement with the experimental data than the multi-node models. RELAP5/MOD3.1 identifies the flow regime of the test section as vertical stratification. However, the flow regime observed in the experiment is the subsonic jet with the bubble having the vertical cone shape. To accurately predict the direct contact condensation in the CMT with RELAP5/MOD3.1, it is essential that a new set of the interfacial heat transfer coefficients and a new flow regime map for direct contact condensation in the CMT be developed.

  5. Phase Equilibrium Experiments on Potential Lunar Core Compositions: Extension of Current Knowledge to Multi-Component (Fe-Ni-Si-S-C) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous geophysical and geochemical studies have suggested the existence of a small metallic lunar core, but the composition of that core is not known. Knowledge of the composition can have a large impact on the thermal evolution of the core, its possible early dynamo creation, and its overall size and fraction of solid and liquid. Thermal models predict that the current temperature at the core-mantle boundary of the Moon is near 1650 K. Re-evaluation of Apollo seismic data has highlighted the need for new data in a broader range of bulk core compositions in the PT range of the lunar core. Geochemical measurements have suggested a more volatile-rich Moon than previously thought. And GRAIL mission data may allow much better constraints on the physical nature of the lunar core. All of these factors have led us to determine new phase equilibria experimental studies in the Fe-Ni-S-C-Si system in the relevant PT range of the lunar core that will help constrain the composition of Moon's core.

  6. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  7. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Authentic to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukral, Nicole; Spector, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    When educators think about what makes learning relevant to students, often they narrow their thinking to electives or career technical education. While these provide powerful opportunities for students to make relevant connections to their learning, they can also create authentic experiences in the core curriculum. In the San Juan Unified School…

  9. DEGAS experiments on volcanic glass samples from AND-1B drill core: implications for primary magmatic versus secondary H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heide, K.; Cameron, B. I.; Krans, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    The existence of volcanic glass in the AND-1B drill core erupted subaquesously or even subglacially affords the possibility of constraining water depth by measuring the volatile content of the glass only if primary magmatic H2O contents can be recognized from secondary H2O. The glass samples studied come from Lithostratigraphic Unit (LU) 2 between 92 and 145 m depth. The black and well sorted sands from subunit 2.4 were most likely derived from subaerial Hawaiian/Strombolian type eruptions. The graded bedding exposed in this subunit may result from fallout of tephra through the water column. Glass fragments from six different depths within subunit 2.4 were extracted from AND-1B sediment first by magnetic separation and then approximately 100 mg of the freshest glass fragments were handpicked under a binocular microscope. The six glass separates were heated in a DEGAS-device up to 1450°C in high vacuum and the liberated volatiles were determined by a simultaneous mass spectrometric analysis. This study was focused on the determination of H2O, CO2, H2, HF, H2S, HCl, SO2, and hydrocarbon species. The six degassing experiments were carried out using a special high-vacuum-hot-extraction method combined with aquadrupol mass spectrometer. Measurements were carried out at less than 10-4 to 10-3Pa and a linear heating rate (10K/min) at a temperature range between room temperature to 1450°C. The volatile species were analyzed in multiple ion detection mode. DEGAS experiments occur under highly non-equilibrium conditions so that reverse reactions between volatiles or between volatiles and the melt are largely prevented. For each glass sample, volatile release occurs at different rates and intensities at different temperatures. Based on the gas release profiles obtained, degassing processes take place in three separate temperature ranges. Low temperature degassing occurs at temperatures up to 500°C and likely represents the liberation of surface bounded volatiles such as H2

  10. Core Formation Process and Light Elements in the Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Sakairi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    Si, O, and S are major candidates for light elements in the planetary core. In the early stage of the planetary formation, the core formation started by percolation of the metallic liquid though silicate matrix because Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si eutectic temperatures are significantly lower than the solidus of the silicates. Therefore, in the early stage of accretion of the planets, the eutectic liquid with S enrichment was formed and separated into the core by percolation. The major light element in the core at this stage will be sulfur. The internal pressure and temperature increased with the growth of the planets, and the metal component depleted in S was molten. The metallic melt contained both Si and O at high pressure in the deep magma ocean in the later stage. Thus, the core contains S, Si, and O in this stage of core formation. Partitioning experiments between solid and liquid metals indicate that S is partitioned into the liquid metal, whereas O is weakly into the liquid. Partitioning of Si changes with the metallic iron phases, i.e., fcc iron-alloy coexisting with the metallic liquid below 30 GPa is depleted in Si. Whereas hcp-Fe alloy above 30 GPa coexisting with the liquid favors Si. This contrast of Si partitioning provides remarkable difference in compositions of the solid inner core and liquid outer core among different terrestrial planets. Our melting experiments of the Fe-S-Si and Fe-O-S systems at high pressure indicate the core-adiabats in small planets, Mercury and Mars, are greater than the slope of the solidus and liquidus curves of these systems. Thus, in these planets, the core crystallized at the top of the liquid core and 'snowing core' formation occurred during crystallization. The solid inner core is depleted in both Si and S whereas the liquid outer core is relatively enriched in Si and S in these planets. On the other hand, the core adiabats in large planets, Earth and Venus, are smaller than the solidus and liquidus curves of the systems. The